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Quiz-I

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History of development of knitting Technology.


Direction of threads in knitted fabrics.
Advantages of knitting.
Reasons for the growth of knitting.
Comparison between weaving and knitting.
Comparison between warp knitting and weft knitting.
Comparison between rib and interlock.
Comparison between rib and purl.
Comparison of basic weft knitted structures.
Calculations : i) Production ii) Fabric length iii) GSM-Dry relaxed, TCWL/10
Classification of weft knitting machines with its products.
Single jersey structures/designs.
Define weft knitting and warp knitting.
Define wale, course, stitch, stitch density, course length, stitch length.

Quiz 2
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Different parts of MPF


Increase and /or decrease of GSM OTM
Factors affect the width and GSM
Standard yarn count
Yarn for socks
Commonly used knitting yarn with types and count.
Knitting show
Double jersey structures
Negative feed and positive feed
Ornamentation of knit fabrics
Horizontal stripe
Concentricity and levelness
Features of a modern knitting machine
Effect of tuck stitch and float stitches
Spinkit

Quiz 3
30. Basic laws and loop length control
31. Weft knitted fabric relaxation and shrinkage
32. Define fleece, fleecy and fleecy fabric
33. Knitting action of three thread fleece
34. Differences between single jersey plain and three thread fleece machines.
35. Production calculation of fleecy fabric
36. Sliver or high pile knitting
37. Calculation of fashioning frequencies
38. Jacquard knitting
39. Fabric defect
40. Tightness factor
41. Loop transfer stitches
42. Causes of needle breakage
43. Starting up a new machine

Causes of needle breakage


1) Yarn carrier hitting needles: Place one finger gently on the yarn carrier. Feel
to see if there is any vibration. If there is, the needles are most likely hitting the
carrier.

2) Large knots, slubs or lumbs in the yarn: When you run down the fabric,
check to see if there are any knots or lumbs where the needle was broken.If
there are, there is a good chance that you have bad yarn on the machine.
3) High yarn tension: Check the yarn tension on the machine. If any feed has an
extremely high tension it could be breaking the needles.
4) Gating off: Look at the needles to see if they are rubbing or hitting each other.
This is a sign that the gating is off.
5) Dirty or bent needle slots: When you remove a bad needle from the
machine, check the trick walls to see if they are bent. Also see if the slot is dirty.
These two factors will retard the movement of the needle causing it to break.
6) Loose or worn cams: Check while the machine is running to see if the needles
are riding smoothly. If they seem to bounce or click there is a good chance that
a cam is either worn or loose. The butt of the needle may break or the needle
may fly and break.
7) Egg shape cylinder: Check the needles at one feed, watching them running
behind a carrier. If they seem to be moving towards and then away from the
carrier, the cylinder may be off or in an egg shape.
8) Stitches that are tight or tucking: Check the stitches to see if they are
knitting too tight or if they are not knocking over. If the stitches are tucking it
might be too big a strain for the needles.
9) Fabric loading-up: Check the take-down tension on the fabric. Check the takeup mechanism to see if it is pulling correctly.
10) Old needles: Examine a needle from the machine to see if it is shiny or worn.
Some old needles will also look burnt.