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HarvardUniversity,

'\^cgHdX

of Education
Dept.
Libraryi

\'^^E"iM\

"^HAKESPEAI
WITH

Uh^trm in

styleand price vfiththis volume^

MfeRCHANT

AS

V.

HENRY

KING
YOU

VENICE.

OF

IT.

LIKE

CAESAR.

JULIUS

LEAR.

KING

MACBETH.
TEMPEST.
HAMLET.
KING

HENRY

VIII.

KING

HENRY

IV.

KING

RICHARD

III.

Copyright^
By

CLARK

(Part I.)

"

x88a.

MAYNARD.

EDITOR'S

The

here

text

classes,has
of the

been

latest

and

presented, adapted
carefully collated
best

those
seemed

most

NOTE.

Where

editions.

readings
and

reasonable

with

have

for

use

that

of six

there

seven

or

was

agreement
dis-

any

whici?

adopted

been

supported by

were

miyed

the

best

the

stance
sub-

authority.
Professor

Meiklejohn's

of

the

here

General

Notice"

volumes.

But

"

these

those

in

pupils

scholars^
was

school
we

have

not

thought

other

grounds

of other

English

on

and

to
was

exhaustive

used

his

; and

annexed,
as

these

hesitated
be

too

deemed

editors

have

to

plan,

has

set

forth

in

out

in

carried

intended

for

ripe Shakespearian

prune

irrelevant

rather

his notes
for

learned

been

been

as

are

plays

college than

form

notes

our

to

it.

for

of whatever
or

purpose,

The

notes

freely incorporated.
B.

by

K.

by

NOTICE.

GENERAL

**

An

has

attempt

interpret Shakespeare
The

Method

""d

; and

of

the

with

compared

the

circumstances,
English.

newer

used

him

by

used

well

with

as

The

as

the

as

constantly

employ-

of

text

and

English

carefully

aS

been

lar
places in simi-

other

been

has

place

one

older

has

text

to

himself.

in
in

editions

new.

Shakespeare

been

language

annotated

thoroughly

has

Compairison

these

of

aid

the

by

language

in

made

been

Greek

any

with

and

as

Latin

or

classic
'*

first purpose

The

The

Editor

with

this

obscure

has
as

the

schooL
to

weave

of

; and

meaning

best

very

in

kinds
This
his

constitution.
reader--m

all

had

if he

terms

interested
of

full working

the

course

in

he
of

of

submits
a

taken

he

that

himself

this

the

into

always

shape

of

that

mind

the

fibre

new
new

or

pains

difficult

excavation

is

of

one

rewards

one's
come

meanings,

own

to

a.t

and

mental
the

ful
care-

recognition

this

receive

girl can

of Shakespeare,
of

and

personally

thorough

boy

very

much

was

thinker

is,of

meaning.

as

the

out

really profound

training

annotation

Shakespeare's

making

been

will in which

thoughts

the

of

out

circumstances

is to read

And

elaborate

this

by

of

had

he

thoughts
characters

before

that

had

of relations

missed,

hitherto

between

escaped him.

For

the

reading;

Shakespeare is just like examining Nature ; there are no


hollownesses, there is no scAmped work, for Shakespeare
is as patientlyexact and as first-hand as Nature
herself.
Besides
this thorough working-out
of Shakespeare's
meaning, advantage has been taken of the opportunity to
*'

teach
the

his

English

English

other

plays

Teachers

of

words

but, in teaching,
need

collected.

enough

that

in

as

Assez

and,

do

not

pupil

gives

all,it is

"

It

become
and

of

have

best

have

effect of

English

a.

all

Teacher

the

instances

probably
one

that

the

text

or

those
close

of

be

two

pils
puamination
ex-

speare
Shake-

be found

can

ing
say-

The

Latin, this
in

given

French

that

hoped
of

that

for the

before

study,

in

leaving
human

that

and

of

life,without

of modem

times

into the

large

every
at least

It would

school

degrading experience.
bringing back

should

Shakespeare

thorough knowledge

lessons

polluting or
the

be

more

Shakespeare

of the

one

substitute

to

and

more

phrase

Some

are

old

certain

or

liar
pecu-

classics.

much

girlshould

play
of

the ancient

were

and

word

will be the best

study of

Greek

either

; his

probable that, for

It is

study

from

it will

two,

or

gathered

rhythm.

him

give

to

ous
copi-

instances

tCy

to

purpose

upon

his

trop

one

them

among

of every

and
many

sU7

a,

will stick in the memory.


who

been

everything else, the

n*y

If each

too

this

dwelt

been

style

introduction

an

have

phrases

his

require each

not

play
For

have

consider

may

is true

similar

; his idioms

of

use

each

Shakespeare.

of

collections

make

to

"

It

boy
one

be

chance

the
would

also

mal
pale and forof pithy and

too

number

V-^UO*^

Digitizedliy

It!

would

vig:orousphrases which
to

reflect vigor in the


used
other

writer

say

more

than

more

that

ever

it had

originalway

ever

; and

provocations and
newness

of

of

characters

lived

in the

the

done

; he

more

insight.""J. M.

D.

to

it

as

speare
Shakethan
and

more

speak in

of words

are

Practice

University of St, Andrews,

by

petual
per-

originalityand

Meiklejohn,
and

well

power
it do

made

his combinations

invitations

as

readers.

^he made

"

Prq/essor of the Theory^ History ^


ttoH

develop

to

English language with

the

any

help

to

M.A.,
of

Educa-

Shakespeare's
Shakespeare

Ured

at

time

of the BniprUshlanguage were


not yet settled;
t"pint8were

Grammar.

when
in a
and
from

and TocabulafT
the grammar
Varioua
of transition.
state
so

Shakespeare^s

is

grammar

is by no means
different
out
own
our
'*
Almost
in itself. In the Elizabethan
any
part of
age,
of
can
speech. An adrerb
speech can be used as any other part
*
the
their eycH;* as a noun,
askance
be used
a verb, 'They
as
and
of time;*
or
beuikward
as
an
adjective, *a seldom
abysm
be
verb
can
adjective, or intrauMtive
Any
pleasure/
noun,
*
You
lice
verb.
used
can
a transitive
as
happy ' your friend, * ma*
his. neck.
An
'fait* an
on
*foot * your
axe
or
or
enemy,
speak and act
adjective can be used as an adverb; and you can
'
'
*
'
easy,** free,** excellent; or asa noun, and you can talk of fair
*
'
*
instead of a paleness.* "veii
Instead of beauty,*and
a pale
A
these
from
the pronouns
not exempt
metamorphoses.
are
*
and
a
he ^ is used for a man,
by a gentleman
lady is described
*
In the second
the fairest she he has yet beheld. *
place, every
as
He for
meets
uf
us.
grammatical
inaccuracy
varietur apparent
tcUeen; plural
Aim, him for he; spoke and took for spoken and
ther
where
with
nominatives
singular verbs; relatives omitted
not

only somewhat

uniform

are

now

considered

unnecessary
for

necessary;

^laU for toill.shotUd for wotUdy would


after */ durst;*
*/ oug/^f,*inserted

antecedents

inserted;

after
wish; to omitted
double
negatives; double

lowed
better,* "c.) and
superlatives; such fol(*more
comparatives
for
that
for
so
used
that
as
if;
as
by cm,
by which^
with
two
verbs
nominatives,
and
apparently
lastly some
that;
and

others

Hhdkesperian

without
any
0ramm4iA

nominative

at

Dr.

all.**

"

Abbott**

Versification.

Shakespeare's

is known
written
mainly in what
of
number
riming, and a
a
blank
they contain
as
verse;
lines.
As
of prose,
number
a
rule, rime Is much
considerable
later
in
than
tne
in the earlier
plays. Thus, Love's
commoner
1.100
riming
lines, while (if we
Lost contains
Labor's
nearly
has
The Merchant
Tale
none.
the
of
songs) Winter's
except

Shakespeare'sPlays

are

but

Venice has 124.


In speaking, we
is called accent.

lay
When

stress

the

on

syllables:this
particular

words

of

composition
regular intervals, the
a

at
the accent
recurs
In blank
is said to be rhythmical.
the
uaually of ten syllables,of which

that

the

verse

second,

by

are

strew
so

ranged
ar-

tion
composi-

lines consisi

fourth, sixth,

accented.
The
line conststi, there,
unaccented
contains
of which
an
fore, of five parts, each
followed
Each
by an accented
syllable,as in the word attend.
of these
what
is called a foot or measure^
five parts forms
**
*"
and the five together form
is a
Pentameter
a pentameter.
**
word
Greek
This is the usual form
sisrnifying five measures.'*
But
of a line of blank
verse.
a
long poem
composed
entirely
be inoqotonous, and for the sake of variety
of such lines would
have
been introduced.
several important modificaUous

elghtli, and

tenth

(a) After

the tenth

**

one
syllable,

added

; as"

Me-thoftight\ you

taid

sometimes

are

are

foot the

(b) In any
the

first

\ you

accent

syllable,
provided

may
two

net

or

two

unaccented

| ther lend | nor

syllablet

bor

|row,"

be' shifted from the second


to
accented
syllables do not come

together.
*'

the

Pluck'

(e) In such

I young
words

guck'
*'

as

|ing

cubs'

\from

""

Bar^'me

|she bear*." |

yesterdav,'* "voluntary,*' "honesty,**


place of the accent,

the syllables -day, -to-,and -ty falling in the


of the verse, regarded
are, for the purposes
-

the*

| the right'\ df vol'- [ un-ta'

have a succession
we
(d)Sometimes
with monosyllabic feet only.

trulyaccented.

as

\ ry chdoa' |ing.'\

of accented

this
syllables;

occurs

"

Whyt

nowi

(e)Sometimes,
occupy
syllables
"He

aaya

(/) Lines

may

blow
but
the

wind^ noeU billoWtand


rarely,two

more

place of one;

or

three

even

any

number

barh,^
unaccented

as"

| he doea^ |be-ing tJien \moat


have

noim

flat \ ter-ed."

of feet from

one

'

to six.

adds much
to the pleasing variety of his
the
by placing
pauses in different parts of the line
second
the
after
third foot), instead
of placing
or
(especially

Finally,Shakespeare

blank

verse

N. B."

In

pronounce
eurer

some
as

one

cases

the

rhythm requires

syllableshall be

that what we usually


divided into two, as"l"er(fire),

"c.
(sure),mi-el (mile), "c. ; too-elve (twelve),jaw-ee (joy),

Similarly,ahe-on (-tionor-sion).
It is very
means

important

of formal

to

give the pupil plenty of ear-trainingbr


Thia will greatly assist him
m
ms

soancAotL

reading.

by

POSSESSION/

'PERFECT

To

STUDY

OF

PLAN

to

attain

standard

the

of

Pbs-

Perfect

reader

session,*the

ought

of

ready knowledge

and

have

to

mate
inti-

an

the

subject;

(See opposite page.)


student

The
as

with

his mind

; and

upon

lastly,to

of

all,to
it

read

to

the

characters

read

it for the

read

the

again,

over

and

the

meanings^

"c.

grammar,

the

With

draw

; then

pleasure

play

plot

ought, first

help

of the

for himself

up

(i)

on

the

whole

each

scene,

play.

he

scheme,

short

can

exaHiination

(2) on
(See page

each

act,

135.)

by

easily
papers

(3) on

The

Plot and

Story of the FUy.


general plot ;

{a) The
(d) The
8. The

special incidents.

Charaoten:

Ability to give

of all that

other.

by

play.
the Charaoten

upon

"

(a) Relation

of A

to

and

(d) Relation

of A

to

and

PoewHion
Cknnplete

of the

of old

words,

of B to A

D.

Language.

of words

(a) Meanings

{d)Use

account

is said

of what

most

Inter^yof

Influflnoe and

eaoh

and

in the

character

each

8. The

is done

connected

;
of words

or

in

old

an

ing;
mean-

(c) Grammar;

(d)Ability to quote lines


point.
0. Power
to Beprodnee, or dnoto.
said by A
was
(a) What
occasion

illustrate

or

on

matical
gram-

particular

at

(d) What

was

{^

argument

What

to

said

by

in

reply to

used

was

by C

lar
particu-

juncture ;
(d)To

quote
a

"i Power

line in instance

of

idiom

an

or

of

peculiarmeaning.

to Looato.

(t^To

attribute
person

(5)To
fe)To

cap

on

line

or

statement

certain

occasion

to

line ;

fillin the

rightword

epithet.

or

by

certain

INTRODUCTION

THE

The

1.

when

Tempest

in

the

Folio
The

2.

on

The

of

fleet

was

driven

in

December,
shore.

the

from

passage

published
of

scene

the

Act

Earl

which

of

an

Die

Ayrer, who

It

age.

almost

died

in

(=

said

Sidea

There

{The

Fair

with

is
Isle

A
of
of

scene

which

Montaigne,
be

in

sh^)

transcriptionof

based

in

the

stanza

on

1603,

and

was

is, besides,
Sided)

similar

was

first
in

0/ J^ariUi^

Stirling's)Tragedte

1604.

1605,

first

passage

to

Edinburgh

in

in

of

the

the

well-known

is also

Sterlin's

schone

Gonzaloin

of

one

tract

called

otherwise

of

on

Jourdan's

Jourdan,

admiral's

the

word-for-word

The

Fourth

London

of

title

translation

1603.

wrecked

was

1609, and

The

Silvester

by

of

account

an

upon

Somers

speech

Florio's

appeared
in

play,

in

of

years

1611,

in

or

occupies the^first
place

written

Bermudas,

The
is

Second

Bermudas,
George

Divels, etc.*
Act

it

based

be

to

Sir

on

of

Discovery

forty-seven
; and

1623

is said

the

islands

these

in

1610,

the year

Edition.

play

shipwreck

about

was

first published

was

writtenin

was

Shakespeare

TEMPEST.

lished
repubGerman

writtei" by Jacob

personages

by

and

the

WILUAM

SHAKESPEARE.

d by

XI

plot

same

heard

or

a.

"

3.

some

iaccount

to

the actual

As

that

White,

play which

Tunis

and

which

sailors to be enchanted,

by

It may

have

rather

beck

believe

not

it

been

sank, and

if it were,
the

down

from

passing

supposed
of exile.

would

we

his

has

nean,
Mediterra-

little

at whose

great magician

broke

waters

Caliban

carried

the

Prospero's place

When

the

in

uninhabited, and

was

though,

so.

from

rose

is

Hunter

fancy. .Mr.

ship's course

Mr.

Tempest ^^says

island

an

of

TAe

of

realms

far out

Naples,

to

of

scene

Lampedusa,

lying not

acted

seen

of.

is in the

that

contended

have

Shakespeare may

island

staff,the

it.'

with

day forth the ,Ue has beene


scene
:
By wandering sailois never
that

From

Some

say

Beneath
Above
Nor

Professor

Lowell

laid nowhere,

sea,

its savage

then

this
tone

and

was

to

"

of the

sleepe.
The

no

country laid down

once

the

Tempest

nowhere

and

that still-vexed

world,

of

the external

and

is

scene
on

any

anywhere

island

hung

tween
be-

liable to incursions

play
"

the

mild

of the

show
The

tolerance, the desire

forgiven,the strong

one

evidence

Shakespeare's latest plays.


interest

in

the

to

that
whole

forgave

young

fine,mellow, political
wisdom,

closingabjuration of mzigical power


was

rores

In

the nether

in their prospects, the

this

and

both.'

one

be

shores.

At

the internal and

Both

to

and

upper

from
4.

rockie

says

for it is in the soul of man,


the

breakes

certainlyin

or

deepe

which

is known

ere

also

Nowhere,

map.

the

'tis buried

latest efforts of

"

all go

to show

and
the
that

Shakespeare'sgenius.

and

stage, and
kind

new

down

went

of life

the

although

find

will

and

sweetness,
which

is the

that this

few

evidence

Love's

Labor

only

two

Lost

; that

of

lines has

the weak

of native
talk

bondage
with

The

strong.

etc. ; and

evidence

maturity.*
later

lines with

syllables.

"

in

are

only
there

The

are

that

the

and

of

the

poet

to

enrich

persons,

of. measurement

deliver
and

there

his
to

number,

it

the
and

are

latter;
ping
stop-

in every

one

The

with

bring

it from

the

effect

syllable in

verse

in

syllables

sense

its close.

additional

rhythms,
to

its

the

all kinds
to

nearer

the

mechanical
do

away

fact,

almost

to

its monotony.

5, The

childish.

plot

is

perfectlysimple, and,

It is nearly

as

childish

as

that

in

than

more

Tempest

Tempest

at

also

Philpotts,

in
thirty-three

sense

ery

ing,
end-

have

four lines of eleven


are

weak

Mr.

plays

have

they

^there

early play

lines,while

conversational

of real

sufficient

peculiarities.They

stop of the

ending

line is to enable

tenderness

in its full

genius

of the line, in l^he

no

its diction

enchanting

own

the early play generally has

the end

with
three

there

very

play, while

that, while

of

human

mind,

many

The

sympathetic critic,
points out

rhyming

in the former
and

his

thought, tempered

most

of his

eleven

"

of

that

have

they

contain

thousand

with

several

thoughtful and

most

begin

simplicityof

compact

tone

and^ for^ buty that^

as

which

lines

by

left the

to

grandeur

is also very

lines ;

rhyming
such

other

is the fruit of

play

characterized

are

the

the

Shakespeare's

peculiartrait

internal

The

its

is with

one

in

chastened

lofty severity of
the

he

English country gentleman.

its structure, 'and in the


and

period when
Stratford-upon Avon

to

an

as

reader

thoughtful

the

probablymarks

it

that

in the Merchant

of Venice; but
and

it is
of

th^ g:roups

and
qualities,
The

to

with

and

the

pero,
is the

each

studious

contrast

and

Alonso
each

other

the

bright

to

of

; and

and

the

his

ambitious

different

in

personages
Pros-

explanations.

as

just,but

are

essence.

Shakespeare's plays,

the

foils and

as

Sebastian

their innermost

out

many

other

both

serve

gjoups

in

as

are,

act

to

attempt

characters

contrasted

quite sufficient to permit the characters


secret
characters
to display their most

neglectful,ruler,

too

and
the

nearly

brother

gjasping

relation

same

to

Gonzalo, the trusty counsellor,is the counterto Stephano, the faithless butler ; the rebellious
personage
Caliban,of the earth earthy, forms a dark background for
;

and

; and

the
the

of

The

Tempest

consists

man

service

is

'

scout

He

Because

he

which

"

back

that
not

is to

happy

serve

be

his

and

home,
Prospero is to

rule

his

^isto
to

people

become

the

the

and

is their

where
to

does

it is to

the

all the

earth

Stephano
is above

where

once

Duke

find

to

; Ariel

the human

Ariel

all

"

again
actors

to

be

enter

his

of
?

why

wind

to

Naples,
married,
Alonso

being

; Caliban
'

out

And

where
^as

and

the close

at

is to
and

flout

works

back

Ferdinand

more.

thinks

favorable

company

again,

of

Trinculo

kindly^

freedom

Caliban

days longer.

perfectly free
; but

true

it,however,

for two

its

master-thought

the

and

them

receive

part

in

the

monster

loving
be

that

thought
The

that

ments
elelove

boundless

personages

says

plements,
com-

all the

of

fertile air of

and

in service.'

everything

play ;

blow

is

reconcilers

and

Dowden

slavery ;

freedom.
the

counterparts, contrasts, and

settled

Professor

randa
; Mi-

loyal Ariel

and

obedient

atoners

forgiveness holds

circle.

air

the

Ferdinand,
are

and

of

airiness

of

may

is
the
go

into bonds

Over

malignant.
the

And

of

contentions
noble

same

Tale

and

men,

the

The

the

play

the natural

or

and

assumed

or

connection
the

or

and

senses

of the

yet this

of assistance

sort

in

of

senses

langaish, and the

drama, in which

birth of

of the

union

Imagination^

the

elements

granted to^

which

owes

of

which, therefore, errors

sins

in any

species

itself

and

scenery

assisted

be

may

the

entirely to

is

dangerous.

to

come

For

imaginative iJEt-

of

the

within"

from

faults,and

by the effect

decorations

modem

from

only
a"d

is addressed

is intended

to

the

to
is

to

apt

the mind

will wi' hdraw

without

timeSt

the moved

seeing and hearing, the spiritualvision

attraction

the

on

principal and

from

much

alle"

no

chronology

venial

are

"

only legitimate interest which

and

proper

ought

imagination; whereas, where

external

Coleridge

of portraiture,
fidelity

upon

species of drama

It addresses

complicated

sympathetic

the

and

mortal

genuine excitement

mere

It is

although the illusion

culty;

of

opinion

is

; but

events

coaptation and

no

for nothing.

count

of

spac?,

geography"

and

critical

historical,or dependent

not

time

Night's Dream.

of the purely romantic

specimen

bv, the poet.

giance to

that

"

only on

rests

with

compared

chinery
ma-

Tempest is

the inf^rest is

Wititer^s

supernatural

be

in

Tempest

in the

The

also

may

employed in the Midsummer


6. The
following is the
'The

providence.

The

it appears

Eighth.^

Tempest

in

appears

that

manner

Henry

in

upon

like

presidesProspero

ing
spiritof reconciliation,of forgiveness,harmoniz-

the
the

all

from

spring from

within.
'

is

Ariel has

in

everything the airy tint which


that

worthy of remark

parison with Ariel,lest the


pematural of
on

the other

imrges.
moral
the

He

sense

man

is

natural

should

tend

is

never

and
to

has

name.

of the

and

and

other.

each

neutralize

one

gross

in

com"

the

of vice ; for it is in the

the

moral

sense,

primacy of the

is marked

moral

truly human.

by

su"

Caliban,

or
dawnings of understanding, without reason
in him, as in some
brute
animals, this advance

faculties,without

it

feelings and

the

; and

And

du'ectly brought into

human

hand, is all earth, all condensed,

intellectual

appearance

other

the

Miranda

gh^es the

the
to

by the

being only that

'The
exact

of the intended

scene

of the

counterpart
in

pitched

assassination

of Alonso

between

scene

his

and

lower

and

of guilt, by

thi"t kind

the

contemplate
with

crime

suggested act, and


how

it. Observe
of another

of it in low

counterpart

act, in which

7. Mrs.
of

worthy

manner

suggestion

with

itself into

there

character

quotation,

'

modest, and
her

The

heightened by

acquainted

between

the

second

trast
con-

ators,
conspirof

scene

the

essential characteristics.*

of

Miranda

she

of Miranda

and

external

resolves

She

is these

well

is also

of womanhood.

tender, and

being,

whole

is
that

"

character

elements

very

scene

life

same

Jameson's

the

become

Trinculo, in the

the

are

to

length

at

effect of this

the

Stephano, Caliban, and


third

"he

cealed,
con-

proposed
something ludicrous
of reverence.
place" something not habitually matter
By
of sophistry,the imagination and
fancy are first bribed to

of

out

or

associating the

or

in the
to

is i^

lady, only

be frustrated

Iceythroughout, as designed to
exhibitingthe same
profound management
of familiarizing
mind, not immediately recipient
a
a

Gmizalo

and

Macbeth

only

internal.

is beautiful,

they

prise
com-

She

is

so

refined
that she is
perfectlyunsophisticated, so delicately
Let us imag:ineany other woman
all but ethereal.
placed
beside
and

Miranda

would

not

brought

What,

skill and

**

placed her

whom

comparison

with

The

the
can

next

that

one

artificial when
child

of

"

^he has
her

own

of earth

*'

ture,
na-

wondrous

removed
sex

and

; he

who

approaches

contrasted,is ArieL

randa
Mihas

the delicate

step is into the ideal and

only being
be

that

them

this pure

done
I"

the

of

Paradise."

the demi-demon

air.

she

with

loveliest

own

; not

and

coarse

Shakespeare
of

one

moment

man

wit
all

; and

for

Enchanted

an

between

spiritof

is not-

contact

has

then,
sweet

there

somewhat

of

Eve

Sh^espeare's

comparison

appear

far from

with

"

into immediate

this
*

the

sustain

of

one

creations

sweetest

could

even

"

pernatural
su-

Miranda,

Besides

the

noble

of

essence

this

mental

and
lig^ht

curled

cloud* and

in

herself

appears

Mirailda

sprite,this

ethereal
**

air,that

ran

colors

the

of

in her mortal

She

has

from

impulses which
of heaven
solitude,
are
its vanities.
eye

of her

have

ocean

the rocks

wish,

and

The

with

natural, the
her

all

its

and
cast

of her

the world

into

beauty

human

and

enchanted
and

beneath

; her

the

companions

the

and

his attendant

her

duteous

If

we

by

of

results

that

we

every

beauty

and

father's

art,
such

not

behold

credible, but

the

such

her

her

presuppose

can

only

not

of

pageants
vocal

to

sprites

situation

is unalterable

in
the
She

?
and

alienabl
in-

part of her.being ; but her deportment, her


her

thoughts

"

poeticalcircumstances

of the pure

charming

of

heart, for

looks, her language,

not

up

has

artificial grace.

nature,

circumstances, do

necessary

; she

sex

her

her.

Miranda

woman's
as

bosom.

in

ministered

before

around

of

frail-strung,

as

her

air,made

very

in music

character

retains

or

Ariel

feet.

presented

situation

the

imitated

woods,

head,

her

over

grandeur.
floated

own

the

many-shaped, manythe silent stars; her playmates the


stooped their foamy crests, and ran

kiss her

rippling to

woman,

to

sprung

and

clouds, and
billows,that

hovered

her

come

and

has

lived,"

female

father,the princely magician

been

tinted

She

have

in

th^

walking

heart

of

one

societyone

The

rainbow

woman,

fluttered

ever

beheld

never

caught

never

loveliness,with

passion-touched, as

as

the

ele-.

rode

winds,

palpable reality,a

""breathing thoughtful breath,"


earth

the

upon

of

creature

and

ideal ; and

to

all

pernatural
these,from the suaround
her, assume

us, who

are

pitying nature, nothing

(Muuistent

than

in the
can

the effect which

by

be
she

secret
more

pro-

duces

others,who.

upon

her

resembling: her, approach


celestial
Most
"

to

who

the goddess

there

is

noble

niag;nanimity with
to the

Miranda,
at

her

the

own

weakness

being

as

society which
assume

(and
is

wonder,"

as

these airs attend

real

thing
some-

us

of

to

service

beneath

have

high

dissemble

abuse)
to

an

of civilization,

does

humble

disposes ;

of

the

with
of

those
real

unreal

place her

In Ferdinand,

state

conscious

ignorant

equal

all the chivalrous

nature, is struck

Only

equally ready

she

in

Miranda.

destiny he

and

sometimes

power,

we

in poetry

superiority,and

of whose

woman,

kind

and

man,

emotions.

teach

of the

creature,

child

mere

new

nothing

which

disguises his
homage

whom

on

Ferdinand

betw^n
is

"

"

sure,

scene

as

anything

I suppose

the

having: beheld

never

wonder
her

own

us"iges

of

pcission,and
and

her
life,

his feet.'

while

by

transient

love, her

d by

PERSONS

Alonso,

REPRESENTED.

King of Naples.
his brother,

Sebastian,
Prospero,

the

rightfulDuke

Antonio,

the

usurping

^Milan.

Duke

of Milan,

brother

to

Prospero.

Ferdinand,
GoNZALO,

honest

an

Adrian,

Francisco,

Caliban,

Trinculo,
Stephano,
Master

to the

son

counsellor

and

slave,

deformed

jester,
drunken

butler.

of a Ship^ Boatswain,

Miranda,

daughter

Ariel,

airy spirit.

an

of Naples.

^^^

savage
a

old

King ";/Naples.

to

and

Mariners.

Prospero.

Iris,
Ceres,

Spiritsf employed

Juno,

in the

Masque.

Nymphs,

Reapers.
Other

SCENE,

"

On

Spiritsattending
board

an

Ship

at

on

Prospero.

Sea

Island.

by

afterwards

on

The

Tempest.

ACT
SCENE

l.-^On
with

Ship

Thunder

Enter

I.

and

Shipmaster

Sea.

at

Storm,

Lightning.

and

Boatswain.

Master,

lOATSWAIN,"
Boats,

Here,

Good,

Master,
ners

ourselves

fall to

aground

Enter

Boats.

Heigh,

my

't

thy wind,

Enter

Alonso,

if

A Ion.
the

master

Boats,

marirun

\.Exit,

bestir, bestir.
Mariners.

hearts

cheerly,cheerly,

S^P/VSTian,
and

the

in
"

Blow

enough

room

GONZALO,

cheer

speak to the
yarely, or we

hearts
1 yare, yare : take
my
Tend
whistle.
to the master's
burst

what

master:

topsail

till thou

Antonio,

Ferdinand,

others,

Where's

boatswain, have care.


?
Play the men^
I pray now,
keep below.

Good

lo

(9)

sc.

do you here ?
drown ? Have
you

and

er

Gonzalo.

and

Shall
mind

what

again ?

give o

ii

Antonio,

Sebastian,

Re-enter

Yet

TEMPEST

THE

I.

we

to

sink?

plagueo' your throat


blasphemous,incharitable dog
Seb, A

Work

Boats,

Hang,

Ant,

maker,

are

we

bawling,

! you
!

you, then.
cur, hang 1 you insolent noisethan
less afraid to be drowned

thou art.
Gon, I '11warrant

him for

drowning

though

40

ship were no stronger than a nutshell.


a-hold ! set her two
Boats.
Lay her a-hoTd,
: off to sea
again; layher off I
courses

the

Re-enter

All lost !

Mar.
lost !

to

What,
The

Gon,

us
our

must

our

Ant,

prayers ! let

assist them.
is as theirs.
case
of

I'm out
We

are

merely cheated

drunkards.

by
wide-chapp*d rascal
mightst lie drowning
washing of ten tides I

voices
\Co9rfu5ed

our

lives
-^

;
"

Would
{Exit

He'll be

every drop of
gape at wid'st to

Though

of

patience.

"

The
Gon,
And

be cold ?

mouths

king and princeat

Seb^

This

prayers ! all

to

prayers,

lUxeunt.

Boats,

For

Mariners,wet.

water

swear

thou

Boatswain.

hang'd yet.
againstit

glut him.
wtthin,\^Mercy

on

us

THE

19

TEMPEST,

ACT

I.

wife and
/" ]
children /
{split
We
we
Farewell^ brother f
splitswe split,
Let's all sink with the king.
\ExU,
Ant
\E^^
Seb, Let*s take leave of him.
would
I give a thousand
longs
furNow
Gon,
for an
of barren ground ;
of sea
acre
heath, broom, furze,anything.The wills
ling,
fam die a dry
above be done! but I would
We

splitI

splitywe

"

Farewell^

my

[^*^.

death.

W.-^The

SCENE

Enter

If

Mira,

Island:

beforethe
Prospero.

Prospero

and

Cell

of

Miranda.

by your art, my

dearest

father^

you have
them :
Put the wild waters
in this roar, allay
The sky,it seems, would pour down
boiling

[cheek;

pitch,
But

that

Dashes

the

sea,
the fire out

mounting
O,

to

I have

the welkin's
su"fer'd

With

those that I saw


suffer ! a brave vessel.
in her,
Who
had no doubt some
noble creature
Dash'd
all to pieces. O, the cry did knock
souls! they
Poor
Against my very heart!

perish'd.
I been any god of
Had
power, I would
sunk the sea withm
the earth, or e'er
Have
It should the good ship so have swallow'd,and
souls within her.
The fraughting
Pro,
Be collected;

THE

11.

No

TEMPEST.

amazement

more

13

tell your

piteouslieart

There's no harm done.


Mird,
O, woe the day 1
No
harm.
Pro,
I have done nothing but in care
of thee,
(Of thee, my dear one! thee,my daughter!)
who
of what thou art,nought knowing
Art ignorant
I am
that I am
Of whence'
better
more
; nor
Than
of a full-poor
cell,
Prospero, master
And thy no greater father.
Mira.
More
to know
with my thoughts.
meddle
Did never
Tis time
Pro.
I should inform thee further. Lend thy hand.
And
So :
pluck my magic garment from me.

20

"

\Lays down
Lie

there, my
have

art.

"

Wipe

thou

his mantle.

thine

comfort.

eyes;

[touch'd

direful spectacleof the wreck, which


The
The very virtue of compassion in thee,
I have with such prevision
in mine art
So safely
ordered,that there is no soul
"

No,

not

so

much

as
perdition

an

hair,

30

in the vessel
any creature
thou heard'st cry, which thou saw'st
sink. Sit down
;
know
further.
For thou must
now
You have often
Mira.
Begun to tell me what I am ; but stopp'd
And left me
to a bootless inquisition
;

Betid
Which

to

Concluding.5/ayf not yet.


"

Pro.

The

hour's

now

come

TEMPEST,

THE

t4

ACT

I.

very minute bids thee ope thine ear ;


Obey and be attentive. Canst thou remember
this cell ?
unto
A time before we came
[not
I do not think thou canst ; for then thou wast
Out three years old.

The

40

sir,I
Certainly,

Mira,

by

what?

By

Pro*

other

any

can.

house

or

person

that
anythingthe image tell me
Hath
kept with thy remembrance.
Mira,
Tisfaroff;

Of

than an assurance
rather like a dream
I not
Had
That
warrants.
my remembrance
?
that tended me
Four or five women
once
Miranda.
Pro, Thou
had'st, and more,

And

But

50

how

[else

is it

see'st thou
That this lives in thy mind ? What
and abysm of time }
In the dark backward
If thou remember'st
aught ere thou cam'st

here,
How

thou

cam*st here thou mayst.


But

Mira,

Twelve

Pro,

year

since.

Thy

mother

said thou wast


father
of Milan
Duke

Was
A princess,
no
Mira,

of Milan

Duke

Sir,are

Mira.

She

since, Miranda, twelve

year

Thy father Was the


A princeof power.
Pro,

that I do not.

worse

was

my
;

and

you my father ?
pieceof virtue, and
daughter ; and thy

not
a

only heir

thou his
issued.
O

the heavens

8C.

THE

II.

foul

What

TEMPEST.

play had

we

15

that

from

came

we

thenee?
Or blessed was't we did ?
Pro,
Both, both, my girl;
heav'd
were
we
By foul play,as thou say*st,
thence ;
But blessedly
holp hither.
Mira,
O, my heart bleeds
To think o' the teen that I have tum'd
you to.
is from
Please
Which
remembrance!
my
[tonio,
you, further.
Pro, My brother and thy uncle,call'd AnI pray thee mark
that a brother should
me
he whom
Be so perfidious
next
;
thyself.
Of all the world I loved, and to him put
The manage
of my state ; as, at that time,
70
it was
the first.
Through all the signiories
And
puted
Prospero the prime duke, being so re"

"

"

In dignity,
and for the liberal arts
Without a parallel
; those being all my
study,
The government I cast upon my brother,
And
to my state grew
ported
stranger, being transAnd rapt in secret
Dost thou attend
Mira,
Pro,

studies.
?
me

Being once

"

Thy

false uncle

Sir,most

heedfully.

how
perfected

to

suits,
How
To

The

to
trash

grant

[whom

to advance,
deny them, whom
for over-topping, new
created

creatures

"

and

"

that

changed them.

were

mine,

say,

or

80

act

TEMPEST,

THE

l6

form'd them ; havingboth the key


Or else new
set all hearts i* th' state
Of officerand office,
To what tune
pleased his ear ; that now he
was

had hid my princely


trunk,
atsuck'd the verdure out on*t. Thou
And
tend'st not.
O good sir,I do.
Mira,
I pray thee, mark me.
Pro,
worldlyends, all dedicated
I,thus neglecting
of my mmd
To closeness and the bettering

ivywhich

The

"

90

With

by being so retired,
popular rate, in my false

that which, but

all
O'er-priz'd

brother
evil nature
: and
Awak'd
an
my trust,
Like a good parent, did begetof him
in its contrary as great
A falsehood
As
A

;
my trust was
confidence sans

Not

lorded,
only with what

,But what

my

had, indeed,no limit,

which

bound.

He

being

thus

revenue )rielded,
might else exact, ^iike

my

"

power

one
100

of it,
by falsing
Who
havingunto truth,
such a sinner of his memory
Made
lie, he did believe
To credit his own
stituti
indeed the duke ; out of the subHe
was
"

And
With

executingthe outward face of royalty,


his ambition
all prerogative: hence
growing,
"

"

Dost thou hear ?


Your
Mira,
sir,would
tale,

cure

deafness.

BC.

THE

II..

have

To

Pr^.

he

'

TEMPEST,
no

17

between

screen

this part

play'd,

And him he play'd


it for,he needs will be
Absolute Milan.
Me, poor man 1 my library
Was
dukedom
large enough; of temporal

royalties
He

(So

thinks me
diy he

now
was

no
.

incapable: confederates
for sway) with the king

of

Naples
do him homage.
him annual tribute,
and bend
to his crown
Subjecthis coronet
The dukedom, yetunbow*d, (alas,
poor Milan !)

To

^ve

To

most

ignoblestooping.

Mi'ra,

Pro,

Mark

his

O the heavens !
condition and the event,

then tell me
If this might be a brother.
I should sin
Mira.
To think but nobly of my grandmother :
dames
Good
have borne bad sons.
Pro:
Now
the condition.
This king of Naples,beingan enemy
hearkens
To me inveterate,
brother's suit ;
mv
Which

Of

that

he, in

homage, and

I know

was,

lieu
not

o^the premises
"

how

much

ute,
trib-

"

Should presently
and mine
me
extirpate
Out of tne dukedom, and coiner fair Milan,
With all the honors on my brother: whereon,
A treacherous army levied,
one
midnight
Fated to the purpose, did Antonio
open
The
gates of Milan; and, i' the dead of

darkness,
2*

120

8C.

THE

ir.

InfusM
with
When
I have

TEMPEST

19

fortitude from
decked the sea

salt ;

Under
An

heaven,
with drops full
[me

burdjengroan'd; which
undergoingstomach, to bear up
my

Against what

should

raised

in

ensue.

How

Mira,

came

we

ashore ?

Providence
divine.
food we had dnd some
fresh water
Some
that
A noble Neapolitan,Gonzalo,
Out of his charity bein^then appointed
of this design did give us ; with
Master
Rich
saries,
garments, linens, stufEs,and necesPro,

By

160

"

"

[gentleness,
since have steaded much
; so, of his
Knowing I loved my books, he fumish'd me
From
mme
own
librarywith volumes that
I prizeabove my dukedom.
Would
I might
Mira.

Which

!
But ever
that man
see
Ms mataU,
Pro.
I zxx^t^^ "^R^ fumes
Now
and hear the last of our sea-sorrow.
Sit still,
Here in this island we arrived ; and here
Have
I,thy schoolmaster,made thee more

profit
Than other princess'
can, that have
For vainer
hours, and tutors not so
Mira.

Heavens

thank

you

I pray you,

sir,
(For still 'tis beating in my
?
For
raisingthis sea-storm
now,

Pro,
By accident most

more^me
careful.
And
for 't!

[reason
mind,) your

thus far forth*


bountiful Fortune,
strange,
Kiiow

"

Digitized
liyV-jUOS?

It

170

t8o

TEMPEST,

THE

20

act

i.

Now
ray dear lady" hath mine enemies
Brought to this shore ; and by my prescience
I find my zenith doth depend upon
A most
auspiciousstar ; whose influence
I court not,but omit, my fortunes
If now
Will ever
after droop. Here
more
cease
"

questions;
Thou
And

inclined
jgiveit way ;
choose.
art

sleep;

to

"

thou

I know

away,

Approach,

servant,
my

Ariel ;
Enter

Ari,

All
I

190

To
To

On

not

come
come

! I
I

am

readynow

Ariel.

hail,great master

! grave

hail !
sir,

come

thy best pleasure; be't to fly,


to ride
swim, to dive into the fire,
the curl'd clouds ; to thy strong bidding
answer

Ariel

task
and all his

quality.
Hast

Pro,

canst

[Miranda sleeps.

"

Come

[dulness"
'tis a
good

thou, spirit.

Performed
to point the tempest that I bade
thee ?
Ari, To every article.
I boarded the kmg's ship: now
the beak.
on
in the waist,the deck, in
Now
every cabin
Fd divide
I flam'd amazement
: sometime
And burn in many places ; on the topmast.
I flame di"The yards,and bowsprit,
would

tinctly.

200

Then

meet

and

precursors

the
join. Jove's lightnings,

THE

n.

8C.

O' the dreadful


.

And

TEMPEST.

zx

more
thunder-claps/

moment-

ary

were
sight-outrunning

not

cracks

the fire and

[tune

Of sulphurousroaringthe most
mighty NepSeem'd
to besiege,
and make
his bold waves

tremble,
Yea, his dread trident shake.
brave spirit
!
so
firm,so constant, that this coil
Would
?
not infect his reason
Not a soul
Ari.
But felt a fever of the mad, and play'd
tricks of desperation.
All but mariners
Some
Plunged in the foaming brine and quit the
Pro,
Who
was

My

vessel,
Then
With

210

[dinand.

all a-firewith me
: the king'sson, Ferhair up-staring ^then like reeds,not
"

hair,
"

[empty,

the firstman
that leap'd; cried.Hell is
all the devils are here.
And
Pro,
I
Why, that's my spirit
But was
not this nigh shore ?
Was

Aru
Close by, my master.
Pro, But are they,Ariel,safe ?
Aru
Not a hair perish'd;
On their sustaining
garments not a blemish.
But fresher than before ; and, as thou bad'st
me,

In

[isle.

troops I have

The
Whom
In an

dispersed them 'bout the


have I landed by himself ;
son
kind's
f left coolingof the air with sighs
odd angleof the isle,
and sitting,

220

THE

S3

His

TEMPEST.

ACT

in this sad knot.

arms

Of the

Pro*

king'sship
disposed,

The mariners, say how thou hast


And all the rest o' the fleet
in haibor
Art.
Satfely
Is the king'sship; in the deep nook, where
once

cairdst me up at midnight to fetch dew


the still-vex*d Bermoothes, there she's
hid:
The mariners all under hatches stow'd \
Who, with a charm
join'dto their suffer'd
Thou
From

[fleet

labor,

830

I have left asleep: and for the rest o' the


Which
I dispersed,
they all have met again
And are upon the Mediterranean
flote,
for Naples,
Bound
home
[wreck'd
saclly
the king's ship
Supposing that they saw
And his great person perish.
Pro.
Ariel,thy charee
Exactlyis perform'd; but there's more wort:
What
is the time o' the day ?
Past the mid season.
Art.
Pro. At least two glasses. The time 'twixt
six and
240

now

Must by us both be spent most preciously.


toil ? Saace thou dost
Ari. Is there more

giveme

pains,

{ised.

remember
thou hast prom*
thee what
is not yet perform'dme.
now?
How
Pro.
moody?
What
is'tth(Hi canst demand ?
Ari.
My UberQr*
Let me
Which

THE

ir.

8C.

TEMPEST.

"

!
Before the time be out? no more
Pro,
I pr*ythee^
Ari.
I have done thee worthy service ;
Remember
served
made no mistakings,
Told thee no lies,
didst
or grumblings: mou
Without
or

i^dge

promise
bate me
a full year.

To

Dost

Pro.

thou

forget

I did free thee ?


what a torment
From
No.
AH.
to
dost ; and think'st it much
Pro. Thou
tread the ooze
Of the salt deep,
To run upon the sharp wind of the north.
business in the veins o* the CMth
To do me

"5o

it is baked with frost.


When
I do not, sir.
Ari,
Thou
Pro,
liest,
malignant thing1 Hast
[envy
thou forgot
with age and
foul witch Sycorax, who
The
her ?
into a hoop ? hast thou forgot
Was

^own
No, sir.

An.
Pro.

bom

hast
Thou
t speak ; tell me.

where

was

she

Ari. Sir,in Argier.


O, was she so ? I must
Pro.
what thou hast been.
Once in a month recount
witch
This damn'd
thou forgett'st.
Which

260

Sycorax,
and sorceries terrible
mischiefs manifold
To enter human
hearing,from Argier,
Thou
know'st,was banish'd ; for one thingshe
For

had

24

THE

'

They would

not

TEMPEST.

take

act

her life.

Is not

i.

this

true?
Ari.
Pro,
And
270

Ay, sir.

This blue-eyed
hag was hither brought
with child,
left by the sailors. Thou, my
here was

[vant:
slave,
then her serwast
As thou report'st
thyself,
too delicate
And, for thou wast a spirit
To act her earthyand abhorr'd commands.
Refusing her grand bests, she did confine
thee,
potent ministers
By help of her more
And
in her most
unmiti^able rase.
Into a cloven pine ; within which rift
remain
Imprisoned,thou didst painfully

dozen years ; within which space she died


left thee there ; where thou didst vent
And
[island
thy groans
fast
mill-wheels
this
As
strike. Then
280
as
was
that she did litterhere,
Save for the son
A freckled whelp hag-born not honor'd with
A human
shape.
Ari,
Yes, Caliban her son.
Pro, Dull thing,
I say so ; he,that Caliban
I keep in service.
Whom
Thou
best
now
know'st
I did find thee in : thy groans
What
torment
make
wolves
Did
howl, and penetrate the
breasts
Of ever-angry bears : it was
a torment
"
To lav upon
the damn'd, which 3ycorax
mine art,
""90 Coulci not again undo ; it was
A

"

"

"c.

I arrived

When

THE

II.

TEMPEST..

heard

and

gape
The pine and let thee
Ari,
Pro* If thou more
an

25

thee,that

made

out.

I thank

thee,master.
murmur*st, I will rend

oak,

And peg thee in his knottyentrails till


hast howPd
Thou
away twelve winters.
Aru
Pardon, master:
I will be correspondentto command.
And do my spritinggently.
Do so ; and after two days
Pro,
I will dischargethee.
That's my noble master I
Aru
What
shall I do ? say what : what shall I
do?
Pro, Go
make
thyselflike to a nymph o'
the sea ;
300
Be subjectto no sightbut mine ; invisible
To everv
eyeballelse. Go, take this shape,
And hither come
in't: hence with diligence.
\Mxit Aribu

Awake, dear heart,awake


well;
!
Awake
Mira.

\wakingJ\The

! thou

hast

slept

strangeness of your

story put
Heaviness
Pro.

in

me.

it off.

Come

slave,who

never

Shake

We'll visit Caliban,my


Yields us kind answer.

'Tis

Mira.

I do

not

love to look

on.

on

villain,
sir,

"c.

THE

n.

TEMPEST.

a?

I must
eat my dinner..
CaL
This island's mine, by Sycoraxmy mother,
thou
When
thou tak'st from
Which
me.
camest

first,

of me ;
and mad'st much
strok'dst me
wouldst give me
howwith berries in't ; and teach me
Water
and how the less.
the biggerlight,
To name
bum
That
by day and night: and then I
loved thee
o' the
thee all the qualities
show'd
And
Thou

isle.
barren place
fresh springs,brini^-pits,
and fertile;
Cursed be I that did so t" All the charms
Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on*4ft

The

you!
For I
Which

am

that you have.


all the subjects
firstwas
mine
own
kuig ; and here

you sty me
In this hard rock, whiles

you

do

keep

from

me

The

rest

Pro,
Whom

o' the island.

stripesmay

Thou

most

move,

not

lyingslave.
kindness

have used thee.


and
Filth as thou art, with human
care;
[violate
lodged thee
In mine
cell, till thou didst seek to
own
Abhorred
slave.
The honor of my child.
will not take.
Which
any printof goodness
thee"
Being capableof all ill! I pitied

28
Took
One
350

Know

TEMPEST.

THE

pains
each

thing

to make

thee

ACT

speak, taughtthee

hour
or

other

savage,
thine own
like

when

thou

meaning,but

didst

wouldst

not,

gabble

A thingmost brutish,I endow'd thypurposes


But thy
With words that made them known.
vile race,
Though thou didst learn,had that in't which

good
Could

not

natures

abide

to

be with ; therefore

wast

thou

Deservedlyconfin'd

360

into this rock,


than a prison.
more
me
language; and my

Who
hadst deserved
Cal. You
taught
on't
profit
[you
The red plaguerid
Is,I know how to curse.
For learning
me
your language !
Pro,
Hag-seed,hence !
Fetch us in fuel ; and be quick, thou'rt best.
other business.
To answer
Shrugg'stthou^
malice ?
dost unwillingly
If thou neglect'st
or
I'll rack
I command,
thee with old
What
cramps
;
bones
Fill all thy

with ach^s ; make thee roar


That beasts shall tremble at thy din.
CaL
No, pray thee!
I must
obey : his art is of such power, \.Aside.
It would control my dam's god, Setebos,
And make
a vassal of him.
Pro,
So, slave ; hence I l^^ Caliban.
"

8C

TEMPEST,

THE

II.

Re-enter Ariel

29

invisible^
playingand ringing;

"

Ferdinand

following,
Ajiibl's Song,
Come, unto these vellow sands,

37^

And then take hands :


Courtsied when you have and kiss'd
The wfld waves
whist ;
here^uid there :
Foot it featly
the burden bear.
And, sweet sprites,

Burden

Hark,
[dispersedly].
The

ArieL

Hark, hark
The

hurk 1

Bowgh-wowgh.
watch"dogsbark :
Bowgh-wowgh.
!

380

I hear

strain of

chanticleer
strutting
Cry Cock-a-doodle-doo,

should
this music be ? i*the
Where
air or the earth ?
and sure
it waits upon
It sounds no more
:
Some
god of the island. Sittingon a bank,
Weeping again the king my father's wreck,
This music crept by me
the waters,
upon
Allayingboth their fury and my passion
air : thence
I have followed it,
With its sweet
rather : but 'tis gone.
Or it hath drawn
me
390'
Fer,

'

"

o, it

beginsagain.
Ariel

sings.

Full fathom five thy father lies;


Of his bones are coral made ;

pearlsthat were his eyes :


Nothing of him that doth fade
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ringhis knell :
Burden,
Ding-dongj
bell.
I hear them, ding-dong,
Hark ! now
Those

are

"

THE

3p

TEMPEST.

act

does remember
The ditty
my drown'd
father :
This is no mortal business,nor no sound
above
I hear it now
That the earth owes
:
Ftr,

400

"

"

[advance,

me.

Pro,

fringedcurtains of
what thou seest yond.

The

And say
Mira.

thine

eye

?
What
is't? a spirit
Lord, how it looks about ! Believe me, sir,
It carries a brave form : but 'tisa spirit.
Pro. No, wench ; it eats and sleepsand
hath such senses
[seest
As we
have, such. This gallantwhich thou
in the wreck ; and, but he's something
Was
stain'd
[mightstcall him
With
grief,that's beautv s canker, thou
A goodly person : he hath lost his fellows
And strays about to find them.
Mira.
I might call him
A thingdivine ; for nothingnatural
I ever
noble.
so
saw
"

410

Pro.

As

laside.]

It goes on, I see,


soul prompts it. Spirit,
fine spirit
!
my
rU free thee
"

Within two days for this.


Most
Per,
sure, the goddess
On whom
these airs attend 1 ^Vouchsafe
tny
"

May
420

And
How
Which

prayer
know if you remain upon this island;
that you wiJ' some
good instruction give,
I may bear we here : my prime request.
J do
wondei

h,6i, pronounce,
i

is,
"

you

If you be maid

or

no

51

?
No

Mira,

TEMPEST,

THE

rt.

8a

wonder, sir ;

But certainly
a maid.
Fer,
My languageI heavens !"
I am the best of them that speak this speech.
Were
I but where
'tis spoken.
Pro.
I the best?
How
What
wert
thou, if the king of Naples heard
thee ?
[wonders
Fer, A singlething,as
I am
that
now,
To hear thee speak of Naples. He does hear
me

And
Who

that he does

with mine

I weep
: myselfam
eyes, ne'er since at

Naples ;
held
ebb, be430

The king my father wreck'd.


Mira,
Alack, for mercy !
Fer, Yes, faith,and all his lords ; the Duke
of Milan
And his brave son being twain.
Pro,
The
of Milan
Duke
\aside\
And
his more
oraver
daughter,could control

thee.
If

'twere fitto do't." At the first sight


They have changed eyes. Delicate Ariel,
Pll set thee free for this ! A word, good sh*;
I iear you have done yourself
some
wrong :'a
word.
?
This
[ungently
Mir a, [aside,]
Why speaks my father so
Is the third man
that e'er I saw ; the first
440
^ther
That e'er I sigh'dfor : pitymove
my
To be inclined my way !
Fer*
0, 11 a virgin,
now

'

"

"

TEMPEST.

THE

32

ACT

I.

your affection not gone forth,I'll make


you
The queen of Naples.
Pro,
Soft,sir! one word more.
[^"V^.TThey are both ineither's power; but
tnis swift business
I must
uneasy make, lest too lightwinning
word
the prize light. One
Make
more
; I
charge thee
That thou attend me :" thou dost here usurp
thou ow'st not ; and hast put thyThe name
self
And

"

"

450

Upon

this island

as

spy

to win

it

From
me, the lord on*t.
Fer,
No, as I am a man.
Mira,
There's
nothing ill can dwell in
such a temple :
have so fair a house,
If the ill spirit
Good
thingswill strive to dwell with't.
Follow me.
Pro,
\To MiRA.] Speak not you for him ; he's a
"

\To Fer.J Come.


I'llmanacle
thy neck and feet together:
shalt thou drink, thy food shall
Sea-water
traitor.
"

The

fresh-brook

be
mussels, wither'd roots, and

husks

cradled.
Follow.
the acorn
Wherein
Fer.
No;
till
I will resist such entertainment
Mme
power.
enemy has more
and
is charmed
draws
from mcming^
\He
f
O dear father.
Mira,
Make not too rash a trialof him, for
*

460

SC.

TEMPEST,

THE

II.

33

He's gentle and not fearful.


Pro.
What, I say,
My foot my tutor ! Put thy sword up, traitor ;
mak'st a show
Who
butdar'st not strike,thy
conscience
[ward ;
from
Is so
possessedwith guilt: xome
thy
here dfsarm thee with this stick
For I can
"

"

'

make
And
thy weapon -drop.
Beseech
Mira.
you, father I
Pro, Hence
; hang not on my garments.
Mira,
Sir,have pity;
I'll be his surety.
Silence ! one
word more
Pro,
470
Shall make
chide thee,if not hate thee.
me
What
!
An advocate for an impostor! hush !
Thou
think'st there are no more
such shapes
as

he,

[wench !

and
but him
Caliban : foolish
this is a Caliban,
of men
To the most
And
they to him are angels.
Mira,
My affections
Are then most
humble
; I have no ambition
To see ^ goodlier
man.
Pro, \to Fer.J
Come
on
; obey :
their infancyagain
m
are
Thy nerves
have no vigor in them.
And

Having

seen

Fer,\aside.'\
in a dream,
as
My spirits,

SbrthcyaJ-e:
are

all bouhd

up.
father's
which. I feel.
loss,the weakness
My
The wreck of all my friends,
this man's
and

threats.
To

whom

I am

subdued, are

lightto

me.

480

THE

I.

sc.

The

of

masters

TEMPEST,

some

35

merchant, and the

chant
mer-

[miracle,
justour theme of woe ; but for the
few in miHions
our
preservation,
speak like us : then wisely,good sir,
/
weigh

Have
I

mean

Can

Our

with

sorrow

our

comfort.

A Ion,
Seb,

Ant.
Seb.

Pr'ythee,
peace.
He receives comfort like cold porridge. 10
The visitor will not give him o'er so.
Look, he is winding up the watch of
his wit ; by and by it will strike.

Gon^ Sir,
Seb. One :"
Gon. When
"

tell
every

griefis entertained

that's

oiBfer'd;
Comes
to the entertainer
Seb. A dollar.
Gon,
to him, indeed; you
Dolor
comes
have spoken truer than you purposed.
have
Seb, You
it wiselier than I
taken
"

meant

you

20

should.

Therefore, my lord,
is he of his
Fie, what a spendthrift

Gon.

"

Ant.

ton|;ue.
I

A Ion.

Gon,

pr'ythee,
spare.

Well,

I have

done

but yet

"

will be

talking.
Ant.
Which, of he or Adrian,for
wagerj first begins to crow ?
Seb,

He

Seb. The old cock.


Ant. The cockerel.
Seb. Done : the wager?

good

30

TEMPEST.

TBE

56

Ani, A laughter.
Seb, A match.
A dr. Though this island

to

seem

act

h.

be

de"

sert,
"

Seb,
A dr.

Ha, ha, ha

So, you

!
"

paid.
sible,
inacces-

almost

and

Uninhabitable

're

"

Seb.

Yet,"
Adr.
Yet,"
could not miss it.
It must
needs be of subtle,tender,
Adr.
and delicate temperance.
AnU
Temperance was a delicate wench.
Seb. Ay, and a subtle ; as he most
learnedly
delivered.
here most
Adr,
The
air breathes upon
us
AnL

40

He

sweetly.
Ant.

Or

Gon.

Here

lungs and rotten ones.


Hwere
perfumed by a fen.
is everythingadvantageous to

True

; save

Seb,

As

if it had
as

life.
AnL

Of that there's
lush and
Gon,
How
how green !
Seb,

50

Ant,

The

Seb,

With

Ant,

He

Seb,

No;

to live.

means

or

none

lustythe

little.
grass

looks !

ground,indeed, is tawny.
an

eye of green

in't.

misses not much.


he doth
but mistake

the truth

totally.
Gon,

almost
Seb.

rarityof
beyond credit)"
But

As

the

many

vouch'd

it is

(which is indeed

rarities are.

sc.

TEMPEST.

THE

I.

Gan,

That

57

being, as

garments,

our

they

in the sea, hoid^ notwithstanding,


were, drenched
their freshness and glosses;. being rather

than stained with salt water.


If but one
of his pocketscould speak,
Ant.
it not say he lies ?
would
Seb. Ay, or very falsely
port.
pocket up his re-

dyed

new

G"m,

fresh
at the

Methinks,
when

as

we

garments

our

them

put

on

are

now

first in

60

as

Afric,

marriage of the king's fair daughter


Claribel to the king of Tunis.
Seb. 'Twas
a sweet
marriage,and we prosper
well in our
Adr,
Tunis

return.
was

never

graced before

with

such a paragon
to their queen.
Dido's time.
Gon.
Not since widow
? a plagueo' that I How
came
Ant, Widow
Dido !
Widow
in ?
tha* widow
iEneas
if he had said widower
:!ieb.What
too ? good lord,how
you take it !
Widow
Adr,
Dido, said you ? you make
of Carthage,not
me
study of that: she was

70

of Tunis.

Gon,
Adr,
Gon,
Ant.

Tunis, sir,was
Carthage ?

This

I assure
His wora

you,

is

Carthage.
80

Carthage.
more

than the miraculous

harp.
Seb,

He

hath

raised

the

wall

and

houses

too.

What
easy next ?
Ant

impossiblematter

will he make

THE

38
I think

Seb,
in his

pocket

TEMPEST.

act

ii.

he will carry
this island home
and give it his son
for an

apple.
Ant.
sea,

bringforth

A Ion, Av

Ant.
Gon.
go

of it in the

And, sowing the kernels


islands.

more

Wny, in good time.


were
Sir, we
talkingthat

our

gar-

fresh as when we were


at
Tunis at the marriage of your daughter,who
is now
queen.
And
Ant.
the rarest that e'er Came
there.
Seb.
*Bate, I beseech you, widow Dido.
Ant.
O, widow Dido ; ay, widow Dido.
Gon.
Is not, sir,my doublet as fresh as the
firstday I wore
it?
I mean,
in a sort.
Ant.
That sort was
well fishM for.
Gon.
When
I wore
it at your daughter's
marriage ?
Alon.
You
these words
into mine
cram

ments

seem

ears

xoo

now

as

against

The stomach of my sense.


Would
Married
daughter there 1
my

I had

never

for, coming

thencCj
is lost

and, in

rate, she too.


Who
is so far from Italyremoved
I ne*er again shall see her.
O thou mine heir
Of Naples and of Milan, what strange fish

My

Hath

son

made

Fran.

on

thee ?

Sir,he may

live ;

him beat the surges under him


ride upon ftieirback ; he trod the water,
Aad
Whose
enmity he fiuugaside,and breasted
I

no

his meal

my

saw

V-:iUO*^It^

Digitized
liy

TEMPEST^

THE

SCI.

39

that met him ; his bbld


surge most swoln
head
he kept, and
waves
'Bove the contentious
oarM
in lustystroke
Himself with his good arms
basis
To the shore, that o'er his wave-worn
The

As

bow'd,
stoopingto

He

relieve him
alive to land.

came

No,

A Ion,

Seb,

That

Sir,you may
great loss.
would

bless

not

thank
our

doubt

; I not

no, he*s

eone.

yourself for
Europe

with

this

your

daughter.
But rather lose her to an African ;
Where
she,at least,is banish'd from your eye,
the griefon*t.
to wet
hath cause
Who
peace.
A Ion,
Pr'ythee,
kneel'd to, and imp6rtuned
were
Seb. You

120

otherwise.
the fair soul herself
lothness and obedience, at
We have
should bow.
end o' the beam
Which
lost your son,
I.fear,forever: Milan and Naples have
in them of this business' making
widows
More
them : the
to comfort
men
Than
we

By all of us ; and
Weigh'd, between

bring

fault's

Your

own.

A Ion,

Gon^
The truth you

o' the loss.

So is the dearest

My
"

lord Sebastian,

speak doth lack

some

ness
gentle-

130

TEMPEST,

THE

46^

ACT

n.

speak it in ; you rub the sore


When
you should bringtne plaster.
Sed.
Very^lFclL
And most chirurgeonly.
Ant.
in us ail,
Gon. It is foul weather
good sir.
When
you are cloudy.

And

time to

Sed.
Anf.
Gan,

weather

Foul

Veryfoul.
Had

plantationof

this

isle,my

lord,
"

Anf,
Sed,
Gon.
140

Sed,
Gon,

He'd
And
I do?

sow't

the

were

nettte-seed.
mallows.
Or docks
or
king of it,what would

with

want

of wine*

I would

by con-

*Scape being drunk, for


r the commonwealth

traries
all things; for no kind of traffic
Execute
of magistrate;
Would
I admit ; no name
Letters should not be known
: riches,
poverty.
of
And use
sion.
service,none
; contract, succes-

Bourn, bound of land,tilth,


vineyard,none
No use of metal, corn, or wine, or oil :
No occupation; all men
idle,all ;

and pure :
And women
too ; but innocent
No sovereignty
:
Yet he would be king on't
Sed,
AnL
The latter end of his commonwealth
forgetsthe beginning.
Son. All thmgs in common
nature
should
"

150

produce
Without

sweat

or

endeavor

treason, felony.
K^:3UO*^Ikl

Digitized
i^y

TEMPEST,

THE

SCI.

need of any engine


should bring
have *, but nature

Sword, pike,knife,gun,
Would

41

I not

or

forth,
Of its own
kind, all foison,all abundance,
To feed my innocent people.
?
Seb, No marrying *mong his subjects
Ant,

None,

man

all idle.

[sir,
Gon.
To

with such

I would

excel the

golden age.

Long

live Gonzalo

And,

Gon,
Alon,

his

nothing to

more

majestyI

do you

Pr'ythee,no

i^"

Save

Seb,

Ani,

perfection
govern,

mark
:

thou

me,

sir ?

"

dost

talk

me.

Gon, I do well believe your highness; and


did it to minister occasion to these gentlemen,
who
of such sensible and nimble lungs
are
that theyalways use to laugh at nothing.
Ant,

*Twas

vou

Gon,

Who,

we

lauehed

at

of merry fooling,
you may continue and

this kind

nothingto you : so
laugh at nothing still.
am

there given!
An it had not fallen flat-long.
Gon,
You
are
gentlemen of brave mettle ;
of her sphere,if
out
you would liftthe moon
in it five weeks
without
she would continue
Ant,
Seb,

What

blow

was

changing.
Enter

Seb,

Ariel

We

fowling.

invisible^
playingsolemn

would

so, and

then

music,

go

bat*

170

TEMPEST.

THE

I.

9C.

yet, metbinks, I

And
What

the

My strong imaginationsees
Dropping upon thy head.
Do

Ant

you

hear

not

crown

What,

Seb,

thy face,
occasion speaks

it in

see

be

thou shouldst
thee ; and

43

art

waking ?

thou

speak ?

me

I do ; and

surely 200
speak'st

Seb.
It is a

sleepylanguage, and thou


Out of thy sleep: what is it thou diast say ?
This is a strange
repose, to be asleep
With
open ; standing,speaking,
eyes wide
moving.
And yet so fast asleep.
Ant,
Noble Sebastian,
Thou
lett'st thy fortune sleep,"die rather ;
wink*st
Whiles

thou

art

waking.

Seb.

There's

meaning

Ant

Thou
dost snore
in thy snores.
serious

more

am

you
Must be so too, if heed
Trebles thee o*er.
Seb,

ni

AnU

teach

you

than my
; which

me

Well, I
how

to

210

so

to

ebb

me.

Ant

If

to do

O,

you but

Whiles

knew

thus

you

how

you the purpose cherish


mock
it ! how, in stripping

it,
You

flow,
Do

instructs

custom

standingwater.

am

Seb,

Hereditarysloth

distinctly
;

more

invest it !

Ebbing

men,

indeed,

THE

44

often do

Most

By tkeir own

220

TEMPEST.

so

near

fear

or

ACT

the bottom
sloth.

n.

run.

Seb.
Pr'ythee,
say on :
of thine eye and cheek proclaim
The setting
from thee ; and a birth,indeed,
A matter
Which
throes thee much
to yield.

Thus, sir:
remembrance, this

Ant

Although this

lord of weak
shall be of as littlememory
he is earth'd)hath here

(Who
When

almost

of persuasion,
spirit
only
Professes
to
persuade) the king his
alive,
'Tis as impossiblethat he's undrown*d
As he that sleepshere swims.
he's

(For

suaded
per-

son*s

"

230

Seb,
That he's undrown'd.
Ant.
What
great hope have
way is

Another

I have

O,

out

you !

of that
no

no

no

hope

hope
hope
that

higha hope

that even
Ambition
cannot
pierce a wink beyond.
But doubts discovery
there. Will you grant
with

That

so

way

me

Ferdinand

is drown'd

Seb.
Ant,
Who's

He's gone.
Then, tell me
the next

heir of

Naples ?

Seb.
She that is queen
dwells
leaguesbeyond man's

Ant
Ten

Claribcl.
of Tunis : she that

[Naples
life; she that from

SC

THE

I.

have

Can

(The

chins

bom
Be
We

rough

45

note, unless the sun were


post,
the moon's
too slow,) tillnew*

no

man

TEMPEST,

and

all were

razorable ; she Hwas

for whom

sea-swallow'd,
though some

240

cast

again;
And
by that destinyto performan act
what's past is prologue; what
Whereof

to

come

In yours and my discharge.


What
stuff is this ? How
Seb.
say you ?
Tis true, my brother's daughter'squeen of
"

Tunis ;
So is she heir of

Naples ;

*twixt which

regions

There is some
space.
A space whose
Ant
every cubit
shali thou^Claribel
Seems to cry out, How
Measure
us back to Naples f
Keep in Tunisy
And
let Sebastian
wake I
Say, this were
death
[no worse
950
That now
hath seized them ; why, they were
Than
There
be that can rule
now
they are.
"

"

Naples
sleeps; lords that can prate
As amply and unnecessarily
As this Gonzalo ; I myselfcould make
A chough of as deep chat.
O, that you bore
this
The mind that I do ! what a sleepwere
As

well

as

For your
me

he that

advancement

Do

you understand

Seb, Methinks
Ant.
Tender
your own

I do.
And
how

good

does your content


fortune ?

THE

46
260

TEMPEST.

act

il

I remember
Seb,
You did supplantyour brother Prosper".
True :
Ant
And look how well mv garments sit upon me ;
feater than before.
My brother's serMuch
vants

then

Were

my

they

fellows;now

arc

my

men.

But, for your conscience


Ay, sir ; and where lies that ? if 'twere
a kibe,
to my slipper
; but I feel not
*T would put me
This deityin my bosom ; twenty consciences.
Seb.
Ant,

That

"

stand 'twixt me

and

Milan, candied

[brother,

they
270

be

Res your
Here
melt ere they molest!
And
No better than the earth he lies upon,
he's like,that's
that which now
If he were

[of it,
dead,
three inches
I,with this obedient steel,

Whom
Can

lay to bed forever : whiles you, doing


thus,
To the perpetualwink for aye might put
This ancient morsel,this Sir Prudence, who
For ail the
Should not upbraidour course.
rest.
as a
They'lltake suggestion
They'lltellthe clock to any

We

say befits the hour.


Seb,

280

cat

lapsmilk

business

that

Thy case, dear friend,


thou gott'st
Milan,
my precedent: as
by Naples. Draw thy sword : one

Shall be
I'llcome
stroke

pay'st;
I the king shall love

And

Ant.
To

thou

the tribute which

Shall free thee from

And

47

TEMPEST,

THE

8C. I.

I rear my
when
fall it on Gonzalo.

thee.
Draw
together:
hand, do you the like

O, but one word.


apart.
[They converse

Seb,

Music,

Aru

My

kvca.i^iinvisible.

Reenter

master,

through his

art, foresees

danger
in ; and
are
That
you, his friend,
dies,)to keep
(For else his project

[forth,

the

[Singsin

sends

thee

me

livmg.

Gonzalo's

ear.

snoringlie,
Open-eyedConspiracy

While

His

you

time

290

here do

doth take

If of life you keep a care,


Shake off slumber, and beware:
1 awake I
Awake

Ant,
Gon.

Then

let

both be sudden.

us

Now, good angels preserve


["/a"fe^"^.l
[Why are you drawn ?
the kingi
awake !hoi
Why, how now! [To A Ion.]
looking ?
this ghastiy
Wherefore
the matter?
What's
Alon.
\wakin^:\
Seb, Whiles

we

stood

now,

we

bulls,or

secunng

heard

,^

rather

^
hollow burst^ of bellowwake
lions ; did't not

you?
It struck mine

your

[""S

repose,
Even
Like

here

car

most

ternbly.

300

TEMPEST.

THE

48

act

I heard

Alan.

O, 'twas

AnL

ear

nothing.
monster^
[roar

it

sure,

too, which

strangeone

That's
Or
A

[me :
cried;

as

did awake
mine

eyes

[noise,
drawn:
there was
best we stand upon

their weapons

saw

you

opened,
310

the

was

this,Gonzalo
honor, sir, I heard

you, sir, and

I shak'd

frighta

of lions.
Heard

herd

Upon mine
humming,

that

to

earthquake !

an

A Ion,

And

din

make
Of a whole
To

Gon.

ii.

"

our
verity. 'Tis
[weapons.
guard;
draw our
that we
quit this place: let's,
Ion. Leacfoff this ground ; and let's make
"

further search
For

poor son.
Heavens

my
Gon.

for

he

is,sure,

keep him

Lead away.
\Ex"unt.
lord shall know
what I

Prosper" my
have

these beasts !

i* the island.

A Ion.

Art.

from

done

"

So, king,go safelyon

to seek

thy son.

[EsuL

W.-'Anotherpartofthel^Xzxi^.

SCENE
Enter

Caliban,
A

noise

Col. Ail the


up

wUh

of thunder

burden

ofwood,

heard.

infections that the

sucks
[make him
Prosper fall,and

From
bogs,fens,flats,on
By inch-meal a disease ! His

sun

hear
spirits

Digitized
liyV-jUO^

\SC

met

sa

yet I needs

And

TEMPEST.

THE

11.

must

49
But

curse.

nor
they'll
[mire,

pinch,
i' the
me
Fright me with urchin-shows, pitch
the dark
in
Nor lead me, like a firebrand,
of my
every
Sometime
Out
For

wav,

unless

trine

are

like apes,

; but

he bid them

they set
that

me

upon

and

mow

chatter at

[which

me,

And
after,bite me ; then like hedgehogs,
Lie tumbling in my barefoot way, and mount
I
am
Their pricks at my footfall ; sometime
with
cloven
with adders, who
All wound

tongues
Do

hiss

me

into madness
Enter

Here

comes

"

Lo

now

! lo !

to

torment

Trinculo.

spiritof

his ; and

me

in slowly. I'llfall flat ;


For bringingwood
he will not mind me.
Perchance
shrub
to
neither bush nor
7V/". Here's
and another storm
bear off any weather at all,
brewing ; I hear it sing i' the wind : yond
black cloud,yond huge one, looks like
same
his liquor.
that woulcT shed
a foul bombard
it did before,I know
as
If it should thunder
not

cannot

have

cloud
hide my head : yond same
but fall by pailfuls. What
choose
Dead
or
or
here ? a man
a fish ?
A fish : he smells like a fish ; a very

where

to

"

we

alive ?
ancient and fishlike smell ; a kind of,not of
the newest,
poor-John. A strange fish I
I was), and
I in England now
Were
(as once
V-jUO*^ \X.

iiy
Digitized

TEMPEST

THE

11.

sc.

the

51

?. Have
devils
we
here ? Do you put tricks upon's with savages,,
of Inde ? Ha ! I have not 'scaped
and men
of your four legs;
drowning to be afeard now
Ste, What's

for it hath
went

on

been
four

matter

said, As

legs

proper a
make
cannot

man

as

him

ever

give

ground : and it shall be said so again while


Stephano breathes at 's nostrils.
!
CaL
The
torments
me
: O
spirit
of the isle,with
hath
four legs ; who
got, as I take it,an
the devil should
he learn our
ague : where
Ste,

is

This

language?

some

I will

monster

give him

if it be
relief,
him
and keep
recover
Naples with him, he's a

If I can
but for that.
him tame
and get to
present for any emperor

some

that

trod

ever

on

neat's-leather.
Cal. Do
not
torment
pr'ythee! I'll
me,
bring my wood home faster.
Ste. He's in his fit now
; and does not talk
after the wisest.
He shall taste of my bottle :
if he have never
drunk wine afore,it will go
his fit. If I can
to remove
him
near
recover
and

keep

him

tame,

I will

not

take

too

much

for him : he shall pay for him that bath him,


and that soundly.
CaL
Thou
dost me
yet but littlehurt; thou
wilt anon,
I know
it by thy trembling: now

Prosper

works

upon

60

thee.

Come
on
jrourways ; open your mouth :
here is that which will give language to you,
cat : open
yoiir mouth : this will shake
your
I
tell
shaking, can
you^and that soundly: yoxx
Ste,

V-^UO*^ It^

Digitized
liy

70

TEMPEST

THE

52

tell who's

cannot

act

friend

your

open

ii.

your

chaps again.
"o

I should

Trin,

know

that voice
; and these

it should

derils :
but he is drowned
are
!
O ! defend me
voices ; a most
Ste. Four
legs, and two
!
His forward voice now
delicate monster
is
to speak well of his friend ; his backward
voice is to utter foul speeches and to detract.
If all the wine in my bottle will recover
him,
! I .will
Amen
I will help his ague.
Come
in thy other mouth.
pour some
be

"

"

"

"

Stephano,
Ste, Doth
thy other mouth call me ? Mercy !
I
"mercy! This is a devil,and no monster:
will leave him ; I have no long spoon.
Trin, Stephano \ if thou beest Stephano,
touch
and speak to me ; for I am
Trinme
culo, be not af eard, thygood friend TrinTrin,

"

"

"

"

culo.

If thou

beest

forth ;
Trinculo,come
ril pull thee by the lesser legs; if any be
Trinculo's legs, these are
artthey. Thou
thou to be
very Trinculo,indeed : how camest
the siege of this moon-calf ? Can
he vent
Ste,

Trinculos

I took him

Trin,
:

"

^but art thou

not

drowned, Stephano

drowned.
Is the
I hid me
?
overblown
under the dead
storm
for fear of the storm.
moon-calf s gaberdine,
And art thou living,
Stephano ? O Stephano,
I

zoo

stroke
to be killed with a thunder-

hope

two

now

thou

art

not

Neapolitans'scaped!

SC

THE

IL

TEMPEST.

Pr'ythee,do

Ste.

stomach

is not

not

they be

turn

about ; my

me

constant.

These
[aside.]

CaL

53

be fine

if

things,an

sprites.

not

brave god and bears celestial liquor:


I will kneel to him.

That's

didst thou

How

SU.

*scape?

How

camest

hither ? swear
by this bottle how thou
I escaped upon a butt of sack,
hither.
camest
which
the sailors heaved
overboard, by this

thou

bottle! which
with mine own

I made

of the bark

hands

since I

was

of

tree

ashore.
that bottle to
cast

V\\ swear
[aside.]
upon
for
be thy true
the liquor is not
subject;
earthly.
then how thou escapedst.
S/e. Here ; swear

Ca/^

Trin,

Swam
like

swim

can

Here,

Sle.
canst

swim

ashore, man,
duck, I'llbe

kiss

like

the

duck,

like

duck

; I

sworn.

book.
thou

Though
art

made

thou
like

goose.
of this ?
any more
; my cellar is in a
is hid.
my wine
does
thine
? how

Stephano,hast
Ste.
whole butt,man
rock by the sea7side where
Trin.

"

How

O
The

now,

moon-calf

ague?
Cal.

Hast

thou

not

dropped

from

heaven

thee : I
Out p' the moon, I do assure
in the moon
when time was.
the man
was
in her
thee
Cal. I have
and I do
seen
thee
adore
mistress show'd
thee ; my
me
and thy dog ana
thy bush.
to that';kiss the book:^
Ste, Come, swear
Ste.

5*
"^
Digitized
by

VjUU^ie

tio

TEMPEST.

^^^

54

furnish it anon

I wiU

act

with

ii.

contents

new

:"

*"

swear.

shallow
.130

weak

monster:

monster

"

i'the

man

credulous
monster:
in good sooth.

poor

I'llshow

CaL

god.
Trin. By

this

thy

foot

"

moon

well

"

"

very

very

a most

drawn, molester,

fertile inch o' the

thee every

island ;
I will kiss

And

of him!

I afeard

the

"

is

this
good light,

this

By

Trin.

a most
light,

when
drunken
monster;
he'll rob his bottle.
Cal. ril kiss thy foot:

be
pr'ythee,

my

perfidiousand
his god's asleep,
I'llswear

myself

thy subject.
Sie. Come
on
Trin, I shall

puppy-headed
^^^

ster

I could

Sie,

Trin,

"

but

down

and

swear.

death

laugh myself to

monster

find in my
kiss.
that

the

most

heart
poor

scurvy
to

at

this

mon-

beat'him,
"

mobster's in

abominable
!
drink
monster
an
thee the best springs;I'll
Cai, I'll show
pluck thee berries ;
rU fish for thee and get thee wood
enough.
the tyrant that I serve
A plague upon
!
I'llbear him no more
sticks,but follow thee.
wondrous
Thou
man.
A most
Trin,
ridiculous monster
I to make
of a
a wonder
poor drunkard !
let me
Cal, I pr'ythee,
bring thee where
crabs grow.
"

150

Come,

then

THE

11.

sc.

And

I with

Show
To

thee

TEMPEST,

nails will

long

my

55
thee

dig

nuts
pig-

;
a

the

snare

instruct thee how

jay*snest, and
nimble

; I'll bring

marhiozet

[thee

thee

Pll

and sometimes
clustVingfilberds,
Young sea-mels from the rock. Wilt
To

with

get

thou go

me

prVthee now, lead the way without


talking. Trinculo, the king and all
any more
will
else being drowned, we
our
company
inherit here. \ToQm.vrM!{.'\ Here; bear my
Fellow Trinculo,we^llfillhim by and
bottle.
by again.
I

Ste.

"

"

'

^"^

[singsdrunkenly,'\

CaL

Farewell,master
Trtn.

drunken

ster!
mon-

for fish ;

I'llmake

fetch in firing

requiring.

trencher,nor wash dish


'Ban, 'Ban, Ca" Caliban,
a

new

master"

Get

new

man.

! hey-day,freedom
hey-day

hey-day,freedom
Ste. O

scrape

Has

Freedom,

dams

more

Nor
At
Nor

farewell.
farewell,

howlingmonster

Col, No

brave

monster

dom,
Free-

i lead the way.

170

\Exeunt"

by

TEMPEST,

THE

56

ACT
SCENE

I,"

Enter

in.

act

III.

Before Vxo^^^xo'sCell.

Ferdinand,

bearing a log,

Ferdinand,

be some
sports
labor
their
and

(HERE

Delight in

them

painful;

are

off

sets

some

kinds of baseness
Are nobly undergone ; and most poor matters
Point to rich ends.
This, my
task
mean
would be
'tisodious, but
As heavy to me
as
I serve
The mistress which
quickenswhat's
dead
And

makes

pleasures: O,
gentle than her

Ten

times

And

crabbed ;
he's compos'd of harshness.
thousands of these logs and

Some
lo

labors

my
more

she is
father's

[remove
I must

pilethem

up,

Upon a
Weeps

sore

injunction.My

when

she

sees

baseness
ne'er like executor.

; and

work

me

mistress

sweet

says

such

Had
But these sweet
labor ;
Least busy when
Enter

Mira,
not
Work

Miranda,

forget:

thoughtsdo
I do it.
and

Prospero

at

Alas,
so

refresh my

even

hard ; I would

now

distance,

pray

you.

had
^^zJUghtning

TEMPEST.

THE

I.

sc.

57

up those logs that you are


pile1
Pray set it down, and rest you
for having wearied
'Twill weep

enjoin'dto
[burns,

Burnt

this

when
you.

My

father
Is hard at studv ; pray now,
rest yourself
;
He's safe for these three hours.
dear mistress.
O most
Fer*
will set before I shall discharge
The
sun
I myst strive to do.
What
If

Mira,

I'llbear

your

while.

logs the

20

you'llsit down,
Pray,give me

that;
I'llcarry it to the
I

pile.
Fer.
No, precious creature :
had rather crack my sinews, break my back"
you should

Than

I sit

While
Mir

such dishonor

lazyby.

well as it does you


much
With
ease
more

As

And

become

It would

a.

to

undergo.

me

and I should do it
good will is
; for my

it,

3C

yours it is

against.
Poor worm!
[aside.]

Pro,
This visitation shows

thou art

infected;

it.

look wearily.
Fer. No, noble mistress ; His fresh morning
with me
When
you are by at night. I do beseech you,
You

Mira.

that
(Chiefly,

What

name

IS

your

might set

broke

your

prayers

.^

O my
hest to say so !
Miranda

Mira.

I have

it in my
:

"

father,

THE

SC. I.

heart

My

TEMPEST,

your service

flyto

slave to it ; and
make
me
I this patientlog-man.

To
Am

Mir

And
If I

there resides
for your sake

you love me ?
earth,bear witness to
Do

a.

O heaven, O

Fer,

59

this sound
what
crown

speak

true

professwith kind
invert
; if hollowly,
I

event
'

best is boded me, to mischief ! I,


Beyond all limit of what else i* the world^
honor you.
Do love,prize,
I am
a fool
Mira.
at what I am
To
glad of.

What

weep
[Aside.]

Fair encounter
rain
affections ! Heavens

Pro,

Of two

most

grace
that which

On

rare

them !
between
Wherefore weep you ?
that dare not
unworthiness

breeds

Per.

Mira, At mine
offer
less take
I desire to give; and much
What
But this is trifling
I shall die to want.
What
;
80
it seeks to hide itself,
And all the more
Hence, bashful
The
bigger bulk it shows.

cunning !
And
I

prompt me,

am

your
if not, rU

You

may

Whether

and holy innocence


plain

will marry me
;
die your maid : to be your fellow
deny me ; but I'll be your servant,

wife,if you

you

will

Fer,
And I thus humble

Mira,

or

no.

My mistress,dearest,
ev"r.

My husband, then

TEMPEST,

THE

6o

act

iii.

Ay, with a heart as willing


bondage e'er of freedom ; here's my

Fer,
As

And mine, with


farewell
now
Till half an hour hence.
Mira,

90

my

thousand

thousand

Fer,

hand.
heart in t : and

and Miranda.
[Exeunt Ferdinand
be,
Pro, So glad of this as they I cannot
Who
am
surprisedwithal : but my rejoicing
I'llto my book ;
be more.
At nothingcan

For
/

perform

business'appertainlng.

Much

W.^Another

SCENE
Enter

supper-timemust

yet ere

Ste, Tell not

me

;
"

will drink water ; not


and board
bear up
drink to me.
Trin.
island !

part of the Island.

and Trinculo
; Ckia^kh
"with a bottle.

Stephano

[ExU

following

the butt is out,

when

we

drop before : therefore


'em.
Servant-monster,

"

! the folly
of this
Servant-monster
They say there's but five upon this
three of them ; if the other two
are

isle: we
be brained like us, the state totters.
I bid
when
Ste, Drink, servant-monster,
thee : thy
eyes are almost set in thy head.
Trin. Where
should they be set else ? he
monster
set
a brave
were
indeed,if they were
in his tail.
Ste,

My

man-monster

tongue in sack

for my

hath

drowned

part, the
Digitized
by

sea

his

cannot

ikl
\j(,}k.}^

sc.

6i

TEMPEST,

THE

II.

I could recover
off and on.
shore, five-and-thirty-leagues

drown
this
or

me.

I swam,

thou
lighjt,

my

ere

shalt be my

the

By

lieutenant,
monster,

standard.

7V/".

Your

standard.
Ste, We'll

if you list:
lieutenant,

he's

no

monsieur
monster.
Nor
Trin,
go neither : but you'll lie like
dogs, and yet sav nothing neither.
if
in thy life,
Ste, Moon-cal^
speak once
thou beest a ^oodmoon-calf.
CaL
How
does thy honor ? Let me
lick thy
shoe:
I'llnot serve
him, he is not valiant.
Trin.
Thou
most
liest,
ignorantmonster
;
thou
constable
I am
in case
to justle
a
: why,
deboshed
there ever
man
a
was
fish,thou,,
sack as I today
coward that hath drunk so much
thou tell a mpnstrous lie,being
? Wilt
but half a fish and half a monster
?
CaL
! wilt thou let
Lo, how he mocks
me
him, my lord ?
Trin, Lord, quoth he!
that a monster
should be such a natural !
Ca/,. Lo, lo, again! bite him to death, I
not

run,

20

"

pr'ythee.
Trinculo, keep a good tongue

S^e,
in your
head ; if you prove
a
mutineer, the next
tree!
The
monster's
subjectand
poor
my
he shall not suffer indignity.
I thank my noble lord. Wilt thou be
CaL
pleasedto hearken once again the suit I made
to thee ?
"

62

THE

Sie
will

Marry,win

stand,and

so

Enter

Cal. As

llr^A
cheated
Aru
T
I

act

kneel and repeat it: I


shall Trinculo.

Ariel, invisibte.

subject to

am

^^^^ ^y ^^s
^?^'i^^^\'
of the island.

me

iil

I told thfee before,


I

'""*

.r.
40

TEMPEST,

cunninghath

Thouliest.

"^^^^
thou
SZiiA
li^s^
would
vahant
niy
lie.

jesting
monkey, thou
would

master

thee
destroy
^

I do not
S/e. Trinculo,
if vou
trouble him any more
In his tale,
this
by
hand,I will supplant
some
^
of your teeth.

Trin.
S/e.

Why,

I said

Mum,

;
"
'

nothing.

then, and

no

more.

FTI^

"

^
Caliban.] Proceed.
^^^' ^
l*^'^y sorcery he got this isle ;
ir
From
me
he got it
If thy greatness will

cry
50

Revenge

him" for,I know, thou


dar'st.
But this thingdare not
Ste, That's most
certain.
Ca/." Thou
Shalt be lord of it,and 111
it

on

"

serve

thee.

shall this be
r.fl^*.?''^'?''^
Canst thou

bringme

to the

compassed?
^'

party 1

^^^ ""^ ^''''^'" ^'^^^^^"^ *^^^


aike
"^^*1^^^^ h's head.
"^Arl
\"^"^
ThnnT^f
^'^^t'
t^^"
^

c/i/.

"r,-"^
What

"^anst

not.

piedninny's this I
*

I do

scurvy patch !"

Thou
xnou

beseech thy greatness,


give him blows
V^:3UO*^VSC

Digitized
iiy

sa

And

II.

take

THE

TEMPEST,

6^

his bottle from

him

when

that*s
[show him
gone,
He shdl drink nought but brine ; for Pll not
Where
the quick freshes are.
into no
further danger :
Ste, Trinculo, run
the monster
word
one
further,and,
interrupt
by this hand, Til turn my mercy out of doors,
and make a stockfish of thee.
did I ?
I did nothing;
Trin, Why, what
ril go further off.
Ste. Didst thou not say he lied ?
liest.
Art. Thou
I so ? take thou that. [Strikes
Ste. Do
the lie
Trin.] As you like this,give me
another time.
Trin. I did not give the lie." Out o' your
A plague o' your
wits and hearing too ?
sack and
bottle! this can
drinking do. A
murrain
on
your monster, and the devil take
:

"^

"

!
your fingers
CaL
Ha, ha, ha !
with
forward
Ste. Now,
your tale. [To
Trin.] Pr'ytheestand further off.
Cat. Beat him enough : after a littletime,
I'll beat him too.
Stand further.
Ste.
Come, proceed.
with
CaL Why, as I told thee,'tis a custom
him
[brainhim.
I' the afternoon to sleep: there thou mayst
Having first seized his books ; or with a log
Batter his skull,or paunch him with a stake,
with thy knife. Remember
Or cut his wezand
First to possess his books ; for without them
"

"

80

TEMPEST,

THE

64

He's but a sot, as I am,


One
spiritto command
him
90

As

I.

rootedlyas
has

He

nor
:

hath

hate

do

they all

utensils, (for

brave

not

but his books

Bum

m.

act

calls

he

so

them)
when

Which,

he

has

house, he'll deck't

withal.

deeplyto consider is
The beauty of his daughter; he himself
Calls her a nonpareil
: I ne'er saw
woman.
and she ;
But only Sycorax my dam
But she as far surpasseth
Sycorax,
And

As

that most

greatest does least,


Ste, Monster, I will kill this

daughter and
100

I will be

king and

man

queen

his

; save

shall
Trinculo and thyself
culo
be viceroys. Dost thou like the plot,Trin?

'graces I and

our

"

Trin,

Excellent.

Sie. Give me
thy hand ; I am sorry I beat
thee: but while thou livest,keep a good
tongue in thy head.
CaL

Within

asleep;
thou destroyhim

Wilt

Ste,
Aru

CaL

no

Let
Yoa

this half-hour

will

he

mine

honor.

be

then ?

Ay,

on

This will I tell my master.


Thou
mak'st me merry : I

am

full of

pleasure;
be jocund. Will you trollthe catch
us
taught me but while-ere ?

sc.

Ste, At
reason,

65

TEMPEST,

THE

II.

thy request, monster,


Come

reason.

any

Trinculo, let
\Sings,

on,

sing.

us

Flout

^em

Thought
CaL

'em and

and scout
is free.

That's

'em and flout 'em

scout

the tune.

not

[A RiEL

I will do

plays the

tune

is the same
Ste. What
Trin, This is the tune

on

tabor and

pipe,

of

catch, played

our

toy the pictureof Nobody.


Ste. If thou beest
thy likeness : if thou

show

man,

beest

thyselfin

devil,take^^t as

120

thou list.
me
O, forgive

Trin.

my
Ste, He that dies pays
thee.
Mercy upon
CaL
Art thou afeard ?
"

Ste.
Cal.

No, monster,

not

sins !
all debts
us

defy

I.

Be not afeard ; the isle is fullof noises,


Sounds, and sweet airs,that give delightand
hurt not.
[ments
thousand
Sometimes
a
twangling instru-

Will

hum

about

mine

ears

; and

sometime

voices.
That, if I
Will

make

then
me

had

waked

after

sleep again :

long sleep,
and

then, in
[riches

dreaming,
clouds,methought, would open and show
Heady to drop upon me ; that when I waked
I cried to dream
again.
Ste, This will prove a brave kingdom to me,
inrhere I shall have my music for nothing.
The

130

TEMPEST,

THE

in.

sc.

67

not, for one repulse,forgothe purpose


That
you resolved to effect.
Seb, {Aside to Ant.] The next advantage
^
Will we
take throughly.
Let it be to-night
Ant,
{asideto Seb. J
;
For now
they are oppressed with travel,they
Do

Will

As

not,
when

use

they are fresh.


{aside to Ant.]

Seb.
Solemn

cannot,

nor

and

strange music
Enter

vtstbU.

nf?7Tl

'

such

vigilance
rmore

I say,

; and

:
to-night

no

inabirue,

Prospero

strangeShapes,bringingin
''^''**'^ -^^^^
*^y "^f"".''
gentleadions
*^
^''^ ^^''^^"
' '""'^'"'''^^"^'
several

thlydepa^J

harmony is

What

^/^^.

hark
friends,

this?

^ood
my J' S
"^

Con, Marvellous sweet


music !
kind
Alon, Give
us
keepers, heavens [
What
these?
vi^ere
Seb, A living
drollery.Now I will believe
there are Unicorns ; that in Arabia
That
There
is
one
tree, the phoenix'throne ; one

phoenix
this hour

At

reigningthere.
I'llbelieve

^^"^-

both;

to me,
does else want
credit,come
Travellers ne'er
'tis true.
ril be sworn
And
did lie.
them.
Though fools at home condemn

And

what

^^"-

I should

If in

report this now,

would

Naples

they believe

me?

If I should say

saw

such

islanders,

20

30

TEMPEST,

THE

68

iii.

act

(For certes, these are peopleof the island,)


shape,
Who, though they are of monstrous
yet note.
Their manners
Our human

Many,

of

gentle-kmd than

more

generationyou shall find

nay, almost

any.
Honest

[aside.]

Pro,

Thou

are

hast said well

for

lord.
there

of you

some

present
than devils.
Are worse
too much
muse
I cannot
Alon,
Such shapes,such gesture and such sound,

expressing
(Although theywant
Of excellent dumb

tongue)a

Fran,

matter, since
behind ; for we

No

Sed,

left their viands


have stomachs.
Will't please you taste of what

They

kind

Praise in departing.
[aside.']
They vanish'd strangely.

Pro.
40

the use of
discourse.

have

"

Alon,
Gon,
Who

Faith,sir,you need
were
we
boys,

would

Dew-lapp'd

not

is here ?
fear.

Not I.
When

[taineers

mounbelieve that there were


throats had
like bulls,whose

hangingat

them

[men

such
of flesh ; or that there were
stood in their breasts ? which
heads
find
we
now

Wallets
Whose

will bringus
Each putter-out of five for one
of.
Good warrant
I will stand to and feed,
Alon,

SC.

last :

Although my

69

TEMPEST.

THE

IIL

test is past. Brother, my

The

"

Stand

anct

Thunder

do

and

to

as

I feel
lord the duke,

matter, since

no

we.

lightning. Enter

Ariel, like
table^andy with

clapshis wings upon the


device^the banqiut vanishes.
Art,

You

three

are

of

men

a
a

harpy ;
guaint

sin,whom

this lower

to instrument

(That hath

50

tiny
des-

world,

the never-surfeited sea


And what is in't)
Hath caused to belch up ; and on this island
doth not inhabit; you 'mongst
Where
man
nien
^

Bemg

unfit to

most

,.

I have

uve.

made

you

mad;
{SeeingAlonso, Sebastian, 6*^.,draw

their

swords.

And

even

with

such-like

hang and
[fellows
fools I I and my
elements,
[well
tempered,may as

valor,men

drown

Their proper selves. You


Are ministers of fate ; the
Of whom
your swords are
the loud winds, or
Wound

with bemock*d-at

stabs
Kill the still-closing
waters, as diminish
that's in my plume ; my fellowdowle
One
ministers

Are like invulnerable


swords
now
Your
are

if you
too

could

massy

hurt,
for your

And

strengths
will not be uplifted.But, remember

(For

that's my business

to

vou,) that you three

70

TEMPEST,

THE

70

Exposed

supplant good Prosper";


the sea, which hath recjuit
it^

unto

child

and his innocent


deed

Him

lii.

did

Milan

From

act

for which

foul

have
The powers, delaying,not forgetting,
and
the seas
Incens'd
shores,yea, all the

creatures.

Against your peace. Thee of thyson, Alonso,


They have bereft ; and do pronounce, by me,
Ling'ringperdition(worse than any death
Can be at once) shall step by step attend
and your ways ; whose
You
wraths to guard
from

you

(Which here, in
80

this most

desolate

else
isle,

falls

Upon

nothing but

is

heads)

your

heart's

sorrow

And

clear life ensuing.

vanishes

He

thunder

in

Shapesagain^ and
and

Pro,

then^to softmusic^ enter ih"

dance

with mocks

and

mowes^

tfietable.
carry
Bravely the figureof this
out

harpy hast
thou
[ing:
Perform'd, my Ariel ; a grace it had, devourOf my instruction hast thou nothing bated
In what thou hadst to say : so, with good life
And

observation

Their

And
In
90

meaner

ministers

kinds have
done : my
charms
work
these mine enemies
all knit up
are
several

their

distractions

power
And

strange,my

in these

they

now

are

in

high

my

fits I leave

them, while I visit

71

Ferdinand, (whom

Young
And

TEMPEST.

THE

III.

SC.

drowned )
his and my loved

they

darling.

{Exit Prosteko
V the

Gon,

In this strange
A Ion,

The

above,

something holy,sir,

the

?
monstrous

billows

spoke

! monstrous
told
and

I
me

it;
did

winds

That

stare

O, it is

Methought
The

from

stand you

why

of

of

name

is

suppose

of

; and

Prosper

the

thunder.
organ-pipe, pronounced
[pass.

me

dreadful

and

deep
name

singit to

; it did bass

my tres^
is bedded
; and
e'er plummet

i' the ooze


Therefore
my son
ril seek
him
deeper than
sounded
And
with him there lie mudded.
[Exit.
But one
fiend at a time,
Seb.
rU fighttheir legionso'er.
V\\ be thy second.
Ant.
[Exeunt

Gon,
Like
Now

Sebastian

and

All three of them


their great guilt.

are

Antonio.

desperate;

poison given to work a great time after,


'ginsto bite the spirits.I do beseech
"

you
of
are

That
And

hinder

May

now

Adr,

follow
supplerjoints,
them

from

provoke

them

what

this

them

swiftly,

ecstasy

to.

Follow, I pray you.


[Exeunt,
Digitized
liyV-jUOS?

It^

THE

7a

TEMPEST.

ACT
SCENE
Enter

iv.

ACT

IV.

h^Before Prospero'jCell.

Prospero,

|F

Ferdinand,
Prospers

I have

too

and

Miranda.

austerely punish'd

you,

Your

compensation makes

amends

fori
Have

given

you

here

thread

of mine

own

life.
that for which I live ; who
once
again
AH thy vexations
I tender to thy hand.
Were
but my trials of thy love,and thou
Hast
strangely stood the test: here, afore
Or

lo

Heaven,
this my rich gift. O Ferdinand,
I ratify
that I boast her off,
Do not smile at me
shalt find she will outstripall
thou
For

praise
And

make

it halt behind

I do believe it

Fer,

Against an
Frp,

her.

oracle.

Fairlyspoke :

sc.

TEMPEST,

THE

I.

own.

What,

talk with

and

Sit then

73

her;

is thine

she

"

Ariel;

industrious

my

servant.

Ariel!
Ariel.

Enter

What

Art,
I

Pro,
Did

would

my

? here

potent master

am.

and
Thou
last service

thy

worthilyperform ;

fellows

meaner

and

I must

your

you

use

another trick : go, bring the rabble.


whom
I give thee power, here to this

In such

O'er

place:
Incite them

And

quick motion

for I must

the eyes of this young couple


vanityof mine art ; it is my promise.
they expect it from me.

Bestow
Some

to

upon

?
Presently

Art,

with

Pro,

Ay,

Art,

Before

you

twink.
can

say Come

And breathe twice and cry So, so


Each one, trippingon his toe.
and mow
Will be here with mop
? no ?
Do you love me, master
Pro,

Dearly, my
approach

Till thou dost hear


Art,

and

GOy

delicate Ariel.

Do

not

3"
me

call.

Well, I concefve.
[Exit.

sc.

THE

I.

And
Where

75

thy sea-marge, steriland rocky hard,


thou thyself
o'
dost air : the queen
the sky,
watery arch and messenger

Whose

thee leave these

Bids

grace,
this
on

Here
To

TEMPEST,

in
grass-plot,

and

come

amain

sport:

I,

sovereign

this very place,


her
peacocks fly

rich Ceres, her to entertain.

Approach,

Enter

Cer,

with her

and

am

50

Hail,many

CERES.

color'd

messenger,

that

ne'er

disobeythe wife of Jupiter;


with
Who,
thy saffron wings,

Dost

upon
my
flowers
showers ; 60
Diflusest honey-drops,refreshing
with each end of thy blue ^ow dost
And
crown
.

My bosky
Rich

acres

scarf

to

and
my

unshrubb'd
proud earth :
my

"

down,

why

hath

thyqueen
d

Summon

me

hither,to this short-grass'd

green?
of true love to celebrate ;
Iris, A contract
And
donation
some
freelyto estate
On the bless'd lovers.
Tell me,

Or.
If Venus

or

her son,

as

thou

heavenlybow.
dost know,
DigifizecJbyV^OOQlC

TEMPEST,

THE

76
Do

attend the

now

queen

act

Since

they

iv.

did

plot
70

that dusky Dis my daughter got,


Her and her blind boy'sscandalM
company
I have forsworn.
Of her society
Iris.
Be not afraid ; I met her deity
Cuttingthe clouds towards Paphos ; and her

The

means

son

with

Dove-drawn
have

Some
Whose

her

here

thought they to

done
charm

wanton

that

are

vows

and maid.
bed-rightshall be

this

upon
no

man

paid
Hymen's

"

torch be lighted
Till
: but in vain ;
Mars's hot minion is return'd again;
Her waspish-headedson has broke his arrows,
but play with
Swears
he will shoot no
more,
'

sparrows,
be a boy rightout.

And

Cer,

Great

Juno

comes

High'st queen of state.


I know
her by her gait.

Enter

yun.

does

How

with

my

J UNO.
bounteous

And

honor'd

Go

[be

me

bless this twain, that

To

sister ?

they may

prosperous

in their issue.
SONG.

Jun, Honor, riches,


marriaee-blessing,
90

Long continuance,and increasing,


Hourly joysbe stillupon you !
on
Juno singsher blessini^s

^o".QQg,^

8C.

THE

I.

Cer. Earth's
Bams
Vines

TEMPEST.

77

foison plenty,
increase,
and gamers
never
empty ;
with clustering
bunches
;
growing

Plants with

goodly burden bowing ;

to you, at the farthest,


Spring come
In the very end of harvest I
Scarcityand want shall shun you \
Ceres' Uessingso is on you.

This is a most
majesticvision,and
Harmonious
charmingly: may I be bold
?
To think these spirits
which by mine art
Pro,
Spirits,
I have from their confines call'd to enact
My present fancies.
Let me
live here ever j
Fer.
father and a wife
So rare a wonder'd
this place Paradise.
Make
Fer,

QuNO

and

Ceres

whisper,and

send

Iris

'

loc

on

employment.
Sweet
Pro.
now, silence ;
Juno and Ceres whisper seriously
;
There's
something else to do : hush, and be

mute,
Or

else

spellis marr'd.
Iris, You
nymphs, call'd Naiads, of the
winding brooks,
harmless
With
and ever
your sedge crowns
looks,
and on this green
Leave
your crispchannels,
our

no

land
Answer

your

Come,

temperate

summons

celebrate
of true
contract

Juno does command


help
nymphs, and

love

7*

be

not

too

to

late.

Digitized
by

^^OOgle

THE

78

TEMPEST.

Enter

certain

act

iv.

Nymphs.

sun-bum'd
sicklemen, of August weary,
hither from the furrow
and be merry ;
Come
Make
holiday: your rye-straw hats put on,
And these fresh nymphs encounter
every one
You

In country

footing.

Enter

certain
Reapers, properlyhabited ; theyjoin
in a graceftU dance : towards
with the Nymphs
Prospero
the end whereof
starts
suddenly^ and

"

speaks; after which, to a strange, hollow^ and


confusednoise,theyheavilyvanish.
Pro,

I had
[aside.]

forgotthat

foul

con-

spiracy

I20

Of the beast

Caliban and his confederates


Against my life ; the minute of their plot
Is almost
Well
come.
[To the Spirits.]
done ; ^avoid ; no more.
Fer. This is strange ; your father's in some
"

"

passion
That

works

130

strongly.
Never

Mira.
Saw I him
Pro.

him

touched

You

do

with

look, my

anger

tillthis

distemper'd.

so

son, in

day

mov^d

sort.

As

if you

Our

These
ended.
our
actors,
I foretold you, were
all spiritsand

As
Are

dismay'd:

were

revels

melted

now

into

be cheerful,sir :

are

air,into thin air

And, like the baseless fabric of this vision.


The cloud-capp'dtowers, the gorgeous
ates.
palThe

solemn

temples,the great globe itself.

SC.

THE

I.

Yea,
And,

all which

Leave

not

TEMPEST.

79

it inherit,
shall dissolve ;
like this insubstantial pageant faded.
rack

behind.

We

such

are

stuff
As dreams are made on, and our littlelife
with a sleep. Sir,I am
Is rounded
vex'd ;
with
weakness
Bear
old brain is
; my
my
"

troubted

140

Be not disturb'd with my infirmity


:
If you be pleased,retire into my cell
there repose ; a turn or two
TJl walk,
And
To still my beatingmind.

Fer.^ Mir
Pro,

Come

with

"

We

Art.

Ariel.

Thy thoughtsI cleave


pleasure.''
Spirit,

must

prepare

you."

!
""/^r

Pro,

your peace.
\Exeunt,

I thank

thought !

Ariel,come

.^r/.

wish

We

a.

to meet

with

Ay, my commander;

What's

to.

thy

Caliban.

when

presented

Ceres,
I thought to have told thee of it ; but
Lest I might anger thee.
Pro.

Say again, where

didst

I fear'd

thou

150

leave

these varlets ?
Art.

I told you,

sir,they were

red-hot with

drinking:
So
For

For

full of valor that

they sm6te

the air

breathingin their faces ; beat the ground


kissingof their feet ; yet always bending

Towards

i6o

TEMPEST,

THE

8o

their

project.

act

Then

beat

iv.

my

[their
tabor,
ears,
At which, like unback'd
colts,they prick'd
lifted up their noses
their eyelids,
Advanced
As they smelt music ; so I charm'd their ears
lowing followed,
That, calf-like,
they my
[and thorns,
through
Toothed
briers,sharpfurzes,prickinggoss.
enter'd their frail shins

Which

last I left

at

them

pool beyondyour cell,


filthy-mantled
dancing up to the chms, that the foul

r the
There

lake
their feet.

O'erstunk

This

Pro.

done, my bird

Thy

shape invisible retain thou

The

trumpery in my

For

stale

to

Pro.
Nurture

catch these

Humanely
And,

devil,a born

can

still:

thieves.
I go, I go. \Exit,
devil,on whose nature

stick ; on
whom
my pains.
all
taken,all, lost,quite lost :
never

with age

as

house,go, bringit hither,

Aru
170

well

was

his

So his mind cankers


Even to roaring.

body ugliergrows,
: I will plague them

all,

"

Re-enter

Ariel, ioaden

with

6v.
glistering
apfarel^

Come, hang them


and

PROSPERO

Ariel

Hear

may

foot fall :

this line.

invisible. Enter
Trinculo, all wet.

remain

Caliban, Stephano, and


CaL
Pray you, tread
mole

on

that
softly,

the

blind

not
we

now

are

near

his cell.

sc.

THE

I.

TEMPEST

8i

which you say is a


Monster, your fairy,
harmless fairy,has done little better than
played the Jack with us.
Ste,

Trin,

CaL
Be

Thou
wert but a lost
Good my lord,give me

for
patient,

Shall

thy favor still:


prize I'llbring thee to

the

mischance

this

hoodwink

monster.

therefore

:
speak softly
Airs hush'd as midnight yet.
Trin.
Ay, but to lose our bottles in the
pool,
Ste, There is not onlydisgraceand dishonor
in that,nu"nster, but an infinite loss.
"

Trin. That's
yet this is

to me

more

than

my

igq

wetting:

your harmless

I will fetch off


for my labor.
o*er ears
Ste.

CaL
This

king, be quiet.

Pr'ythee,my
thou here.
is the mouth

monster.
fairy,
though
my bottle,

o' the cell

no

I be

See'st

noise,and

enter.

Do

that

goodmischief

which

may

make

this

island

Thine own
forever,and
For aye thy foot-licker.
Ste, Give me
thy hand

I, thy Caliban,
:

I do

bloody thoughts.
Trin. O king Stephano ! O

beginto

have
"oo

peer ! O

worthy

9C

THE

I.

TEMPEST,

83

bear this away where my hogshead of wine is,


I'll turn
or
you out of my kingdom : go to,
carry this.
this.
Trin, And
Ste. Ay, and this.
230
A

heard.
Enter
of Hunters
shape of hounds^ and hunt them

noise

settingthem

Ariel

ana

divers
about

in
Spirits,

Prospero

on.

Pro.

Hey, Mountain^ hey

Ari.

Silver

Pro,

Fury^ Fury

/ there

it goes.

Silver

there !

Tyrant^ there

hark, hark

/
I

[Caliban,Stephano,
driven

and

Trinculo

are

out.

Go, charge my gobhns that they grindtheir

joints
With

convulsions
dfry

With

ag^d

cramps

make

them

Than

pard or

cat

; shorten

; and

pinch-spotted

more

o' mountain.

Ari.
Pro.

up their sinews

Hark, they roar.


Let them

be hunted

At this

soundly.

hour
Lie at my mercy all mine enemies :
Shortlyshall all my labors end, and
Shalt have the air at freedom
; for
Follow,and do me service.

240

thou
a

little

\Exeuni.

by

84

THE

TEJ^PEST,

l.-^Beforethe

Enter Prospero

in his

r,

V.

ACT
SCENE

Acr

magic

Cell

of Vros^ro.

robes ; and

Ariel.

Prospero,
does my
My charms

HOW

project
gatherto

head

crack
not
spirits
; my
obey ; and Time
Goes
upright with his carriage.

How's
Ari,

the

day ?

the sixth hour

On

; at which

time,my

lord,
You

said

Pro,
When

should

work

our

cease.

I did say so,


first I raised

the

tempest.

Say,

my

spirit,
fares the

How

king and's

Aru
In the

They
His

as

left them ;
the lime-grovewhich
cell ;

Just as
In

fashion

same

you

cannot

followers ?
Confined

together
you gave in charge;
all prisoners,
sir.
weather-fends

your

[king.

budge till your

brother,and

release.
The
tracted
yours, abide all three dis-

And
the remainder
mourning over them.
Brimful
of sorrow
and dismay ; but.chiefly

Him

term'd,sir,The good
Gonzalos

that

you

old

lord,

sc.

His

TEMPEST,

THE.

I.

85

his beard, like winter's


drops
[works them
From
of reeds ; your charm
eaves
so strongly
beheld them, your affections
That, if you now
tender.
become
Would
Dost
thou think so, spirit?
Pro.
1 human.
Mine
Ari,
would, sir,were
And
mine
Pro,
shall.
Hast
thou, which art but air,a touch,a feeling
Of their afflictions ? and shall not myself,
of their kind, that relish all as sharply
One
Passion
as
they,be kindlier moved than thou
tears

down

run

20

[thequick,

art ?

I am
struck to
with their high wrongs
with my nobler reason
'gainstmy fury

Though

Yet
I take part
Do
virtue

In

than

the

in

rarer

is

action

vengeance

they being

penitent.
The
Not

My
And

doth
extend
purpose
Go, release them, Ariel ;
I'llrestore,
Til break, their senses

sole drift of my
further.
a frown
charms

30

they shall

Aru.
Pro,

Ye

be themselves.
rU fetch them, sir. IBxiu
of hillS)brooks, standing
elves

lakes,and groves ;
foot
And ye that on the Sands with printless
th" ebbing Neptune
and do flyhim
Do cnase
When

By

back : you demi-puppetsthat


-do the green
sour
ringlets

he comes
moonshine

make,
Whereof
^

the

'

ewe

not

[pastime-

bites ; and you, whose

that rejoice
Is to make^ midnight mushrooms;
To hear the "olcniiircurfew ; t"y^hose
^d
40

THE

86

(Weak
The

TEMPEST,

act

v.

have bedimm*d
cali'd forth the mutinous

though ye be) I

masters

noontide

sun,

winds,
the azur'd vault
thunder
Set roaringwar
: to the dread
rattling
I given fire,and rifted Jove's stout oak
Have
bolt : the strong-based
his own
With
promontory
'twixt the green

And

I made

shake
The
pine and cedar
their
Have
waked
forth
them
Have

^^

sea

and

[up
; and by the spurs pluck'd
: graves, at my
command.
sleepers; oped, and let

But this rough magic


my so potent art.
I here abjure : and, when
I have required
Some
I do)
now
heavenly music (which,even
To work mine end upon their senses
that
This airycharm
is for,I'll break my stafiE,
Bury it certain fathoms in the earth.
And, deeper than did ever plummet sound,
I'll drown
\SoUmn music
my book.

By

Re-enter Ariel

him^
after

Alonso,

with

frantic

gesture^ attended

and
by Gonzalo
; Sebastian
in
Antonio
like manner^
attended
by Adrian
and
Francisco
: they all
the circle which
enter
PROSPERO
hcul madcy and there stand
charmed
;
which
Prospero
observing^
speaks,

A solemn air and the best comforter


To an unsettled fancy cure
thy braina,
Now
useless,boU'd within thy skull J There
60

stand,
For

you

are

spell-stopp'd.

Holy Gonzalo, honorable


Mine

eyes"

even

sociable

man,
to

the show

of

th^^'fy

K^:3UO*^\SC

Digitized
iiy

SC.

Fall

An4

TEMPEST.

THE

I*

The

fellowlydrops.

"

apace
the

S^
charm

dissolveB

momiitg steals upon the night,


Melting the darkness, so their risingsenses
Begin to chase the ignorantfumes that mantle
Their
clearer reason.
O good Gonzalo,
sir
My true preserver, and a loyal
To him thou follow's.t,
I will pay thy graces
both in word and deed.
Home
Most
cruelly
Didst thou,Alonso, use me
and my daughter:
Thy brother was a furtherer in the act ;
Thou'rt
Flesh
pinch'dfor't now, Sebastian.
as

"

70

"

"

"

and

blood,

mine, that entertained ambition,


and nature
bastian,
Se; who, with
Expell'dremorse

You, brother

[strong.
Whose

inward
here' have

Would

pinches

therefore

kill'd your

king :

thee,

I do

give
for-

[standing

though

Unnatural

most

are

thou

art

!
"

Their

under-

Begins to swell ; and the approachingtide


Will shortlyfillthe reasonable shore,
[them
lies foul and muddy.
Not
of
That now
one
That
me
:
yet looks on me, or would know
Ariel,
the hat and rapierin my cell ;
Fetch
me
"

\Exit Ariel.
I

As
Thou

and

myself present
Milan
sometime
: quickly,
was
spirit
;
shalt ere long be free.

I will disease

Ariel

ArieL

me,

singingsand
re-enters^
Where
In

the bee

helpsto

there
sucks^

belli he;
cowslip's
^

attire ProsperOw

suck I ;
c^c^cAo

^
Digitizedby V^OOQIC

80

THE

8^

TEMPEST,

"'Tlierelooueh': wlMiiowUdocnr.
On the bat's back I do fly

-^

V"

V.

ACT

"

'i

After

suiiuner,,merrily.
merrily,shjfllI live now
Merfily,"
Under

Pro,

the blossom

that's my

Why,

that

hangs on the bough.

daintyAriel

I shall-

miss thee ;
sp.
:
shalt have freedom
But yet thou
so, so.
To the king'sship,invisible as thou art :
shalt thou find the mariners
There
asleep
the
and
the hatches; the master
Under

"

jx)

boatswain,
Being awake, enforce

them

to

this

place:

I pr'ythee.
presently,

And

,.

I drink the air before me,


e'er your pulse twice beat.

Ari.
Or

All

Gon.

and

\ExUs Ariel.

torment, trouble, wonder^ and

[us

amazement

3:0

return

Inhabits here : some


heavenlypower guide
Out of this fearful country !
Pro.
Behold, sir king"
The wronged duke of Milan, Prospero :
that a livingprince
For more
assurance
Does
now
speak to thee,I embrace thy body ;
I bid
and thy company,
And
to thee
A

heartywelcome.

\^'hether thou beest he or no.


trifleto abuse me,
enchanted
Or some
: thy pulse
As late I have been, I not know
of flesh and
Beats
blood; and, since I
as
A Ion.

saw.

thee.

affliction of my mind
held me
I fear,a madness

The

amends, with which"


:

this must

crstve

if tilis be at all)a most


I resign; and
dukedom

(An

Thy

strange story.

do entreat
wrongs.-^ But

pardon me
my
should Prosper"

Thou
Be

89

TEMPEST.

THE

I.

SC

how

^
"

livingand be here ?
Pro,
\toGoNZALO.] First,noble friend,

Let

thine

embrace

me

age j

whose

120

honor

cannot

Be

measured

or

confined.

Gon.
Or be not, Til not swear.
Pro,
subtilties o' th.e
Some

Whether

this be

do ret

You

isle,that

taste

will not

let

[all;

you

"

Welcome, my friends
\Aside to Seb. and Ant.] But you, my
I so mincied,
brace of lords,were
I here could pluck his highness'frown
upon

thingscertain.

Believe

"

you
And
justify
you traitors ; at this time
ril tell no tales.
Seb, {aside. The devil speaks in him.
'\

Now,

Pro.
For you, most
Would

Thy
My
Thou

wicked

rankest

dukedom

ther
call bro-

restore.

If thoubeest

Prospero,
of thy preservation :
us
particulars
thou hast met
us
here,who three hours

A Ion:

Give
How

to

infect my mouth, I do forgive


fault ; all of them ; and require
1 know
of thee,which, periforce,

even

must

sir,whom

SJ^lCe

'

'.

'

*'"

Digitizedby

V.30U^ It:'

130

SC

THE

I.

TEMPEST,

justledfrom

Been

That I
Which

was

know

your senses,

Prospero, and

am

91

thrust forth of Milan

this shore

For

; who

160
most

[was landed.
where

be the lord on't.

To

tain
cer-

that very duke

strangely
Upon

for

No

of

'tis a chronicle

wreck'd.

were

you

yet of this

more

day by day,

relation for a breakfast,nor


Befitting this first meeting. Welcome, sir ;
ants
This cell's my court : here have 1 few attendNot

My

abroad

subjectsnone

And

since you

dukedom

At

requiteyou with
least bring forth a

As

much

I will

as

The entrance

Mira,

me

as

given me again,
gocSa thing;

wonder
dukedom.

a.

I would

call it fair

content

ye

false.
dearest

love,

Seb,

Though

the

merciful :
I have cursed them

of

kingdoms

you

play.

A Ion,
A vision of the island,one
Shall 1 twice lose.
F^r,

to

for the world*

Yes, for a score


should wrangle,

Mir

And

have

lord,you play me
No, my

Sweet
not

you, look in.

pray

nand
of the Cell opens ^ and discovers Ferdiand
^iKK-anK
chess,
at
playing

Fer,

I would

my

most
seas

without

If this prove
dear

son

high miracle !
threaten,they are
cause.

[Ferdinand

Jkneels to ALONsa

^lo

TEMPEST,

THE

9J

Of

all the

Now

Alon*

80

ACT

v.

blessings

gladfather

thee about !
compass
Arise, and say how thoii cam'st here.
Mira,
O ! wonder!
How
there here !
are
many goodly creatures
beauteous
How
mankind
is ! O brave new
a

world,
That

has such
Pro,
Alon,

peoplein't 1
'Tis

to

new

thee.

is this maid, with whom


thou
wast
at play?
[hours;
Your
eld'st acquaintance cannot
be three
Is she the goddessthat hath severM
us,
What

brought us

And

thus

Fer.
190

But, by

immortal

I chose

her,when

For

advice, nor

Is

his

daughter to

Of whom

I could

not

thought I

this famous

Duke

him

to

one

she

of Milan,

me.

oddlywill it sound

ask my

child

hers:
that I
am

!
forgiveness
.

Pro,
There,
remembrance
Let us not burden our
A heaviness
that's gone.
Gon,
Or should

father

ask my

had

often I have heard renown,


I have
before ; of whom
saw
and second father
a second
life,

A Ion,
But O, how

200

Sir,she's mortal
Providence, she's mine ;

so

But never
Received
This lady makes

Must

together?

I have
have

spoke ere
you gods,
And on this coupledrop a

this.
"

sir,stop ;
with

inlywept,
Look
down,
'

blessed

crown

TEMPEST.

THE

I.

sc.

93

it is you that have chalk'd


Which
broughtus hithej I
For

A Ion,

I say,
Was

Gon.

Milan

forth the way


'

Amen,

thrust from

Gonzalo

Milan

that

his issue

Should

kingsof Naples ? O, rejoice

become

Beyond a common
joy ; and set
With
: in
gold on lastingpillars

it down
one

voyage

Claribel hfer husband find at Tunis ;


And
Ferdinand, her brother,found a wife
lost ; Prospero his
Where
he himself was
dukedom
ourselves
In a poor isle ; and all of us
Did

When

no

his

was

man

[hands:

own.

A Ion, [toFer. and Mir.] Give me


your
still embrace
Let griefand sorrow
his heart
That doth not wish you joy !
Gon.
Re-enter

Be't
with

Ariel,

the

Master

so

and

! Amen
Boatswain

amazedly following,
0
1

look, sir,look,sir

; here

is

prophesiedif a gallowswere

This

fellow

could

drown

not

of

more
on
:

us

land.
phemy,
blas-

now,

fon shore
That
Hast

swear'st grace
thou no mouth
?
news
Boats. The
best

Our

and
kin^,

o'erboard,not
by land ? What
news

We

firstput out

is the

is that we
the next, our

Which, but three glassessince,we


Is

an

found
[safely

company

split,"
tight and yare

1
oath

and

to sea.

have

ship,

gave

"

out

[when
bravelyrigg'd as

TEMPEST,

THE

94

I done

Have

V.

Sir,all this service

\a5ide,'\

Aru

ACT

I went.

since

!
spirit
My tricksy
Aloft, These are not natural events
; they
[you hither ?
strengthen
how
came
From
strange to stranger.-^Say,
IT I did
Boa^.
think,sir,I were well

[aside.]

Pro*

awake,

230

dead of sleep,
strive to tell you. We
were
And
not) all clapp'd under
"how, we know
Vd

noises
[several

hatches,
with

strange and
Of roaring,
chains.
howling,jingling
shriekihg,
of sounds,all horrible.
And more
diversity
but

Where

now

even

awaked ; straightway,
We
at liberty
:
were
Where
beheld
we, in all her trim,freshly

royal,
ship ; our master
good,and gallant
Caperingto eye her : on a trice,so pleaseyou.

Our

340

Even
And

in

divided from them


were
broughtmoping hither.
Art\ [aside.!
Was't well done ?
Pro.
Bravely,my diligence.Thou
shalt be free.
A /on. This is as strange a maze
e'er
as
a

dream,

were

we

[aside.]

trod :
there
is in

[nature

men

And
Was
Must

ever

conduct

our
rectify

this

of

business
more
oracle
some

knowledge.

Pro.
Do

than

Sir, my
infest your mind

with

liege.

beatingon
The
strangeness of this business : at pick'd
leisure,
[you
Which
shall be shortly,
singleTil resolve
not

TEMPEST,

THE

SCI.

{Which
These

95

of every
shall seem
probable)
happen'd accidents : till when, be

to you

[hither,
spirit
;

cheerful,

Come
^Aside^

think of each thingwell.


Set* Caliban and his companions free
Untie the spell.
{^ExitAriel.]" How
And

"

my
There

are

Re-^nter

Ste,

fares

gracioussir 1
yet missing of

few odd

Some

250

your company
lads that you remember

not.

Ariel, drivingin Caliban, Stephano, and


Trinculo, in their stolen Apparel.

Every

man

shift for all the rest, and


for himself ; for all is but

take care
let no man
coragio!
fortune.
Coragio,bully-monster,
260
Trin, If these be true spieswhich I Wear
in my head, here*s a goodly sight.
deed
inO Setebos, these be brave spirits,
CaL
"

fine my master
will chastise me.

How
He

Seb,
What
Will

thingsare
buy
money

is !

them

afraid

of them
like ; one
doubt, marketable.
badges of these men,

Very

plainfish,and, no

Pro,

am

Ha,ha1
these, my lord Antonio

Ant.
Is

Mark

but the

my lords,
This
Then
say if they be true.
one
His mother
a witch, and
was
That could control the moon, make

[knave,
mis-shapen
"

so

strong
flows and

ebbs,
And

deal in her command

without her power.


K_3UO*^ If

i^y
Digitized

270

9^

THE

These

TEMPEST,

have robb'd

three

devil
(For he-s a natural
To take my life: two
and

know

Must

Acknowledge

a^d this pernio

one) had

[them
plotted with

of these fellows

this

you

thing of

ness.!
dark-

mine.
I shall be

pinch'd to death.
this Stephano, my
drunken

CaL
Is not

Alon^
butler ?
aSo

me

own;

v.

act

He

Seb,

is drunk

A Ion, And

now

Trinculo

he wine ?
is reeling
ripe: where
:

where

had

should

[them ?
they
Find
this grand liquor that
hath
gilded
How
cam'st thou in Uiis pickle?
I have been in such a pickle since I
Ttin.
"

out ot
last,that,I fear me, will never
my liones: I shall not fear fly-blowing.
Seb, Why, how
Stephano ?
now,
not ; I am
not
Ste, O, touch me
Stephano

saw

you

but

Pro,
Ste,

cramp.
YouM

be king o' the


I should have been a

A Ion, This

is

as

look'don.

290
Pro,

He

is

sore

one,

then*

strange a thing as e'er I


{Pointingto Q,K\A%PM,
in
disproportion'd

as
y

isle,sirrah

his

ners
man-

shape. Go, sirrah,to my cell ;


Take
with you your companions ; as you look
To have my pardon, trim it handsomely.
after
C"?/.Ay, that \ will ; and 1*11be wise hereAs

in his

[ass
.

And

seek

for grace*

Wjhata

th^ice:doublc
VjUO*^

Digitized
liy

It!

sc.

TEMPEST.

THE

1.

97

for a god
take this drunkard
And worship this dull fool.
Go to ; away I
Pro.
bestow
Alon.
Hence, and
luggage
}Our
found
where
it.
yoii
Seb, Or stole it rather,

Was

to

\Exeunt Caliban, Stephano,

300

and

Trinculo.

Sir, I invite your highness and

Pro.

your

[rest

train
poor cell : where
you
tnis one
night; which

To

my

For

shall take

your
(part of it) I'll

[make

waste

it

I not doubt, shall


Go quick away : the story of my life,
accidents gone by.
And the particular
Since I came
to this isle : and in the morn
With

ni

such

discourse

bring you

to

as,

ship

your

and

Naples,
nuptial
so

to

the
I,have hope to see
Of these our dear-belov^d
solemnized ;
And
thence retire me
to my
Milan, where
Every third thought shall be my grave.
Where

Alon.
To

hear

Take

the

the story of your

life,which

310

long

must

strangely.

ear

I'lldeliver

Pf-o.
And

all;
auspiciousgale^,
promise you Calm s":.as,
that
sail so expeditious
shall catch

Your

royalfleetfar

And

off.
"

"l

{Aside. My

Ariel ;
"

chick,
"

That is thy charge ; then


Be
free, and fare thou
draw near.

to the elements

well !
"

Please

you

\Exeun*-

NOTES.

uRUBUy

Npnnanii'rvmhj
Cogfl

Or.

without

itJ^B

In iiietiLlotied

dSrt

WeU

TnMuM

and

Thus

we

This

driving

was

Good

5.

here

on

Cheerly

for

to

It

lee-shore.
*

all

wo

in Mrs.

Browning
; and
aiigerly
fellowly^traitorlyy
Truuteriy, aud
of

From

Tare, read^ t
initial guttural into
as

in

'The

said

into

young.

daeg, day.
time
to

the

7. Aoom

of

thff

WeU

aa

word

the
'

cheer

Be

of

was

good

because

hut*

ooun^

cheer.'
the

ship
really
fellow.
f arely, handily.
S.
;

Good

Shakespeare and
In Shakespeare
wondei^ly,
The
ruption
ly is a corkvnyerly.
find

in

like.

o.

yvng

thi"ii^rajn^

houtewtfe and

is

Co.

right.*

cA,0erify.So

of

Tost.

New
refer

caunot
a

means

the

in

y.

N'tps

Tamfng

ttvU^nd*

Gf.

bo^n,
Botttnrain, pronounced
(Auwcy).
gif; whence
The
earliest
Cheer.
meaning
2.
So

P.

1.

z.

3. Good.

FIRST.
Scene

terumce.

Fr.

(UmiiiQ'

GL

In

Nf^w

"

K-

SoriefL,

ttif*

WcU
AU't
U^roiUs.

na

Ctormjui
G-^

"

c^ompaixi;

M"IJ(li;Johii'j^,

CnMfda

ACT

find

Dim.

ColHia^'a

used.

iShr^jp;

rA*

Lj-tlus

S.

Prof
been

httvfl
au

C(i.

and

E^

(-= KotfltHb";

Gernuiu
iJit*

K.

In

(- conferj,

Cf

Gfl are

append

name

pti^yHp flhurL

Shrew

Loiv

""Hlgh

a"r,

school

our

tirevlc^

oagimt"ti
B^rU^y;

-^

Ln

"

Press

Ctar"itc]on
of

Gcr.

H.

SogUflli;

Old

Caught

; L.

Slffii Gifrmanj

tlve;

".

Oi

ABBBETUTIOJfe."

ttbeO"nin^"

invites

The
lend
you

storm.
=

is very
common
final guttural

sea-room.

The

0. E. gearo.

; go;

attend.

your

also

change of An
in
Cf.
English.
changes intojr/

Cf. Hamlet,
tend.'
servants

I. iii. ":

^Blowl

NOTES

100

p. Flay the

So

men.

phrases:
tJie'painter (Sonnet
played

mine eye hath


etc.
watchman
; play the sheep,
end; in line; at
Cf. the phrases: On
has at door,to wars, in presence,
at heart.
at mouth, and
II. vii.),
Jjike

cabin.
And
Shakespeare

i6. To
nose

on

the

Shakespearehas

Play the tyrants;


xxiv. 1) ; play the
hand.

[act I.

TO

{As

It,

You

See Abbott, sect. 90.


bjxndle. The
only instance of the word
=
Hana
2o.
in Shakespeare.'
with this s^se
=
happen. "t Hamlet, I. iiv 249 :
.

23.

Hap

"

And
Oive

else

whatsoever
iC an

but
understandJUjig,

no

tongue

the word

as

often

more
Shakespeare

shal^hap to-night,

uses

'

noun.

or
natural disposition.
character
Uomplezioii,
to be hanged can ne\er
l"om
is
that
Perfect gallowi. He

26.

be drowned.*
28. Little advantage ==

'

heard.

use.
li^t^o
square-sail.

main
office = so loud that onr
our
CI. P. S.
the storm.
^Weatl^er,

31. MaixMMmrse
32. Louder than
not

is of

has'
38.Koise-maJker. Shakespleare

several

cattser,
justicer,
this: Sworder,pulpiter,m,oraler,
'
'-^

orders

like

n6anb

and

are

pauser

/T

It. hi.117).
'Macbeth,
either io^atTMec^rotMi*
This may mean
40. For drowning.
or as regards drowning.
inff
'To lay a ship a-hold is to
Steoven^'sars,
43. A-hold.
she can, in order to
bringher to lie as near to the wind as
^Iwo
sea.'
clear of tl^eland,and
get her out
and the fore-sail.
courses, the main-sail

keep

50.

to

III. vii :
Merely,utterlyor absolutely.Cf. Antony,
It. ii. ' The

lost ; ' and Othello,


merelv
T^he horse were
mere
perditionof the Turkish fleet.'
*

wide.
the mouth
51. Wide-chapp'd, opening
time ior jaws.
usual word in

Chaps was

Shakespeare^

52. The washing


54. Olnt,swallow

while ten
up.

tides ebb and flow.

^t"^
the will of the Powers.
^I'ingi
61. The wills =
S.
P.
erica.
CI.
of
and heather denote different varieties
are
All the directions in seamanship in the above scene

SC.

II.]

TH"

TEMPEST,

IWr

iiaid by thejbeft nautUj^dauthoritiesto be

p^rfec^lj
"y)rrect

Sebastian,in tni^ 6c^ne,and


to the boatswain, should
b^remarked. It
their after-proceedings.At the point in the
all is lost,and the t^icagical
iiiteres,V.^et^
in,

The conduct
their behavior

aud

of Antonio

is

key

to

where

acene

Shakespeare uses

2.

4.

In thii

bjajik verse.
.

,',*

,;

for

roaring.
0,
E. "?oZcc",.
cjou^;.^;Ger.-wo^il^Ti,
sky^..
Welkin,
roar

"

,,

clouds.
-

."

stillfind it in tl^epoetryof
also has iireoJas
a
lable.
dissyl-

Fire,a dissvUable,as we,


Arnold. Tennyson
Matthew
5.

'.

"

'

"

,.,,,/.

..

8i;)ll..used
Brave, fine looking. 3o we find l^rdy
1)1H.
'
t.
ii.*'4j36,
An4
Ger., and hroM in N. E. (or Scotch')^ Se^
his
the
in
hfia
Fuller,
Holy State,
^Qnteuoe^ I'His clothed
neither bnkve nor
bare but cpuiply.'
'.
were
.^^
^=
The shipJ9 thought pf.-asa person..
7. Who.
.'
Qod"rfbower
la
s=.powfirfulfiQd.,
Ji ""
';j,.
i
that made the u^ig^^. Sq ShaJ|^q^p"Bar
13. Fraag]mn|t,
hsji fraught andfiaughtage,
but jxevcr /i'4i^i
; mi/fa^ghC'
collect
"d for /o^fTi."
^--Oolleoted,
togeth^^ jour scattered
d

'

.,,

'

and

aflfrighted
spirits.
horror,
Amaaement,^
14.

Ghost
inental

in Hamlet

look

the
So

112) caUs"Jiis,attentio;L
tp ibhe

mother

'

!^r^

in

thy mother

I Bmasemeutoti

!
Sir W.

day

the

In such
Scott

'

v-

But

15. Woe
worth

of hi"

agony
'

dative.

(III.iv.

dee, alsb Y* i- 104, ^nd

slts.^

"

phrases,tfie dayU in the


Ihtr chase,woe
worth
Woe

the

is the imperative,
from
day !.'.
(where wwth
to become].
treo9*/Aait,
""*':'
adverb
2a
Pnll,an
very.'
with.'
So WicliffS tranpl^tfis
Meddle
mil
22.
with"
M^\,'
thew, xxvii 34, *wyn medlid" with gall.'
25. Lie there, my art. So Fuller [Holy Stat^;i".6)"says
he put oflfhis gown
that Lord Burleigh,when
at night,
lie
Treasurer.'
there,I^rd
nsedtogay,
r
th^ virtue it8el"'
The
Yirtoe
27.
very
'

"

'

"

'

lOa

NOTES

Perdition,in its literal ^ense


I lose.) See HamUt, Y, IL
jperdOf
in you.'
Buffers no perdition
3a

31. Betid for hetided.


refer
3a. Cry and nnk
35.

[act

TO
of Iau.
117: 'His

to
respectively

BootleM,profitless. From
also better and beat,
etc

the

to boot ; as
or

creaturt

same

I.

Lat.
deiincment

(From

and

Bonrce

vesteL
comes

search.
^InqnUdtioii,

guess.
41. Out
44.

fully or completely.
Shakespeare often uses ke^ in the sense of
Kept
convex
keep;
stayyas in the phrases when earth-delving
=

live or
he keepsin the
with.
45.

coldJUcd,etc.
I
and

Aasuranoe, something

46. Warrants,

ErrorsjLi:*

supports

construes

can

he

iMspalso

quitesure

confirms.

Cf.

with

of.

Comedyof

Could

Bemembranoe

Backward,
we
ii.,
have,
^

.y

also used

He

all my
travels warrant
me
they live.*
is the nominative.
In Metuure,
adverb
used as a noun.
an
inward
is
*I was
of hia.' 0%tward
an

in Sonnet cxxv.
2.
Abymn for aJbytg.
Abysm is the fonn always found in Shakespeare.
speare.
ShakeA very usual phrase with
56. Piece of virtue.
Thus he has, A pieceof st%vdy
; that pieceof song;
a piece
; O ruined
of knavery; a pieceof excellent witcficraft
A sample,or peretc.
{King Lear, IV. vi.),
fect
puce of nature
P.
"1.
S.
specimen.
usual
The heavens ! It is not un59* Jsnied, descended.
mth
to placethe before a word used in
Shakespeare
exclamation
Thus we
vocative
or in toe
find,O the
case.
fatherI how he holds his countenance
{Henry IV., Part I.,
II. iv.)
60. Had we. did we experience
with.
or meet
C"
8: * Heave
Chorus
62. Heav'd thence.
ffentyV., V. '
him
Henry VI. ,
away
upon
your winged tnoughts ; and
*
from hence.*
Pari JLy".L: To heave the traitor Somerset
63. Help,helped.Short for hoipen. Cf holden. stillused
for hold. Shakespeare uses
times; and
holp nineteen
as

a noun

helped only six times.


Cf. 'My face
04. Teen, sorrow.

is full of

shame, my

heart of teen.'
I

ii.l

sc.

THE

pleasedto

Dest

69. To him
Thus

Bpeare.
70.

fiixamany

We

ment.

put

oe

Cf. King
such a deed.'

from

put

Impose

"

to him
^intrusted)

similar

Kanage, always

John,^IV. i.: \

Arom.

65. From, quite gone


am

103

TEMPEST,

mo

used

the

manage-

of ideas in

inversions
to what
penance

Shf^ecan

you

by Shakespeare for

vent.*
in-

ment.
manage-

subject states of Northern Italy. They


Signiorief,
owed
feudal obedience to the Holy Roman
Empire.
of
the
other
dukes, who
Prime,
precedence
taking
73
ruled also over
dukedoms
or signiories. The
^ukedoms of
in
of
abolished
remnants
Parma, Modena, etc.,
18^, were
71

these.
'

critic writes, This


American
An
Thy fUie vnela
and the followingspeech of Prosperoare
of
a network
and
is dropped,
anacoloutha.
The
subject.My orothei'y
taken
he
before
and
whom,
finally
up again as
in^a^ uncte^
its verb (but only after another
is reached in
interruption)
A parenthesisbegins with as at thai time ;
a-eatbd
new
but it cease"
to be treated as a parenthesis,
and eddies into
the main
of
current
expressionat Those beingall my study.*
This hesitation
and involution
in Pro8pero*s talk arises
77.

fh"m

the

making
which

fact that he is bent on an impossibility


that of
Miranda
his past history,
understand
the crisis m
"

comparable to nothing in her experience.


fullyinstructed.
79. Perfected,
81. Traih (a metaphorfi-om hunting),tc restrain a dog
by a trash, or strap,tastened to his neck.
Over-topping,
running in iVontof the other dogs.
82. Or
either.
It must
not be forgottenthat or is a
contraction
of other^which is the Northern
form of either.
83. Key for tuning musical instruments.
"-- it. And
of
also find in Shakespearethe
87. On't
we
phrases: Many thousand on^s ; the mastei'-cot-d on^s heart;
"it very root on"s heart ; the lands he stood seized on ; two on^s
IS

-^

daughters; the rest on '* body ; and others.


89. All,entirely. This is probablythe meaning ii^dUme
^= aZl or quite07^).
^ the primaxy
90. doeeneii, solitude,retirements

104

NOTES

of the

sense

which

word,

[acti;

TO

from

comes

Lat.

the

cla.vjd9irt

clavM; and a6
first-hand,
Hence,
close- (the noun),
second-hand,through Fr., close^closet^
etc.
cloigter,
except for -the fact that.
91. Btit by =
popularity,
surpassed in value all mere
92. 0*er-priz*d,
Lat.
l-t"THk.
From
estimation.
reor
^Rate,
(rtetu*),
in
awoke
never
Shakespeare. He also uses
93. Awak'd,
to shut

{clxmi nm):

at

waked, and

woke.

iLeYer

Like

94.

."-

good parent. An
sons
01 a good man

allusion

idea that the


inferior to himself.
this word
occurs.
Bible there is but
not

the

use

or

few instances

of the

95. Its,one

of

There

Milton,

one.

in*
wh6

saunz,

it,and
100.

"

common

gehius are

Shakespearewhere
of the

version

our

died' in

1674,

has,

and

doea

fable;

taste,sans
Unto truth.

in

English in the forma


rather fond of
Shakespeare seems

sauntz.

Sans

came
preposition'

sans

sans
teeth,

question;" sans

made
^-^tdfifsdb^
everything'."

sans

But

of

word:

This French
97. Sans, without.
with the Norman, and is found
in
saun,

the

to
man

In

ten.

are

'"

The^e

words

are

lord

acy"^c^^^

an

eyes,

of.

sinner

the it refers to lie.

To credit

102.

as

to credit.

being my substitute.
103. Subititatioii =
face,performing the official
104. Executing the outward
duties.
better -tlian Lord
Executing a face is not much
Chatham's,
this

'

wiU

embark

now

upon

the/catore^n which

questioh mainlyhinges.*

108. Needs

'

of necessitv.
The lise of the name
hot MiWn.)
(if/Zaa,
109. Milan.
both in
of the place for the whole
title is very common

England

and

Scotland.

'

'

'

Dry, thirsty.Still

112.

partsof tiie

used

in

this

in

sense'

many

'

countiy.

he
the conditions or contract
Condition,
with Naples.
^The event, the issue.
anything but, otherwise thaAi.
119. But =
117.

had to make
'

"

123. In Heu

0* the

premiMi,in

imt'ofthC't^nditions.

"

return

for the
.?."

.o'

canryinfe

sc.

il:]

THE

105

TEMPEST,

Fated, fixed by

fate for the purpose.


So we
of ni^ht.
of darjmeas.
dead
say
130. Dead
Shakespearehas also "n iin drtadfaldead of dark midnighty
where
dead has an adjectiveadded to it.
is
instruments.
or
131. Miniftcers,servants
^Minister
is
from
from Lat. Tmmts.
less ; as magisler
magis,more.)
Dr.
Schmidt, ' which
134. Hint, subject (*that,' says
gives both matter and motive ').
business.
136. Present bnsineas,immediate
of thB word, not
T38. Impertinent, in the literal sense
129.

not pertsdning
or
relatingto anything
pertiiie)iL

Our

to talk aoout.

word for this now


asked.
A
very

Demanded,
word, in Shakespeare.
130.

Wench,

have

we

iBirreUvanL
of

use

common

of

term

the

iarity.
kindly famil-

Painted, disguised.

143.

144. In few

in brief.
had
form, which
152. Chernbin, the French
time.
the language since Chaucer's
(The form
plural of chei-ub.)
properlythe Hebrew

words,

existed in
c/iemOimiB

With, filled with, possessed with.


Mr.
Aldis Wright gives the
155. Decked, covered.
the word
with
and connects
the Icelandic
meaning sprinkled,
In Yorkshire, dag means
a
deiffh,
damp or wet.
the grass.
Dr. Schmidt, on
the
on
drizzlingrain or aew
floods
other hand, says that
ed
to speak of
as
being increasis
with
speare
Shaketears
too
an
by
hyperbole
frequent
(Dedk is the English form of the H. Ger. dechm,
154. Infnsbd

'

CO

cover.

in H.

Ger.

doublet

of

D"u;h.

The

as

deck

teg 01 tec, in tego, tectum;


Lat.
etc.
From
delect,detective,

thatch, which
word

same

as

Eng.

is

and

appears

appears
in

Latin

the

derivattves
are
Fr.
taUe
tegvUacomes
;

tiUX

156 Which.

The

antecedent

is to be

found

in

Thou

didst smile.
which
bore up
157. An nndeirgoingitomach, a courage
is used by Shakespeare in 'the
against trouble, stomach
*enpe
gaiixx.
Stomach

of

inclination,
anger,

Cf. JTafnlet,
I. i. 100':

stubborn
"

Some

ccnirape, and
-l^at
enterprise

arro-

hath

in 't.'

DigitizedliyV^:iUOy

It!

a
-

II.]

sc.

107

TEMPEST,

THE
.

913.
217.

standingon end.
Up-ftaring,
Sustaining,keeping them up"
fresher

318. But

but

thoj

part of the

chantment.
en-

fresher.

are

OdcL unnoticed or lonely.


232.
333. Li tnis sad knot, folded thus.
338. Still-vex*
d,constantlyharassed. The best example
stili is to be found in
of Shakespeare's use of the word
Mtrck(mt\ i. 136,where Antonio says to Bassanio:
"

And, If it stand,
Within

the

eye

as you
of honor.

yoiinelf still do,


*

(The word is wrongly supBennoeihet, the Bermudas.


posed
called after tlie
to be a plural; tor the islands were
told
discoverer
we
are
Benmulez.) In Stowe's Annals
the
at
that 'Sir George Sommors, sitting
stem, seeing the
ship desperate of relief^
lookingcTory miuute when the
ship would sink,espied land which, according to his and
Captain Newport's opinion,they jud|^dit should be that
islands
dreadful coast of the Bermoodes, which
and
to be enchanted
nations said and supposed
and devils which
with witches
grew by reason

of all

were

inhabited
of

tomed
accus-

thunder-storm
and tempest near
unto
those islands ; also for that tne whole coast is so wondrous
dangerous of rocks, that few can approachthem but with
unspeakablehazard of shipwreck.'
monstrous

to put in a place ;
(Literally,
239. Stow'd = bestowed.
Middle
verb from
a
place" A. 8. xtowya
Eng. stoias,
from base "to,rootsta^to stand (Ske^t) ; and we
of places, as Stowe,mshopsiowen
nd it in many
names

Slace;

Walthanwtowef Chepstow.)
WhoforwA^wi.
23a
333. Flote,flood or

Jlow,etc.
Float; ifeet;
=
Graat
royal,used in
336.
339. Two
turns

in

fflanes

of the

John

Knox's

in
pulpit

the hour-glasswhich

the technical

two
hour-glasses),

(
hour-glass. See
=

cognates of the word

The

sea.

V.

224,

St. Andrews

regulatedthe

three

official

sense.

hours, or two
glasses since

still be
preaching. If the
may

by

are.

seen
con-

'

108

NOTES

TO

[aCT T;

well pleasedwith the first hour's sermon,


gregationwere
they*woiild call out, 'Give us aoother glass.'
'

Still fouud in this sense


itithe wofd
Pains,work.
to take
painsUihing. Shakespeare has both the 'J)hi"a8e8,
and
to takepain^. The
pain,
phrase to ffivB
paihihas now
fallen out of the language.
i
242. Eemember, remind.
243. Moody^discontented,peevish on".
Shakespeare has not the noim mistake.
247. MiHtainngg.
248. Grudge,complaint. {Giowl "ml arunt axe said to
."'
be relatives of (jrnW^e.)
of the sea.
at the bottom
252. Ooze,mud
the more
usual meahing in.
57. Envy, malice or hate"
Shakespeare.
the old form of Algiers.
2^9; Ar"fier,
to be used by Shakespeare
27^.Grand nests. Grand seems
in much
the same
way as he employs great. See
note on
from 0. E.7ta",
line 236.
command,
for
^HeSts,
behests. ('The final t is properlyexcrescent, as in whils-t^
ogaiTist,
Skeat.)
amongs-t, amids-t.^"VROFE^sov,
for
275. ITnmitigable (implacable)
inmitigahU. So
has
which
inckaritahle,
Shakespeare
infortunate,
incei-tain,
are
right;in, being the Latin negative,and un the English.
obedient.
296. Correspondent,
drowsiness.
uses
307. Heaviness,
heavyin
Shakespeare
the same
and
has
the
be
woe
phrases: Tfio%igh
heavt/.'
sense,
it
seldom
the
dew
sUeps; heavy sleep;
honey-heavy
of
yet
241.

"

slumber.
311.
314.

"

Miss, be" without.


Earui.
Shakespeare frequentlyuses

denote

dulness.
grossness
318. Quaint, with fine invention

the

Word

to
"

'

or

and taste.

321. Wicked, hurtful.


winds
An old writer says, ' Southetn
323. South-west
fall into
men
corrupt and destroy; they heat and maketh

richness.'
326. Pen.

d is
elves.
inorganic), ^urchins,
hobgdblins: or mischievous
is
'the
The
in
it
still
primar}'meaning was
hedgehog,as
North
of B"Mi5land.

Cogs.: Pin, pinfold;poimd (where the

SC.

II.]

TEMPEST.

THE

10^

Vastofniffht,desolate part of night, d. P.S.


with berries in*t. Some critics have conjectured
334 Water
this to be a descriptionof coffee, news
t)f which
to England in Shakespeaie's
was
time.
beginuintfto come
Chanabers's
Dr.
JBoo/fcof Dam,
See
i. 170.
and propeities.
dualitiee,cai)acitie8
337
in
as
a
Sty, pen,
342
sty. The only instance of the
word
used as a verb in Shakespeare.
01 or
343. Whiles, the genitive of 0. E. hwil, time
the
WIdlea
time.
is found in Shakespeare eighteen
during
327.

"

times.
to.
348. Capable O^ impressionable
*

Preaching
351. Know

His form
and
to stones, would

thine

cause

make

meaning,

own

Gt

Hamlet, III. iv.

coiijoined,
capable.^

them

know

huw
CI. P.

to

attach

S..
meaning to the sounds thou didst ut^"r.
353. Kace, inherited dispositioii.
356. Confined into. Cf. line 276.
359. Bed
plague.Shakespeare has alsb the phrases;
A red murrain
The
physiciansof the
; the red j^stilence.
time mention
sore^the
three different kinds of thfe plagu"6
^fiidyou. dc^fepatch
red the j-ellow,
and the b1"ick
you.
in the
is still used
360. Learning, teaching. Learn
Learn
in this sense
has g:t^er^lly
North in this sense.
in
Accueative
thanhdouble
Xcaru
noble
:
me
Shakespeare a
learned
learn
him
me
Jiow to mak^
forbearance
falnm;
;

perfumes,etc.
361. Tnou

'rt best

it

were

best

for

thee.

In ces
sentenseat, there

like He gave me
me
a
a
book; They ojf'ej^ed
is a dative object as well as an
accusative
(or objective).
But in turiiing
them
from the active into the passiveform,
in seizing;
the tirst
on
grammatical carelessness was shown
or dative
objectto be turned into the nominative, instead
of the accus
tive or true
object. Thus, we had I ivat
and
Iwafi offef^a seat, instead of A book was
given a book,
This absurdityreaches
in
its culmination
shmion over
the house.
Iwa4
362. Malice for malicious creature.
Shakespeare is veiy
fond of using the abstract term for the concrete.

givenme,

etc.

110

NOTES

Fact

TO

Old is often used by Shakespeare as


Thus
find Ola ahusim of God^t
we
epithet.

364. Old oraxupt.

intensive
patienceand the Hncfa English; old aweai'ing
(Merchant,
lY.
ii. 15). A Shakespearian critic says, ^ Old, from
that
to mean
meaning trAa^ one has knovyn of old,has come
which
is most
remarkable
extreme
in one's experience;
or
old-fashioned winter is one
that comes
as an
up to one's
of
winter.'
idea
a severe
strongest
SeteboB,
a
god of the Patagonians. * They say that
368.
when
die,there appear ten or twelve devils
any of them
and dancing about the oody of the dead, and seem
leaping
to have their bodies paintedwith divers colors,and that
is one
them
seen
among
biggerthan the residue, who
maketh
great mirth and rejoicing.This great devil they
call Setebos.'
Eden's
Historyof TravayU,

an

"

Featly, nimblv, cleverly. Cf tTwiter'*Tale lY.


She dances featn^.' Shakespeare has also the adjective
and the verb.
Tnus
had
Never
master
we
find,
apa^jfe

374

iv.
so

hind^ofeat.
bear, the burden, or chorus,of

burden
375. The
Co. S.
music.

384. Waiti npoUt is In attendance on.


Christ's
388. FasBlon,suffering.Cf the phrase,
tmd

cross

passion.

393

Fnll.

says this song is


400

the
DittjTt

402

Owes,
in

highly
*

alliterative line.

of the water, watery.*


words
From
of a song.

semember.

dictate.
word

the

Lat

dictat%to

commemorate.

This

owns.

Charles Lamb

is

common

very

use

of the.

Shakespeare.

403. Advance,

liftup.

And

we

also find in

Shakespeare

To
phrases:

advance
a
hand; advance his bleeding
the
etc.
colon's,
swora;
handsome
fellow. The root of the word
408. Gallant,
to be found in gala.
fleems
somewhat.
but that." ^lomethiiu:=
Used
409. Bnt =
also
in
i.
adverbially
Merchant,I. J20:"

the

advance

'
,^

Bf

I have

disabled

lomethliig showing

more

mine

estate

swelling port.*

by

8C.li.]

THE

TEMPEST.

Ill

And
6lMriceawae
siso ases ndthing with the
tion. Thus in Merchant I. i. 161,we have :"
'

To

Cato's

same

ftmo-

NothlBf HntfennaiMd

daoghter, Bmtus^

Portia.'

Pdlowi, companions. Shakespearefirequentlj


uses
in
the
companion
contemptuons sense, just as we use/;/411.

Uw.

Tine, subtle,
capable. It may be noticed that
is the ^thet almost constantlj
apphed to Ariel.
416. Host rare, tlie godde". Cl.0! dea cerU of
415.

JEneidA.
420.
427.

this
the

828.

sense
as in line 7'Z,
rrime, chief" used in the same
A singlething. Shakespeare freouentlT uses
the

word

Thus
with a contemptuous sense.
he has the
single
chin
wit
phrases: Your
dovhle^your
single.
t^e
is called ahio*
line
brother
in
109,
409. Kaples; as

lute MiUm,

Twain,

cut

down

from

0. E. twegen.

(So

the

guthail^nail,etc.)
exchange.
43a C3iange=
438. Bone jonnelf wrong, are mistaken, put yourself
433.

becomes
turaT^

in

i also iu

Mse
position.
Eiuier^s
each other's.
=
445.
evil (illbeinga contraction of evil. Cf. e^en
452. HI =
for even).
Can dwelL
Supply that.
are
458. Freah-brook
moMels, which
quite without
flavor.
a

46a Entertainment, treatment


of gentleblood,
high-bom and high-spirited,
463. Ctontle,
timorous.
therefore no coward.
^Fearfoli
ana
Capable
of causingfear.
Co. S.
464. H7 foot,in the absolute case (saidprobably with a
geeture).The lowest subjectI have daring to lecture me.
466. ward, guard,or positionof defence.

475. The most

of men.

Shakespeare also
usage

would

479. Aervet,

einews.

uses

An idiom stillin use in Scotland.


thehefore comparatives,where
em
mod-

requireit.
the prii^arysense

not

in

of the

Lat

nervi,

11^

NOTES-

[ACT .II.

TO.

481. Spirits* bound up. An aUusIoU'


of utter helplessness
so often felt in dreams.
.

SECOm).

ACT

tj^

to

"

sense

.
,

Scene

1.

""

=^
merchantman,
5. Merchant
Tell
he begins to count.
count
=
speare:
Shake15.
; and
has the phrases
a hundt'ed;the iron Omgue of
: TtU
line 67 :-^
midnight/tath told twelve. So Milton, L^AlUffiH),
*

And
ehepherd:
every
Under
the hawthorn

sheep)
teii"T3iBtalei'f
In the

dale.'

Lat. dolor.

Dollar w,
the
on
"^ith dell,dale^
other hand, an Englishword, connected
from
etc.
it
to
comes
us
Histoi-ically,
Germany, from the
of Joachim
mia.
in Bohesilver-works in the Tfial or Talley
Whaler in H. Ger became
dollar in Low
Ger.
dativd
of
Truer ;?= more
E.
adverb was the
Th^ 0.
trul^*.
The sense
the adjective,
flection
of this inas bnghtS for hi-ightti/^"
the s^nse of all inflections
was
lost,as gradually'

Dolor, grief,from

19

Jost; and the letterc.drpppedoff.

WAS

In
Sjiendthrift.

23

what
=
thrift
^o.
Coc^rel,

this compoundsj|2t3"7wfis'a
Verb,and
has been saved by thHft.
/
.

n double

"from
ji)tcif^"/,-

dimihutiye; like

wftger.
laugh X^sX piyst^tie
of the
instance
The
only
40. Temperance,temperature'.
word
with this sense
in Shakespeare,
name.
as a ^^qinan's
A9s Temperance, in this line taken
Like FaithyHope, Charitj},
^uth, etc.
of
50. Lush, full
sap.
of
5a. Eye
green, a slighttinge of ^een.
only the whole thing.
53. Kot much
57. Vouched, well guaranteed.
should now
say gloss.
59 Glosses. We
Ha I Jia! iia! The

35

.,

,^.

=-

"

"'

for their queeti. An fdidm which


still rehave lost in England, but wrhicb the Germans
tain.
father.'
have Abraham
Cf. Matt. iii.9 : ' We
to. our
about
that
Of
76.
that,

69 To their
we

queen,

"V..

I.]

THE

78. Tunis- was

TEMPEST.

Carthage.

\U

Thia is

mistake.
Tunis is
about four miles firom the ruins of the ancient Carthage.
If Gonzalo's
word
make
81. His word
is more.
can
cities
these
into one^ it has more
than
two
the
power
of
miraculous
which
the
walls
raised
of
Amphion,
harp
Thebes.'
98. That sort = that phrase in a sort.
of my sense, the inclination and t'eeiThe stomach
101.
of
better
reason.
^'ni? my
Cf. Much
Oar'd himself.
Ado. III. i. :
112,
a

"

'

115: As
not

The
Cut
=

donbt.

See T. 1. 38.

plcasant'st angling is to see the fl6h


the silver stream.
her golden oars

with

in Shakespeare. ^I
Verj' common
Shakespeare often transposes the negative.

as

if.

be 4ookeQ
Or the do may
hath cause
=
whiqh hath

Who
grief with tears.
i;2i.

The
who

antcQcdeut

omitted.

as

upon

to water

reason

its

to loho is eye.

equallybalanced.
of were
Shakespeare has 9\sQweigh^ in the sense
lent
equivain weight. Lothness,unwillingness
124.

Weighed

125. Bow,
foolish

bend.

sapling,and

Cf.

weighed

was

or

PericUt, 17. ii.:


be bowed

'

You're

young

I would

have
as
you.'
that
is
Antonio
=
And
well
opinion.
1.33- Very
your
adds,* And expressedvor}' like a surgeon too.'
Prom
contractea
iixtosurgeofi.
134. Chirnrfl^on,now
must

Or. cheirf
the hand, and erawi, a work.
13s Fonl weather, as tue sailors say,

dirtyweatJier.

136. Cloudy, in gloom or sorrow.


137. Pbtntation,the colonizing. So. insolent)aic"iit Bimplv umistial ; defend,forbid,etc.
literature.
the
So the French
have
144. Letters =
phrasebelles lettres; and we speak of an unlettered man.
146 Bourn, boundary. Professor Skeatsays this word
.

from
the 0. Fr. boune, a limit
is '
is a doublet of bound ;*the d being excrescent
with the Northern
be connected
But it may
or burn, a mountain
stream, which often serves
word
bum
find in ffolbom
we
;=
(The

comipted

Tyburn; Westbourne,eto.)

Thus

bourn

or inorganic.
English "owm
as

Old

tillage^
^TilUk,

boundary.
Bourne

sc.

THE

I.]

206.

Wink'it,kecpst thine

207.

Whiles

while.

which
vjhilt^

noun

115

TEMPEST,
shnt.

eves

Whuti

is

old

an

genitiveof

the

time.

meant

This
if
is a
to heed me.
If heed me
=
you mean
of
ellipsis.
very strong instance
thee
makes
three times
211.
as
Trebles,
great.
inclined
to
neither
other.
anone
Standing water,
go
way nor
210.

216.
fortune

Ebbing

the verb
220.
221.

which
222.

other

"

224.

have

'

not

tyt and

taken

cheek

the tide of
to attract

seem

into the

plural.
Amatter, something important.
The
Throes
thee, pains thee.
only pafisage in
has
used
the
word
as a verb.
Shakespeare
This lord, Francisco, who
is in his dotage.
membranc
^Reand memory
are
placed in antithesis to each
in
the
^the one
other in a passivesense.
an
active,
Earth'd, buried.

is used

word

words

The

Proclaim.

219.

who

men

men,
at the full.'

as

The

only

instance

where

the

verb.

Only professes whose sole professionis. Only


in Shakespeare,as in ordinaryspeech and writing,has a
strong tendency to slide out of its rightplace.
The only instance
of the compound
227, Undrown'd.
in
Shakespeare. But Shakespeare has also,Unaching {=
not giving pain); unarm
(= to disarm); unbookish (= ignorant
225.

(=

:m7iccm"

232.

Wink,

233.

Donbts
ambition

even

Discoveryfor

the

to

undress), and many

smallest

others.
.

chink.

discovery.

The

distance

men

live.

is

so
great, that
be certain
of what
it finds there.
thing discovered ; the abstract for the

cannot
the

concrete.
237. Man's life =
for the concrete.

where

238. Note, information


a

thing

with
24a

known.

or

knowledge.

Post, the

Shakespearemeans
Basorable,fit for

Again
From

letter-carrier.

the

Lat. "io"mw,
And

in haste,
razors,

or

for

shaving.

by

abstract

in

post

Cast

[act ii.

TO

NOTES

116
cast

up.
the
a tneatrical
tenn, such as Shakespeare
Prologue,
24^.
there are
passa^
fond of using. In fact,in this one
iras
that may be regarded as theatrical" """",j^erfour words
and dUcharye.
form^prologtte^
discharge, for us to bring to a conclusion.
244. In
241.

Cfrili.
i. 22.

u%
go over
240. Meaiure
of
Mnd
a
250. Chougli,

every

of

one

us

(cubits).

monedula.
jackdaw, the
JnAlVs
WelZlY.i.^Shakespeare has choughs'language,
Of as deep chat,with as great a power
gabble enough.'
of profound remark.
to be a different verb
26a
Tender, regard. This seems
with
from that meaning to offerand is perhaps connected
Corvtu

teTid,

See note

263. Feater.

on

I. ii.374.

the heel. See King Lear,


on
or sore
Kibe, chilblain,
in
brains were
If a man's
the Fool
1. V. 8, where
says,
't not in danger of kibes ?
his heels,were
266.

'

'

ofAthentf

Of Timon
frozen.
IV. lit : * The cold brook candied with ice.'
will.
which
theynever
270. Melt

26p.Candied,congealedor
275.

Wink, sleep.

contemptuously. (The word comes


m"rdto
Lat
from
(mw*-Mwi), 1 bite ; through 0. Fr. morcel
etc.)
(Ft, morceau), CogB. : Memorse ; moi'dent,
used

276. Morsd,

277.

Should

not

would

not

then.

278. Suggestion,temptation. The

most

ing
frequentmean-

of the word in Shakespeare.


the strokes of the dock.
count
279. Tell the clock,
in the
284. The king, A little too premature, as
of Macbeth (a. I.)
285. Bear, a form of raise.
let it fall.
286. Fall =
of have a care,
the model
293. Keep a care, on
i. 19 :
296. Sudden, quick. Julius CcesarjIII.
"

209.

Oasca, be sadden

Looking

for looks.

; for we

fear prevention.'

case

II.]

sc.

THE

117

TEMPEST,

guarding.Cf. MamUiy
Seonring,

300.

him

secure

I.

113

v.

Scene

in

2.

So King Alfred mentions


of
that Orosius found on the coast

of his works
stikke-maelum
Norway villagesand towns
is the dative of
here and there). Maelum

Urohin-Bhows,

9. Mow.

with

make

Mind,

comes

round
look at

18. Bear

(= stick-meal,
mael^a part.

of elves.
apparitions

(The

ugly laces.

mouth; but

13. Wonnd
17.

instances,

Ineh-mealf inch by inch.

one

5.

Heaven

'

has ihal^d in five


309. SQiak'cL Shakespeare
three of wMch
are participles.

3.

'

word

has

flrom the Fr. m"me,

about.
or notice.

Still used

"

nothing to do
wry face.)

in chis

sense.

from.
largeleathern

ott,
Bombard, a

screen

one

vessel for holdingliquor.


So in Henry IV., Part /.,II. iv.,the Prince calls Falstaff
'
that hjge bombard
of sack.'
I. i. 37 :
Ci. Borneo and Juliet,
25. Poor-John,salt hake.
"Tis well thou art not fish ; if thou hadst,thou hadst been
This was
doubt the commonest
Poor- John.'
fish supno
plied
in Catholic coimtrien on Fridays.
be the making of him.
28. Make
=
a man
Dutch
e^tttV.
From
30. Doit,the smallest coin.
Gf the phrase in the Greed,' suffered
33 Snfrered death.
under Pontius
Pilate.'
35. Oaberdine,along, loose,outer garment, like a smocks
frock.
31.

36. Acquaints
37.

makes

acquainted.

shelter myself. The


oldest meaning o*
clothes. This meaning is still retained in the

Shroud,

shrovds

was

(= dressingof a ship).
who
cleans
42. Swabber, the man
46. Tang, a high shrill sound.

shrouds

54. Inde, India.


and

twice

56. Proper
57. Give

as

the deck

with

This form occurs


three times
Milton.
in
he should be ; or handsome.

gpround,yield. The oppositewas

swab.

in Shakespeare,

togetground.

118

NOTES

TO

See

Henry /F., Part 11.^II. iii.:


vantage of the king.'
63. Becover, in the transitive
in this sense
by Shakespeare.
'

64. Trod

on

As proper

men

trod upon

ever

If

they get ground

and

Frequentlyused

sense.

Cf. JnlxM

neat'i-leather.
as

[act II.

I. i. 25:
have gone
neat's-leather,

Cmar^

handiwork.'
68. After the wiseit
in the wisest feushion.
the irony of greed.
71. I will not take coo much,

upon

my

72.

74.
77.

Soundly, thoroughlywell.
Trembnng, a sign of demoniac

Langnage to you, cat


*Oood liquorwill make
a cat

possession.

allusion to the

An

speak.'
jaws (a Scandinavian

the
Chaps (or cAop*),
85. Help, cure.

79.

proverb,
word).

edy
long spoon. Cf the proverb quoted in the Comthat
of 'Err(yr8,
rv. iii.: 'He must
have a long spoon

89. Ko

the devil.'
TV'e find in
Trinculo.
95. Very, the real unmistakable
such
Yowr
phrases as,
Shakespeare
very very Rosalind;

would

sup with

the very

HamleCs

of

cause

etc.
lunacy; thy very princess,

Aiege, seat or stool.


96. Moon-cali| a lumpe
.

'

out

of flesh

shape, with

without

life.'

99.

Over-blown,
Sack,

124. When
126. Bush.

past.

qualmish..,

Spanish w'ine.

white

=
at
time' was
Cf. Midsummer

one

time.

Night^sDream,

wlth'lanthem, dog,

L, where

and

bush

of

thorn,

Moonshine.'

drawn

splendiddraught

drawl, draggle;dray, drain; draft and


cognates.)
152.

Crabs,crab-apples.
Fig-nuts,earth-nuts.

154.

Marmozet,

151.

Y.

:^

'This man
Presenteth

131. Well

and

oom^ant,

Kot

108.

says

over

still queasy,

102.

Quince

blown

kind

156.Sea-mels,sea-malls

of very small
or

sea-mews.

(i"row,drag ;

draw^

are

all

monkey.
Caliban,being a
"

SCI.]

THE

poeticalboing,speaks in
prose.
make
159. Inherit,

; the

yerse

ordinaiy seamen

oorselTes masters, take


ACT

ploy
em-

possessionof.

THIED.

SCBNE

1.

Cf. Merchant^ I. i. 171, where


which
are.
says with reference to his suit to Portia:

Are

1.

119

TEMPEST.

Bassanio

"

I hare

mind

presages

me

irach thrift.*

The word
full of or requiringpains (not "am).
Thus Fuller
often used in the sense
of jMin^taJivno.

Painfal
was

of

v. 29) speaks
{HolyWarj
^

and

Flavel

as

his mind
2.

another

in

to

work

Joseph
he

as

mentions

'

without
painful preacher,'
the congregation.

Sets off =

is

'^painful
ter
carpenthe
any

menial
^Baaeneas,

se^off.

Quiekeni, puts life in. (Quick in its


meant
have it still in that
liviTig
; and we
phrase, 'the quick and the dead.' Hence
likethe modem
slang phrase.Look alive !)
entirelyframed,or made up.
9. Ck"mpos*d,
or heavy.
II.
Sore,severe
6.

13.

^MOUtor, i"er8on

31.

Saib,occupied,and

who

John
reference in
Rev.

earliest sense
sense

Bt

in the
quick! is

the business.

carries out

therefore

tion.
occupa-

like to

not

come

near

you.
creature.
Infected
viiitation. Viniar
had
here
Miranda
stolen out to
visit
means
simply
Ferdinand
at his work; but Prospero employs the
see
in conmion
terms
use
duringa visitation of the plague.
32. Wearily for Mwory.
37. Heat, behest.
38. Top, the highest height. Shakespeare has also the
31.

Worm,

tion

phrases, Now
xvi.

stand

top of happy hours (Sonnet


the top ofjudgment/ from top of honor to disgrace^
s
you

on

the

5) ;
feet.
attentive. Or, perhaps,2mn^"
42. Diligent,
I love.
of the Lat diligoy

in the

sense

120

NOTES

[act iii.

TO

it. (This
foiled it.or disparaged
the foil which
with
be confounded

46. Put it to the foil =


word

not
foU. must
from
Lat. foliumya
a Kt-off, That
comes
means
leaf,
through 0. FT.faeille;and its cognate in foliage.The foil
in the text is from 0. Fr. fouler,to trample under
foot ;
and

its cognates are defile


and
fuller.
blunt sword, so called Because blunted
53. Abroad, in other places.
53" Skil-loM ot

58.

or

also

failja

foiled.)

ignorantof.

Somethiiiff,used

60. A

Hence

adverbially.See note on I. ii.409.


the impression that his

king. "He speaks under

fi"ther is drowned.
Co. S.
This
63. Wooden
slavery of carrying wood.
elarersr,
of the adjective is very
in
use
common
Shakespeare.
Thus we find : The humble salve (forthe salve of humanity)':
of beingold); civil bounds (for
v^y old exaise
my excuse
(for
bounds of civility)
bread (forthe bread of jpov; distressful
others.
; and very many
evty)
in imitation
63. Blow for to blow. To is omitted after suffer^
of the like idiotn with let.
69. Kind event, successful issue or ofutamu.
70.
71.

pervert.
Hollowly, with insincerity. ^Invert,
tune.
misforBoded, foreboded or portended.
^Miichief^
I. v. 46: 'You
Cf. Macbeth
murdering ministers

who
.

wait

72.

What

77. That

on

else =

dare.

be got out of mine


79.

Die to want,

84. Maid
87. Thni

mischief!
Bnythingelse.

Nature's

antecedent
Hence
dare
die if I want.

'

to that is

The

/, which

is to

is in the firstperson.

maid-servant.
ho falls upon
his knees.
Like desirous of The
of

humble,

only instance
WiUing
in Shakespeare where
willingis construed with of.
be taken with
(= greater).
more
94. At nothing must
^Mybook of magic.
88.

...

SCENS
a.

Bear

up, make

6. Brained

2.

for them.

like ns, with brains like

ours.

Digitized
by

li.]

SC.

THE

121

TEMPEST,

as the eyes of a
Set,fixed,
14. Standard,ensign. These

8.

intoxicated are.
words
ently
used indifferwere
for the colors or sign itself,
for
the
who
or
man
ries
carthem.
But we should now
standard-bearer.
Even
say
ancient was used in both senses
by Shakespeare.
You is the dative.
like.
List means
15. If von list
Ko stanoard,for he cannot
stand.
stance
in case, quiteequal to jhstling.The only in33.^Am
in Shakespeare of the phrase with this moaning.
This was
the spelling,
and
24. Deboshed,debauched.
time.
represented the pronunciation in Shakespeare's
tall language of drunken
34. SnfRBT indignity. The
46.
pomposity; and see line
^5- Trinonlo. Stephano does not see Ariel,and thinks
it is Trinculo that is speaking.
man

52. This thing,Trinculo.


brought about.
55- Ck"mpassea,
Not
56. The party = the person.

an

uncommon

ing
mean-

in Shakespeare.
6a Pied ninnv, party-colored
The
fool.
professional
fool wore
On the same
a motley dress.
grounds,a very
fool was
for a domestic
Patch.,
nickname
common
64. Freshes,fresh- water springs. The only instance of
the word in Shakespeare.
threat in Shakespeare's
dried fish. A common
67. Stockfish,

time.
him

8^.Pannoh, run
with the fhnction
86.

of

noun

used

connected

with

through the paunch.


v"rb.

Weiand, wind-pipe. Said

to

be

wheeze.

87. PoMesB,seize.
90. As
as

rootedly
=

mine.

^But

their hatred of him

only;

but in two

his books ; and


to bum
care
his
not
fine fumiture.

good

is

senses

(2)bum

fine.
91. Brave, splendid,
constmction
The
here, as
92. Which.
with Shakespeare,is highlyconversational
03. That

sidered.

that whicn.
the
Cf.
idiom,* What
=

deep rooted
: (1)only take
onlythem" and
as

is very usual
and free.

to be
^To consider =
is there stillto do 1 '

con*

III.]

sc.

Frustrate

lo.
*'

THE

Some

frustrated.

yerbs

123

TEMPEST,
Dr.

Abbott, sect. 342,says,

tts t, and d, on
ending
in their
alreadyresembling participles
not add ed in the participle.

in

Forgo.

The
is round
in
Ger. form of the

12.

which

i
J.

fordo J=

has

prenx

terminations,do

nothing to do with fore


is a negative particle,"
find it in forbid^
; and we

but
^ore),
K. Grer.

vei'

ruin),/b^yiw,etc.

to

A livinff drollery,
a puppet-show in which

21.
was

done

ing
the act-

livingfigures.

Dy

what
else- does.
does else =
25. What
is without
is
incredible.
credit,or

their

of

account

^Want

credit

The
word
in
archaism
was
an
Certes,certainly.
Spenser'sand in Shakespeare's
time, though Spenser is
30.

very fond

of it.

32. Gentle-ldnd.

Compound epithetsare

not

unusual

in

Shakespeare. Dr. Abbott, sect 2, gives. Sudden-bold;


active-valiant;
valiant-young{Henry IV., PartI.,Y" i.);
and others.
; ienseless-obstinatef
childish^oolish
36. Muse, wonder
39. Praiae in
and have
away
a

hurryto

at.

departing
seen

all.

praisewhen
That is,Don't

are
you
b'e in too

going
great

praise.

46. WalletB of flesh. The horrible goitreof the Alps


and other mountainous
alluddistricts is probably here ed
to.

48. Each

An allusion to " a kind of inverted


which
in Shakespeare'sday.
in vogue
was
travellers
often tried to
dangerous; ana

putter-ont

life-insurance

Travelling was

that risk into money.


A
person going a distance ^wt
of money,
condition
out a sum
of receivingtwo, three,
on
four,or five times the amount
according to the danger
and the distance
his return.'
on
turn

"

"

49. Stand

to, a phrase generallyused by Shakespearein


to do one's best.
sense
tojlinchy
The banquet vanishes.
The idea was
taken by Shake^

the

of not

speare from
60. Their

the Third

Book

proper selves

of the u^neid.
their own
selves.

64. Still-cfoeing,
constantlyclosing,however
wide

the

gashes made

in them.

See note

on

deep

I. ii. 2^.

and

124

NOTES

[act hi.

TO

65. Dowld. a film of down.


ail cognates.)

and

{Dowle,downy

dust

are

Like, used as an adverb,modifyingvmulMrahle.


The
form
alwaysemployed by
67. Maasy, massive.
Shakespeare.
created
Creatnret,
enragedor irritated.
74. ^cens'd,
things.
of bereave.
76. Bereft,past participle
(A compound of
is ot quoth.)
a doublet of rob j as bequeathe
reave
ruin that is slowly lengthened
T7' Iang[*ring
perdition,
and
out
out,
piece by piece.
given
At
is,Worte
once
78.
belongs to death ; and the sense
66.

"

than

death

any

at

once

be.

can

antecedent

The
79. Whose.
8a PallB,probably a

in
they^

is

of the

remnant

line 76.
Northern

plmtil

ine".
cordial or hearty repentance.
81. Heart's sorrow,
semi-technical
or
86. Good life. Evidently a technical
and livelystyleof
with
a creditable
=
stage-expression,
*
to the very
Cf. the phrase, The actingwas
penormance.

remarkablyexact observance
straiLge,
of eve^ particular.
88. tneir several kinds have done, acted out their re-,
spectivecharacters.
mental
perturbation.
9a Bistractioiis,
Cf.
is.
Whom
John^ 17. it :
Ktng
92.
87. Observation

"

...

Of

Arthur, whom

they

say

Is killed

to-night.'

constructions.
See Dr. Abbott,sect 410.
Shakespeare is very
9^. Stare, a verb used as a noun.
consult,and expectas
daring in this. Thus he has solicit,

confusion

nouns

; my

the sun's

of two

depart;
appear;

make prepare
O heaving
ly

for war

mingle^and

falseaccuse

many

others.

See Dr. Abbott, sect. 451.

my trespass in bass.
several times this idea,that the horror
99.

Bass, utter

has the power


I03.

But

one

Shakespeare
of

great

has

storm

disclose their crimes.


making
fiend,let \here be but one.

of

criminals

SCI.]

THE

125

TEMPEST,

it
disquietude.In Shakespeare
Ecstasy,extreme
means
a
any state of being beside one's self (Gr. ekstagis,
from
from
whether
or
standingout),
joy
miseiy.
io8.

ACT

FOURTH.
Scene

1.

Other editions have thrid^


which is only on
other spelling. Thrid is used by Enghsh poets in such
phrasesas *to thrid the mazy dance.'
3. Thread.

la.
22.

24.

Fairly,excellently,finely.
Vaniiy,illusion of spectacularexhibition.
of twinkle. Cf. MerchaM^
The
root
Twink.

II. ii,

I'lltake my leave of my master


says,
of
in the twinkling
an
eye.'
be
to
the seat of love and coura^o^
37. Liver, supposed
Shakespeare has the following phrases: Lily-livei-ed
; mxth-

137,where

'

Launeelot

white-livered,

and
pu/eon-liveredj
livetedj

38.Corouaxy,a surplusor
Lat. corollarium,

some

present of

(From
supernumeraries.
additional
garland,an
gift;

of corOnaj a crown.)
a ^rland ; diminutive
corolla^
bnsk.
39.- Pertly,
also
or meadows.
41. Leas, originally
(Spelled
pastures
in composition,as
m
Bromleyy
leyand leigh^especialij]^
it
In
in
the
form
of loo;
Madlewh,etc.
Belgium
appears
water-lea.
and Waterloo is =
of covered.
sense
Stover^
44. Thatch' d, in the original
winter fodder for cattle.
See note on I. ii.273.
46. Hest = behest.
^Betrims,
of
function
trim.
the
6e
is
to a large extent
makes
(The
intransitive
into a
intensii^and
turn
to
to
an
{2\
(1)
;
Thus
transitive vero.
bereave ; and.{:c)
(1) bedim,bedtist,

from

beweep,bemoan, bewail,etc.)
47.

Hymphs, in
that

in

the dative.

Cambridgeshire

Broom
broom

(proves. Steevens
sometimes

grows
tallest
cattle
as
high enough
theypass
where
it
is
still
cultivated
in
and
through it,
places
higher.'
is an
his
forsaken
sweetheart.
Lass-lorn,
by
{Lotti
49.
of
It
is
found also in forlorn=
old past participle lose.

says
*

to

conceal

the

126

NOTES

ntterljlost

[act iv.

TO

interchangeof
etc.)
Pole-dipt
The

and chair ^
twined round

and
with

is found

in chain

poles clipped or

by the yines.
50. Marffe,edge. The only instance of this form,

usual form.
gent is Shakespeare's
Iris
^2. Arch,and meiienger.

ifar-

the goddessof the


raiaboWf and also the messenger of Juno.
55. Amain, at ftillspeed,or with full force.
was

59. Saffron wings, of deep yellow.


from late Lat. hoKM^ a wood.
62. Botky,
(We
also had
^in Pr. hocage which, in the
the word hoKCLoe
road from
come
Buckingham Palace to Westminster, has becorruptedinto Birdcage Walk.
66. Freely,liberally. ^Bftate=
to settle on, as an

woo^,

"

"

estate.
70.

Dii is in the dative.

Bnikr

Dis

was
(Dit-ig)

another

for Pluto (who carried off


of Geres),
the god of the Infernal

the daughter
Proserpine,
Regions.
Soandal'd, disgraced by

name

71. Blind

boy, Cupid.

scandal

PaphoB, a citjin Cyprus, a favorite haunt of Yenus.


lOnion, darlmg.
a monosyllable.
outright. ^High*8t,
Bight out
also
noeefstykijicPst,
Shakespeare has
secrefst,
dearst,loy473.
Chaucer
has
etc.
See
sect
hext for
Abbott,
atst,
have Tiext for nighest.
as we
highest,
of walking. (This word is not derived
83. Gait,manner
74.
79.
82.

from

90, but from

get. Its cognate is get =

the way to get


in older English the name
for a street.

a thing. Oate was


In H. Gor, Oasse.
Cf.

at

Bishopsgate,
Overgo^
Nethergate^

Upper Street,etc.)
91. Foison.

See note

II. i. 156.

for pUnH^Plenty
Shakespeare has the word as

on

fal. The only place where


an
adjective.
92. Gamer, a doublet of grannrr.
charm.
^Bold to
loa
Charminirly by dint ("f ninfric
bold as to think.
fhink
so
Shakospoare several times
=

omits

the asy

as

in Richard

Iff.. TTI. ii.:


*

To

trust

"

I wonder
he is so fond
of unquiet slumbers

the mockery

dby^^OOgk

I.]

sc.

THE

and, in one
Ccesar,III.

other

127

TEMPEST,

instance,he

omits

both

to

and

(Julius

as

i. 40) :"
'

To

think

that

CaBsar

bears

Be not fond
such rebel blood.

'

See Abbott, sect. 281.

Confines,limits

I02.

Cf.

district.

or

Whether
in sea
The extravagant
To his confine.'

or

ffamUt, I. i. 155

fire, in earth or air,


erring spirithies

:-^

and

IT.
Shakespearehas also the adjectivesconfineUss(Ma/ibethy
iii.55),and^Tie^ in the sense
of limitless.
d, with the power of performing wonders.
104. Wonder'
The
word is not a participle
adjectiveformed on
; but an
the model
of landed, talented,
from
the nonn.
See
etc.,
note

on

1. ii. 97.

goddesses
were
mountain)
{aros,
;
springs
mountains
ads,
oak) and Hamadry; Dryads {Drus, an

109. Naiads

(from

of rivers and
of the

Gr. nod, I flow)

So Shakespeare speaks
head in the hollow bank.'
113.
119.

of the cool water.

Footing, dancing.
r Be

Works,

(= Make

gone
affects.

the

135.

Distempered,discomposed.
Sort,way or manner.
Inherit,possess.

137.

Rack,

127.

clouds

the

of the water.
the rough ripple
of the Severn
hiding ' his crisp

because
Temperate,

123. Ayoid
125.
126.

Oreads

as

of oaks and trees.


III.
Crisp,curled with

were

above

place voidj.

cloud,or film of .cloud. Bacon says, ' The


(thethinner clouds),in the upper region,we

call the rack.'


in Shakespeare
is no
There
exact
parallel
139. Bounded.
of the word
round.
to this extremely fine use
A

lleep.

So

a
*

modem

poet :

Onr life is
Between
a

Ti|"|,Beating.

and

watch

sleep

and

a vision,
sleep.*

Prospero, seeing the

shortness

and

un-

128

NOTES

[act iv.

TO

is vexed by the thought that


aubstantialnesB of this life,
bad men
should wish to rob him of the little happiness he
first,in Milan, and now
here in the island.
has
Mr. Phil"

pottsalso wisely conjecturesthat

he wishes
to compose
for
Italian's strong wish
an
mind, and
his old enemies, now
so
on
completely in his
vengeance
he conauers
spurred to
only when
power, a wish which
his

free it from

'

compassion by Ariel's sympatny.*


147. Meet

as an
with, encounter
enemy.
represented. Cf. Jfwry Wivtt^ IV.
148. Presented
vi. :
Must
my sweet Kan present the Faiiy Queen.'
of vcutaUts (the r taking the
151. Varleti,a doublet
place of the ").
=

'

unbroken
tJnbaok'd.eolti^
or nnridden.
dentate).
Toothed,thorny (in botany

157.
i6i.

QoH,

gorse.
covered
16^.Filthy-mantled,

with

filth or

scum

green
*

Poor
Cf King Lear, III. iv. 117 :
mantle.
of the standing-pooL'
Tom
drinks the green mantle
trinkets (here it means
167. Trumpery, showy trifies,
as

with

clothes).
168.
170.

174.
tree or

Stale,bait,decoy.
Nnrtore, good-breeding,education,homanit^.
lindentill they roar.
Even to roaring
^line,
=

lime-tree.

178. Played tlie Jaek


the old

for

name

=:

knave.

played the

Jack

was

knave in cards.

this misfortune.
186. Hoodwink
this miiehanee, cover
The
meaning of hoodwinik is to blindfold. So we have the
word
hoodman, the child blindfolded in the game of Hood-

fnan-blind

(=

ballad

allusion

to the

old

"

204.

passage
210.

to be

Blind-man's-bufQ.

King Stephano. Probaoly an


II. :
quoted also in Othello^

SOI.

King Stephen

was

worthy

Frippery,shop for second-hand clothes. The only


where
the word occurs.
in Shakespeare
Lnggage, in a contemptuous sense = something

^iM^ieeTalong.

215.

peer,* etc.

Jerkin,a jackett)r

short coat

sc.

I.]

THE

129

TEMPEST,

216. A bald jerkin. An


allusion to the tricks placed
ing
shavby sailors on passengers when
crossing the * line
their heads.
Or it may
refer to the old belief that
'
mate
the violent
fevers which
in that hot clithey contract
them
lose
make
their hair.'
*

"

217.

By lin^

and

220.

Pan

pate, clever

of

level

methodically.
sally. A j^om is

thrust

in

fencing.
222.
Time, bird-lime.
MuUer's
bamacle-geese. (See Max
225. Bamaoles
JLectures on the Science of Language, Second
Series,ii.535.1
It was
old belief that, in the north
of Scotland, ana
an
nacle
especiallyin the Orkneys, there grew a Goose Tree or Barfell into the
which
Tree, on which
shell-fish,
grew
These
of
and
them
out
came
water, opened,
voung
geese.
in Lent, because
eaten
not
birds,
were
they were
feese
Hiberbarnacle
is
of
word
ut fishes.
a
corruption
(The
from Hibemia^
nicuke
Ireland.)
find in
for villainously.
So we
low
226. Villainons
the
Shakespeare
phrases: Instant old; noble spoken; equal
=

ravenoiu, etc.
229. Go to =

came,

an

expressionof reproofor
Cat o* mountain,

338. Pard, panther.

Scene

Crack not z= are


3. His carriage=

ounce.

FIFTH.

ACT

9.

tion.
exhorta-

1.

fiawless.

In Shakespeare's
carry.
that which is carried
time, the word carriagemeant
carries.
well
that
which
See
as
as
Judges, xviii. 21 : 'So
they turned and departed,and put the little ones and the
cattle and the carriage(= baggage)before them.'
8. Oaye in charge, ordered.
defends from
the weather.
Cf.
=
Weather-fends
10.
Fender,
till you release them.
In the
11. Till 3ronr release =
active sense.
The word is generallypassive.
21.
Touch, delicate feeling.
what

he

has

to

I.]

sc.

'

THE

There

cannot
be
this is.*

Than

181

TEMPEST,
pinoh in death

more

sharp

8i. Beawmable

shore of reason.
ihore =
85. Diflcaie me, tako off m^ present dress. Cf. WinUfn's
TaU, IV. iy. : * Disease thee instantly,' Shakespeare has
also disbefichj
and many
others.
disbranchy
Drink the air. Cf. the phrase devmr the way, and
102.
the Lat. carpere viam.
112.
Trifte,
phantom.
^Abiue,deceive.
I have done.
the wrongs
=:
See line
119. My wrpnffs
11 and line 25.
The abstract for the
Thine age = my old friend.
121.
in Shakespeare.
This is very common
concrete.
123. Taste, experience.
said to have been borrowed
from
a word
124. Snbtilties,
'
When
the vocabularyof cooks.
dish
was
so contrived
a
unlike what
it reallywas, they cblled it a
as to appear

subttety.Dragons, castles,trees,etc.,made

out

of sugar,

had the like denomination.'


said with contemptuous severity.
126. My brace of lords,
Often,however, used simply for two.
So Shakespeare has the phrases: To pluck
127. Pluck.
his indignation
down justice
on
thy head ; plvick
from your

awful hench,

Justify,
prove.
132. Inibct,as with the plague,taint and pollute.
modifies rest/ire.
i34" Perforce,
140. Woe
sorry. Shakespearehas used woe adjectivelyfour times in nis plays; in the phrases: Be woe for
128.

me

woe

are

we, etc.

143- Of whose

soft ffrace

146. As late =
148. May call
is also

can

by

whose

kind favor.

recent.

call.

This

meaning of the word

preservedin the phrase might and main.


Admire, wonder, or are astonished.

155.
I57" Bo

officesof truth

164. Ghronide

days to

ancTas

performtruthful ftmctions.
of day by day, a story that it would take
=

telL

narrative.
165. Relation,
173*

Plftyme

false

you

are

cheatingme.

dby^^OOgle

132

NOTES
ihoiild wrangle=

175. You

[act v.

TO
be at

should

you

to
liberty

wraugle.
If this be only a vision,thQ
pain of losingwould have to be gone through over again.
the fame
or
report. Ct. Henry F/.,
194. BexLOwn =
Part I.JY. V.:"

178. Shall I twice lose.

'

So

I driven
to suffer

am

Either

197. Hers
201.

by

breath

shipwreck,

of her renown.
'
or arrive.

her father,now.

=:

Inly

Heaviness, sorrow.

Shakespearehas the word (1)twice as


twice as an adverb.
chalked out.
204. Chalk* d forth =
Still,
always.
=
blasphemer.
219. BUumhemy
sportive.
227. Tricksy,
228. They stren^en =
they go
strength growing m strangeness.
233. Seyeral,separate.

inwardly.
and (2)
adjective,

within

an

or

215.

on

from

strengthto

"

241.

Moping,actingwithout

full consciousness

the

or

guidance of tnought
245 Conduct
the person and
247.

So

conductor.

we

still use

guide for

So

"till.
say

for the process.

Infest, harass.

248. Pick'd,chosen,at the righttime.

pickedmen.
249. Single=

when

we

^Besolye yon, will explain

alone.

to you.

250.

Every

'At

accidents.
each

Cf. Winter's

his needless

Tale,II. iii.:

"

heavtngs.'

256. Odd, unreckoned.

Every man shift for all the rest If,in the infinite
life,
complexity of human
Shakespeareever sought for
257.

be the moral
of the
is called a wiora/" this would
of Shakespeare'sart,that he
play ; and it is significant
characters
it
the
of
of the lowest
in
into
mouth
one
puts
what

It.

Even

his brain has been

permeated by the plainmean-

by

SCI;]

THE

external 'is but fortune


is eyeijthing.
fidelitjThe

ingof these strange eyents.


and

chance;

and

conduct

258. Coragio=

(Italian).

courage

anafaithful.

True, correct

260.
268.

138

TEMPEST.

A plain Ml
=
plainlya fish.
269. BaogM, the stolen apparelthey have on.
mand
practicingthe com^73' Beafin her oommand,
go on
of her (the moon) beyond (= without^the power

granted to her (Sycorax).


281. Beeling ripe. Cf. Merchant^I. iii. 64
of my

wants

The

ripe

friend.*

Gilded tnem, made their faces shine.


Cf Coriulanusy
II. iii.:
out
285. Will never
282.

See Abbott, sect. 405.


has been well pickled.

along 1 *
he

Will you
becauae
^Fly-blowing,
*

Sirrah, *a compellation,'says Schmidt, 'used in


comparatiyelyinferior persons.'Thus in Much
addressing
find it resented by one who thinks tiimself
we
Adoy ly. li.,
and
1 am
a gentleman :
a gentleman,sir,
Yours, sirrah ?
288.

'

'

name

my

is Conrade.'

Grace, favor.
Shakespeare.

206.

with

'

299. Bestow

"

stow

"

a rather
Thrioe-donble,

away.

^Yonr

usual

luggage, the

style
fine

domes

they had on.


events.
306. Accldenti^ incidents,
for
nuptials. Shakespeare has this noun
309. Nnptial
and only five times in the plueight times in the singular,
ral
number.
Re
has funeral* twice ; in all other instanceajuneral,
Retire^like advise^
endeavor^
complain^
'311. Betire me.
used
reflexively.
repent^repose^fear^etc.,was
EPILOGUE.
It is doubtftil whether
this Epilogue was
written
by
Jonson.
In
It
been
the
Shakespeare.
oy Ben
may have
it is
after
folio edition,
on
a
page ; and,
alone upon
remamed
is
t
hat
it
not
Uxevntj
liKely
Prospero

pnnted

the stage.

sep'arate

la

Noise

TO

NOTES

184
With
was

the

help

supposed

TEMPEST,

THE

of yoor

to dissolye

hands
a

[act v.
your

applauBe.

spell. See IT. L 40,and

107,108.
i6.

Prayer.

An

allusion to the

of " concludingthe
'^
the sovereign.
up kneeling,for
God himself
i8. Mercy itielf=
time

Shakein speare's
prayer, offered

old custom

play by

^Freee =

frees from.

to
Shakespeare has. ComplavMd (abont)her wrongs;
look (for) you;
KoMng (at) hit itate; twear'it (by) thy
gods,etc. See Dr. Abbott,sect 200.

So

by

EXAMINATION
of the

Pome

PAPERS.

questions

taken

from

Papers of the "n|^h

the

vice
Civil Ser-

Commission.]

Give

1.

of

substance

the

Act

(First

chiefly).

the

story told

by Prospero

to

Miranda.
2.

State

the

3.

State

by whom,
lives

following
{a) We

do

{e)

He

's

(/)

business

in the

and

as

words

in

Explain Shakespeare's

deed;

{a) Play

(d)

{g)

(0 g*"^^^

hests
some

in the
were

very

closeness

6. Give
mar,

the

use

the

man

our

lives

drunkards.

by

of time.

abysm

there

Bermootkis^

am

o' the

veins

now,

Italics

5.

occasions, the

what

(h)

hint

that

wonders,

above.

following

{b) incharitable

virtue

words

wrings

and

{c) god of

{f) from

{e)holp
that

's hid.

in the

of the

use

she

earth.

fearful.

not

Explain

power

as

single thing,
the

and

4.

phrases

of

still-vex'

gentle

on

Caliban.

"

backward

me

and

cheated

merely
the

From

and

whom,

uttered

dark

the

{fi)To

to

were

are

iP) In
{c)

parts played by Ariel

mine

such

eyes;

(/) capable of
instances

of

double

of

Shakespeare's peculiar g^ram-

comparatives,

and

best.
185

by

such

phrases

136

(Second Act).

B
1.

Give

2.

State

zalo from
3.

State

the

in the Second

of the action

brief account

of the

substance

Act

quoted by Gor

passage

Montaigne.
by whom,

following lines

uttered

were

and

whom,

to

what

on

occasions

the

"

{a) I saw him beat the surges under him.


(d)Bourn^ bound of land, tilth^vineyard,none.
{c)To the perpetualwink for aye might put.
("jf)
They will not give a doit to r"ilieve a lame beggar.
with strange bedfellows.
(^)Misery acquaintsa man
4.

and

5. Annotate

in Italics

words

Explain the

explain

the

"ix

the above.

in
peculiarities

the following

phrases : (a) A paragon to their queen ;


ip)tJte dearest 0/ the lossr (c)minister occasion ; [d) ebbing
; {h) after
men;
{e) candied; (/) ^udaen ; {g) inch-meal
and

words

the wisest
6. Give
with

overbla^vn,
(i")

1.

Give

2.

Contrast

3.

Shakespeare's compounds

un,

and

of

instances

some

by

some

short

of the

account

of the sailors
and

on

in Scene

conversation

conspiraciesformed

the two

Ry whom,

lines uttered

(Third Act).

by

the courtiers

respectively.

what

occasions,were

the

following

:
"

least when

{a) Most

buzy

ip)Thou

shalt be my

i.

I do it.

lieutenant

Here
's a
{c)
Through forthrights and

maze

or

my

standard,

trod, indeed,

meanders.

137
Each putter-out offiveJar
((/)

will

one

\e)

bring us.
good life

With

And

observation

Their

several

strange^ my

kinds

have

ministers

meaner

done.

Explain the words in Italics.


of the following
5. Explain fully Shakespeare's use
words
and phrases : {a) Sore ; {b)the top 0/ admiration
;
{c)plain ; [d)brained like us ; (e)to paunch ; {/) brave;
{g)gentle-kind; {h)ecstasy,
6. Annotate
in Shakespeare's gramirregularities
mar
any
4.

you

have

may

noticed
D

Quote

1.

in the Third

(Fourth

Act.

Act).
revels

speech beginning, *Our

the

now

are

ended.'
State by whom,

2.

lines

uttered

were

{a) Do

{p)You

and

what

occasions,the following

"

smile.at

not

on

nymphs

me

called

that / boast her


of

Naiads

off.
the

wandering

brooks,

byline and

*
Steal
(tf)

is
level,'

excellent

an

/aw

e^

pate,

(d)Being

lass-lorn ;

thy pole-diptvineyard,

in Italics.
the words
Explain and annotate
of the
following
4. Explain fully Shakespeare's use
words
and phrases : {a) Fairly ; (b)freely ; {c)wondered
;
this mischance;
{d) distempered; {e)meet with; (/) hoodwink
{g)aged cramps; {h) villainous low.
of the
of Shakespeare's use
5. Quote a few instances
3.

work

rack.

by

Classics, Etc..

English

FOB

etCi
inEnglish
Grammar,
Reading,
Classes
Literature,
BT

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of the

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ia whidi BngUik
thoroughlyadaptedfor fleliools
caref
where
por"
ally-selected
a
or
of
study,
Literatureforms a
or
for
minute
examination,
selected
is
Classic
of
some
tion
English
and
ftill
The notes are unusually
for supplementary readingmatter.
volumes
in
nearly half the book. Btymany
exhaustive,occupying
of all the more
mologv is attended to throughout,the derivations
student with all
the
words
difficult
being given. In short,they supply
understanding and just apprethe information necessary to a perfect
useful philo*
much
communicate
elation of the text,and incidentally
and generalknowledge.
logical
Theee Yolames

are

branch

K". 1
""

"

**

""

(Cantos L aad IL)


ByroB*ePr"p1iee7 of Paste.
MlttoB'sL'AUecreaBdllPeuerM*.
(S"leeted.)
and MoraL
Lord BaeoB""EMa7s,OlTU
of
CTUllon.
PrlM"er
Bjrmi's
B"l6cted
(Ulla Bookb.
MoeiVs
lire-Wonklpven.
and

""ld"dt

**

r
%
"

SeoU*s

Va

!"

**

11

OsMpheir*

**

It

Maeanlay'a

Eaaay

Maeanlay'a

Anaada

11

Be"tt*a

of Hope.

Pleaavrea

""

14

0hakeapeare^a
and lY.)

(Abridgment

Buayaa'a

on

aad

other

fhna
(8el":tloBt

Itt

"oldaaalth*a

16

""

**

17
18
19

a"eeB*a Wake.
Hon'a
Marteer.
Oolerldce*B AMlent
de Ooverley.
Sir
Bocer
Addlaoa**
In
a
Oonatry OhnrehyaHU
6ray*a Elecy

**

""

""
**

91
M

8eott*a

i* M

Lady

ghakeapeare'a
Bhakeapcare'a

Aa

Ton

Like
John

Kin*
Kla*

Henry

It, ete.

(S^toctlons.)

Kla* Blehari
IT., Kin* Henry

and

n.

Henry

Tm.,

and

Jnllni

(CONTINUED.)

OiMar.

(Saieetloat.)

T., Kin* Henn

by VjUU*
Digitized

(SalecttOna.)

Bkak"apeaM*"

(Canto L)

Lake.

of the

Shakeapoare'a

Tl.

Aets

TraveUer.

**

""

L)

Poema.

of TeiJee.

Merehaat

of Part

PUcriai** Prosreaa.

*"

"

L)

TT.)

Canto

(SetocttonsArom
Last MlnatreL

MarmloB.

""

*"

Canto

Tlllase.

D"Mrted

(Introdoetlon and
Lay of the
BnrM*OoUer*a
Saturday Nlclit,aadOtkerPoeaM.
The
Orabbe*a
Tillage.

""

Purts

II.)

""

**

tnm

fialeetlons.,

CLASSICS-Continued.

ENGLISH
""
M
""

""
M

(BookL)

Ezeuwlra.

WMdnwwrthli
P"9""" EMuy

ir".M

OritlflUak

OB
M
"|iteeiie. (Outos L and IL)
tr
Sp"iuer*" Faerie
(3ookl.)
ftS Oewver*"TMk.
MUtmt'sOemM.
A"
Letu
Baton.
Eaeek
Ardea* Tke
""
TeuyM"*(i

IJlyMM*

"""

litheaaa.
Boek.
(Selecttons.)
(Ck"nden8ed.)
OaroL
OhrlstauM

**

91

Irrlas** Bketek

8A

""

88

""

84

IMekeniP
as
Carlyle** Hero
Warrea
Kaeaalay's

**

86
86

""
*"
""
M

87
88
88

""

40

**

41

48
48

M
M

Propket.
Hasttas*.

Teaaysoa's
Memory
^otatioas.

Poets.
Alexaader"s
Feast, aad
Tke Eto of St. Afaes.
Keat^
IrTlBc"s Les"Bd of Sleepy HoUow.

Drydea*s

Bryaat^s

Tkaaatopsls,

48

BasklB*s

Modem

"*

48

Tke

"*

68

""

61
68

Webster's
Browa's

Bab

68
64

Morris's

Life

Bnrke's

Speeok

**

66

68

"*

"

67
68
68

68

81
88

M
""
""

"

Dream

afFalr

W^mtm.

MaeFleekaaa.

ttom
Tales
Bkakeopeare.
Lamk*s
to Teaek
Readlac.
How
Le Bow's
Baaker
Hill Oratloas.
Webster's
Tke
OrthoSplst. A Manual
Aeademy

(Condensed.)

Cavalier

44
46
48
47

""

(Condensed.)

of Waketeld.
Tlcar
Two
Tke
Tolees^ aad

Goldsasltk's

Mlltoa's

Lyeldas, aad

Hyaui
aad

of Pronondsttaa

tke NatlTlty.
Poeau.
Otker
oa

(Selections.)

Palaters.

Speaker.
Bkakespeare
Boaadabout
Papers.
Tkaekeray's
aad JelTersea.
Adaam
Frieads.
of 4asoa.
Deatk

Oratloa
and

oa

His

and
on

Americaa

Taxattoa.

88

of tke Leek.
Pope's Bape
Elalae.
Teaaysoa's
Teaaysoa's la Memorlam.
Oknrek's
Story of tke .fiaeld.
of tkeniad.
Okarek'ftStory
to Lllllpvft.
Swift's "alllTerHi Toyace
(Condensed.)
Essay oa Lord Baeoa.
Maeaalay's
Version
by ReT.B.Potter" HA.
English
Aleestls of Enriptdes.
Tke
Version
by Tlioaias FkaiiOh"
Tke
Aatlsoae of Bopkoeles. English

"

84

EUsabetk

"*

86
88
87
88

(Selected Poems.)
Bobert
Browalac.
(Selections.)'
Addlsoa's Tke
Bpeetator.
Adam
Beda.
from Qeorce EUefs
Beeaes
aad Aaareky.
Mattkaw
Araold'li Oaltare

lln"D.D.

M
M

""

Barrett

Browalas.

C0iUinu4d

on

(SelectedPooni.)

tost pagt%

OOgLc

ENGLISH

CLASSICS-Continued.

ff"i 69
"*

""
**

"*
**
**
**

of Are.
l^eQuliioey's Joaa
T"
Bwno.
Oarlyle's Emsj
ob
n
Harold**
B7MB*""hUde
and n.)
PllcHMce"(Oant"ML
TA
and
Poe** Raven,
other
Poenu.
T8-74
CUve.
(Double Namber.)
Maeanlajr'e Lord
T5
Webeter*e
to Hayne.
Reply
T"-77
Rome.
Macaulay*"
Lays of Anefent
(Double Vomber.)

f8

American

PatrlotieSeleetiono

Washlnston'e
Bpeeeh,
*"
**
**
"*
*"
"*

**
**
""

t"-M

Seott*e

88

Addison's

""

88

lrTlns"s Westndnster

94-96

**

86

**

97

Poenu.

Selected

Wordsworth**

""

The

GraU.

Holy

98

Edwin

99

Oaxton

""

100

FnUer

**

101

Marlowe's

Hooker.
The

of Malta.

Jew

"

""

""

""
"*
"*
""

103
~

~'

jiii"cniulAj*"ti*p*tt}
'

MacanUy's

(Selected Foems.)

(Selections.)
(Selections.)

DanleL

and

Essjiy
EssJlj

i*n

f in

AddlJOB.

OB

Fred

'

"

A^anl^tvn.
Cjrvt,

and

^nByiOBi

Byrou.

Other

JSutnbera

in

Preparation,

Mailing price, single numbers,


double

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""'

"

ot Ct-wiurit
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t laiiH
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IwJnc^A
IMKc^DDl^nta.
Burfc*:^'* I** t Pint
liH
iiimvlUntlou.
ItMrkcV
ItU

Mai'ituLuy'd

proporatloii,)

BoswtU'*
naSlfftLl'"
JohllMil.
JoniiMii.
and
W^t-IUTe^s Bible.

vn
on

Travels
Mnndef
lUCs
Essay
io?4-10tt
Macawlay'n
MlLtan"*
ilO-ill
natAflun

|"U

Essay.

Second

(Selected Poems).

Arnold.
and

Sketehee.

Christmas

nnd

Abbey,

of Chatham.
Earl
Maeaulay's
BaUads.
Early Eafllsh
and
Surrey.
Wyatt,
Skelton,

**

i^ht
loo
lOr

Sir Galahad.

and

Onto.

**

""

Oettysbar

Lake.
(Doable Number.)
8l-8"
8eott*e Marmlon.
(Doable Number.)
8S-84
Man.
Pope's EaMy
on
(Double Number.)
85
and
other
8heUey*"
Poenie.
Skylark, Adonal%
88
IMckene*
the Hearth.
Crtcket
on
(In preporatioo.)
8T
of Style.
Bpenoer*e Philosophy
Lamb**
88
of
Ella.
EMaye
(In preparation.)
88
(Book IL) SeeNo-iS.
Oowper** Taak.

""

**

Uneoln'e

AddroM,

of tbe

Lady

Tennyson's

"*

:i"eelaratlon of Independenoc

ete.

80
81

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Uk

Critical

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^.

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FuU

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