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Dayton Review 1 Home of Dayton Rodeo - Gateway to Des Moines River Valley S i

Review

Dayton Review 1 Home of Dayton Rodeo - Gateway to Des Moines River Valley S i

1

Home of Dayton Rodeo - Gateway to Des Moines River Valley

Since 1877 !

Vol. 138, No. 04

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

daytonreview@lvcta.com

Whole grade sharing, new staff and more at SWG meeting

Public hearing Feb. 18 at

The resolution was read and approved regarding the whole grade sharing with Prairie Valley. It is approved that SWG and PV will continue the 5-12 whole grade sharing through 2018-19 and potentially beyond, but will automatically terminate if the districts reorganize. Kelsey Westrum was introduced at the SWG Board meeting Jan. 14. She will be part time Special Education Teacher at the Dayton building. The PPEL was explained by Mr. Stoffers. There is an upcoming meeting with the financial management com- mittee before the negotiations meetings. There will be a teacher leadership committee start-

ing in spring or summer for next year’s grant opportunity. The Building and Grounds committee wants to meet with the early childhood teachers from the Dayton building in regards to the necessity of them all needing to be in the same area. The Board will be holding an Instructional Support Income Surtax public hearing on Feb. 18 at the Burnside Library starting at 5:25 pm. The regular school board meeting will follow the hearing.

A contract was made for Daniel Lee as a junior high

wrestling coach. Two open enrollments were approved.

A Junior at the high school, with four other band

Continued on page 5

at the high school, with four other band Continued on page 5 Bradley S. Lane is

Bradley S. Lane is the new President-CEO of Security Savings Bank.

Brad Lane new President-CEO of Security Savings Bank

Bradley S. Lane was appointed as the new President- CEO of Security Savings Bank at the January 13, 2015, board meeting. Lane is replacing Steven R. Lane who recently re- tired. He is currently on the Iowa Bankers Association Board of Directors, Board of Trustees for the Gowrie

Municipal Utilities, City of Gowrie Parks Board, Stewart Memorial Community Hospital Board of Directors and is involved with the Community Bankers of Iowa Leaders of Tomorrow.

He is also active with Southeast Valley’s athletic pro-

grams and coaches his kids in several different sports. Lane makes his home in Gowrie with wife, Jennifer and three children, Jordan, Carter and Madison. Lane grew-up in Farnhamville, is a graduate of Cedar Valley

High School, University of Iowa, Iowa School of Bank- ing, Graduate School of Banking in Colorado, and is a Certified Community Lender (CCL).

in Colorado, and is a Certified Community Lender (CCL). Seventh Grade participants are Erin Zeka, alto

Seventh Grade participants are Erin Zeka, alto sax; Keeley Maguire, tenor sax; Viatris Scott, baritone; and Haley Studyvin, trumpet.

SV Middle Schoolers perform in Honor Band Festival

Three middle school Band musicians from SE Valley performed in the 27th Annual Orpheus Jr. High/ Middle School Honor Band Festival at Simpson College in Indianola last Tuesday, January 20th. They were part of two bands, selected by their directors from all over Iowa, rehearsing all day and pre- senting a concert for the public that evening. Their con- ductor was Paul Bloomquist, graduate of SE Webster and currently director of bands at ICCC.

of SE Webster and currently director of bands at ICCC. Sixth Grade participants were Anthony Stevens,

Sixth Grade participants were Anthony Stevens, trom- bone, and Morgan Farnham, alto sax.

SWG school tax levy election Feb. 3; PPEL increased over 10-year period

From .52 cents to $1 per $1,000

By Glenn Schreiber

The Southeast Webster Grand School district has scheduled a special election for a Physical Plant and Equipment Levy (PPEL) on Tuesday, Feb. 3. This school district has operated with an infra- structure tax levy for more than 30 years and currently the tax levy is 52 cents per $1,000 of taxable valuation. The tax levy on the Feb. 3 ballot would increase that tax levy to $1 per $1,000 of taxable valuation. The current school tax levy will expire in 2016. The new tax levy, if approved, would continue for 10

years. If the measure is approved it would impose an income surtax upon the state individual commencing with calendar year 2015 (the percent of income surtax not to exceed 20%). A person/family with a home valuation of $50,000 will continue to pay about $26 in the school tax

levy. For a $100,000 home/real estate the cost would be $52 per year. On the state income tax side, a person with a $500 state income tax would pay an additional $20 per year and a person with a $1,000 state income tax bill would pay an additional $40 per year. These scenarios cover a large number of people within the district, but no farmers. Their situations are different. The same formulas are in place for farmers but there is obviously more real estate involved and likewise more state income tax involved. Among the 338 school districts in Iowa, 281 have some income surtax in their levy. Southeast Webster Grand has used PPEL funds in the past for construction of new additions; heating sys- tem upgrades and repairs; technology items like comput- ers; purchase of school buses; roof, gym floor replace- ment; and more. By law the funds cannot be used for salaries, benefits or other general fund expenditures.

Visit www.daytongowrienews.com for your local news

2 Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015

2 Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015 One man at AZ swimming pool and he was Gowrie It

One man at AZ swimming pool and he was Gowrie

It was a nice sunny day in Mesa, AZ, with temps in the high sixties. But it was windy and a little chilly and therefore there was only one person at the Farnsworth swimming pool that larte afternoon in Dreamland Villa. The gentleman pulled into the parking lot in his golf cart. When we entered the pool area the man was in the hot tub and that was our destination also. “Where are you from?” the man asked. “Iowa,” I said. “Ha, that’s where I came from many years ago. I’m from the town of Gowrie,” he declared. “I’ve heard of it,” I said as I chuckled inside. His name was Elwood Winger, or was it Ringer? I didn’t have a note pad with me in the hot tub. “I graduated from Gowrie High School in 1949 and I never looked back,” he said. “Actually, we don’t live too far from you. We are from Dayton,” I said. “Is that town still alive?” he asked. “We used to beat them at baseball.” This guy is a character, I’m thinking. He really had a good sense of humor, he liked to tell stories, and he enjoyed conversation. “We met some people from Gowrie last year,” I men- tioned. “Do you know Dale and Kay Miller?” “Yes I do,” he declared. “Kay is a good friend of my sister, Sharon Carlson who lives in Gowrie. Sharon is even wilder that I am,” he smiled. Al’s real first name is Elwood. “In high school if someone had a situation that wasn’t too serious, and per- haps needed a little humor, they would say: Go to El.” And then you could see a twinkle in his eye. Early in life Al attended seminary and was thinking

about a ministerial career. “But it wasn’t for me,” he said. “I’m so glad about what I proceeded to do.” Al got his undergraduate degree and then proceeded to get his Master’s in mental health. “In the early fifties mental health was in its infancy,” he stated. He moved to Idaho and established a career of men-

tal health diagnosis and psychiatry

He traveled in small

planes, going from one small town to another. He would often meet people in churches or schools, or whatever meeting place could be arranged. He lived in various cities, including Boise. But his mental health work was always conducted via small plane travel. Al remembers working at a lumber yard in Gowrie. He also recalls teaching kids to spin their car tires just right out in the country on gravel roads. “There weren’t any blacktop highways back then,” he said. “Some main highways like 169 were blacktop, but there were many hard surface roads.” Al has a home in Dreamland Villa and he has a sum- mer place in Show Low, in the high country on the east side of the valley. He really seems to enjoy life. He mentioned that he has several relatives in the Gowrie area and he tries to come back to his home town every two years.

Pony Express Dance Saturday, Jan. 31

At Starlite Village in Fort Dodge

The Dayton Wranglers Saddle Club will be holding its annual Pony Express Dance Saturday January 31st, at the Best Western Starlite Village Inn & Suites in Fort Dodge. All the proceeds will be given to Easter Seals of Iowa, Camp Sunnyside. Easter Seals of Iowa enables handicapped the experience of the camp facility, for kids who would not otherwise get the chance. Camp Sun- nyside’s mission is to provide exceptional services to ensure that all people with disabilities or special needs and their families have equal opportunities to live, learn, work and play in their communities. Our event is hosted to raise money and be a part is of the Pony Express Riders of Iowa who will ride from all corners of the state to Camp Sunnyside in Des Moines on Easter Weekend. Pony Express motto” we rideThe dance featuring The Jay Clyde Band will start at 7:30 p.m. to midnight, doors open at 6:30 pm, with an auction and raffle. Items for this are always welcome! Admission for adults is $5. Kids 17 and under are $3. Kids under the age of 17 must leave @ 10 pm, due to State law. Come join the fun, lots of nice items donated, a great band and a great cause! For information call 571-2832. Jane Klingson, Chairman

Harcourt flouride levels remain high; signs installed

The City of Harcourt is waiting on results from the water samples sent in, hoping the flouride levels will go down enough so they can stop sending the high flouride notices. The pipes at the water plant are going to be fixed by Bergman Plumbing. The new jake brake signs have been installed on

Highway175.

The utilities spent on the Community Center are a concern since the building only receives $5,560 and $4,896 is the utility expense. There was no report from the Park and Rec or 911 and Ambulance. In regards to Emergency Management, the resig- nation of Tony Jorgensen was discussed and what was planned to fill the vacancy. There was very little change in the budget so the numbers from last year are being used again. The attorney had prepared a lease for the ball dia- mond to the school, changes are being made and then the school will be going over the revised contract. A E911 increase was discussed, dollar amounts and explanations. The increase is probably out of the Coun- cil’s hands, so a plan is needed to adjust for the increase in the budget.

Dayton area residents on ISU Dean’s List

Iowa State University has released their Fall 2014 Dean’s List. Students must have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher and carry a minimum of 12 credit hours of graded course work. The local residents are:

Dayton - Caitlin Renea Pace, Biology; Natalie Marie Williams, Public Relations. Harcourt - Alexander Robert Engquist, Human Sci- ences Special (Non-Degree); Matthew Robert Lundquist, Veterinary Medicine. Gowrie - Anna Lind Brandes, Agricultural Busi- ness; Cassidy Michaela Brinkman, Event Management; Cally E. Duncan, Elementary Education; Katie Elizabeth Jaeschke, Family and Consumer Science Education and Studies; Lindsey Rae Kruse, Elementary Education; Ki- ersten McGuire, Kinesiology and Health. Callender - Jensen Sandgren, Agricultural Business. Stratford - Alisha K. Carlson, Child, Adult, and Family Services; Cainon Keith Leeds, Management In- formation Systems; Kelsey Anne Westrum, Elementary Education; Molly N. Westrum, Child, Adult, and Family Services. Otho - Jessica Kathleen Stumpf, Elementary Educa-

tion.

Paton - Anthony Patric Wilson, Computer Engineer-

ing.

Five Southeast Valley students place at Triton Jazz Festival

The Second Annual Triton Jazz Festival was held on the Iowa Central Community College campus on January 15, 16, 2015. Southeast Valley had five students win in the Class 2A Soloist Division: Jalen Fuss; Miranda Keith; Hannah Peterson; Heather Baird; and Jack Mumper. 21 jazz bands from Class 1A, 2A, 3A, and 4A high schools performed for a panel of judges, who provided clinical critiques.

Dayton Review

Help Wanted Golf Course positions

Oak Park Golf and Recreation is accepting applications for the 2015 golf course and park season. Positions include Superintendent/Club- house manager, part-time clubhouse workers, part-time golf course maintenance worker, and part-time park maintenance worker. Previous restaurant and/or golf course experience a plus. Applications are available at the Dayton City Clerk’s office at 202 1st Avenue SW, Dayton, IA 50530-0045, phone 515-547-2711.

Deadline for receipt of applications at the Clerk’s office is 4:00 p.m. on Friday, February 6, 2015. EOE

office is 4:00 p.m. on Friday, February 6, 2015. EOE F F R R I I
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) ticketmaster.com • 1-800-745-3000 • Ticketmaster Outlets Southeast Valley performs at the Jazz Festival at ICCC.

Southeast Valley performs at the Jazz Festival at ICCC.

Dayton Review

Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015

3

Dayton Review Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015 3 A very large swan and goose enjoy the beautiful

A very large swan and goose enjoy the beautiful weather last Sunday at the Trumpeter Swan Reserve outside Webster City.

Support given for school tax levy proposal at Praire Valley public forum Jan. 21

Some negative comments on Callendar School

By Jill Viles

Public input regarding the Physical Plant and Equipment Levy was welcomed in advance of the Janu- ary 21 Prairie Valley School Board meeting. Voters of the district will decide on February 3 if a property tax increase and/or an income tax increase is warranted. Ap- proximately fifteen citizens arrived ready to pose ques- tions and concerns regarding the proposed levy. Lisa Willardson, business manager for the district, opened the question and answer period by ad- dressing a question often posed to school officials: “If the school has sufficient funds coming in each year, why

does the district need to occasionally ask for an alterna- tive source of funding?” Willardson went on to explain that only certain things may be purchased from the general fund, for ex- ample, teacher salaries and textbooks. The general fund may allow a district to purchase a school bus; however,

a replacement motor may not be purchased with these

funds. In the same line of thinking, a school may use certain funds to pay for solar lights, but must secure alter- native funding to pay the light bill. Currently, the Prairie Valley School District has

a 33 cents per $1,000 of property valuation. On Feb. 3 voters will be asked to approve a $1 per $1,000 property valuation. A school district may ask for an increase in this funding through the implementation of a tax levy; however, passage requires 50% +1 approval from the vot- ers. Typically a levy is passed for a ten year period. The Prairie Valley School District has approved previous tax levies, but it has been so many years, the exact date was not readily identified at the meeting. It was the consensus of the board and per- sons attending the meeting that the last levy expired

Dayton Food Pantry donations, supporters

Submitted by Diane Esperson,

In January 2013, we opened the Dayton Food Pan- try to those in need of emergency food help living in the SEW-Grand school district, which includes Boxholm, Burnside, Dayton, Harcourt, Lehigh and Pilot Mound. Last year started off slow, but as more people learned that it was for more than just Dayton, the usage increased as the year progressed. This 2014 year, we served 62 families at least one or more months during the year, with the monthly average being 19 families. We are open on the third Saturday of each month from 10:00 – 12:00 noon. The participant receives a “shopping list” as a guide to the various things they can pick from and how many. They also receive a voucher to the Dayton Community Grocery for things such as milk, eggs, bread, margarine, meat and fresh pro- duce. With more families using our service, we have a greater need for donations as the shelves get pretty well emptied out each month, but I'm proud to say that people from the area have really stepped up and met the need especially this Thanksgiving and Christmas. Anyone wishing to donate food may leave it at the Emanuel Lutheran Church or in the green container by the door at the Dayton Community Grocery. Any monetary donations can be given or sent to Diane Esperson, 504 2nd St. NE #801, Dayton, IA 50530. We are very fortunate to have so many individuals and organizations that have donated to this worthy cause. Thank You to each and every one of you!!!!

approximately 20 years ago. Additionally, it was clari- fied that a $2.40 bond issue was passed approximately 20 years ago as the previous levy expired; however, it was noted the district cannot pass a bond issue and a Physical Plant and Equipment Levy at the same time. Superintendent Lois Irwin clarified the four po-

sitions those concerned with the future of the Prairie Val- ley School District infrastructure may assume:

1. The district can do nothing.

2. The district can maintain existing buildings.

3. The district can remodel existing buildings.

4. The district can rebuild existing buildings.

Irwin did not identify any one of these choices

as the preferred option for the district. “It’s the commu- nity that makes the decision,” emphasized Irwin. As voters take to the polls on February 3rd, the district wants to remind voters there are three general aims for the proposed tax levy increase:

1. Improve student centered technology;

2. Building and grounds improvement;

3. Improve transportation fleet; An example of student centered technology

Continued on page 6

Ogden Ag Marketing Club meets Feb. 12

Includes 2015 Crop Insurance

The Ogden Ag Marketing Club will sponsor the meeting on Thursday, February 12 beginning at 6:30 pm. The club meets in Ogden at the Leonard Good Commu- nity Center located at 114 SW 8th Street in Ogden. The program is titled Managing Revenue Risk and Using Precision Marketing. Steve Johnson with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and Chris Beavers with Ag Yield will be the featured speakers. Topics to be discussed include 2015 Crop Insurance Changes & New Crop Marketing Strate- gies. Beavers will be presenting in a "Ag Yield - Preci- sion Marketing." The club meets again on Thursday, March 12. Fea- tured speakers will be Elwynn Taylor, ISU Extension Cli- matologist and Steve Johnson, ISU Extension Farm Man- agement Specialist. That program is titled “Crop Weather Update & Managing Crop Risks.” The public is invited. For questions, please contact the Boone County Exten- sion Office at (515) 432-3882.

Dayton Wranglers Pony Express Dance

Saturday Jan. 31 7:30 to Midnight Starlite, Fort Dodge, Jay Clyde Band, Adults $5 Children 17 & under $3, (Children must leave at 10 p.m.) Raffles, Live Auction All Proceeds for handi- capped Kids at Easter Seals of Iowa Camp Sunnyside.

E vEryday M ath P arEnt n ight

EvEryday Math ParEnt night

(Parents of Students in Grades K-4)

(Parents of Students in Grades K-4)

M ath P arEnt n ight (Parents of Students in Grades K-4) Monday, February 2 6:00-7:00
M ath P arEnt n ight (Parents of Students in Grades K-4) Monday, February 2 6:00-7:00

Monday, February 2 6:00-7:00 p.m.

Dayton Elementary Lunchroom (Free childcare will be provided)

If you have questions about the Everyday Math program, you’ll want to attend this informational

If you have questions about the Everyday Math program, you’ll want to attend this informational and engaging event. Participants will also receive free math materials to use with your children at home.

Attention:

Robert Sullivan

Attention: Robert Sullivan Unknown items stored with Moorland Mini Storage will be dis- posed of January 31, 2015 if account is not satisfied prior to this date.

Attention:

Earl Smith

Attention: Earl Smith Unknown items stored with Moorland Mini Storage will be dis- posed of January 31, 2015 if account is not satisfied prior to this date.

31, 2015 if account is not satisfied prior to this date. Correction We sincerely apologize for
31, 2015 if account is not satisfied prior to this date. Correction We sincerely apologize for

Correction

We sincerely apologize for our error regarding Brad Lane's promotion to CEO at Security Savings Bank in last week's issue.

Dayton Review Staff

~ Email your news to daytonreview@lvcta.com ~

Dayton Review

Glenn Schreiber: Editor Samantha Lee: Graphic Designer Amanda DeVries: Clerical, Writing Mary Lou Strandberg: Meditation & Specialty Writer

Box 6 Dayton, IA 50530-0006 Ph# 515.547.2811 • Fax 515.547.2337 E-mail daytonreview@lvcta.com www.daytongowrienews.com

E-mail daytonreview@lvcta.com www.daytongowrienews.com Official Newspaper of Webster County, Iowa Towns of:

Official Newspaper of

Webster County, Iowa Towns of: Dayton, Lehigh, Harcourt, and Southeast Webster-Grand Community School District

Published Wednesdays

DAYTON REVIEW

(USPS 149740) is published weekly for $30 Webster, Boone and Hamilton County, $32 Other Iowa Counties and $34 Out of state; single copy 85¢ by the Dayton Review, 25 South Main, Dayton, IA 50530-0006. Periodicals postage paid at Dayton, Iowa. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the DAYTON REVIEW, PO Box 6, Dayton, IA 50530-0006

4 Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015

Dayton Review

4 Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015 Dayton Review Kidnapping attempts reported in Dayton, Gowrie on Sunday Girls

Kidnapping attempts reported in Dayton, Gowrie on Sunday

Girls are

There were two attempted kidnappings in Gow- rie and Dayton on Sunday, Sept. 28. The failed abduction in Gowrie was at Brockett Park, located on the south side of the town’s business district and reported at 2:50 p.m. The girl was 12 to 13 years old. She got away, running across the alley north to the busi- nesses.

An unconfirmed local source reported the girl being cut from the attempt. Sheriff James Stubbs told local news station KCCI someone with a ski mask approached her from the bushes and as she ran she saw an older, white vehicle with rust, a van, SUV or truck in the alley. In Dayton, the kidnapping attempt was reported at 5:09 p.m. by a girl five to six years old riding her bike by 3rd St. NE and 5th Ave. NE. The Grandview Care Center is located in that block. The man was reported fol- lowing the girl on foot. In both attempts a man wearing a black ski mask with the same vehicle description was reported. Brockett Park in Gowrie is a very popular park where Soccer is played along with Little League sports. The north boundary of the park is lined with bushes mak- ing it impossible to see it. The day care right by the alley also utilizes the park. The 13 year old girl who was a potential kidnap- ping victim Sunday in Gowrie went to school Monday as usual and according to local sources she walked with a group of her friends. There was a report of a kindergarten student not attending Monday due to Sunday’s incident. There was a field trip planned for the kindergartners that stayed on schedule. We need the public’s help to solve these inci- dents. Gowrie and Dayton are 12 miles apart and are on Highway 175. If anyone was in the area of either incident and saw a white van, truck or SUV or something out of place please call the Dayton Police Department 515-547- 2624.Gowrie Police Department 515-352-3800 or the Webster County Sheriff’s Office. You may also call Web- ster County Crime Stoppers at 515-573-1444.

also call Web - ster County Crime Stoppers at 515-573-1444. Abby Duckett was a Toy Wrapper

Abby Duckett was a Toy Wrapper elf in the Winter Concert at the SV Burnside location Thursday, Dec. 18.

Remember

IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE!

The Dayton Review: Ph. 515-467-2811 email daytonreview@lvcta.net

Dayton Review: Ph. 515-467-2811 email daytonreview@lvcta.net Elle Woods, played by Nicole Williams, decides to go to

Elle Woods, played by Nicole Williams, decides to go to Harvard to win back her ex-boyfriend.

decides to go to Harvard to win back her ex-boyfriend. Dayton Elementary Winter Concert Xander Dorman

Dayton Elementary Winter Concert

Xander Dorman was Bright Eyes at the Winter Con- cert Thursday in Burnside.

Fresh, homemade noon specials! and serving breakfast Wed. (1/28) Ham Balls Thurs. (1/29) Hot Beef
Fresh, homemade noon specials!
and serving breakfast
Wed. (1/28)
Ham Balls
Thurs. (1/29)
Hot
Beef
Fri. (1/30)
2
pc Fish
Mon. (2/2)
Tater
Tot Casserole
Tues. (2/3)
Fried Chicken
Wed. (2/4)
Cook’s
Choice
Chef Salad (Mon-Fri)
Breakfast: 6:30 - 8 a.m.
Lunch: 11 - 1 p.m.
$4.99
Dayton
Community Grocery
22 N. Main • 515-547-2217 • Dayton, Iowa 50530

Recipe of the Week

from Dayton

Community Grocery

Wonton Pizza Snakers

9 wonton wrappers non-stick cooking spray 1/2 cup shredded reduced fat mozzarella cheese 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese Italian seasoning (I sprinkled a little bit on each wrapper) 36 pepperoni slices

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a baking sheet with non-stick spray. Add the wonton wrappers to the sheet. Spray them with more non-stick spray. This will en- sure that the wrappers get nice and crispy. Sprinkle some Italian seasoning onto each of the coated wrappers. Next add the mozzarella cheese evenly. Probably around a teaspoon onto each wrapper. Sprinkle some grated Parmesan cheese on top. Add 4 slices of pepperoni to each wonton. Bake in the preheated oven for 8 to 10 minutes, or until wontons are crispy and the cheese is melted. Let cool on paper towels. Serve alone or with pizza sauce!

Reminder

Please send your change of address promptly so that your subscription to The Dayton Review can continue without interruption.

to The Dayton Review can continue without interruption. Spencer Johnson won his 100th match at Gilbert

Spencer Johnson won his 100th match at Gilbert Dec. 6.

Dayton Review

Dayton Review What a difference 140 years can make! The January 14th article in The Review

What a difference 140 years can make!

The January 14th article in The Review about the old school ledgers showing the salaries of teachers in the Dayton School, 1887-1892 caught my eye and interest. In these modern times and inflation pricing it is hard for us to imagine. It took me back to the “Little House” books as schooling was featured in those writings both when the Ingalls children were in school and then when Laura became a “school marm”. It is my understanding that the teaching and learning emphasis was on, as the old song states, “readin’, writin’ and ‘rithmetic”. I believe those

subjects were taught “to the tune of a hickory (or reason- able facsimile) stick”.

I noticed that there was mentioned that in 1873

there would be four months of school beginning De- cember, 1873 and taught by a “Mr. E.A.C.” for $40.00 a month. Was that because this was a rural area and farm- ing, the planting through harvest, took precedence over “book learnin’ “? I know it was few in the more rural areas who had the privilege of a high school education in the 1880’s. The main purpose of school was to learn to read, write and “cypher” well enough to handle the busi- ness of farming or other businesses. I remember Dad tell- ing his graduating class (l922) included a girl who was almost twenty. She came from somewhere in the North Central Iowa area where there was still no high school

but she had a relative living in the St. Charles area with whom she could live and attend school and she took ad- vantage of it.

I wasn’t too surprised to see that the salaries

were quite low (as we currently think) and that they could make all of $1.75 more a month if they did their own “janitoring”. Another thing I would like to know is how large the school building was back in 1873 and how many grades (if designated as lst, 2nd, etc.) there were. I did do some research and learned that the salaries mentioned were quite the norm for the times and rural areas of the Midwestern states. My research also informed me that many of the teachers of the era had to find lodging and board and that there was little left for their own pock- ets after paying for them each month. They, especially women, might also be expected to help with the house- hold chores. It must have been a tiring occupation. I as- sume that doing their own “janitoring” included bringing in the wood for the stoves in the winter and cleaning out the ashes and disposing of them. Were there some kindly older boys trying to gain teacher’s favor who may have done this for her?

I checked back on the “real” Laura Ingalls, not

the TV version, and learned that she began her teaching career at the age of 16. She was a smart girl and had prob- ably completed all that was offered in her own school so

Week of Jan. 23, 1985 Grand Community Homecoming Candi- dates: A king and queen will be selected from this group to reign as the 1985 homecoming royalty Friday night, Jan. 25 at Boxholm. The king and queen will be crowned following the girls and boys basketball contests with Dayton. A dance will be held after the coronation cer- emony. Candidates are Kevin Grove, Lori Muench, Gary Clausen, Denise Dickerson, Mike Dodson, and Debra Holmberg. Leo Luhmann of Dayton is a patient at Trinity Regional Hospital, Fort Dodge. The 1984 edition of WHO’s WHO IN MUSIC will carry the names of three students from Dayton Com- munity School who have been selected as being among the country’s most outstanding high school musicians. They are Susan Anderson, clarinet; Joni Henely, clarinet; and Andrea Kalahar, flute. Larry Hansen is the instrumen- tal music director. Mr. and Mrs. Ron Huffman returned recently from a trip to Mexico. They drove to Texas and took a bus tour to Monterey and Saltillo, Mexico. Mr. and Mrs. Ken Bohlke visited Mr. and Mrs. Dan Bohlke and Megan, Dave and Robbie Bohlke in Iowa City recently. After suffering eight straight losses this season, Joe Benetti and the Stratford Indians won their first game of the season 50 - 46 over Lohrville in non conference action January 15. Doug Carlson led the Indians in their first victory with 13 points, Bill Crystal scored 12, Matt Johnson 11, Steve Monson 8, Marty Swanson 4, and Jerry Wilhelm 2. Stratford made 14 field goals and 21 of 42 free throws. They fouled 14 times. Bill Hood led Lohrville with 15 points. Bill Crystal led the Indians with 9 rebounds, Doug Carlson and Matt Johnson 7, and Marty Swanson 6.

she was prepared to teach others. Because boys lost out on so much schooling due to their family farm obliga- tions, some of her students may have been as old as she was. Education and the tools for it have sure come a long way since those pioneering days. Even since my school time it is amazing the progress in what can be taught and learned and the implements for the teaching are almost unbelievable. When I was in high school to teach in the elementary grades one only had to have a two year col- lege education degree, thus one of the teachers, can’t re- member her name, related more to us in high school than to her fellow teachers. In the mid-1940’s we were still pretty much antiquated, using the L.C. Smith typewrit- ers that were pre-war – way pre-war, but we learned to use a keyboard and that knowledge has enabled some of us from that era to use a computer, even if not to its full

capacity. It was those World Ward II years and the do- ing without things on the home front that started some of the modern progress though. Many things were cre- ated for the “war effort” and adapted for civilian use upon war’s end and the development of technology has been going at a fast pace. Children who can barely talk can use an I phone and play computer and other electronic games quite proficiently. All the technology has enabled many occupations to require fewer people to do bigger jobs --- even farmers, especially farmers. Because of that farms have gotten bigger and bigger, machinery bigger and bigger and capable of handling acreage that it took many human hands, arms, legs and backs to do. Thus the rural populations diminished, taking the little school enrollments down. To keep operating, the schools had to combine, closing buildings and more technology and more school combining etc. etc. etc. That scenario has been repeated and repeated as we all know. The Des Moines Register has been running a se- ries about the closing of rural schools and the impact it has had on the populace around them. There was also a mention of their continuing to follow the saga of the new Prairie Valley school district, now including Gowrie. This resulted in the closing of the Boxholm building which had been hosting only two grades but with great tools at their disposal. We graduates of the Boxholm Consolidat- ed School and Grand Community systems, particularly, have been having our moments of nostalgia over that. In the Register was also an article from a fellow who had at- tended the Jordan-Napier school with his remembrance. We wonder, all over Iowa and probably other states too, what will become of our beloved buildings. Some have already been demolished or sit rotting away. Is all we are going to have left are memories and nostalgia?

by Amanda DeVries

Jan. 25, 1995 Anita K Dargy, Dayton, received a $250 grant from DMACC Alumni Association. Dargy is enrolled in DMACC’s Nursing program. The Tri-County Tourism Group of Dayton has been awarded a $616 grant to produce a brochure promot- ing Boone, Hamilton and Webster counties. The grant is provided by the Central Iowa Tourism Region. Unofficial results from the Webster County Dis- trict 2 special election, Bernard Monson, Gowrie, 461 votes; Dick Tell, Dayton, 334 votes; Arthur Sollie, Gow- rie, 142; Beverly Kehoe, rural Gowrie, 104; Peter Owen- son, Ft. Dodge, 286; Brad VanKooten, rural Callender, 40; Lee Phillips, Otho, 31; Dean Vogel, Otho, 29; and Donna Dornath, Rt 1 Ft. Dodge, 40. The Board has been in a program to move class- es from the Burnside and Dayton centers so each grade section is in the same building. This will result in grades K-2, lower elementary, to be located in Dayton; grades 3-5, upper elementary, to be in Burnside. This will take effect with the 1995-96 school year. Earl Wertz, 89 was photographed picking mums Dec. 5 when the temperature was only 12 degrees above zero. He took them to Fanny Reed, a former Lehigh resi- dent, currently residing at the Grandview Health Care Center, celebrating her 103rd birthday. Evelyn Frances Ervin Enger, Shasta Lake City, California, celebrated her 86th birthday Saturday, Jan. 14, 1995. Evelyn was born in Dayton and is a cousin of Mrs. Maurice (Rosalie) Engman, Dayton. She plans to visit Dayton next summer.

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DNR released rainbow trout in Moorland Pond

1,500 trount released Jan. 24

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources released 1,500 ten to twelve inch rainbow trout in the Webster County Conservation Board’s Moorland Pond Saturday, January 24 at noon. This was the second of two planned stockings for Moorland Pond located on the southwest edge of Fort Dodge. This is a good opportunity for taking kids or novice anglers fishing as trout tend to bite readily after they are stocked.

Whole grade

Continued from front page

members presented a new marching band top they would like the school districts and music boosters to purchase. They said with sharing the expenses the cost is approx- imately $5,000. The bands will use the pants and hats from the Prairie Valley uniforms. Mr. Stoffers is autho- rized to approve the purchase when completed. Ms. Purtell, the K-8 TAG Coordinator presented a new handbook that the board approved. It was announced that IPTV was coming to the elementary to deliver the iPads and discuss the Community Literacy centers. The Every Day Math Program was mentioned, and a parent night is being held Feb. 2. Middle School Wres- tling was to begin Monday, Jan. 19. Mr. Fox told the Board several students qualified for a writing competition through the Noon Sertoma’s in Ft. Dodge. In March, the 4th graders will be tour- ing the Burnside building and getting aquainted with the teachers. There will be a later date set for a parent tour. Information regarding the use of chrome books was also presented.

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6 Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015

Senior Series

Retired Callender Farmer was on forefront of farming with chemicals, soybeans; served on school boards Co-

founder of Webster County Soy Bean Association

home to Iowa and met a recruiter for the Navy who con- vinced him to switch branches. “They sent me to school in the service,” he said. He studied metal working at trade school in Chi- cago for six weeks before being sent to service pilots at a base in Rhode Island. Before he was discharged in 1946 Hanson’s military career took him up and down the east coast and to a naval base in Puerto Rico where he ser- viced planes patrolling for enemy submarines along the coast.

After his military service, Hanson hitchhiked home to Callendar from Minneapolis. Along the way he ran into Elvina Schmadeke, a neighbor in Callender.

way he ran into Elvina Schmadeke, a neighbor in Callender. Garland Hanson and Betty Hanson “She

Garland Hanson and Betty Hanson

“She picked me up and hauled me home,” he

said.

A few years after he returned home he married his high school sweetheart Betty Hanson. She and Gar- land Hanson grew up going to church together and she was friends with his sister Goldie Hanson. When Garland Hanson was a senior in high school she was a freshman. “The most important thing that we did with our

lives back then was Friday night [roller skating] at the Rolland Township Farm Bureau Clubhouse,” she said. Garland Hanson said he had other girlfriends over the years before mar- rying Betty Hanson. “But, [I] still came back to the same one,” he

said.

Together they had three boys, two of whom farm the family’s land to-

day. Having lived nine years short of a century, Garland Hanson has seen the world go through tre- mendous changes. He said when he was a child the roads were made of dirt and families tended to pro- duce most everything they needed for survival—from dairy products, meat, to vegetables and fruits—on their own. “We were self-suffi- cient,” he said. “About the only thing we bought was coal.”

He also said sourc- es of entertainment were much simpler when he was a child. He and his best friend Don Olson used to hide in Olson’s family ap- ple orchard and throw ap- ples at a man who drove by with a team of gray horses.

Continued on page 7

By Cassidy Riley

The terms “farmer” and “celebrity” are rarely used to describe one person. However, in the case of Garland Hanson, 91, of Callendar the two words come together in an unexpected way. In 1972 Hanson was named Master Farmer by Wal- laces Farmer and even graced the cover of the agriculture magazine in the March 11, 1972 issue. He was also fea- tured in Successful Farming and the New York Times that same year. Hanson attributes his media attention to innova- tive work he did with new herbicides and pesticides. “We were some of the first ones to use certain chemicals,” he said. He said on his farm, which was at that time near- ly 2,000 acres, including land he owned and rented, he set aside trial plots to test new chemicals provided by Dow Chemical Company, such as Treflan. “We had a lot of weed problems in those days,” he said, adding pesticides and herbicides were very new at the time. In the Successful Farming article he’s quoted as saying “as far as I’m concerned, there’s no reason to have any weed problems,” because of available chemicals. The article in the New York Times in ’72 pri- marily focused on his work with soybeans. According to the article, soybeans were the new “wonder crop” of the time period and were in high demand. A graphic printed in the paper shows the crop was worth nearly $1.4 bil- lion in exports. Hanson was one of the co-founders of the Webster County Soybean Association. “That was the beginning of soybeans,” Hanson said. “The first soybeans were used for livestock feed. Then we developed the soybean as a commercial prod- uct.”

Next to Hanson’s innovative farming, his wife Betty Hanson attributes some of his fame to his commu- nity involvement. “He was a hard worker and he was a great com- munity worker,” she said. Hanson served on the Callendar School Board for 14 years, Iowa Central Community College Board for 28 years, and he represented Iowa in the American Lu- theran Church Council for eight years, among many other

things. Garland Hanson also gave some of his time up to the United States Navy during World War II. When the U.S. declared war on Japan in December 1941 he was working at an airplane manufacturing plant in California. He and some friends joined the army immediately. “I didn’t have any qualms at all,” he said. “We took for granted that it was our obligation.” Shortly after enlisting in the army he returned

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Dayton Review

Tax Levy

Continued from page 3

involves the former ICN room, now described as Poly- com technology. Currently the district offers psychology, sociology, and Spanish using this medium. According to principal Jim Henrich, 20 students are typically enrolled in each course. The district has been approached by representatives from Iowa Central Community College who would like to see an increase in the number of course offerings. However, this would

require technology upgrades to be initiated by the district. Willardson emphasized the problems faced by the district. “Current technology is ever-changing. What worked well two years ago may be out of date this school year.” Additionally, it was noted that cell phone usage in the building serves to tax the network. Board member, Jim Carlson, expressed support of the levy. “If we do not need to spend the money, we can save it. It’s not ‘use or lose’ money,” he explained. Additionally, the board may decide they are not going to assess the levy in a particularly vulnerable year. For example, if land values drop significantly in the next ten years, the board may vote not to tax the land for fear this

is too great a burden for local farmers.

There was some discussion as to whether the tax levy should originate solely from property taxes. An alternative arrangement involves assessing 20 cents of the dollar requested from income taxes. It was noted that those who do not own property, i.e. those that rent apartments, would be contributing to a proposed tax levy. Some in attendance felt this arrangement would serve to spread the cost of the levy more fairly across the commu-

nity. Board member, Heidi Mc Guire, also expressed

support for the levy. “We’re going to have small fires all the time,” she explained. “For example, the elevator in the high school went out unexpectedly. We have to be prepared for unavoidable circumstances like this.” Dennis Tucker, former Prairie Valley principal, agrees. “We have to keep our facilities up to date, or we will find our students sent elsewhere to school.” Mayor, David Stokesbary, concurs. “If you have a school in your city, this influences property values in

a positive manner.” Additionally, Stokesbary expressed

concern that not enough funds are directed toward the Arts. It was noted, he would love to see a theater at the high school. “Arts develops students as much or more than athletics,” he passionately espoused. “We need to make the arts something special.” Business Manager, Lisa Willardson, suggested the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the district are just as essential. “Buses are a necessity. Our buses must be rotated con- tinuously. We lease the buses, and our lease comes up for renewal every three years.” As the discussion moved toward input from the public, concerns were raised. Many in attendance express lingering hurt and resentment over the closure of the Cal- lender building. In particular, the “giving away” of the building, rather than a sale of the building, was an issue of contention. One citizen was deeply concerned that bids as high as $16,000 were dismissed, and that these funds could have been used by the district. Board member, Shannon Miller, explained the district was wary of an out of state enterprise and didn’t want to see a business failure by an unfamiliar party result in deterioration of the build- ing and property. This sentiment was affirmed by several other citizens in attendance. “The reason people aren’t going to vote for the PPEL is because people are left with a bad taste in their mouths regarding the money wasted in the closure of the Callender building,” said one concern per- son.

“You don’t have good accountability as a board,” exclaimed another. “Now you’re asking us to pay more.” Shannon Miller expressed support in the face of the angry sentiment. “We’re always looking for advice from the public.”

SV Post Prom omelet breakfast Feb. 1

The Southeast Valley Post Prom is having omelet breakfasts Sunday, February 1, 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. at the Dayton Community Center and Sunday, February 8, 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. at the Farnhamville Coop Center. All are invited. Free will donation.

email us your NEWS daytonreview@lvcta.com

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NEWS

daytonreview@lvcta.com

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Dayton Review

Dayton Review Garland Hanson drives a team of horses in 1928. Senior Series Continued from page

Garland Hanson drives a team of horses in 1928.

Senior Series

Continued from page 6

“That was about the biggest thrill we had,” he said. “He’d just holler at us.” Garland Hanson said he applauds most of the technical advancements he’s seen in his lifetime, such as reliable motor vehicles, but he worries about its possible misuse.

“It’s just been tremendous. I really enjoy it,” he said. “The more advancement the better it is. [But] I don’t like seeing little kids with a cell phone or a game and [they] sit and play a game all day long.” In his retirement Garland Hanson said he is thankful for the “wonderful” life he’s had among his friends and family. Despite his surge of fame in the early 70’s he said he considers himself a simple man who still appreciates the simple forms of entertainment. “There’s nothing better than to watch half a doz- en birds in the bathtub at one time,” he said.

half a doz- en birds in the bathtub at one time,” he said. Garland Hanson (second

Garland Hanson (second to left), wife Betty Hanson (center), and sons Dan Hanson (far left), David Hanson (second to right), and Jim Hanson (far right) pose for a family photo.

Prairie Valley School Board discusses computer upgrades, new gym heater

Whole grade sharing affects enrollment

By Jill Viles

The Jan. 21 Prairie Valley School Board meeting initiated with a discussion of upgrades needed to meet the high demand for technology enhanced education in the classroom. The district wants to continue providing a lap- top for students and staff, but expressed concern the com- puters need to be replaced soon as technological changes require upgrading on a regular basis. Currently, high school students receive their own personal computer, but laptops also need to be upgraded at PV elementary as well. It’s estimated it will cost the district $47,000 to replace existing laptops. It was pro- posed the district could purchase half of the computers this year, and add replacement costs for the other half of computers to the next fiscal year. Sean Blunk, PV physical education instructor, submitted information regarding upgrades required for the weight room. The PE department is seeking $6,500 in funds for cardiovascular equipment. Additionally, they have been offered a donation of dumbbells from the Nor- walk School District. High school principal Jim Henrich stated the room is used by students and 6-10 members of the public as well. He added that the treadmills are becoming worn out and a couple of them need to be taken out at this point. Additionally, the heater in the practice gym went out in mid-December. It has been discovered the unit needs a new coil. According to principal Henrich, the heater has been “patched together” to last the winter sea- son. Essentially, the heater is functioning at half capacity, but will need to be placed. The district has received a bid of $11,856 to ser- vice the heater. At this point in the meeting, high school stu- dent, Hannah Peterson, discussed the updated uniforms requested by band members. The Southeast Webster Grand School District will pass one-third of the cost of the uniforms, as will the booster club, comprised mainly

of parents of students in band. The Prairie Valley School District has been asked to pick up the remaining third of the uniforms, and this proposal was unanimously approved. In total, the cost of the uniforms is $14,300. PV high school student Hannah Peterson brought sample garments and it was the consensus those in the attendance, the uniforms were stunning. Band members have entertained bids from three manufacturers, and have agreed to the mid-price bid.

They are going to keep using their pants, but it was noted if the pants are ever damaged, they can be sent back for

a replacement at no charge. The new garments will take

six

months to arrive once they are ordered. Currently, the band has 70 members, but they would like to order

a few more uniforms for those planning to update in the

coming year(s). Discussion was held regarding the Good Con- duct Policy. This topic is especially important as the dis- tricts are grade sharing and want to make sure everyone is on board with the expectations of the new arrange- ment. There will be a shared meeting with both districts to iron out the details of the policy and eliminate gray areas.

In addition, the grade sharing arrangement has altered the way students are counted among the districts and this has led to changing statistics in terms of how open enrollment students are counted. The count becomes confusing as a student may have been an open enrollment student in last year’s count as they attended middle school in Gowrie, but that same student must be counted as a return to Southeast Webster Grand’s count as they now attend school in Burnside. This creates changes in revenue provided to the respective districts as funds must be allocated to the dis- trict in which the student currently attends school. The

Continued on page 11

Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015

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8 Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015

Public Notice

Your Right to Know SWG Board of Education

Southeast Webster-Grand Board of Education January 14, 2015 * 6:00 p.m. Dayton Elementary Library The Board of Education of Southeast Webster-Grand met in regular session and was called to order by President Hector. Roll call -- Hector, Lundgren, Hansen, Hainzinger, Sanders, and

Hinman. Absent - Clausen. Other present were approximately fifteen parents, students, employees, and patrons of the district. Motion by Hainzinger seconded by Sanders to approve the minutes

of the December meeting. All ayes motion carried.

Motion by Hainzinger seconded by Lundgren to approve the agenda as presented. All ayes motion carried. Mr. Stoffers introduced Kelsey Westrum, new employee at South- east Webster-Grand Elementary, Ms. Westrum will be a 1/2 time special education teacher. Ms. Westrum gave the board a brief history of her education and student teaching experience. Mr. Stoffers presented a power point explaining the PPEL funds and why the school board is asking that the PPEL funds be increased to $1.00 including a mix of income surtax. A few questions were asked and answered by Mr. Stoffers and the board members. Motion by Hainzinger to approve the attached list of bills and that the secretary is directed to issue warrants on the proper funds. All ayes motion carried. Motion by Sanders seconded by Hinman to approve a contract for Kelsey Westrum to teach special education in the Dayton building 1/2 time beginning January 5th. All aye motion carried. Motion by Hinman seconded by Lundgren to approve a contract for Daniel Lee as a junior high wrestling coach. All ayes motion carried. Motion by Sanders seconded by Hainzinger to approve an open en- rollment in from the Fort Dodge district for a student that moved from the Des Moines area to Fort Dodge and wishes to attend our school district starting now. All ayes motion carried. Motion by Hinman seconded by Sanders to approve the open enroll- ment for a kindergarten student to attend the Ogden school in the 2015- 2016 school year. All ayes motion carried. Miranda a junior at Southeast Valley high school along with 4 other band members presented a new marching band uniform top that they would like the school districts and music boosters to purchase; with shar- ing of the expenses it would cost the school district approximately $5,000. The bands will be utilizing the pants and hats from the past Prairie Val- ley uniforms. The board authorized Mr. Stoffers to approve the purchase when it is finalized. Motion by Hansen seconded by Hainzinger to approve the new TAG handbook as presented by Ms. Purtell, K-8 Tag Coordinator. All ayes motion carried. Mr. Grandfield discussed the Early Childhood meeting which will be held Thursday night in Dayton. IPTV will be coming Thursday to the elementary to deliver the iPads and discuss the Community Literacy cen- ters. The elementary staff will be having an everyday math for parents’

night before February 6th to explain what they can do at home to help their kids to understand everyday math. The elementary has been discuss- ing the summer reading program and gathering information regarding the implementation of such a program. Mr. Fox informed the board that we had several students qualify for

a writing competition through the Noon Sertoma’s in Fort Dodge. Middle School wrestling begins on Monday. January PD will concentrate on formative assessment. “How technology can improve that assessment.” Late March the 4th grade students will be coming to the Burnside building

to get acquainted with the teachers and get tours of the building. The Par-

ents will be having a tour and meeting after that date. He gave the board information regarding the usage of the chrome books. Mr. Stoffers discussed the PPEL again, touched on an upcoming meeting with the financial management committee before the negotiations meetings. Informed the board of the teacher leadership committee that

will be started in the spring or summer for next year’s grant opportunity. Next board meeting is on February 18th with a goal setting workshop with Harry Heiligenthal to set some goals as a district and superinten- dent. Make up day for the day missed will be made up on March 30th with a teacher PD workday. The Bldg & Grounds committee feels that they would like to meet with the early childhood teachers from the Dayton building regarding the necessity of all the early childhood teachers to be

in

The board will hold an Instructional Support Income Surtax public hearing on February 18th at 5:25 p.m. in the Burnside Library. Regular meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. or follow the hearing. Motion by Lundgren seconded by Sanders to approve the final read- ing of policy 401.10 Physicals and DOT Physicals. All ayes motion car-

ried. Motion by Hansen seconded by Lundgren to approve the resolution

to study reorganization with Prairie Valley.

WHEREAS, pursuant to Iowa Code Section 257.11(2)(c) a school

district is entitled to generate supplemental weighting if it has executed

a whole grade sharing agreement with another Iowa school District and

adopts a resolution to study reorganization with another Iowa school dis- trict with which it whole grade shares, and WHEREAS, the Southeast Webster-Grand Community School District has entered into a whole grade sharing agreement beginning in 2014-15 with the Prairie Valley CSD to whole grade share grades 5-12 and this agreement continues per its current terms through 2018-19 and potentially beyond but will automatically terminate if the two Districts re- organize, and WHEREAS, the Southeast Webster-Grand CSD commits to study reorganization with Prairie Valley CSD to potentially take effect on or before July 1, 2019 and understands that the Prairie Valley CSD will do the same. BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED AS FOLLOWS:

The Board of Directors of the Southeast Webster-Grand CSD

adopts this resolution jointly with the Prairie Valley CSD to study the ques- tion of undergoing a reorganization involving the two Districts to occur on or before July 1, 2019. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED The Board of Directors of the South- east Webster-Grand CSD requests that the School Budget Review Com- mittee and the Iowa Department of Education approve qualification for supplemental weighting for the Southeast Webster-Grand CSD to be submitted for the October 1, 2015 count date and to continue thereafter consistent with Iowa statute and rule for as long as the District requests same and continues to qualify for said supplemental weighting by showing progress toward reorganization. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Board Secretary of the Southeast Webster-Grand CSD shall be directed to submit this resolution

to the SBRC immediately (and before October 1, 2015) for consideration

of entitlement for supplemental weighting. The Board Secretary shall fur-

ther submit any additional documentation in support of this resolution as the SBRC or the DE may require. Motion by:_Hansen Second by:_Lundgren

the same area.

By the following Resolution:

Ayes:

Lundgren,

Hainzinger, Hansen, Hector, Sanders, and Hinman

Nays:

Non This resolution passed and approved this _14th

day of _Janu-

ary_, 2015 President, Board of Directors Southeast Webster-Grand Community School District ATTEST:

Secretary, Board of Director Southeast Webster-Grand Community School District 6 ayes motion carried. Motion by Hansen seconded by Hainzinger that the meeting ad- journ. All ayes motion carried. 8:50 p.m.

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Burnside Prairie Lakes Qomo Hitevision Rasix Computer Center Rieman Music School Specialty, Inc Security Savings Bank
Burnside Prairie Lakes Qomo Hitevision Rasix Computer Center Rieman Music School Specialty, Inc Security Savings Bank
Burnside Prairie Lakes Qomo Hitevision Rasix Computer Center Rieman Music School Specialty, Inc Security Savings Bank

2

subscription

open enrollment

escrow postage

posters

repairs

toner

repairs to instruments supplies ACH billing

United School Bus Seat Servic

Xenia Rural Water District Federal w/h FICA w/h Treasurer of State IPERS Federal w/h FICA w/h Delta Dental Wellmark Treasurer of State Federal w/h FICA w/h Advantage Administrators AFLAC Collection Services Common Remitter Collection Services SWG Education Assoc

Delta Dental Fort Dearborn National Wellmark Avesis Treasurer of State IPERS Dustin Hector Cory Lundberg Coca Cola Decker Sporting Goods Dustin Hector Cory Lundberg Dustin Hector Cory Lundberg Cory Lundberg Curtis Stover Dustin Hector Cory Lundberg Halvorson Trane

bus parts

water & sewer payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll payroll JH BB official JH BB official beverages replacement slip pad JH BB official JH BB official JH BB official JH BB official JH BB official JH BB official JH BB official JH BB official

repairs to HVAC controls

Anderson Erickson Dairy

Milk

Dayton Community Grocery

bread

Domino’s Pizza

pizza lunch

Earthgrains Company (The)

bread

Martin Brothers Dist. Co.

food & supplies

Facilities Cost Mant Group, LLC

services

ABC Pest Control

pest control

Access Systems

color copies

Alliant Energy

electricity

Anderson Implement

shipping

Apple Computer, Inc.

computer

Arnold Motor Supply

bus parts

Black Hills Energy

natural gas

Boone Community School Caseys General Store

Dayton Community Grocery

Dayton Leader Dayton Light & Power Dayton Lumber Company Dayton Review Deck 76 Service

Electrical Engineering & Equipt Colight bulbs

Engel Law Office Feld Fire

Fort Dodge Machine & Supply

open enrollment gasoline food & supplies

advertising electricity & water supplies publication of minutes/ad gasoline

services inspection of fire door

bus parts

Genesis Development

special education services

Grandfield, Daniel

mileage

Grossnickle Plumbing Heatingplumbing repairs

Hawkeye Fire & Safety fire extinguisher inspection Heartland Technology Solutionscomputer repairs

Hoglund Bus Co., Inc. Iowa Central Comm College

Iowa Communications Network

Iowa Department of Human Servicesmedicade refund

Ia School Finance Info Servicebackground check

Johnston Autostores Warehouse bus parts

bus parts

college classes

services

Kwakenat, Michele

mileage

Lehigh Valley Coop Telephone

services

Lennon, Joanne mileage

Martin Brothers Dist. Co. Matthews, Angie Messenger Mid Iowa Sign Midamerican Energy Midwest Wheel NCIBA JH

P & R Entry Doors, Inc.

Personn Concept Compli Serv Dept.posters

Postmaster Burnside Prime Refrigeration Co. Rieman Music Rogers Tire Service Safety Kleen Corp. School Specialty, Inc Screen Surgeons Sherene Kemp SWG CSD Burnside SWG CSD Dayton

Star Energy-Division of Gromark, Inc.LP

Timberline Billing Service LLCmedicade charge

Timothy C. Blair

Trisha Wisecup books

supplies supplies advertising vinyl for scorer’s table electricity bus parts entry fee

repairs

postage repairs repairs repairs supplies supplies supplies open enrollment transportation postage daycare meals

2

garbage

$982.80

$29.25

$35.00

$76,053.43

$150.00

$277.96

$150.00

$371.83

$126.39

$387.84

$35.00

$62.04

$670.10

$425.35

$1,390.54

$200.10

$940.21

$134.69

$255.00

$145.12

$2,367.36

$53.00

$25,575.62

$45,782.50

$835.86

$20.90

$240.60

$2,053.26

$346.42

$1,886.00

$1,033.39

$907.79

$37,638.87

$284.15

$11,878.90

$44,405.00

$100.00

$100.00

$141.27

$64.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$1,074.40

$2,649.18

$53.74

$460.20

$208.86

$15,942.64

$2,950.00

$125.00

$996.60

$459.89

$11.09

$999.00

$854.27

$4,833.04

$10,464.25

$851.87

$562.29

$40.00

$2,757.96

$360.44

$314.90

$123.12

$290.35

$405.00

$330.00

$14.79

$282.85

$63.90

$1,150.66

$196.45

$1,820.37

$47.40

$4,356.00

$2.75

$1,470.28

$48.00

$220.85

$772.20

$1,084.23

$36.10

$2,054.40

$9.98

$491.00

$160.00

$5,804.50

$231.86

$30.00

$100.50

$25.85

$33.81

$185.00

$67.00

$25.00

$449.00

$1,008.70

$310.00

$247.50

$65.96

$963.90

$4,435.66

$122.01

$705.00

$75.00

WCCTA services $27.84 Wex Bank gasoline $241.34 $438,772.93 WEBSTER CO. BOARD OF SUPERVISORS Regular Meeting
WCCTA
services
$27.84
Wex Bank
gasoline
$241.34
$438,772.93
WEBSTER CO.
BOARD OF
SUPERVISORS
Regular Meeting
January 13, 2015

The Board of Supervisors met in Session on the above date with the

following members present: Fletcher, Dencklau, Campbell, and Leffler. Absent: Singer. Moved by Leffler, seconded by Campbell to approve minutes of the January 6, 2015 regular meeting. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Campbell, seconded by Fletcher to approve hiring and employment of Hans Becker, Assistant County Attorney at a salary of $54,000.00 effective January 14, 2015. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to receive and place on file the Webster County Compensation Board Elected Officials salary recom- mendation for fiscal year 2015-2016 as follows:

Supervisor

Chairman

Sheriff

Auditor

Treasurer

Recorder

Attorney

36,050

37,050

85,000

63,860

63,860

63,860

100,000

Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Leffler, seconded by Campbell to approve appointment of Margo Knippel and Berna Tucker, to Planning and Zoning Board. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Campbell, seconded by Fletcher to approve appointment

of Jane Burleson, Pat McLoud and Mick Flaherty to the Webster County Magistrate Appointing Committee. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to approve appointment to the Condemnation Jury as follows:

OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF AGRICULTURAL PROPERTY

Steven Doster Bill Secor, Jr David Stein Kent Pliner CITY AND TOWN PROPERTY Laura Eastwood Claire Williamson

Dana Hotz

Richard Merrill

Clara Krog

Lloyd Stewart

Alan Wooters

Al Conkling

Dayton Review

Jody Rossow

Mike Doyle

Jim Bice LICENSED BROKERS David Bradley

Chris Parker

Mark Klever

Tim DuBois

Doris Stanek

Dwight Guthrie

Craig Patterson BANKER, AUCTIONEERS AND PROERTY MANAGERS Scott Klingson

Kraig Barber

Dave Flattery

Sid Bodholdt

Michael D Callon

Brent Larson

Ted Beran Motion carried unanimously. The Webster County Fair Board updated the Board on their project and requested fiscal year 2015-2016 funding. No action taken. Moved by Campbell, seconded by Fletcher to receive and place on file County Recorder’s Report of Fees Collected for period ending Decem- ber 31, 2014. (Copy on file in Auditor’s office). Motion carried unani- mously. Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to approve and authorize Chair to sign Contract between Owens-King Company and Webster County Recorder for security storage of county microfilm. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Leffler, seconded by Campbell to adopt the following reso-

lution:

WHEREAS, the Iowa Association of County Supervisors recognizes that a high quality transportation system serves as the artery for economic

activity and that the condition of the infrastructure in the State of Iowa is a key element for our future economic growth; and WHEREAS, an integral part of the State of Iowa’s Road Use Tax Fund (RUTF) is the fuel tax, which has not been significantly increased since 1989, while maintenance and construction costs have more than doubled during that same timeframe; and WHEREAS, there have been several state-wide studies completed over the past 10 years identifying the requirement to significantly increase the amount of funding for the administration, maintenance and improve- ments to our state-wide public roadway system, including the 2006 Road Use Tax Fund (RUTF) study, the 2011 Road Use Tax Fund (RUTF) study completed per 2011 Iowa Code Section 307.31, and the 2011 Governor’s Transportation 2020 Citizen Advisory Commission (CAC) created by Gov- ernor Branstad; and WHEREAS, the 2008 TIME-21 study documented the fact that under today’s funding structure and highway usage, over 20% of the travel done in Iowa is by out-of-state drivers while only 13% of the state’s road use revenues come from out of state drivers; and WHEREAS, the funding provided by the implementation of the TIME-

21 Fund in 2009 is inadequate to meet the critical maintenance

and improvements needs for the State of Iowa’s transportation sys- tem; and WHEREAS, 95% of Road Use Tax Fund revenues are required by the Iowa Constitution to be spent only on our roadways; and WHEREAS, due to the severe shortage in state funding to meet the critical needs of our roadway system, several Iowa counties have had to resort to issuing millions of dollars of bonds to pay for their most critical maintenance needs, which will have to be paid off through property taxes;

and WHEREAS, Webster County has issued $0.00 in bonds to pay for our most critical roadway and bridge needs; and WHEREAS, the 2011 Governor’s Transportation 2020 citizen Advi- sory Council report to Governor Branstad and the Iowa Legislature identi- fied the need for at least $215 million per year of increased funding over the next 20 years, in addition to the funding being provided by the TIME-21 revenues, just to meet the most critical needs of our transportation infra- structure; and WHEREAS, the Iowa Good Roads Association, the Iowa County Engineer’s Association, and numerous business related associations throughout Iowa have publically supported the call for increased RUTF funding; NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Iowa State Associa- tion of County Supervisors and the Webster County Board of Supervisors strongly encourages the implementation a long-term, sustainable trans- portation funding solution to address the critical needs of our infrastructure system.

1. Provide adequate state-wide funding to offset the projected

shortfall for our most critical needs of over $215 million annually through an increase of the motor fuel tax revenues.

2. Enable the Iowa Department of Transportation to provide

primary highway funds to counties and cities in lieu of federal funds, pro- viding increased efficiencies for state and local governments.

3. Increase the permit fee for oversize/overweight vehicles.

4. New funding should be distributed consistent with the Road

Use Tax Fund distribution formula. And, BE IT ALSO RESOLVED that the Iowa State Association of County Supervisors and the Webster County Board of Supervisors support the ongoing evaluation of creative, supplemental solutions to increased RUTF funding. Resolved this 13th day of January, 2015 at Fort Dodge, Iowa. Webster County Board of Supervisors s/Keith Dencklau Chairperson Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Campbell, seconded by Fletcher to approve and authorize Chair to sign utility permit from CenturyLink to bore dual armored fiber optic communication cable under 170th Street west of Samson Avenue between Section 1 and 12, Township 89 North, Range 28 West, Cooper Township. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to allow claims. Motion car- ried unanimously. Moved by Leffler, seconded by Campbell to adjourn the meeting. Motion carried unanimously. s/Carol Messerly s/Keith Dencklau Webster County Auditor Chairman, Board of Supervisors Regular Meeting January 20, 2015

The Board of Supervisors met in Session on the above date with the following members present: Fletcher, Dencklau, and Leffler. Absent:

Campbell and Singer. Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to approve minutes of the January 13, 2015 regular meeting. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to approve wage increase

for Douglas Darrah, Correctional Officer to $16.85 per hour effective Janu- ary 9, 2015, per labor agreement. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Leffler, seconded by Fletcher to receive and place on file resignation of David Kraft, Correctional Officer effective January 8, 2015. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to receive and place on file the resignation of Catherine Casey, Case Manager effective January 22,

2015. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Leffler, seconded by Fletcher to receive and place on file

resignation of Karli Ludwig-Payer, Dental Hygienist effective January 14,

2015. Motion carried unanimously.

Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to approve hiring and em- ployment of Krystal K. Steck, Typist Advanced, effective January 21, 2015 at the rate of $12.75 per hour per recommendation of Jessica Wernimont, Child Support Recovery Unit. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Leffler, seconded by Fletcher to approve and authorize Chair to sign Healthcare Flexible Spending Account Amendment for the Flexible Benefits Plan with Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield of Iowa, effec- tive January 1, 2015 limiting participant’s salary reduction for the plan year to $2,500. (Copy on file in Auditor’s office). Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to receive and place on file resignation of Lynda Pingel as Coleman Sanitary Sewer Board Trustee, effective January 12, 2015. Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Leffler, seconded by Fletcher to adopt the following Reso-

lution: RESOLUTION, to initiate vacation of part of Webster County road originally known as the “Jackson and Deer Creek Road”, now known as Garfield Avenue, lying south of the right of way of the road now known as 150th Street, running north and south, being 33 feet in width each side of the Range Section line between Section 36, Township 90 North, Range 30 West, Jackson Civil Township and Section 31, Township 90 North, Range

29 West. Deer Creek civil Township, all west of the fifth Principal Meridian,

Webster County, Iowa. WHEREAS, said portion of road right of way is a dead end and not used by the general public, and WHEREAS, the portion of road right of way lying south of the right of way of the Union Pacific Railroad was vacated January 29, 2008 and filed for record on January 30, 2008 as Instrument No. 2008-528, and WHEREAS, vacating said parcel would not land lock any landowner,

and WHEREAS, vacating said parcel would return same to the county tax roll, thereby benefiting the general public and returning said parcel to productive use, NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the Webster County Board

Continued on page 9

Dayton Review

Webster County Legal

Continued from page 8

of Supervisors hereby proposes the vacation of the following described

parcel of road easement, to wit:

All that portion of the road originally known as the “Jackson and Deer Creek Road”, now known as Garfield Avenue, lying south of the right of way of the road now known as 150th Street, being 33 feet in width each side of the Range Section line between Section 36, Township 90 North, Range 30 West and Section 31, Township 90 North, Range 29 West of the Fifth Principal Meridian, Webster County, Iowa, and containing 0.68 acres more or less. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that a public hearing by the Webster County Board of Supervisors on the proposed vacation of said parcel of road easement be set for 10:30 A.M., Tuesday, February 17, 2015, in the Board of Supervisor’s Room of the Webster County Courthouse, Fort Dodge, Iowa 50501, and the County Engineer send notice to adjacent property owners explaining proposed vacation and requesting their com- ments or claims.

s/Keith Dencklau ATTEST:s/Carol Messerly Keith Dencklau, Chairperson Carol Messerly Webster County Board of Supervisors Webster County Auditor Motion carried unanimously. Moved by Fletcher, seconded by Leffler to adjourn the meeting. Motion carried unanimously. s/Carol Messerly Keith Dencklau Webster County Auditor Chairman, Board of Supervisors

/

s

Webster County Claims Register Report for 01-13-2015

A

Plus Auto Glass

Outside Services

393.52

Abc Pest Control Inc

Pest Control

62.00

Access Systems

Software

1,079.08

Access Systems Leasing

Copier Lease

250.61

Acco Brands Usa Llc

Shredder Repair

412.21

Advanced Systems Inc

Office Supplies

78.33

Ahlers & Cooney Pc

Urban Renewal

1,036.00

Shed Supplies

91.62

Airgas North Central Inc Allscripts

Monthly Maintenance Fee

138.00

Amhof, Roxanne Mileage

51.51

Anderson, Katherine

Mileage

294.78

Anderson, Mindy

Cell Phone Reimbursement

25.00

Arnold Motor Supply

Stock

102.28

Birdsell, Tamara

Mileage

222.88

Black Hills Energy

Utilities

1,616.86

Bob Barker Company

Supplies

208.08

Brennan, Jennifer

Rent Payments

300.00

Calhoun County Eca

Lighting

8.75

Calhoun-Burns & Associates IncBridge Inspections

Casey, Catherine Casey’s General Stores Inc Center For Disease Detection

Travel Expenses Fuel Test Fee Evaluation Supplies Rent & Expense Wages

Central Ia Juvenile Det Center Central Iowa Distributing Inc Clark, Richard Cochrane, Toni Zehr

2,110.80

23.46

2,326.38

99.50

13,614.00

330.20

400.00

3,041.00

Cole, Dr Dan

Medical Examiner Expense

200.00

Community Health Center

Voucher Program

80.00

Condon, Kristine

Mileage

197.89

Consolidated Mangement Co IncFood Service

8,847.01

Cost Advisory Services IncFy 2014 Cost Allocation

6,100.00

Crites, Charlotte

Clinic Cleaning

300.00

Daniel Tire Company

Repairs

183.79

Dayton Review

Legals

1,106.03

Utilites

45.79

Dayton, Town Of De Lage Landen

Copier Lease Equipment

314.75

Dearborn National

Life Insurance

575.36

Des Moines Stamp Mfg Co

Office Supplies

493.35

Edman, Alisha Mileage

176.97

Eldora Pharmacy

Pharmaceutical Services

2,074.59

Electronic Engineering

Service

2,295.60

Fastenal Company Stock

354.48

Force America Inc

Stock

3,031.63

Fort Dodge Ford Inc

Service

208.24

Fort Dodge Glass Tinting

Coat Windows

90.00

Fort Dodge Machine & Supply Stock & Parts

410.54

Fort Dodge Water Dept

Water

381.34

Foster Funeral Home & CrematioMedical Examiner Expense

600.00

Freeman, Susan Wages

535.50

Frontier Communications

Phone Service

1,911.48

Garcia, Samantha

Wic Interpreter Fees

10.00

Gargano, Mark

Medical Examiner Expense

600.00

Gehlhausen, Dawn

Mileage

118.84

Gene Moeller Oil Company

Fuel

172.62

Goldfield Comm Services CorpInternet Charges

41.23

Goodner, Brenda

Mileage

297.85

Gowrie Municipal Utilities

Utilitles

342.96

Gowrie News

Legals

1,106.03

Gray Sanitation Garbage

44.00

Grell, Melissa

Phone/Mileage

220.33

Gunderson Funeral Home IncFuneral Services

Halfwassen, Angie

Phone Reimbursement

Mileage & Travel Expenses

700.00

Gurnett, Teresa Mileage

24.48

25.00

Hameed, Jameel

Rent & Expense

400.00

Hamilton, Monica

Mileage

68.34

Hanna, Laura

Mileage

186.66

Hauser, Alison

213.86

Henderson Products Inc

Parts

1,731.00

Hepp, Blaine

Contracted Wages

2,527.93

Hiway Truck Equip Co

Frieght Charges

331.60

Hotsy Equipment Company

Shed Supplies

38.59

Householder, Elizabeth

Phone Reimbursement

25.00

Howell, Haley

Phone Reimbursement

159.64

Howell,

Julie A

Mileage

166.27

Hugghins, Cathy Wages

700.00

Info Dog Security Llc

Shredding

38.95

Iowa Prison Industries

Supplies

307.73

Iowa St Assoc Of AssessorsAssociation Dues 2015

600.00

 

Isac

School Of Instruction

130.00

J

& K Marketing, Jack BradleyContracted Wages

810.00

Jifi Print Inc

Supplies

518.85

Jim’s Service Inc

Vehicle Services

90.48

Johnson Controls Inc

Service Agreement

252,062.00

Jones, Rebecca Mileage

85.68

Josten, Kathleen A

Cell Phone Reimbusement

25.00

Kavanaugh, LindsayCell Phone Reimbusement/Mileage

56.37

 

Dental Services

297.82

Kelch, Dr. Pamela Kerwin, Linda

Phone Reimbusement/Mileage

163.21

Kimball Midwest Stock

145.51

Kittleson, Valerie

Mileage

226.44

Lacaille, Carman

Rent & Expense

400.00

Latella, Dr Joseph

Medical Examiner Expense

82.00

Lehigh Valley Coop Tele

Utilities

172.47

Lehigh, City Of

Utilities

96.30

Lincoln, Janel

Wages

420.00

Liska, Laccey

Mileage

102.00

Lucas County Sheriff

Service Fees

29.94

Marco Inc

Copier Lease

1,160.85

Matheson Tri-Gas Inc

Welding Supplies

275.19

Mcgill, Andrew L

Telephone

50.00

Mediacom

Cable

167.47

Michael, Brett

Wages

1,190.34

Midamerican Energy

Utilities

1,310.05

Midas Council Of GovernmentsMeeting Expense

17.25

Midwest Wheel Co

Stock & Parts

1,634.10

Nanniga, John

Patient Treatment

450.00

Napa Auto Parts

Shed Supplies

5.33

Napa Auto Supply

Stock & Parts

880.90

Nelson, Erin

Contracted Wages

513.18

Next Generaton TechnologiesOffice Equipment

59.08

Nichols, Tricia

Mileage

109.15

O’connor, Barb Mileage

18.87

Office Elements

Office Supplies

748.03

O’halloran International Inc

Stock & Parts

2,623.62

Olson, Staci

Medical Examiner Expense

396.08

Stock & Parts

865.35

O’reilly Auto Parts Palace Park Mch Llc

Rent Payments

240.00

Palmer, Katherine

Mileage

166.77

Payne, Kelly

Rent Payments

250.00

Pederson Sanitation

Garbage

88.00

Petty Cash Sheriff

Postage & Freight

Fire Extinquishers

429.20

Powerplan

Parts & Stock

1,044.53

Prairie Energy Cooperative

Lighting

106.68

Prescott, Kari

Mileage

154.53

Proshield Fire Protection

419.00

Rees Hydraulic Sales & Service

Parts

335.26

Reliable Office Supplies IncShop Office Supplies

53.62

Reserve Account Postage

1,003.55

Roger’s Tire Service

Tires And Tire Repair

24,679.00

Royal Properties Llc

Rent

1,400.00

Ruge, Ashley

Mileage

157.08

Schoon, Karen L Telephone

50.00

Screenvision Direct

Advertising

204.00

Sibbitt, Dani

Mileage

193.30

Star Energy Llc

Fuel

1,070.26

Storey Kenworthy/Matt ParrottOffice Supplies

1,155.92

The Messenger

Legals/Publications

912.35

Timmerman, Susan Mileage

382.51

Town & Country Veterinary Clin Dog Pound

301.00

Treasurer State Of IowaConservation Board Expense

121.00

Trimark Central Billing

Inmate Medical

220.00

Trinity Regional Medical CenteMedical Records

20.00

Truck Country Of Iowa

Stock And Parts

1,422.80

Ubben, Courtney Mileage

228.48

Union Cab Company Inc

Cab Passes

240.00

United Property Group Llc

Rent Payments

600.00

United States Cellular

Cell Phone

361.85

Upper Des Moines OpportunityContracted Services

75.00

Us

20 Association

150.00

Uspca

Utley, Lacey

Vaske, Marcene

Verizon Wireless

2015 Membership Dues Memebership

50.00

Mileage

86.70

Rent & Expense

400.00

Phone Services

2,518.30

Visiting Nurses Services Of Ia

Idph-Hcci

1,450.00

W

& H Coop Oil Company

Fuel

41,257.05

Walmart Community

Supplies

574.91

Walters Sanitary Service Inc Garbage Services

163.25

Webster Calhoun Coop Tele

911 Circuits

738.75

Webster Co TelecommunicaContracted Services

36,719.00

Webster County Sheriff

Service Fees

887.02

Wells Fargo Remitance Center

Supplies

5,356.10

Wic

210.00

Witte, Joel

Printer Ink Cartridges Cell Phone Reimbursement

25.00

Woolstock Mutual TelephoneComputer Services/Internet

159.85

Wright County Sheriff

Service Fees

41.80

Wuebker, Jennifer

Mileage

175.95

Youth & Shelter Services

Shelter Services

186.60

WEBSTER COUNTY Auditor
WEBSTER COUNTY
Auditor

Iowa Wages Publication Report Reported Wages: Gross

Reporting Period From 01/01/2014 to 12/31/2014

Employee Name

Albrecht, Jesse

Alexander, Brandi

Anderson, Dale

Anderson, Katherine

Anderson, Mindy

Andrews, Kim

Angstrom, Brenda

Badger, Irvy

Bahr, Jason

Baldridge, Ryan

Becker, Jesse

Been, Allyson

Benson, Jennifer

Benton, Kevin

Berglund, Mark

Berglund, Philip

Bintz, Warrren

Birdsell, Tamara

Brackey, Jordan

Brown, Jamie

Brown, Keane

Bunda, Kendal

Campbell, Mark

Carlon, David

Carlson, Jenna

Carnelley, Ivy

Casey, Catherine

Chalstrom, Gordon

Chalstrom, Patsy

Chance, Jennifer

Chase, Dennis

Chernik, Brent

Choquette, Christopher

Christie, Derek

Clark, Carolyn

Claude, Vickie

Cloud, Anthony

Coleman, Cori

Condon, Kristine

Cooper, Dennis

Cooper, Nancy

Copper, Chance

Cosgrove, Judy

Cosgrove, Matthew

Cramer, David

Daniels, Jolene

Darrah, Douglas

Davis, Kayla

Dencklau, Doug

Dencklau, Keith

Dencklau, Shawna

Dencklau, Violet

Dolata, Michael

Durschmidt, Keith

Eastwood, Brittany

Edman, Alisha

Eldal, Paul

Eldal, Tina

Elifrits, Steven

Elkin, Emily

Escobedo, Shelly

Estergaard, Scott

Feldmann, Sarah

Ferrari, Troy

Fisher, Ron

Fleener, Luke

Fletcher, Clark

Ford, Erin

Friedrich, Galen

Frye, Sherri

Gadbury, Janet

Gaillard, Thomas

Gansz, Kenneth

Gartin, Amber

Gehlhausen, Dawn

Geist, Laura

Gernhart, Mary

Gillespie, Gary

Gillette, Carol

Gimer, Peggy

Goodner, Brenda

Grady, Kay

Grady, Tom

Gregory, Joseph

Grell, Melissa

Greve, Dolores

Grossnickle, Ronald

Guddall, David

Gurnett, Laura

Guthrie, Ashley

Halfwassen, Angela

Hamilton, Monica

Hammersland, Danny

Hammitt, Joann

Hanna, Laura

Hansen, Karen

Hanson, Earl

Hanson, Georgene

Wages

6,033.60

26,856.62

68,806.50

44,153.63

21,630.96

45,043.01

39,939.32

30.00

61,730.30

59,591.53

53,875.44

17,803.00

85,692.28

45.00

30.00

30.00

30.00

30,356.67

70,864.01

6,501.11

47,282.75

30.00

34,708.10

15.00

27,392.10

432.00

51,043.11

30.00

30.00

26,598.73

15.00

432.00

10,857.00

45,835.05

39,377.02

57,014.88

46,663.63

64,359.42

24,400.50

15.00

15.00

11,924.03

60,030.93

57,039.28

30.00

40,001.06

31,828.32

3,062.86

90.00

34,708.10

34,687.76

30.00

402.00

15.00

14,800.80

23,341.13

30.00

48,024.87

53,564.82

36,605.66

40,170.23

47,044.81

43,349.73

30.00

46,762.39

64,546.63

35,568.59

38,703.46

47,863.49

40,104.96

41,818.61

1,641.50

15.00

249.00

62,929.70

38,948.67

30.00

70,464.87

52,053.56

57,014.90

11,551.50

15.00

15.00

47,523.15

46,934.81

30.00

60.00

45.00

855.00

20,961.67

51,792.00

25,931.27

46,594.27

30.00

24,458.12

43,235.75

30.00

30.00

Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015

9

Hanson, Marty

30.00

Haraldson, Tracy

25,874.45

Harrison, Angela

55,538.08

Hauser, Alison

58,205.42

Hay, Kathleen

45,023.33

Hays, Kenneth

61,934.25

Hearn, Shelly

48,024.85

Heatherington, Lyle

15.00

Heesch, Jayson

65,548.57

Henderson, Brian

35,703.10

Herzog, Darren

45,023.33

Heun, H

47,558.88

Heun, Jeffrey

46,908.65

Hickey, Pamela

14,620.44

Hicks, Chad

47,906.79

Hofbauer, Daniel

48,109.08

Hofbauer, Randolph

47,690.18

Householder, Elizabeth

52,490.24

Housken, Daniel

30.00

Housken, Duane

30.00

Howell, Haley

20,906.19

Howell, Julie

57,255.64

Hubbell, Luke

47,838.50

Iles, Dale

49,940.08

Jacobs, Malinda

32,777.13

Janssen, Bradley

38,925.98

Jawish, April

13,870.26

Johll ii, Brian

80,065.48

Johnson, Emily

25,056.39

Johnson, James

30.00

Jones, Amy

35,013.45

Jones, Erline

39,896.96

Jones, Mackenzie

330.00

Jones, Rebecca

22,937.76

Jorgensen, Michael

30.00

Jorgensen, Tony

47,844.18

Josten, Kathleen

59,797.12

Junkman, Ricky

49,967.98

Kaufman, Bonnie

30.00

Kavanaugh, Lindsay

29,677.20

Keller, Paul

34,184.66

Kenyon, Michael

62,387.00

Kerwin, Linda

25,808.32

Kilen, James

48,389.90

Kinne, Janet

90.00

Kist, Thomas

90.00

Kittleson, Valerie

34,324.02

Knickerbocker, Cindy

12,395.04

Knippel, Brett

61,025.93

Koester, Bradley

90.00

Kraft, David

35,995.88

Kruse, Kevin

67,947.19

Lamoureux, Meghan

35,129.53

Lara, Joan

38,505.79

Larson, Daniel

90.00

Larson, Donald

15.00

Larson, Hannah

5,368.83

Lau, Deanna

120.00

Lauer, Robert

48,212.26

Lee, David

47,794.42

Leffler, Merrill

34,708.10

Leffler, Theresa

5,979.60

Legvold, James

45.00

Lehman, Donald

90.00

Lewandowski, Daniel

35,103.21

Lewis, Sara

15,306.85

Lewis, Trinity

47,334.39

Licht, Scott

48,000.12

Liska, Laccey

25,232.00

Lizer, Sheilah

46,704.58

Lovain, Heather

14,278.87

Markert, Steven

30.00

Martinson, Tanya

41,922.96

Mcgill, Andrew

65,761.53

Mcgill, Jacob

280.00

Merrill, Richard

120.00

Messerly, Carol

60,030.93

Messerly, Jan

60,041.19

Miller, Geoffrey

58,092.87

Minikis, Julie

45,023.33

Moenck, Darrell

30.00

Montgomery, Laura

37,893.77

Murray, April

58,617.28

Nahnsen, Colleen

39,416.97

Napier, Shelley

18,443.19

Nellis, Brian

36,034.09

Nellis, Ricke

10,662.00

Nelson, Christy

39,377.05

Nelson, Gary

15.00

Nelson, Jason

30.00

Nelson, Melissa

35,419.13

Nichols, Tricia

54,536.35

Nickelson, Sonya

44,696.41

Nielsen, Natasha

24,264.05

Nowell, Tanner

35,653.96

O’brien, Christopher

59,325.10

O’connor, Barbara

22,321.00

Olson, Deanne

9,617.07

Osterberg, Denise

3,903.38

Owen, Lori

42,614.14

Palmer, Katherine

26,338.00

Patz, William

15.00

Paullin, Joseph

59,792.04

Peterman, Jennifer

26,800.49

Peterson, Cody

46,824.01

Peterson, Daymon

47,897.10

Peterson, Dean

48,484.11

Peterson, Emily

10,471.99

Peterson, Joseph

32,712.39

Peterson, Michael

15.00

Peterson, Patrick

30.00

Pliner, Doreen

38,970.38

Porter, Amy

66,937.46

Powers, Tyler

16,713.66

Prescott, Kari

77,487.01

Pringle, Lavonne

56,169.26

Pyle, Joshua

32,947.77

Rial, Kristine

48,024.85

Riley, Patrick

22,085.56

Ripperger, Allison

57,435.31

Roderick, Angela

45,041.58

Rogers, Ben

15.00

Roosa, Donald

30.00

Royster, Dwight

15.00

Royster, Marsha

2,758.77

Royster, Mathew

7,062.94

Ruge, Ashley

10,824.00

Runyon, Harold

30.00

Ryan, Renee

36,449.76

Sams, Ladon

46,653.58

Samuelson, Marsha

15.00

Sandgren, Carl

30.00

Saxton, Jamie

33,257.79

Scherff, David

20,062.57

Schmehr, Deborah

96.80

Schoon, Karen

47,068.39

Schreiber, Michael

44,201.45

Scott, Austin

10,150.86

Sheda, Jennifer

53,298.95

Shehan, Patrick

45,033.33

Sheker, Randy

48,575.88

Shelledy, Nannette

43,944.16

Sibbitt, Danielle

22,359.49

Simpson, Cory

25,991.47

Singer jr, Robert

34,729.02

Smith, Kim

45,401.32

Sparks, Alyssa

31,299.84

Spencer, Brad

40,979.23

Stanberg, Bobby

47,571.25

Stanberg, James

29,281.96

Steinberg, Caroline

45,023.34

Stewart, Jacob

47,867.28

Stoneburner, Kathleen

37,907.20

Strait, Rodney

70,781.99

Stringer, Amy

49,689.60

Struecker, Dale

1,571.50

Struve, Adam

10,123.94

Continued on page 10

10 Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015

10 Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015 Swing and miss "When pride cometh, then cometh shame, but with

Swing and miss

"When pride cometh, then cometh shame, but with the lowly is wisdom." Proverbs 11:2 Do you remember playing softball in grade school? When it was our turn to bat, we walked to home plate full of confidence. Then the pitcher would toss the ball, and with a triumphant swing, we just knew that it was a home run. Instead, we missed the ball and all of a sudden, we were on the verge of striking out. We may not play softball anymore, but I think this is something we all do (well, most of us anyway). We march proudly to the home plate (our daily lives), think- ing we will hit it over the fence, but in fact, the opposite happens. What causes our downfall? The word is found in the Scripture at the begin- ning of the article. Pride! We all become a little bit con- ceited, or a little bit over confident, and then we start to boast about who we are and what we are doing for the Lord. We start calling for "home runs" before we even hit the ball, and then we expect to be treated special, like a super star. (Proverbs 18:12) Most importantly, we for- get the reason we have hit "home runs" in our life before (Proverbs 22:4) We forget that everything we have, and everything great we can do, is from God.(Psalm 18:32) It's always interesting to see how much we rely on God when we are on our knees, but how much we rely on ourselves once He helps us get back on our feet. I

find it interesting that when we start relying on ourselves, that's when we find ourselves back on our knees search- ing for God's grace. What accomplishments have you had in your life? What things are you good at? And are you trying to get other people to notice what you can do, or are you thanking God for what He has given you the ability to do?

a good look at your life

this week and determine whether the abilities you have are your treasure, or is the God who has given them to you the treasure?

Until next week

take

who has given them to you the treasure? Until next week take Public Notice Your Right

Public Notice

Your Right to Know City of Harcourt

City of Harcourt Regular Meeting January 19, 2015 at 7:00 p,m. The regular meeting of the City of Harcourt met at City Hall on January 19, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. Mayor Brundage called the meeting to

order with the following Council present: Hansen, Engquist, Greenfield, and Gallentine. Council Member Peterson was absent. Also present Robert Barnett. Moved by Engquist, seconded by Hansen to approve the Agenda as presented. AYES: ALL M/C Moved by Gallentine, seconded by Hansen to approve minutes as presented. AYES ALL M/C. REPORTS AND UPDATES

A. Water and Sewer: Barney reported on bacterial samples,

fluoride, sodium, and nitrates that he had sent in; he is hoping fluoride levels go down enough we can stop sending out fluoride notices. Barney

stated that he still has some more samples that he will need to collect and send in. Barney provided estimate for fixing the pipes at the water plant. Motion by Gallentine, seconded by Hansen to have Bergman Plumbing fix pipes at water plant. AYES ALL M/C. Barney stated not much going on with lagoon, operating well.

B. Maintenance: No Report

C. Streets: Council Member Greenfield reported that the jake

brake signs had been installed.

D. Community Center: Mayor and Clerk expressed their con-

cerns over the utility bills for the community center, the Clerk reported that the community center only receives $5560 in monies for the center and of that $4896 is spent on utilities. We discussed the options and things that we could do to help with the expenses. The City will be look- ing at budget numbers to see if city could allocate anymore funds to the center.

E. Park and Rec: No Report

F. Fire Department: Council Member Hansen stated there

would be a county wide meeting to be held on January 20th, 2015 at

the Lost Grove Community Center; Hansen reported that Life Flight was scheduled to be here.

G. 911 and Ambulance: No Report

H. Solid Waste: Meeting to be held on January 27th, 2015.

I. Emergency Management: Mayor reported meeting was held

last week. Items discussed were the resignation of Tony Jorgenson and how and what the plans were to fill this position. Also the budget was discussed and decided that not many changes in budget, so will use last

year’s numbers for this budget. Next meeting tentatively set for 2/12/15. OLD BUSINESS

A. Lease Ball Diamond to School- Council went over lease that

attorney had prepared; changes that needed to be made were noted and

will have attorney make necessary changes. We will then have school go over contract. NEW BUSINESS

A. Water Meter Reader Position- Mayor presented applications

that had been received. Motion by Gallentine, seconded by Engquist to contact Stacy Wilson and offer her position. AYES ALL M/C.

B. E 911 Increase- Mayor informed council of proposed rate in-