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Learning Basics

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Adams/View

Overview

Overview

Starting Adams/View

You or your system administrator can customize how you start Adams/View and how Adams/View looks after you start it.

To start Adams/View in UNIX:

1. At the command prompt, enter the command to start the Adams Toolbar, and then press Enter. The standard command that MSC provides is mdadamsx, where x is the version number, for example mdadams2010, which represents MD Adams 2010.

The Adams Toolbar appears.

2. Click the Adams/View tool

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.

For more information on the Adams Toolbar, see Running and Configuring Adams.

To start Adams/View in Windows:

1. On the Start menu, point to Programs, point to MSC.Software, point to MD Adams 2010, point to AView, and then select Adams - View.

For more information on running Adams products from the Start menu, see Running and

Starting a New Modeling Session

When you start Adams/View, Adams/View displays a Welcome dialog box that lets you create a new Modeling database or use an existing one. The Welcome dialog box also lets you import modeling data and specify your working directory.

Adams/View also displays the Welcome dialog box when you use the New Database command to create a new modeling database in which to store your models. The Welcome dialog box is shown below.

To start a new session:

1. Select one of the options explained in the table below to indicate how you'd like to start using Adams/View, and then select OK.

The option:

Does the following:

Create a new model

Lets you start a new modeling session with a new modeling database. Follow Steps 2 and 3 to create the new modeling database.

Open an existing database

Lets you open an existing modeling database. Learn about Opening a

Modeling Database.

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Overview

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The option:

Does the following:

Import a file

Lets you start a new modeling session by reading in a model from an Adams/View command file or an Adams/Solver dataset.

• Import - Adams/Solver Dataset Files

• Import - Adams/View Command Files

Exit

Lets you exit Adams/View without performing an operation.

2.

Specify the directory to be used as your working directory. Adams/View saves all files in this directory. You can change the working directory at any time. Learn about specifying working

directory.

3.

If you selected to create a new model, do the following:

In the Model name text box, enter the name you want assigned to the new model. You can enter up to 80 alphanumeric characters. You cannot include special characters, such as spaces or periods.

Select the gravity settings for the new model. You can select:

Earth Normal - Sets the gravity to 1 G downward.

No Gravity - Turns off the gravitational force.

Other - Lets you set the gravity as desired. The Gravity Settings dialog box appears after you select OK on the Welcome dialog box.

4.

Select a preset unit system for your model. In all the preset unit systems, time is in seconds and angles are in degrees. You can set:

MMKS - Sets length to millimeter, mass to kilogram, and force to Newton.

MKS - Sets length to meter, mass to kilogram, and force to Newton.

CGS - Sets length to centimeter, mass to gram, and force to Dyne.

IPS - Sets length to inch, mass to slug, and force to PoundForce.

5.

If you do not want any of the preset unit systems, you can change the units as required. Learn

about changing the default units.

6.

Select OK.

Adams/View creates a new model for you. If you selected to set gravity when creating a new model, the Gravity Settings dialog box appears. Learn about specifying gravitational force.

Modeling Process

The steps that you use in Adams/View to create a model mirror the same steps that you would use to build a physical prototype. Click a step below or use the arrows on the right to read the steps sequentially.

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Adams/View

Overview

Functional Virtual Prototyping Process

4 Adams/View Overview Functional Virtual Prototyping Process Although we’ve listed the steps that you perform to

Although we’ve listed the steps that you perform to create a model as though you create the entire model at once and then test and improve it, we recommend that you build and test small elements or subsystems of your model before you build the entire model. For example, create a few modeling objects, connect them together, and then run a simple simulation to test their motion and ensure that you are connecting them correctly. Once these are modeled correctly, add more complexity to your model. By starting out slowly, you can ensure that each subsystem works before moving on to the next step. We call this the crawl-walk-run approach.

Adams/View Main Window

After you start Adams/View, the Adams/View main window appears.

Main toolbox
Main toolbox

Initial Adams/View Window

Menu bar

Welcome Dialog box

main window appears. Main toolbox Initial Adams/View Window M e n u b a r Welcome

Status bar

Exiting Adams/View

To exit Adams/View:

Learning Basics

Overview

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1.

On the File menu, select Exit.

2.

If you did not save your work, asks you if you want to save your work:

To save your work and exit Adams/View, select OK. If you want to save the model with a new name in the current directory, enter the new name in the Filename text box.

To exit without saving your work, select Exit, Don’t Save.

To continue using Adams/View, select Cancel.

Note:

If you accidentally exit without saving your work, you can use the Adams/View Log file

(aview.log) to recover your work. Learn about using the Adams/View log file

Displaying Product Information

When using any Adams product, you can display the following information:

Software version number and the date it was built

Directory where Adams is installed

Copyright statement

To display information about Adams/View:

1. From the Help menu, select About.

2. View the information, and then select OK

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Tip:

Shortcut from the Status bar, select

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Loading and Unloading Plugins

MSC has many add-on modules or plugins to Adams/View, which expand its functionality. The plugins include Adams/AutoFlex, Adams/Vibration, Adams/Controls, and Adams/Durability. You run these products from within Adams/View. You can set Adams/View to load them automatically when you start up. You can also unload them while in your current session of Adams/View. To run a plugin, you must have a license to it. (To learn more about the various plugins, see their online help.)

To see if there is a license available to run a plugin:

1. From the Tools menu, select Plugin Manager.

The Plugin Manager appears.

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Adams/View

Overview

3. At the bottom of the Plugin Manager, in the text box Licenses, view the number of licenses available.

To load an available plugin:

1. From the Tools menu, select Plugin Manager.

2. In the Load column, next to the plugins you want to load, select Yes.

3. Select OK.

The commands or menus for the plugins are added to Adams/View.

To unload a plugin:

1. From the Tools menu, select Plugin Manager.

2. In the Load column, next to the plugin you want to unload, clear the selection of Yes.

3. Select OK.

Adams/View removes any plugin menus or commands.

To set up a plugin so it loads automatically when you start Adams/View:

1. From the Tools menu, select Plugin Manager.

2. In the Load at Startup column, next to the plugin you want to load automatically, select Yes.

3. Select OK.

Executing a System Command

You can execute an operating system command from within Adams/View so that you do not have to leave the Adams/View window.

You can select to display the results of the command in the Information Window or the Log file. If you select to display the results of the command in the Information window, you can:

Clear the window and only view the results of the command.

Save the results of the command to a file.

If you select to display the results in the log file, you can keep the command results with the other commands that you execute so that you can cut and paste the information together into a new file.

To execute a system command within Adams/View:

1. On the Tools menu, select System Command.

The Execute System Command dialog box appears.

2. In the Command Text text box, enter the operating system command that you want to execute. See your operating system documentation for more information.

4. Select OK.

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Using the Adams/View Log File

Adams/View generates a log file during each Adams/View session, called aview.log.

While you are running Adams, you can display the current contents of the log file. In addition, you can display the log file in a text editor. The following sections explain how to display the log file in Adams/View and set the type of messages displayed.

• Viewing the Log File in Adams/View

• Updating the Log File

• Setting the Log File Information

Note:

You can change the name of the log file through the initialization file .mdi_init. For more

information, see Running and Configuring Adams.

Viewing the Log File in Adams/View

You can use the Log File command on the Tools menu to display the log file. You can keep the dialog box open as you execute commands so you can keep track of the commands and messages that you receive.

To help you use the log file as a command file, Adams/View marks any messages as comments so that it does not try to execute them when you import the command file. It indicates a comment by placing an exclamation mark (!) in front of the message. Adams/View also displays as comments any commands that it executes when it starts up. To help you distinguish the startup commands from messages, Adams/View follows the exclamation mark (!) with the command prompt (>>).

To display the log file:

1. On the Tools menu, select Log File.

The Display Log File dialog box appears.

2. Select Info to display all messages written to the log file. The default is to display only warnings, errors, and fatal messages.

Updating the Log File

Adams/View does not update the Display Log File dialog box each time you execute a command. Therefore, if you want to see the commands that you executed since you opened the dialog box, you must update the log file.

To update the contents of the log file:

From the Display Log File dialog box, select Update.

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Adams/View

Overview

Setting the Log File Information

When you display the log file, Adams/View displays only warnings, errors, and fatal messages that you have received. You can change the type of messages that Adams/View displays as well as display the commands that Adams/View has executed. You can also display only lines that contain certain information, such as display only commands that create links, and remove any duplicate lines that occur if you encounter the same error again.

To set the type of information displayed in the Display Log File dialog box:

1. Select the Show only lines of type check box and then select one of the following:

Info - Displays all commands that you have executed in Adams/View.

Warning - Displays non-fatal messages that warn you of possible problems with commands you entered.

Error - Displays fatal messages that Adams/View did not understand and, therefore, did not successfully process.

Fatal - Displays messages that indicated that your model would not simulate.

2. If desired, select Show only lines containing and enter the text that the line must contain in the text box. You can also enter wildcards. Learn about using wildcards.

3. Select Apply.

To remove duplicate lines:

From the Display Log File dialog box, select Suppress duplicate lines.

Using Wildcards

You can use wildcards to narrow any search, set the type of information displayed in a window, such as the Database Navigator or the Log file, or specify a name of an object in a dialog box.

This character:

Represents:

* (asterisk)

Zero or more characters

?

Any single character

[ab]

Any one of the characters in the brackets

[^AB]

Any character other than the characters following the caret symbol (^) in the brackets

[a-c]

Any one character in a range enclosed in brackets

{AB, bc}

Any of the character strings in the braces

Tips on Using Wildcards

Here are some tips for entering wildcards:

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Overview

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Case is insignificant so xYz is the same as XYz.

You can match alternative sequences of characters by enclosing them in braces and separating them with commas. For example, the pattern a{ab,bc,cd}x matches aabx, abcx, and acdx.

You can form character sets that match a single character using brackets [ ]. For example, [abc]d matches ad, bd, and cd

You can use a dash (-) to create ranges of characters. For example, [a-f1-4] is the same as

[abcdef1234].

You can use a backslash (\) to include a special character as part of the character set. For example, [AB\]CD] includes the five characters A, B, ], C, and D.

Here are some examples of more complex patterns and possible matches:

x*y - Matches any object whose name starts with x and ends with y. This would include xy, x1y, and xaby.

x??y - Matches only those objects with four-character long names that start with x and end with y. This would include xaay, xaby, and xrqy.

x?y* - Matches all of those objects whose names start with x and have y as the third character. This would include xayee, xyy, and xxya.

*{aa,ee,ii,oo,uu}* - Matches all those objects whose name contains the same vowel twice in a row. This would include loops and skiing.

[aeiou]*[0-9] - Matches any object whose name starts with a vowel and ends with a digit. This would include eagle10, arapahoe9, and ex29.

[^aeiou]?[xyz]* - Matches any object whose name does not start with a vowel and has x, y, or z as the third letter. This would include thx1138, rex, and fizzy.

You can use quotation marks to identify all objects with a certain naming pattern. The following example describes how to set a damping ratio of 0.05 to all beams in .model_1 that have ‘_beam’ in the name.

for var=the_beam obj=.model_1."*_beam*" type=Beam force modify element_like beam & beam_name = (eval(the_beam).name) & damping_ratio = 0.05 end !for

Adams/View Tools

Adams/View provides following tools. Click on each tool to learn more.

• Coordinate window

• Command Navigator

• Command Window

• Message Window

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Adams/View

Overview

• Information Window

• Database Navigator

• Table Editor

Setting Preferences

Learning Basics

Setting Preferences

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Setting Default Coordinate System

Coordinate Systems in Adams/View

When you first start Adams/View, it displays a View triad in the lower left corner. The view triad displays the global coordinate system for the Modeling database.

By default, Adams/View uses a Cartesian coordinate system as the global coordinate system with three axes (x, y, and z). Adams/View attaches the ground part to the global coordinate system and by default positions all other modeling objects to it.

Rotation Sequences

Adams/View uses three orientation angles to perform three rotations about the axes of a coordinate system. You specify the order in which axes are rotated about as a sequence of three numbers (1,2,3), which correspond to x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. For example, a rotation order of 312 produces rotations about the z-, then x-, and then y-axis. Adams/View provides you with a set of 24 rotation sequences from which to choose. The most commonly used rotation sequence, body 313, is the default sequence.

The figure below shows how successive rotations defined by the rotation angles orient the axes. Dashed lines represent original orientations and solid lines represent new and unchanged orientations.

and solid lines represent new and unchanged orientations. • The first angle rotates the coordinate system

The first angle rotates the coordinate system about its z-axis. This repositions the x-axis and the y-axis (see a in figure).

The second angle rotates the coordinate system about its new x-axis (x´) to reposition the new y- axis (y´) and the z-axis (see b in figure).

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Adams/View

Setting Preferences

The third angle rotates the coordinate system about its new z-axis (z´) to reposition the new x- axis (x´) and the second new y-axis (y´´).

Together and in sequence, these rotations define the orientation of the coordinate system (see c in figure).

The right-hand rule defines the direction of positive rotation about each axis. For example, if you are looking down the initial z-axis, positive rotations are counterclockwise and negative rotations are clockwise.

To set the default coordinate system:

1. Do one of the following:

On the Settings menu, select Coordinate System.

On the Move tool stack of the Main toolbox, select the Coordinate System tool

The Coordinate System Setting dialog box appears.

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2. Select the type of location coordinate systems: cartesian, cylindrical, spherical

3. Select the type of rotation sequence. See Rotation Sequences.

4. Select either:

Space fixed - Adams/View applies the rotations about axes that remain in their original orientation.

Body fixed - Adams/View applies the rotations about axes that move with the body as it rotates.

As Adams/View applies each rotation to an axis, it produces a new set of axes.

5. Select OK.

Specifying Gravitational Force

You can specify the magnitude and direction of the acceleration of gravity. For each part with mass, the gravitational force produces a point force at its center of mass.

To turn off gravity:

From the Gravity Settings dialog box, clear the Gravity check box.

When you turn on gravity, an icon appears in the middle of the Adams/View Main window. To turn off the display of the gravity icon, see Edit Appearance Dialog Box.

To turn on and specify gravitational force:

1. Do one of the following:

On the Settings menu, select Gravity.

On the Create Forces Palette and Tool Stack of the Main toolbox, select the Gravity tool

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.

The Gravity Settings dialog box appears.

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Setting Preferences

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2. Select the Gravity check box to turn on gravity.

3. Set the acceleration of the gravity in the x, y, and z directions with respect to the global coordinate system. See the table below for assistance.

4. Select OK.

To enter:

Do the following:

A value

Enter the acceleration value in the X, Y, or Z text boxes as appropriate.

A standard value

Select a standard button (+ or -) for the direction you want to set. The standard acceleration value appears in the apropriate X, Y, or Z text boxes.

(+ or -)

Setting Screen and Printer Fonts

You can change the font Adams/View uses to display text in a view, such as the name of a part or a note on the screen, or to print text to a printer. The fonts available for displaying text in a view are those available with your operating system. The fonts available for printing text are a fixed set of 12 fonts. Note that your printer may not support all of these printer fonts. Learn about Printing Models.

To select a screen or printer font:

1. On the Settings menu, select Fonts.

The Fonts dialog box appears.

2. In the Screen Font text box, enter the name of the font you want Adams/View to use to display text in a view. To browse for a font, right-click the text box, select Browse, and select a font.

3. Set Postscript Font to the font you want to use to print text.

4. Select OK.

Specifying Working Directory

By default, Adams/View searches for and saves all files in the directory from which you ran Adams/View. You can change the working directory.

To change the working directory for the current session:

1. On the File menu, select Select Directory.

Select the directory in which Adams/View should save files.

2. Select OK.

You can also set the working directory when you start Adams/View. Learn about starting a new session.

To change the working directory for all sessions:

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Adams/View

Setting Preferences

From the Adams Toolbar, right-click the Adams/View tool, and then select Change Settings.

In the Registry Editor, select WorkingDirectory, and then change the working directory.

For more information, see Running and Configuring Adams.

2. On Windows:

On the Desktop, right-click the Adams/View shortcut, and then select Properties.

In the Start In text box, enter the working directory.

Setting Units of Measurement

You can set the units that Adams/View uses in modeling, importing, and exporting files. You can select individual units or select a set group of units.

Units of Measurement in Adams/View

The units of measurement that Adams/View provides for you are shown in the table below. The table also shows the default units when you start a new session

For the

 

The default

dimension:

Its supported units are:

unit is:

Length

Meter, Millimeter, Centimeter, Kilometer, Inch, Foot, Mile, Micrometer, Nanometer, Angstrom, Microinch, Mils, Yard

Millimeter

Mass

Kilogram, Gram, PoundMass, OunceMass, Slug, KilopoundMass, Tonne, Milligram, Microgram, Nanogram, Us_ton

Kilogram

Force

Newton, KilogramForce, Dyne, PoundForce, OunceForce, KiloNewton, KilopoundForce, MilliNewton, CentiNewton, Poundal, Micronewton, Nanonewton, Meganewton

Newton

Time

Second, Minute, Hour, Millisecond, Microsecond, Nanosecond, Day

Second

Angle

Radian, Degree, Revolutions, AngularMinutes, AngularSeconds

Degree

Frequency

Radians per second, Hertz

Radians per

second

Entering Unit Measurements in Text Boxes

When you enter a numeric value in a text box, you can specify the units of measurement that you want used for the value or let Adams/View use the default unit. For example, you can specify the length of a link in millimeters even when the default unit is set to meters.

When you want to enter an alternate unit, you include the value and its unit. Adams/View encloses the value and unit in parentheses ( ). You can also enter an abbreviation for the unit. For example, to specify 60 millimeters, enter the following:

(60mm)

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Setting Preferences

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You set default units when you create an Adams/View model or you can use the Units command on the Settings menu to change the units.

Unit Labels

To enter units other than the default in text boxes, you can use either simple unit labels or composed unit labels.

Simple Unit Labels

Simple units:

Simple unit Labels:

Minimal abbreviations:

Length

centimeter

centimeter

cm

c

foot

f

ft

ft

inch

i

kilometer

kilometer

km

km

m

m

meter

met

mile

mile

millimeter

millimeter

mm

mm

Angle

am

am

angular_minutes

angular_m

angular_seconds

angular_s

as

as

degree

d

radian

r

Mass

gram

g

kg

kg

kilogram

kilogram

kpound_mass

kpound_m

lbm

lbm

megagram

meg

ounce_mass

ounce_m

pound_mass

pound_m

slug

sl

Time

hour

ho

millisecond

millis

minute

min

ms

ms

second

s

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Adams/View

Setting Preferences

Simple units:

Simple unit Labels:

Minimal abbreviations:

Force

dyne

dy

kg_force

kg_

kilogram_force

kilogram_force

knewton

kn

kpound_force

kpound_f

lbf

lbf

millinewton

millin

newton

ne

ounce_force

ounce_f

pound_force

pound_f

Frequency

hz

hz

radians/second

radians/sec

Any unique abbreviation for a simple unit label is acceptable. For example, you can abbreviate radians in the following ways, since none of the abbreviations conflict with abbreviations for any other units:

radians = radian = radia = radi = rad = ra = r

There are three exceptions for entering unique aliases:

Aliases:

Unit Labels:

d

degrees, although it conflicts with dynes

kg

kilograms, although it conflicts with kg_force

m

meters, although it conflicts with mile, minute, ms, millisecond, and millinewton

Here are some examples of unit labels associated with a number within text boxes:

1mm

1.2 inch (spaces are not significant)

24in (you can use abbreviations)

Composed Unit Labels

Composed unit labels enable you to create aggregate units. You do this by combining Simple Unit Labels and operators. There are three operators for composing aggregate units from existing simple units:

Operator:

Notation:

Comment:

Exponentiation

**

Right operand must be an integer: inch**2

Multiplication

- or *

foot-pound_f = foot*pound_f

Division

/

 

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Setting Preferences

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A composed unit label is always enclosed in parentheses to eliminate ambiguity. Here are some tips and examples of composed unit labels:

To indicate torque, enter: 3.3 (newton*meter)

To indicate composed acceleration, enter: 9.8 (meter/sec**2)

To indicate angular acceleration, enter : PI (rad/sec**2)

To indicate multiplication with a dash, enter: (fun(1)*3)(in - lbf)

You cannot include parentheses inside of composed units. Therefore, the following is incorrect:

1.2 (inch / (sec*deg))

Instead, enter the following:

1.2 (inch / sec/deg)

Tip:

In general, if you see units associated with numbers in the information window, command file, log file, and so on, you should be able to take that unit string and use it in a text box without error.

To set the unit of measurement in Adams/View:

1. On the Settings menu, select Units.

The Units Settings dialog box appears.

2. Select the unit of measurement for each of the dimensions using the table below for assistance.

3. Select OK.

To select:

Do the following:

Unit for a specific dimensions

Select the individual unit from the pull-down menu associated with the dimension.

Predefined unit

Select one of the following buttons. In all the unit systems, time is in seconds and angle is in degrees. When you select a predefined unit system, the units selected appear in the upper portion of the dialog box.

MMKS - Sets length to millimeters, mass to kilograms, and force to Newtons.

system

MKS - Sets length to meters, mass to kilograms, and force to Newtons.

CGS - Sets length to centimeters, mass to grams, and force to Dyne.

IPS - Sets length to inches, mass to pound mass, and force to PoundForce.

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Adams/View

Setting Preferences

Saving and Restoring Settings

You can save the current settings of the display of your model and any other settings you specify through the Settings menu. Adams/View saves your settings in the file aviewBS.cmd in the directory from which you ran Adams/View.

The settings that Adams/View saves include:

Part and model display

• Rendering mode, colors, and translucency

Visibility of the View triad, Screen icons, Working grid, and Coordinate window

Settings for working grid, units, and screen icons

• Force graphics

Toolbox and toolbar display and placement

Simulation preferences

Solution controls

When you start up Adams/View, Adams/View reads the settings stored in aviewBS.cmd, if it exists in your path, and uses them instead of any settings in the Modeling database.

To save settings:

1. Set the display of your model and any other Adams/View settings, as desired.

2. From the Settings menu, select Save Settings.

To restore the saved settings:

1. From the Settings menu, select Restore Settings.

Models

Learn about working with Model in a Modeling database:

• Creating Models

• Displaying Models in the Database

• Merging Models

• Renaming a Model

• Modifying a Model's Comments

• Printing Models

• Deleting a Model

• Viewing Model Topology Map Through Information Window

Note:

To copy a model, see Copying Objects.

Creating Models

You can store more than one Model in a Modeling database. You may find it helpful to store multiple models in the same database because it lets you:

Keep multiple versions of the same mechanical system in the same file.

Store models of subsystems in one file that you want to combine and simulate as a whole.

Compare results between models.

To add a model to the current database:

1. On the Build menu, point to Model, and then select New.

The Create/Modify model dialog box appears.

2. In the Model Name text box, enter the name of the model that you want to create. You can enter up to 80 alphanumeric characters. You cannot include special characters, such as spaces or periods.

3. Select whether or not you want to use the same gravity settings as the current model in your

database. Learn about Specifying Gravitational Force.

your database. Learn about Specifying Gravitational Force . 4. Select the Comments tool on the dialog

4. Select the Comments

tool on the dialog box and enter comments you want associated with

the model. Learn about Comments.

5. Select OK.

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Models

Displaying Models in the Database

You can set a View window so it displays a particular Model in the current Modeling database. You will find this helpful when you want to compare different models or work with different models at the same time.

To display a different model in a view window:

1. Click the view window in which you want to display the model.

2. On the View menu, select Model.

The Database Navigator appears listing the current models in your modeling database.

3. Select the model you want to display from the Database Navigator.

4. Select OK.

Learn about Setting Part Display.

Merging Models

You can merge one Model in your Modeling database into another model. For example, you can merge a subsystem, called the source model, which you want to work on separately, into the base destination model when you are ready to work on them as a whole. Adams/View maintains the source model and does not change it after the merge operation.

This is helpful for merging two subsystems stored in the same database into a single model. It allows you to work on each subsystem individually and merge them together when you are ready to work on them as a whole.

As you merge models, you can:

Enter a set of translations and rotations that Adams/View applies to the source model. Adams/View first rotates the model then translates it.

Specify whether Adams/View merges parts with the same name into one part, or copies and renames the duplicate objects before merging them into the destination model.

Place all merged objects into a group. Learn more about Grouping and Ungrouping Objects.

To merge models:

1. On the Tools menu, select Merge Two Models.

The Merge Two Models dialog box appears.

2. In the Base Model Name text box, enter the name of the destination model.

3. In the Model to be merged text box, enter the name of the source model that you want to merge into the destination model.

Tips on Entering Object Names in Text Boxes.

Models

3

By default, you enter Cartesian (x,y,z) coordinates. You can change the convention for entering translational positions. Learn more about Coordinate Systems in Adams/View.

5. Specify the angular position of the parts and polylines in the source model.

Adams/View orients the coordinate system starting from the initial coordinate system and applying three successive rotations. By default, you supply body-fixed 313 Euler angles. You can change the convention for entering orientation angles.

6. If desired, enter a new or existing group into which Adams/View adds all merged objects.

7. Set the pull-down menu to either merge parts that have the same name (Merge) or rename the parts before merging the models (Rename).

8. Select OK.

Renaming a Model

Adams/View lets you change the name of a Model.

To rename a model:

1. On the Build menu, point to Model, and then select Rename.

The Database Navigator appears.

2. Select the model you want to rename.

The Rename Object appears.

3. Enter a new name for the model.

4. Select the More button database.

5. Select OK.

to display the Database Navigator and rename another object in themodel. 4. Select the More button database. 5. Select OK . Modifying a Model's Comments You

Modifying a Model's Comments

You can change the comments associated with a model.

To modify a model's comments:

1. On the Edit menu, select Modify. Be sure that no objects are selected. If objects are selected, click

the background of the main window or double-click the Select tool

The Database Navigator appears.

.
.

2. Select the model you want to modify, and then select OK.

The Create/Modify model dialog box appears.

select OK . The Create/Modify model dialog box appears. 3. Select the Comments tool on the

3. Select the Comments

tool on the dialog box and enter any comments you want associated

with the model. Learn about Comments.

4

Adams/View

Models

Printing Models

Adams/View prints the currently displayed Model as it appears in the currently active View window. You can set various print options, such as specifying Postscript or HPGL format.

Before printing, be sure to check which view window is the active window and what the magnification of your model is in the view window. You might also want to check the font that Adams/View is using

for printing text. Learn about Setting Screen and Printer Fonts.

To print the currently displayed model:

1. Select one of the following:

On the File menu, select Print.

On the Standard toolbar, select the Print tool

The Print dialog box appears.

.
.

2. Set the printing options as desired, and then select OK.

To print:

Do the following:

To a printer

Select Printer and, in the Printer text box, enter an operating system command to execute the print job (for example, lpr -Psp2 or lp -c -Ppd1 ).

Only to a file

Select File and enter the location and name of the file to which you want to print the model in the File text box.

In a different format

Select the format. You can select Postscript, HPGL, or Encapsulated Postscript.

In color or black and white

Select either Color or Black and White. If you select Black and White, Adams/View prints the model in black and white even if you are using a color printer.

At a different orientation

Select the type of orientation: Portrait or Landscape.

On a different size paper

Select the size of paper or select Default to accept the current default paper for the printer.

To cancel printing:

Select Cancel or press the Esc key.

Deleting a Model

You can remove a Model and all its objects from the Modeling database. When you delete a model, Adams/View removes the following objects from the modeling database:

Parts

Geometry

• Markers

Joints

Forces

Simulation results

• Data elements and System elements

• Design variables

Models

5

It does not remove plots, interface changes, or design variables that belong to the modeling database.

To delete a model:

1. Do one of the following:

On the Build menu, point to Model, and then select Delete.

On the Edit menu, select Delete.

The Database Navigator appears.

2. Select the model you want to delete. Learn about selecting objects.

3. Select OK.

If you selected Delete from the Build menu, Adams/View asks you to confirm the deletion of the model.

4. Select Delete.

Viewing Model Topology Map Through Information Window

The model topology map displays information about the parts in your Model and determines what constraints are owned by the model and what parts the constraints connect. The information appears in

the Information Window.

You can view the part connection information in two ways:

By part - Lists each part in the model, along with the parts it is connected to and what constraints or forces are affecting it.

By connections - Displays each constraint and force with the parts they connect and act on. Also displays any unconnected parts.

Model Topology by Part

You can select to have Adams/View list each part in the model, along with the parts it is connected to and what constraints or forces are affecting it. If an object is inactive, the text (OFF) appears next to it. The following shows the information that appears in the Information window or Database Navigator when you display the connections by parts for a model called model_1.

Topology of model: model_1 Ground Part: ground

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Adams/View

Models

Part ground Is connected to:

LINK_1 via JOINT_2 (Revolute Joint) LINK_6 via JOINT_1 (Revolute Joint) LINK_1 via FORCE_1 (Single_Component_Force)

Part LINK_1 Is connected to:

LINK_5 via JOINT_3 (Revolute Joint) ground via JOINT_2 (Revolute Joint) ground via FORCE_1 (Single_Component_Force)

Part LINK_5 Is connected to:

LINK_1 via JOINT_3 (Revolute Joint) LINK_6 via JOINT_4 (Revolute Joint)

Part LINK_6 Is connected to:

LINK_5 via JOINT_4 (Revolute Joint) ground via JOINT_1 (Revolute Joint)

To display model topology by parts, do one of the following:

From the Tools menu, select Model Topology Map.

In Adams/View, on the Status bar, from the Information tool stack, select the Model Topology

by Parts tool

.
.

Model Topology by Connections

When you select to display model topology by connection, Adams/View displays each constraint and force with the parts that they connect and act on. Adams/View also displays any unconnected parts, and indicates when an object is inactive with the text (OFF). The following sample shows the information that appears when you select to display topology by connections for a model with three parts, named

model_1.

Topology of model: model_1 Ground Part: ground

JOINT_1 connects LINK_2 with ground (Revolute Joint) JOINT_2 connects LINK_3 with LINK_4 (Revolute Joint) JOINT_3 connects LINK_2 with LINK_3 (Revolute Joint)

Unconnected Parts:

LINK_1

To display model topology by connections:

Models

7

On the status bar, from the Information tool stack, select the Model Topology by Constraints

tool

.
.

Note:

You can also view model topology through the Database Navigator.

8

Adams/View

Modeling Database

Modeling Database

Adams/View stores all your work in Modeling database.

Learn more:

• About the Adams/View Modeling Database

• Creating a Modeling Database

• Opening a Modeling Database

• Saving Modeling Database

• Saving the Current Modeling Database with a New Name

About the Adams/View Modeling Database

The Adams/View Modeling database is a hierarchical database. Each object in the database has an object that owns it, called its parent, and many objects own other objects, called their children. The top level objects in the database are models, views, plots, and libraries containing such things as dialog boxes.

The following shows the hierarchy of a database called Database_1 that contains one model and a plot of the model.

Database_1 that contains one model and a plot of the model. Names of objects in the

Names of objects in the database use a hierarchical naming structure. For example, a block built on the ground part is named .model_1.ground.block.

Creating a Modeling Database

When you first start working with Adams/View, it provides you with options for creating a new Modeling database. You can also create a new modeling database anytime during your Adams/View session. You can have only one modeling database open at a time, but it can contain multiple models.

Remember that Adams/View saves all your customization changes, such as any new dialog boxes, in the modeling database. Therefore when you create a new modeling database, the standard Adams/View

Modeling Database

9

interface appears and you will need to make any changes again in the new database. If, however, you use the command, Save Settings, on the Settings menu to save any preferences you set, Adams/View reads these and changes the interface accordingly. Learn about Saving and Restoring Settings.

To create a modeling database:

1. Do one of the following:

On the File menu, select New Database.

On the Standard toolbar, select the New Database tool

.
.

When you create a new database, Adams/View automatically closes the current database. If you did not save your current database, Adams/View asks you if you want to save it before closing.

2. Select one of the following if you did not save your existing database:

Yes - Saves and closes the database.

No - Closes the database without saving it.

Cancel - Does not save the database.

Adams/View displays the Welcome dialog box, which lets you choose how you want to start your modeling session with the new modeling database.

Opening a Modeling Database

You can open an existing Modeling database. You can only open one database at a time. To load different types of data into your modeling database, such as geometric data or commands, import the data as

explained in Exchanging Data in Adams.

To open a modeling database:

1. Do one of the following:

On the File menu, select Open Database.

On the Standard toolbar, select the Open Database tool

.
.

The File Selection dialog box appears. The File Selection filter is set to display only modeling database files (those with a .bin extension).

2. In the Directories list box, select the directory in which the file is located.

3. Highlight the file that you want to open in the Files list box, or type the file name in the Selection text box.

The highlighted file appears in the Selection text box.

4. Select OK.

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Adams/View

Modeling Database

Saving Modeling Database

You can use the Save Database command to save the current Modeling database as an Adams/View Binary format file. Saving your modeling database as a binary file saves all modeling information, including any customization changes you made. To save the model data in another format, export the data

as explained in Exchanging Data in Adams. To save your preferences, see Saving and Restoring Settings.

To save an existing modeling database:

1. Select one of the following:

On the File menu, select Save Database.

On the Standard toolbar, select the Save Database tool

.
.

Before saving the file, Adams/View displays a message asking you if you’d like to create a backup file of the current database file.

2. Select one of the following:

Yes - Creates a backup file of the existing database file and saves the database. When Adams/View creates a backup file, it adds a % to the end of the file extension (for example, model.bin%).

No - Saves the database without making a backup copy of the existing database file.

Cancel - Exit the command without saving the database.

Saving the Current Modeling Database with a New Name

You can save the current modeling database to a binary file with a new name. This lets you keep several versions of your database under different names and reduces the risk of losing your work if you inadvertently change or delete your model. Saving your modeling database saves all modeling information, including any customization changes you made. To save the model data in another format, export the data as explained in Exchanging Data in Adams. To save your preferences, see Saving and

Restoring Settings.

To save a new database or an existing database with a new name:

1. On the File menu, select Save Database As.

The Save Database As dialog box appears.

2. In the File Name text box, enter the name you want to assign to the file.

Tips on Entering File Names in Text Boxes.

3. Select OK.

Database Navigator

11

Database Navigator

The Database Navigator helps you view, select, and modify objects in your Modeling database.

Learn more:

• About the Database Navigator

Viewing Objects

• Showing, Hiding, and Selecting Objects in the Database Navigator

• Managing the Select List

• Filtering Objects in the Database Navigator

• Sorting Objects in the Database Navigator

• Setting Highlighting in the Database Navigator

Changing Objects

• Setting Appearance of Objects Through the Database Navigator

• Renaming Objects Through the Database Navigator

• Adding Comments Through the Database Navigator

Viewing Information About Your Model

• Viewing Model Topology Through the Database Navigator

• Viewing the Associativity of Objects

• Viewing Object Information Through the Database Navigator

About the Database Navigator

The Database Navigator appears when you do one of the following:

Select Database Navigator from the Tools menu.

Execute an editing command, such as Modify, from the Edit menu when no object is currently selected.

Request to view information about an object using the Info command on the Edit shortcut menu.

Browse for the name of an object to enter in a dialog box using the Browse command.

The Database Navigator has several modes in which you can display object information. It can be set to just let you browse for objects or you can set it to rename objects, view information about the objects, such as view how the object relates to other objects, and view dependencies.

The Database Navigator only displays the types of objects that are appropriate for the command you are executing. For example, if you are renaming a model, it only displays models in your database. On the other hand, if you are searching for any modeling object in the database, it displays all types of modeling objects. You can also set a filter for the types of objects that the Database Navigator displays.

12

Adams/View

Database Navigator

The Database Navigator shows objects in their database hierarchy. The following figure shows the Database Navigator with the top-level modeling objects in a small database that contains one model, model_1 . These objects do not have parents. Double-click the name of a model, in this case model_1, to find all the objects belonging to that model.

model_1, to find all the objects belonging to that model. Showing , Hiding, and Selectin g

Showing , Hiding, and Selecting Objects in the Database Navigator

In the Database Navigator Tree list, a plus (+) in front of an object indicates that the object has children below it but they are hidden. A minus (-) indicates that all objects immediately below the object are displayed.

To show or hide objects below a single object:

Double-click an object with a plus or minus by it.

To expand or collapse all objects by one level:

In the lower right corner of the navigator window, select the + or - button.

To hide all objects:

Database Navigator

13

In the lower right corner of the navigator window, select the - button.

You can use the Database Navigator to select any object in the database. You can also select more than one object to complete a command. You can create a list of selected objects on which to perform options by choosing Select List from the pull-down menu at the top of the Database Navigator.

To select a single object:

In the tree list, click the object and select OK. If the Database Navigator is not in multi-select mode, you can also double-click the object to select it.

To use the mouse to select a continuous set of objects:

1. In the tree list, drag the mouse over the objects you want to select or click on one object, hold down the Shift key, and click the last object in the set. All objects between the two selected objects are highlighted.

2. Select OK.

To use the Up and Down arrow keys to select a continuous set of objects:

1. In the tree list, click on the first object, hold down the Shift key, and then use the Up or Down arrows to select a block of objects.

2. Select OK.

To select a noncontinuous set of objects:

1. In the tree list, click on an object, hold down the Ctrl key, and click on the individual objects you want to select.

2. Select OK.

To clear any selection in the tree list:

Hold down the Ctrl key and click the selected object to clear its highlighting.

Managing the Select List

You can use the Database Navigator to view objects you've selected using the procedures explained in

Showing, Hiding, and Selecting Objects in the Database Navigator. The list of objects is called the Select

list. You can also add and remove objects from the Select list.

To view the select list:

From the pull-down menu, select Select List.

The selected objects appear in the text box to the right.

To add objects to a select list:

14

Adams/View

Database Navigator

2. From the tree list or view window, select the objects to be on the select list as explained in the previous section.

3. Select Add.

4. Select Apply.

To remove objects from the select list:

1. From the pull-down menu, select Select List.

2. From the list that appears on the right, select the objects to be removed.

3. Select Remove.

4. Select Apply.

To clear all objects from the select list:

1. From the pull-down menu, select Select List.

2. Select Clear.

3. Select Apply.

Filtering Objects in the Database Navigator

You can filter the types and names of objects that you want displayed in the Database Navigator Tree list to narrow the display to exactly what you want or to broaden the display using wildcards. For example, you can narrow the display to only parts or broaden the display to include all objects that begin with a particular character, such as an h. Learn about Using Wildcards.

To set the filter of the Database Navigator:

1. In the Filter text box, enter the name of the objects that you want to display. Type any wildcards that you want to include.

2. From the pull-down menu to the right of the Filter text box, select the type of object or objects that you want to display in the Database Navigator. To select from all the different object types in the modeling database, select Browse.

3. To only display active or inactive objects, set the pull-down menu below the Filter objects to either Active Objects or Inactive Objects. Learn about Activating and Deactivating Objects.

4. Select OK.

Sorting Objects in the Database Navigator

You can sort objects in the Database Navigator by their name or type, such as parts or geometry. You can also select to not sort the object so the objects appear in the Database Navigator in the order they are stored in the modeling database.

Note that sorting by name can be slow for objects with very long names. Setting no sorting is the fastest way to see objects.

To sort objects in the Database Navigator:

Database Navigator

15

At the bottom of the Database Navigator, from the Sort by pull-down menu, select how you'd like the objects sorted.

Setting Highlighting in the Database Navigator

You can set up the Database Navigator so that whenever you select an object in the tree list, it also appears selected in the main window and the reverse. Highlighting is off by default.

To toggle highlighting:

Select Highlighting.

Setting Appearance of Objects Through the Database Navigator

Through the Database Navigator, you can set how individual, types of objects, and children of objects appear in Adams/View.You can set:

Visibility of the object and of its name on the screen.

Color, line style, line width and transparency of the object. For example, you can set the color of the object’s outline or its name.

Size of the screen icons that represent the object in your model. Note that these changes take precedence over the size you specify globally for the modeling database.

State of the object during a simulation: active or inactive.

You can also set appearance through the Edit -> Appearance command. Learn about Setting Object

Appearance through Edit -> Appearance Command.

To set the appearance of objects:

1. Select an object from the Database Navigator Tree list.

2. Use the options in the dialog box to set the appearance of the object. To inherit an attribute from a parent of the object, select None from any of the pull-down menus. See Display Attribute dialog box help.

Tip: For transparency, the higher the value, the more transparent the object is, allowing other objects to show through. The lower the value, the more opaque the object is, covering other objects. However, setting the transparency of objects can have a negative impact on graphical performance if you are using a graphics card without hardware acceleration for OpenGL. Instead of setting an object’s transparency, consider setting the object’s render mode to wireframe.

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Adams/View

Database Navigator

Object - Only apply to the selected object.

Siblings - Apply changes to all objects of the same type that are children of the parent of the selected object.

All - Apply changes to objects matching the filter you set in the Filter text box.

4. Select Apply.

Renaming Objects Through the Database Navigator

You can use the Database Navigator to rename any object. Also see Renaming Objects Through Menu Commands.

To rename an object:

1. From the Database Navigator pull-down menu, select Rename.

2. From the Tree list, select the object to rename.

3. In the text box that appears to the right, type a new name for the object.

4. Select Apply.

Adding Comments Through the Database Navigator

You can use the Database Navigator to associate comments with any object in the Modeling database.

To associate comments with an object:

1. From the Database Navigator pull-down menu, select Comments.

2. From the Tree list or View window, select an object.

3. In the text box that appears to the right, type or modify the comments associated with the object.

4. Select Apply.

To save the comments in a file:

Select Save to File.

Viewing Model Topology Through the Database Navigator

The model topology map displays information about the parts in your model and determines what constraints are owned by the model and what parts the constraints connect. The information appears in the window on the right of the Database Navigator.

You can view the part connection information in the following ways:

By part - Lists each part in the model, along with the parts it is connected to and what constraints or forces are affecting it.

Learn more about Model Topology by Part.

Database Navigator

17

By connections - Displays each constraint and force with the parts they connect and act on. Also displays any unconnected parts.

Learn more about Model Topology by Connections.

Graphically - Displays a representation of the selected part and shows its connections to other parts.

Learn more about Graphically Viewing Model Topology.

Graphically Viewing Model Topology

In graphical topology, the Database Navigator displays a representation of the selected part and shows its connections to other parts. The connections represent the joints or forces between the parts. Each time you select a different part in the tree list of the Database Navigator, the graphical display changes to show the select part at its center. If an object is inactive, the part appears dimmed.

the graphical display changes to show the select part at its center. If an object is

18

Adams/View

Database Navigator

To display model topology of parts and connections:

From the Database Navigator pull-down menu, select Topology by Parts or Topology by Constraints.

To graphically view the topology of parts:

1. From the Database Navigator pull-down menu, select Graphical Topology.

2. From the Tree list or view window, select an object.

Viewing the Associativity of Objects

You can use the Database Navigator to display the objects that a selected object uses. For example, you can select a joint in the tree list to show the I and J markers that the joint uses. You can also select to view the objects that use the selected object.

To view the associativity of objects:

1. From the Database Navigator pull-down menu, select Associativity.

2. Set the associativity:

To show the objects that the selected object uses, select Uses

To show the objects that use the selected object, select Is Used By.

3. From the Tree list or View window, select an object.

The objects associated with the selected object appear in the text box to the right.

To set up automatic navigation of the objects:

Select Auto Navigate. Learn more About Auto Navigation.

To save the current associativity information to a file:

Select Save to File.

Viewing Object Information Through Database Navigator

You can use the Database Navigator just as you would the Information Window to display information about an object.

To display object information:

1. From the Database Navigator pull-down menu, select Information.

2. From the Tree list or View window, select an object.

The information about the object appears in the window to the right.

To save the information to a file:

Select Save to File.

Database Navigator

19

To return to the information about a previous object:

Select

.
.

About Auto Navigation

When you select Auto Navigate, the Database Navigator lets you view the associativity of objects that you select from the Tree list and any objects listed in the window on the right. For example, if you have a model with a joint motion, and then select to view the associativity of that motion, you see a joint listed in the right window, as shown below.

With Auto Navigate selected, you can just select that joint from the right window to view its associativity. If it were not selected, you would have to select the joint from the tree list to view its associativity. In addition, when you select the joint in the right window, the Database Navigator also highlights it in the tree list.

In addition, when you select the joint in the right window, the Database Navigator also highlights

20

Adams/View

Information Window

Information Window

Adams/View uses the Information window to display many different types of information about your model, Simulation, or motion data. In addition to just viewing information about your model, you can perform a variety of operations in the Information window. For example, you can display additional information about the current object's parent or child, print the information, display information about a different object in the database, and more.

Learn more:

Displaying Information

• Displaying Object Information and Accessing the Information Window

• Displaying Parent and Children Information

• Displaying an Object's Modify Dialog Box

Managing Information

• Clearing the Information Window

• Saving Information in the Information Window

• Displaying a Text File in the Information Window

• Copying Text in the Information Window

• Setting the Information Mode

Displaying Object Information and Accessing Information Window

You can display information about each object in your Modeling database, including parts, geometry, motion, and Markers. You can view the information about an object currently on the screen or any object in the database, including view windows or dialog boxes.

When you display information about the objects in your modeling database, Adams/View displays information specific to that type of object. For example, when you display information about a rigid body in your model, Adams/View displays information about its material content, inertial properties, initial conditions, orientation, velocity, and more. When you display information about a motion, Adams/View display information about the type of motion it is, its function, and time derivative.

To display information about a modeling object displayed on the screen:

Right-click the object on the screen, and then select Info.

Tip:

You may want to zoom in on the object on the screen to more easily place the cursor over just that object.

Information Window

21

To use the Database Navigator to display information about objects in the Information window:

1. On the Status bar, select the Info tool

window: 1. On the Status bar , select the Info tool The Database Navigator appears. from

The Database Navigator appears.

from the Information tool stack.

2. Select the object about which you want to display information. Learn about selecting objects.

3. Select OK.

The information window appears.

To display object information once you've displayed the Information window, do one of the following:

In the text box at the top of the Information window, enter the name of the object, and then select Apply.

If the object name already appears in the Information window, place the text cursor in the name of the object, and then select Apply.

Displaying Parent and Children Information

Each object in the database has an object that owns it, called its parent, and many objects own other objects, called their children. The top-level objects in the database are models, plots, and interface objects, called gui objects. These objects do not have parents. You can display information about the parent or children of the object currently displayed in the Information window.

If an object has a parent, the type of parent it has appears in the Information window under the heading Parent Type and the name of the parent is placed in front of the name of the object in the Object Name heading. For example, for the part LINK_2, its parent type and name appear in the Information window, as shown below:

and name appear in the Information window, as shown below: To display an object's children: •

To display an object's children:

In the Information window, select Children. Learn about accessing the Information window.

To display an object's parent, do one of the following:

In the Information window, select Parent.

In the Information window, place the text cursor in the name of the parent and select Apply.

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Adams/View

Information Window

Displaying an Object's Modify Dialog Box from the Information Window

When information about an object is displayed in the Information window, you can access that object's modify dialog box so you can modify the object.

To access an object's modify dialog box from the Information window:

In the Information window, place the text cursor in the name of the object and select Modify.

Learn about accessing the Information window.

Learn about other ways of Accessing Modify Dialog Boxes.

Clearing the Information Window

Each time you request information in the Information window, Adams/View adds the information to the bottom of the Information window without removing the current information. You can remove all current information.

To clear the Information window:

In the Information window, select Clear.

Saving Information in the Information Window

You can save the contents of the Information window to a text file.

To save the contents of the information to a text file:

1. In the Information window, select Save to File.

The Select File dialog box appears.

2. Select the directory in which you want to place the file.

3. In the File Name text box, enter the file name.

4. Select Open.

Displaying a Text File in the Information Window

You can display any text file in the Information window. You will find this helpful if you want to display an information file that you saved or you are creating a demonstration of your model using an Adams/View command file and you want to display information about a particular object or aspect of the demonstration.

To display a text file when the Information window is already displayed:

1. In the Information window, select Read from File.

The File Selection dialog box appears.

Information Window

23

2. Select the directory in which you want to place the file.

3. Highlight the file that you want to open in the list, or type the file name in the File Name text box.

4. Select Open.

To display a text file when the Information window is not displayed:

1. On the Tools menu, select Show File.

The Info Window Read dialog box appears.

2. In the File Name text box, you can either:

Enter the name of the file.

Browse for a file: right-click the File Name text box, and then select Browse to display the File Selection dialog box.

3. Select OK.

The Information window appears with the text of the file as its content.

Copying Text in the Information Window

You can copy any text in the Information window for use in another window, dialog box, or application. You cannot paste or delete any text in the window.

To copy text in the Information window:

1. Highlight the text that you want to copy.

2. Right-click the Information window and select Copy.

Setting the Information Mode

By default, the Information window displays only a part's parent and type. To display more information about the part, you can turn on verbose mode. When you turn on verbose mode, the Information window displays the children of the object, its geometry, whether or not comments are associated with it, and its attributes, such as its color and visibility.

To turn on verbose mode:

Select the Verbose check box.

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Adams/View

Information Window

Adams/View Interface

Learn about the different aspects of the Adams/View interface.

• Using Shortcut Menus

• Using Toolboxes, Tool Stacks, and Palettes

• Working with Text Boxes

• Working with the Coordinate Window

• Using Tables to Enter Values

• Undoing and Redoing Operations

• Canceling Operations

• Managing Messages

Using Shortcut Menus

The four different types of Shortcut menus are explained in the table below.

To display and select a command from a shortcut menu:

1. Right-click the appropriate type of object.

2. Select the desired command.

When cursor is over:

The shortcut menu lets you:

Modeling object in the main window (for example, a rigid body)

Select, modify, duplicate, delete, measure, rename, deactivate, set appearance, and display information about the object.

Main window (over no modeling object)

Set the display of the main window, such as zoom in on your model or change the view orientation.

See an Example of shortcut menu.

Text box in a dialog box

Enter information required in the text box.

See Using Shortcut Menus in Text Boxes.

Strip charts that monitor a measure

Transfer the plot to the full plotting window, display information about the measure, and delete the measure.

Using Toolboxes, Tool Stacks, and Palettes

Some of the tools on the Main toolbox are actually Tool stacks. If you are using tool stacks frequently, you can display many of them as floating dialog boxes, or palettes. For example, you can display the

2

Adams/View

Adams/View Interface

Geometric Modeling tool stack as the Geometric Modeling Palette. You can keep these palettes open during your entire modeling session and place them anywhere on your screen.

As you create objects, such as parts or constraints, Adams/View provides settings to assist in defining the objects. It provides the settings in a container at the bottom of the palette or Main toolbox. For example, as you create a link, Adams/View lets you specify its width, length, and depth before you create it. Then, as you create the link, these dimensions are set regardless of how you move the cursor. You can also define Design variables or Expressions for these setting values.

To select a default tool from the Main toolbox or palette:

Click the tool once with the left mouse button.

To select a default tool so you can use it several times or set the display in all view windows:

Double-click the tool with the left mouse button.

To stop using a tool:

Select another tool, Esc key, or the Select Tool.

To display a tool stack and select a tool from it:

1. Right-click a tool stack.

2. Select the desired tool in the stack.

To display a tool stack as a palette:

On the tool stack, select the Display Palette tool

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Working with Text Boxes

Text boxes in dialog boxes let you input information into Adams/View. Adams/View text boxes provide you with a visual cue as to whether or not the information in the text box is required to run the command. If the information in the text box is required, the text box appears in a lighter shade of gray. If the information is not required, the text box appears in a darker shade of gray. Also, you can use the shortcut menu in a text box to determine if the information is required.

Learn more:

• Using Shortcut Menus in Text Boxes

• Entering Modeling Objects in Text Boxes

• Searching for Files

• Cutting, Copying, Pasting, and Clearing Text

• Viewing and Validating Text in Text Boxes

• Entering Unit Measurements in Text Boxes

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Using Shortcut Menus in Text Boxes

The text boxes also contain Shortcut menus to access commonly used commands that pertain to the information to be entered in the text box. For example, if a text box requires a file or model name, you can click the right mouse button to display a command for browsing your directories or modeling database. The types of commands that appear on shortcut menus depend on the type of object required in the text box. The table below shows the different menu commands that appear for each type of object.

When the text box requires: The shortcut menu lets you: Modeling object (for example, a
When the text box
requires:
The shortcut menu lets you:
Modeling object (for
example, a rigid body)
• Browse the Modeling database, select an
object from the screen, or create an object.
• Copy, cut, and paste text.
• Manage and parameterize objects. These are
the same commands available through the
pull-down menus.
• Display information about the required
values.
File name and location
• Browse directories.
• Search a specified path.
• Copy, cut, and paste text and display
information about the required values.
Text, such as a value
• Copy, cut, and paste text.
• Parameterize the text, if appropriate.
• Display information about the required
values.

Entering Modeling Objects in Text Boxes

Many of the dialog boxes in Adams/View require the name of a modeling object, such as a part or model. To help you enter the object name, Adams/View provides commands on the Shortcut menus in text boxes for selecting the object from the screen or for browsing your modeling database using the Database Navigator.

The shortcut menu also has a command called Guesses. Guesses displays the five most recently created objects of that type. Depending on the object required, the shortcut menu also contains a command to create a new object of the required type.

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To enter a modeling object by typing:

Place the cursor in the text box, and then type the name of the modeling object in the text box.

Be sure to enter the entire name of the object, including its model and parent, if the name of the object is not unique within the entire database. For example, if you had two markers called mar_1 on two different parts, you need to enter .model_1.par_1.mar_1 to uniquely identify the

marker. Learn about the Adams/View modeling database hierarchy.

To enter a modeling object by picking, browsing, or creating the object:

1. Right-click the text box. The first command on the menu is the type of object to be entered. For example, the first command is Model if you are to enter a model, Constraint if you are to enter a constraint.

2. Point to the type of object and then do one of the following:

Select Pick and click on the desired object in the main window.

Select Browse to display the Database Navigator, and then select the desired object from the

Database Navigator.

Point to Guesses and select the desired object from the list of recently created objects of that type.

Select Create to create an object of the type required.

Searching for Files

If a text box requires the name and location of a file, you can browse for it or look for it in a specified search path. The next sections explain how to browse and search for files:

• Browsing Directories

• Using a Search Path

Browsing Directories

You can use the Select File dialog box to browse for a file.

To browse for a file:

1. Right-click a text box that requires a file name to display a shortcut menu.

2. Select Browse to display the Select File dialog box.

3. Double-click the directory that contains the file.

4. In the File Name box, type the file name you want to open, or highlight the file in the list.

5. Select Open.

Tip:

Clear the text box, if necessary, and double-click to display the File Selection dialog box

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Using a Search Path

The file aview.pth in the aview directory defines search paths for different types of files. For example, there is a path defined for database modeling files (binary files), paths defined for command files, and so on. Adams/View displays the search paths defined for a particular object when you select Search from a shortcut menu in a text box. You can use these search paths to quickly locate files.

For more on aview.pth, see Running and Configuring Adams.

To search for a file in a search path:

1. Right-click a text box that requires a file name to display a shortcut menu.

2. Point to Search, and then select a search path that contains the file you are looking for. For example, if you are searching for a modeling database (binary file), select $LOCAL_AVIEW.

The Select File dialog box appears.

3. Locate the file in the list, and then select Open.

Cutting, Copying, Pasting, and Clearing Text

You can use the shortcut menu commands that appear in text boxes to cut or copy the text in the box to the clipboard (a temporary storage area) and paste text saved in the clipboard into the text box. You can also quickly clear text in a text box using a keyboard shortcut.

To cut and copy text in a text box:

1. Select the text that you want to cut or copy.

2. Right-click the text box to display the shortcut menu and do one of the following, depending on the type of text in the text box:

3. If the text is a value, select Cut or Copy.

4. If the text is a name of an object, point to Text, and then select Cut or Copy.

To paste text stored in the clipboard:

1. Place the cursor in the text box where you want to paste the text.

2. Right-click the text box to display the shortcut menu and do one of the following depending on the type of text in the text box:

3. If the text is a value, such as a real number, select Paste.

4. If the text is a name of an object, point to Text, and then select Paste.

To quickly clear a text box:

Left-click at the start of the text box, and then press Ctrl-k.

Viewing and Validating Text in Text Boxes

To help you ensure that you enter the correct type of information and to see if the information is required, the Shortcut menus in text boxes contain a submenu called Field Info. Field Info does the following:

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Indicates whether or not the information in the text box is required to execute the command. The following text appears in the menu. They are for information only and do not execute a command.

Required appears if the information is required.

Optional appears if the information is not required.

Displays the type of information you should enter (text, integer, model, and so on).

Validates the information you have entered in the text box. This is particularly helpful if you entered a function in the text box. Adams/View also automatically validates the information when you move the cursor out of the text box.

information when you move the cursor out of the text box. To view and validate the

To view and validate the information required in a text box:

1. Right-click the text to display the shortcut menu.

2. Point to Field Info, and then do either of the following:

To verify that the information you already entered was correctly enter, select Validate. If you enter invalid information, Adams/View highlights the text box in red and displays an error message.

View the type of information to be entered and whether or not it is required for Adams/View to execute the command.

Also see Entering Unit Measurements in Text Boxes.

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Working with the Coordinate Window

You can use the Coordinate window to help you identify the coordinates of any location in a View window. You can also measure the distance between objects based on their coordinate locations.

The sections below explain how to work with the coordinate window:

• Displaying the Coordinate Window

• Measuring the Distance Between Points

Displaying the Coordinate Window

To toggle on and off the display of the coordinate window, do one of the following:

On the View menu, select Coordinate Window.

On the Main toolbox, from the Toggle Tool Stack, select the Coordinate Window tool

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The coordinate window appears in the lower right corner of the screen. You can move and size it as you do any window in your operating system.

Tip:

Press the F4 key to toggle the display of the coordinate window.

Measuring the Distance Between Points

In Delta mode, you can use your mouse and the coordinate window to find the distance between two points

To measure the distance between two points:

1. Move the cursor to the point in a view window where you want to begin, and press and hold down the mouse button.

2. Drag the cursor to the next point. As you drag the cursor, Adams/View displays the distance the cursor moves in the coordinate window.

3. To end delta mode, release the mouse button.

Using Tables to Enter Values

Adams/View has two types of tables for entering values as shown in the table below. To learn more, click:

• Entering Values in Cells

• Moving Between Cells

• Selecting Cells and Rows

• Cutting, Copying, and Pasting Text in Cells

• Viewing Entire Contents of a Cell

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• Resizing Columns

The table:

Lets you:

Example:

Table Editor

Enter values for all types of objects.

Table Editor Enter values for all types of objects.

Location Table

Enter values for multiple locations, such as the locations for the points on a spline.

Location Table Enter values for multiple locations, such as the locations for the points on a

Entering Values in Cells

To enter values in a cell of a table:

1. Click the cell.

The text cursor appears in the cell.

2. Enter the values in the selected cell.

Moving Between Cells

You can quickly move from one cell to another using the following shortcuts. Note that you must press the Enter key to enter information into the cells.

To move to the next cell:

Press Tab.

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To move to the previous cell:

Press Shift + Tab.

To move up to the previous row or down to the next row:

Press the up or down arrow keys.

Selecting Cells and Rows

To work with information in a table, you must select the information you want to change.

To select:

With the mouse:

A cell

Click the cell.

A range of cells

Click the upper left cell and drag across the cells you want to select.

OR:

Hold down the Ctrl key and select individual cells.

An entire row

Click the row header.

An entire column

Click the column header.

Cutting, Copying, and Pasting Text in Cells

You can cut or copy text from one cell of a table and paste it in another cell.

To cut or copy text:

Right-click the text in the cell that you want to cut or copy and then select Copy or Cut.

To paste text:

Right-click the cell where you want to insert the text, and select Paste.

Viewing Entire Contents of a Cell

Often, information displayed in a cell is longer than the width of the cell. When this happens, Adams/View displays an arrow next to the cell to indicate that there is more information than can fit in

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