Sie sind auf Seite 1von 9

Syllabus: Sociology 2: International Sociology

11/19/14, 12:03 PM

Sociology 2: International Sociology


Winter 2012, Course #69050
Time/Place:
Class Web Page:
Online Readings:

Tuesday and Thursday 2:00-3:20pm, PCB 1100


http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/soc2.htm
http://webfiles.uci.edu/schofer/classes/2012soc2/readings

Instructor:
Office:
Office Hours
Office Phone:
Email:

Evan Schofer
SSPB 4271
Tuesday 12:00-1:00pm & by appointment
(949) 824-1397

TAs:
Email:
Office Hours:
Office:
Sections:

Drew Duncan
duncana@uci.edu
Thursday 11-12 & by appt.
SST 619
M 10:00- 10:50 SE2 1306
M 5:00- 5:50p SST 238

TAs:
Email:
Office Hours:
Office:
Sections:

Mike Landis
mlandis@uci.edu
Tuesday 12-1 & by appt
SST 675
Tu 11:00-11:50 SSTR 101
M 9:00- 9:50 SE2 1306

Matt Pearce
pearcem@uci.edu
Tuesday 1-2pm & by appt.
SST 695
Th 1:00- 1:50p ICF 102
Th 12:00-12:50p SSTR 101

Introduction
This course explores international political, economic, cultural, and social changes that are currently
transforming our world on a global scale, as well as theoretical ideas and research from sociology and related
fields to help us make sense of them. Countries are increasingly interconnected by flows of information,
trade, money, immigrants, technology, and culture. Trans-national corporations and political organizations
(e.g., the United Nations) have grown in size and influence, as have the organized social movements that
lobby or oppose them. The goal of the course is clarify what globalization is and how it is affecting societies
around the world. Some issues well examine: How does global trade affect jobs and the economy? What
causes international financial crises, and can they be avoided? How does the spread of political ideologies
affect politics in the countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America? How do international social movements
and protesters affect government policies in different societies? Does globalization increase or reduce the
potential for international conflict and terrorism?
Readings & Media
Reading assignments are listed below. Readings marked by an asterisk (*) are OPTIONAL for those who are
interested in greater understanding of the course material. Readings should ideally be completed by the first
http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/syllabus2.htm

Page 1 of 9

Syllabus: Sociology 2: International Sociology

11/19/14, 12:03 PM

class meeting on the week indicated. Lectures and sections will make more sense if youve done the
readings!
Required Online Readings:
Online readings can be accessed via the UCI webfiles system. A UCINET id is required for webfiles access.
You must also register for webfiles access by clicking on the following link: http://webfiles.uci.edu
Once you have registered for webfiles access, you can access the readings here:
http://webfiles.uci.edu/schofer/classes/2012soc2/readings
Most readings are in .pdf format. A few readings are in doc format (Microsoft Word) or can be accessed on
the web in html format. A pdf reader such as Adobe Acrobat Reader can be downloaded for free.
http://get.adobe.com/reader/
WARNING: We all know that computers can crash and networks can fail. And, the webfiles system is
occasionally slow or unavailable. Therefore, you must be responsible and plan ahead. I suggest you
download all the readings at the start of the quarter and keep a spare copy on a USB drive. That way youll
have a copy even if the webfiles system is down or your computer dies. Excuses such as my computer
crashed or the network was down will not garner sympathy on the day of the midterm or final, given that
you that you had ample opportunity to access (and download or print) the course readings at any time during
the quarter.
Supplemental Readings/Handouts. I may assign additional required readings such as topical newspaper
articles by providing either a web link or a hard copy during class.
Required Video Material:
The course will be utilizing video material from various documentaries, including the PBS series
Commanding Heights: The Battle for the World Economy. I will provide links to videos (if available) on
the course website so you can review them as you prepare for the exams.
Assignments and Evaluation
Midterm Exam. There will be one closed-book midterm exam that will cover course material from lectures
and readings. (45% of final grade)
Midterm Exam: Tuesday February 14, in class (2:00-3:20)
Final Exam. There will be a closed-book final exam that will cover course material from lectures and
readings. The final exam will encompass material from the entire course but with more emphasis on material
discussed after the midterm. (45% of final grade)
Final Exam Time: Thu, Mar 22, 1:30-3:30pm
NOTE: Due to prior incidents of academic dishonesty, I will not offer alternative midterms or finals for those
who cannot attend regularly-scheduled exams. If you cannot attend the scheduled midterm and final I
http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/syllabus2.htm

Page 2 of 9

Syllabus: Sociology 2: International Sociology

11/19/14, 12:03 PM

suggest you enroll in a different course.


Discussion Section Assignments and Participation. This course has a required weekly discussion section.
Discussion sections offer the opportunity to discuss readings, ask questions, participate in group activities,
and generally deepen your knowledge of course material. Attendance of discussion sections is required and
will contribute to your final grade. Section instructors may distribute required assignments (which may
include homework assignments, in-class writing activities, in-class or online quizzes, etc.) that will contribute
to your final grade. (10% of final grade).
Final Grades. Your final grade will be computed based on the percentage weightings indicated. In the event
of a borderline grade, I may use my discretion in adjusting grades based on course participation and effort.
Incompletes will not be given, except in unusual circumstance.
Assignment Policies:
Section Attendance/Assignments/Quizzes. Unless otherwise indicated by your section instructor, missed inclass activities, quizzes, or assignments cannot be done later. If you anticipate missing section, ask your TA
if it is possible to attend a section at some other time during the week. Complete a Section
Grade/Attendance Transfer Form to ensure that your attendance and grades (if any) are properly recorded
when you attend a different discussion section.
Late Assignments. Assignments received late will be marked down incrementally for each day past the
deadline. Extensions for certain kinds of assignments may be granted for legitimate reasons if requested in
advance (but this generally does not apply to in-class activities such as quizzes).
Missed Exams. Typically, students who miss exams receive a zero. DO NOT MAKE TRAVEL PLANS ON
THE DATE OF THE MIDTERM OR FINAL EXAM. You are welcome to inquire about alternative exam
arrangements, but we probably wont be able to accommodate you. In a class this large we get inundated
with requests for special treatment. The best thing is to avoid a problem by planning ahead making sure you
dont miss an exam.
Grade Corrections/Changes. If you believe that you received an incorrect grade on an exam or assignment,
complete the Grade Change Request Form and give it to your TA. The form is available on the course
website.
Cheating, Plagiarism, etc. Academic violations such as cheating and plagiarism will be dealt with very
severely, based on the specifics of the case. I may use software to detect text plagiarized from the web or
other sources. If requested, students in this course must provide computer copies of their written work for
examination by plagiarism detection software. Keep electronic copies (and backups) of all course work.
University Policies
Students in this course must abide by all relevant university policies, ranging from issues of general behavior
to academic issues such as plagiarism. It is your responsibility to be aware of university policies.

http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/syllabus2.htm

Page 3 of 9

Syllabus: Sociology 2: International Sociology

11/19/14, 12:03 PM

My Policies
Respect. All participants in this course (including myself) should strive to treat others and their ideas
with respect. The course material and class discussion will cover sensitive topics ranging from immigration
and welfare to racial and ethnic identity. Disagreements may arise. Try to be aware of and show respect for
other peoples feelings on such issues. Conversely, if you find yourself offended by something, please try to
raise the issue in a constructive manner either in class, afterward, or even anonymously so the situation
can be addressed. Often, conflicts are rooted in simple misunderstandings, but sometimes they reflect more
serious issues that can only be resolved if things are brought to my attention.
Commitment to Learning. There is no point in taking a course if you are not committed to learning. That
means doing the readings, showing up, concentrating, and participating in class discussion and group
activities. I strive to make the class interesting, but make no mistake: this is not entertainment. We will
struggle through ideas and readings that are difficult and may seem boring if you do not yet understand them.
It is your responsibility to be committed.
Professionalism. I expect you to conduct yourself professionally. If you show up and do your work, you will
most likely do well. If you dont show up and fail to do the work, expect a bad grade. Take responsibility for
your actions. (I really dislike it when students come to me and say I havent been to class for 6 weeks and
missed the exam. But, I really need this course to graduate/keep my financial aid/get into law school/make
my parents happy. Cant you give me a better grade? If those goals are really so important to you, do the
work!)
Course Information
Course handouts, assignments, and other information will be posted to the course web page (listed above).
Any changes in the syllabus, assignments, or course requirements will be posted there. Check the web site
periodically to keep fully informed.
Schedule & Reading Assignments
NOTE: * indicates optional reading, NOT required.
Week 1: Background: States, Markets, and Globalization (Jan 10, 12)
Required reading: 33 pages
NOTE: Discussion sections will not meet during week 1.
Ellwood, Wayne. 2006. The No-Nonsense Guide to Globalization.
Chapter 1, Globalization Then and Now. Pp. 12-25 (14 pages)
J. Bradford DeLong. 2010. What Do Econ 1 Students Need to Remember Most from the Course?
[excerpt] Blog post: http://delong.typepad.com/sdj/2010/12/what-do-econ-1-students-need-to-remembermost-from-the-course.html (2 pages)
Krugman, Paul. 2009. The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008.
http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/syllabus2.htm

Page 4 of 9

Syllabus: Sociology 2: International Sociology

11/19/14, 12:03 PM

Chapter 1, The Central Problem Has Been Solved Pp. 15-22 only. (8 pages)
Chapter 3, Japans Trap. Pp. 62-65 (moral hazard) and 68-71 (liquidity trap). (8 pages)
*Delong, J. Bradford. 2011. Prolegomenon to Any Useful Discussion of American Finance. Blog post:
http://delong.typepad.com/sdj/2011/10/a-note-prolegomenon-to-any-useful-discussion-of-modern-americanfinance.html
Debating Keynesianism:
Ferguson, Niall. Keynes Cant Help Us Now. The Los Angeles Times. February 6, 2009. (3 pages)
Krugman, Paul. Keynes Was Right. The New York Times. December 29, 2011. (2 pages)
*Krugman, Paul. Nobody Understands Debt. The New York Times. January 1, 2012. (2 pages)
Week 2: States and Markets and Globalization (Jan 17, 19)
Required reading: 56 pages
January 16: Holiday (Monday)
Reich, Robert T. 2007. Supercapitalism: The Transformation of Business, Democracy, and Everyday Life.
New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf. (29 pages total)
Chapter 1, The Not Quite Golden Age, section 9 (pp. 46-49) (3 pages)
Chapter 2, The Road to Supercapitalism. sections 3-6, 9 (pp. 60-75, 86-87) (18 pages)
Chapter 3, Of Two Minds, sections 1 (pp. 89-95) and 8 (pp. 122-3) (8 pages)
Other sections and chapters are OPTIONAL but interesting. Take a look!
Friedman, Thomas L. The Golden Straightjacket. Chapter 5 (p. 83-93) in The Lexus and the Olive Tree.
Farrar, Straus, and Grioux (1999). Focus on pp. 86(middle)-88(top), 90-end. Skim the rest. (6 pages)
Friedman, Thomas L. 2005. The Untouchables. Chapter 6 in The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the
Twenty-First Century. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. (12 pages)
On Privatization:
*Hiltzik, Michael. 2009. Why Privatizing the University of California Wont Work. The Los Angeles
Times. December 10, 2009. (2 pages)
* Dillon, Sam. 2005. At Public Universities, Warnings of Privatization. The New York Times, October 16,
2005. (3 pages)
Quiggin, John. 2010. Zombie Economics: How Dead Ideas Still Walk Among Us. Princeton, NJ: Princeton
University Press. Chapter 7 Privatization [Excerpt]. P. 186-188; 195-197 ONLY. The rest is optional. (6
pages)

http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/syllabus2.htm

Page 5 of 9

Syllabus: Sociology 2: International Sociology

11/19/14, 12:03 PM

Week 3: Economic Globalization (Jan 24, 26)


Required reading: 58 pages
Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2006. Another World Is Possible. Chapter 1 in Making Globalization Work. New
York: W. W. Norton and Co. Pp. 7-10(top) only. (3 pages)
Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2006. The Multinational Corporation. Chapter 7 in Making Globalization Work. New
York: W. W. Norton and Co. P. 187-195 only. (9 pages)
Krugman, Paul. 2009. The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008.
Chapter 4, Asias Crash. Pp. 77-97. (21 pages)
Chapter 6, Masters of the Universe. Pp. 120-123 & 134-138. (9 pages)
Grieco, Joseph M. and G. John Ikenberry. 2003. Economic Globalization and Political Backlash. Chapter
7 in State Power and World Markets: The International Political Economy, W. W. Norton and Company
(2003). 204-215; 224(bottom)-229 (18 pages)
Week 4: Economic Globalization (Jan 31, Feb 2)
Required reading: 52 pages
Krugman, Paul R. 2007. The Trouble With Trade. The New York Times, Dec 28, 2007. (2 pages) Also
at: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/28/opinion/28krugman.html
Rodrik, Dani. 2011. The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the Future of the World Economy. New
York, NY: W. W. Norton and Co.
Chapter 3, Why Doesnt Everyone Get the Case for Free Trade? Pp. 47-60. (14 pages)
Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2006. Making Trade Fair. Chapter 3 in Making Globalization Work. New York: W. W.
Norton and Co. Pp. 61-74 only. (14 pages)
Krugman, Paul R. 2009. Chinese New Year. The New York Times, December 31, 2009. (2 pages) Also
at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/01/opinion/01krugman.html?hp
Rodrik, Dani. 2011. The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the Future of the World Economy. New
York, NY: W. W. Norton and Co.
Chapter 9: The Political Trilemma of the World Economy. Pp. 189-97 & 200 (mid)-205(top) (14
pages)
Chapter 11, Designing Capitalism 3.0 Pp. 233-239(top). (6 pages)
Week 5: Globalization, Economic Crises, and Governance (Feb 7, 9)
Required reading: 35 pages
Krugman, Paul. 2009. The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008.
Chapter 8, Banking in the Shadows. Pp. 153-164. (12 pages)
Chaper 9, The Sum of All Fears. Pp. 165-180. (15 pages)
http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/syllabus2.htm

Page 6 of 9

Syllabus: Sociology 2: International Sociology

11/19/14, 12:03 PM

Lewis, Michael. 2011. When Irish Eyes Are Crying. Vanity Fair. (3 pages)
Also at: http://www.vanityfair.com/business/features/2011/03/michael-lewis-ireland-201103
Read pages 1-2 & 5. I recommend skimming the rest it is a fun read.
Drum, Kevin. 2011. A Conversation About Greece. Blog post. (2 pages) Also at:
http://motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2011/11/conversation-about-greece
Irwin, Neil. 2010. Europes Financial Contagion. The Washington Post (1 page).
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/business/financial-crisis-in-europe/
Krugman, Paul. 2011. The Hole in Europes Bucket. The New York Times, October 23, 2011. (2 pages)
*Brawley, Mark R. 2003. Globalization and Domestic Politics. Chapter 5 in The Politics of
Globalization. Pages 110(bottom)-115. Toronto, Ontario: Broadview. (5 pages).
Week 6: Globalization, Politics, and Governance (Feb 14, 16)
February 14: Midterm Exam
* In-class closed book exam, covers readings, class, & section from Weeks 1 5
NO DISCUSSION SECTION TUESDAY-FRIDAY DUE TO MIDTERM EXAM
! Monday sections will meet, to make up for Presidents day holiday
Required reading: 27 pages
Rodrik, Dani. 2011. The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the Future of the World Economy. New
York, NY: W. W. Norton and Co.
Chapter 7, Poor Countries in a Rich World. Pp. 135-158. (23 pages)
Afterward, A Bedtime Story for Grown-Ups. Pp. 281-284. (4 pages)
Week 7: Theories of Globalization (Feb 21, 23)
Required reading: 68 pages
Febrary 20: Holiday. No Section (Monday).
Serneau, Scott. 2006. Class: A World of Rich and Poor. Pp. 7-32 (Chapter 1) in Global Problems: The
Search for Equity, Peace, and Sustainability. Boston, MA: Pearson. (36 pages)
Brawley, Mark R. 2003. Theoretical Lenses for Viewing Globalization Pp. 35-56 (Chapter 2) in The
Politics of Globalization. Toronto, Ontario: Broadview. (22 pages)
Schofer, Evan, Ann Hironaka, David Frank, and Wesley Longhofer. 2011. Sociological Institutionalism and
World Society. In Nash, K, A. Scott, and E. Amenata (eds). The New Blackwell Companion to Political
Sociology. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd. (10 pages)

http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/syllabus2.htm

Page 7 of 9

Syllabus: Sociology 2: International Sociology

11/19/14, 12:03 PM

*Meyer, John W., John Boli, George Thomas, and Francisco Ramirez. 1997. World Society and the NationState. Excerpt. (8 pages)
*Frank, Andre G. 1969. The Development of Underdevelopment. Pp. 3-20 in Frank, Andre G. 1969.
Latin America: Underdevelopment or Revolution. New York, NY: Modern Reader. (18 pages).
*Chirot, Daniel and Thomas D. Hall. 1982. World-System Theory. Annual Review of Sociology, 8:81106. (26 pages).
Week 8: Theories of Globalization (Feb 28, Mar 1)
Required reading: 61 pages
Waltz, Kenneth N. 1999. Globalization and Governance. PS: Political Science and Politics, Vol. 32, No.
4, pp. 693-700. (8 pages)
Keohane, Robert O. and Joseph S. Nye. 2001. Realism and Complex Interdependence. Pp. 20-32 in
Power and Interdependence (Third Edition). New York, NY: Longman. (13 pages)
Sikkink, Kathryn. 1998. Transnational Politics, International Relations Theory, and Human Rights. PS:
Political Science and Politics, Vol. 31, No. 3. (Sep., 1998), pp. 516-523. (8 pages)
Nye, Joseph S. 2004. The Changing Nature of Power. Chapter 1 in Soft Power. New York: Public
Affairs. (32 pages)
* Keck, Margaret E. and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. Transnational Advocacy Networks in International
Relations. Pp. 1-38 in Keck, Margaret E. and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. Activists Beyond Borders. Ithaca,
NY: Cornell University Press. (38 pages)
Week 9: Globalization: Identity, Culture, Conflict (March 6, 8)
Required reading: 66 pages
Huntington, Samuel. 1993. The Clash of Civilizations? Foreign Affairs, 1993, Vol. 72, No. 3 (Summer),
pp. 3-22. (19 pages).
Bowen, John R. 1996. The Myth of Global Ethnic Conflict. Journal of Democracy, 7, 4:3-14. (12 pages).
Martell, Luke. 2010. The Globalization of Culture: Homogeneous or Hybrid? Pp. 89-104 (Chapter 4) in
Sociology of Globalization. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. (16 pages)
Kurzman, Charles. 2002. Bin Laden and Other Thoroughly Modern Muslims. Contexts. Nov 2002, Vol. 1,
No. 4: 1320. (7 pages)
Telvick, Marlena. 2007. Al Qaeda Today: The New Face of Global Jihad. Also at:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/front/etc/today.html (4 pages)

http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/syllabus2.htm

Page 8 of 9

Syllabus: Sociology 2: International Sociology

11/19/14, 12:03 PM

*Boli, John and Frank Lechner. 2002. Globalization and World Culture. In the International Encyclopedia
of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, edited by Neil J. Smelser and Paul M. Baltes. Oxford: Elsevier. (5
pages)
Week 10: War, Terrorism, and Global Politics (March 13, 15)
Required reading: 43 pages
Daalder, Ivo H. and James M. Lindsay. The Bush Revolution. Pp. 152-165 in Kreiger, Joel (ed). 2006.
Globalization and State Power: A Reader. New York, NY: Pearson Education. (14 pages)
Schaeffer, Robert K. 2009. Revolution and War in Afghanistan. Pp. 259-280 (chapter 11) in
Understanding Globalization (4th ed). (21 pages)
Shane, Scott. 2009. The War in Pashtunistan. The New York Times, December 5, 2007. (4 pages)
Rubin, Alissa et al. 2010. Afghanistan in Review: High Hopes and Big Obstacles. The New York Times,
December 31, 2010. Video, available online at:
http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/12/31/afghanistan-in-review-high-hopes-and-big-obstacles/?
scp=3&sq=war%20in%20afghanistan&st=cse
*Tirman, John. 2012. The Forgotten Wages of War. The New York Times, January 3, 2012. (2 pages)
Schmidt, Eric. 2012. Lulls in US Drone Strikes Aids Pakistan Militants. The New York Times, January 7,
2012. (2 pages)
Week 11: Finals Week
Final Exam Time: Thu, Mar 22, 1:30-3:30pm

http://www.socsci.uci.edu/~schofer/2012soc2/syllabus2.htm

Page 9 of 9