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Transmission Substation

Work Practice Manual

Think Safe, Work Safe, Live Safe

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Instruction
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Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

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DM8051865, Rev 0, Mar 2011

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Revision status

DM8051865, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Contents
1.
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
2.16
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
4.
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12
5.13
5.14
5.15
5.16
5.17
5.18
5.19
5.20

Definitions
Provisional emergency procedures
Portable earthing/shorting equipment
Electrical storms
Hazardous workplace safety
Confined space safety
Tags
Pyrolysis in vehicle tyres
Temporary barriers and signs
Asbestos and fibreglass working procedures
Electronic communications in vehicles and operational areas
Height safety
High voltage insulated tools and equipment testing and use
Fall prevention equipment
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This section has been left intentionally blank
Fire precautions for transmission substations
Clothing and personal protective equipment requirements
Glove protection
Head protection
Face and eye protection
Electrical System Safety Procedures (ESSP) 2009
Customer switchyards guidelines
Substation entry requirements
Substation clearances
Secondary isolations
Portable ladders
Scaffolding
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Elevated work platforms
Crane use
Dogging
Rigging
Use of SF6 gas
Safety observer role
Induced voltages
Pitch removal
Use of pesticides and herbicides
Vegetation management in substations
Site security
Un-authorised access
Electrical substation insulator washing

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Work Practice Manual

Contents

DM8051837, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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5.21
Pilot cable boxes
5.22
Battery banks
5.23
Excavations in substations
5.24
Low voltage work rescue plan
6.1
Leaking oil filled equipment
6.2
Environmentally sensitive areas
6.3
Treated poles
6.4
Dangerous goods safety
6.5
Handling contaminated soil from around removed poles
6.6
Lamps and fluorescent tube disposal
6.7
Oil and chemical spills
6.8
Aboriginal artefacts
6.9
PCBs in streetlight capacitors and choke boxes
6.10
Controlled waste
6.11
Erosion
6.12
Native vegetation clearing and maintenance
6.13
Biosecurity
7.1
Licensing and authorisation
Appendix 1
Tags and signs
Appendix 2
Standard forms
Appendix 3
Westrail data
Appendix 4
Emergency contacts information
Appendix 5
Western Power facilities information
Appendix 6
First aid information

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Work Practice Manual

Contents

DM8051837, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Hierarchy of documentation
This Transmission substation work Practice Manual supersedes all other
documentation covered in the manual for Transmission Substation Work Practices
and Procedures.

All information contained in the Electrical System Safety

Procedures overrides the Transmission Substation Work Practice Manual.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Hierarchy of documentation and


DM7931007, Rev 0, Mar 2011
responsibilities
Reviewer: Dave Christmas
Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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Responsibilities
The person in charge is responsible for:

Ensuring the persons who will perform each task or activity is provided with the
applicable instructions, has read and understands them.

Ensuring the persons performing each task or activity are made aware of their
responsibilities.

Ensuring each activity or task will be performed only by the approved


employee or contractor.

Ensuring persons performing allocated tasks and activities have the necessary
skills, experience and qualifications.

Everyone on site is responsible for:

Complying with the relevant instructions in this manual.

Refusing to undertake work outside their level of expertise and seeking


guidance before undertaking such tasks.

Informing the person in charge or the on-site person in charge of electrical


hazards found in the area.

Undertaking the work in such a manner as to ensure others are exposed to the
least possible degree of risk or hazard.

Keeping up to date with all existing and future safety regulations and work
practice instructions.

Watching out for the safety of others.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Hierarchy of documentation and


DM7931007, Rev 0, Mar 2011
responsibilities
Reviewer: Dave Christmas
Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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1.

Definitions

Aboriginal
A member of the Aboriginal race of Australia, including a descendant of the
indigenous inhabitants of the Torres Strait Islands.
Above
Greater in height than a given level, at or to a higher point.
Active or phase conductor
Any conductor that is maintained at a difference of potential from the neutral or
earthed conductor (also known as phase, line, red, white, blue, live).
Anchor/anchorage point
A secure point of attachment on a structure to which a fall-arrest device, or lanyard
assembly, or restraint line may be secured.
Apparatus
Any item of electrical machinery or equipment (including primary and secondary) in
which conductors are used, or supported, or of which they form a part.
Approved
Having appropriate Western Power endorsement in writing for a specific function.
Approved work technique
A documented technique which meets the requirements of this manual and which
has been approved by Western Power.
As constructed drawing
A design drawing that has been modified or altered due to changes to the
construction. As constructed drawings should be prepared by a qualified surveyor
where cable routes are shown and should be verified and signed by the person in
charge of the work.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions

DM7839783, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Asbestos
The name given to a group of naturally occurring fibrous, crystalline minerals. The
three main types of asbestos minerals that have been used in products throughout
WA are Crocidolite (Blue Asbestos), Amosite (Brown Asbestos) and Chrysotile
(White Asbestos). Contact with asbestos is strongly linked to fatal illnesses.
Atmospheric monitoring device
A device that can measure continually or at intervals, the composition of the air
including:

Combustible gases.

Oxygen level.

Carbon monoxide.

Hydrogen sulphide.

Authorisation/Authorised
Shall be approved in writing or by means of an approved technique by western
power. See Approved
Authorised Person
Is a competent person with the delegated authority to perform the duty concerned
on behalf of Western Power.
Barrier
A temporary visual device (fence/restraint/person) that restricts or prevents access
to non-authorised personnel.
Brush contact
Momentary accidental or inadvertent contact.
Bush fire
A fire, or potential fire, however caused, including a fire in a building.
Bush Fire Service (previously the Bush Fire Board before 1997)
Co-ordinates the volunteer bush fire brigades that fight fires in rural areas.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Cable
An insulated conductor or two or more such conductors laid together, whether with
or without fillings, reinforcements or protective coverings.
Cable cover
A mechanical protective object that affords protection to cables from inadvertent
contact (e.g. split conduit, planking, slabs, conduit, poly pipe and concrete) covered
with earth placed over the cable in accordance with the design manual.
Cable locator
A device that can be used to detect the presence of buried apparatus either by
sensing fields or signal injection.
CDD/EDD
Controlled Descent Device / Emergency Descent Device. A device or system that
enables a person to descend from a height at a predetermined speed
ChemAlert
A database providing chemical and product information and Material Safety Data
Sheet (MSDS).
Circuit
Circuit is a configuration of electrically connected components or devices that has a
closed loop giving a return path for the current.
Clean down
The removal of all soil and vegetation from a vehicle and/or footwear by either
washing or brushing down. Particular attention is to be made to wheel arches,
mudflaps, tyres and vehicle under-body.
Collapsible area
The area surrounding an excavation that may be subject to collapse due to
excavation work. A safety provision is using the natural angle of the lay of the soil to
the horizontal in which the soil will not collapse (angle of repose up to 30).

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Work Practice Manual

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Collection tank
A grease trap, oil interceptor, or an impervious vessel, other than an apparatus for
the treatment of sewage, for the collection, storage, transfer or treatment of
controlled waste.
Combined earthing system
A combined earthing system as defined in AS 3000, in which high and low voltage
electrical equipment is connected to a common earthing system.
Combustible material
Any material capable of catching fire and burning.
Commissioning
Activities carried out in order to ensure that new and existing equipment is safely
and accurately connected to the network and, once in service, will operate as
intended. Activities include inspections to verify installation, commissioning tests
and post-energisation tests/checks.
Commissioning Authority
The Commissioning Authority is the group, which conducts pre-commissioning and
final commissioning activities. The Commissioning Authority controls access to
plant and equipment (which cannot be energised by normal switching) during the
commissioning stage.
Commissioning Notice
Issue of this notice signifies that all commissioning tests have been completed and
that a site or items(s) of plant is accepted by the Operating Authority ready for
service. The notice may contain a list of outstanding items.
Competent / competent person
A person having the skills, knowledge and attributes needed to complete a task.
Completion Notice
A Completion Notice is issued to advise that construction work has been
completed. It may be used for a complete site, part of a site, or may only cover
certain items of plant. It may also contain a list of outstanding items.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Concentrated
Oil, chemical, gas or fuel that has collected in one location.
Conductive pole
Concrete poles, steel poles and wooden poles with a down earth conductor.
Conductor
A wire, cable or form of metal designed for carrying electric current (includes
neutral and earth).
Confined space
An enclosed or partially enclosed space that is not intended or designed primarily
for human occupancy, within which there is a risk of one or more of the following:

An oxygen concentration outside the safe oxygen range.


A concentration of airborne contaminant that may cause impairment, loss of
consciousness or asphyxiation.

A concentration of flammable airborne contaminant that may cause injury from


fire or explosion.

Engulfment in a stored free-flowing solid or a rising level of liquid that may


cause suffocation or drowning.

Connectable
Apparatus capable of being connected to the live system by switching.
Connected
Joined together by a conductor capable of carrying electrical current for its required
function or purpose by physically clamping or bolting conductors together or closing
a circuit breaker, switch or similar device.
Constant leakage monitoring
Monitoring continually or at intervals of leakage (in micro amps) of current across
the insulated section of the boom during high voltage work, 1uA/kV allowable.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Construction authority
The Construction Authority is the group which is responsible for the construction
and installation of the plant and equipment. The Construction Authority controls
access to plant and equipment which cannot be energised by normal switching
during the construction stage.
Construction authority work permit (CAWP)
Construction Authority Work Permit (CAWP) a non-operational permit issued by
a Construction Authority that authorises the work on new or non-operational and
not connected electrical apparatus and associated equipment.
Construction site
A workplace at which construction work (see definition below) is done and includes
any adjoining area where plant or other materials used or to be used in connection
with that work are located or kept and over which the Network Total Workforce has
control for the purpose of doing the construction work.
Construction work

The construction, erection, installation, alteration, repair, maintenance,


cleaning, painting, renewal, removal, excavation, dismantling or demolition of,
or addition to, any building or structure, or any work in connection with any of
those things, that is done at or adjacent to the place where the building or
structure is located.

Work on which a hoisting appliance or any scaffold or shoring is used or


intended to be used.

Work in driving or extracting piles, sheet piles or trench sheet.

Work in laying any pipe or work in lining pipe that is done at or adjacent to the
place where the pipe is laid or to be laid.

Work in sinking or lining or altering, repairing, maintaining, renewing, removing,


or dismantling a well or borehole.

Road works, earthworks or reclamation.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Work in laying an underground cable or work related to laying an underground


cable that is done at or adjacent to the place where the cable is laid or to be
laid.

Contact area
The surface area of one object that makes contact with another.
Continuity test
A test to determine whether electrical current flows continuously throughout the
length of a single wire or individual wires in a cable
Contractors
Any person(s) engaged to execute works under a contact.
Control Authority
This is the representative authority responsible for the control of the apparatus.
Typically this includes:

Construction authority

Commissioning authority

Operating authority: Transmission SOCC and Distribution NOCC

Controller
An authorised person who co-ordinates switching, performs switching by remote
control and approves the issue of work permits.
Cover (Insulated)
A barrier of insulating material specifically designed, approved and tested for use
as a line cover or as a cover for equipment or apparatus.
Customer standing agreement (CSA)
Is a document which represents a standing agreement between the high voltage
customer and Western Power. The purpose of a CSA is to ensure that any
customer switching of specified circuits is performed with the network operators
prior permission and approval.

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Danger
Is the presence of risk to health and/or risk of bodily injury.
Danger Zone (as defined by the ESSP/ENA)
LINES Distribution and Transmission.
The danger zone is an area surrounding live electrical equipment (such as power
lines), that ordinary persons, equipment and materials must not enter. The size of
the zone varies depending on the voltage.
Danger zone (AS 2067)
SUBSTATIONS
Area limited by the non-flash over distance (N) around live parts that are without
complete protection against direct contact.
Note: Infringing the danger zone is considered the same as touching live parts.
Dangerous goods in bulk
Dangerous goods of Class 2 (gases) in a container with a capacity greater than 500
litres or dangerous goods of another class in a container with a capacity greater
than 450 litres; and a container with a net mass of more than 400 kilograms.
Also See Packaged Dangerous Goods.
De-energised
The electrical supply has been de-energized but not necessarily isolated, tested
and earthed.
DFIS
Distribution Facilities Information System. A geographical information system (GIS)
that allows users to view the electrical distribution network in relation to physical
geographical location in Western Australia. Users can view and analyse network
assets using spatial information.
Discharged (Electrically)
Conductors which have been connected to earth so that any stored electrical
energy has been removed.

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Discharged (Mechanical)
Means mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic or fuel energy apparatus which has had
all stored energy removed.
Discharge
The release or dissipation of stored energy.
DNAR
Distribution Network Access Request. The formal request to Network Operation
Control Centre to access the HV distribution network.
Do Not Operate Danger Tag
An approved tag that reads DO NOT OPERATE DANGER which is affixed to
isolation and program earthing points established for the purpose of issuing a Work
Permit to personnel.
Drop zone
The area below the immediate work where objects could fall or be directed into if
they strike other structures or objects after the fall.
Earth
The conductive mass of the earth, the electric potential of which, at any point, is
conventionally taken as zero.
Earthed
Electrically connected to earth in an approved manner by approved earthing
conductors or switches.
ECL
Electrical Contractors Licence.
EDD / CDD
Emergency Descent Device / Controlled Descent Device. A device or system that
enables a person to descend from a height at a predetermined speed.
Electrical-Access-Permit (EAP)
Western Powers standard form that authorises access to, and work on, electrical
apparatus which has been made safe by isolating and earthing.
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Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions

DM7839783, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Electrical apparatus
Any electrical equipment or machinery, in which conductors are used, or supported,
or of which they form a part.
Emergency
An event, actual or imminent, which endangers or threatens to endanger life,
property or the environment, and requires co-ordination of a number of significant
emergency management activities.
EMISWeb
A database for recording and tracking Western Powers environmental activities
and legal compliance.
ENMAC
Electricity Networks Management and Control (for distribution systems). An
advanced DMS/TCS/SCADA product that completely computerises Electricity
Distribution Control Room operations.
Equipotential mat
A conducting device at ground level, connected electrically to equipment, to avoid
differences of step and touch potential through the body of a person.
ESA
Environmentally Sensitive Area.
ESO
Environmental Support Officer.
ESSP Electrical System Safety Procedures
The intention of the ESSP is to provide Western Power with a standard set of
procedures and rules that govern all access to the network issued and owned by
NOCC and SOOC.
EWL
Electrical Workers Licence.
EWP
Elevated work platform.
Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7839783, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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Excavation
Any action that digs, displaces or penetrates the ground.
Extra Low Voltage
Not exceeding 50V AC or 120V ripple-free DC.
Extreme fire danger
The fire danger rating for the day in a district that exceeds specific values (as
determined by the Bureau of Meteorology) and aspects of the Bush Fires Act 1954
which are in force for the day.
Ferro-resonance
A resonance condition that may occur when an unloaded delta / star distribution
transformer becomes energised or de-energised by single phase high voltage
switching, causing sustained over-voltages.
Fire danger warning
Advice from the Bureau of Meteorology indicating adverse fire weather conditions.
Fire extinguisher (hand held)
The hand-held fire extinguisher is simply a pressure vessel from which is expelled a
material or agent to put out a fire.
Fire fighting unit
A device that comprises a container filled with a minimum of 400 litres of water and
a motor driven pressurised pump (spray unit) capable of discharging water.
Formal handover
A formal handover is either a verbal or written exchange of information between two
or more people who have responsibility for the job.
The formal handover information must be accurate and understood, thereby
ensuring the continuity of safe work processes.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7839783, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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Formal workplace risk assessments


These risk assessments are required both for individuals and teams. For individuals
it involves following clearly defined steps usually in the form of hazard checklist to
be completed and signed off by an individual identifying the hazards and assessing
the risks within their own or another workplace as part of a regular procedure.
Frangible
Impact-absorbent hexagonal column with a split seam feature where all sides are
intermittently welded in the Vehicle Impact Zone (10.5m and 12.5m columns only
from ground level to 3m).
Fully insulated EWP
An approved, tested and insulated EWP that has constant leakage monitoring
facilities to ensure continued insulation for higher voltage work, 66kV and above.
Ground safety clearance
The minimum distance required between the earthed end of any exposed insulator
carrying or containing live parts and ground or the floor of permanent walkways
used for normal inspection and operation functions. This distance is equivalent to
the reach of a person at ground level (2400mm) which includes an allowance of
300 mm for tools.
Ground approach distance
The distance to be maintained by all ground personnel from the base of the mobile
plant (stabilisers/outriggers) when deployed.
Ground observer
A person whose sole role is to advise the EWP operator of any hazards that could
restrict the operation or cause damage to the EWP, and be able to perform
emergency operation by use of manual recovery system if required to do so.
Note: This function could be preformed by the safety observer if trained in
emergency recovery by manual means.
Handover Certificate
Is used when responsibility for control of one or more items of plant, or an entire
site, is transferred from one group to another.
Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7839783, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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Hazard
A source of potential harm or a situation with the potential to cause loss or damage.
Hazardous workspace
Any space that, during its occupancy is likely at any time to:

Have an atmosphere which could contain unacceptable levels of harmful


contaminates.

Have a too high or too low level of oxygen.

Cause engulfment of the space.

Has a means of entry or exit that is restricted.

Restricted entry or exit requires the use of three limbs to enter or exit. Therefore it
is impossible for a single person to remove an incapacitated person unaided.
Training must be provided by a registered body and meet national requirements for
Confined Space Entry.
High Voltage (HV)
A nominal voltage exceeding 1000 volts AC or 1500 volts DC.
High voltage earth installation
Any high voltage installation where high voltage earth electrodes are to be installed.
This could be at ground-mounted substations wood poles with a down earth or
conductive poles.
Horizontal work safety clearance
The minimum distance from the extremities of the work object, horizontally to the
nearest live part.
Hot work
Any naked flame, any hot air blower or any gas operated handgun.
Independent earth
An effective earthed reference point used for testing purposes.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7839783, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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Independent scaffold
Scaffolds that consist of two or more longitudinal rows of standards connected
longitudinally and transversely. Independent scaffolds typically but not necessarily
are constructed prefabricated components, prefabricated frames, tubes and
couplers or timber components with bolted connections
Information Caution Tag
An approved general purpose information tag affixed to apparatus to provide
information about changed or unusual network operating conditions. A Caution
Tag would be used for conditions that do not require a Do Not Operate, Restricted
Use or Out of Service tag and may not be apparent to the observer if the tag was
not present.
Inspection
To view or examine to a set criteria as part of a job process.
Inspection tag
A tag which is used to indicate that the equipment to which it is attached has
passed inspection. The Inspection Tag should also show the date when the
equipment was inspected and the date when the next inspection is due.
Instructed Person
A person who, whilst operating mobile plant (crane) near energised overhead
electrical apparatus, is adequately advised and supervised by an Authorised
Person to ensure they avoid the dangers presented or created by energised
equipment.
Insulated
Separated from adjoining conducting material by a non-conducting substance,
which provides adequate resistance to the passage of current, or to disruptive
discharges through or over the surface of the substance at the operating voltage
and to mitigate the danger of shock or injurious leakage of current.
Insulated conductor
A conductor covered by a type of insulation that prevents the danger of electric
shock.
Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7839783, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
14 of 31

Insulated EWP
An approved and tested insulated EWP fitted with an approved and tested
insulating liner to the inside of the basket glove and barrier method. An approved
and tested insulated EWP without a liner stick method.
Insulated tools and equipment
Tools and equipment specifically designed, approved and tested for use on or near
live electrical apparatus.
Insulating barrier
A barrier of rigid or flexible insulating material specifically designed, approved and
tested for use as an insulated cover.
Insulating equipment
Equipment of insulating material specifically designed, approved and tested for use
on high voltage equipment.
Insulating gloves
Gloves especially designed, approved and tested to a rated voltage for working on
or near live electrical apparatus.
Isolated
De-energised by an isolating device that prevents unintentional energisation of the
electrical apparatus.
Isolating Device
A device for rendering plant and apparatus isolated.
Isolation Point
An isolating device that has been isolated and has a DANGER DO NOT OPERATE
tag fitted.
Issuing Officer (IO)
Is an authorised person who is responsible for issuing and cancelling work permits.
Note: this task is generally handled by the switching officer.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7839783, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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Job briefing
A discussion (for example, during toolbox meetings) which must involve all
members of the work party prior to the commencement of any work, and as
required throughout the job.
The key elements include but are not limited to:

Scope of work involved.

Work procedures/practices involved.

Roles of each crew member.

Hazards associated with the job and the control measures required (JRA).

Work zone setup.

Contingency plans.

Job risk assessment (JRA)


A job risk assessment (JRA) is a critical part of work planning. It ensures the scope
of work is understood, all foreseeable hazards have been identified, effective
controls established and communicated through the job briefing process.
Karabiner
An oblong metal ring with a spring clip, used to attach a running rope.
Lanyard
A line used, usually as part of a lanyard assembly to connect a fall-arrest harness
to the anchorage point or static line in situations where there is risk of a free-fall.
Leaching
Action of a liquid filtering or gradually oozing through the wood pole, typically
indicated by a moist, gummy or sticky surface.
Lead combat authority
A title used to describe an organisation that is responsible for ensuring that all
emergency management activities are undertaken for a specific emergency.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 1 Definitions
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Linesmans pole strap


A work-positioning strap designed to be placed around a pole and attached to two
points on each side of a line workers body belt, or a fall-arrest, or fall harness,
whilst the wearer is working on the pole.
Live
Energised or subject to hazardous induced or capacitive voltages.
Live line equipment
All approved live line tools, rope, insulating equipment and other gear used for live
line work.
Live line glove and barrier method
A method of performing live line work on circuits up to and including 33,000 volts.
The live line worker is fully insulated from earth and phases using approved
insulating gloves and sleeves, insulating platform and/or insulated EWP and
insulating barriers.
Live line stick (also called Hot Stick)
A stick of insulating material specifically designed, approved and tested for use in
physically bridging the distance between the live line worker and energised
apparatus, between the energised apparatus and earth, between adjacent phases,
and to enable physical loads to be taken or tools to be applied to the stick.
Live line stick method
A method of performing live line work using tools and equipment attached to live
line sticks with the live line worker maintaining the MAD from energised apparatus.
Live line work
All work performed on high voltage apparatus capable of being energised without
implementing the full protective practice of isolating, proving de-energised and
earthing at the worksite.
Live line worker
A person who, by way of training and demonstration of competency, performs live
high voltage work.

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Live work
All work performed on components of electrical apparatus, not isolated, nor proved
de-energised or short-circuited or earthed.
Load box
An electrical device used to apply a resistive load to the low-voltage side of a
transformer.
Low Voltage (LV)
A voltage less than 1000 volts AC or 1500 volts DC.
Manual recovery system
A system that is capable of being operated by a person located on the ground to
manually retrieve an EWP basket.
Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)
A document providing detailed information on a hazardous substance.
Mats
A insulated material specifically designed, approved and tested for use as a mat to
stand on insulating you from earth.
Mechanical protective glove
A glove that by its design affords the wearer protection against cuts, abrasion and
penetrating hazards.
Medical air cylinder
A cylinder containing air of breathing quality. Used to oxygenate the atmosphere
within a power transformer.
MEN
Multiple Earthed Neutral system of earthing, as defined in AS 3000.
Midspan
The centre of a span between two fixed points or poles.

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Minimum Approach Distance (MAD)


The minimum separation distance that must be maintained by a person, mobile
plant (including its load) or any object (other than insulated objects designed for
contact with live conductors) from electrical apparatus for that apparatus nominal
voltage and the person skill level (Authorised person or ordinary person).
Minimum tool insulating distance
The distance that the insulating material (stick or rope) is subjected to whilst
touching energised conductors. This distance shall be measured between the metal
end fitting at the conductor end of the insulating material and the metal end fitting or
handmark, where provided, at the opposite end of the insulating material. When live
line sticks consist of sections joined with metal couplings, the insulating distance
shall be the total of each of the lengths of insulating material which have not been
bridged out by the metal couplings.
Minor spill or leak
Amounts between 20 and 100 litres.
Mobile plant
Cranes, elevated work platforms, tip trucks or similar plant; any equipment fitted
with a jib or boom and any device capable of raising or lowering a load.
Mobile scaffold
An independent scaffold that is freestanding and mounted on castors.
Multi-task workplace risk assessments
These are sophisticated workplace risk assessments that form part of the planning
process of the more complex jobs and projects. They follow a similar format to that
of formal Workplace Risk Assessments in as much as they require hazard
identification and risk assessment, but involve a more highly structured, facilitated
risk assessment.
Near
Outside the Minimum Approach Distance (MAD) but where there is a reasonable
possibility of a person, mobile plant or any object, either directly or through any
conducting medium, coming within the MAD.
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Network
An interconnected system of transmission and distribution conductors and electrical
apparatus. The word network can be used interchangeably with system.
Network operator
The owner, controller operator of an electricity network (NOCC/SOCC).
Network Total Workforce (NTW)
Is the total workforce who work on Western Powers Assets the network and
consists of Western Power employees, contractors, sub-contractors, Alliances and
partners.
Neutral conductor
The conductor of a three-wire or multi-wire system that is maintained at an
intermediate and approximately uniform potential in respect of the active or outer
conductors, or the conductor of a two-wire system that is connected to earth at its
origin.
NMS
Networks Mapping System.
No Work Zone
An area around a suspected object of Aboriginal origin in which no construction
activities are to be conducted.
NOCC
Network Operations Control Centre. The NOCC is responsible for control of the
Distribution Network.
Noxious weed
A non-native species, which is declared to be harmful and if found, must be
controlled or eradicated by the property owner.
Object of Aboriginal origin
An object, including Aboriginal remains, used, made or adapted for a purpose
consistent with Aboriginal traditional cultural life.

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One Call
(Dial Before you Dig phone number 1100) The service that issues information about
the likely presence of buried apparatus installed by various service utilities.
http://www.1100.com.au
On-site person in charge
A person who is responsible for the work being carried out by a work team.
Operational work
All construction, maintenance, trade based and switching activities undertaken in a
field environment.
Operating Agreement (OA)
The agreement between two parties used to confirm that the state of apparatus will
remain constant for the duration of the agreement.
Operating Authority
The division responsible for the operation and control of the network.
Ordinary Person
Is a person without sufficient training or experience to enable them to avoid the
dangers that electrical apparatus may create.
Organochlorine pesticide
A wide range of organic chemicals, which contain chlorine and sometimes several
other elements.
Other cable systems
Telecommunications cables, pay television cable, control cables, aerial earthed
cables, electrolysis drainage cables.
Out of Service Warning Tag
An approved tag that reads OUT OF SERVICE warning which is affixed to
apparatus and advises of the physical condition of apparatus or network controlled
by the apparatus.

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Out of use (electrical)


For HV the removal from each source of electrical supply, a length of conductor
equal to or greater than the insulation distance for that voltage. For Low Voltage, a
gap in the conductor of not less than 150mm. An isolator is not an acceptable
alternative to the removal the length of a conductor.
Packaged dangerous goods
Dangerous goods Class 2 (gases) in a container with a capacity of not more than
500 litres or dangerous goods of another class in a container with a capacity of not
more than 450 litres; and a container with a net mass of not more than 400
kilograms.
Packing groups
Packing groups are used for the purpose of determining the degree of protective
packaging required for Dangerous Goods during transportation.

Group I: great danger, and most protective packaging required. Some


combinations of different classes of dangerous goods on the same vehicle or in
the same container are forbidden if one of the goods is Group I.

Group II: medium danger

Group III: least danger among regulated goods, and least protective
packaging within the transportation requirement

PCB
Polychlorinated Biphenyl a hazardous substance found in capacitors and
transformers manufactured before 1978.
PCB coffin/drum
A container acceptable for PCB contaminated chokes and capacitors is a steel
drum of gauge 18 or heavier with a gasket made of PCB resistant material.
Person in Charge
The person responsible for the work being carried out by a work party.

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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)


Approved clothing or similar items intended to protect a person from injury and
specifically approved for particular types of work and/or the location where the work
is performed.
Phase position
Line phase wire is matched to the corresponding load terminal or position. Western
Power connects the three phases in the order Red White Blue from left to right
at the meter terminals.
Phase rotation
The direction phases rotate relative to each other.
Phasing out
The identification of active conductors of the same phase (having no significant
angular displacement i.e. red phase to red phase).
Plant
Mechanical plant including all machinery and equipment not elsewhere defined as
apparatus.
Polarity
The voltage of a conductor relative to another conductor or the general mass of
earth.
Portable earthing equipment
Earthing equipment that can be transferred from one location to another and used
for earthing and short-circuiting de-energised apparatus.
Potholing
The action of removing earth by hand or vacuum excavation to determine the
existence of any known or unknown buried apparatus.
PPC
Personal Protective Clothing.

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Proposed Outage Plan (POP)


A Proposed Outage Plan is the on-line mechanism by which outage requests are
lodged with the Transmission Network Operating Authority. The request for access
(POP) can be utilised for the purpose of maintenance, construction or testing. A
Proposed Outage Plan outlines:

Isolations which are required to complete the work.

Operational impact.

The date and time of the intended work.

The types of Permit required.

Any special precautions which need to be taken.

Contingency planning information

Primary plant
Primary plant is all equipment which can be connected to HV levels, e.g. circuit
breakers, isolators, and current transformers. Primary plant also includes any
equipment directly associated with the major plant, e.g. Buchholz relays on
transformers, SF6 gas pressure switches on circuit breakers, etc.
Process owner
The Process Owner is the person who has been assigned with the authority and
responsibility for managing the whole process from end-to-end. This authority may
extend across more than one division and/or functions, in order to deliver agreed
business results.
Program Earth
Earthing equipment of approved type applied as part of an electrical switching
program/schedule.
Prohibited burning time
The times of the year during which it is declared by the Minister under Part III,
Division 2, Section 17 of the Bush Fires Act 1954, to be unlawful to set fire to the
bush within a zone of the State and, in relation to any land in that zone.

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Pyrolysis
The chemical decomposition of a substance by the action of heat.
Rated voltage
The manufacturers recommended maximum voltage to be applied to the specified
equipment.
Recipient
A person authorised by Western Power to sign on and sign off work permits under
control of the Recipient In Charge.
Recipient In Charge (RIC)
Is the authorised person who has the responsibility of accepting and relinquishing
EAPS and VAs and managing the work group activities to ensure compliance with
the conditions of the EAP or VA and the requirements of the ESSP.
Remote control
A module that is used to operate a base unit.
Remote end
The opposite end of the cable from where work is being carried out.
Restricted Use Danger Tag
An approved tag that reads RESTRICTED USE DANGER which is affixed to
apparatus and advises of the person who controls the operation and state of the
apparatus.

A Restricted Use Tag allows the nominated person to change the

status of the apparatus as required for their work.


Risk
The chance of something happening that will have an impact upon objectives. It is
measured in terms of consequences and likelihood.
Risk control
That part of risk management, which involves the implementation of policies,
standards, procedures and physical changes to eliminate or minimise adverse
risks.

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RMU Ring main unit


One or a combination of ring main switches and/or switch fuses used to control and
operate HV underground systems.
Road safety barrier
A physical barrier separating the work area and the travelled way, designed to
resist penetration by an out of control vehicle and as far as practicable, to redirect
colliding vehicles back into the travelled path.
RSU
Radio switching unit comprising a base unit and remote control.
Running Earth
Additional aerial earthed conductor run either above or below the active
conductors.
Rural area
The countryside and pastoral areas outside the boundaries of a city or town.
Safe-cut
A method of exposing underground cables to establish their status.
Safety Observer
Is a competent person assigned by the person-in-charge and whose sole function is
to observe and warn against unsafe approach to live electrical apparatus or unsafe
conditions.

The safety observer must remain outside the minimum approach

distance.
Safe working load
The maximum load (in kilograms or kilonewtons) to be applied to the specified
equipment, apparatus or hardware.
Sag
The vertical distance between the final conductor position midspan and the
conductor fixing points.
Sanction To Test (STT)
Western Powers standard form which authorises testing of electrical apparatus.
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SCADA
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition.
Scaffold
A temporary structure, specifically erected to support access platforms or working
platforms.
Secondary equipment
All equipment that is not directly connected to a HV system. Typically, anything that
is installed on a protection panel. This includes (but is not limited to) protection
relays, control relays, contactors, indication equipment, SCADA equipment, panel
wiring, marshalling boxes and control kiosks. The demarcation point on CTs and
VTs is the magnetic interface point. The secondary cores within CTs and VTs are
part of the secondary system.
Secondary isolation schedule (SIS)
The Secondary Isolation Schedule is used to:

Formalise the preparation of secondary isolations.

Pass written information to the recipient.

Provide information for isolation and restoration.

Secondary systems
Secondary systems include (but are not limited to) station LV supply, batteries and
battery chargers, protection circuits, pilot cables, control and alarm circuits, SCADA
and communication equipment.
Secondary work activities
All

construction

type

work

for

the

purposes

of

secondary

equipment

installation/replacement or modification, conducted under the conditions of an EAP


permit. Whenever access to secondary equipment is required, a Secondary
Isolation Schedule will be in accompaniment with either EAP for primary plant or an
EAP for secondary plant.
Section safety clearance
The minimum distance between live parts and the foot position of a person,
whether they are on the ground, a walkway, a platform or on top of equipment.
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Serviceable apparatus
Parts of the network and consumer owned apparatus to which access is allowed by
the Network Operator and Service Providers for the purposes of maintaining
supply.
Short Circuited Low Voltage
Earthing of LV circuits is performed by bonding all phase and neutral conductors
using approved equipment and procedures. This is commonly referred to as shortcircuiting.
Shall and Should
Throughout this manual the word shall is to be interpreted as the minimum
requirement and should is to be interpreted as advisory or discretionary.
SOCC
System Operations Control Centre. The SOCC is responsible for control of the
Transmission Network.
Spiking
The process of proving a cable has no hazardous voltage present, by creating a
short circuit between the core(s) and neutral/earth screen, using a method that
poses no risk to persons during the spiking of the cable.
Stabiliser
An approved, hydraulically deployed stabilising structure fixed to a crane borer subframe.
Substation
Any yard, terminal, switchyard, zone substation or facility that transforms or
switches high voltage.
Switching
The operation of circuit breakers, isolators, disconnectors, fuses or other methods
of making or breaking an electrical circuit and/or the application and removal of
program earths.

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Switching Authority
An authority that has been issued an approval to give approval to perform switching
operations.
Switching Device
Any item on the network capable of connecting and disconnecting apparatus.
Switching Operator
A person authorised by the operating authority to carry out switching operations
within the limits of their authorisation.
Switching Program/Schedule
A switching program/schedule is a list of switching operations that are placed in a
logical sequence to ensure operation of electrical apparatus is carried out in a
controlled manner.
System
Refer network.
Test
The measurement of electrical apparatus, with an approved device, to establish the
present condition.
Test voltage
The voltage which shall be applied to the specified equipment for the purpose of
periodic electrical testing.
Tested
Apparatus which has been tested in accordance with the relevant standard.
Tester in Charge (TIC)
A person authorised to receive and relinquish a Sanction to Test (STT) within the
limits of their authorisation.
TNO
Technical Network Officer.

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Under Direction
The authorised operator with the D restriction may carry out switching on their
own. However, each item of the program requires direction by telephone or radio
from the authorised switching operator.
Vicinity Authority (VA)
Western Powers standard form that authorises work in close proximity to live
electrical apparatus or apparatus which may become live.
Vertical work safety clearance
The minimum distance from the extremities of the work object, vertically to the
nearest live part.
VIR
Vulcanised Insulated Rubber
Western Power Authorised Representative
Is Authorised to act on behalf of Western Power within their scope of authorisation.
Work area
The area within normal body reach of the working position.
Working earth
Additional to program earths installed by a working crew to ensure a safe work site.
Work place
A place, whether or not in an aircraft, ship,
vehicle, building, or other structure, where employees or
self-employed persons work or are likely to be in the course of their work.
Work site
Colloquial term used by Western Power that refers to a Construction Site.
Refer to Construction Site.
Work team
One or more authorised persons who have been authorised to carry out work on
Western Power equipment/network.
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Working load limit


Working load limit (WLL) is the maximum load (tension) that may be applied to
slings or to any materials handling equipment.
Working voltage
The maximum voltage to be applied to the specified equipment while conducting
actual fieldwork.

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2.1

Provisional emergency procedures

Purpose
This instruction applies to any worksite (building or in field) where the job risk
assessment process has identified the need for an emergency procedure.
In accordance with this instruction, it is the duty of the onsite person in charge to be
responsible for developing, implementing and communicating a workplace
emergency procedure.
Instructions

Where the job risk assessment process has identified the need for a
provisional emergency procedure, document the process in the job risk
assessment form and confirm that all team members understand their role and
responsibility.

Obtain the direct telephone numbers of local doctors, ambulance services, fire
brigades and police. When working in country areas, it is essential to know the
direct numbers for emergency services (Refer to Appendix for more
information).

Determine and check the adequacy of emergency communications.

Check the availability of first aid equipment relevant to the potential injury risk
and confirm that a team member is trained in first aid.

In the event of an emergency, stop the work and decide on the appropriate
action. If practicable, immediately document any additional actions in the job
risk assessment form.

Where necessary, establish an evacuation assembly area.

Take into

consideration any member of the public affected by the emergency.

Inform the Formal Leader and comply with the Incident Notification process.

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Emergency contact information:


NOCC

9427 0626

SOCC

9427 4287

General emergency

000

SES

132 500 (fire, flood, storm, earthquake, emergency assistance)

Western Power

13 13 51

Police

13 14 44

Ambulance

13 12 33

For more information about contact details for SOCC, NOCC and the shire refer to
the Appendix.

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2.2

Portable earthing/shorting equipment

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for the earthing of, vehicles and
plant operating near high voltage electrical apparatus and the earthing of high
voltage conductors within Transmission Substations.
Scope
This instruction covers all works conducted on electrical apparatus where access is
required via a permit within Transmission Substations.
Lightning
Portable earths are not designed to protect persons from the effects of lightning.
Refer Section 2.3 (Electrical storms) for further information.
Instructions

Only use approved appropriately rated, portable earthing equipment.

The minimum allowable rating for portable earths is 150mm squared.

Before applying portable earths, confirm the apparatus has been de-energised
by using an approved proximity sensing device (e.g. Modiewark) set at the
voltage of the apparatus to be tested.

Always check the proximity sensing device is operative on an adjacent live


apparatus. If no live apparatus is available, an electro magnetic field emitter
(e.g. modiLive tester) can be used to test the device or an alternative used to
test the tester.

Apply portable earths immediately after a test has proven the high voltage
electrical apparatus is de-energised.

When applying portable earthing equipment, the earth connection must be first
on and last off.

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Do not apply portable earthing equipment to a structure fitted with an earth to


neutral bond.

Firmly clamp the portable earth lead to the earth connection point.

Always use permanently installed earth points.

Avoid dragging earth leads along the ground.

Earth leads must be arranged so that:

They are not hung up, crossed over or wound on the ground.

The excess lead is away from the work site.

Unused earth leads are to be attached to earthed conductors.

They are not tied together.

Apply and remove portable earths using the approved stick, with leads kept
clear of person(s).

When work is continuing for a number of days, prior to commencing work each
day, the RIC or TIC must inspect the earthing equipment to make sure it is still
correctly installed.

Program earths

Install program earths in accordance with the switching schedule.

Where a program earth is applied, a Do Not Operate (Danger) tag must be


fitted. This includes portable and fixed program earths. In some situations this
may also be the working earth location and in this case both earth and tag can
only be removed by the authority of the issuing/switching officer.

Program earths may be temporarily removed during work, ONLY after:

Permission has been granted by the IO who has fitted a Restricted Use
Tag on the earths that can be removed.

All persons working under the permit are notified and cease work.

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The earth is removed and re-applied by the Recipient in Charge or the


Tester in Charge.

Work must not restart until the earths are reapplied.

Program earths must be noted on the Electrical Access Permit and Sanction to
Test.

Where it is not practical to install program earths in accordance with the


switching schedule, they must be placed within the isolated section as close as
possible to the switching schedule location. Where this is not possible, portable
program earthing equipment may be installed closer to the work area.
However, an assessment of the potential dynamic movement (whip) of the
earthing leads must be assessed using the job risk assessment process.

Install transmission line program earths at the switching schedule isolation


points.

Working earths

Working earths must be installed as close as possible and visible from the
worksite.

A program earth can be used as a working earth if it is visible from the


worksite.

Where there is a risk of induced voltage, install additional working earths.


(Refer section 5.14 - Induced voltage).

Steel and concrete structures

Where a running earth is supported on a steel or concrete structure, ensure it


is bonded to either the structures earth terminal, the metalwork of the structure
or to the down earth.

Vehicles and plant earths


Always earth an insulated elevated work platform, at the vehicle earthing point, to
ground or a known earth when working:
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On or near live high voltage conductors.

On or near de-energised high voltage conductors.

On or near de-energised and earthed high voltage conductors.

Use a common earth bond where multiple vehicles are at the worksite.

Securely attach the earth lead to the vehicle or plant chassis.

A person must stand on an Equipotential Mat while operating base controls


on a stationary vehicle or plant which is near live high voltage overhead
electrical apparatus.

Attach the earthing lead of the Equipotential Mat (either bonded or clamped)
to the approved bonding point or a clean metal surface on the vehicle.

Do not connect the earth lead to a structure fitted with an earth to neutral bond.
When in a substation, a vehicle / plant that may be in motion or can alter its
height e.g. elevating work platform, bobcat, concrete pump and tip trucks, must
be earthed as follows:

Attach a drag chain to the chassis earth connection. The chain must have
at least 150mm of 10mm bright or galvanised chain touching the ground.

Static plant or plant moved for positioning must be attached via approved
earthing lead(s) to the earth points in the substation. Care must be
exercised when positioning the plant so as not to damage or release the
earth connection.

Temporary buildings/structures, which may be affected by falling primary


conductors, must be solidly bonded at the site fault level rating to the
Substation earth grid.

Temporary buildings/structures that will not be affected by falling primary


conductors must be earthed in accordance with AS3000 (Section 5 Earthing
arrangements and earthing conductors) to the Substation earth grid. Install an
independent earthing stake/rod if the connection to the grid is not possible.

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Inspection and maintenance

At a minimum, conduct six monthly detailed inspections on all portable earthing


equipment.

Test insulated sticks in accordance with Instruction 2.12 High voltage


insulating equipment.

All portable earthing equipment must clearly display the due date of the next
inspection.

Remove from service and Tag any damaged or defective portable earthing
equipment, until it can be repaired or discarded.

If a set or component of an earthing or shorting set has been subjected to fault


current or energisation, it must be removed from service, Tagged and retained
as possible evidence for the investigation by Western Powers Safety &
Compliance Section.

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2.3

Electrical storms

Purpose
This instruction describes the safe systems of work when working near electrical
storm activity when within transmission substations.
Instructions

During the job risk assessment process, assess the electrical storm activity
when the Bureau of Meteorology, NOCC or SOCC has issued a warning.

Stop work and assess the electrical storms approach.

Determine the electrical storm activity and decide whether to continue working.
If practicable or necessary, notify the Formal Leader of any decision to stop
work.

Seek shelter in a building or enclosed vehicle until the lightning storm passes.
Relocate to safe location as a lightning strike to power lines will often induce
very high voltages and in some events cause the pole to explode sending
debris over several metres.

Avoid standing near a pole during an electrical storm, as a direct strike will
result a voltage dispersing into the ground creating a step potential.

If work continues, monitor the electrical storm activity as changes may occur in
a short period.

When working in substations on lines apparatus, be aware that the weather


conditions locally may not be a clear indication of the weather conditions along
the line route.

Pilot systems are usually interconnected. Do not work on any Pilot systems if
electrical storm or severe winds are identified as being present within 30 km of
the metro area or to the Pilot system nearest to the weather condition
identified.

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2.4

Hazardous workspace safety

Purpose
The purpose of this instruction is to describe the safe system of work associated
with the entry and activities performed by any person working on behalf of Western
Power who enters a hazardous workspace.
The instruction only provides the key points relevant to hazardous workspaces
identified on Western Power worksites and does not attempt to replicate the OSH
Regulation Division 8 - Work in confined spaces, or any Confined Space training
provisions.
Instructions
Basic requirements

The person in control of the worksite must carry out a suitable and sufficient Job
Risk Assessment for all work activities to be undertaken in the hazardous
workspace.

Foreseeable risks include but are not limited to:

Changing task conditions.

The working environment.

An individuals physical size and shape.

Work materials and tools.

Task competency.

The rescue of an incapacitated person.

Determine whether the work environment is a hazardous workspace or confined


space.
Note:
Avoid entry if the work environment is determined to be a confined space and
designate a competent person who is trained in Confined Space entry to
implement safe systems of work in accordance with Worksafe WA
requirements. (Refer to section 2.5 for confined space)

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Confirm that all team members are conversant with all risk controls and if required
designate competent safety observers and a rescue team.

Establish a communication system.


Consider methods of completing the work without entering the hazardous
workspace.

Identify a method to isolate any power supply in the event of an emergency.

Determine any work permit requirements.

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2.5

Confined space safety

Purpose
The purpose of this instruction is to provide an understanding and knowledge of the
requirements when performing work safely in a confined space.
This instruction only provides the key points relevant to confined spaces identified
on Western Power worksites and does not attempt to replicate or supersede the
following references:

Occupational Safety and Health Regulation Division 9 Work in confined


spaces.

Australian Standard 2865: 2009 Confined Spaces.

Western Power Safety and Health Procedure Confined Space Procedure.

Any Western Power approved Confined Space training provisions.

Risk control

Establish a register to record all workplaces defined as a confined space.

Fix a warning sign at the entrance and or exits of all confined spaces.

Temporary confined spaces must display a confined space sign for the
duration of the work.

Only remove a permanently fixed confined space sign if the workplace due to a
re-design is no longer a confined space.

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Training

All persons with tasks associated with a confined space, shall be trained and
assessed as competent to conduct those tasks. Training must be current and
recorded in Ellipse Training module or in the Contractor Authorisation records.

Persons shall be reassessed every three years to maintain their competency to


conduct tasks associated with confined spaces.

Depending on the confined space work, activity risks, the key confined space
training competencies may be either General Awareness training or Specific
Training.

The person issuing a confined space entry permit must be an authorised


Recipient in Charge who has achieved a Confined Space Entry course
accreditation.

Confirm at least one (1) member of the work team is trained in the following
first aid competencies:

HLTCPR201APerform CPR

HLTFA201A Provide basic emergency life support, first aid qualifications

Those who work in remote locations may require HLTFA302AProvide


first aid in remote situations.

If it is established that there is a foreseeable fire risk, ensure an appropriate


number of team members are trained in the use of fire equipment.

Any person who is required to use atmospheric monitoring equipment must be


trained in its use and calibration requirements.

Instruction

The Work Parcel or any pre-job instruction must include all foreseeable
confined space risks associated with the work activity.

Consider methods of completing the work without entering the confined space.
Before commencing the confined space work activity, wear personal protective
equipment and clothing appropriate to the risk.

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The Recipient in Charge of the Confined Space Entry Permit is responsible for
accepting and relinquishing the permit and managing the work activities to
ensure compliance with approved procedures and processes.

The Recipient in Charge of the permit must assign accountabilities related to


the confined space activity.

The Recipient in Charge of the permit must carry out a Job Risk Assessment
for all work activities to be undertaken in the confined space.

Foreseeable risks include, but are not limited to:

Access and egress restrictions.

Engulfment by fumes, gas or liquid.

Soil or sand engulfment.

Dangerous oxygen levels.

Breathable Oxygen levels (19.5 to 23.5 is the percentage of oxygen that is


required with other gasses to be breathable)

Explosion or fire.

Electrical arcing.

Unsafe temperatures.

Harmful noise levels.

Confirm that all team members are conversant with all risk controls.

Postpone the work activity if all the confined space risk controls cannot be
implemented.

Perform atmospheric testing if fumes or gases are known to be present due to


work processes, stored materials or any foreseeable hazard that may result in
injury or acute illness.

Designate a competent Safety Observer.

Establish an emergency response process appropriate to the confined space


risk.

Establish a communication system.

Identify a method to isolate any power supply in the event of an emergency.

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The Recipient in Charge of the permit is responsible to ensure the Job Risk
Assessment process is followed and that all permits are completed.

Work must be completed in compliance with all appropriate instructions.


At the conclusion of the work activity, sign off the Confined Space Entry Permit
and secure the confined space from unauthorised access.
DANGER

SF6 gas is five times heavier than air. Escaped SF6 gas will displace oxygen at
ground level, especially in confined spaces. This could present a danger of
asphyxiation due to oxygen deficiency if employees are working in deep tanks,
enclosed vessels, and in ducts, trenches or pits where SF6 gas is present.
Permits

Before any confined space activities commence, issue a Western Power


approved confined Space Entry Permit. (Refer Appendix 2 Standard Forms).

Other work permits may include:

Electrical Access Permit.

Vicinity Access Permit.

Construction Authority Work Permit.

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2.6

Tags

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements of Western Powers electrical tagging
system by explaining the application and use of the four (4) approved operational tags on
Western Power network apparatus, including secondary plant and communication systems.

Training, authorisation and permissions


Personnel applying and removing tags must be suitably trained and authorised in their roles
and functions.
Table 1 - Tag permissions

Note 1

The TIC can temporarily remove the Restricted Use tag during the process of
changing the state of the apparatus and then re-apply the Restricted Use tag.

Note 2

The person responsible for maintenance is likely to be general network field staff.
However, in this context they are tasked with repairing / maintaining.
They will remove the Out of Service tag as the initial part of this task.

Note 3

Any authorised person can apply and remove the Information tag which would only
be removed when the normal operating condition has been restored.
ATTENTION

Personnel applying tags without completing all required fields of information


may have their Switching Ticket cancelled.

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Operational
The following tags are the approved tags for use on Western Powers electricity system.

Do Not Operate tag

The Do Not Operate tag prohibits operation of the apparatus.

The Do Not Operate tag may only be used when work is being carried out on
the system.

The Do Not Operate tag must be applied to apparatus that has been isolated
and earthed in according to a switching program and an EAP issued.

Authorised switching operators or issuing officers shall fit and remove tags in
accordance with the approved switching program unless during a fault
condition (where there is no program).

A Do Not Operate tag must be attached to all isolation points of the


plant/equipment in a visible position.

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A Do Not Operate tag must be attached to high visibility warning signs placed
on interconnectable normally open points that could be closed. A sample of the
high visibility warning sign is shown below.

High Visibility
Warning Sign
Stock code:
CZ5012

Once all work has been completed, the Do Not Operate tag must be removed.

If any defect is still present on the apparatus, and work has ceased on the
apparatus or the apparatus is not to be returned to operation, the Do Not
Operate tag must be removed and an Out of Service tag applied.

When further work is to be conducted on the plant/equipment at a later date, a


new Do Not Operate tag must be attached to the plant/equipment.

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Out of Service tag

The Out of Service tag prohibits the operation of apparatus specifically to


prevent damage to the apparatus or network and to ensure that personnel who
may operate the apparatus are not endangered.

Is fitted to apparatus that is unserviceable, awaiting repair or being repaired.

Prohibits operation of the apparatus to ensure the safety of personnel working


under the conditions of the work permit.

The Out of Service tag must be used to indicate a General and Unusual
Operating Instruction (GUOI).

When a Out of Service tag is used and fitted for switching on primary
apparatus NOCC/SOCC must be advised.

The Out of Service tag must be applied directly to the defective component in a
noticeable position.

Apparatus with remote control must be tagged at all control points.

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Restricted Use tag

The Restricted Use tag prohibits all personnel, other than the person
nominated on the tag, from operating the apparatus.

Attached and removed by the Issuing Officer or Switching Officer when issuing
a Sanction to Test.

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Information Tag

The Information tag is used for conditions that do not require a Do Not
Operate, Out of Service or Restricted Use tag and provides information about
changed or unusual network operating conditions.

Where an Out of Service tag is attached to any equipment, all personnel that
work on the equipment must comply with any instruction or information on the
tag prior to commencing, and during, any tasks associated to the tagged
equipment.

General
Out of Service tag: This tag may be used for non-operational use and does not
have to be recorded with NOCC/SOCC.
Information tag: This tag may be used for non for non-operational use.
Fitting tags

For the tags to be effective, all the relevant information must be filled out on
them correctly and clearly, referenced and placed in a visible location on the
apparatus and remain in place for the duration of the condition indicated on the
tag.

Only approved tags are permitted to be used.

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Tags must be attached so that they can be easily seen and remain in place for
the duration of the condition indicated on the tag.

The tags may be attached using the hasp of a padlock through the hole in the
tag, or attached to the equipment with string, or cable ties.

Logging/recording the tags

For other isolations, (e.g. confined space or Construction Authority Work


Permit) record the tag on the permit.

Information tags are not required to be logged, provided that sufficient


information is written on the tags. Do not use this tag when the reason for the
information can be removed or controlled by other permanent methods.

Removal of tags

Do Not Operate tags can be removed as per the switching program and
ENMAC schedule by the person who affixed the tag.

If a person other than the person who applied the tag wishes to remove it, they
must first contact:

The person who fitted the tag;

The onsite person in charge;

The team leader of the group responsible for fitting the tag; and

The formal leader of the person who fitted the tag;

to ensure that removal of the tag will not put any person at risk, will not affect
any other work being performed, and that all persons concerned know the tag
has been removed.
If a tag is encountered in the work environment and it cannot be determined
why it has been affixed, the following must occur before work proceeds:

Identify and contact the person who placed the tag or, if unavailable,
his/her team leader.

Identify why the tag was placed on the equipment.

Contact relevant control (i.e. NOCC, SOCC, SCADA) to check if any work
is being carried out on the system and if a permit is in existence for the
apparatus.

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Be familiar with and authorised to operate that equipment i.e. a Switching


Operator.

Check for any personnel working on the equipment or on any associated


section of the network.

Check the condition of the equipment and any associated section of the
network.

Remove the tag and log it in the appropriate system.

Inform your Formal Leader of this event.

Check equipment operates correctly with the use of the relevant


commissioning checks.

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2.7

Pyrolysis in vehicle tyres

Purpose
This instruction describes the safety precautions to take when a vehicles air-filled
tyres are subjected to extreme heat such as a high voltage flashover.
Overview

A chemical reaction known as pyrolysis can occur when excessive heat


develops in or is applied to a rubber tyre.

This results in an accumulation of flammable gas within the tyre that exceeds a
critical level. That is, parts of the tyre remain hot enough to ignite this explosive
gas mixture.

Pyrolysis in vehicle tyres can be caused by:

A lightning strike.

Contact with live high voltage apparatus.

Defective or under-inflated tyres.

The application of heat (such as oxyacetylene or welder) on wheel rims


with tyres attached.

Overheated brakes.

Fire.

Exploding tyres can blast part of wheel rims and tyre fragments over long
distances.

Instruction

Remove all tyres when welding or carrying out any oxy-acetylene works on
wheel rims.

Inform Fleet Services or their representative of any suspect vehicle brake


overheating.

Conduct a risk assessment immediately after vehicle tyres are exposed to the
effects of extreme heat and if practicable and safe, drive the vehicle into a
nearby clear area.

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Remain clear of any fallen power line until it has been proved de-energised
and earthed.

If the conductor is touching a vehicle or plant and the driver appears to be


injured, remain clear until the conductor has been proved de-energised and
earthed.

If in radio or telephone contact, arrange to isolate the supply and contact Fire
and Emergency Services Authority of Western Australia (FESA).

The driver of a vehicle in contact with a power line should remain in the vehicle
until the electrical supply has been isolated. If the driver is alone, he should
attempt to seek assistance before leaving the vehicle. If at risk due to a
potential explosion or fire, leave the vehicle by jumping clear with both feet
together.

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2.8

Temporary barriers and signs

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for the installation and erection
of temporary safety barriers or warning signs where a worksite requires protection
or separation from anything that may be impacted by the worksite within
Transmission Substations.
Scope
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for the installation and erection
of temporary safety barriers or warning signs where a worksite requires protection
or separation from anything that may be impacted by the worksite for the Network
Total Workforce (NTW) within Transmission Substations.
Instructions

Conduct the JRA process and assess the need for temporary safety barriers or
warning signs.

Erect temporary safety barriers, warning signs and/or designate a person to


direct pedestrians if the risk assessment identifies any hazard that would put
the public at risk of injury or harm.

Where practical, install safe access ways through the immediate worksite,
allowing the NTW access. Alternatively, escort NTW through the immediate
worksite.

Position temporary safety barriers or warning signs so that they will not
become a hazard or a workplace obstruction.

On completion of work, remove all temporary signs and barriers.

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Installation and erection

The following are approved temporary safety barriers:

High-visibility mesh.

High-visibility rope and flag.

Road safety barriers.

Temporary fencing.

High-visibility road traffic management cones and bollards.

Appropriate warning or advisory signs are required to be erected in conjunction


with these barriers. Walls, fences or other impassable permanent barriers may
be used as part of a temporary safety barrier.

If star pickets are used to support temporary safety barriers or warning signs,
drive them into the ground firmly to a maximum depth of 600 mm.
Note:
Take care to avoid driving the picket into underground services. Refer to Field
Instruction 5.23 Excavations. Cover the top of the star picket to prevent injury.

High-visibility barrier mesh

Use high-visibility barrier mesh around excavations and exposed cables, to


stop members of the public from entering a hazardous worksite. A barrier mesh
is not designed to prevent a fall into a trench.

Erect this mesh to at least 900mm from ground level.

Attach high-visibility mesh to star pickets, ground screws, freestanding bollards


or suitable permanent supports by star picket through the barrier mesh, making
it secure by using a suitable fastener, or by using a suitable fastener directly
against the selected support.

Position star pickets, ground screws, or freestanding bollards no more than 2


metres apart to maintain the minimum height of 900 mm and prevent the
barrier mesh from falling over.

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High-visibility flag rope barriers

High-visibility flag rope is also used to safely guide NTW around, or through, a
hazardous worksite.

A high-visibility rope is used in substations to indicate working, live, or safe


areas.

Tie high-visibility flag rope to star pickets, ground screws, freestanding


bollards, suitable permanent supports, or selected supports using a suitable
fastener.

Position the high-visibility flag rope barrier between 900 mm and 1200 mm
above the ground.

Position star pickets, ground screws or freestanding bollards up to a maximum


distance of 3 metres apart to prevent the flag rope from sagging below 900
mm.

A flag rope is not designed to prevent a fall into a trench.

Plastic barriers

Use plastic barriers to redirect pedestrian traffic away from a worksite.


However, do not install them to provide a physical barrier between the travelled
way and the work area.

Temporary fencing

Use temporary fencing to prevent unauthorised entry to worksites.

Install temporary fencing at a distance that will not create an additional hazard
to the general public.

Install temporary fencing where enclosures are required to stop unauthorised


entry to electrical apparatus, plant, and equipment.

Construct temporary fencing to a minimum height of 1800 mm with the panel


sections consisting of steel mesh, plastic fencing, chain wire or metal hoarding.

If access gates are fitted, ensure they can be locked.


For increased security, attach barbed wire extensions to the top of the
temporary fencing.

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Make sure temporary fencing is far enough away from the safety barrier, (see
Tables 1 and 2 above), to provide protection against a vehicle collision.

If the JRA process identifies a particular hazard erect temporary warning or


advisory signs in conjunction with temporary safety barriers.
Warning or advisory signs that can be used on Western Power work sites are:

Power Line Work in Progress.

Pedestrians This Way.

Do Not Enter.

Caution. Excavation Work in Progress.

Danger. Live Cables.

Authorised Entry Only.

Put warning and advisory signs where they are clearly visible and do not
obstruct pedestrians and vehicular traffic.

Ensure all warning and advisory signs are legible and in good condition.

Emergency response generators

Refer to the Emergency Response Generators manual for detailed standards


on temporary fencing for emergency response generator deployment.

References

Occupational Safety and Health Regulations 1996.

Western Power Public Safety Policy.

AS 1743-2001: Road Sign Specification.

AS 1742.3-2002, Part 3: Traffic Control Devices for Works on Roads.

MRWA Traffic Management for Works on Roads Code of Practice (March


2004).

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2.9

Asbestos and fibreglass working procedures

Purpose
This instruction outlines the steps to be followed when working on equipment
containing, or is suspected of containing, asbestos materials.
Exclusions
This instruction does not cover thermal and acoustic insulation or automotive
equipment containing, or suspected of containing, asbestos materials.
Product overview
Asbestos can be found in:

Asbestos, Lebah and Zelemite kWh meter boards.

Porcelain fuse cartridge holders with asbestos braiding.

Vinyl floor tiles in substations.

Cable ducts.

Cable lagging

Safety precautions
Asbestos
Before starting any work on electrical equipment containing or suspected of
containing asbestos material, carry out an on-site hazard risk assessment.
Apply control measures (outlined below), to minimise the release of, and possible
exposure to, asbestos fibres.
When removing electrical equipment that does not appear to be damaged or
deteriorated (no cracked or broken panels or loose fibres), wear:

A class P2 respirator (QE-0138).

PVC disposable gloves (QH-064 or QH-0068) for extra wrist length protection.

Re-useable dust-proof goggles (QE-0071).

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Take the following additional safety precautions when removing electrical


equipment that does show signs of deterioration or damage:

Wear disposable coveralls (QC-0316-18).

Display an asbestos warning sign which reads: Asbestos Related Work in


Progress.
Electrical meter panels
Until July 1988, panels with asbestos products known as Zelemite, Lebah, and
Ausbestos were used.
These panels can be identified by their appearance:

They are black, bitumen, and approximately 12 mm to 30 mm thick.

The material name (in most cases) will be stencilled on the back of the panel.

These panels should not be confused with black Formica panels that are
between 6mm and 10 mm thick.

The asbestos material contained in the panels remains passive until the meter
panels are cut, drilled or damaged. Therefore, all panels installed before 1988
must not be modified by cutting or drilling.

Panels containing, or suspected of containing, asbestos materials

Before removing any electrical equipment from a panel, make sure it is


disconnected from the supply and proved to be de energised.

Smear grease or petroleum jelly on the base of the device, and then remove it.
Immediately after removing the device, place grease or petroleum jelly over the
fixing holes.

Smear a small amount of grease or petroleum jelly around the panel screws or
fixings, and then remove the panel.

Immediately after removing the panel, dampen it with a low-pressure hand-held


water spray.

Wipe away all dust and panel debris within the enclosure with a damp rag.

Do not return a panel with equipment attached.

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Place the panel and rag into the small plastic bag (OC-3106), seal the bag then
place in the large plastic bag (OC-3109) marked Caution Asbestos.

When work is complete, place disposable coveralls (if used), respirator and
gloves into the large plastic bag (OC-3109) marked Caution Asbestos.

Porcelain fuse base and holders with asbestos braiding

Some older type porcelain fuse bases or holders attached to the panels are
likely to have asbestos braiding inside to prevent the panel from over-heating.

Before you remove porcelain fuse bases and holders, disconnect from all
sources of supply (including the neutral) and prove de-energised.

Remove porcelain fuse bases and holders with asbestos braiding by leaving
the fuses in the porcelain fuse bases and removing the panel as per the panel
removal instructions.

Vinyl floor tiles


Some substations have floor tiles on the floating floors that may contain asbestos
materials. Where additional holes are required to be made in these tiles the
following methods are to be used.
Small holes:

Use a hand drill to drill holes in vinyl floor tiles. Power tools and battery
operated drills are not permitted.

Large holes:

Mark the intended location for the hole.

Put on appropriate PPE (see above for details).

Damp down around marked area.

Cur the tile by hand outside the marked area (do not use a rotating or
reciprocating blade).

If required, heat the tile piece to be removed to soften the tile and glue.

Remove the cut-out section in the largest pieces possible and place in the
plastic bag.

Seal the edges of the cut tile with silicon or shaving cream.

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Wipe up any remaining moisture with a damp rag and place in the plastic bag
with the tile pieces.

Cut the required hole in the timber portion without cutting into the tile.
Place the debris and / or remains and the used PPE and rags into a small
plastic bag (OC-3106), seal the bag and then place it into the large plastic bag
(OC-3109) marked Caution Asbestos.

Note:
Power tools are not permitted when working on asbestos products.
Cable ducts
Cement fibre cable ducts were made of chrysotile white asbestos fibre cement and
can be identified by either of the following:

Light grey in colour, usually 100 mm in diameter and approximately 4m in


length;

50 mm channel shape duct mainly used in streetlight circuits in and around


central business districts.

The asbestos materials contained in the cement fibre cable ducts are passive until
the duct has either deteriorated through age or has been damage.
When removing and replacing ducts take the following steps:

Disconnect all cables within the duct from all sources of supply and prove deenergised.

Dampen down the outside of the ducting with a low pressure water spray.
Apply a cable slipping compound to the cable duct (and cable) at the opposite
end to the cable exit point, minimising the release and possible exposure to
any released material.

Withdraw the cables and remove ducting, taking care not to cause any
unnecessary damage that may release the asbestos fibres.

Place the cable ducting on plastic sheeting (OC-7891), double wrap, seal, and
mark Caution Asbestos.

When the work is complete, place disposable coveralls (if used), respirator,
and gloves into the large plastic bag (OC-3109) marked Caution Asbestos.

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Storage

Place the bags marked Caution Asbestos into the designated receptacles
at the local depot.

Store large commercial panels, pillars and cable ducts in the designated
storage area.

Disposal

When the receptacle is three-quarters full, inform Depot Governance, who will
arrange for the disposal and replacement of the bin.

Request Depot Governance to arrange immediate disposal of large


commercial panels, pillars and cable ducts.

Ensure all bags and double-wrapped asbestos equipment and products are
sealed and undamaged before placing them in the designated storage areas.

Cover or wrap unwanted fibreglass equipment in a plastic bag or plastic


wrapping, then place it into a designated container and dispose of it according
to local depot or council regulations.

References

Occupational Safety and Health Regulations (1996) Part 3: 3.1 Identification


of Hazards, Assessing Risks in Workplaces; Part 5: 4.1 Asbestos.

Department of Consumer and Employment Protection (WorkSafe) Asbestos


Code of Practice and Guideline notes.

Western Powers Asbestos Management Plan and Guidelines.


NOHSC Guidelines to Working on Electrical Meter Panels Identified as
Containing Asbestos.

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton

2.10

Electronic communications in vehicles and operational areas

Purpose
This instruction describes the requirements for using electronic communication
equipment in vehicles and workplaces.

Electronic communications equipment

includes; mobile phones, GPS, Go-Books, etc.


Exclusions
This instruction does not apply to the use of mobile phones when performing
remote end-to-end testing of pilot cables.
Instruction

Taking the eyes off the road to operate or take a momentary look at a device
screen such as a Go-Book or GPS while driving is a distraction and considered
an at-risk behaviour.

Switch mobile phones off when:

Working on live electrical apparatus or put them in position whereby they


are not a distraction to a safety observer or anyone involved in the work.

Operating or refuelling machinery.

Driving a vehicle not equipped with a hands-free unit.

Note:
Western Power will not pay or refund any road traffic penalty imposed on an
employee.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 2.10 Electronic


communications in vehicles and
operational areas

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communications in vehicles and
operational areas

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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2.11

Height safety

Purpose

This instruction describes the safe systems required when performing work
above two (2) metres.

This instruction only provides the key safety requirements relevant to working
at heights and does not attempt to replicate any detailed work practices
contained in Codes of Practice, specific workplace instructions or training
documents.

Instructions

Conduct a job risk assessment before commencing work.

Any person performing work on a Western Power building, roof or other


structure, which is above two (2) metres and not considered part of Western
Powers network, must provide a safety management plan for working at
heights.

When working above two (2) metres, wear approved fall protection appropriate
for the task.

Only work from a stable platform, which has a safe access and egress.

Apply risk controls that prevent accidents, resulting from slippery work platform
surfaces.

Fall arrest system

Other than a pole structure, a fall arrest system is required when working at
heights above two (2) metres.

Use a fall arrest system, designed to restrain a persons fall from one level to
another and also minimise the risk of injuries or harm during the fall.

Before attaching a fall arrest system, check the anchor point integrity. The
anchor points must be capable of withstanding a force of at least 1.5 Ton in a
direction that simulates the loading likely to be placed on it in the event of a fall.

Formally inspect permanent anchor points every six (6) months or in


accordance with the manufactures specifications.

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Section 2.11 Height safety

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Remove fall arrest equipment from service after it has arrested a fall, pending
inspection and operational certification by a competent person.

Personnel wearing a fall protection harness must never work alone.

Elevating work platforms


Wear an approved anchored safety harness and lanyard. The lanyard should be
either:

A retractable inertia reel lanyard, or

A fixed short length lanyard, which will prevent egress from the bucket.

Towers
When ascending or descending a tower use a double lanyard system.
Scaffolding
Above two (2) metres, install edge protection and a guardrail system.
Transformers (above 2 metres high - excluding pole top transformers)

Use a ladder, elevated work platform or an approved means to ascend or


descend from a transformer above a height of 2 metres.

Before stepping onto a transformer, attach fall arrest equipment to the anchor
point.

Remain attached to the fall arrest equipment during the performance of the
work.

Depending on the risk of a fall, consider the use of a restraint line, maypoles,
and redirect anchors.

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Section 2.11 Height safety

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Examples of anchor points:

Training

Any person who performs work at height on behalf of Western Power, must be
trained and possess an approved competency.

A person who issues fall protection equipment must provide the user with
instruction in relation to the correct fitting, use, selection, testing, maintenance,
storage of the equipment and explain its limitations.

Provide rescue training appropriate to the work at height risk potential.

Provide first aid training appropriate to the potential injury.

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2.12

High voltage insulated sticks and equipment testing and use for
Substations

Purpose
This instruction outlines the requirements for the testing and use of high voltage
insulated sticks in substations and associated equipment.
Instructions
General
Prior to the commencement of work, high voltage sticks and associated equipment
must be inspected to ensure they are:

Designed, tested and certified for work on or near live overhead lines.

Rated for the voltage of the relevant overhead line.

Stored and transported so it is not exposed to excess moisture, dust, abrasion


and other deteriorating effects.

Checked and cleaned before use.

Tagged out and removed from service if they are defective.

Kept clear of deteriorating contaminants such as hand creams, sunscreens,


paint solvents, hydraulic oil, which may affect or deteriorate insulating qualities
of the equipment.

Testing

Prior to use ensure all high voltage insulated sticks or associated equipment
that has not previously been used is tested.

Test all high voltage insulated sticks or associated equipment at least every six
(6) months.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 2.12 High voltage


insulated tools and equipment
testing and use

DM7843790, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Western Powers Testing Service section or any other similar high voltage
testing facility must test all insulated sticks and associated equipment to the
relevant standard.

Note:
Visual inspections of the insulated stick should be carried out prior to use. If any
physical damage to the surface is reported it should undergo a stick leakage test.

All high voltage insulated sticks and associated equipment must display an
expiry test date six months forward from the date tested.

The expiry date (month and year) must be clearly visible.

Put the expiry date in the same position on the high voltage insulated sticks or
associated equipment each time it is tested.

Withdraw from service if the test date has expired and do not re-use until they
have been re-tested and correctly dated.

References

Applicable ASTM testing standards

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 2.12 High voltage


insulated tools and equipment
testing and use

DM7843790, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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2.13

Fall prevention equipment

Purpose
This instruction describes the requirements for inspecting and maintaining fallprevention equipment.
Fall prevention equipment is required to avert a fall from height or to mitigate any risk
identified during the job risk assessment process.
As with any personal protective equipment, fall prevention equipment must not be
used in isolation of other risk controls.
Instructions

Refer to Height Safety (in this section) for fall protection instructions when
working above two (2) metres.

Before using fall-arrest equipment, the Formal Leader must ensure that the
wearer attends a use and maintenance training/education session.

Carry out inspection of rescue kits refer Appendix 2 Inspection Checklist for
pole top rescue kits.

Before using fall-prevention equipment, perform an informal inspection to ensure


it is in serviceable condition and operates correctly. Using the Fall Prevention
Equipment Checklist (refer Appendix 2 Standard Forms), carry out a detailed
inspection at least every six (6) months. The equipment must pass all checks
before attaching an Inspection Tag (refer Appendix 1 Tags and Signs).

Check the fall-prevention equipment expiry date. If the label is illegible or the
date cannot be determined, remove this equipment from service.

Immediately withdraw any equipment that fails the six-monthly inspection or is


found defective at the before-use check.

Remove and destroy fall-prevention equipment ten (10) years from the date of
manufacture.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 2.13 Fall prevention


equipment

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Fall prevention equipment maintenance

Using pure soap or soap flakes in lukewarm water, sponge down or hand wash
dirty or gritty webbing.

Thoroughly rinse washed or rain soaked fall-prevention equipment and hang out
to dry at room temperature. Do not expose to direct heat.
DANGER

If a fall has occurred or if a fall indicator activates, withdraw the equipment from
service immediately.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 2.13 Fall prevention


equipment

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton

2.16

Fire precautions for transmission substation work

Purpose
When performing any work where there is a risk of starting a fire it is mandatory to
comply with the requirements described in this instruction and record in the job risk
management the risk controls required to eliminate or reduce any risk of damage or
harm.
Responsibilities of the on site person in charge

The responsibilities of the on site person in charge include:

Ensuring the work can be undertaken without the threat of a fire starting.

Following the job risk management process.

Ensuring any person who may be required to operate fire-extinguishing


equipment, has been instructed in the use of that equipment.

Confirming the operation of fire fighting equipment.

Creating an emergency escape plan.

General
The following general instructions apply to any situation where fire is a threat.

Conduct a daily inspection of all fire extinguishers and fire-fighting units to


ensure they are operational.

Where practicable, before attempting to extinguish a fire that is likely


to become out of control, immediately telephone 000 or the local shire
council (see Appendix 4).

Any person who starts and then extinguishes a fire must advise the local
shire council for the district (see appendix 4) in which the work is being
undertaken.

The local council will monitor the area in case a flare-up of the fire.

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Section 2.16 Fire precautions for


transmission substations

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Western Powers smoking policy requirements; smoking is prohibited


where the job risk management process identifies a fire risk.

Risk assessment
If the job risk management process identifies that the work includes tasks which
have the potential to cause a fire, the following are required:

Work within the substation building

When operating any equipment within a transmission substation building


the following is required to be adjacent to the workplace, one (1) 9.6
kilogram CO2 or dry powder fire extinguisher.

Switching

When operating open switchgear e.g. line isolators or gang


switches within a transmission substation, the following is required
to be adjacent to the operator; one nine (9) litre pressurised water
fire extinguisher or one sixteen (16) litre knapsack spray, in the
event a ground fire may be started as a result of the switching.

Grinding or the use of spark producing tools

At least (1) able-bodied person (trained in extinguisher operation) must


be in attendance and dedicated solely to the detection and suppression
of any fire

An area of 5 metres radius, free from flammable materials


immediately around the work site, will be established and
maintained around all hot work areas.

Welding screens and the wetting down of surrounding area is


required to reduce possible spark ignition around the immediate
work site.

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Internal combustion engines including generators portable petrol


engine driven drills or tools

An area of 5 metres radius, free from flammable materials


immediately around the work site, will be established and
maintained around all hot work areas.

When operating any of the above equipment within a transmission


substation the following is required to be adjacent to the plant, one nine
(9) litre pressurised water fire extinguisher or one sixteen (16) litre
knapsack spray, in the event a ground fire being started as a result of
the equipment being used.

Flame-producing equipment such as welding apparatus, cable jointing


LPG gas equipment, oxy-acetylene apparatus etc.

At least (1) able-bodied person (trained in extinguisher operation) is to


be in attendance and dedicated solely to the detection and suppression
of any fire

An area of 5 metres radius, free from flammable materials


immediately around the work site, will be established and
maintained around all hot work areas.

Welding screens and the wetting down of surrounding area is


required to reduce possible spark ignition around the immediate
work site.

Fire weather warnings information contacts

Obtain information on fire and weather warnings from:

NOCC: Ph 9427 0636.

SOCC: Ph 9427 4287.

The local Shire Council (Refer Appendix 4 for contact numbers).

Regional radio stations.

Bureau of Meteorology website.

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transmission substations

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Work during a total fire ban warnings

FESA can issue a total fire ban for any conditions from Low moderate right up
to Catastrophic.

The Western Power FESA exemption only applies to work which cannot be
reasonably postponed to a time with safer weather conditions.

The conditions of the Western Power FESA exemption overrule the


requirements within this field instruction.

Situations will occur where the nature of the work and its location will not be a
risk of starting a fire and does not conflict with the Western Power FESA
exemption.

The work group formal leader must approve the work before

proceeding.

Conditions of the annual FESA exemption must be adhered to and


documented, using the Fire Exemption Review document (Appendix 2),
recording the details of the work requirements and the precautions taken.

A copy of the FESA exemption form must be in all vehicles that are required to
work under the conditions of the exemption.

Viewing the maps overleaf.

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3.1

Clothing and personal protective equipment requirements

Purpose
This instruction outlines the use and maintenance of approved personal protective
clothing.
Scope

This instruction applies to any persons, including visitors, who enter Western
Power construction depot/sites or perform work on behalf of Western Power.

The scope of the instruction excludes special personal protective clothing


/equipment requirements as defined in material safety data sheets or other
specific safe work instructions.

Requirements

Personal protective clothing is required to reduce the risks associated with


coming into contact with anything that may cause harm, injury or any identified
risk.

As with personal protective equipment, personal protective clothing must not


be used in isolation of other risk controls.

General
The minimum clothing requirement for visitors to operational depots/sites are:

High-visibility clothing or a high-visibility vest.

Long trousers and a long-sleeved shirt or overalls buttoned to the wrist.

Covered footwear.

Eye protection relevant to the risk.

Head protection relevant to the risk.

Note:
Where a person remains outside a three (3) metre zone from exposed electrical
apparatus, the minimum clothing required is Level 0.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 3.1 Clothing and


personal protective equipment
requirements

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Level 0 requirements : 100% cotton


The following minimum approved personal protective clothing must be worn when
carrying out operational, construction or maintenance activities.

High-visibility clothing or a high-visibility vest, both 100% cotton.


100% cotton long trousers and a long-sleeved shirt or overalls buttoned to the
wrist.

Safety footwear.

Eye protection relevant to the risk.

Head protection relevant to the risk.

If a person enters inside three (3) metres from any exposed electrical apparatus,
they must comply with the Category 1 personal protective clothing requirements:
Level 1 requirements : Flame retardant cal rating = >7Cal
The following minimum approved personal protective clothing must be worn when
carrying out operational, construction or maintenance activities.

High-visibility clothing or a high-visibility vest,

Overalls or long-sleeved shirts and long trousers.

Safety footwear.

Eye protection.

Gloves relevant to the risk.

Head protection relevant to the risk.

Level 2 requirements Flame retardant Cal Rating = >7Cal


The following minimum approved personal protective clothing must be worn when
carrying out operational, construction or maintenance activities as described in
table 1.

High-visibility clothing or a high-visibility vest.

Overalls or long-sleeved shirts and long trousers.

Face shield and safety glasses must be worn.

Safety footwear.

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Work Practice Manual

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personal protective equipment
requirements

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Gloves relevant to the risk.

Head protection relevant to the risk.

Level 3 requirements Flame retardant Cal Rating = >14


The following minimum approved personal protective clothing must be worn when
carrying out operational, construction or maintenance activities as described in
table 1.

Long-sleeved shirts and long trousers.


Flame retardant overalls over shirt and trousers (or Switching jacket) (Cal
rating => 14).

Face shield with safety glasses worn under.

Safety footwear.

Gloves relevant to the risk.

Head protection relevant to the risk.

Level 4 requirements Flame retardant Cal Rating = > 37


The following minimum approved personal protective clothing must be worn when
carrying out operational, construction or maintenance activities as described in
table 1.

Overalls or long-sleeved shirts and long trousers.

Switching jacket (Cal rating = 30).

Face shield with safety glasses worn under.

Safety footwear.

Gloves relevant to the risk.

Head protection relevant to the risk.

Level 5 requirements Flame retardant Cal Rating > 37


The following minimum approved personal protective clothing must be worn when
carrying out operational, construction or maintenance activities as described in
table 1.

Overalls or long-sleeved shirts and long trousers.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 3.1 Clothing and


personal protective equipment
requirements

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Switching jacket and trousers (Cal rating = 30).

Hood with safety glasses worn under (Cal rating = 40).

Safety footwear.

Gloves relevant to the risk.

Wet weather, thermal clothing, undergarments and Jewellery

Wet weather and thermal protective garments must be approved before they
can be worn over the protective clothing.

Non-natural fibre garments (for example nylon or polyester) are not


recommended to be worn under protective clothing.

Unnecessary metallic objects - for instance neck chains, earrings, rings,


watches, bracelets and other jewellery - must not be worn while carrying out
live work.

Arc flash protective clothing (switching suits)


The level of arc flash protection clothing required when conducting switching
operations:

Before approaching any apparatus, assess the risks and consequences of a


potential arc flash.

Select the correct, approved configuration of flash protection clothing.

Determine an emergency action plan based on a potential arc flash event.

Consider using a Safety Observer.

Consider the following when accessing the arc flash hazard area:

Fault current level.

Working distance from the device.

Insulation/construction of the device.

Device environment.

Weather.
Face shield and safety
glasses used at LV frame

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Work Practice Manual

Section 3.1 Clothing and


personal protective equipment
requirements

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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When approaching electrical apparatus take into consideration the following:

Fault levels and reduction of fault current.

Safe operation of apparatus.

Care and maintenance

Inspect personal protective clothing before use and replace any item that is
damaged or in a poor condition.

Altering personal protective clothing is prohibited.

The matrix on the next page must be used when selecting the level of clothing
required to perform switching on different types of equipment. The matrix should
also be used in conjunction with the risk analysis process and the safe work
method statements in determining the level of protective clothing necessary when
working in circumstances such as; on or near live low voltage busbars/conductors,
live low voltage cable jointing, load testing or racking switchgear.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 3.1 Clothing and


personal protective equipment
requirements

DM7845227, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


5 of 6

Table 1 : Minimum PPC requirements for switching operations

Clothing
Combinations

PPE

Level 0:

Level 1:

Level 2:

Level 3:

Level 4:

Level 5:

Hi-vis100%
cotton long
sleeve shirt &
trousers
or
overalls

Hi-vis FR
long sleeve
shirt &
trousers
or
overalls

Level 1
plus
Face shield
with safety
glasses worn
under

Level 2
plus
Overalls
or
FR switching
jacket

Level 2
plus
FR switching
jacket

Safety
footwear,
eye
protection
and head
protection
to risk
needs

Safety
footwear, eye
protection
and head
protection
to risk
needs

Safety
footwear, eye
protection
and head
protection
to risk
needs

Safety
footwear, eye
protection
and head
protection
to risk
needs

Safety
footwear, eye
protection
and head
protection
to risk
needs

Level 1
Plus
FR switching
jacket
plus
FR switching
trousers
plus
FR hood with
Safety
glasses worn
under
Safety
footwear, eye
protection
and head
protection
to risk
needs

14

37

37

FR (Flame
retardant)
Cal rating
HV O/H
equipment
LV O/H
equipment
Uni Pillar air
insulated
Transformer
LV frame
up to
315 KVA air
insulated
Transformer
LV frame
greater than
315 KVA air
insulated
HV RMU SF6
insulated
HV RMU air
insulated
HV RMU oil
insulated
Zone
substation
outdoor
equipment air
insulated
Zone
substation
Indoor CBs

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory

Compulsory

Compulsory

Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory

Compulsory

Compulsory

Section 3.1 Clothing and


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3.2

Glove protection

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for the use of gloves when
working on either the high or low voltage network, whether energised or deenergised.
Maintenance and inspections

Before commencing work, check gloves for good condition. For electrical work,
check insulating gloves for any cuts or punctures.

Air pressure-test insulating gloves before use.

Discard any gloves that are damaged, in poor condition, or have failed the air
pressure test.

Electrically test insulated gloves every six (6) months from date of issue.

Record issue date on electrically rated gloves.

Gloves rated 3,300V or less do not need to be electrically tested before initial
use.

Check gloves test expiry date and remove or retest if date has expired.
Insulated gloves must be stored in an approved glove bag and/or a dry
location. Insulated gloves do not have a shelf life.

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When working on or near live or de-energized low


voltage apparatus 500V minimum-rated insulating
gloves must be worn with approved wrist length
mechanical protective gloves.

Where there is a risk of Low Voltage contact and the


task requires dexterous movement the leather outer
glove may be removed, the JRA process shall be
used to identify and document adequate control
measures that include:
Insulated covers

Barriers

Insulated tools

These control measures are required to protect the


insulated glove from damage. If this is not
achievable then the work must not proceed.

Work with chemical or hazardous


substances

Reference material safety data sheet (ChemAlert)


for correct glove type.

Work where there is a hand injury risk


(other than knife cut injury)

Wear approved wrist length mechanical protective


gloves rated 3121 or greater.

Work where there is a knife cut hand


injury risk

Wear a cut resistant glove rated 3544 on the hand


exposed to the cut risk (normally the left hand for a
right-handed person).

Operating high voltage switchgear

Wear 3,300 volt minimum rated insulating gloves


with approved wrist length arc flash mechanical
protective gloves.

Working on or near live LV or deenergised LV electrical apparatus within


Transmission Substations

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Work Practice Manual

Section 3.2 Glove protection

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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3.3

Head protection

Purpose
This instruction outlines the type of approved head protection that must be worn
while carrying out work on the Western Power network.
Head protection is required to reduce the risk of injury such as falling objects, arc
flash burns and effects of exposure to UV radiation.
As with any personal protective equipment, head protection must not be used in
isolation of other risk controls.
Instructions
Based on a specific need identified during a risk assessment, the on site person in
charge has the authority to exceed these instructions.
Safety helmets

Wear a Western Power approved safety helmet:


If there is a risk of a person being struck on the head by a falling object.
If the head is exposed to hitting a static object.
Where the site displays a Safety Helmet Area sign.

Record the date of issue inside the safety helmet.

Inspect the safety helmet before use.

Immediately replace a damaged or suspected damaged safety helmet.

Replace the safety helmet after two (2) years service in an operational
environment.

Secure the safety helmet with a chinstrap if there is a probability that it will
dislodge from the head.

Based on a risk assessment, where the on site person in charge considers that
a safety helmet is impracticable an alternative risk control/s must be
implemented.

For maximum sun protection, a new plastic snap brim replaces the fabric sun
visor (Western Power stock code QC0114).

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Section 3.3 Head protection

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Arc flash hoods

Only wear approved arc flash hoods (40 cal).

Inspect the arc flash hood before use.

Immediately replace a damaged arc flash hood.

Wear an arc flash hood in accordance with personal protective clothing


switching requirements.

Other head protection

Consider such risks as ultra violet radiation and foreseeable head injuries,
which may result from performing maintenance work under machinery or plant.

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Section 3.3 Head protection

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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3.4

Face and eye protection

Purpose
This instruction describes the requirements for use and maintenance of face and
eye protection.
Face and eye protection is required to eliminate the risks associated with flying
particles and extreme heat radiation or any other foreseeable risk.
As with any personal protective equipment, eye and face protection equipment
must not be used in isolation of other risk controls.
Instructions

Wear only Western Power approved eye and face protection.


Wear only approved non-conductive framed (non-metallic) medium-impact eye
protection when working on or near live apparatus.

Wear goggles on worksites where dust particles or chemicals may cause an


eye injury. Refer to a material safety data sheet.

Wear a face shield when operating equipment such a grinder or chainsaw.

For arc flash protection, wear eye protection underneath face shields/arc flash
hoods.

Wear approved eye protection, day and night, in the following areas:
All designated eye protection areas.
When working on live electrical apparatus.
When operating switchgear.
All zone and terminal substations and power station switchyards.
Indoors when determined by the JRA that there is a risk of damage to the
eye.
All workplaces where there are mechanical hazards such as flying

particles, sparks, molten metal splash, and wire or conductor recoil.


All workplaces where chemical hazards such as splashes, fumes and dust

are present.
In all workplaces where thermal and radiation hazards such as heat, glare,

ultra-violet rays and infrared rays are present.

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Section 3.4 Face and eye


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Care and maintenance

Wear, use and maintain approved eye protection in accordance with


manufacturers use and maintenance specifications.

Inspect eye and face protection before use and replace any damaged or
unserviceable item.

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Electrical System Safety Procedures (ESSP) 2009

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5.1

Customer switchyards guidelines

Purpose
The purpose of this instruction is to outline considerations for working in customer
switchyards.
Instructions

Obtain diagrams of customer equipment detailing primary and secondary


equipment, including the line of demarcation between Western Power and the
customer.

Establish who owns the equipment and details of the Operating Authority.

Obtain the correct name and telephone number of the customer contact on site
(both business and after hours).

Obtain a list of any environmental hazards before entry upon the site.

Determine the type of procedures and permits used on site by the customer,
and check they meet Western Powers requirements. If the procedures and
permits are at a standard that is less than WP requirements, then either WP
procedures and permits are utilised, or work on-site shall be refused.

Where applicable, arrange for all Western Power personnel who are to visit site
to attend the customers induction course.

Obtain a list of work teams expected on site.


Make a note of shared equipment and commissioning responsibilities,
including overlaps.

Never commission customers equipment unless

authorised by the customers work site supervisor.

Ensure the customer installation has been approved (after customer lodgement
of a completion certificate) before energising it.

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5.2

Substation entry requirements

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for all escorted and un-escorted
persons who enter Western Power Transmission Substations or Switchyards for
operational and non-operational activities.
Instructions

Entry to a substation is allowed only if the person holds a Substation Entry


Authority (level NA 1 or NA 2), or they are escorted (this is to be the exception
and not the norm) by someone who holds a Substation Entry Authority.

People who hold this level of access will hold a Substation Entry Authority card
issued by System Management Division.

Meet the minimum PPE requirement for the site they are entering, this is
displayed at the point of entry.

Persons who are required to work on or near Western Powers electrical supply
system shall not do so unless they:

Have been appropriately trained for the work they intend to do;

Have current competency in first aid and resuscitation; and

Are authorised by Western Power to carry out the work.

Authorisation for un-escorted persons

A Level NA 1 Substation Entry Authority is issued to un-escorted persons


who are not required to sign onto a work permit. To obtain this level of
authorisation, the person must complete the Level NA 1 Substation Access
Course.

A Level NA 2 Substation Entry Authority is issued to un-escorted persons


who are required to sign onto a work permit as either the Recipient or
Recipient In Charge. To obtain this level of authorisation, the Level NA 2
Substation Access Course must be completed.

Note:
Section 4 provides information on the different permits available and their correct
application.
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Escorted persons

If the person is being escorted into and around a substation by an authorised


representative (Western Power or contractor), they must undergo a site
specific induction given by the authorised representitive

The authorised representative must use the Substation Entry Induction


Form (see Appendix 2 for a representation of the form).

The escorted person must sign the Substation Entry Induction Form
acknowledging their role and responsibilities.

The authorised representative must sign the form to confirm the induction has
been carried out. For auditing purposes, file the completed Substation Entry
Induction Form at the local Western Power depot.

The authorised representative must always directly supervise the escorted


person.

The escorted person may sign onto the Work Permit as part of a work group,
providing the authorised person who is doing the escorting has a NA 3 access
authority. However, it is not possible to sign on as the Recipient In Charge of

the Work Permit.


Note:
If there are two or more escorted persons working at different locations within the
substation or switchyard, they must be directly supervised by their individual
authorised representative.

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5.3

Substation clearances

Purpose
The purpose of this instruction is to outline the requirements for Western Power
personnel (Network Total Workforce) who work within substations over 1kV AC
defining the apparatuss nominal voltage and the clearances for that voltage.
Instructions

Australian Standards 2067 - 2008 states the following clearances:


Phase to Earth

Smallest permissible clearance in air between live parts and earth or


between live parts and parts at earth potential.

The clearances to earth between live parts and earthed material apply to
any structure or surface substantially at earth potential, including any fixed
or portable screens which may be provided. Earthed material includes a
poor conductor such as concrete.

Phase to Phase

Smallest permissible clearance in air between live parts of different


phases or between the same phase that are electrically separate from
each other.

Non-flashover distance (N)

The distance from live equipment across which a flashover will not occur.
It is slightly more than the Minimum phase to earth clearance. The area
within the non-flashover distance is referred to as the Danger Zone.

Ground safety distance (G)

The minimum distance from the earthed end of equipment insulators to the
ground or a walkway. It is 2440mm for all voltages (above 1kV).

This

dimension is based on the assumption that a 1900mm tall person has a


vertical reach of 2440mm.

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Section safety clearance (S)

The minimum distance measured between live parts and the foot position
of a person standing whether they are on the ground, walkway, or platform
or on top of equipment.

Section safety clearance (S) is the sum of the Non-flashover distance


(N) and the Ground safety distance (G).

The section safety clearance shall be applied from the foot position
vertically and from the foot position over guard rails or screens by tautstring measurement, to the nearest live parts.

Horizontal work safety clearance (H)

The minimum distance measured horizontally between live parts and the
extremities of the work object.

Where work is to be carried out from a ladder, on the equipment or a work


platform, the horizontal work safety clearance shall be applied from the
extremities of the work object in any horizontal direction to the nearest live
parts.

Vertical work safety clearance (V)

The minimum distance measured vertically between live parts and the
highest part of the work object.

Where work is to be carried out from a ladder, on the equipment or a work


platform, the vertical work safety clearance shall be applied from the
extremities of the work object in any vertically direction to the nearest live
parts.

Taut string distance

The distance between two parts measured along a taut string stretched
the shortest way between those parts.

The taut string distance is used to measure the shortest distance away
when measuring from the base of where a person is standing up and over
guard rails and screens to the nearest live point.

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Danger zone (Non-Flash over distance)

Area limited by the non-flash over distance (N) around live parts that are

without complete protection against direct contact.


Note:
Infringing the danger zone is considered the same as touching live parts.
Table 1
Safety clearance for operational
purposes and maintenance work
Voltage
kV

Phase to
Earth
Clearance
mm

Phase to
Phase
Clearance
mm

Up to 3.6

60

70

NonFlashover
Distance
mm

Ground
Safety
Clearance
mm

(N)

(G)

Section
Safety
Clearance
mm

65

Horizontal
Safety
Clearance
mm

Vertical
Safety
Clearance
mm

(S)

(H)

(V)

2505

1965

1405

6.6

90

105

100

2540

2000

1440

11

160

185

175

2615

2075

1515

22

280

325

310

2750

2210

1650

33

380

440

420

2860

2320

1760

66

630

725

695

3135

2595

2035

132

1300

1495

1430

3870

3330

2770

220

1900

2185

2015

4455

3915

3355

330

2200

2530

2330

4770

4230

3670

2440

Safety Clearances

The Section, Vertical and Horizontal work safety clearances are based on the
principal that when a person is inspecting or operating live substation
equipment or working on isolated equipment, they should not be able to reach
into any Danger Zone surrounding live equipment.

It has Been assessed that a tall person holding a small hand tool or material up
to 300mm in length would have a maximum reach of 2440mm vertically or
1900mm horizontally. This is illustrated by Figure 1 page 6.

Applying the principal described above, it follows that the distance to live
equipment must always be at least the dimension of the Danger Zone plus
the vertical or horizontal reach as appropriate.

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The derivation of clearances applicable to persons at ground level in a


substation is illustrated by figures 2 to 4 pages 7 and 8.

The derivations of clearances for maintenance works in a substation are


illustrated by figures 5 to 8 pages 9 and 10.

Movement of Vehicles and Plant:

The Section and Horizontal work safety clearances are applied to the
movement of all vehicles and plant.

Section safety clearance is to apply between the highest point on the vehicle
where a person would normally sit or stand and any live conductor.

Horizontal work safety clearance is to apply between the lateral extremities of


the vehicle and any live conductor.

Transport clearance T = N + 100mm (500 minimum) is to apply between the


highest point on the vehicle and any live conductor.

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Working from a Platform:

Whether the platform you are working from is scaffolding or an Elevated Work
Platform (EWP) the following work clearances must be maintained.

Section safety clearance is required from the foot position vertically to the
nearest live parts.

Section safety clearance is required from any foot position on the platform over
the guard rail of scaffolding or EWP bucket by taut string measurement to the
nearest live parts.

Horizontal work safety clearance is required from the extremities of the work
object in any horizontal direction to the nearest live part.

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Fig. 1: Dimensions of tall operator or workman

Fig. 2: Dimension for access at ground level

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Fig. 3: Protective barrier

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Fig. 4: Protective obstacle

Fig. 5: Dimensions for maintenance work

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Fig. 6: Safety clearances for maintenance work

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Fig. 7: Work sections in single BusBar installation

Fig. 8. Work sections in duplicate BusBar installation

References

Australian Standard 2067

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Section 5.3 Substation


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5.4

Secondary isolations

Purpose
The purpose of this field instruction is to ensure that Transmission Substation
secondary isolations, when performed for the purpose of issuing a Permit or in
conjunction with a primary permit, allow subsequent activities by recipients to be
carried out in a safe manner.
Responsibilities

Field Protection Services Section is the delegated Operating Authority with


respect to Secondary Systems (excluding Communications, SCADA, DC
Chargers/Batteries and Fire Alarm systems) Transmission and SubTransmission Switchyards. This Authority exists for either Operational sites or
Non-Connectable

plant/equipment/sites

under

the

control

of

the

Commissioning Authority.

This delegated authority does not cover secondary plant in:

Power Stations, including generator step-up transformers

Gas Turbine sites, including generator step-up transformers

Distribution circuits outside the zone substation boundary

Regional Power Station sites

Instructions
Authorisation for operational sites

Permits will be required for access to operational secondary systems


equipment if the nominal voltage level exceeds 50 VAC or 120 VDC. Systems
that come under the Australian Standard definition of Ultra Low Voltage are not
required by statutory regulation to be permitted.

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Only personnel who possess a Secondary Systems Certificate of Competency


and are suitably endorsed as Issuing Officers for Secondary Systems are
authorised to issue Permits on Secondary Systems under the control of Field
Protection Services.

Other Secondary System Operating Authorities must also adhere to the


Permitting requirement if nominal voltages exceed 50 VAC or 120 VDC.

Commissioning sites

The only Secondary System Field Protection Services personnel authorised to


issue Permits on Secondary Systems plant at commissioning sites are those
staff who have a Secondary System Services Certificate of Competency
endorsed for: Issuing of work Permits for Commissioning Switchyards.

Pilot cables

Secondary Systems Field Protection Services are the operating authority for
pilot cables and associated equipment

Pilot cables are considered to be an extension of the substation secondary


circuits. However only appropriately authorised Secondary Systems Field
Protection Services personnel can issue Permits on pilot cables and
associated equipment up to and including pilot isolating transformers.

Certain Contractor persons have been issued with special Certificates of


Competency that allow them to receive Permits as either RIC or TIC on pilot
cables. These people hold either a Certificate 3 Linesmans ticket or an A Class
electrical Workers Licence.

Communications Equipment

Teleprotection Signalling equipment interfaces with protection equipment


powered by DC systems that operate at a running voltage of 127 VDC or 254
VDC. Certain Communications personnel are authorised to carry out isolations
under instruction and to take on the responsibilities of RIC/TIC. However, this
is a strictly defined and controlled process.

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Notification

Secondary Systems Issuing Officers will normally require at least one week
notice from any party requiring access to secondary equipment in an
operational site. The request will normally be by way of an email and Market
Participant which has been approved by System Operations.

Plant and equipment that is deemed non-connectable comes under the


authority of either a Construction or a Commissioning Authority. In these
circumstances, there is no requirement to notify either NOCC or SOCC. The
requirement for advanced notice to the Secondary System Operating Authority
to request an Isolation is still a requirement.

In many cases, where the work is to be carried out by Secondary Systems


Field Protection Services, a member of the working party may issue the Permit
and notification will be done by the working party.

For the purpose of

requesting and obtaining access to operational equipment the normal Market


Participant Interface process must be followed.

There will obviously be little or no advance notification when Permits need to


be issued due to the failure of secondary equipment or in an emergency.

Isolation & making safe

It is the Secondary System Issuing Officers responsibilities to make sure the


correct Isolation has been carried out to ensure:

The safety of personnel working on the equipment is assured.

System security is maintained.

Isolations will normally be carried out by an Issuing Officer, however there are
some circumstances where this is not the case, these are:

Where Isolations are simple and or pre-planned such as when


Communications staff access protection signalling equipment. See
previous sub section on Communications equipment.

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Specific instruction for secondary permits

When access is being provided for others, Isolations are complex, the Permit
to be issued is an EAP, the work will last for more than 1 day or where there
are other work parties working in the vicinity, then a Secondary Isolation
Schedule (SIS) is required. This ensures that the risk of making a mistake is
reduced, and, if another person restores the Isolations, they will have a
complete list of what Isolations have been carried out. For this reason a copy
of the SIS must always be left on site with the Permit.

When a Primary System Permit is issued that requires Secondary Isolations, or


a Secondary Access Only Permit is issued, an SIS will be produced and
attached to the Permit in accordance with the preceding requirements.

In some circumstances, a separate Secondary Permit will be associated with a


Primary Permit. In these circumstances, the SIS will be attached to the
Secondary Permit. The Primary Permit will contain detail or notations referring
to the association with the Secondary Permit.

Isolations that are required to ensure personnel safety (i.e. an isolation point is
required to remain isolated or else there would be a risk of electric shock) must
provide a physical/visible break.

A Do Not Operate (Danger) tag

applied

(preferably by a lockable fuse insert with the Do Not Operate (Danger) Tag
attached to the lock). If it is not possible to provide a visible break, for example
in the case of a Miniature Circuit Breaker, then isolation will be confirmed by
the use of a test meter and the Miniature Circuit Breaker must be provided with
a locking facility.

As a minimum, the Do Not Operate (Danger) Tag must include the name and
contact details of the person who applied the tag (the applicator), the date of
applying the tag and the reason for applying the tag.

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The Do Not Operate Danger Tag can only be removed by the applicator or by
another authorised person after following the approved Permit relinquishment
processes. All isolation locations (e.g. each panel, marshalling box, Krone, etc.
must have a Danger Tag or Caution Tag fitted) to identify who, why and when
the Isolations were applied.

In all circumstances, wiring is required to be proved de-energised before


access is permitted. Adjacent in service equipment should also be identified by
covering with approved covers/barriers. When inadvertent contact may occur
use an approved insulated cover. Using circuit in service tape is appropriate
for equipment that is newly energised. Furthermore, where work is undertaken
on separate panels within a 24 hour period, previously worked on panels
should be covered or taped using circuit in service tape.

Whenever possible the methods used to achieve Isolations should be: Positive
and Visible. The preferred method is by removal of links and/or fuses and by
proving dead using a voltmeter. Where this is not possible a Miniature Circuit
Breaker may be used but it must be wired off and Do Not Operate Danger
Tagged, and the side to be isolated must be proved dead using a voltmeter.

In the case of VT Isolations, where another party is working on the primary


circuit and an Miniature Circuit Breaker must be used for isolation the
equipment side of the Miniature Circuit Breaker must be earthed. Care should
be taken to remove the earths prior to the VT being energised. Where an
Miniature Circuit Breaker or a Switch is utilized for the purpose of Isolation,
access to the proven Isolated load side shall be strictly controlled and
managed. There is no current requirement to earth the load side of VT
secondary circuits in the scenario given in this dot point.

Miniature circuit breakers pose certain risks; often they serve a remote load
circuit and are located with other Miniature Circuit Breakers in an AC
distribution Board. In these circumstances the Miniature Circuit Breaker that is
being utilized as an Isolation point must be locked off or the load wiring be
removed.

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Section 5.4 Secondary


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CT isolations will normally be carried out using test links or test plugs. Care
must be taken not to open-circuit an energised CT or remove its ground
reference connection.

As a last resort, if no other means is available, wiring must be removed from


terminals. All removed wires will be tagged or labelled. On restoration of the
wiring, sufficient testing must be carried out to prove that the wiring has been
restored correctly.

Permits on Teleprotection signalling equipment (TPS)

From time to time it is necessary to issue a STT to Communications staff for


them to work on TPS equipment. The Permit must be accompanied by an
official Isolation Schedule. These schedules are contained in a DM folder
entitled Teleprotection Signalling SIPs Approved. Using the isolation
schedule Communications staff carry out and restore the appropriate
Isolations.

The STT is not to be issued over the telephone, instead it should be issued
personally to the Communications officer responsible for the work. The STT
Permit is to be presented complete with the correct SIP Isolation. The
Communications Officer upon receipt of the STT Permit is then officially the
TIC and therefore has the responsibility to instruct all members of the working
party.

Conflict of responsibilities

In cases where officers are issuing work Permits for their own work party, the
Issuing Officer for an EAP should preferably not also be the Recipient In
Charge, or Tester In Charge for a STT.

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Where an authorised and certified Secondary Systems issuing officer is


working alone it will not be possible to adhere to the above requirement. In this
circumstance, the secondary Systems officer should issue him/herself with a
Permit. In doing this the officer must recognise that the usual checking
process, which occurs when there is more than one person involved, is not
present and therefore extra care must be taken.

Existence of Primary EAP and Secondary STT Permits on the same item of
Primary Plant

When a single apparatus is split into two separate apparatus by electrical


isolation, a STT can then be issued on the associated secondary equipment
while an EAP is in force on the primary equipment. This can only be done if:

Secondary Isolations are carried out as per Secondary Systems Safe


Working Procedure.

An SIS is produced for the work and attached to all relevant Permits.

All work parties are agreeable to the Primary and Secondary Isolations to
be applied.

Strict control and management of the work sites is undertaken by both


work parties.

Effective communication is exercised by both work parties to ensure


neither party can impact upon the other as a result of their individual
actions.

An example of this occurrence is when Secondary Isolations are made to


isolate Line Protection schemes away from the associated Line Circuit
Breaker. This arrangement, (if agreeable to both work parties), testing of
the Line Protection Schemes under a Secondary System STT can occur
whilst Circuit Breaker maintenance is being conducted under a Primary
System EAP.

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Section 5.4 Secondary


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Logging of Secondary System Permits

Once the Permit has been issued the Issuing Officer must log the Permit with
the appropriate control centre. This is necessary for two reasons:

So that the controllers know that there is someone working on a particular item
of secondary equipment and are aware of any implications to the power
system, such as the risk of unwanted tripping.

So that if someone else tries to issue a Permit on the same or associated


equipment, then the controller can alert them to the existence of a current
Permit. This is particularly important with Permits on pilot cables where it is
conceivable that someone may access a PJB at the same time as high voltage
testing is being carried out on the pilot cable.

Cancellation of secondary permit

Upon completion of the work for which the Permit was issued the Issuing
Officer shall satisfy himself that:

All Recipients have signed off the Permit and are aware that they will no longer
have access to the equipment.

The Recipient/Tester In Charge has relinquished the Permit.

The equipment is in the required condition for the next stage of the work.

All Isolations should then be restored or their condition set up for the next
stage of the work. For a Sanction to Test the final condition of the equipment
should be noted on the Permit. The Issuing Officer should then cancel the
Permit and advise the appropriate control centre that it has been cancelled.

Reference

Secondary Systems Safe Working Procedures

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Work Practice Manual

Section 5.4 Secondary


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DM7848779, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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5.5

Portable Ladders

Purpose
This instruction outlines the use and maintenance of ladders within Transmission
Substations.
Instructions

Use only Western Power approved ladders.

Note:
Never use metal ladders. The only ladders permitted are, approved and nonconductive.

Conduct a work site risk assessment.

If required, install barriers or barricades.

Ensure all locking devices on the ladder are secure.

If using as a working platform, a step and trestle ladder must be in the fully
open position.

Stabilise and secure ladders before ascending to the work platform.


The ladder must be footed until it is secured via the head rope or footed at all
times, if this is not possible.

When positioning the ladder use the 4:1 rule. For example, if the distance
between the ladder base and the supporting structure is one (1) metre the
ladder should be supported approximately four (4) metres from the ground.

Ensure the ladder is not placed so the weight of the ladder and any person
using it are supported by the rungs for example, straddling a scaffold plank.

If the ladder is being used for access or egress, the ladder must extend at least
900mm above the stepping off point of the working platform.

Do not walk the ladder while a person is standing on the rungs.

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Section 5.5 Portable Ladders

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Only one person on the ladder at any time and must be within the load rating of
the ladder, unless in the event of a pole top rescue.

There is no requirement for a fall arrest system when ascending or descending


a portable ladder, however it is essential that when in position to perform work,
fall protection must be in place.

Make sure the full body harness and pole strap are in good condition and
attached correctly.

During ascent and decent, face the ladder and maintain three point of contact
with the ladder at all times.

It is preferable to grasp the ladder rungs when climbing up or down a ladder as


it is easier to grip and prevent swinging in the case of a fall. Always maintain
three points of contact.

Do not carry tools or equipment whilst climbing up or down a ladder, utilise tool
belts, pouches or rope pulleys carried without compromising the three points of
contact.

Step and trestle ladders must be used in the fully open position.
Use Trestle ladders for light duty work only and the minimum width of the
working platform must not be less than 450 mm. Work performed on a trestle
platform that is over two metres above ground level must have edge protection.

Restrictions when using ladders on porcelain insulators

Use of ladders against post insulators is not permitted.

Use of ladder against surge diverters or lightning arresters is not permitted.

Ladders with metallic reinforcement that may contact the porcelain are not
permitted to be used, unless protected from that contact.

Use of ladders against insulators not in a vertical aspect, is not permitted.

Metallic or rigid pole straps are not permitted unless specifically designed for a
particular insulator.

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Section 5.5 Portable Ladders

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The work on the insulator is not a result of the insulator failing electrically or
mechanically.

Key site controls

Ladders are firmly stabilised in position against the structure/insulator.

The worker is to be secured or attached at the work position.

The worker is maintaining three points of contact at all time when on the
ladder, or uses an approved harness and pole strap secured around the
insulator to enable both hands to be used.

Maintenance

Inspect all new ladders before use and fit the standard inspection tag to the
reinforcing rod of the bottom rung of the ladder, indicating the next date of
inspection. (See Figure 3, Appendix 1).

Workers name and current date must be written on the inspection tag before
fitting it to the ladder.

Inspect every ladder before climbing, to check it is safe to use. If it is unsafe,


tag it out using the Warning Tag.

At least every six (6) months, carry out a detailed inspection using the ladder
inspection data sheet checklist (see Appendix 2).

If any defects are discovered during the six monthly inspection, tag the ladder
out and return it to the supplier (along with the completed ladder inspection
data sheet) for repair. If the ladder is not to be repaired it is to be destroyed
(rendering it unusable) and removed from the asset register.

Note:
If a ladder falls from a vehicle or structure, inspect it thoroughly before using it
again. If you find or suspect any defects, follow the same procedure as above.

When sending the ladder for repair insert the ladder inspection data sheet into
an adhesive document pouch and attach it to the bottom rung of the ladder.

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Section 5.5 Portable Ladders

DM7848932, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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References

Business Process Management of Defective Plant or Equipment NonNetwork Related (DM 404243).

Code of Practice - Prevention of Falls at Workplaces.

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Section 5.5 Portable Ladders

DM7848932, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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5.6

Scaffolding

Purpose
The purpose of this instruction is to outlines the minimum requirements for erecting,
dismantling and maintaining scaffolding within Transmission Substations.
Instructions

Only persons who are trained and certified in scaffolding are permitted to erect
and dismantle scaffolding more than four (4) metres in height.

At least two people must be engaged in the process of erecting scaffolding.


Ensure at least one of those people holds a current scaffold certificate to the
level required.

Inspect all scaffolding before climbing to make sure it is safe.

Construct,

assemble

and

maintain

all

scaffolding

according

to

the

manufacturers specifications.

Tie all scaffolding of four metres and taller to the structure being worked on,
unless the manufacturers specifications state otherwise.

Stabilise all scaffolding to prevent it from falling inwards or outwards by:

Tying the scaffold to the structure being worked on.

Adding backup bays to increase the base dimension.

Installing stabilisers or outriggers at a 3:1 ratio, providing a base with


dimensions at the narrowest point of at least one-third the maximum work
platform height.

If scaffolding is left partially erected or unattended, warning signs must be


placed on it to prevent unauthorised access.

Only use mobile scaffolding which has adequate strength and is on a solid
level surface.

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Section 5.6

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Mobile scaffolding must be able to safely support the total load imposed by the
weight of the scaffold, the people working on it, and the materials used.

Use insulated scaffolding where there could be an accidental reduction in safe


working clearances.

Edge protection

If there is a possibility of someone falling more than 2 metres, install edge


protection to the open sides of the working platform.

Guardrails, midrails, and toe boards are suitable edge protection.

If you cannot install edge protection, use a fall restraint or arrest system
instead.

Securely fix guardrails parallel to the working platform, 900 mm to 1100mm


above the platform.

Place guardrails no more than 100 mm outside the edge of the working
platform.

Position midrails half way between the guardrail and the toe board.

Erect toe boards to the exposed edges of a working platform (or any other
place) where tools or materials could fall more than two metres.

The toe board must be securely fixed to the floor (or posts) and is at least 150
mm high. The gap between the toe board and the working platform must be no
more than 10 mm.

Mobile scaffold

The height of a mobile scaffold must not exceed three times the length of its
smallest base dimension.

Fit four (4) castors under the mobile scaffold to safely support the total load
imposed by the weight of the scaffold, the people using it, and their materials.

The weight on the castors must not exceed manufacturers specifications.

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The maximum safe working load for a mobile scaffold is 450 kg. This
comprises:

A single-deck platform with a load equivalent to an evenly distributed load


of 450 kg.

Two (2) working platforms with a load equivalent to an evenly distributed


load of 225 kg.
DANGER
Do not move the mobile scaffold while someone is on it.

Ensure castors have an effective wheel brake capable of being locked, and
which cannot be accidentally released when working from the scaffold.

When the assembly is lifted off the ground, ensure the castors do not fall out of
the scaffold tube.

Tower or independent scaffold

The height of the tower or independent scaffold must not exceed three times its
smallest base width (unless specifically stated in the manufacturers
specifications).

Where the height of the tower exceeds three times its smallest base width, tie it
to the supporting structure.

The minimum size of the base plates for independent scaffolding must be 150
mm x 150 mm or 170 mm in diameter.

Insulated scaffolding
If the scaffolding is used to carry out Live work, the following will apply.

Prior to erection, wipe insulated scaffolding clean and then dry with a siliconeimpregnated cloth.

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Store insulated scaffolding in a cool, dark, and dry area, ensuring there are no
distortions and/or mechanical stress.

Make sure the storage area is out of direct sunlight, free of chemicals, oils,
solvents, damaging vapours, and fumes.

Test all insulated scaffolding if it has not been used before.

Test all insulated scaffolding at least every six months.

An authorised person using an insulated stick leakage tester can test the
insulated scaffolding at the local depot, or it can be sent to Western Powers
electrical testing section.

Check all insulated scaffolding that displays a test expiry date (month and
year) six months forward from the testing date.
DANGER
DO NOT attach the fall arrest system to, or around, porcelain insulators.

Inspection / maintenance

If damaged or defective scaffolding components are found during erection,


remove them from service and tag them out using the Defective Plant and
Equipment tag (refer Appendices).

Only persons trained and certified in scaffolding can inspect and tag
scaffolding.

Tag scaffolding:

When it has been erected for a second partys use.

When it has been inspected for a second party - at least every 30 days.

Following any incident where the stability or adequacy of the scaffold is


affected.

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Section 5.6

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DM7850130, Rev 0, Mar 2011


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Following repairs and before use.

Carry out a detailed inspection of all scaffolding components at least every six
months using the Scaffold Inspection Data Sheet (refer Appendices).

If, during the inspection, any damaged or defective components are found,
remove them from service and tag them out and report to formal leader.

References

AS/NZS 1576.1: 1995 Scaffolding: General Requirements.

AS/NZS 4576: 1995 Guidelines for Scaffolding.

Occupational Safety and Health Regulations 1996.

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5.8

Elevated Work Platform Safety

Purpose
This instruction provides the key safety requirements relevant to working from an
elevated work platform (EWP) inside a Transmission substation.

It does not

attempt to replicate any detailed work practices or maintenance requirements


contained in Power Training Services training documents or other pertinent
documents.
Instructions
Un-insulated Elevated Work Platform
These instructions must be read in conjunction with, section 2.2 (Portable earthing /
shorting equipment), section 5.3 (substation clearances) and section 5.13 (Safety
observers role) of this manual.

The operator must be competent and authorised to operate the EWP in use.
The EWP operator and safety observer must be trained and competent in the
use of the emergency retrieval system for the unit being used.

Complete a detailed Job risk analysis (JRA) and job briefing before
commencing work when using a EWP. The total work group must be involved
in the process.

During the set up and prior to operation, the EWP must be bonded to the
substation earth grid. Use a minimum of 150mm squared earthing conductor
(in test date), bolted or clamped to the vehicle and substation earth mat.

Un-insulated elevated work platforms working within substation sites must


have the basket bonded to the hardware and the chassis connected to a
known earth point using the approved earthing leads (either bolted or
clamped).

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Section 5.8 Elevated Work


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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Equipment under construction, which is at risk of induced voltages, must be


made safe by applying earths to ensure no potential rise is possible.

Use a common earth bond where multiple vehicles are at the worksite.
Only use un-insulated EWPs on isolated and earthed apparatus. Do not use
un-insulated EWPs when within the section safety clearances to live
apparatus.

Clearly define the work site with barriers and signs. All assets within the work
site must be de-energised and earthed. Section safety clearances must apply
between the work site boundary and live conductors to ensure the safety of
personnel at all locations within the defined work site.

Observe horizontal and vertical safety clearances to live or de-energised


apparatus. Refer to section 5.3 for clearances.

Un-insulated EWPs are not permitted to enter the Section safety clearance.

A safety observer must be used while the EWP is being manoeuvred (this
includes travelling inside the substation) and positioned into the work position.
Effective and immediate communication must be maintained between the
operator and the observer at all times.

A safety observer must be present if the work requires the work platform to be
repositioned at any time and there is a risk of encroaching on the safe working
clearances. If safe clearances cannot be maintained, additional isolation must
be carried out and the JRA revised.

Where possible, physical barriers must be used to prevent the EWP from
entering the exclusion zone e.g. CT / VT.

Appoint a member of the work party to monitor / assist the EWP operator in
case of an emergency or to manoeuvre the EWP into a new position. Maintain
effective communication between both parties.

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Section 5.8 Elevated Work


Platforms

DM7850545, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Insulated Elevated Work Platforms


Use an insulated EWP when it has been identified during the pre planning or JRA
process that the section safety clearance could be encroached upon when work is
carried out on de-energised and earthed apparatus.

The operator must be trained and authorised in the use of the EWP.

Undertake a job risk assessment to identify all foreseeable hazards and ensure
risk controls are implemented.

Appoint a designated safety observer for the duration of the work, while the
section safety clearances could inadvertently be broken.

The EWP must be fitted with an emergency decent device. The operator and
safety observer must have achieved a competency in emergency decent with
in a twelve month period.

The EWP must be rated and electrically tested (with in a 6 month period) for
the voltage being worked on.

EWP operators must ensure that:

They carry out daily, pre and post operational checks on the EWP.

They do not exceed the elevated work platform safe working load.

The elevated work platform equipment is level. Place stabilising / outrigger


footplates on firm, stable load bearing surfaces. Remove basket-bonding links
before operating the elevated work platform.

Only operate an elevated work platform when the wind velocity is less than 45
km/h

All persons involved in elevated work platform operations maintain a ground


approach distance around the base of the elevated work platform
(stabilisers/outriggers included), when used near live apparatus. Members of
the public are not allowed to encroach on the ground approach distance.

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A barrier is to be in force around an elevated work platform, prior to the boom


operation, where inadvertent contacts may occur. Ground approach distances
are provided in Table 2.
Table 2: Elevated Work Platform Ground Approach Distance (GAD)

Voltage of conductor

Approach
distances (mm)

Low voltage

1000

High Voltage 1 KV up to 33kV

1200

66kV

1500

132kV

1800

Over 132kV

3000

Based on industry practice, derived from step and touch potential calculations.
If the above clearances cannot be maintained, insulating gloves rated to the highest voltage within the
boom reach on the structure must be used.

In addition to operational personal protective clothing and personal protective


equipment, wear an approved fall protection harness.

Attach the fall protection harness to the elevated work platform basket anchor
point (lanyard maximum length including shock absorber 1200m) before
operating the boom(s).

A fall arrest system is not required to be worn on scissor lift platform, unless
advised by the manufacture or a person in control of the work place. If a fall
arrest system is required to be worn, a suitable anchor point must be provided.

When performing any work, stay inside the basket and have at least one (1)
foot on the basket floor.

Never tamper with the deadman basket control to bypass its manual function.

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Travelling in elevated work platforms

Undertake a job risk assessment to identify all foreseeable hazards and


implement risk controls.

Use a trailing drag chain of a minimum 10 mm steel to earth the EWP.

Use a safety observer when moving an E.W.P. inside a substation.

Keep EWP booms in the stowed position.

Person travelling in the basket must at all times, wear a suitable safety harness
and lanyard. (This excludes the scissor lift platform)

Escorting a person in a elevated work platform basket

An escorted person is defined as someone who is authorised to ascend in an


EWP basket but is prohibited from performing any operational work. They may
observe, take photographs or make a movie on behalf of Western Power.

An accredited EWP operator must accompany the escorted person.


The EWP operator must provide the escorted person with an induction that
includes the operation of the EWP and the correct use of a fall arrest harness.

The EWP basket must not breach the section safety clearances.

If in the event of an EWP mechanical failure the emergency descent device


must not be used. Lower the EWP basket by the base controls.

Contract elevated work platform


A hired EWP operating on Western Power assets must be inspected prior to use in
accordance with the Combined Elevated Work Platform and Crane/Borer External
Hire Checklist (refer Appendix 2 Standard Forms).

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Section 5.8 Elevated Work


Platforms

DM7850545, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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References

Occupational Safety and health Regulations

AS 2550.1 2006 Cranes, hoists and winches Safe use General


requirements

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Section 5.8 Elevated Work


Platforms

DM7850545, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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5.9

Crane use

Purpose
The purpose of this instruction is to outline the safe work requirements when
operating a crane within a Transmission substation.
The instruction only provides the minimum requirements relevant to crane
operations and does not attempt to replicate any detailed work practices or
maintenance requirements contained in training or other pertinent documents.
Refer to section 5.10 of this manual for the role of a dogman on Western Power
construction sites.
Competency and authorisation
The crane operator must:

Possess a Licence to Perform High Risk Work for the crane.

The designated Safety Observer must:

Be competent and instructed in the recognition of relevant workplace hazards.

Note:
A dogman who is considered competent by the on site person in charge may be
delegated as a Safety Observer.
The Dogman must:

Posses a current Licence to Perform High Risk Work - DG and be competent


in their designated role.

Basic instructions
The crane operator must:

Perform the logbook pre-start crane operation checks.

Be competent to perform the task.

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Check and inspect all chains, slings and other lifting devices for wear, tear
damage and counterfeit.

Comply with the crane manufacturers specifications and recommendations.

Ensure the crane is suitable for the lift capacity and jib manoeuvrability.

Never leave the crane unattended unless all safeguards have been
implemented.

Earth cranes in accordance with relevant instructions (section 2.2 portable


earthing).

Mitigate any risks associated with step and touch potential by imposing a
ground approach distance.

Where practical, position the crane so that the maximum reach of the jib is
unable to enter the minimum approach distance of live or de-energised
apparatus. Consider inadvertent movement clearances.

Position the crane and outriggers on stable ground.

Stand on a conductive mat electrically bonded to the vehicle when using side
controls or wear insulated gloves rated to at least the voltage of the nearby
power lines.

Attach non-conductive 16mm tag lines to the suspended load to provide


additional manoeuvering control.

Stow the crane jib when travelling (except when performing pick and carry
movements).

The on site person in charge must:

Conduct the job risk assessment process and implement risk controls.

Establish an emergency plan relevant to the task.

Confirm that any person who is involved in the task understands the risk
controls.

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Position warning signs, barriers, etc. to delineate the safe work area and warn
others not involved in the task of any foreseeable risk.

Crane operations
The following are additional instructions that apply when operating a crane in a live
substation.
The crane operator must:

Possess a current Substation Entry Permit (NA1 for work not requiring a permit
or NA2 when required to sign onto a permit) or under the direct escort of a
person who possess a current NA 3.

Perform the logbook pre-start crane operation checks before entering the
substation.

Comply with the maximum 15kph speed restriction. When performing pick and
carry movements, do not exceed walking speed.

When travelling within a live substation securely attach a trailing 10mm


diameter bright or galvanised drag chain to the crane (minimum 150mm of
chain in contact with ground).

Only drive the crane across trafficable trench or cable covers.

Only use the crane for lifting or supporting dead apparatus.

The on site person in charge must:

Possess a current Substation Entry Level 2 Authorisation.

Establish an Emergency Plan relevant to the task.

Enter the substation and notify SOCC via the substation telephone landline.

Record attendance in the substation logbook.

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5.10

Dogging

Purpose

To outline requirements for creating a safe work environment to move loads


using vehicle loading and slewing mobile cranes on Western Power
Transmission Substations. (Refer to Section 5.9 of this manual)

The instruction describes the role of a licensed dogman on any Western Power
Transmission Substation.

The instruction only provides the key points relevant to a dogman and does not
attempt to replicate comprehensive instructions defined in legislation, Western
Power guidelines or training documentation.

Instructions

The onsite person in charge must provide a dogman on a construction site


wherever there is a:

Requirement to select slings.


Ensure that chain shorteners/grabs are not used, as they are considered
unsafe for Western Power projects.

Requirement to inspect lifting gear.

Need to direct a crane operator in the movement of a load.

Required training and competencies

The onsite person in charge must confirm that the dogman posseses a current
License to Perform High Risk Work DG, and is competent in their designated
role.

Key tools and equipment

The onsite person in charge must provide the necessary tools and equipment
required by a dogman for the task. For example, first aid kit, communication
device and barricades.

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Personal protective equipment and personal protective clothing

Personal protective equipment and personal protective clothing must be


suitable for the task/s and in compliance with relevant instructions.

Slinging loads

Without limitations, a dogman is required where judgement must be exercised


in sling selection for the task.

The slinging of loads includes, but is not limited to:

Transferring loads from a vehicle to the ground or from the ground onto a
vehicle when on construction sites.

Directing a crane operator in the movement of a load, particularly when


the crane operators view is obstructed i.e. lifting or lowering compound
transformers.

The person having control of the workplace must confirm that the dogman and
crane operator are licensed and experienced in construction work and relevant
crane operations.

The crane operator must clearly define the task the dogman is required to
undertake.

The dogman and crane operator must complete an assessment of the worksite
and scope of the lift then apply all controls required to eliminate or reduce the
risk of injury or damage. If required, develop a preliminary dogging plan.

The dogman, in consultation with the crane operator, must calculate and
confirm the load weight and other factors related to the lift such as the centre of
gravity.

The dogman and crane operator must inspect the required lifting gear and tag
and remove any unserviceable equipment.

Lifting gear must be connected to the load in accordance with the


manufacturers specifications.

The dogman must adopt a position whereby he/she is able to provide their
undivided attention to the crane operator. Work must cease if the dogmans
view is impaired.

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The dogman must be competent in the use of Australian Standards hand


signals and whistles.

The dogman must ensure the stability of the load during the lift.
In the movement of the load, the crane operator must be directed by a dogman
until the load is in its final position.

If for any reason, the dogman has to leave their position, they must ensure the
crane operator ceases all crane movements.

If an at-risk situation is imminent, the dogman or any member of the team is


authorised to stop the crane operation.

Whenever any noise factor inhibits clear communication between the crane
operator and dogman, they must establish an at-risk warning system such as:

Hand signals.

Whistle signals.

A compressed air horn.

Two-way radio.

Other approved signal equipment.

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5.11

Rigging

Purpose
The purpose of this instruction is to outline the requirements for Western Power
personnel (Network Total Workforce) who undertake rigging within Transmission
Substations.
Scope
This instruction covers all Western Power Network Total Workforce (employees and
contractors) who are required to undertake rigging within Transmission Substations.
General

All lifting work (as identified in this section) relating to work undertaken by
Western Power personnel is to be overseen by an authorised Western Power
representative. The authorised person must ensure that any lifting work is
supervised by a competent, qualified person (e,g. Rigger or Dogman).

Any lifting work undertaken as part of a works contract must clearly be


identified as part of the initial contract schedule. Lifting work which is
undertaken on a new site under construction, is to be risk assessed and the
work reviewed and authorised by Western Power, prior to commencement.
Western Power may provide a suitable person to oversee this work.

Instructions

Ensure crane operators and dogger or riggers are qualified.


Any riggers who undertake dogging must do so in accordance with section
5.10 Dogging.

Except for emergency stop signals, ensure crane operator responds only to the
designated signal person.

Stop a lift if an unsafe condition is suspected.

Never exceed a components rated capacity.

Before, during, and after using any rigging equipment, inspect it. If defective,
immediately remove from service. Do not weld or alter any rigging or lifting
devices.

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If the rigging equipment, lifting device, or crane has been shock-loaded, stop
the work and inspect the equipment immediately.

The slinging of loads, selecting and/or inspection of lifting gear or directing a


crane operator in the movement of a load during work activities at Western
Power worksites, must only be undertaken by, or under the supervision of, a
person with a certificate of competency in dogging as a minimum.

Rigging Qualifications

Basic rigging consists of dogging and rigging work involving:

Movement of plant and equipment.

Steel erection.

Hoists (including mast climbing hoists).

Placement of pre-cast concrete.

Safety nets and static lines.

Perimeter safety screens and shutters.

Cantilevered crane-loading platforms.

Intermediate rigging consists of all basic rigging listed above and:

Cranes and excavators.

Tilt slabs.

Hoists with jibs and self-climbing hoists.

Demolition.

Dual lifts.

Advanced rigging consists of all basic and intermediate rigging work outlined
above and:

Gin poles and shear legs.

Flying foxes and cableways.

Guyed derricks and structures.

Suspended and fabricated hung scaffolds.

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References:

National Standard for Licensing Persons Performing High Risk Work schedule
licence classes and definitions.

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5.12

Storage, handling, transport and disposal of Sulphur Hexafluoride

(SF6) gas
Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for safe handling, storage,
maintenance, repair, transport and disposal of equipment containing SF6 gas.
Safety aspects and implications
SF6 gas is colourless, odourless, tasteless, non-toxic and non-combustible.
However, SF6 gas can be a risk to human health due to toxic by-products and its
potential to displace oxygen in confined spaces.
Environmental aspects and implications
SF6 gas is a greenhouse gas with a Global Warming Potential 23,000 times more
than carbon dioxide.
Instructions

Follow the manufacturers instructions and the Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6)


MSDS to handle, store, maintain, repair, transport and dispose of SF6 filled
equipment

Ensure that SF6 does not leak to the atmosphere.

Handling & Recovery


Employees and contractors must:

Be trained and found competent to operation SF6 evacuation and filling


devices.

Follow the safety recommendations contained in the SF6 MSDS.

Avoid heat, sparks, open flames and other ignition sources as it can produce
toxic bi-products.

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During planned maintenance or repair work, employees and contractors must


use an approved SF6 evacuation and filling device to reclaim and process SF6
and return the withdrawn SF6 into the equipment being maintained or repaired.

Evacuate and fill the circuit breaker according to the manufacturers


instructions.

Recovered SF6 (not reclaimed and returned into equipment) must be returned
to a nominated Western Power Depot (Kewdale and Jandakot).

Maintain SF6 equipment in ventilated areas.


Neutralize by-products (eg. with hydrolysed lime) and extracted with a Hazmat
rated vacuum cleaner.

Transportation

Only transport SF6 in approved cylinders in accordance with manufacturers


guidelines.

Transport cylinders in an upright position and restrained on board the vehicle.


Do not transport cylinders inside a vehicle cabin.

Disposal

Recover all the remaining SF6 before disposing of SF6 filled equipment.

Neutralize all failed or decommissioned equipment previously filled with SF6


prior to disposal, salvage or repair.

Treat all failed or decommissioned equipment containing SF6 gas or byproducts and/or SF6 gas requiring treatment for re-use as a Controlled Waste.

Safety
You must have a confined space entry ticket before entering any confined space.
Wear the following safety equipment before working on SF6 equipment:

Disposable overalls with elasticised sleeves, legs and close fitting neck or
hood. When worn, the overalls must overlap the gloves and boots.

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Disposable gloves (preferably nitrile or neoprene).


Full-face respirator fitted with organic vapour canister (eg. Protector type
RFF20 respirator fitted with a RC42A canister). Alternatively, a suitable
respirator with chemical type industrial goggles may be used.

Safety boots/shoes.

Where high volume SF6-filled equipment resides and the depths of enclosures
(cable trenches and pits) near the equipment has been identified as a confined
space, permanent exhaust fans must be installed.
Fit exhaust fan/ with an inlet pipe extending to the lowest level of the room,
ensuring the removal of SF6 from the work area is to an open or well-ventilated
area.
Where exhaust fans are not installed in an enclosed or partially enclosed area,
6
where SF equipment resides, the area must be adequately ventilated before

undertaking work.
References

AS 2791-1996 High-voltage switchgear and controlgear Use and handling of


sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) in high-voltage switchgear and controlgear.

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5.13

Safety Observer role

Purpose
This instruction describes the role of a safety observer on any Western Power
worksite.
The instruction provides the key points relevant to a safety observer and does not
attempt to define the role for all work situations.
Instructions

Without limitations, a safety observer is required for the following work:

Operating, installing or maintaining live electrical equipment. (An


exception may include; switching operations, the operation of secondary
systems

Work on or near live overhead conductors.

Work on or near live underground cables.

Work on transmission and communication towers. (Lattice and pole


structures)

Crane or elevated work platform operations working near live conductors.

Any excavation work deeper than 1.5 metres.

Any workplace or process in which the risk assessment determines the


need for a safety observer.

Where a risk assessment determines that a safety observer is necessary, then


work must not be undertaken without the presence of a safety observer.

The on-site person in charge must provide sufficient safety observers for the
duration of the task.

The onsite person in charge must instruct the safety observer of their duties,
clearly define the work activity and the period whereby a safety observer is
required.

While observing a task the safety observers sole role is to observe the
movement of people or equipment and when necessary give warnings in the
event of any risk or non-compliance to safe work procedures.

The safety observer must be conversant with the emergency notification


process and competent in the use of any onsite voice communication system.

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The safety observer must not have any known temporary or permanent
disabilities that would adversely affect their competency to perform their role.

The safety observer must adopt a position whereby they are able to give their
undivided attention to those performing the work. Work must cease if the
safety observers view of the work is impaired.

The person performing the work must respond verbally to confirm an


understanding of any instructions or warnings given by the safety observer.

If for any reason, the safety observer must leave their position, work must be
suspended. Those performing the work must move to a safe distance whereby
they are clear of any risk.

The safety observer must not undertake any other tasks that may distract their
focus on the work being performed, or attempt to observe two or more
separate teams.

The role of the safety observer must be rotated if fatigue becomes a risk factor
or the work must be suspended.

A formal handover is required if a role

change occurs.

In the event of any imminent risk or non-compliance to safe work procedures,


the safety observer or any member of the team is authorised to stop the work.

Training and competencies

The onsite person in charge must confirm that the safety observer is
appropriately skilled in all aspects of safety observation and fully aware of the
potential risks associated with the work.

For some high-risk work, the safety observer may require specific authorisation
or competency.

Where a rescue process is required, the safety observer must be trained in


that process. If the rescue process includes machinery or plant, the safety
observer must be authorised and proficient in its operation.

The safety observer is required to possess the following first aid competencies:

HLTCPR201APerform CPR.

HLTFA201A Provide basic emergency life support first aid.

Those who work in remote locations may require HLTFA302AProvide


first aid in remote situations.

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Key tools and equipment

The onsite person in charge must provide any tools and equipment required by
a safety observer.

When noise may impact on the ability for the safety observer to communicate
with those performing the work establish an at-risk warning system such as a
whistle, compressed air horn or two-way radio.

Personal protective equipment and personal protective clothing

The safety observers personal protective equipment and clothing must be


suitable for the work, in good condition and in compliance with relevant
instructions.

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5.14

Induced voltages

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for working on isolated
apparatus that could be under the influence of induced voltage within Transmission
Substations. It includes an explanation of, and advice on how to reduce or eliminate
the risk of electrical induction on the isolated conductor/ apparatus.
DANGER
Induced voltages may be as little as a few volts and as high as many kilovolts
and could be hazardous or life threatening if the correct procedures are not
followed.
Note:
An induced voltage is often simply referred to as induction.
All persons performing work must comply with the worksite clothing and minimum
PPE requirements of section 3.0 in this Manual
Instructions

Carry out an inspection of the work area to determine the proximity of one set
of conductors to another or an item of electrical apparatus to a set of
conductors to determine the likelihood of the existence of any induced
voltages.

Hazardous induced voltages may be present on apparatus due to its running in


close proximity to a live conductor or adjacent apparatus at any point along its
length. The danger may not be visible from the worksite.

Complete the job risk assessment (JRA) process and job briefing to identify all
foreseeable risks, including induced voltages.

Wear personal protective equipment and clothing appropriate for the risks
identified during the JRA process.

Obtain the relevant permits for the apparatus to be worked on, from the
controlling authority (SOCC).

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Apply program earths according to the switching programme. Earths must be


to the required specifications for substations.

Working earths must be placed either side, or as close as possible to the


workers working on the apparatus, ensuring that the earth grounding leads are
bonded at the earthing point (e.g. substation earthing grid) to create an
equipotential work zone. See section 2.2 Portable Earthing Equipment.

Use a proximity tester (modiewark) to determine the presence of induced


voltage on isolated and earthed apparatus. Start on the highest setting and
gradually reduced to the lowest to identify induced voltages.

Applied and removed portable earths using an approved and rated insulated
stick.

Connect mobile equipment, such as cranes, operating on the structure to the


portable earthing point on the structure to create a equipotential zone.

Wear class 2 insulated gloves to avoid touch potential which may occur when
working around mobile plant and other conductive apparatus.

Broken, repaired, separated and joining conductors

If any part of the conductor being worked on is disconnected in any way, it is


important to ensure a temporary jumper is installed to bridge out the break in
the conductor.

If this is not done, the worker touching both ends of the

disconnected conductor will act as a bridge and may receive a shock if an


induced voltage is present in the isolated conductor.

If any part of the earthing is broken, dangerous voltages may occur when it is
necessary to break a part of the earthing system. Connect a bridging lead
across this part of the earthing system, before it is broken.

Do not remove the earth connections between apparatus and the earth system
while the apparatus is in service, unless it is specifically known this can be
done safely. A dangerous voltage may occur if the earth connection is removed
from high voltage apparatus while in service.

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Conductors on the ground

When required to handle conductor/s at ground level, which includes repairing


the end of a broken conductor, moving or securing a conductor, there are
additional requirements to the normal earthing requirements for electrical
access.

Person/s working on any conductor on the ground that may have induced
voltages, must wear a minimum of class 2 insulated gloves in addition to the
working earths applied to the conductor. If the conductor is disconnected, use
a temporary jumper to bridge the gap until the conductor can be pulled
together and reconnected. The temporary bridge can then be removed.

Conductors working aloft

When carrying out conductor jointing, splicing or disconnecting for any other
reason, earth both conductors as close as possible to the apparatus and a
temporary jumper placed across the disconnected conductor, to maintain
electrical continuity. The lead must comply with the Portable earthing
equipment requirements (refer to section 2.2 of this manual).

Extra working earths


If, by means of a risk assessment (JRA) there is a likelihood of induced voltages,
use extra working earths at the worksite to reduce the risk of induction. In severe
cases, wear class 2 insulating gloves.
UN - insulated elevated work platforms working within a substation must:

The basket bonded to the electrical apparatus being worked on.

The vehicle earthed to an identified earthing point using approved earthing


leads (either bolted or clamped).

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General information

Where possible, leave all earth switches ON at the substation site unless they
need to be opened for testing. Before any earth switches are opened, ensure
all personnel are aware of the changes to the earthing arrangements within
their relevant work area. If operating an earth switch, a Restricted Use tag
must be placed at the switch. Once the testing is completed, the earths are to
be re-applied and all personnel notified.

Transmission lines are considered one of the major sources of induction. The
current in the energised high voltage conductor causes a magnetic field that
may cut through de-energised conductors. This induces a current in the
isolated lower voltage line.

The voltage in the lower voltage line is a function of:

The current in the higher voltage line.

The distance separating the two lines.

The nature of the dielectric, ambient conditions, moisture, heat wind etc.

Guide to induced voltage exposure

Distance from energised line


(meters)

1.0

2.0

3.0

4.0

5.0

6.0

Percentage of the phase


value of the energised line

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

The distance between the overhead transmission lines and any object in the
field may change from time to time, according to the electricity loading of the
lines as well as the swinging angle. Induction can be increased or transferred
when conductive object approaches an energised conductor, i.e. pulling or
tensioning equipment, busbars, switchgear and mobile plant.

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The number of working earths required will be influenced by the value within
the electric field, the main earth resistance, the resistivity of the ground and the
proximity of the working earths to the working position. In severe cases when
induction cannot be totally eliminated, wear class 2 insulating gloves

References

(IEC TR 61328) Live working - Guidelines for the installation of transmission


line conductors and earth wires - Stringing equipment and accessory items.

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5.15

Pitch removal

Purpose
This field instruction outlines the requirements for Western Power personnel
(Network Total Workforce) when carrying out the task of pitch removal within
Transmission Substations.
Instructions
PPE

All personnel who are required to remove pitch must wear the following PPE:

Safety glasses or face shield.

Nitrile, PVC or leather gloves.

Approved overalls or long sleeve shirt and trousers.

Safety footwear.

A protective apron (leather or PVC) or disposable overalls may be worn to


compliment the above PPE.

Equipment

The approved equipment required to perform a melt out of a pitch box is:

Heat lamp box assembly.

Pitch trough.

Aluminium chute.

Grease for lining troughs and chutes.

scaffolding or ladders as required.

Ventilation system.

LPG gas torch, hose and gas bottle.

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10 amp 1-phase extension lead.

RCD power box.

Hand tools.

Suitable cleaning agent.

Pitch waste drum with securable lid.

Fire extinguisher (CO2).

Electric heat gun.

Preliminary arrangements for pitch removal in substations

The following tasks must be completed prior to setting up for a pitch melt out:

Obtain details of the replacement insulator medium required for the cable
box and any other materials required.

Undertake a JRA for the task.

Pitch removal process


Permits and outage

Prepare the apparatus for work by:

Ensuring the electrical hazard is removed by switching, earthing and/or


racking.

Ensuring pitch removal equipment can be set up in position without


encroaching on any other adjacent electrical hazards.

Completing the necessary permits.

DANGER
Equipment will become hot. Ensure all PPE is worn.

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Heat lamps

Ensure that heat lamps are positioned appropriately to undertake the work
safely.

Pitch melt out

When initial pitch flow commences, carry out a visual check to ensure the chute
and pitch trough are catching all the pitch.

Melt-out time will vary with the box size. Ambient temperature and air movement
in the pitch box vicinity will also affect melt-out time.

Check the box for melt-out progress at intervals not greater than one hour, and
gauge the amount left and expected time to complete. The final check is close to
full melt-out stage. There is no expected undesirable consequences of leaving
the lamps in place after all the pitch has been melted out.

A gas torch may be used to assist in melting pitch. Due care must be given for
the flame not to come into contact with pitch or electrical apparatus. Additionally
the torch must constantly be moved so as not to cause a hot spot.

Clean up

While the pitch remnants are still heated, use an electric heat gun on medium
setting and rags dipped in the cleaning agent to remove remaining traces of pitch
from the bushings and corners of the box.

Note: All pitch traces must be

removed.
Pitch disposal

Any waste material and the pitch must be disposed of in accordance

with

relevant regulatory requirements (not left on site).


References

Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) Guidelines for Acceptance


of Solid Waste to Landfill.

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5.16

Use of pesticides and herbicides

Purpose
This field instruction outlines the requirements for Western Power personnel
(Network Total Workforce)

when using pesticides and herbicides within

Transmission Substations.
Licensing

Certain pesticides and herbicides require that application be carried out only by
a licensed individual.

Instructions

Follow label and material safety data sheet (MSDS) directions to identify
proper safety equipment, handling and application and to note health concerns
of pesticides and herbicides.

As appropriate, or as recommended on the label, wear the following personal


protective equipment when handling, mixing, or applying pesticides and
herbicides :

Long-sleeved shirt and full-length trousers or long-sleeved coveralls.

Non-canvas or nonporous shoes or boots.

Safety glasses or face shield.

Neoprene gloves.

Ensure respiratory protection is based upon MSDS, exposure assessment, and


work practices.

Ensure applicators adhere to the following guidelines for caring for personal
protective equipment:

After each days use, launder reusable clothing. Do not launder


contaminated clothing together with normal household clothing.

After each days use, discard disposable clothing.

Do not handle contaminated clothing with unprotected hands.

At the end of each day, wash reusable personal protective equipment with
detergent and clean water. Dry the equipment in a clean, dry place.

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After eight (8) hours of use, or more frequently if the odour of the pesticide
and herbicides can be detected while wearing the item, replace pesticide
respirator cartridges.

For several scheduled applications at different locations in a single day,


disposable clothing may be reused, providing the garment is in reasonably
good condition (that is, no heavily soiled, saturated, or torn areas).

To minimise or eliminate potential personal exposure to pesticides and


herbicides through inhalation, ingestion, and/or skin absorption:

Never eat, drink, or smoke when handling pesticides and herbicides.

Remove all jewellery before handling pesticides and herbicides.

Wash hands with soap and water after handling, mixing or applying
pesticides and herbicides.

If an accidental exposure occurs:

Follow the first aid guidelines given on the manufacturers label and/or
MSDS.

Contact local safety and health professional and call local area poison
control centre.

References

National Code of Practice for the Control of Workplace Hazardous Substances


[NOHSC:2007(1994)] (PDF Version).

Guidance Note for the Assessment of Health Risks Arising from Hazardous
Substances in the Workplace [NOHSC:3017(1994)] (PDF Version).

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5.17

Vegetation management in substations

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum safe working requirements for vegetation
management work within the danger zone of live and/or de-energised conductors
within Transmission Substations.
This field instruction must be read in conjunction with section 5.3 of this manual.
Instruction

Vegetation management within substation differs from overhead power lines.


Substation Clearances must be adhered to when working in substations to the
apparatus nominal voltage.

When carrying out vegetation management work, never breach the section
safety clearance when inside a substation unless covered under a permit.

All work that is less than the work safety clearances (V&H) for the apparatuss
nominal voltage must be isolated and earthed and an Electrical Access Permit
issued.

All work greater than the work safety clearances (V&H) and less than the section
safety clearance (S) to any apparatus nominal voltage must be covered by a
Vicinity Authority. Any work greater that the section safety clearances (S) to any
apparatus nominal voltage may not be required to be covered by a permit.

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Safety requirements
Personal protective equipment

When performing vegetation management work in western power substations,


all members of the work team must wear the following personal protective
clothing and equipment:

Category Level 1 requirements for PPC : Flame retardant cal rating =


>7Cal

Any other applicable PPE as required by the nature of the task.

All workers who operate an elevating work platform must hold a Western
Power High Risk Worker Licence.

Safety observer
A safety observer can be an operational employee or any person who has the
minimum requirements and successfully completed either:
The one-day Tree Pruning Near Power Lines course; or
The three-day High Voltage Vegetation Work course.
The Safety Observer must be competent and instructed in the recognition of relevant
workplace hazards.
References

Western Powers Work Practice Manual

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5.18

Site security

Purpose
This field instruction outlines the requirements for Network Total Workforce when
entering and exiting Western Power Transmission Substations.
Instructions

It is Important when entering and exiting substations that all external gates are
left closed and locked. The only exception is when there is a person standing
at the gate to open it when vehicles arrive, then it is to be closed and locked.

Private locks are not allowed (on operational sites).

Unauthorised multiple locking of substation external perimeter fencing is


prohibited.

When first arriving at site you must:

Upon arrival report to the call centre (9427 4287) and advise them of:

Site location.

Name.

Contact number.

Number of persons on site.

Purpose of work.

Record in the substation logbook name, date, purpose of work and then sign
the logbook (completed by a member of the work group).

When leaving, report to the call centre.

When leaving close and lock all gates.

When entering and exiting Western Power Substations (Zone and Terminal)
with security systems:
The following substations have electric fences and security alarms in the relay
rooms:

Southern Terminal

Northern Terminal and Malaga Substation

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Medina Substation

Neerabup Terminal

Rockingham substation - Photoelectric beams with electric fencing

These substations are monitored, and guards will respond if alarms are
activated. Always assume that electric fences are energised at all times.
Always check the status of the fence before opening gates. If in doubt go
through the disarm procedure.
The procedure for arming and disarming electric fences

Treat the fence as armed and live at all times.

Login entry with SAT call agent.

Disarm the electric fence before opening the gate to enter / leave the
substation.

Arm the electric fence (if there are no tags / signs) after closing the gate
and ensure the substation secure.

Log out of site with SAT call agent upon leaving the substation and report
any issues.

In the event that personnel require the electric fence to remain disarmed:

Login entry with SAT call agent.

Disarm the electric fence and ensure tags/signs secured to keypads.

Perform and complete works then remove all tags/signs.

Arm the electric fence after closing the gate and ensure substation is
secure.

Log out of site with SAT call agent upon leaving the substation and report
any issues.

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5.19

Un-authorised access

Purpose

This field instructions outlines requirements for Network Total Workforce who
have arrived at a Transmission Substation to find persons inside or suspicious
activity around the perimeter.

It also applies to when they feel their personal safety is threatened.

Instructions
Safety of Western Power personnel at substations

Western Power personnel must at all times when entering a substation be


mindful of their personal safety.

Western Power personnel arriving at site must be observant and exercise


caution

to

ensure

their

switchyards/substations,

safety

or

of

against
suspicious

unauthorised
activities

person(s)
outside

in
the

switchyards/substations.

If unauthorised person(s) are detected inside the switchyard:

Move to a safe location.

Call SOCC (94274287) control room requesting security/police attendance


and advise details.

From a safe location, observe the unauthorised person(s) activities in the


switchyard if possible.

Advise SOCC control room if switching action is required for safety due to
nature of the activities of the unauthorised person(s).

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If suspicious activities are detected outside the switchyard:

Move to a safe location.

Call SOCC control room and advise details.

From a safe location, observe the unauthorised person(s) activities if


possible.

Note:
The SOCC controller will, depending on the nature of the suspicious activity
reported, use his discretion in determining whether to call the police or the security
services.
Situations that may require security escorts

Western Power employees called up after hours to investigate faults or to


perform emergency work need to feel safe when they are working and are
entitled to a security escort if they feel threatened in any way.

Security may be requested in, but not limited to:

Employees are instructed to go to an isolated location or to an area that is


a known trouble spot.

There are reasons to believe that the fault(s) are caused by vandals and
that the vandals may still be on site.

When an employee feels threatened and considers it appropriate to call


security.

Contacting the security firm

Wilson Security will provide escort, when required. Whenever an employee


requires a guard, (this will be decided by the employee in consultation with the
System Operations Controller), the SOC shall contact Wilson Security.

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Wilson Security must be advised of the location where the security guard is
needed, and the name of the employee requiring their services. An estimated
time of arrival (ETA) will be provided by Wilson Security. The SOC shall pass
this information on to the employee concerned and the employee will coordinate his/her ETA accordingly.

Delays may be experienced at some sites because Wilson Security does not
directly cover these areas. They will in these instances use the services of
other security companies. These sites are:

Darlington

Mandurah

Muchea

Mundaring Weir

Sawyers Valley

Note:
There are approximately twenty (20) metropolitan substations that are not

patrolled by a security firm. Wilson Security can be called upon to attend to


these substations by providing them with the address.
None of the country substations are being patrolled. For country substations

the standby person in that area should be contacted.


Procedures to follow on arrival at site

The employee must immediately inform SOCC upon arrival of the security
guard or upon arrival at the affected site (if the security guard has already
arrived).

The security guard must remain with the employee until the employee
considers it safe for the guard to leave. The employee must then contact the
SOC to inform them that the guard is no longer required.

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Evidence of un-authorised access

Evidence of un-authorised access is breaches in the substations external


fencing, vandalism to apparatus and graffiti to substation buildings. This must
be reported immediately.

SOCC Bulk Transmission Desk 9427 7064

SOCC Regional Transmission Desk 9427 7014

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5.20

Electrical substation insulator washing

Purpose
This field instruction is to provide guidance on the safe handling and application of
Electrical Substation Insulator washing either in a live or de-energised state.
Safety aspects and implications

All personnel engaged in performing this task must observe Western Powers
general safety requirements.

There are specific mandatory safety requirements within this procedure which
must be strictly adhered to for the safe performance of this task.

Training and standards

This procedure applies to all insulator washing work performed by certified


persons, on live high voltage apparatus from 6.6 kV up to and including
132 kV, with the same washing principals applied to de-energised washing of
220 and 330 KV terminal station equipment.

This standard is to ensure the safety of the person/s carrying out this work, the
general public and the operational integrity of the assets themselves. It also
specifies the minimum standards for equipment required for energised
substation washing methods.

For workers to perform live substation insulator washing, they are required to
be trained (PTS 012) and hold a valid Western Power authorisation for the task
and a current network authority card.

Non-trade personnel and electrical apprentices are not permitted to perform


live substation insulator washing, and are restricted to providing assistance
only in performing the task.

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insulator washing

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Washing of substation and terminal station insulators in their de-energised


state poses minimal risk to personnel, assets or the public. Treat as live; abide
by the processes detailed within this document and carry out the work under a
VA permit.

Non-trade personnel who have attended the training (PTS 012 Electrical
substation insulator washing), found competent and accredited, may wash in
substations in a de-energised state.

Environmental aspects and implications

There is minimal environmental impact related to the performance of this


activity, as there is no water run-off, or environmentally hazardous by-products
produced.

Give consideration to overspray and airborne particles washed from dirty


insulators.

Customer aspects and implications

Customer satisfaction can be maintained and enhanced by performing this task


in adherence to this work instruction, existing company policies, guidelines,
Legislation and accepted practices.

Safe and effective implementation of this task will surely increase the reliability
and stability of high voltage assets and power network in general, whilst
enhancing the quality of professional services we are providing to our
customers.

Tools and equipment required


High-pressure water pump

There are various types of pumps used for washing insulators. They are petrol,
diesel or hydraulically driven and have a working range of up to a maximum of
14,000 KPa.

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Fibreglass insulated washing wand

The washing wand consists of three (3) lengths of fibreglass live line stick. The.
sticks can be joined together and adjusted between 2.4m and 4.2m.

Attached to one of the 1.2 m sticks is a Synflex non-conductive hose, which


has a working pressure of 19,250 KPa. This hose is approximately 6m in
length, has a swivel head fitted with a 1.58 mm nozzle at the top and a hand or
foot control valve at the bottom.

This wand is used to wash the insulators, with the nozzle between 300 mm to
450 mm away from the live apparatus. These sticks are to be tested as per
Field Instruction 2.13 of this Manual.

Conductivity meter

Meters are used to check the conductivity of the water in millisiemen/meter,


before live insulator washing commences and when required during the day.

Instructions
Conduct a Job Risk Assessment (JRA) process before caring out the task of
substation insulator washing.
Take into account the following:

Wind does it exceed 45 km/h?

Tripping hazards.

Permit conditions.

Do not direct the spray at another individual as high-pressure water can cause
harm.

Discuss location of adjacent equipment that is not to be washed or subjected to


high levels of overspray.

Nearest live equipment, not within the scope of the permit.

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insulator washing

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Discuss the level of surface pollution in the yard.


Visually inspect the insulators for cracks or chips (do not wash insulators
affected by cracks or chips).

Worksite personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements

It is the responsibility of the person/s on any worksite, plus the on-site person
in charge, to make sure these requirements are complied with.

Approved PPE (Level 1) must be worn at all times when washing high voltage
insulators.

Do not use Gloves while using:

High voltage live line sticks (hot sticks).

High voltage insulated washing wand.

The washing environment

Stop energised spray washing when adverse weather conditions, such as rain,
heavy mist, fog or the likelihood of lighting is present..

Obtain a Vicinity Authority permit before energised spray washing commence.


The location of the spray washing needs to be clearly marked on the Vicinity
Authority permit.

When live insulator washing is to be carried out on equipment which has


automatic reclosing facilities, these facilities must be made inoperative for the
duration of the work (no reclose possible)

Test and equipment criteria

Before using the washing wand, check the fibreglass sticks for cracks and
damage to the surface.

Inspect all insulated sticks and equipment before use. Report faulty or
damaged sticks and equipment to the supervisor, and tagged out of service.
Only use if replaced with new or repaired and tested.

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insulator washing

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Test all insulated sticks associated with the washing wand at intervals not
exceeding six months. Attach the test date to the sticks.

Do not use the sticks if the next due test has expired, until they are retested..

Wind velocity

Overspray onto unwashed insulators may result in a flashover.

Use a wind velocity meter (anemometer) to assess the worksite.

Work with caution when winds exceed 30 km/

Work must not proceed when winds exceed 45 km/h

Water pressure criteria for insulator washing in sub stations

Earth the washing unit,or the vehicle they are mounted on.

Ensure the water container is free of contamination; flush out with low
conductivity water before use.

Use de-mineralised low conductivity water. Check the water quality with a
suitable conductivity meter to confirm it meets the required criteria of no higher
than two millisiemen/meter.

Check the following items before washing commences:

All hoses are connected and there are no leaks.

Working pressure on high-pressure wand is suitable (2800 KPa).

Earth leads with in test date.

Insulators which may be high pressure washed

All porcelain / ceramic insulators can be high pressure washed, subject to


consideration of the following points.

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insulator washing

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Proximity of items that are not to be exposed to pressurised water, such as


circuit breaker breathers, site glasses, gauges, seals, insulator section gaskets
or flanges, or other perforations.

The insulator being free from cracks, chips deteriorated glazing or other
surface defects.

Some insulators must only be washed when de-energised such as old design
stacked insulators, or Surge arrestor insulators if required in high pollution
areas.

Insulators which must not be high pressure washed

Irrespective of the type of equipment i.e. isolators, CBs, Transformer


Bushings, Instrument transformers etc, the following insulator types are not to
be washed with high pressure demineralised water:

Silicone coated rubber insulators.

Composite (Polymeric) insulators

Epoxy design insulators (Prone to deep surface cracking).

Substation equipment which may be high pressure washed

Circuit breaker lower insulators - (non circuit interrupting portions).

Washing upper (circuit Interrupter) portions offers a marginal increased risk in


relation to safety and asset integrity, particularly on oil circuit breakers as
described in the next section.

Sites encountered with a high rate of surface pollution, this upper portion can
still be washed by accredited operators, staying well clear of the circuit breaker
head section. But in this event - de-energized washing is advised and must be
arranged.

Circuit breaker pole insulator assembly flanges must be avoided, with washing
beginning and terminating one full skirt away from any flange or gasket.

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Take care when washing older design circuit breakers (typically ones rated 33
kV and below), with arcing horns installed across the lower and upper
insulators.
Sub station washing process

Obtain a Vicinity Authority from the operating authority.

Any auto-reclose systems set to one shot.

Conduct a pre-start inspection on all the washing equipment and check for any
leaks.

Clean the fibreglass washing wand with a silicone-impregnated cloth.

Earth the spray-washing unit and or vehicle to the substation earthing system.

For energised washing of insulators in a sub station, the conductivity of the


water must not exceed two millisiemen/metre.

Reduce the water pressure to 2,800 KPa or below. .


Maintain a clearance between the nozzle of the wand and the live apparatus.
For voltages up to 132 Kv a clearance of 450 mm

Always wash so the overspray drifts (wind assisted), away from unwashed
insulators.

On completion, a rinse down of the insulator (tops only) from the top to the
bottom is required.

On vertical mounted insulators, start the wash process from the bottom moving
to the top of the insulator.

The minimum number of persons required to wash insulators in a sub station is


two per washing unit, both being trained in correct washing techniques and
procedures.

One person will wash the insulators, while the second person operates the
control valve and acts as the observer.

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5.20 Electrical substation


insulator washing

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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The observer watches; clearances, change in the wind direction, along with
other hazards.

If a wind shift occurs during washing operations it may be necessary to


reorganise the washing to suit these conditions.

References

Western Power document: Asset Integrity - Switchgear Maintenance Criteria


DM1045858.

Western Power document: Safety Items For Consideration When Performing


Work on High Voltage Equipment DM1538080.

IEEE STD 957-1995 - Guide for Cleaning Insulators.


AS 4436-1996, Guide for the Selection of Insulators in Respect of Polluted
Conditions.

Western Power document: Live high voltage substation insulator washing


review DM3450710.

Western Power document: PTS 012 - Electrical Substation insulator washing


DM5354948.

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Work Practice Manual

5.20 Electrical substation


insulator washing

DM7852408, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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5.21

Pilot cable boxes

Purpose
The purpose of this instruction is to outline the requirements for Western Power
personnel (Network Total Workforce) for access to pilot cable termination link and
pilot isolation transformer boxes.
Instructions
General

Before working on a pilot cable termination link and pilot isolation transformer
box, all personnel must have completed (and met the outcomes of) the pilot
training course.

Always wear Western Power-approved clothing and personal protective


equipment (PPE) according to the Western Power Safety Manual.

Before commencing work:

Obtain all relevant permits from the controlling authority for the apparatus
to be worked on.

Isolate the pilot cable termination link or pilot isolation transformer box.

A portable pilot cable high voltage class 2 insulated mat must be used when
carrying out work on a pilot cable termination link or pilot isolation transformer
box.

Use barriers, shrouds, or isolating transformers to maintain an earth-free


environment that extends for two (2) metres around the pilot cable termination
link or pilot isolation transformer box.

A suitably rated isolation transformer (16kV) must be used when bringing


external power cords into the earth-free exclusion zone of the pilot cable
termination link or pilot isolation transformer box.

Do not work on pilot equipment in the metro area if there is electrical


thunderstorm activity within a 30 km distance to any part of the inter-connected
pilot system.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 5.21 Pilot cable boxes

DM7852389, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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If the Pilot is run as an overhead circuit, examine the Pilot Cable route and
determine what exposure it has to live HV Lines. If necessary, request an
outage on the Line of concern.

Inspection and testing

Check the insulated mats for signs of damage and deterioration before use.

If the insulated mat is damaged or has deteriorated, remove it from service.

Test insulated mats according to instruction Section 2.13 - High voltage


insulated equipment.

References

American Standard ASTM D 178-01 (matting).

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 5.21 Pilot cable boxes

DM7852389, Rev 0, Mar 2011

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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5.22

Battery banks

Purpose
To outline the requirements for Network Total Workforce who work on battery
banks within Transmission Substations.
Instructions

Complete a Job Risk Assessment (JRA) before working on batteries.

Work in a well ventilated area.

Confirm the battery room ventilation

system is working, especially for lead acid batteries.

Wear the correct PPE when working on lead acid batteries, e.g. full-face
shield, glasses, apron and rubber gloves.

Ensure access to fresh water and eye-bath


facility.

Use insulated tools and equipment.

Do not access and work on battery systems


that are producing excess gas, due to being
boosted or equalise charged.

Only use a dampened cloth when cleaning batteries to prevent the build
up of electrostatic charges.

Spill kits must be available during any battery work.

Keep battery rooms clean. Neutralise liquid spills or leaking electrolyte


before cleaning up.

DANGER
Batteries contain corrosive electrolytes and can produce potentially explosive
gases.
Lead acid batteries are installed in an intrinsically safe environment. Maintain
adequate ventilation in these environments. Equipment used in these areas
must also be intrinsically safe.

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Section 5.22 Battery banks

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Background

DC systems are installed in substations to supply power for; control, protection,


alarms, communications, and other critical auxiliary circuits.

Different DC voltages are used within substations, depending upon equipment


requirements. Common voltages are 32, 50 and 110 V DC.

The storage batteries may be lead-acid or nickel cadmium, each with its own
characteristics.

Hazards associated with DC systems

There are a number of hazards present when working with DC systems in


electrical substations as follows:

Electrical shock DC voltages and large currents may be high enough to


cause severe burns or electrocution.

Acids and alkalis can burn skin and eyes.


Confined spaces gases from battery cells can build up and require
ventilation before battery rooms are entered.

Hazardous Work Spaces

Lead acid batteries

Also called a wet-cell or flooded-cell battery because the electrolyte is in a


liquid form.

They are vented batteries because the charging process can produce gasses
of hydrogen and oxygen, which needs to be able to escape from the confines
of the battery case.

Use a hydrometer to measure the specific gravity of the cells. This gives the
rate of charge for the battery.

The water level in the battery must be maintained at the correct levels.

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Section 5.22 Battery banks

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Lead acid batteries suffer from terminal corrosion because of the corrosive
atmosphere created by the misting of sulphuric acid, which is vented from the
battery or seeping through the battery terminal seals.

Nickel cadmium cells

Nickel cadmium battery banks do not have to be placed in a intrinsically safe


environment.
Oxygen and hydrogen is released through the vent, therefore,top up the water
levels of vented nickel cadmium cells.

The electrolyte in a nicad is potassium hydroxide (alkaline), cross


contamination from sulphuric acid in lead acid cells must be avoided.

The specific gravity of nickel cadmium cells is unchanged by the chargingdischarging process.

Identification of battery type

The external appearance of lead acid and alkaline batteries can be very
similar. However the electrolyte is not inter changeable. It is important when
doing any testing or servicing the correct identification of battery type is
undertaken. A label is on the battery container to indicate its type.

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Section 5.22 Battery banks

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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5.23

Excavations in substations

Purpose

The instruction describes the safe systems of work that include the
avoidance of any existing underground services.

The instruction only provides the key points relevant to Western Power
worksites and does not attempt to replicate the Worksafe WA Code of
Practice Excavations 2005 or any detailed work practices included in
training manuals.

Training/authorisation requirements

A person performing any of the functions described in this instruction must


have completed a Western Power accredited excavation course delivered
by Power Training Services or another Registered Training Organisation.

A person who is required to install trench shoring at a depth greater than


1.5 metres must have completed the BCCCM2010B Install trench support
course or an approved equivalent.

Based on the technical issues involved in some excavations, involvement


from or consultation with an appropriately experienced engineer will be
required.

Instructions
Follow the 4 step method:

Plan

Pothole

Protect

Proceed

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Work Practice Manual

Section 5.23 Excavations in


substations

DM7851627, Rev 0, Mar 2011

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Plan
Dial Before You Dig cannot determine the location of underground
cables/assets inside a substation.

Contact

Western

Power

nominated

representative

(i.e.

Project

Manager/Construction Manager) when working in a substation to verify


cable locations.

Before commencing excavation work, use the Job Risk Assessment


(JRA) process to identify all foreseeable risks, then conduct a job briefing.

Reinforce any structure that has the potential to fall into a trench or
excavation by sheet piling, shoring, bracing, guying or using another
approved appropriate means.

Where there is a probability of excavation work damaging underground


utilities or undermining a structure, contact the utility or structure owner
and request the implementation of appropriate risk controls.

Wear personal protective equipment and clothing appropriate to the risks


identified during the JRA process.

Install appropriate worksite safety barriers.

A competent Safety Observer is required for any excavation deeper than


1.5 metres.

If required, the delegated Issuing Officer will issue a work permit to the
Recipient-in-Charge.

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Section 5.23 Excavations in


substations

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Pothole

Based on the JRA, decide on appropriate means of pot holing. Hand


digging or vacuum excavating is a safer alternative than mechanical
digging. When pot holing, comply with the minimum approach distances.

Do not use mechanical excavators until all underground utilities have


been located and identified. Excavator operators must comply with the
minimum approach distances for specific underground utilities. No
mechanical excavation is permitted within 500mm in any direction of any
underground electrical cables or gas pipe. When using a small excavator,
attach a smooth edge bucket or a rounded tooth bucket for clay/rock
excavation taking of layers of maximum 50mm at a time.

Locate and keep clear of overhead conductors (where applicable).

Advise Western Power and the asset owner immediately of any damage
to an underground asset.

Indicate existing services and their routes with such things as spray paint,
pegs or flagging tape. Where practical, mark the ground to identify an
underground utilities depth.

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Protect

Delegate a competent Safety Observer to monitor machinery used to


excavate.

Install trench shoring whenever it is foreseeable that the soil may collapse
due to vibration, instability, fine sand, water saturation, etc.

Refer to

course notes or other relevant documents for specific shoring


requirements.

Consult a competent person when shoring trenches

deeper than 1.5m

Reinforce any structure that is likely to fall into a trench or excavation by


sheet piling, shoring, bracing, guying or using another appropriate means.
If the risk cannot be controlled, stop the work.

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Proceed

Excavator operators must comply with the minimum approach distances.

Install covers or an approved barrier to prevent damage.

On completion of any excavation work, use an approved process and/or


device to confirm that underground utilities are not damaged.

Instigate appropriate risk controls and if necessary isolate the area


around a damaged utility.

The person in control of the workplace must immediately inform the


Western Power nominated representative of the damage and if
appropriate, the utility owner and request their site attendance.

Where practicable, backfill all open trenches at the end of each shift.
Compaction shall be done and met design requirements and/or Australian
Standards

Remove site waste..

Leave the worksite in a safe condition as stipulated in the Job Risk


Assessment.

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Section 5.23 Excavations in


substations

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Work Practice Manual

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DM7851627, Rev 0, Mar 2011

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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5.24

Low voltage work rescue plan

Purpose
To outline the requirements for Western Power personnel and the Network Total
Workforce to have a low voltage rescue plan when undertaking work on or near
energised low voltage apparatus within Transmission Substations.
Instructions

Before working on or near low voltage apparatus that is energized the following
precautions must be taken:

The JRA process must be completed before the task is undertaken,


outlining all hazards and their control measures.

Adequate PPE must be worn.


Use Insulated covers and barriers to reduce the risk of inadvertent contact
with live low voltage.

The following precautions should be undertaken before starting work:

Emergency Rescue kit available and ready to use.

Safety Observer in position who understands how to perform a Low


Voltage rescue.

The rescue plan discussed and planned before work starts.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 5.24 Low voltage work


rescue plan

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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General principles of rescue

If a casualty has received an electrical shock from low voltage electrical


equipment (A.C. from 50V to 1000V and D.C. from 110V to 1500V), the
following requirements should be considered and followed:

Isolation of the supply of electricity if feasible.

Safety of the rescuer (avoid becoming the second victim).

Alert rescue personnel.

If possible, move the casualty clear from any hazards.

Provide first aid treatment to the casualty to the level trained to.

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Section 5.24 Low voltage work


rescue plan

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Note details of the incident for reporting later.

If required to move the casualty, it is recommended the Drag Method be


used. Before moving the casualty:

Ensure electrical supply is isolated or the casualty is no longer in contact


with the electrical supply.

Drag the casualty to a safe area, clear of hazards.

If there is a fire, use the fire blanket as follows:

Wrap the blanket around the casualty to extinguish flames.

Direct the flames away from the casualtys face and own body.

It is essential to provide assistance and information to all ambulance and


medical personnel. Workers must familiarise themselves with communication
and protocol requirements at their work site such as radios, telephones and
emergency sirens/lights.

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Work Practice Manual

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Work Practice Manual

Section 5.24 Low voltage work


rescue plan

DM7851608, Rev 0, Mar 2011

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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6.1

Leaking oil-filled equipment

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for the removal of oil filled
equipment from a transmission substation site, including PCB oil filled equipment.
Responsibilities

It is the responsibility of the officer in charge to make sure this instruction is


read and understood.

It is the responsibility of the on site person in charge to make sure this


instruction is complied with.

It is the responsibility of all personnel who are required to handle, store and
transport transformers that are leaking or not, to comply with this instruction.

Instructions
Personal protective equipment
All personnel who are required to handle, transport and store oil filled equipment,
must wear the following personal protective equipment:

Safety glasses.

Nitrile gloves.

Overalls or long sleeve shirt and trousers.

Safety footwear.

Handling oil filled equipment suspected of containing PCB

If the oil filled equipment is dated pre-1978 or suspected for other reasons
such as make or type to contain PCB, remove it from operation and store
within the transmission substation for PCB confirmation testing.

Arrange for a specialist contractor to sample the oil in the suspected PCB
equipment. Consult Formal Leader for contractor details if unsure.

The contractor will arrange for laboratory analysis of the oil samples to be
conducted at a National Association of Testing Authorities (NATA) accredited
laboratory.

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No oil-filled equipment manufactured prior to 1978 can be removed from


metropolitan sites until PCB testing occurs and the results are received. For
country areas, this equipment must be transported to Kewdale depot and
stored in a clearly marked bunded area until PCB testing occurs and results
are known.

Based on the results of the PCB oil testing, label the equipment with either a
PCB free, Contains non-scheduled PCB or Scheduled PCB sticker.

Handling leaking oil filled equipment (including PCB)


In addition to the standard personal protective equipment detailed above, additional
equipment must be worn whilst handling leaking oil filled equipment suspected to
contain PCB as follows:

Splash-proof goggles.

Disposable Tyvek overalls/coveralls.

Where an inhalation risk exists (due to hot equipment), a Type A (organic


vapour) respirator must be worn.

If removing the repaired equipment from site, store the leak repaired PCB oil
filled equipment on heavy duty plastic at the substation site.

All used personal protective equipment, absorbent mats / materials used when
handling equipment suspected of containing PCB must, on completion of the
task, be placed in a plastic disposal bag and sealed. These bags must be
placed in the designated container at the Western Power depot

Transporting oil filled equipment

Repair all leaks on oil filled equipment prior to transportation.

Two part putty repair kit Powerpatch (Adapt Australia T 92744277) is to be


used.

Leaks must be isolated by inserting putty, wiping the area dry and preparing
the metal surface by sanding for the application of the two pack compounds
over the putty. Mix compounds in separate containers to enable further multiple
repairs with remaining compound.

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6.1 Leaking oil filled equipment

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Transport oil filled equipment, labelled PCB free, directly to Western Power
Transmission Maintenance depot at Kewdale for repair, refurbishment or
scrapping. The relevant paperwork must accompany the equipment.

PCB mineral oil

Transport all oil filled equipment labelled Contains schedule/non-scheduled


PCB directly to Western Powers preferred supplier for PCB treatment and
disposal.

Contact environment@westernpower.com.au to arrange transportation.

Do not store PCB oil filled transmission substation equipment at a Western


Power Depot.

References

Department of Environment Guidelines for acceptance of solid waste to landfill.

Material safety data sheet for transformer oil.

Western Power procedure for handling, storage, transport and disposal /


treatment of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).

Western Power policy for return and refurbishment of distribution transformers.

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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6.2

Environmentally sensitive areas (ESA)

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for any work undertaken in or
near an environmentally sensitive area.
Overview

The Western Power environmentally sensitive area program ensures


employees and contractors are informed of areas that require special
considerations or precautions to be taken prior to, and during, work at Western
Power work sites, facilities or adjacent land.

Environmentally sensitive areas are clearly defined by the placement of


reflective green signs and strips on poles and gates in or near those areas.

Environmentally sensitive areas include those containing:

Rare fauna habitats.

Declared Rare and Priority Listed Flora.

Threatened Ecological Community.

Declared weeds.

Organic farms.

Specific dieback-affected areas.

Parks and conservation covenants.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 6.2 Environmentally


sensitive areas

DM7856742, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Pre-planning

When a work package or job card is received, determine whether the work will
be carried out near an environmentally sensitive area.

If the work is to be carried out near an environmentally sensitive area,


determine the site-specific Environmentally Sensitive Area Number and
contact the Environment Section to request procedures and provide details of
the type of work, the location of the work and the site-specific Environmentally
Sensitive Area Number.

Written environmentally sensitive areas procedures must be obtained prior to


commencing work in or near an environmentally sensitive area by contacting
the

Western

Power

Environment

Section

on

0419

987

954

or

environment@westernpower.com.au.
Entering and leaving environmentally sensitive areas
When entering an environmentally sensitive area:

Follow instructions issued by the Environment Section and when provided, the
Department of Environment and Conservation.

Use sealed roads where possible.

Clean down vehicles and footwear before entering an organic farm.

Avoid driving on vegetation in an environmentally sensitive area.

When leaving an environmentally sensitive area:

Follow instructions issued by the Environment Section and when provided, the
Department of Environment and Conservation.

Clean down vehicles and footwear if the environmentally sensitive area


contains declared weeds or dieback.

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Section 6.2 Environmentally


sensitive areas

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Unplanned maintenance

When conducting unplanned construction or maintenance activities in an


environmentally sensitive area, take all precautionary measures to prevent soil
movement or disturbance.

Incidents

If a notifiable environmental incident occurs during work in or near an


environmentally sensitive area, contact NOCC on 08 9427 0626.

Notifiable environmental incidents include any incident which, as a


consequence of Western Powers work, causes damage or has the potential to
cause damage to the environment.

Complete a Guardian Notification Form when a notifiable environmental


incident occurs. Note: The form must be submitted to the Formal Leader within
24 hours of the incident.

Substation Environmentally Sensitive Areas


There are many environmentally sensitive areas along transmission lines. Four (4)
of these environmentally sensitive areas are also in or adjacent to substations.
These substations and their access procedures are listed below. If work must be
carried out within the environmentally sensitive area or any additional information is
required regarding these areas, please contact Western Power Environmental
Section, 0419 987 954, environment@westernpower.com.au
Cannington Terminal:
Environmental Issue:

Conservation wetland, rare plants and threatened


ecological community

Procedure for access:

Ensure no disturbance to wetland and native vegetation to


the north and east of the substation fence.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 6.2 Environmentally


sensitive areas

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Kemerton Substation
Environmental issue:

Rare plants

Procedure for access:

Access the substation using the existing limestone track


only. No off track driving.

Bridgetown Substation
Environmental issue:

Declared weed - Pattersons curse (purple flower).


Western Power spray substation annually to eradicate the
weed.

Procedure for access:

When leaving, brush down boots, vehicle and any


equipment that may have come into contact with the weed,
just outside the entrance to the substation.

Cataby Substation
Environmental issue:

Dieback. The Tiwest Cooljarloo mineral sands mine


operates under a Dieback Management Plan that requires
all vehicles and machinery to enter the site clean (free
from dirt, mud and plant material). Vehicles must not
deviate from Western Power corridor.

Procedure for access:

Entry and exit to the substation is via the main entrance


wash down facility.

Report to the Tiwest Administration Office and notify


the Group Leader Environment, prior to passing
through the washdown bay.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Access under dry soil conditions, where possible.

Only drive to the substation and the site office.

Section 6.2 Environmentally


sensitive areas

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Emergency after hour access:

Prior to arrival, contact the North Mine Supervisor on


(08) 9690 9912 or 0419 942304 to notify intended
arrival and the reason/s for access.

Upon arrival, re-contact the supervisor.

Follow all instructions provided by the supervisor.

The Tiwest contact for environmental issues is Group


Leader Environment, Ph: (08) 9690 9200.

References

Western Power environmental procedure for assessing, registering, updating,


maintaining, reviewing and archiving assets near environmentally sensitive
areas.

Western Power environmental procedure for maintaining assets near


environmentally sensitive areas.

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Section 6.2 Environmentally


sensitive areas

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6.3

Treated poles

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for handling and disposing of
chemically treated poles and pole butts.
Overview

To prevent wood rot and termite attacks, Western Power has used or uses the
following chemicals to treat poles:

Tar (used 1940s 1976).


Organochlorine pesticides such as Dieldrin or Aldrin (used mid 1970s
early 1980s) as a pole mix with diesel.

Creosote (used 1980 1986).

Copper chromium arsenate (used in the early 1980s until now).

Chemical treatment rods (used since 1993).

Instructions

Avoid skin contact with treated poles and pole butts. When sawing, drilling,
handling and disposing of treated poles and pole butts, you must wear:

Class P2 dust mask

Approved safety glasses.

Leather gloves.

Overalls or long-sleeved shirt and trousers.

Safety footwear.

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Section 6.3

Treated poles

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Pole Ash

Stay upwind of burning treated poles to avoid smoke inhalation,

Do not touch or disturb burnt parts of treated pole, if possible,

Do not drive or walk through pole ash, if possible,

If it is necessary to make saw cuts on burnt poles, make them in the unburnt
sections where possible.

If pole ash can be seen in an environmentally sensitive area or where


customer complaints are likely, lightly wet down the ash with water and collect
it into a suitable sealed container. Do not collect it if it is still burning,

Transport the pole ash to the nearest depot and place it within a 205 litre steel
drum within the depots controlled waste storage area. Label the drum with a
controlled waste sticker and then inform Facilities Management.

Pole butts

Cut the butts of poles treated with pole mix or chemical treatment rods at a
location 300 mm above the pole mix stain or chemical treatment holes,

Remove treated poles, including pole butts from the site the same day you pull
them out,

Place treated poles, including pole butts in the redundant pole storage area at
the nearest depot.

References

Distribution Pole Inspection Manual.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.3

Treated poles

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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6.4

Dangerous goods safety

Purpose
This instruction outlines safe methods for handling, storing, transporting and
disposing of dangerous and explosive goods.
Overview

Dangerous and explosive goods include, but are not limited to:

Compressed oxygen or other gases.

Explosives.

Flammable liquids, i.e. petrol and diesel fuels.

Toxic and infectious substances including organochlorine pesticides,


arsenic trioxide and chlorpyrifos.

Corrosive substances such as caustic soda and hydrochloric acid.


Miscellaneous dangerous goods and articles including PCBs and
asbestos.

Read the relevant Materials Safety Data Sheets before handling, storing,
transporting or disposing of dangerous or explosive goods.

An emergency manifest is stored in a weatherproof cylinder at the main


entrance of all depots and work-sites where dangerous and explosive goods
are stored.

The emergency manifest is accessible to emergency services personnel, and


includes:

A list of the dangerous, explosive and hazardous goods stored at the depot or
work-site (along with accompanying dangerous and hazardous goods codes).

Maximum quantities stored.


A map of the site (with symbols) identifying the stored goods and their
locations, at the depot or work-site.

Date last reviewed.

Next review date.

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Section 6.4 Dangerous goods


safety

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Instructions
Prerequisites

Complete an appropriate training course before transporting dangerous and/or


explosive goods.

When working with dangerous and/or explosive goods, refer to ChemAlert or


the Materials Safety Data Sheets for the required personal protective
equipment, safe handling information and precautionary advice.

A Dangerous Goods Bulk License is required to transport dangerous goods in


bulk.

The transporting vehicle must be:

Licensed to transport dangerous goods in bulk (licenses are issued for a


period of 3 years - check currency).

Fitted with devices to secure the container/s.

Packing and storage of dangerous goods

Make sure all packages and containers are clearly marked.

Check all dangerous and/or explosive goods are packaged and stored in
accordance with the requirements in the Materials Safety Data Sheets.

Ensure all storage areas in environmentally sensitive areas are bunded.

Transportation of dangerous goods

Follow guidance notes for the Requirements for the Road Transport of
Explosives in Risk Category 1, 2 and 3 Quantities, issued by Department of
Mines and Petroleum.

Ensure all transported dangerous and/or explosive goods are packaged in a


fashion suitable for their safe haulage (and within the limits recorded in the
Materials Safety Data Sheets).

Always carry shipping documentation when the aggregate quantity of the


dangerous or explosive goods in the load is 25%, or more, of the placard load
limit for the goods.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 6.4 Dangerous goods


safety

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The transporting vehicle must display appropriate signage when transporting


dangerous goods in bulk, packaged dangerous goods and/or explosive goods.

When transporting dangerous goods in bulk, make sure the emergency


information panel relating to the goods is readable and clearly marked.

Disposal of dangerous goods

Dispose of dangerous and explosive goods in accordance with Controlled


Waste, in Section 6 of this Manual.

References

Western Power Environmental procedure for dangerous and explosive goods.


Department of Consumer and Employment Protection - Road Transport of
Dangerous Goods in Packages.

Australian Dangerous Goods Code (ADG7)

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Section 6.4 Dangerous goods


safety

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6.5

Handling contaminated soil from around removed poles

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for managing soil from around
removed poles.
Overview

To prevent wood rot and termite attacks, Western Power has used the
following chemicals to treat poles:

Tar (used 1940s-1976).


Organochlorine pesticides such as Dieldrin or Aldrin (used mid 1970searly 1980s) as a pole mix with diesel.

Creosote (used 1980-1986).

Copper chromium arsenate (used from the early 1980s to the present).

Chenical treatment rods (used since 1993).

Instructions

When removing a pole, wear appropriate personal protective equipment as


follows:

Approved safety glasses

Leather gloves.

Overalls or long-sleeved shirt and trousers.

Safety footwear.

Helmets as per Section 1 of this Manual.

When removing the pole, avoid skin contact with soil surrounding the pole.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.5 Handling


contaminated soil from around
removed poles

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After removing the pole, dig the soil immediately around the hole to a depth of
300mm and 400mm out from the hole
(1 metre from the hole for transmission poles).

Shovel the excavated soil back into the pole hole and compact every 300 mm
to within 300 mm of the top.

Fill the remaining 300 mm with clean soil and compact it until the soil is slightly
raised.

If the excavated soil cant be put back in the pole hole and can be reached by
animals or humans, remove it from the site by following Field instruction 11.10controlled waste.

Note: If the location of a removed pole will become part of a residential


development, contact the Pollution Group at pollution@westernpower.com.au

References

Distribution Pole Inspection Manual.

Western Power environmental procedure for disposal of redundant chemically


treated poles.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.5 Handling


contaminated soil from around
removed poles

DM7856904, Rev 0, Mar 2011

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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6.6

Lamps and fluorescent tube disposal

Purpose
This instruction outline the correct method to replace and dispose of lamps and
fluorescent tubes.
Instructions

When replacing or disposing of broken lamps and fluorescent tubes, wear:

Approved safety glasses.

Leather gloves.

Overalls or long-sleeved shirt and trousers.

Safety footwear.

Blown lamps should be placed in the box supplied with the replacement lamp
or within a sealed globe bag (UA#OC3107).

Blown fluorescent tubes should be placed in the box supplied with the
replacement fluorescent tube.

If the lamp or fluorescent tube is broken, put the broken glass and bayonet or
Edison screw base into a globe bag (UA#OC3107) and seal it.
Note:
Place all lamps and fluorescent tubes in the box supplied with the
replacement or within a padded globe bag.

Store boxed or bagged lamps, bayonets or Edison screw bases in the


designated globe recycling drum at the depot. When the drum is three quarters
full, inform Facilities Management at the depot.

Store boxed fluorescent tubes in a secure undercover storage area.

References

Department of Environment and Conservation Waste Management.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.6 Lamps and


fluorescent tube disposal

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fluorescent tube disposal

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6.7

Oil and chemical spills

Purpose
This instruction outlines how to respond to oil and chemical spills.
Instructions
The following Oil and Chemical Spill Card guides you on how to respond to oil and
chemical spills and includes who you must contact after the spill. You must follow
the Oil and Chemical Spill Card whenever a spill occurs.
OIL / CHEMICAL SPILL CARD
Is the oil/chemical spill:

a risk to public safety (i.e. on a road, pathway, etc)?


in or near a drain or water body (i.e. river, lake, etc)?

If yes, contact NOCC immediately on 9427 0626.


If no, report the spill as soon as you are able through
pollution@westernpower.com.au.
YOU MUST REPORT ALL SPILLS

Before reporting the spill, make the area as safe as possible.

Immediately after reporting the spill:

Control the spill (i.e. stop or isolate the source)

Contain the spill (follow spill kit instructions where available).

You must wear the following Personal Protective Equipment when responding
to a spill:

Safety glasses

Nitrile, PVC or leather gloves

Overalls or long sleeved shirt and trousers

Safety footwear

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Work Practice Manual

Section 6.7 Oil and Chemical


Spills

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Spills and spill cleanup is managed by the Pollution Group within the
Environment, Community Engagement and Approvals Branch. The Pollution
Group can be contacted on pollution@westernpower.com.au or 0437 900 737.

Reporting incidents into Guardian

You must report all spills in Guardian as an incident. Make sure you tick the
Environmental box in the Incident Details section.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 6.7 Oil and Chemical


Spills

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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6.8

Aboriginal artefacts

Purpose
This instruction outlines the appropriate steps to take when, during ground and
excavation activities, objects are discovered which might be Aboriginal in origin.
Instructions

When an object which may be Aboriginal in origin is discovered, immediately


inform the on-site person in charge.

The on-site person in charge must establish a No Work Zone around the site,
large enough to ensure the discovery will not be disturbed.
Note:
Work may continue outside the No Work Zone.

The on-site person in charge must contact NOCC (9427 0626) to advise them
of the discovery. (If NOCC cannot be reached, contact the Environment,
Community Engagement and Approvals Branch).

In turn, NOCC must contact the Environment, Community Engagement and


Approvals Branch, who will take over management of the discovery and
provide the on-site person in charge the appropriate management procedures
to follow.

The on-site person in charge must inform all personnel on site of the
Environment, Community Engagement and Approvals Branch procedures to
follow.

References

Western Power Environmental procedure for ground disturbance and


excavation activities when objects discovered are suspected of being of
Aboriginal origin (DM2772390).

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.8 Aboriginal artefacts

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6.9

PCBs in streetlight capacitors and choke boxes

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for safely removing, handling,
and storing streetlight capacitors and choke boxes containing PCBs.
Instructions
Personal protective equipment

When removing, handling and/or storing streetlight capacitors and choke boxes
containing PCBs, wear:

Approved safety glasses: non-conductive (non-metallic) medium-impact


frame.

Nitrile, PVC, or leather gloves.

Overalls or long-sleeved shirt and trousers.

Safety footwear.

Handling equipment containing PCBs

When handling streetlight capacitors and choke boxes containing PCBs, follow
the Material Safety Data Sheet procedures for working with PCBs.

Removal of equipment containing PCBs

When removing from service a streetlight and/or capacitor containing PCBs,


place the capacitor and associated choke box into a plastic bag of not less
than 150 microns and seal it.

Put the plastic bag containing the removed streetlight capacitor and/or choke
box into a suitable container for transportation.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 6.9 PCBs in streetlight


capacitors and choke boxes

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Storage at the depot

At the depot or workshop, store all plastic bags containing streetlight capacitors
and choke boxes in the undercover PCB drum provided for this purpose. That
drum must be kept closed.

When the PCB drum is three-quarters full, order a replacement PCB drum.

Arrange with the Environmental Land Management Branch to send the (three
quarters full) drum to the PCB Stores at Western Powers Welshpool
Substation.
Note:
Before transporting the PCB drum to the PCB Stores at Welshpool Substation,
the lid of the drum must be checked to ensure it has been sealed with silicon or
firmly secured.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.9 PCBs in streetlight


capacitors and choke boxes

DM7857346, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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6.10

Controlled waste

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for handling, storing,
transporting, and disposal of controlled waste.
Overview

There are designated storage areas for controlled waste at each Western
Power depot.

Controlled waste includes:

Acidic solutions or acids in solid form.

Asbestos.

Mercury.

Soil contaminated with a controlled waste (such as Aldrin or Dieldrin).

Oils and emulsions (including waste mineral insulating oils unfit for
intended use).

Polychlorinated biphenyls (includes waste, substances or articles


containing or contaminated with PCBs).

Paints and resins.

Solvents.

Organic and inorganic chemicals (detergents, pesticides, herbicides).

Acids (including nitric acid).

Alkalis.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.10 Controlled waste

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Instructions
Personal protective equipment

Before handling controlled waste refer to:

Relevant Material Safety Data Sheet stored on-site.

ChemAlert Ph 1800555477 or 93221711.

When handling, storing, transporting and disposing of controlled waste, wear


the following personal protective equipment:

Approved safety glasses: non-conductive (non-metallic) medium-impact


frame.

Nitrile, PVC or leather gloves.

Overalls or long-sleeved shirt and trousers.

Safety footwear.

Storage of controlled waste

Store controlled waste in its original packaging (or containers) when placing it
into designated storage containers at the depot.

Where this is not possible, place the controlled waste in appropriate


packing/containers (as per the Material Safety Data Sheet).
DANGER

DO NOT mix controlled wastes when storing.

Place controlled waste containers in the depots designated hardstand area.


Double-bag asbestos material before putting it in the on-site asbestos disposal
bin.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 6.10 Controlled waste

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Inform the Environment, Community Engagement and Approvals Branch (Ph


9326 6294) when controlled waste must be collected from a depot or
substation and they will arrange for a Department of Environment and
Conservation-licensed carrier company to collect the controlled waste and
dispose of it at an approved disposal site.

The Environment, Community Engagement and Approvals Branch will provide


further instructions to the on-site representative to ensure correct transfer of
the controlled waste from Western Power to the carrier.

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Section 6.10 Controlled waste

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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6.11

Erosion

Purpose
This instruction outlines how to minimise erosion and soil disturbance for planned
or unplanned construction or maintenance works.
Instructions

Follow an approved environmental management plan for new transmission


works.

Land

Keep the area of disturbance as small as possible for site works.

Reinstate all excavations, immediately following works.

If erosion is detected that could affect Western Power assets or stakeholder


properties, notify the Environment, Community Engagement and Approvals
Branch at environment@westernpower.com.au or phone 9326 6329, as soon
as possible.

Do not light or cause fires to be lit.


Follow any extra requirements for erosion control given by a Western Power
Environmental Officer

Water

When conducting works around water bodies, where possible be extra


cautious, as soils are less stable.

References

Western Power - Environmental Procedure for Soil Erosion, Soil Disturbance


and Land Degradation.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.11 Erosion

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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6.12

Native vegetation clearing and maintenance

Purpose
This instruction outlines what to do when the work may require clearance or
maintenance of native vegetation.
Overview
Native vegetation clearing is removal, damage or destruction of West Australian
native vegetation and can include driving over or trimming native plants.
Vegetation maintenance is work that keeps vegetation clear of power lines and
other assets.
To determine whether vegetation is native to Western Australia, contact the
Environment,

Community

Engagement

and

Approvals

Branch

at

environment@westernpower.com.au or phone 9326 6329 (Distribution) and 9425


5074 (Transmission).
Instructions

A clearing permit is not required for vegetation maintenance around existing


infrastructure that has live electrical conductors or equipment.

To obtain a clearing permit, contact the Environment, Community Engagement


and Approvals Branch at environment@westernpower.com.au or phone 9326
6329 (Distribution) and 9425 5074 (Transmission).

Do not exceed the clearing area described in the clearing permit.

Follow Western Power approved Environmental Management Plan and/or


other environmental conditions

If required to clear outside of the approved area, contact the Environment,


Community Engagement and Approvals Branch to modify the clearing permit.
Note: Although this may delay clearing, prosecution or personal fines may
apply for unauthorised clearing.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.12 Native vegetation


clearing and maintenance

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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If DEC markers are sighted which indicate rare plants are present in a road
reserve [yellow hockey sticks pointing in their direction]:

Stop work

Do not enter the area

Contact the Environment, Community Engagement and Approvals Branch


for advice.

Follow biosecurity instruction 6.13 to limit the spread of pests and diseases
(e.g. Phythophthora dieback or weeds).

Do not dispose of vegetation debris that may smother or crush existing


vegetation. For advice phone 9326 6329 (Distribution) and 9425 5074
(Transmission).

If any of the following occurs, immediately call NOCC (9427 0626) as it may
be a significant incident:

Clearing without a clearing permit.

Clearing outside the designated clearing area.

Clearing that

does

not

follow a Western Power

Environmental

Management Plan or agreed environmental conditions.

Actions that do not follow this instruction.

References

Western Power Environmental Instruction for vegetation clearing and


maintenance.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.12 Native vegetation


clearing and maintenance

DM7863613, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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6.13

Bio-security

Purpose
This instruction outlines the minimum requirements for bio security when working
on agricultural properties, in and around native vegetation and water bodies and
Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) Estate.
Instruction

Bio security threats to agricultural and natural environments include:

Environmental weeds.

Declared plants.

Plant diseases (including Phytophthora dieback).

Pests.

Stock disease including ticks, lice and other parasites.

Note: Clean on entry, Clean on exit

Agricultural property

Prior to entry, consult with the property owner, if contactable, to identify any bio
security issues.

DEC Estate

At least ten (10) days prior to entry, contact DEC office in the local area before
entering a DEC estate.

Discuss any relevant bio security threats and the

presence of Phytophthora dieback with the DEC officer. Obtain a Disease Risk
Area permit if entering a Disease Risk Area.

Plan to undertake works in dry soil conditions wherever possible.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Section 6.13 Biosecurity

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Before leaving the depot, familiarise yourself with all bio security permits and
plans, Disease Risk Area Permits, hygiene plans and/or Environmental
Management Plans. Ensure vehicles and equipment are clean and free of soil
and plant material prior to leaving the depot.

Entry

All vehicles, personnel, equipment, plant and machinery must be clean on


entry. Use clean down facilities at entry points, if available.

Agricultural property

Follow instructions on bio security signs or as given by the owner.


Avoid walking or driving through crops by using sealed roads, main access
tracks and fire breaks between and within properties.

Closed farm gates shall be closed after access/egress. Open gates shall be left
open.

DEC Estate

Follow instructions on biosecurity signs or as given by the DEC Officer.


Sealed roads and main access tracks shall be used when moving between and
within a DEC estate. Do not walk or drive through vegetation, if possible.

Exit

All vehicles, personnel, equipment, plant and machinery must be clean on exit.
Use clean down facilities at exit points, if available.

Report any plant or animal species which you suspect may be a declared pest
to the Environment, Community Engagement and Approvals Branch.

Obtain help
Contact the numbers below for assistance in:

Obtaining contact details for your local DEC office.

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Work Practice Manual

Section 6.13 Biosecurity

DM7863655, Rev 0, Mar 2011

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Complying with a DEC requirement (if you are unable to comply, or unsure of
how to comply).

Complying with a bio security sign.

Complying with an agricultural property owners instructions.


Environment, Community
Engagement and Approvals Branch

environment@westernpower.com.au

Distribution

9326 6329

Transmission

9425 5074

References

Western Power Environmental Instruction for Biosecurity (including


Pythopthora dieback) Maintenance and Construction DM#3029512

Western Power Environmental Instruction for Biosecurity (including


Pythopthora dieback) Project Design and Planning DM# 3030007

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Section 6.13 Biosecurity

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7.1

Licensing and authorisation

Purpose
The purpose of this instruction is to outline the requirements for the Network Total
Workforce (employees and contractors) Licensing and Authorisation who work
within Transmission Substations.
Instructions
Network Authority Card
All individuals requiring access to a Western Power Construction site (as defined
in the W.A. Occupational Safety and Health Regulations), will require a Network
authority card.

The Network Authority card is applicable to the Network Total Workforce.

The minimum requirements to access a Western Power site are:.

Basic First Aid.

OH&S Construction Induction Card (White Card).

Western Power Operational Induction.

Network Access Authority

Refer to section Four (4) of this manual for the requirements to gain access to
substations

It must be the exception and not the norm for a person to be escorted in a
substation to carry out work.

References

Western Powers Electrical System Safety Procedures.

http://www.docep.wa.gov.au/EnergySafety/Content/Licensing/Electrical_contra
ctors_and_workers/Licensing.html

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Work Practice Manual

Section 7.1 Licensing and


authorisation

DM7863826, Rev 0, Mar 2011

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Section 7.1 Licensing and


authorisation

DM7863826, Rev 0, Mar 2011

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Appendix 1 Tags and signs

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Appendix 1 Tags and signs

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Tags and signs


Do Not Operate tag

Information tag

Out of Service tag

Restricted Use tag

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Appendix 1 Tags and signs

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Inspection tag

Chemically treated against termites tag

Scaffolding tag

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Appendix 2 Standard forms

Document

DM Reference

Fire exemption review (this is a representation of the form)

7678094

Hazardous Workspace Entry Authority (Permit)

5236790

Notification of installation of high voltage earthing

5237319

Western Power public notice

5237308

Fall prevention equipment checklist

6783836

Ladder inspection checklist

4778786

Scaffold inspection data sheet

5236891

Plant hire sheet for contractor use

6617609

Electrical Access Permit

N/A

Sanction To Test

N/A

Vicinity Access

N/A

Operating Agreement

N/A

Network Access levels

N/A

Confined Space Entry Permit

6460100

Construction Authority Work Permit

N/A

Substation Entry Induction Form

N/A

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Fire exemption review


(this is a representation of the form)

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


6 of 62

Hazardous workspace entry authority (permit)


(this is a representation of the form)

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Appendix 2 Standard forms

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Hazardous workspace entry authority (permit)continued:


(this is a representation of the form)

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Appendix 2 Standard forms

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


8 of 62

Notification of installation of high voltage earthing


(this is a representation of the form)

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Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


9 of 62

Western Power public notice


(this is a representation of the form)

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Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms


Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
10 of 62

Fall prevention equipment checklist


(this is a representation of the form)

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Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms


Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
11 of 62

Inspection checklist for pole top rescue kits


(this is a representation of the form)

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Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms


Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
12 of 62

Ladder inspection checklist


(this is a representation of the form)

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Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms


Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
13 of 62

Scaffold inspection data


(this is a representation of the form)

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Appendix 2 Standard forms


Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
14 of 62

Plant hire sheet for contractor use combined elevated work platform & crane/borer
external hire checklist (this is a representation of the form)

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Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms


Reviewer: Dave Christmas

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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Work Practice Manual

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Network access levels


Authority

Function Level

Work Level

NA0

FSA

NA1 *

NPA

NA2*

NA3V
NA3T
NA3D
NA4T
NA4D
NA5V
NA5T
NA5D

VA only
T
D
T
D
VA only
T
D

RIC
TIC
IO

Legend
Function Level
FSA=Fully Supervised Access
NPA=No Permit Access
R=Recipient
RIC=Recipient In Charge
TIC=Tester In Charge
IO=Issuing Officer
NA1*=Substation Entry Authority 1 (SEA1)
NA2*=Substation Entry Authority 2 (SEA2)

Details of Access

Fully Supervised Access - On site induction, work requiring a


work permit (supervised by NA3) or no work permit
(supervised by level NA2). There is no authorisation for this
level of access.
No Permit Access - Not permitted to sign on/off work permits,
can only engage in work not requiring a work permit, can
access sites unescorted
Permit Recipient - Sign on/off permits, work under work permit
condition, can access sites unescorted.
Acceptance/relinquishment of VA work permits as RIC
Acceptance/relinquishment of EAP/VA work permits as RIC
Acceptance/relinquishment of STT work permits as TIC
Issue and cancellation of VA work permits as IO
Issue and cancellation of EAP/VA/STT work permits as IO
Work Level
T=Transmission
D=Distribution
Work Permits
EAP=Electrical Access Permit
VA=Vicinity Authority
STT=Sanction To Test

Network Access Level

NA0 (Continuous Full Supervision)


On site induction - no authority issued
NA1 (Non Permit)
NA1 - Distribution and Transmission
(Formerly Substation Access Level 1)
NA2 (Permit Recipient)
NA2 - Distribution and Transmission
(Formerly Substation Entry Level 2)
NA3 (Recipient In Charge - RIC)
NA3V - VA Only
NA3D - Distribution
NA3T - Transmission
NA4 (Tester In Charge - TIC)
NA4D - Distribution
NA4T - Transmission
NA5 (Issuing Officer)
NA5V - VA Only
NA5D - Distribution
NA5T - Transmission

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Purpose

Fully supervised access for either work requiring a permit or


work not requiring a permit.
Unsupervised access to network assets not requiring a
permit.
Capability to sign on and off permits as recipient for work on
or near network assets.
(Incorporates Network Access Level 1)
NA3V
Receive and relinquish VA only as Recipient In Charge to
work near network assets.
NA3D and NA3T
Receive and relinquish EAP or VA as Recipient In Charge to
work on or near network assets.
Receive and relinquish STT as tester in charge to test
network assets.
Issue/Cancel EAP, VA and STT permits.
(For future development)

Appendix 2 Standard forms

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Confined space entry permit


(this is a representation of the form)

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Appendix 2 Standard forms

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Confined space entry permitcontinued:


(this is a representation of the form)

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Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Construction authority work permit


(this is a representation of the form)

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Work Practice Manual

Appendix 2 Standard forms

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Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Construction Authority work permitcontinued:


(this is a representation of the form)

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Appendix 2 Standard forms

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Substation Entry Induction Form


This is a representation of the form

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton


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Appendix 3 Westrail data

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Appendix 3 Westrail data


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Westnet Rail areas

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Appendix 3 Westrail data


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Conductor weights

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Appendix 4 Emergency contacts information

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Appendix 4 Emergency
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Emergency - Metro Depots


Note: If dialling from an internal phone, remember to dial 0 first.
Emergency Switchboard in Perth (Fire, Police, Ambulance): 000
Police Switchboard (Non Emergency): 131 444 Poisons Information Service (24 hours): 131 126

Jandakot Prinsep Road


Doctor
Jandakot Medical Centre
1/5 Berrigan Drv South Lake 6164
(08) 9417 3233
Hospital
St John Of God Health Care Murdoch
(Private), 100 Murdoch Drv 6150
(08) 9366 1111
Police
120 Murdoch Drv Murdoch 6150
(08) 9313 9000
Mandurah
Doctor
Dudley Park Medical Centre
265 Pinjarra Rd Mandurah WA 6210
(08) 9535 4644
Hospital
Peel Health Campus (Private &
Public)
110 Lakes Rd Mandurah 6210
(08) 9531 8000
Police
333 Pinjarra Rd Mandurah 6210
(08) 9581 0222
Waroona Depot
Doctor
Waroona Doctors Surgery
117 South Western Hwy W.A 6215
(08) 9733 1461
Hospital
Murray Hospital
McKay St, Pinjarra
(08) 9531 7222
Police
9 Recreation Road, Waroona
(08) 9733 1230
Site:
Contact Rob Deleo
Phone: 9733 1053 Mobile: 0439 977
615

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Kewdale
Doctor
Healthpoint Belmont Medical Centre
4/321 Abernethy Rd Cloverdale 6105
(08) 9479 1555
Hospital
Royal Perth Hospital (Public)
Wellington St Perth 6000
(08) 9224 2244
Police
273 Abernethy Rd Belmont 6104
(08) 9424 2700
Mount Claremont
Doctor
Mt Claremont Medical Centre
32 Strickland St Mt Claremont 6010
(08) 9384 0950
Hospital
Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (Private)
Hospital Ave Nedlands 6009
(08) 9346 3333
Police
379 Cambridge St Wembley 6014
(08) 9387 6777

Power Training Services


Doctor
Jandakot Medical Centre
1/5 Berrigan Drv South Lake 6164
(08) 9417 3233
Hospital
St John Of God Health Care Murdoch
(Private), 100 Murdoch Drv 6150
(08) 9366 1111
Police
120 Murdoch Drv, Murdoch 6150
(08) 9313 9000
Stirling / Balcatta
Doctor
Stirling Central Medical Group
Victoria Rd (cnr Wanneroo Rd)
Balcatta
(08) 9440 5300
Hospital
Royal Perth Hospital (Public)
Wellington St Perth 6000
(08) 9224 2244
Police
Warwick 37 Eddington Rd 6024
(08) 9246 8333

Forrestfield
Doctor
Healthpoint Belmont Medical Centre
4/321 Abernethy Rd Cloverdale 6105
(08) 9479 1555
Hospital
Royal Perth Hospital (Public)
Wellington St Perth 6000
(08) 9224 2244
Police
273 Abernethy Rd Belmont 6104
(08) 9424 2700
Site:
Chief Fire Warden Doug Dixon
Phone: 9359 7543 Mobile: 0417 951
437

Appendix 4 Emergency
contacts information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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Emergency -

North Country depots

Note: If dialling from an internal phone, remember to dial 0 first.


Emergency Switchboard in Perth (Fire, Police, Ambulance): 000
Police Switchboard (Non Emergency): 131 444 Poisons Information Service (24 hours): 131 126
Geraldton
Doctor
Lester Ave Geraldton WA 6530
(08) 99 20 8111
Hospital
St John Of God Health Care
Geraldton (Private)
Hermitage St (cnr Cathedral
Avenue) Geraldton
(08) 99 65 8888
Geraldton Regional Hospital
Shenton Street Geraldton
(08) 99 56 2222
Police
Geraldton Police Station (24
hours)
21 Marine Terrace Geraldton WA
6530
(08) 99 23 4555

Three Springs
Doctor
No Permanent Dr Locum Only Three Springs Medical Centre
Thomas Street Springs WA 6519
(08) 99 541013
Hospital:
North Midlands District Hospital
Thomas Street Three Springs WA 6519
(08) 99 543200
Police
Three Springs Police Station
Carter Street Three Springs WA 6519
(08) 99 541016

Jurien Depot
Doctor
Jurien Bay Medical Centre
Whitfield Street Jurien Bay WA 6516
(08) 96 521484
Hospital
Closest Hospitals are Moora, Three
Springs and
Dongara-Eneabba-Mingenew Public
Hospital
48 Blenheim Rd, DONGARA, WA,
6525
(08) 9927 0200
Police
Jurien Bay Police Station
Bashford Street Jurien Bay
(08) 96 521017

Moora
Doctor
Moora Doctors Surgery
Dandaragan Street
(08) 96 511433
Hospital
Moora Hospital
Dandaragan Street
(08) 96 511403
Police
Moora Police Station
Roberts Street
(08) 96 511106

Northam
Doctor
Grey Street Surgery
Grey Street
(08) 9622 1599
Hospital
Northam Regional Hospital
Robinson Street
(08) 9690 1300
Police
Northam Police Station
Gairdner Street
(08) 9622 4260

Merredin
Doctor
Merredin Medical Centre
91 Todd Street, Merredin, WA
6415
(08) 9041 5588
Hospital
Merredin Health Service
Kitchener Road,
Merredin WA 6415
(08) 9081 3222
Police
Merredin Police Station
22 Mitchell Street, Merredin, WA
6415
(08) 9041 2945

Southern Cross
Doctor
Southern Cross Medical Centre
Achernar Street, Southern Cross, WA
6426
(08) 9049 1321
Hospital
Southern Cross Hospital
Coolgardie Road, Southern
Cross WA 6426
(08) 9081 2222
Police
Southern Cross Police Station
Canopus Street, Southern Cross, WA
6426
(08) 90491144

Koorda
Doctor
Nursing Post
Allenby Street
9684 1288
Hospital
Wyalkatchem-koorda District Hospital
Honour Avenue Wyalkatchem WA
6485
(08) 9681 1000
Police
Koorda Police Station
36 Haig Street Koorda WA 6475
(08) 9684 1241
Kalgoorlie
Doctor
Plaza Medical, 335 Hannan St, 9021
3988
Lamington Medical, 18 Addis St, 9021
3022
Boulder Medical, 49 Burt St, 9093
1044
Hospital
Kalgoorlie Hospital
Piccadilly Street, Kalgoorlie WA 6430
(08) 9080 5888
Police
Kalgoorlie Police Station
31-33 Dugan Street, Kalgoorlie, WA
6430
(08) 9021 9777

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contacts information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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Emergency -

South Country depots

Note: If dialling from an internal phone, remember to dial 0 first.


Emergency Switchboard in Perth (Fire, Police, Ambulance): 000
Police Switchboard (Non Emergency): 131 444 Poisons Information Service (24 hours): 131 126
Picton
Hospital
Bunbury Regional Hospital
(Public)
Bussell Hwy (cnr Robertson Rd)
Bunbury 6230
(08) 9722 1000
Police
76-78 Wittenoom St Bunbury
6230
(08) 9722 2111
Site
Chief Warden Trish James
Ph: 9780 6372
Fire Warden Sandra Hale
Ph: 9780 6370
Fire Warden Mark Wells
Ph: 9780 6379
Fire Warden Ralph McColl
Ph: 9780 6310
Fire Warden Megan Buswell
Ph: 9780 6330
Fire Warden Greg Blake
Ph: 9780 6325
Fire Warden Richard Oxford
Ph: 9780 6315
Bridgetown
Hospital
Bridgetown District (Public)
Peninsula Rd Bridgetown 6255
(08) 9782 1222
Police
24-26 Steere St Bridgetown
(08) 9761 1666
Site
Fire Warden Ken McLernon
Ph: 9761 0327

Margaret River
Hospital:
Margaret River District (Public)
Farrelly St Margaret River 6285
(08) 9757 2000
Police
20 Willmott Ave Margaret River 6285
(08) 9757 2222
Site
Fire Warden Paul Ablett
Ph: 9757 9071

Albany
Hospital
Albany Regional Hospital (Public)
Warden Ave (cnr Hardie Rd) Albany
(08) 9892 2222
Police
210 Stirling Tce Albany 6330
(08) 9892 9300
Site
Fire Warden Michelle Miller
Ph: 9841 0826
Fire Warden Kim West

Collie
Hospital
Collie District Hospital (Public)
Deakin St Collie 6225
(08) 9735 1333
Police
Wittenoom St Collie
(08) 9734 1444
Site

Jerramungup
Nursing Post
Nursing Post (Public)
Kokoda Rd Jerramungup 6337
(08) 9821 1011
Police
Vaux St Ongerup
(08) 9828 2172
Site

Narrogin
Hospital:
Narrogin District Hospital (Public)
Williams Rd Narrogin 6312
(08) 9881 0333
Police:
Earl St Narrogin
(08) 9881 1911
Site:
Fire Warden Bill Rybarczyk
Ph: 0428934654

Kondinin
Hospitial:
Graham Street, Kondinin, WA, 6367
(08) 9889 1000
Police:
Stubbs Street, Kondinin, WA, 6367
(08) 9889 1100
Site:

Busselton
Hospital:
Busselton District (Public)
Mill Rd Busselton 6280
(08) 9754 0333
Police:
20 Stanley St Busselton 6280
(08) 9754 9555
Site:
Fire Warden Ruth Green
Ph: 0427473145

Katanning
Hospital:
Katanning District (Public)
Clive St Katanning 6317
(08) 9821 1011
Police:
Clive St Katanning
(08) 9821 1888
Site:
Fire Warden Rod Zilm
Ph: 0429927125

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contacts information
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Shire Contact Numbers


Shire Council

Telephone

After Hours

Albany
Augusta-Margaret River
Beverley
Boddington
Boyup Brook
Bridgetown-Greenbushes
Brookton
Broomehill / Tambellup
Bruce Rock
Bunbury
Busselton
Capel
Carnamah
Chapman Valley
Chittering
Collie
Coolgardie
Coorow
Corrigin
Cranbrook
Cuballing
Cunderdin
Dalwallinu
Dandaragan
Dardanup
Denmark
Donnybrook-Balingup
Dowerin
Dumbleyung
Geraldton Greenough
Gingin
Gnowangerup
Goomalling
Gosnells
Harvey
Irwin
Jerramungup
Kalamunda
Kalgoorlie-Boulder
Katanning
Kellerberrin
Kojonup
Kondinin

9841 9333
9780 5255
9646 1200
9883 4999
9765 1200
9761 1555
9642 1106
9825 1002
9061 1377
9792 7000
9781 0444
9727 0222
9951 7000
9920 5011
9576 4600
9734 9000
9080 2111
9952 0100
9063 2203
9826 1008
9883 6031
9635 1005
9661 0500
9652 0800
9724 0000
9848 0300
9780 4200
9631 1202
9863 4012
9956 660
9575 2211
9827 1007
9629 1101
9391 3222
9729 0350
9927 0000
9835 1022
9257 9999
9021 9600
9821 9999
9045 4006
9831 1066
9889 1066

9841 9349
0409 805 255
9646 1390
0428 838 025
0428 611 125
9642 1117
9825 1114
9061 1230
9792 7000
9781 0444
0417 953 959
0427 511 186
0429 205 011
0427 576 127
0408 931 274
0407 479 035
0428 521 106
0429 632 203
0427 261 008
0427 836 031
0427 991 000
0427 611 001
0419 937 203
0419 918 287
0429 482 244
0417 180 423
0429 311 202
9863 4151
9956 6600
0408 943 576
9827 1283
9629 1210

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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
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0419 047 528


0427 110 237
9835 1075
0428 688 381
9021 9600
0409 891 645
9637 1130
9831 1368
9889 1206

Koorda
Kulin
Lake Grace
Mandurah
Manjimup
Merredin
Mingenew
Moora
Morawa
Mount Marshall
Mukinbudin
Mullewa
Mundaring
Murray
Nannup
Narembeen
Narrogin
Northam
Northampton
Nungarin
Perenjori
Pingelly
Plantagenet
Quairading
Ravensthorpe
Serpentine-Jarrahdale
Swan
Tambellup / Broomehill
Tammin
Three Springs
Toodyay
Trayning
Victoria Plains
Wagin
Wandering
Waroona
West Arthur
Westonia
Wickepin
Williams
Wongan-Ballidu
Woodanilling
Wyalkatchem
Yilgarn
York
Bureau of Meteorology
FESA
Department of Environment and Conservation

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Work Practice Manual

Appendix 4 Emergency
contacts information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

9684 1219
9880 1204
9890 2500
9550 3777
9771 7777
9041 1611
9928 1102
9651 1401
9971 1204
9685 1202
9047 1102
9961 1007
9290 6666
9531 7777
9756 1018
9064 7308
9881 1866
9622 6100
9934 1202
9046 5006
9973 1002
9887 1066
9892 1111
9645 1001
9839 0000
9526 1111
9267 9267
9825 1002
9637 1101
9954 1001
9574 2258
9683 1001
9628 7004
9861 1177
9884 1056
9733 7800
9736 2222
9046 7063
9888 1005
9885 1005
9671 1011
9823 1506
9681 1166
9049 1001
9641 2233
1300 659 213
9323 9300
9334 0375
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9684 1360
9880 1023
0429 651 101
9550 3630
6454 4600
0427 413 450
0429 111 354
0428 511 808
9971 1025
9685 1317
9047 1213
9961 1180
9290 6666
0408 081 898
0427 062 940
9064 7320
9881 1246
9574 4555
0427 341 202
9046 5042
9973 1120
0429 887 106
0419 042 237
9645 1001
0427 264 377
0428 955 471
0416 001 350
9825 1114
9637 1550
0429 111 354
9574 4555
0428 831 035
9628 7115
0429 611 493
9884 1023
9733 1947
9736 1222
9046 7082
9888 1445
0419 941 829
0428 322 123
0429 108 140
0429 960 000
9049 1230

000
9334 0375

Appendix 5 Western Power facilities information

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Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
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Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
44 of 62

SOCC and NOCC numbers


Description

Telephone

NOCC Coordinator

9427 0637

NOCC North Metro General

9427 0612

NOCC North Country General

9427 0604

NOCC South Metro General

9427 0615

NOCC South Country General

9427 0608

SOCC Generation Desk

9427 4288

SOCC Bulk Transmission Desk

9427 4287

SOCC Regional Transmission Desk

9427 4339

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
45 of 62

Depot locations
Depot

Address

Albany

27-31 Chesterpass Rd, Albany, WA 6330

Region

Bridgetown

58 Nelson St, Bridgetown, WA, 6225

South

Busselton

32 Cook St, Busselton, WA, 6229

South

Collie

1347 Patstone Road, Collie, WA, 6225

South

Forrestfield

6 Hillary Place, Forrestfield, WA, 6058

Metro

Geraldton

350 Eighth St, Woorree, WA, 6531

North

Jandakot

85 Prinsep Rd, Jandakot, WA, 6164

Metro

Jerramungup

Newton Street, Jerramungup, WA, 6337

South

Jurien

Lot 261 Carmella St, Jurien Bay, WA, 6516

North

South

Kalbarri

Lot 261 Walker Street, Kalbarri, WA, 6536

North

Kalgoorlie

149 Great Eastern Highway, West Kalgoorlie, WA, 6430

North

Katanning

3 Kojonup Road, Katanning, WA, 6317

South

Kewdale

500 Abernethy Road, Kewdale, WA, 6105

Metro

Kondinin

1 Notting Road, Kondinin, WA, 6367

South

Koorda

20542 Ross Road, Koorda, WA, 6475

North

Mandurah

22 Husband Road, Barragup, WA, 6210

Metro

Margaret River

Lot 59 Willmott Avenue, Margaret River, WA, 6285

South

Merredin

Coombes Drive, Merredin, WA, 6415

North

Moora

Lot 3 Berkshire Valley Road, Moora, WA, 6510

North

Mt Claremont

11 John XXIII Avenue, Mt Claremont, WA, 6010

Metro

Narrogin

1282 Booth Street, Narrogin, WA, 6312

South

Northam

Lot 14 Northam-York Road, Northam, WA, 6401

North

Picton

Boyanup-Picton Road, Picton, WA, 6229

South

Power Training Services

Training Place, Jandakot, WA, 6164

Metro

Southern Cross

1435 Bullfinch Road, Southern Cross, WA, 6426

North

Stirling

Corner Wanneroo Road and Balcatta Road, Balcatta, WA, 6021

Metro

Three Springs

Perenjori Road, Three Springs, WA, 6519

North

Waroona

Lot 26 McClarty Street, Waroona, WA, 6215

Metro

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
46 of 62

Appendix 5 Substation locations


Description

Phone No

Street

Town / Suburb

Nearest Cross
Street

Branch

Shire

Imperial Street

South
Country
South Metro

Albany

South
Country
South Metro

Murray

Albany 132/22kv

9841 1343

Albany Hwy

Albany

Alcoa Kwinana

9410 3111

Naval Base

Alcoa Pinjarra

9531 6850

Amherst Street
132/22kv
Anderson Street
66/22kv

9335 1973
9173
1659

Off Cockburn
Road
Pipeline
Road
Amherst
Street
Anderson
Street

Arkana
132/22kv

9349 3171

Arkana Road

Balga

Walderton Ave

North Metro

Stirling

Australian Fused
Materials 132kv
Australian Paper
Mills
66/22kv
Baandee
Substation
B.P. 66/22kv

9438 8827

East Rockingham

Patterson Road

South Metro

Rockingham

9418 1307

Alumina
Road
Sudlow Road

Bibra Lake

Phoenix Road

South Metro

Cockburn

Southcott
Road
Mason Road

Baandee

9419 2962

Great Eastern
Hwy
Rockingham
Road

James Ct
Marriott
Road

Kwinana
Wellesley

Railway
Parade
Beechboro
Nth. Road

B.P.Refinery
Barrack Silicon
Beckenham
132/25kv
Beechboro
132/22kv

9797 2088

9279 9175

Beenup 132kv

9758 2519

Belmont 132/22kv
Bennet Street
132/22kv

9277 3082

Bentley 132kv
BHP Kwinana
Bibra Lake
Bluewaters
Power Station
330kv
Bluewaters
Terminal 330kv

(82) 3243

(82) 3315

9499 5411

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Oakley
Fremantle
Port Hedland

Pilbara
Power

Fremantle
Port Headland

North Metro

Kellerberrin

South Metro

Kwinana

Mason Road
Devlin Street

South Metro
South
Country

Kwinana
Harvey

East Cannington

Station Street

North Metro

Canning

Morley

Wandoo Road

North Metro

Kwinana

Off Scott
River Road
Alexander
Road

Belmont

McKay
Street

Bentley

Leath Road
Morse Road
Boys Home
Road
Access From
Boys Home
Road

Refinery
Complex
Stevens Street

Kwinana

Margaret
River/Augusta

Paget Road
Belgravia
Street

South
Country

Bayswater
Augusta Margaret River

South Metro

Belmont

South Metro

Victoria Park

Naval Base

Marquis Street
Sth Of Beard
Street

South Metro

Kwinana

Bibra Lake

Wellard Street

North Metro

Cockburn

Palmer

Williams Collie
Road

South
Country

Collie

South
Country

Collie

Palmer

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
47 of 62

Description

Black Flag132/33kv

Phone No

042 910
6786

Boddington
132/22kv

9499 5458

Boulder 132/33kv

9093 1925

Bounty 132/33kv

9039 4425

Bridgetown
132/22kv
Bulgarra 132/11kv
Bunbury Harbour
132/22kv
Bunbury Power
Station

Street

Black FlagOra Banda


Road
Old Soldiers
Road - On
Boddington
Mine Site
Fimiston
Street
Forestania
Southern
Cross Road

End Of Soldiers
Road

South
Country

Boddington

Goldfields

Kalgoorlie Boulder

Jilbaldji
Reserve

Goldfields Hwy
Hyden
Norseman
Road
Sth Western
Hwy

Boulder

Karratha

9499 5486

Byford 132/22kv
Canning Vale
132/22kv
Cannington Terminal
Cape Lambert Power
Station
Cape Lambert
33/132/220kv

9525 1392
9455 1404
9458 2980

Vulcan Road
Liege Street

Vittoria
Vittoria

9727 2142

9651 4116

Central Park 11kv

9322 5721

Chapman 132/11kv
Chidlow

9938 2163

Bussell
H'way
Carrabin
South Road
W Brand
Hwy
St. Georges
Terrace
Chapman
Valley Road

Kondinin

South
Country

Bridgetown Greenbushes

Victoria Pk

Estuary Dve
Great Eastern
Hwy

Vasse

Boallia Road

South Metro
South
Country

Byford

George Street

South Metro

Canningvale
Cannington

Magnet Road
Grose Ave

South Metro
South Metro
Pilbara
Power
Pilbara
Power
South
Country
North
Country

Capel
Carrabin

Cooljarloo

Tuart Dr
Off Railway
Line
Nth Of
Cooljarloo
Road

Perth

William Street

Geraldton

Nerrel Street

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

North
Country

Pilbara
Power
South
Country
South
Country

Finnerty Street
Koombana
Dve

9187 1771

Carrabin 66/22kv

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Boddington

Millstream
Road

Busselton 66/22kv

Cataby 132/33kv

Kalgoorlie Boulder

9185 1101

9781 4200

Shire

Goldfields

Hester

Burswood 66/22kv

Branch

Kalgoorlie

Hester Road

972 1791

Nearest Cross
Street
Turn Off
Approx 20kms
From Kalgoorlie
On
Meekatharra
Road

9761 1843

Estuary Dve
Leshenault
Road
Burswood
Road
Rendezvous
Road
Thomas
Road

Capel 66/22kv

Town /
Suburb

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
48 of 62

Roebourne
Bunbury
Bunbury
Victoria Park
Busselton
Serpentine
Jarrahdale
Canning
Canning
Roebourne
Roebourne
Capel
Westonia

North
Country

Dandaragan

Metro
North
Country

Perth
Geraldton Greenough

Description

Phone No

Clarence Street
66/11kv

9367 2125

Clarkson 132//22kv
Cockburn Cement
132/22kv
Cockburn Cement
Limited
Cockburn Power

(82) 1262
9410 1638

9411 2740

Collie Power Station

94995494

Collie 66/22kv

9734 1889

Collier 66/11kv
Cook Street
132/11kv

9367 4440
9321 9096

Coolup 66/22kv
Cottesloe 132kv

9530 3224
9384 2666

Cottesloe 66/6.6kv

9384 2666

Street

Clarence
Street
Quinn's
Road
Holmes
Road
Holmes
Road
Leath Road
Boys Home
Road
Patsone
Road
Morrison
Street

South Perth

Nearest Cross
Street

Branch

Shire

Onslow Street
Cnr Hidden
Valley Retreat

South Metro

South Perth

Clarkson

North Metro

Wanneroo

Munster

Russell Road

South Metro

Cockburn

Munster
Kwinana

Cockburn
Kwinana

Palmer

Russell Road
Beard Street
Off Williams
Road

Collie

Rowlands Road

South Metro
South Metro
South
Country
South
Country

Como

Thelma Street

South Metro

South Perth

Cook Street

West Perth

Valli Road
Curtin Ave

Coolup
Cottesloe

Thomas Street
Off Sth West
Hwy
Jarrad Street

North Metro
South
Country
South Meto

Murray
Cottesloe

Cottesloe
Kwinana
Beach

Jarrad Street

South Metro

Cottesloe

Port Road
Second Street

Geraldton

Hudman Road
Opp George
Road

South Metro
North
Country
Pilbara
Power
Pilbara
Power
North
Country
North
Country

Kwinana

Cunderdin

Mundaring
Geraldton Greenough

East Perth

Joel Tce

North Metro

Vincent

East Perth

Opp Joel Tce

North Metro

Vincent

CSBP132/22kv

9419 0892

Cunderdin 66/22kv
Dampier Main
(Hamersley Iron)

9635 1283

Curtin Ave
Kwinana
Beach Road
Cubbine
Street

Dampier 33/132kv

9183 1474

Off Parker Pt
Road

Darlington 32/22kv
Durlacher Street
33/11kv

9299 6851

East Perth 132kv

9427 4306

East Perth 66kv


East Rockingham
(Erm)

9427 4305

Edgewater (Westrail)
Edmund Street
66/11kv

9326 2218

9921 0343

Town /
Suburb

Victor Road
Durlacher
Street
Summers
Street
Summers
Street

Dampier
Darlington

Collie
Collie

Perth

Cunderdin
Roebourne
Roebourne

Edgewater

Joondalup

North Metro

Joondalup

9335 2324

George Grey
Pl
Stevens
Street

Fremantle

Edmund Street

South Metro

Fremantle

Main 9425
1212
Backup
0427 991
380
Control
Room
9425 1213

Bibby Road

Nambung

Brand Hwy

Emily Ann 132kv

Emu Downs

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
49 of 62

North
Country

Dandaragan

Description

Phone No

Eneabba132 / 33kv

9952 9024

Esperance 33kv
Finucane Island
66/6.6kv
Flynn Drive
132/22kv
Forrestdale

Street

25km South
Of Eneabba
Harbour
Road
Finucane
Island

Town /
Suburb

Eneabba

Nearest Cross
Street

Branch

Off Brand
Highway

North
Country

Esperance
Pilbara
Power

Forrest Ave

East Perth

Dubs Close

Forrestfield

Wellington
Street
Abernethy
Road

Eighth Street
Training
Place
55kms From
Yalgoo On
Rhs Of
YalgooPaynes Find
Road
Crandon
Street

Woorree

Stirling Crs

9325 8741
018 942
732

Geraldton132 / 33kv

9921 3339

Glen Iris

(82) 3235

Golden Grove

9961 0342

Gosnells132 / 22kv
Guildford Terminal
330/132kv

9398 2834
(132kv)
9250 5330
(330KV)
92508160

Hadfields132 / 22kv

9279 2704

Railway
Parade

Hay Street 132/11kv

9325 4429

Hay Street

Hazelmere
Hedland 220/66kv
Terminal
Henley Brook
132/22kv
Herdsman Pde
66/6.6kv
HISMELT 132kv
(Customer S/S)

(82) 3245

Hazelmere

9387 5178

Central Ave
Whim Creek
Road
Barrambie
Road
Herdsman
Pde

9410 2411

Hopelands Terminal
James Street
132kv
Jandakot Training
Centre

Carnamah
Esperance

Port Hedland

Forrest Ave 66/11kv


Forrestfield132 /
22kv

Shire

Port Hedland

North Metro

Port Hedland

Jenark Road

South Metro
North
Country

Kalamunda
Geraldton Greenough

Jandakot

Hope Road

South Metro

Cockburn

Yalgoo

Find Wagga
Wagga Road

North
Country

Gosnells

Walter Street.

South Metro

Gosnells

Midland

Central Ave

North Metro

Swan

Bassendean

Iolanthe Street.

North Metro

Bassendean

Perth

North Metro

Perth

North Metro
Pilbara
Power

Swan

Port Hedland

Pier Street.
Bushmead
Road
N/W Coast
Highway

Port Hedland

Henley Brook

Lord Street

North Metro

Swan

Jersey Street.
Sth Of Beard
Street

North Metro

Cambridge

Leath Road

Wembley
Kwinana
Beach

South Metro

Kwinana

James Street
Linesman
Line

Northbridge

Shenton Street

9411 7878

Jandakot

North Metro
South
Country

Cockburn

Joel Terrace 66/11kv

9328 8318

Joel Tce

East Perth

Summers
Street

Kalamunda 132/22kv

9293 1853

Wilkins Road
Walker
Street

Kalamunda

Lewis Road

Kalbarri

Magee Cres

9172 3445
(82) 1273

Yalgoo

Hocking

Kalbarri

33/6.6kv

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

North Metro

Vincent

South Metro
North
Country

Kalamunda

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
50 of 62

Perth

Northampton

Description

Karratha Terminal
132kv
Katanning
66/22kv
Kadathinni
Terminal
Kellerberrin
66/22kv
Kemerton
330/132kv

Kemerton Power
Station
Kenwick Link
Connector
330/132kv
Kerr McGee
Minerals Kwinana
Kerr McGee
Minerals Cataby
Kerr McGee
Minerals Muchea
Kewdale
Kojonup
132/66/22kv
Kondinin
220/33kv

Phone No

9185 2918
9821 1312

9045 4044
9720 1378
330kv
Yard 9499
5479
Control
9729 0821

Karratha
Road
Kojonup
Road
Lot 20
Perenjoir
Doy Road

Three Springs

Gr.Eastern Hwy

North
Country

Kellerberrin

Kellerberrin
Harvey

Harvey

Wellesley

East Of
Wellesley Road

South
Country

9831 1110

9889 1072

Corrigin
Road

9499 5367

Illareen Road
Three Springs
Road

Off Treasure
Road

Grand Hwy
Hazelhurst
Street
Tunney
Road

Landwehr
Terminal

Katanning
Three
Springs

Shire

Pilbara
Power
South
Country
North
Country

Karratha

Leach Road

Mason Road
W Of Brand
Hwy

(82) 3293

Branch

Wellesley

9411 1426

9571 9301

Nearest Cross
Street

South
Country

Horley Road

9690 9200

Town /
Suburb

Off Wellesley
Road

(82) 3265

Koolyanobbing
66/22kv
Kwinana
Desalination
Plant
Kwinana
Substation 132kv
Kwinana
Substation 330kv
Landsdale

Malaga 22kv
Mandurah
132/22kv
Manjimup
132/22kv
Manning St
132/11kv

Street

Roebourne
Katanning

Wimbledon
Street

South Metro

Gosnells

Cooljarloo

Thomas Road
Nth Of
Cooljaroo Road

South Metro
North
Country

Dandaragan

Muchea

Opp Bore Road

North Metro

Chittering

Kewdale

Mackay Street

South Metro
South
Country

Belmont
Kojonup

W Of
Narambeen
Road

North
Country

Kondinin

Kenwick
Kwinana
Beach

Kojonup

Kondinin

Kwinana

(97) 3209

9499 5302

Barter Road

Naval Base

Leath Road

South Metro

Kwinana

9411 2473

Leath Road

Naval Base

Weston Street

South Metro

Kwinana

9411 2599
9247 5932

Leath Road
Hepburn Ave

Naval Base
Darch

Weston Street
Mirrabooka Ave

South Metro
North Metro

Kwinana
Wanneroo

Wangerup

Buller Road

South
Country

Waroona

Malaga

Weir Road

North Metro

Swan

Mandurah
Manjimup

Elizabeth Street
10k Sth On Sw
Hwy

South Metro
South
Country

Manjimup

Scarborough

Joyce Street

North Metro

Stirling

(82) 1233
9581 2188
9771 1220
9341 3249

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Landwehr
Road
Marshall
Road
Dower Street
Eastbourne
Road
Manning
Road

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
51 of 62

Mandurah

Description

Margaret River
66/22kv
Marriott Road
132/22kv
Mason Road
132/22kv

Phone No

Street

9757 9240

Forrest Road
Marriott
Road

9721 6917
9419 5958

Meadow Springs
Medical Centre
66/6.6kv

9499 5377

Medina 132/22kv
Merredin
Terminal
220/132kv
Merredin
132/66kv
Merredin
66/22kv
Midland Junction
132/22kv
Milligan Street
132/11kv
Mirrambeena
Moonyoonooka
Terminal

9419 4802

Moora 132/33kv

9651 1128

Morley 132/11kv
Mt. Barker
132/22kv
Mt. Newman
66/11kv
Mt.Lawley
132kv Switchyard
Muchea
132/22kv
Muja 330kv No.1
Switchyard
Muja 330kv No.2
Switchyard
Muja 220kv
Switchyard
Muja 132kv R &
M
Muja 132kv
Switchyard East
Muja 132kv
Switchyard West
Muja 66kv
Switchyard
Mullaloo
132/22kv

9276 1217

9386 7614

9041 2180
9041 2476
9041 1116
9274 1514
9321 2539

9851 2907

Mason Road
Off Yindana
Bvd
Monash Ave
Abercrombie
Road
Robartson
Road
Combes
Drive
Combes
Drive

Town /
Suburb

Nearest Cross
Street

Margaret
River

Tingle Pl

Branch

Shire

South
Country
South
Country

Augusta Margaret River

Wellesley

Devlin Road

Kwinana
Beach

Nth Of Railway
X

South Metro

Kwinana

Nedlands

Hampden Road

North Metro

Nedlands

Postans

Thomas Road

South Metro

Kwinana

Merredin

Merredin

Sth Of GE Hwy
Great Eastern
Hwy
Great Eastern
Hwy

North
Country
North
Country
North
Country

Parklands

Harvey

Mandurah

Merredin

Merredin
Merredin
Merredin

Lloyd Street
Milligan
Street
Down Road

Midland

The Crescent

North Metro

Swan

Perth
Albany

Hay Street

North Metro

Perth
Albany

Miling Moora
Road

Moora

Coode Street
Quangellup
Road

Morley

Barber Street
Catherine
Street

Mt. Barker

Wilson Road

Hedland

North
Country

Moora

Muirs Highway

North Metro
South
Country
Pilbara
Power

Bayswater
Plantagenet

9272 1560

Central Ave

Menora

Alexander Dr

North Metro

Stirling

9571 4006

Byrne Road
Powerhouse
Road
Powerhouse
Road
Powerhouse
Road
Powerhouse
Road
Powerhouse
Road
Powerhouse
Road
Powerhouse
Road
Joondalup
Drive

Muchea

Off Brand Hwy

North Metro
South
Country

Chittering

9734 0628
9734 0630
9734 0632
9734 0633
9734 0631
9405 3118

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie

Collie
Ocean Reef
Road

Edgewater

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

North Metro

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
52 of 62

Joondalup

Description

Mumbida
132/66kv
Mundaring Weir
66/6.6kv

Mungarra
11/132kv S/S
Murdoch
Substation
Murdoch Drive
66/22kv
Murray Street
66/11kv
Myaree
66/22kv
Narrogin South
220/66kv
Narrogin
66/22kv
Nedlands
66/6.6kv

Neerabup
Terminal
330/132kv
New Gen
Kwinana
North Beach
132/22kv
North Fremantle
66/6.6kv
North Perth
66/11kv
Northam
66/22kv
Northam
132/66kv
Northern
Terminal 330kv
Northern
Terminal 132kv
Oakley Terminal
330kv
O'connor
66/22kv
Osborne Park
132/11kv
Padbury
Narrogin South
220/66kv

Phone No

9295 1725
132kv
Yard 9927
6057 Gt
Site
9927 6039

9172 2740
9321 8101
9330 1209
9881 2637
9881 1391
9386 6283
330kv
Yard 0408
945 643
132kv
Yard 0429
883 167
330kv
Yard 0439
979 737
9447 3296
9335 2498
9328 8097
9622 6241
9622 2630
9249 3044
9249 3172
9531 3788
9337 1995
9446 1843
9425 1214
9881 2637

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Street

Mundaring
Weir Road

Nangetty
Walkway
Road
Murdoch
Drive
Murdoch
Drive
Murray
Street

Town /
Suburb

Nearest Cross
Street

Mundaring

Base Of
Mundaring Weir

Mungarra

Kelly Road
Farrington
Road

Murdoch
South
Hedland

Demarchi Road

Branch

Shire

Mundaring

North
Country
South Metro
Pilbara
Power

Mullewa
Melville
Port Hedland

Perth

King Street

North Metro

Perth

Norma Road
Gt.Southern
Highway

Booragoon

Booth Street
Rockton
Road

Narrogin

Graham Road

South Metro
South
Country
South
Country

Melville

Narrogin

Kitchener Road
Narrogin Valley
Road

Narrogin

Nedlands

Barcoo Ave

North Metro

Nedlands

Ziatas Road

Pinjar

Pinjar Road

North Metro

Wanneroo

Leath Road
Retford
Place
Tydeman
Road
Bourke
Street
NorthamYork Road
NorthamYork Road
Marshall
Road
Marshall
Road

Naval Base
Waldorf Street

North Metro

Stirling

Pearse Street

South Metro

Fremantle

North Metro
North
Country
North
Country

Northam

Northam

Campsie Street
Woodley Farm
Dr
Woodley Farm
Dr

Malaga

Weir Road

North Metro

Swan

Malaga
Oakley

North Metro
South
Country

Swan

Oakley Road
Garling
Street
Scarborough
Bch Road
Gibson Ave
Gt.Southern
Highway

Weir Road
Pinjarra /
Williams Road
Bowen Street
Ellen Stirling
Bvd
Brisbane Road
Narrogin Valley
Road

South Metro

Fremantle

North Metro
North Metro
South
Country

Stirling
Joondalup

Kwinana

Carine
North
Fremantle
North Perth
Northam

O'connor
Innaloo
Padbury
Narrogin

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Narrogin

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
53 of 62

Vincent

Northam

Murray

Narrogin

Description

Phone No

Parkeston
133/33kv
Parklands
Pegs Creek
132/11kv
Piccadilly Street
132/11kv
Picton 66/22kv
(New)
Picton Terminal
132/6kv
Pinjar
11/132kv
Pinjar Gas
Turbine
Pinjarra
132/22kv
Quinninup
66/22kv
Qv1 11kv
Rangeway
13/11kv
Redbank
11/66kv
Red Hill 22kv
Regans
132/33kv
Riverton
132/22kv
Rivervale
132/22kv (New)
Rockingham
132/22kv
Roebourne
33/11kv
Rudds Gully
132/33/11kv
Sawyers Valley
66/22kv
Shenton Park
66/6.6kv
Shotts 330kv

9091
0150
(82) 3286
9185 2019
9021
6099
9725 6300
9725 6300
9400 3910
Main Gate
9400 3911
9531 1434
9773 1247
9322 5628
9425 1242
(86) 6211

Town /
Suburb

Bulong Road
Off Yindana
Road
Dampier
Road
Piccadilly
Street
Boyanup
Picton Road
Boyanup
Picton Road

Parkeston

Perry Road

Pinjar

Perry Road
Paterson
Road
Wheatley
Coast Road
St. Georges
Terrace
Hutchinson
Street
Redbank
Road
Redhill Road

Pinjar

Nearest Cross
Street

Branch

Shire

Kalgoorlie Boulder

Yarri Road

Parklands

Mandurah
Pilbara
Power

Pegs Creek
Kalgoorlie

Parsons Street

Picton

Harris Road

Picton

Harris Road

Quinninup

Mandurah
Road
Off Sth West
Hwy

Perth

Milligan Street

Geraldton

Nw Hwy

Pinjarra

Port Hedland
Red Hill

Toodyay Road
1.3k Sth Of
Orange Spring
Road

Goldfields
South
Country
South
Country

Roebourne
Kalgoorlie Boulder
Bunbury
Bunbury

North Metro

Wanneroo

North Metro
South
Country
South
Country

Wanneroo
Murray
Manjimup

Metro
North
Country
Pilbara
Power
North Metro

Perth
Geraldton Greenough
Port Hedland
Swan

North
Country

Dandaragan

9655 0089

Brand Hwy

Regans Ford

9332 8544

Camm Ave
Midgley
Street
Off
Broughton
Way
Stephen
Street

Bull Creek

Salmond Way

South Metro

Melville

Lathlain

Rutland Ave

South Metro

Victoria Park

Rockingham

Swinstone/Tow
nsend
Withnell Street

South Metro
Pilbara
Power

Rockingham

Roebourne

Sawyers
Valley

Stephenson
Street

Daglish

Selby Street

Collie

Williams Road

9361 7192

9527 3331

9295 1204
9381 6385
9734 5164

South East
Terminal
South Fremantle
Southern Cross
66/33kv

Street

9335 8533
9049 1221

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Great
Eastern
Highway
Lonnie Street
Salvation
Road
Lots 232 &
231 Orton
Road
Robb Road
Bullfinch
Road

North Metro

Mundaring

North Metro
South
Country

Nedlands

Hamilton Hill
Southern
Cross

Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Collie
Serpentine
Jarrahdale

Oldbury

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information

Reobourne

Mctaggert Cve

South Metro
North
Country

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
54 of 62

Cockburn
Yilgarn

Description

Phone No

Southern River
Southern
Terminal 132kv
Southern
Terminal 330kv
Summers Street

9499 5379

Lot 101
Southern
River Road

9417 9283

Annois Road

9417 9395
9328 7254

Tate Street
66/22kv
Three Springs
132/33kv
Ti-West Pigment
Plant
Tomlinson Road.
(Was
Chamberlain
John Deere)
Tully Road
132/22kv
University
66/6.6kv
Victoria Park
66/6.6kv
Wagerup
132/22kv

9458 5773

Annois Road
Summers
Street
Tate Street

Bentley

Perenjori
Road
Mason Road

Three
Springs
Kwinana
Beach
Welshpool

Wagin
66/22kv

9861 1427

Waikiki
Walkaway
Windfarm

9954 1104
9411 1444

Street

Tomlinson
Street

9386 7396
9361 1363
9733 5295

Fairway
Street
Bank Street

Town /
Suburb

Nearest Cross
Street

Southern
River

Branch

Shire

Landor Street

Metro

Gosnells

Bibra Lake

Windmill Dve

South Metro

Cockburn

Bibra Lake
East Perth

Windmill Dve
East Parade

South Metro
North Metro

Cockburn
Vincent

Sevenoaks
Street
Morowa Road

South Metro

Canning

North
Country

Three Springs
Kwinana

Adams Dve

South Metro

Canning

Crawley

Myers Street

North Metro

Subiaco

Victoria Pk

Somerset
Street
Entry To
Refinery

South Metro

Victoria Park

Off
Willowdale
Road
Tillellan
Road

Wagerup

South
Country

Waroona

Wagin

Arthur Road

South
Country

Wagin

(82) 3276

Safety Bay
Road

Safety Bay

Read Street

0427 429
731

Off Burma
Road

Walkway

9306 8166

Clarkson Ave

Wanneroo

9172 3000

Harwell Way

Wedgefield

Tennant
Street

Welshpool

Ellam Street

South Metro

Canning

Perth

Pier Street

North Metro

Perth
Boddington

Welshpool

Furnace Road

South
Country
South Metro

Wembley
Downs

Weaponess
Road

North Metro

Cambridge

Rockingham
Geraldton Greenough

Waterloo
Terminal 132kv
Wattleup
Wanneroo
132/22kv
Wedgefield
66/22kv
Webforge
Wellington Street
66/11kv
Wells Terminal

9325 5710

Welshpool
132/22kv (New)
Wembley Downs
66/6.6kv

9458 1800

Wellington
Street
Off Soldiers
Road
Kurnall Road

9341 3953

Empire Ave

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Wanneroo
Road

Pilbara
Power

Boddington

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

North Metro

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
55 of 62

Wanneroo
Port Hedland

Canning

Description

Phone No

Street

West Kalgoorlie
Terminal
220/132kv
West Kalgoorlie
Terminal 33/11kv

9021 7606

Western
Collieries
132/22kv
West. Mining
Kambalda
132/11kv

9734 4127

West
Kalgoorlie
Road
West
Kalgoorlie
Road
Shotts Road
South

West. Mining
Smelter 132/11kv
Western Mining
132/11kv
Western Terminal

9022 3475

9021 1866

9021 6122
9419 2161
9387 5061

Off
Kambalda
Road
Off
Celebration
Road
Charles
Street
Brockway
Road

Westralian Sands
Modal
Crescent

Willeton
Wickham No.1
Wickham No.2
(Cliffs Robe)
Wongan Hills
132/33kv
Worsley
132/22kv
Wundowie
66/22kv
Yanchep
132/22kv
Yerbillon
66/0.440kv
Yilgarn
220/33kv
Yokine
132/11kv
Yornup
66/22kv

Town /
Suburb

Nearest Cross
Street

Kalgoorlie

G. Eastern
Highway

Kalgoorlie

G. Eastern
Highway

Collie

Goldfields
Road

South
Country

Collie

Boulder
East
Rockingham

Goldfields

Kalgoorlie Boulder

Patterson Road

South Metro

Rockingham

Mt Claremont

John Xxiii Ave

Nedlands

Bunbury

North Metro
South
Country

Bunbury

Canning Vale

South Metro

Canning

9734 3086

Worsley

Gastaldo Road

9573 6216

Hawke Ave

Wundowie

9407 5247

Romeo Road

Carabooda

9047 5050

Smyth Road
E.Sth.CrossMarvel Loch
Road

Carrabin

Wanneroo
Road
7km E Of
Carrabin

Southern
Cross

10km Sth Of Sx

Darch Street
Gommes
Road

Yokine

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Kalgoorlie Boulder

Coolgardie

Wilding Road

9761 9047

Kalgoorlie
Boulder

Goldfields

Wongan Hills

9349 3847

Goldfields

Shire

Kambalda

Serio Road
Worsley
Refinery

9049 1465

Branch

Cape Street
Sth Western
Hwy

Yornup

Appendix 5 Western Power


facilities information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

Pilbara
Power
Pilbara
Power
North
Country
South
Country
North
Country
North Metro
North
Country
North
Country
North Metro
South
Country

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
56 of 62

Wongan Ballidu
Collie

Wanneroo
Westonia

Yilgarn
Stirling
Bridgetown Greenbushes

Appendix 6 First aid information

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 6 First aid


information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
57 of 62

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Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 6 First aid


information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
58 of 62

First Aid
When possible, the person with the best first aid knowledge should stay with the
casualty while someone else calls for the emergency assistance.

To call for the Ambulance, Police or Fire Service, use 000 from all phones
(including mobiles). If you are using a digital mobile phone and 000 fails, call
112 unless your service provider has advised otherwise.

When the emergency operator answers, state clearly which service is required.

Stay calm and speak clearly to convey the message. Be ready to answer any
questions.

State the following:

The exact address or location with any clear landmarks or closet street
cross reference

An outline of the emergency

The number of victims involved

Any information about the condition of the victim(s)

Any hazards relevant to the area, such as fire, chemical, spills, fumes

The Telephone number where the caller can be contacted in case further
information is needed

Wait until the operator tells you to hang up.

Ask someone to stay in a prominent position to direct the emergency service


vehicle to the correct area.

DIAL 000

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 6 First aid


information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
59 of 62

The Chain of Survival describes the sequence of critical intervention stages in the
initial care of a cardiac arrest patient.
The Critical stages are:

Early Call For Help


It is essential to attend the casualty and call for help as soon as possible.

Early CPR
This will increase the casualtys chance of survival by encouraging oxygenated
blood flow to the brain.

Early Defibrillation
The restoration of an adequate heart rhythm is necessary for the casualty to
survive a cardiac arrest.

Post Resuscitation Care


Transportation of the casualty to hospital by ambulance should not be delayed
to enable further treatment and monitoring of their condition.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 6 First aid


information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
60 of 62

DRABCD
Check for danger to yourself, bystanders and the casualty

D - Danger

Can whatever caused the problem harm you or others?


Assess the level of consciousness

R - Response

Check if the casualty is conscious by asking questions and


squeezing their shoulders. If no response, get a bystander to
call for help.
Check , clear and then open the airway (Head tilt/chin lift)

A - Airway

Open the mouth and look inside for any obstructions.


Roll onto side and remove any foreign matter by scooping
downwards with fingers.
Check breathing: look, listen, feel (10 seconds) min 2
breaths

B - Breathing

Look down the chest, listen for breath and feel it on your
cheek. Rest your hand on the person's diaphragm and feel for
breathing.
If they are not breathing, give 2 rescue breaths. If the casualty
is breathing but unconscious, place in the recovery position
and monitor ABC. Seek emergency assistance.

C - Compressions

If no signs of life after 2 rescue breaths, commence CPR


30 compressions : 2 breaths

D - Defibrillation

Attach an AED as soon as possible


Follow the directions of the AED.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 6 First aid


information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
61 of 62

Secondary survey
Once a Primary Survey has been carried out and the breathing, circulation and
severe bleeding has been controlled, a secondary survey is required.
A Secondary Survey is designed to determine if the casualty is suffering from any
other injuries that require treatment. Complete a full secondary survey of a casualty
before treating the injuries so that injuries may be prioritised.

Always wear rubber gloves and check hands regularly for blood or fluid.

Do not allow the casualty to move during the survey.

Speak calmly and reassuringly to the casualty and ask them for the:

History: What happened and previous injuries (this will give an indication
to possible new injuries).

Allergies: What are they allergic to? Record this information. Medical
alert bracelet/necklace.

Medications: What medications are they taking?

Check the pulse rate and note the breathing rate and characteristics.

Check the casualties back for injuries and/or bleeding.

If rolling a casualty into the recovery position, ensure keys and other objects from
pockets have been removed so that further damage or injury is not caused.

Transmission Substation
Work Practice Manual

Appendix 6 First aid


information
Reviewer: Dave Christmas

DM7863894, Rev 0, Mar 2011


Authoriser: Lewis Potterton
62 of 62