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North Sea Region (UK) Procedure for control of temporary equipment OMS SPR: Walter Kerr Reliability

North Sea Region (UK)

North Sea Region (UK) Procedure for control of temporary equipment OMS SPR: Walter Kerr Reliability and

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

OMS SPR:

Walter Kerr Reliability and Maintenance Manager

Document

Ian Clyde Quality Management Lead North Sea Operations

Custodian:

Document

Sheila Tait OMS Information Management Advisor

Applicability:

North Sea Region (UK)

Administrator:

Issuing

Engineering

Level or control tier:

2

department:

Main OMS

5.4

Other OMS

Sub-element:

Sub-elements:

Old document number:

UKCS-SOP-005

First issue date:

March 2001

Revision number:

Issue 6

Revision date:

February 2013

Last review date:

February 2013

Next review date:

February 2016

Revision summary:

Document updated to new simplified language and template. This version has changed to define a single standard for the region, and to allow for the removal of associated asset (level 4) documents, where possible.

For further information contact DCC at ODL on 01224 628018 or dcc@odl.co.uk.

Document location:

Documentum/ABZ Federal/OMS/North Sea - UK/5_0 Assets/5_4 Inspection and Maintenance

This document is uncontrolled when printed or saved locally.

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Key facts and what this document covers

Why this document is important

Why this document is important

This document sets out what BP and service or equipment provider personnel should do when hiring or supplying temporary equipment for use on North Sea Region (UK) offshore installations and onshore terminals and sites.

By following this document, you’ll make sure that, for temporary equipment, we meet the following legal and OMS requirements in:

OMS Sub-element 5.4 Inspection and Maintenance which states that ‘BP entities inspect and maintain plant, assets, facilities, floating structures and transport equipment to prevent injury to people, damage to the environment and achieve competitive performance over the lifecycle’

What is temporary equipment?

What is temporary equipment?

Temporary equipment is equipment that is not a permanent part of the installation, terminal or site and will be removed after a limited time. This equipment can include the following equipment and assemblies:

diesel engines

portable generators

electric powerpacks

logging units

workshops and stores (with or without electrical equipment)

control cabins

offices

portable electrical tools and equipment (including electrical test equipment)

welding sets

portable power tools and equipment

hand-held radios

non-destructive or magnetic particle crack-testing equipment

high pressure (HP) jetting equipment

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

well control equipment including:

- blowout preventer (BOP) stacks

- lubricators and crossovers

- riser sections and valves

- stuffing boxes and similar equipment

- coiled tubing spreads

- wireline winch units, powerpacks and wireline masts

- well test spreads (including associated equipment).

Who needs to read this document and implement it?

Who needs to read this document and implement it?

If you are in one of the following roles then it’s important that you understand your responsibilities when hiring or supplying temporary equipment.

Procurer

The Procurer (the person hiring the equipment) must:

give correct details for the hired item

say if there is a need for inspection before transportation from the supplier

define certification requirements because poor certification arriving with equipment from onshore is a big issue and one of the biggest drains on time offshore

make sure that the supplier is aware of any inspection and certification requirements and the requirements of this document

raise a separate order with the BP Inspection Representative for doing the inspection unless a blanket order is already in place for the Asset.

The Procurer should also take the following into account:

This procedure includes the LOLER requirements for temporary equipment to ensure safe handling during loading and unloading.

Personal and company toolboxes

Personal and company toolboxes, and the tools and equipment they contain, to go either on their own or as part of a shipment of equipment, must meet the requirements of this procedure. The supplier must make sure that any power tools, pressure-retaining components or electrically powered equipment meet the requirements of this procedure. The supplier must have certification available to support this, signed by a responsible person in their company.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Portable electrical equipment

A Competent Person must inspect any portable electrical equipment that remains on the

installation for longer than six months in line with the requirements of Inspection and testing of portable electrical equipment (UKCS-SOP-031).

Hand arm vibration risk

For tools that are a hand arm vibration (HAV) risk, see Hand arm vibration practice

Management of change

You should consider the Management of Change (MoC) procedure (NSR-GRP-4.2-0001), with Change to Plant at Appendix 1 Paragraph 1, in certain cases, for example:

- adding or modifying structural steelwork

- considering weight control or location because of the weight or large dimension of the item

- creating temporary hazardous zones

- temporary tie-ins to permanent systems

- temporary isolations of safety critical systems.

You should use the MoC process to assess the effect of the equipment on the existing safety critical elements (SCEs).

In these cases, you must get approval from the technical MoC before you can release any

order to a supplier.

i

Important:

When referring to BP offshore installations, these procedures apply to normal operations. The procedures may require amendment for combined operations, where equipment from a drilling rig is located alongside or on an installation. The appropriate Combined Operations Safety Case will explain any such changes.

Competent Authority (onshore only)

SI 2005/No 1088 The Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) Regulations require that there is a Major Accident Prevention Policy, in which operators include all dangerous substances at their establishments. Operators should send a safety report to the Competent Authority whenever necessary. In line with this, the safety management system should consider all hazards temporary equipment causes.

The Competent Authority will carry out inspections to make sure that information in the operator’s report reflects conditions at the establishment.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Independent Verification Body (IVB) (offshore only)

SI 2005/No 3117 the Offshore Installations (Safety Case) Regulations (SCR) 2005 and Guidance L30 require Duty Holders (Operators) to identify SCEs on their installations. They must also develop appropriate Performance Standards and Written Schemes of Verification for each SCE.

All BP North Sea offshore facilities define temporary equipment as an SCE. Consequently, each facility has in place a Performance Standard and a Written Scheme of Verification. These documents have been reviewed and endorsed by Lloyds, BP North Sea’s IVB. The IVB independently verifies continued achievement of the performance standards by checking that BP conforms to the Written Schemes of Verification.

The installation of temporary equipment may require the MoC process to be initiated by the onshore Single Point Accountable (SPA) for the modification. If the MoC process is initiated, the IVB is told about any changes impacting on SCEs in accordance with the MoC procedure (NSR-GRP-4.2-0001). Verification record sheets within the electronic MOC system are used to describe the change being proposed. These verification record sheets are then submitted by the MoC SPA so the IVB can assign the appropriate level of verification.

BP Inspection Representative

The BP Inspection Representative ensures that all relevant inspections are completed before signing the inspection release certificate (IRC) and Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1).

Supplier

i

Important:

All documents for review, or which go to BP with the equipment, must be written in English unless otherwise agreed.

The supplier must ensure that the equipment they supply meets all current relevant legislation, in particular:

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

This includes proof of an inspection of new ATEX-compliant equipment and either:

- a review of the ATEX technical file, or

- verification that the manufacturer has an accredited quality control process for design and construction and conformity procedures for ATEX-compliant equipment.

The supplier must provide appropriate and current material, test and compliance certification.

The supplier should also make sure the equipment meets the requirements of the Oil & Gas UK (OGUK)) Guidelines for the Safe Packing and Handling of Cargo to and from Offshore Locations.

Shipping agent

The shipping agent makes sure that equipment has a fully completed Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1).

Supply base service provider (SBSP)

People in BP who requisition equipment and services should know about the following systems and procedures:

Ordering systems in BP

There are two ordering systems in BP – Maximo and CTX. Drilling and Completions and Well Services are the only users of CTX. Requisitions raised in CTX are sent to the supplier as a Maximo purchase order.

For orders raised in Maximo, certification requirements are detailed at individual line level. For requisitions raised in CTX, they are only at project level.

How equipment is routed at the supply base

When equipment arrives at the supply base, it is only routed through the transit shed if it needs containerisation. Deck lifts are routed directly to the quayside via the cargo inspection gantry.

Only equipment that we purchase goes through goods received processing before it is shipped offshore.

Equipment that we rent or is provided as part of a service goes through the goods received notice (GRN) process automatically. Because of this, the SBSP cannot check if the supplier should have had the equipment inspected and released.

i

Important:

The person requisitioning the equipment is responsible for ensuring that the supplier knows about the certification requirements at the purchasing or requisitioning stage.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

SBSP workscope and ‘closed box’ policy

BP employs the SBSP to ‘lift and shift’ and instructs them to operate a ‘closed box’ policy. This means that enclosed shipping containers packed by the supplier (generally containing services equipment) are not opened to identify, count or inspect the contents.

Taking all the above information into account, the SBSP only checks that a completed Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1) accompanies the equipment offshore when the three criteria below have been met:

- It has been ordered in Maximo (certification requirement denoted at line level) not CTX.

- It is routed through the transit shed (equipment requiring containerisation).

- It is being purchased (has to go through the GRN process).

i This covers a very small percentage of the total equipment that BP ships offshore. As stated above, the person requisitioning the equipment is responsible for ensuring that the supplier knows about the certification requirements at the purchasing or requisitioning stage.

Important:

Offshore Installation Manager (OIM) and Onshore Site Manager (OSM)

Assign a responsible person(s) to manage the UK-PRO-5.4-1002 offshore requirements to:

- Receive and inspect equipment, confirming that it has the appropriate paperwork.

- Log all temporary equipment details, including arrival date, in the Temporary Equipment Register.

- Ensure that site-specific Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER) and noise assessments are completed as required with the appropriate paperwork (see Guidance on PUWER (UKCS-TI-017)).

- Conduct 90-day inspections of equipment, and record findings.

Note:

Where temporary equipment is tied into live hydrocarbon plant, for example, equipment rigged up for well intervention work, this should be controlled in the specific workpack by using PC1 and SH1 forms (see Technical integrity and assurance procedure (UKCS-TI-019)).

Accountable for their operating facility complying with the requirements of UK-PRO-5.4-1002.

Assign a Temporary Equipment Responsible Person to manage and control all temporary equipment on the installation or site.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Temporary Equipment Responsible Person

Ensure the following duties are completed:

All temporary equipment received on site or at the installation must be entered in the register with equipment details and arrival date.

All equipment on the register should be inspected by a suitable installation representative and an Equipment Site Form PE002 (see appendix 2) completed before the equipment is put into service.

Once the equipment is installed a noise assessment, hand/arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) assessment and PUWER assessment checklist should be completed before the equipment is put into service.

Damaged or faulty equipment must be updated in the register.

On-going inspection and maintenance of all equipment must be listed in the register.

All equipment removed from the site or installation must be deleted from the register.

Although not mandatory, a tagging system which highlights inspection dates can be used to assist with the process.

Note:

What to do if you can’t follow the requirements in this document

What to do if you can’t follow the requirements in this document

What to do if you can’t follow the requirements in this document

If you can’t follow the requirements in this document you should stop the work you’re doing and speak to your line manager.

If after speaking to your line manager it’s agreed that you still can’t follow the requirements, you must consult the OMS Single Point Responsible (SPR) for the OMS Sub-element associated with this document. Find out who the SPR is for this document.

If the OMS SPR agrees that the work can go ahead either without following the requirements

in this document or by following a lesser requirement, the line manager should record this as

a temporary change in the electronic management of change (MoC) system. The OMS SPR will be the MoC verifier and authoriser.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

What this document covers

What this document covers
 

Page

Section 1

Equipment for offshore use

9

Procedure for getting temporary equipment offshore

9

North Sea Region (UK) (offshore) temporary equipment technical details

15

Temporary stores, offices, workshops and service units

20

Section 2

Equipment for onshore use

25

Procedure for shipping equipment

27

North Sea Region (UK) (onshore) temporary equipment technical details

30

Temporary stores, offices, workshops and service units

34

Operational requirements

39

Appendices

Appendix 1

Portable/Transportable Equipment Release Form (PE001)

Appendix 2

Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form (PE002)

Appendix 3

Maintenance checklists

Appendix 4

Diesel engine checklists

Appendix 5

Temporary Equipment PUWER Assessment Checklist

Appendix 6

Technical specification for purchase or hire of pneumatically operated manriding vehicles

Appendix 7

Inspection Representative call-out procedure

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Section

1

Equipment for offshore use

Procedure for getting temporary equipment offshore

The Temporary equipment flowchart (offshore) shows the relationship between the various roles of onshore and offshore personnel in the procurement process.

The text after the flowchart explains how we:

procure equipment

send equipment offshore

receive equipment offshore

inspect equipment

maintain and repair equipment.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Temporary equipment flowchart (offshore) February 2013 Issue

Temporary equipment flowchart (offshore)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

How we procure equipment

Procurer

The Procurer’s role is to do the following:

Consider where the item is to be installed and initiate the management of change (MoC) process, if required.

Select a supplier to provide the service.

Specify equipment to be provided, in conjunction with relevant discipline engineers or Technical Authorities (TAs), and the hazardous classification of the area in which it will be used.

Define certification requirements.

Consider the weight of the equipment and confirm that it won’t exceed deck loading of the proposed installation location.

Consider whether the equipment adds any risks and if its location could affect any site safety critical elements (SCEs), equipment, processes or practices (with guidance from onshore Asset or Technical Authority SCE owners, as required).

Specify that the BP Inspection Representative must inspect the equipment (at the supplier’s premises). In Maximo, this means the Procurer should tick the ‘inspection required?’ box and call up the hired and transportable equipment clause in the long description field.

Specify inspection requirements appropriately, if not procured via Maximo.

Ensure that the supplier knows about the requirements of this document and any installation-specific requirements.

Raise a separate order on the BP Inspection Representative for carrying out the inspection (we prefer to have a blanket annual order in place for each site or discipline on the site if necessary).

i

Important:

The Procurer must obtain technical and financial approval before raising the order.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Supplier

When the supplier receives the order or contract from us, they select suitable equipment, including any installation-specific requirements as described in North Sea Region (UK) offshore temporary equipment technical details or otherwise. They also do the following:

Ask the BP Inspection Representative to carry out an inspection (see appendix 7 for call-out procedure).

Ensure that a competent representative completes and signs Part A of the Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1).

Correct any defect or inadequacy found as a result of the inspection.

Complete an assessment to make sure the equipment complies with the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER).

Compile documents to accompany the equipment when it goes out, which should include the following as a minimum:

- inspection release certificate (IRC) (original)

- Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1)

- manufacturer’s certificates showing testing authorities’ approval for all equipment certified for installation in hazardous areas (subdivided into Zone 0, Zone 1 and Zone 2)

- operating, maintenance and instruction manuals, where appropriate

- a copy of the PUWER assessment (see the PUWER assessment checklist in

- equipment weight and footprint data.

BP Inspection Representative

The BP Inspection Representative’s role is to do the following:

Review all certificates and documents for the equipment.

Sign the Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1) and any associated checklists (PE003 to PE014) that are required (see appendix 3) on completion of the inspection, as long as the equipment meets the specification in How we procure equipment.

Issue an IRC and Form PE001, and any other relevant documents, to the supplier.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

How we send equipment offshore

BP’s supply base service provider (SBSP) arranges shipment of equipment which must have a completed IRC (original) and an Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1). Where the ordering, routing and purchasing criteria have been met but the IRC and release form are not available, the SBSP should tell the BP Logistics Co-ordinator before sending the equipment offshore.

How we receive equipment offshore

Each North Sea Region (UK) offshore installation appoints the Responsible Person for receiving temporary equipment. The Responsible Person may delegate depending upon the disciplines involved, but is still responsible for the accuracy of the register for all equipment.

When the equipment arrives offshore, the person responsible for controlling hired and transportable equipment will do the following:

Record the equipment in the register of temporary equipment, and ensure that they raise the Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form PE002 (see appendix 2).

Arrange for a Responsible Electrical Person (REP) or other delegated competent person to inspect the equipment and complete the PE002 form.

Before use, a competent PUWER assessor should complete an assessment checklist (see the PUWER assessment checklist in UKCS-TI-017) for the equipment after it’s in the working position.

Along with the site Noise Co-ordinator (usually HSEA or Medic), ensure that equipment does not invalidate the conclusions of the site noise assessment. See Noise Environment Management System (UKCS-HH-010).

For tools that can pose a hand arm vibration (HAV) risk, confirm that these have a valid HAV certificate and ensure that they’re in the site HAVS tracking system (see Hand arm vibration practice (UKCS-HH-011)).

Gather the relevant certificates and documents and file in the Temporary Equipment Register.

Ensure that the following forms are collated:

- Portable/Transportable Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1)

- Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form PE002 (see appendix 2)

- the PUWER assessment

- any other necessary checklists

- all certifying documents for the equipment.

For any item that is found damaged on arrival, or that differs from the inspection note from the onshore base, either keep this onboard for repair by the supplier or ship it directly to the contractor’s base.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

If an item is unsuitable, complete a user feedback report (UFR) form in line with the User Feedback Reporting System (UKCS-CSM-015). This will be replaced during 2013 by the Supplier Quality Management, Excellence through Supplier Quality process and non-conformance indications (NCIs) will be used.

For all items on the register, maintenance and inspection activities should be set at vendor recommended frequencies and carried out before they go overdue.

All equipment that is removed from site should be deleted from the register.

How we inspect equipment

Competent personnel should inspect any temporary equipment offshore every 90 days, or in a timeframe which the manufacturer recommends, in line with Equipment Site Form PE002 (see appendix 2). If you’re a Competent Person, you should file the results of the inspection, along with the documents for that equipment, in the register of temporary equipment.

You should implement and record any necessary training on how to use temporary equipment.

The accountable person(s) for the Temporary Equipment Register should monitor it periodically to establish if there’s any temporary equipment that has been in use for over a year. If any

is found, they should discuss it with the relevant Discipline Engineer to decide whether

a more permanent engineering solution should be considered.

How we maintain and repair equipment

Supplier

Sections 2, 3 and 7 of The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, and Guidance L1, list duties which the supplier of equipment must carry out to supply and maintain plant and safe systems of work so that they are as safe as possible and don’t pose any health risks.

For maintenance or repair activities, the supplier must do the following:

Provide a plant maintenance and repair register for review by a BP Inspection Representative (the register should be available for BP inspection at all times).

Tell the Responsible Person before they maintain or repair the equipment offshore, so that a BP representative can witness the activity, if necessary. Although we don’t see changes to temporary plant and equipment as a modification, they still need the correct technical and safety review.

Inspect the equipment again after any maintenance or repair, in line with the Equipment Site Form PE002 (see appendix 2).

Identify any faulty item that is beyond repair, and ship it to the supplier’s base (they should enter this action and disposal instructions into the register of temporary equipment).

Send suitable spare parts offshore with the equipment.

Keep detailed and up-to-date records of all maintenance and repairs to their offshore equipment.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

North Sea Region (UK) (offshore) temporary equipment technical details

General offshore environmental conditions

The nominal environmental conditions for all North Sea Region (UK) installations are:

maximum ambient temperature: +30°C

minimum ambient temperature: -15°C

relative humidity up to 100% highly saline.

Electrical-driven equipment

Electrical supplies

The Electrical technical details table shows the alternating current (ac) power supply specifications for all installations.

BP installations don’t provide a direct current (dc) power supply for supplier’s equipment. Suppliers should organise their own dc supply if this is required.

Note:

BP installations do have a 24Vdc power supply, but only for instrument or fire and gas (F&G) indication and annunciation from supplier’s equipment.

Temporary equipment for use offshore should have fittings that suit existing installation power supplies and sockets (see the Electrical technical details table). The Procurer should make it clear on the purchase order if they need to wire equipment directly into the installation electrical system.

Some specialised equipment might need electrical supplies that don’t meet the above requirements. If this happens, the relevant installation Asset Engineer should be asked for advice.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Cable specifications

Cable specifications are as follows:

All cables for power supplies to portable equipment must have an integral earth conductor.

Cables must be long enough for portable equipment to reach the worksite without using an extension lead, but they shouldn’t be longer than:

- 15m for equipment that needs a supply of 110Vac or less

- 20m for equipment that needs a supply of more than 110Vac.

If you use an extension lead, you should check that any earth loop impedance is low enough to ensure the circuit protection device works within the set time limit.

Cables for extension leads, hand lamps, portable tools and associated portable transformers are to be either heat, oil and flame-retardant (HOFR) or SY steel braided cables.

Specialised test equipment, which requires a certain type of cable, is exempt from the requirements in the second and third bullet points above, subject to agreement with the installation Asset Engineer. The Inspection Co-ordinator will record all these exemptions so that the Regional Electrical Technical Authority can carry out a periodic review of cable specifications to decide whether they need to add any new specifications to future versions of this document.

Where physically possible, cables must be flame-retardant at least to the standard of BS EN 60332-1 Test on electrical and optical cables under fire conditions, 2004.

The REP or delegated CEP must check all cables before and after use.

Electrical loads and protection

The supplier must work out the total electrical loading, and the size and type of electrical protection they need to protect individual circuits. They must record all design calculations.

Installation power sockets

The plug configuration must suit the power sockets on BP installations (see the Electrical technical details table). The supplier must make sure that all electrical equipment for use on BP installations has a compatible and suitably rated plug. If equipment is for wiring directly into the installation electrical system, it is possible to supply it without a plug.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Portable transformers

Transformers for supplying portable electrical equipment must be double wound with an earthed screen between primary and secondary windings, and with the secondary winding centre tapped to earth.

Transformers must be fitted with a 110V secondary winding with sensitive, current-operated, earth-leakage circuit breakers controlling the outgoing supply. The residual current device should operate with a minimum operating time of 40 milliseconds if the earth leakage current is more than 30mA. It should also have a test pushbutton that can be used to prove the integrity of the tripping circuit.

Ingress protection should be at least IP54.

If the installation can’t provide the required type of transformer, they might be able to provide

a suitable one in special cases only.

Portable electrically powered tools and maintenance equipment

The equipment will be suitable for use in Zone 1 areas, unless otherwise agreed with the Procurer.

If it is necessary to use industrial electrical equipment, the user must:

stay with the equipment at all times during use

use it only if they have a spark potential or naked flame permit

isolate and disconnect it from the electrical supply when not in use.

All hand-held portable tools must be able to operate at rated voltages of no more than 110V.

Ingress protection should be at least IP55.

The supplier must state hand tool vibration levels over 2.5m/sec 2 to the user.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

 

Installation

Frequency

Voltage (3ph)

Voltage

Voltage (1ph – workshops, offices and accommodation)

Manufacturer – plug type

Pin

Rating

 

(Hz)

(1ph)

configuration

(amps)

Andrew

60

440

254

254

CEAG ABB CHG 5117 304 R0001 CEAG ABB CHG 5117 306 R0001 CEAG ABB CHG 5147 506 R0001

2P+E

16

2P+E

16

3P+E

63

Bruce

60

440

110

254

CEAG ABB GHG 5157 506 R0001 PUQ and C10 modules:

3P+N+E

125

CEAG ABB GHG 534-2507-V000 7h D and C60 modules:

3P+N+E

63

CEAG ABB GHG 534-2506-V000 6h CEAG ABB GHG 5117 304 R0001

3P+N+E

63

2P+E

16

Clair

60

440

254

254

CEAG ABB GHG 5147 407 R0001 CEAG ABB GHG 5117 304 R0001

3P+E

63

2P+E

16

ETAP (recent audit advises that these plugs will not fit the sockets on ETAP)

60

440

110

254

CEAG ABB GHG 5117 304 R0001 CEAG ABB GHG 5147 506 R0001

2P+E

16

3P+N+E

63

Forties Unity

 

50

415

110

240

CEAG GHG 511 4304 R002 CEAG GHG 534 0003 R0716

2P+E

16

 

3P+E

63

Miller

60

440

110

254

CEAG ABB GHG 5117 304 R0001 CEAG ABB GHG 5147 506 R0001 CEAG ABB GHG 5157 506 R0001

2P+E

16

3P+N+E

63

3P+N+E

125

Mungo

60

440

110

254

CEAG ABB GHG 5117 304 R0001 CEAG ABB GHG 5147 506 R0001

2P+E

16

3P+N+E

63

Magnus

50

415

110

240

CEAG ABB GHG 5422 300 V0000

2P+E

10

24

CEAG ABB GHG 5117 304 R0001

2P+E

16

(see Note 1)

       

CEAG ABB GHG 5432 304 V0001

2P+E

16

(see Note 1)

       

CEAG ABB GHG 5342 406 V0000

3P+E

63

(see Note 2)

       

CEAG ABB GHG 5157 506 R0001

3P+N+E

125

(see Note 3)

Notes:

1.

Both types of 110V plug are used on Magnus.

 

2.

Plug used on general platform welding sockets on Magnus.

3.

Plug used on the impact deck welding sockets on Magnus for wireline and wellserve requirements.

 

Electrical technical details table

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Portable electrical test equipment

Equipment in this category includes:

high-voltage test sets

earth testers

crack detectors

vibration monitors

radio and telemetry test equipment.

Only personnel who have sufficient training or technical knowledge and experience can use specialised test equipment that needs power at voltages of more than 55V to earth. This will avoid any danger. The installation REP must inspect and approve this type of equipment before use.

Portable lighting

Battery-driven lamps

The equipment must be suitable for use in a Zone 1 area, unless otherwise agreed with the Procurer.

The ingress protection should be at least IP66.

The battery charger unit must be 240Vac or 110Vac, and the lamp should have a rechargeable battery.

Permanent electrical supply

The lighting will be 25V and suitable for use in a Zone 1 area.

The ingress protection should be at least IP66.

The diffuser and housing of the lighting will be impact-resistant.

The lighting rating should be at least 55W.

Hand-held radios

The equipment must be suitable for use in a Zone 1 area. Anyone using a hand-held radio should only use approved batteries.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Earthing

All skid-mounted equipment should be bonded to the structure of the skid, which should have two M12 threaded bronze studs complete with nut and locknut for bonding to the installation earthing system. These studs should be at diagonally opposite corners of the skid.

Temporary stores, offices, workshops and service units

Any temporary stores, offices, workshops and service units must comply with ETP GP 44-32 Protection of Personnel from Explosion, Fire and Toxic Hazards on Offshore Facilities.

Operating guidelines for pressurised modules

The differential pressure between the interior of the cabin and the exterior should be kept between 0.5 and 1mbar. The reset pressure for this equipment should be 0.7mbar above external pressure.

The system must sound an alarm if the pressure within the cabin falls to less than 0.5mbar above the surrounding atmosphere. If there is a continued loss of pressure for up to 30 seconds, all supplies to industrial electrical equipment within the cabin must be isolated within an enclosure suitable for installation in a Zone 1 hazardous area.

When a sprinkler flow switch operates, all supplies to industrial electrical equipment and the fans must be isolated.

On detection of gas ingress at the pressurising fan air inlet, the fan must be shut down and all

supplies to industrial electrical equipment isolated within an enclosure suitable for installation

in a Zone 1 hazardous area.

To purge the cabin of flammable gases, the pressurisation fan should be started using a key switch that overrides the gas shutdown signal. The fan, contactor and override switch should be suitable for installation in a Zone 1 hazardous area.

The system should allow for five air changes before energising industrial electrical equipment.

A key switch controls the restoration of supplies to industrial equipment. It should have the

following notice attached:

‘NOT TO BE OPERATED UNTIL ATMOSPHERE HAS BEEN CHECKED AND FOUND TO BE GAS-FREE.’

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Equipment specifications

The electrical installations should be suitable for use in a Zone 1 hazardous area. If the units are for industrial electrical equipment, they should have a pressurisation and gas detection system.

The electrical supply to the temporary module will terminate in a Zone 1 approved power isolator.

Battery maintained emergency lighting should be Zone 1 approved, and located so it lights both normal and emergency exits.

The module electrical earthing system, any metallic water or gas pipes, and the module structural steelwork should be bonded to an identified external M12 threaded bronze stud, complete with nut and locknut for bonding to the installation earthing system.

Cables entering the module will be via multi-cable transits.

All circuits on distribution boards and all electrical fittings should be labelled with the circuit ID.

Systems that should operate under hazardous conditions, for example, F&G systems, must meet Zone 1 hazardous area standards throughout. All supplies to non-hazardous equipment should be able to disconnect automatically, if there is a hazardous condition, for example:

on detection of gas, for example 60% lower explosive limit (LEL) gas ingress at the pressurising fan air inlet

on continued loss of pressure in the module for up to 30 seconds.

Sensitive, current-operated earth-leakage circuit breakers must control all 240V socket outlets. The residual current device should operate, with a minimum operating time of 40 milliseconds, if the earth leakage current is more than 30mA. This device should have a test pushbutton that can be used to prove the integrity of the device.

Lighting levels should suit any work necessary within the unit, as recommended by Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) guidelines. Emergency fittings must be available to give a lighting level of at least 50 Lux when supplied from installation power. These fittings must have a standby supply (internal batteries) which can give a lighting level of at least 0.2 Lux for 90 minutes.

The container wall needs an escape route kick-out panel, at the opposite end from the door, if the maximum distance inside the container to the outside door is more than 5m.

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UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Interfaces with the installation

BP will supply the following services, local to the container or module as needed:

electrical supply

installation alarm and safety shutdown signals

telephone or telephones

public address (PA) speakers

potable water supply for sprinkler system

drain connections

plant air

instrument air.

Any equipment BP provides remains BP property. This equipment must be removed and returned to BP either before the unit leaves the installation or after it returns to the supplier.

HVAC systems

HVAC systems must meet the requirements of BS EN 15138:2007 Petroleum and natural gas industries – offshore production installations – heating, ventilation and air conditioning.

If HVAC systems need filtration, this should meet the requirements in Table B.1 of the above standard.

HVAC systems should have fire dampers fitted to meet the fire rating of the barrier that they penetrate.

The ventilation air change rate must be as recommended by the CIBSE guidelines.

Diesel-driven equipment

Diesel engines for use in Zone 2 hazardous areas must meet the requirements of:

ETP GIS 34-305 Diesel Engines (checklist PE012A in appendix 4) if placed on the market and put into service in the European Community (EC) on or before 30 June 2003

ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (checklist PE012B in appendix 4) if placed on the market and put into service in the EC after 30 June 2003.

Diesel engines for use in non-hazardous areas should meet the requirements on checklist PE012C in appendix 4.

All unattended portable diesel engines in Zone 2 hazardous areas (as stated in the should have a way of isolating the engine fuel supply using a 110Vac solenoid which is suitable for installation in a hazardous area.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

All attended portable diesel unit engines in Zone 2 hazardous areas must have a securely attached ID tag, be fully documented and have procedures available for any necessary emergency shutdown of the unit.

The unit supplier must tell the installation OIM that a manned portable diesel unit engine is onboard.

The unit is under permit conditions and any local installation requirements. If there is an emergency shutdown, shutdown procedures for the unit should be available on the installation and personnel must be competent to carry these out.

Compressed air equipment and air-driven equipment

All hoses must be antistatic, in line with BS 2050 Electrical Resistance of Conducting and Antistatic Products made from Flexible Polymeric Material, and marked at both ends to show this. Conductivity levels should be measured coupling to coupling.

The hose service must be marked at each end of the hose, preferably on a blue sleeve.

Hose connections must be bayonet-type quick-action coupling (for example, Macdonald) with whip-checks.

Grit blasting and spraying equipment must be earthed whenever it is in use and the earth leads must be 4mm 2 flexible copper braids or strands with transparent polyvinyl chloride (PVC) extruded covering.

The equipment must have permanently fixed earth connections either by using bolts or another suitable method, and by a strong spring clamp (for example, heavy duty crocodile clip) or clamp at the workplace or system end.

Air-driven lighting must have a rating of 55W, be suitable for use in a Zone 1 area and have an ingress protection rating of IP66.

The Utility air supply pressures table lists the utility air supply pressures for each installation.

The Procurer must confirm the compressed air supply before sending out any air-driven equipment.

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UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Installation

Utility air supply (barg)

Andrew

10

Bruce

9

Clair

10

ETAP

9

Forties Unity

7

Miller

9

Mungo

N/A

Magnus

6

Utility air supply pressures table

Hydraulic systems

The following paragraphs are specifically for portable hydraulic flushing units.

The flowrates for a water glycol service should be between:

0 to 27 litres/min at up to 1700psi supply pressure

0 to 20 litres/min at up to 3000psi supply pressure.

The flowrates for a mineral oil service should be between:

0 to 45 litres/min at up to 1700psi supply pressure

0 to 24 litres/min at up to 3000psi supply pressure.

All supply line components should be suitable for 3000psi working pressure and the pressure relief valve should be adjustable from 100 to 3000psi.

A pressure gauge should indicate the maximum system pressure (supply line).

Filter mesh sizes should be as follows:

suction line filter – 125 micrometres

supply line filter – 3 micrometres

return line filter – 3 micrometres.

The fluid reservoir capacity should be 250 litres filled volume. The reservoir fluid temperature should be kept between 15 and 70°C. The ambient temperature for flushing is 20 to 50°C.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Section

2

Equipment for onshore use

The text after the Temporary equipment flowchart (onshore) explains how we:

procure equipment

ship equipment

receive equipment

inspect equipment

maintain and repair equipment.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Temporary equipment flowchart (onshore) February 2013 Issue

Temporary equipment flowchart (onshore)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Procedure for shipping equipment

How we procure equipment

Procurer (Job Engineer)

The Procurer’s role is to do the following:

Consider where the item is to be installed and initiate the management of change (MoC) process if required.

Select a supplier to provide the service.

Define certification requirements.

Specify equipment to be provided, in conjunction with relevant discipline engineers or Asset Engineers, and the hazardous classification of the area in which it will be used.

Consider the weight of the equipment and confirm that it won’t exceed loading of where it is going, if above ground level.

Specify that the BP Inspection Representative must inspect the equipment (at the supplier’s premises). In Maximo, this means the Procurer should tick the ‘inspection required?’ box and call up the hired and transportable equipment clause in the long description field.

Specify inspection requirements appropriately, if not procured via Maximo.

Ensure that the supplier is aware of the requirements of this document and of any site-specific requirements.

Raise a separate order on an Independent Inspection Authority for performance of the inspection at the suppliers. A blanket annual order should be considered for each site or discipline per site.

Supplier

When the supplier or contractor receives the order or contract from us, they select suitable equipment, including any site-specific requirements as described in North Sea Region (UK) (onshore) temporary equipment technical details or otherwise. They also do the following:

Ask the BP Inspection Representative to carry out an inspection (see appendix 7 for call-out procedure).

Ensure that a competent representative completes and signs Part A of the Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1).

Correct any defect or inadequacy found as a result of the inspection.

Complete an assessment to ensure the equipment complies with Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER).

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Compile documents to accompany the equipment when it goes out, which should include the following as a minimum:

- inspection release certificate (IRC) (original)

- Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1)

- manufacturer’s certificates showing testing authorities’ approval for all equipment certified for installation in hazardous areas (subdivided into Zone 0, Zone 1 and Zone 2)

- operating, maintenance and instruction manuals where appropriate

- a copy of the PUWER assessment (see the PUWER assessment checklist in

- equipment weight and footprint data.

BP Inspection Representative

The BP Inspection Representative’s role is to do the following:

Review all certificates and documents for the equipment.

Sign the Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1) and any associated checklists (PE003 to PE014) that are required (see appendix 3) on completion of the inspection, as long as the equipment meets the specification in How we procure equipment.

Issue an IRC and a PE001, and any other relevant documents, to the supplier.

Where a site does not have a designated BP Inspection Representative, a relevant competent authority at the site will inspect temporary equipment when it arrives onsite.

How we ship equipment

The shipping agent arranges shipment of equipment, which must have a completed IRC (original) and an Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1). If these aren’t available, the shipping agent should inform the supplier that they must complete this part of the procedure before the agent can ship the equipment.

How we receive equipment

When the equipment arrives onsite, the Job Engineer responsible for the equipment will do the following:

Record the equipment in the register of temporary equipment, and ensure that they raise the Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form PE002 (see appendix 2).

Attach a temporary equipment tag to powered items.

Arrange for the Competent Electrical Person (CEP) or other discipline authorities to inspect the equipment.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Before use, arrange a site-specific PUWER assessment for the equipment after it is in the working position (see the PUWER assessment checklist in UKCS-TI-017).

Along with the site Health, Safety and Environmental Adviser (HSEA), make sure that equipment does not invalidate the conclusions of the site noise assessment.

For tools that can pose a hand arm vibration (HAV) risk, confirm that they have a valid HAV certificate and ensure that they’re in the site HAVS tracking system (see the Hand arm vibration practice (UKCS-HH-011)).

Gather the relevant certificates and documents and file in the Temporary Equipment Register.

Ensure that the following forms are with the PC1:

- Portable/Transportable Equipment Release Form PE001 (see appendix 1)

- Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form PE002 (see appendix 2)

- the PUWER assessment

- any other necessary checklists

- all certifying documents for the equipment.

Ensure that the relevant authorities sign the PE002 and that the PUWER Clearance Authority completes and signs the PC1 checklist.

For any item that is found damaged on arrival, or that differs from the inspection note from the onshore base, either keep it onsite for repair by the supplier or ship it directly to the contractor’s base.

Whenever an item is unsuitable, complete a user feedback report (UFR) form in line with the User Feedback Reporting System (UKCS-CSM-015). In 2013 this will be replaced by the Supplier Quality Management, Excellence through Supplier Quality process and non-conformance indications (NCIs) will be used.

How we inspect equipment

Competent personnel should inspect any temporary equipment on site every 90 days or in a timeframe which the manufacturer recommends, in line with Equipment Site Form PE002 (see appendix 2). If you are a Competent Person, you should file the results of the inspection, along with the documents for that equipment, in the register of temporary equipment.

You should also implement and record any necessary training on how to use temporary equipment.

The accountable person(s) for the Temporary Equipment Register should monitor it periodically to establish if there is any temporary equipment that has been in use for over a year. If any is found, they should discuss it with the relevant Discipline Engineer to decide whether a more permanent engineering solution should be considered.

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How we maintain and repair equipment

Supplier

Sections 2, 3 and 7 of The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, and Guidance L1, list duties which the supplier of equipment must carry out to supply and maintain plant and safe systems of work so that they are as safe as possible and don’t pose any health risks.

For maintenance or repair activities, the supplier must do the following:

Provide a plant maintenance and repair register for review by a BP Inspection Representative (the register should be available for BP inspection at all times).

Tell the Responsible Person before they maintain or repair the onsite equipment so that a BP representative can witness the activity, if necessary. Although we do not see changes to temporary plant and equipment as a modification, it still needs the correct technical and safety review.

Inspect the equipment again after any maintenance or repair, in line with the Equipment Site Form PE002 (see appendix 2).

Identify any faulty item that is beyond repair, and ship to the supplier’s base (they should enter this action and disposal instructions into the register of temporary equipment).

North Sea Region (UK) (onshore) temporary equipment technical details

General onshore environmental conditions

The nominal environmental conditions for all UK onshore terminals or sites are:

maximum ambient temperature: +25°C

minimum ambient temperature: -10°C

relative humidity up to 100% highly saline.

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Electrical-driven equipment

Electrical supplies

The Electrical technical details table shows the alternating current (ac) power supply specifications for all onshore terminals or sites.

BP terminals and sites don’t provide a direct current (dc) power supply for supplier’s equipment. Suppliers should organise their own dc supply if this is required.

Note:

Temporary and portable equipment for use onshore should have fittings that suit existing terminal or site power supplies and sockets (see the Electrical technical details table). The Procurer should make it clear on the purchase order if they need to wire equipment directly into the terminal or site electrical system.

Some specialised equipment might need electrical supplies that don’t meet the above requirements. If this happens, the relevant Site Asset Engineer should be asked for advice.

Cable specifications

Cable specifications are as follows:

All cables for power supplies to portable equipment must have an integral earth conductor.

Cables must be long enough for portable equipment to reach the worksite without using an extension lead, but they shouldn’t be longer than:

- 15m for equipment that needs a supply of 110Vac or less

- 20m for equipment that needs a supply of more than 110Vac.

If you use an extension lead, you should check that any earth loop impedance is low enough to ensure the circuit protection device works within the set time limit.

Cables for extension leads, hand lamps, portable tools and associated portable transformers are to be either heat, oil and flame-retardant (HOFR) or SY steel braided cables.

Specialised test equipment, which needs a certain type of cable, is exempt from the requirements in the second and third bullet points above, subject to agreement with the Terminal or Site Asset Engineer. The Inspection Co-ordinator will record all these exemptions so that the Regional Electrical Technical Authority can carry out a periodic review of cable specifications to decide whether they need to add any new specifications to future versions of this document.

Where physically possible, cables will be flame-retardant at least to the standard of BS EN 60332-1 Test on Electrical and Optical Cables under Fire Conditions, 2004.

The Responsible Electrical Person (REP) or delegated Competent Electrical Person (CEP) will check all cables before and after use.

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Electrical loads and protection

The supplier must work out the total electrical loading, and the size and type of electrical protection needed to protect individual circuits. They must record all design calculations.

Terminal and site power sockets

The plug configuration must suit the power sockets on terminals and sites (see the Electrical technical details table).

The supplier must make sure that all electrical equipment for use on BP terminals and sites has a compatible and suitably rated plug. If equipment is for wiring directly into the terminal or site electrical system, it is possible to supply it without a plug.

Portable transformers

Transformers for supplying portable electrical equipment must be double wound with an earthed screen between primary and secondary windings, and with the secondary winding centre-tapped to earth.

Transformers must be fitted with a 110V secondary winding with sensitive, current-operated, earth-leakage circuit breakers controlling the outgoing supply. The residual current device should operate with a minimum operating time of 40 milliseconds if the earth leakage current is more than 30mA. It should also have a test pushbutton that can be used to prove the integrity of the tripping circuit.

Ingress protection should be at least IP54.

If the terminal or site can’t provide the required type of transformer, they might be able to provide a suitable one in special cases only.

Frequency

Voltage

Location

Manufacturer

Pin

Rating

(Hz)

(1ph)

configuration

(amps)

50

110

Plant

STAHL 8575/

2P+E

16

12-304 (yellow)

50

110

Substations and

Reyrolle Belmos

2P+E

16

workshops

Electrical technical details table

240V supplies are also available in substations from standard 240V 13A switch socket outlets.

If electrical equipment needs a 415V power supply, the Procurer must make sure that the equipment’s plug or plugs have a suitable rating and are compatible with the socket outlet(s) on any hired temporary diesel generation facility.

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UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Portable electrically powered tools and maintenance equipment

The equipment must be suitable for use in Zone 1 areas, unless otherwise agreed with the Procurer.

If it is necessary to use industrial electrical equipment, the user must:

stay with the equipment at all times during use

use it only if they have a spark potential or naked flame permit

isolate and disconnect it from the electrical supply when not in use

either remove it from the hazardous area when not in use or make sure a standby person is there.

All hand-held portable tools must be able to operate at rated voltages of no more than 110V.

Ingress protection should be at least IP55.

The supplier must state hand tool vibration levels over 2.5m/sec 2 to the user.

Portable electrical test equipment

Equipment in this category includes:

high-voltage test sets

earth testers

crack detectors

vibration monitors

radio and telemetry test equipment.

Only personnel who have sufficient training or technical knowledge and experience can use specialised test equipment that needs power at voltages of more than 55V to earth. This will avoid any danger. The Terminal or Site REP must inspect and approve this type of equipment before use.

Portable lighting

Battery-driven lamps

The equipment must be suitable for use in a Zone 1 area, unless the Procurer agrees otherwise.

The ingress protection should be at least IP66.

The battery charger unit must be 240Vac or 110Vac, and the lamp should have a rechargeable battery.

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Permanent electrical supply

The lighting must be 25V and suitable for use in a Zone 1 area.

The ingress protection should be at least IP66.

The diffuser and housing of the lighting must be impact-resistant.

The lighting rating should be at least 55W.

Hand-held radios

The equipment must be suitable for use in a Zone 1 area. Anyone using a hand-held radio should only use approved batteries.

Earthing

All skid-mounted equipment should be bonded to the structure of the skid, which should have two M12 threaded bronze studs complete with nut and locknut for bonding to the terminal or site earthing system. These studs should be at diagonally opposite corners of the skid.

Temporary stores, offices, workshops and service units

The location of temporary stores, offices, workshops and service units must comply with the following:

Non-hazardous area temporary stores, offices, workshops and service units equipment specifications

The electrical installations should be suitable for use in a non-hazardous area.

The electrical installation must be designed, installed and tested in line with the current edition of the Institute of Electrical Engineers (IEE) wiring regulations.

The electrical supply to the temporary module should terminate in an approved power isolator.

All circuits on distribution boards and all electrical fittings must be labelled with the circuit ID.

All electrical equipment must be tagged.

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UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Sensitive, current-operated earth-leakage circuit breakers must control all 240V socket outlets. The residual current device should operate, with a minimum operating time of 40 milliseconds, if the earth leakage current is more than 30mA. This device should have a test pushbutton that can be used to prove the integrity of the device.

Lighting levels should suit any work necessary within the unit, as recommended by Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) guidelines. Emergency fittings must be available to give a lighting level of at least 50 Lux when supplied from terminal or site power. These fittings must have a standby supply (internal batteries) which can give a lighting level of at least 0.2 Lux for 90 minutes.

Normal and emergency exits must have battery-fitted emergency lighting.

The module electrical earthing system, any metallic water or gas pipes, and the module structural steelwork should be bonded to an identified external M12 threaded bronze stud, complete with nut and locknut for bonding to the terminal or site earthing system.

Cables entering the module must be via multi-cable transits.

Occupied temporary buildings must have a fire detection system installed. Systems that should operate under hazardous conditions, for example, fire and gas (F&G) systems, must meet Zone 1 hazardous area standards throughout. All supplies to non-hazardous equipment should be able to disconnect automatically if there is a hazardous condition.

The container wall needs an escape route kick-out panel, at the opposite end from the door, if the maximum distance inside the container to the outside door is more than 5m.

Hazardous area temporary stores, offices, workshops and service units equipment specifications

These are similar to the non-hazardous specifications above, with the exceptions below.

The electrical installations must be suitable for use in a Zone 1 hazardous area. If the units are for industrial electrical equipment, they should have a pressurisation and gas detection system (see Operating guidelines for pressurised modules).

The electrical supply to the temporary module must terminate in a Zone 1 approved power isolator.

Battery-fitted emergency lighting must be Zone 1 approved, and located so it lights both normal and emergency exits.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Systems that should operate under hazardous conditions, for example, F&G systems, must meet Zone 1 hazardous area standards throughout. All supplies to non-hazardous equipment should be able to disconnect automatically, if there is a hazardous condition, for example:

on detection of gas, for example 60% lower explosive limit (LEL) gas ingress at the pressurising fan air inlet

on continued loss of pressure within the module for up to 30 seconds.

Operating guidelines for pressurised modules

The differential pressure between the interior of the cabin and the exterior should be kept between 0.5 and 1mbar. The reset pressure for this equipment should be 0.7mbar above external pressure.

The system must sound an alarm if the pressure within the cabin falls to less than 0.5mbar above the surrounding atmosphere. If there is a continued loss of pressure for up to 30 seconds, all supplies to industrial electrical equipment within the cabin must be isolated within an enclosure suitable for installation in a Zone 1 hazardous area.

When a sprinkler flow switch operates, all supplies to industrial electrical equipment and the fans must be isolated.

On detection of gas ingress at the pressurising fan air inlet, the fan must be shut down and all

supplies to industrial electrical equipment isolated within an enclosure suitable for installation

in a Zone 1 hazardous area.

To purge the cabin of flammable gases, the pressurisation fan should be started using a key switch that overrides the gas shutdown signal. The fan, contactor and override switch should be suitable for installation in a Zone 1 hazardous area.

The system should allow for five air changes before energising industrial electrical equipment.

A key switch controls the restoration of supplies to industrial equipment. It should have the

following notice attached:

‘NOT TO BE OPERATED UNTIL ATMOSPHERE HAS BEEN CHECKED AND FOUND TO BE GAS-FREE.’

Interfaces with the terminal or site

BP will supply the following services, local to the container or module as needed:

electrical supply

installation alarm and safety shutdown signals

telephone or telephones

public address (PA) speakers

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

potable water supply for sprinkler system

drain connections

plant air

instrument air.

Any equipment BP provides remains BP property. This equipment must be removed and returned to BP, either before the unit leaves the terminal or site, or after it returns to the supplier.

HVAC system

HVAC systems for onshore facilities must meet the requirements of ETP GP 14-02 Guidance on Practice for Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning – Onshore.

If HVAC systems need filtration, this should meet the requirements in Section 10.7 of the above ETP.

HVAC systems should have fire dampers fitted to meet the fire rating of the barrier that they penetrate.

The ventilation air change rate must be as recommended by the CIBSE guidelines.

Diesel-driven equipment

Diesel engines for use in Zone 2 hazardous areas must meet the requirements of:

ETP GIS 34-305 Diesel Engines (checklist PE012A in appendix 4) if placed on the market and put into service in the European Community (EC) on or before 30 June 2003.

ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (checklist PE012B in appendix 4) if placed on the market and put into service in the EC after 30 June 2003.

Diesel engines for use in non-hazardous areas should meet the requirements on checklist PE012C in appendix 4.

The unit is under permit conditions and any local installation requirements. If there is an emergency shutdown, shutdown procedures for the unit should be available on the terminal or site and personnel must be competent to carry these out.

Compressed air equipment and air-driven equipment

The Procurer should make sure that, if there is a need for air-driven equipment but there is no facility to tie into the terminal or site instrument or plant air system, a suitably rated air compressor unit is available.

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All hose connections must be bayonet-type quick-action coupling (for example, Macdonald) with whip-checks.

All hoses should be antistatic in line with BS 2050 Electrical Resistance of Conducting and Antistatic Products made from Flexible Polymeric Material and marked at both ends

to show this. Conductivity levels should be measured coupling to coupling.

The hose service must be marked at each end of the hose, preferably on a blue sleeve.

The hose should be certified for at least six months.

Grit blasting and spraying equipment must be earthed whenever it is in use and the earth leads must be 4mm 2 flexible copper braids or strands with transparent polyvinyl chloride (PVC) extruded covering.

The equipment should have permanently fixed earth connections either by using bolts or another suitable method, and by a strong spring clamp (for example, heavy-duty crocodile clip) or clamp at the workplace or system end.

Air-driven lighting should have a rating of 55W, be suitable for use in a Zone 1 area and have an ingress protection rating of IP66.

The Procurer should confirm the compressed air supply before sending out any air-driven equipment.

Hydraulic systems

The following paragraphs are specifically for portable hydraulic flushing units.

The flowrates for a water glycol service should be between:

0 to 27 litres/min at up to 1700psi supply pressure

0 to 20 litres/min at up to 3000psi supply pressure.

The flowrates for a mineral oil service should be between:

0 to 45 litres/min at up to 1700psi supply pressure

0 to 24 litres/min at up to 3000psi supply pressure.

All supply line components should be suitable for 3000psi working pressure and the pressure relief valve should be adjustable from 100 to 3000psi.

A pressure gauge should indicate the maximum system pressure (supply line).

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Filter mesh sizes should be as follows:

suction line filter – 125 micrometres

supply line filter – 3 micrometres

return line filter – 3 micrometres.

The fluid reservoir capacity should be 250 litres filled volume. The reservoir fluid temperature should be kept between 15 and 70°C. The ambient temperature for flushing is 20 to 50°C.

Operational requirements

Control and use of mobile plant

Mobile plant in hazardous areas

Mobile plant should be used as infrequently as possible in hazardous areas. If mobile plant must be used in a hazardous area, it is best to locate and use it on roadways, if possible. To minimise voltage drop in the cables, weld sets must be located as close to the worksite as possible.

For mobile plant in hazardous areas, the following rules apply:

Mobile plant must have a spark arrestor and Chalwyn valve fitted and have a valid vehicle inspection tag.

The Control of Work Supervisor, Area Operator and Emergency Response should agree the location of the mobile plant and record this on the work control certificate.

After it is in a hazardous area, the Control of Work Supervisor (or their representative) should check the location and condition of the mobile plant every shift, as part of their worksite visits, and the Area Operator should do this on their area checks.

The mobile plant should be left in the hazardous area for as little time as possible.

The maximum number of items of mobile plant allowed in hazardous areas at any time is six.

The Mobile Plant Attendant should tell operations (the area Control Room Operator (CRO)) by radio before starting mobile plant. If a single attendant is looking after several items of mobile plant, they only need to notify operations when they start the first item.

There must be a Mobile Plant Attendant with the mobile plant in hazardous areas while it is running and for 15 minutes after it is shut down.

Mobile plant should not be left unattended with the engine running.

One Mobile Plant Attendant can watch several items of mobile plant if these are located together.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

All mobile plant in hazardous areas must have a constant gas monitor (CGM) upwind of the mobile plant it is monitoring and a CO 2 fire extinguisher.

When not in use, the mobile plant must be properly shut down and the keys removed.

Mobile plant in non-hazardous (operating) areas

Mobile plant should be used as infrequently as possible in non-hazardous operating areas.

If mobile plant must be used in a non-hazardous operating area, it is best to locate and use it on roadways, if possible. To minimise voltage drop in the cables, weld sets must be located as close to the worksite as possible.

For mobile plant in non-hazardous operating areas, the following rules apply:

Mobile plant must have a spark arrestor and Chalwyn valve fitted and have a valid vehicle inspection tag.

The Control of Work Supervisor should agree the location of the mobile plant and record this on the work control certificate.

The Performing Authority should tell operations (the area CRO) by radio before starting mobile plant. If there are several items of mobile plant, the Performing Authority only needs to tell operations when they start the first item.

Mobile plant in non-hazardous areas does not need a Mobile Plant Attendant.

Mobile plant in non-hazardous areas must have a CO 2 fire extinguisher but does not need a CGM.

When not in use, the mobile plant must be properly shut down and the keys removed.

The person using the mobile plant must shut it down if the plant alarm or the terminal or site general alarm (GA) sounds.

Mobile plant in non-operating areas

Wherever possible, mobile plant should be located in non-operating areas. For mobile plant operating in non-operating areas, the following rules apply:

Mobile plant must have a spark arrestor and Chalwyn valve fitted and have a valid vehicle inspection tag.

The Control of Work Supervisor, Area Operator and Emergency Response should agree the location of the mobile plant and record this on the work control certificate.

Mobile plant in non-operating areas does not need a Mobile Plant Attendant.

Mobile plant in non-operating areas must have a CO 2 fire extinguisher but does not need a CGM.

The person using the mobile plant must shut it down if the plant alarm or the terminal or site GA sounds.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

What are the Mobile Plant Attendant’s responsibilities?

The Mobile Plant Attendant should do the following:

Stay close enough to see the mobile plant and CGM.

Understand how the mobile plant, gas monitor and fire extinguisher work.

Shut down the mobile plant if either the plant alarm or the terminal or site GA sounds.

Understand that if they can’t stop the mobile plant engine using the normal controls it could mean there is gas present.

Discharge a CO 2 fire extinguisher into the engine air intake if the mobile plant engine does not stop.

Note:

The hazardous area classification for the jetties changes when a ship isn’t alongside.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Appendix 1 – Portable/Transportable Equipment Release Form (PE001)

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . Portable/Transportable Equipment Release Form

Portable/Transportable Equipment Release Form (PE001)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Portable/Transportable Equipment Release Form (PE001)

Portable/Transportable Equipment Release Form (PE001) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Appendix 2 – Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form (PE002)

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please click here . Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form (PE002)

Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form (PE002)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form (PE002)

Portable/Transportable Equipment Site Form (PE002) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . PE002 and 90-day Inspection

PE002 and 90-day Inspection Record

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Appendix 3 – Maintenance checklists

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . Portable Electrical Tools (PE003)

Portable Electrical Tools (PE003)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . Portable Test Equipment (PE004)

Portable Test Equipment (PE004)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . Ex ‘e’ Portable Lighting

Ex ‘e’ Portable Lighting (PE005)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please click here . Portable Electrically Powered Maintenance Equipment

Portable Electrically Powered Maintenance Equipment (PE006)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . Ex ‘d’ Portable Lighting

Ex ‘d’ Portable Lighting (PE007)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . Portable Transformer (PE008) February

Portable Transformer (PE008)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please click here . Portable Modules (PE009) February 2013

Portable Modules (PE009)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please click here . Power Extension Leads (PE010) February

Power Extension Leads (PE010)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . High Pressure Jetting Equipment

High Pressure Jetting Equipment (PE011)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please click here . Well Interventions Handling Equipment (PE014)

Well Interventions Handling Equipment (PE014)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Appendix 4 – Diesel engine checklists

For a printable version of this form, please click here.

For a printable version of this form, please click here . Inspection at Supplier’s Works of

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ETP GIS 34-305 (PE012A) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a printable version of this form, please click here.

a printable version of this form, please clic k here . Inspection at Supplier’s Works of

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (PE012B)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tem porary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (PE012B) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tem porary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (PE012B) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tem porary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (PE012B) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tem porary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (PE012B) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tem porary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (PE012B) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tem porary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (PE012B) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tem porary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (PE012B) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tem porary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX

Inspection at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines to ATEX Directive 94/9/EC (PE012B) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . Inspections at Supplier’s Works

Inspections at Supplier’s Works of Diesel Engines for Use in Non-hazardous Areas (PE012C)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please clic k here . Diesel Engine Inspection and

Diesel Engine Inspection and Periodic Function Checks (PE013)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 Diesel Engine Inspection and Periodic Function Checks

Diesel Engine Inspection and Periodic Function Checks (PE013) (cont’d)

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Appendix 5 – Temporary Equipment PUWER Assessment Checklist

For a usable version of this form, please click here.

For a usable version of this form, please click here . February 2013 Issue 6 Uncontrolled

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

for control of tempor ary equipment UK-PRO-5.4-1002 February 2013 Issue 6 Uncontrolled when printed or saved

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Appendix 6 – Technical specification for purchase or hire of pneumatically operated manriding winches

What are the minimum supply criteria?

Overload protective device

emergency stop on air supply

integral emergency lowering device (in event of power failure)

10mm diameter multistrand wire rope galvanised with steel core construction (factor of safety = 10 -1 )

assisting spooling device

upper and lower travel limit switches

slack wire detection system

failsafe control lever

derail protection on rope drum

drum guard

air exhaust silencer

supply air regulator filter and lubricator

dual braking facility (one automatic and one manual)

marine paint specification

materials certification to Type 3.1.B of BS EN 10204:1991 Metallic Products – Types of Inspection Documents 1991

CE compliant and type approved.

What are the specifications?

Rated line pull capacity = 150kg max.

Operating air supply pressure (nominal) = 6.1bar.

Standard air consumption (nominal) = 54cfm.

Rope drum storage = 115m.

Rated line speed = 30m/minute.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

Appendix 7 – Inspection Representative call-out procedure

How to arrange an inspection

Suppliers who need inspection services must contact BP’s contracted inspection company (Oceaneering) by calling their Inspection Co-ordinator on 01224 758697. If this number is unmanned at any time there will be a voice message giving alternative contact details.

For some items of specialised equipment it may be necessary to contact an alternative inspection company. In such cases, the BP purchase order originator will provide the required contact details.

The supplier should give the Inspection Co-ordinator relevant location, equipment and shipping details, plus contact details for the supplier and procurer. Suppliers must also check with the procurer that a valid order is in place with the inspection company to cover the inspection, because the company can’t start the inspection without this. Suppliers’ equipment must conform to UK-PRO-5.4-1002 and any specific procedures (for example OGUK Guidelines for the Safe Packing and Handling of Cargo to and from Offshore Locations), as well as relevant specifications and legislation. The Inspection Co-ordinator will nominate the relevant discipline inspector and confirm the inspection visit time.

What happens during an inspection?

The Inspection Representative will be at the supplier’s site at the agreed time, will ask for the point of contact and will inspect the equipment. If the equipment isn’t ready, the Inspection Representative will wait for half an hour.

If the equipment still isn’t ready after that time, they will tell the Inspection Co-ordinator and move to their next assignment. The Inspection Representative will raise a non-conformance report (NCR) against the supplier for this.

If the equipment is ready, the Inspection Representative will inspect it. If the Inspection Representative finds a non-conformance in one particular area during the inspection, they will continue and finish the inspection (as it is possible to release part orders). On assignments where they raise NCRs, the Inspection Representative will:

detail the non-conformances on the NCR

explain the non-conformances to the supplier along with any corrective requirements

ask the supplier to sign acceptance of the NCR

tell the Inspection Co-ordinator about the NCR.

Procedure for control of temporary equipment

UK-PRO-5.4-1002

The Inspection Co-ordinator, Inspection Representative and supplier will agree a suitable date and time for a revisit (the Inspection Representative shouldn’t do revisits for NCR corrective work before previously booked inspection assignments). The supplier will tell the Procurer if the revisit will have any impact on the equipment delivery schedule.

If equipment complies with requirements, the Inspection Representative will issue an inspection release certificate (IRC) and the appropriate PE checklist or checklists to the supplier. They will also complete an inspection report that the Inspection Co-ordinator will keep. If the Inspection Co-ordinator has noted any areas of concern on the report, they will send them to the supplier by email or fax. Areas of concern are items of equipment or related documents that the Inspection Representative identifies during an inspection visit that do not fully meet the requirements of UK-PRO-5.4-1002 but that they correct during the inspection visit.

If it is necessary to cancel a visit (by telling the Inspection Co-ordinator), this will be accepted the day before the agreed visit time but will incur an NCR if cancelled on the actual day of the visit.

NCRs and Excellence through Supplier Quality (ESQ) process

The BP quarterly unit inspection and fault analysis report lists all NCRs and areas of concern (identified by individual fault codes) for the BP supply chain management.

It may also be necessary to raise an ESQ non-conformance indication (NCI) for certain NCRs. This will only be necessary if the issues raised in the NCR are considered serious and only after discussion with the BP job responsible person.