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Volume 121 Number 7

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Wednesday, February 18, 2015

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7 www.centralwinews.com Wednesday, February 18, 2015 $1 Loyal girls’ fi rst league title 40 years in

Loyal girls’ rst league title 40 years in the making

At exactly 8:47 p.m. on Jan. 13, 2015, a very, very long wait for the Loyal High School girls program finally came to an end. When the final buzzer sounded to conclude the Greyhounds’ 70-38 win at Greenwood, it became official -- the Loyal girls were conference basketball champions. It was the first time since the first-ever Loyal girls baskeball game was played in the early winter of 1974 could that be said. On Monday night, Loyal com- pleted an undefeated 16-0 Eastern Cloverbelt Conference season with a 59-37 home win over Owen- Withee. The team’s overall record is now 18-2, and it is ranked fifth in the state in Division 5 in the latest Associated Press prep girls bas- ketball poll. On Saturday night at 7:30, at Neillsville, Loyal will take on Fall Creek for the program’s possible first-ever overall confer- ence championship. Loyal’s girls basketball history has not been without its bright moments -- the team qualified for WIAA sectional competi- tion in 1999 and again in 2004. A conference title has been elusive, however, in part because the league to which Loyal has been

assigned has long been dominated by highly successful programs -- Neillsville most recently, Owen- Withee before that, and Mosinee and Greenwood in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Even in those seasons when Loyal has had stronger teams, there have been dominant obstacles in the way. Loyal first fielded a girls basketball team in 1974, coached by Ellie Robillard. Players out for the sport in its debut sea- son at Loyal included Michele Teter, Don- na Rowley, Amy Anderson, Sue Kehrberg, Mary Elpert, Ruth Fravert, Sue Bielen,

Sue Kehrberg, Mary Elpert, Ruth Fravert, Sue Bielen, STAFF PHOTO Loyal’s fi rst-ever girls conference

STAFF PHOTO

Loyal’s rst-ever girls conference championship basketball team (front from left) Ryleigh Wilke, Jaedyn Pieper, Devyn Schoonover, Morgan Reinwand, Amanda Zettler (back) Katie Hoeser, Jaelynn Young, Missy Benz, Karsyn Rueth, Amber Acker and Jackie McPherson.

Ann Esselman, Lorraine Wolf, Shari Hills, Shari Slahor, Barb Arbelovsky, Cindy Tews, Nila Nelson, Dawn Chambers, Tami Schoonover, Candy Schiller, Cindy Noeld- ner, Debra Friedemann, Jody Hartl, Jeni Hug, Ann Abrahamson, Jodi Schoonover, Dina Jembrzyski, Donna Shupe, Jane Dahlby, Sue Gregory, Pat Wilke, Kathy Studinski and Debbie Chambers. Claude Hieptas took over as head coach of the program for several years in the late 1970s, prior to Mark Rueth becom-

ing head coach. The Greyhounds played to an 8-12 overall record in 1977-78 and placed third in the Cloverbelt Conference in 1982-83. However, the record fell off to 4-14 in 1983-84. The team improved to 7-7 in the conference in 1986-87, good for fourth in the Cloverbelt. The following season produced the Greyhounds’ first league winning record, at 8-6. The program’s success bottomed out between 1989 and 1998, with no more than four conference wins in any of those sea-

sons. The Greyhounds posted 1-13 records in two of those years. In 1998-99, the Cloverbelt re- cord was again dismal at 3-11, but Loyal went on a winning streak in the WIAA playoffs and came within a game of reaching the state tournament. The team beat Gilmanton 60-46 in a sectional semi-final at Augusta, but fell 75- 54 to second-ranked Potosi in the sectional final played at La Crosse Logan. That team -- coached by Dave Oldenberg -- included play- ers such as Becky Brey, Nicole Pamelia, Mindy Krasselt, Kathy Rinka, Pam Krause and Carrie Meyer. Loyal produced a 7-7 league record in the following season and went 6-8 in 2000-01. The record fell to 2-12 the following season and 3-11 in 2002-03. In 2003-04, the Greyhound team coached by Oldenberg repeated the sectional surprise. After fin- ishing 6-8 in conference, the Grey- hounds won four straight games to again reach the sectional. That year’s team fell 58-39 to Eau Claire Regis, with players including Jen- nifer Trimble, Kristen Landini, Katie Luttropp, Carey Petri and Blair Weyer.

Loyal struggled through medio- cre seasons in 2004-05 and 2005-06, but then put together a 10-4 league mark in 2006-07 to finish second behind Neillsville (13-1). That was a short-lived success, as Loyal tumbled to 0-14 in the league the following season. A string of more average seasons passed, until Loyal surged to 10-8 in 2012-13 to finish fourth in the conference. In 2013-14, Loyal improved yet again to 15-3 to tie Owen-Withee for second-place behind undefeated Neillsville.

Greenwood School Board primary election results

Top two advance to April 7 spring election

Dean Lindner

104

Roger Sonnentag

93

Sarah Shaw

56

Wayne Fleischmann

3

Spencer School Board primary election results

Top two advance to April 7 spring election

Lynda LeGrand

141

James Krasselt

128

Shawn Lyon

27

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Page 2 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Wednesday, February 18, 2015

OPINION

The Postal Service should be about just that -- ‘service’

The United States government doesn’t want you to read these words. Or at the very least wants you to wait to read them until they are no longer relevant. That is the message being sent as the government continues cutting back services through the U.S. Post Office. Under federal mandate the post office must operate as a business and must be self supporting while at the same time following government ac- counting standards and regulations that make no sense in the private sector. It is as if the powers that be in the federal government want the postal service to just disappear and along with it the vitality important role of

providing a nationwide communica- tions link, even to those places without internet or cellphone service. The Washington D.C. decision mak- ers in the post office are relying on plant closures and theoretical econo- mies of scale to cut costs. While large urban areas may not see a dramatic change in their services, rural areas are being hit hard with service cuts and office closures. People are having to pay more for less service. Mail that used to take a day or two to be delivered now may take a week or more and in the process log hundreds of miles in the back of a truck as it is transported from one processing station to another. The postal service management has addressed these complaints about slow delivery by changing the standard of delivery for everything from the first class letter you send with your

water bill payment to magazines, newspa- pers and packages. It is kind of like grade inflation where, “C”

level work is changed to be an “A” to make it look better on the report cards. Under the new standards that went into effect on Jan. 1, postal customers in Medford should still get their paper the next day, but subscribers in Gilman could have up to three days to get their paper in the mail even though the pa- pers are mailed at the same time. This is because the papers go from Medford where the post office trucks them to Wausau and then to Gilman. If that

extra mileage seems silly, it gets worse. Up until last week, a newspaper going to Stanley -- about 40 miles from where the printing plant is in Abbotsford -- went on a multi-state journey before reaching its destination. The papers went from Abbotsford to Wausau and from there to Green Bay then to Des Moines, Iowa then to Minneapolis be- fore being sent to Stanley. Considering each stop has up to two days to process and move along the mail, the well-traveled papers could arrive to subscribers six days later and not be considered late under the postal service standards. Fortunately, a postal employee in Wausau utilizing some common sense is working to fix this problem and stop the cross country travel for papers in this region. However, that is only a localized fix to system-wide problem. For snowbirds, getting their papers in places like Arizona or southern Texas, the post office says you should be happy with getting your newspaper a week after they are mailed. Any com- plaint issued before that time will be ignored by the post office. The new postal

standards are unac- ceptable. But getting anyone in a decision making level of the postal bureaucracy

Members of the TRG editorial Board include Publishers Kris O’Leary and Kevin Flink, Editor Dean Lesar, and Carol O’Leary.

to listen is a challenge. Collectively newspapers and other periodicals are big postal customers. They account for a massive part of the postal service’s mailing volume, not to mention the amount paid in postage. However, the bean counters and decision makers are more concerned with being able to reduce the hours of route carriers than with providing service to their customers and the American people. Rural postmasters and mail carriers are being pinched in the middle between unhappy custom- ers and a bureaucracy committed to a course of centralization and mechani- zation over service. For many, the risk of being the next position cut or office closed is too great to buck the bureau- cracy and side with service. The only way this will change is if

people complain to members of con- gress to change the focus of the post office back to being a service for tax- payers. People also need to make their voices heard to higher levels of postal management about their unhappiness with low standards of service. Americans do not look for a return on investment from national highways or the armed forces. The post office needs to be returned to that level of service and reliability. Even in an elec- tronic age, the printed word is vitally important both for the dissemination of ideas and for economic health of our communities. Bureaucrats and bean counters are far removed from the im- pact their decisions have on people and business and need to be reminded that there is a world beyond their spread- sheets and corporate doublespeak.

world beyond their spread- sheets and corporate doublespeak. Budget proposals leave school officials wondering

Budget proposals leave school officials wondering

Officials for both public and private schools are puzzled by Gov. Scott Walker’s budget for elementary and secondary education. They agree that more state taxpayer support is needed for each of them to succeed. Walker’s budget calls for expanding the voucher program that provides state help for the poor to send their children to participating voucher schools. The pro- gram has been limited largely to Racine and Milwaukee, but the governor’s budget removes participation ceilings. The governor’s budget calls for a $150 per-pupil reduction in state aid for each child in public schools in the first year of the new biennium. It also would scale back the size of the vouchers and lower income limits for participation. But the budget is cloudy for everyone because public school budgets would be tapped to provide the voucher money. Public school officials suggest the total loss, including the state cutback, could come to $127 million in the first year of the biennium. In addition, the shift in money would come even if the child entering a voucher school had not previously been enrolled in a public school in the district. Jim Bender, who, as president of School Choice in Wisconsin, has led the fight for more voucher schools, said those schools “need proper funding or they won’t open more seats.” Lurking in the back of the financing question is whether more voucher schools would provide a better education. That fight bubbled up as public school administrators assailed the governor’s ap- proach. John Forester, director of govern- ment relations for School Administrators Alliance, also noted the Walker adminis-

tration expects a 4.7 percent increase in general tax revenue in the first year of the biennium. “Despite overwhelming evidence that private school vouchers do not improve student achievement and lack adequate accountability to the public, Gov. Walker continues to pursue private school vouch- er expansion,” said Forester. “The ultimate objective of voucher advocates is a statewide system of pri- vate-school vouchers for all Wisconsin children,” he added. The governor wasn’t buying criticism of his budget ideas. “To me, the losers are the people who want to grow the state government beyond the state’s ability to pay,” Walker said. But, to hear both the private and pub- lic school leaders, the financial picture for the upcoming school year is at best unclear. The local school bud-

get issues have gone largely unnoticed in the media because of the

controversy over Walk-

er’s budget plans for the University of Wisconsin System. His budget calls for a $300 million, two-year reduction in state support for the system. Walker also proposed eliminating the “Wisconsin Idea” of public service that dates back more than a century. The governor retreated, first suggest- ing the Wisconsin Idea change was a “drafting error,” then said it was caused by confusion among his staff. The gover- nor suggested the budget issue could be partially solved if the university faculty would teach an additional course.

if the university faculty would teach an additional course. Matt Pommer University officials predicted that other

Matt

Pommer

University officials predicted that other top-notch schools would raid the faculty ranks, offering other jobs to UW faculty who are leaders in their disciplines. Walker’s move attracted national atten- tion because he is preparing to run for national office. Two weeks before he released his bud- get plan, the governor urged local school officials to encourage high school students to think about going to technical and vo- cational schools. A two-year technical school education “is just as noble and needed as those of their classmates who go on to a four-year college or university,” Walker said in a speech in Milwaukee.

or university,” Walker said in a speech in Milwaukee. ATTENTION MAIL SUBSCRIBERS DID YOUR NEWSPAPER ARRIVE
or university,” Walker said in a speech in Milwaukee. ATTENTION MAIL SUBSCRIBERS DID YOUR NEWSPAPER ARRIVE

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The Tribune- Phonograph, P.O. Box 677, Abbotsford, WI 54405. Send your letters to: news@trgnews.com Publishers Kris
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Publishers Kris O'Leary and Kevin Flink Editor Dean Lesar Advertising Sales Phil Greschner

Publishers

Kris O'Leary and Kevin Flink

Editor

Dean Lesar

Advertising Sales

Phil

Greschner

Advertising Designer/Proofreader

Mary

Ann Lesar

Advertising Designer/Pagination

Ashley

Kadolph

The Tribune Record Gleaner (TRG) was formed in 1969 by the merger of The Loyal Tribune, The Spencer Record and The Greenwood Gleaner. This newspaper has served the Loyal area since 1894. OUR GOAL The TRG strives to fairly and accurately report the community news of the area. We welcome comments on our content and design. Readers who have comments on any topic related to the content of this newspaper should direct them to the editor. We welcome submissions of topics for coverage. Please direct them to the editor. OPINIONS Pages 2-3 of each edition of the TRG is devoted to expressing opinions. The opinions presented on this page are meant to represent the diversity of human thought and do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher.

LETTER POLICY The TRG welcomes letters to the editor for publication. Letters must be signed and must contain the name, address and telephone number of the writer, for verification purposes. Letters should be concise and may be edited for length, grammar and focus. Letters on local topics will be given first priority. Address letters to Editor:

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Wednesday, February 18, 2015 -Tribune Record Gleaner - Page 3

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 -Tribune Record Gleaner - Page 3 That didn’t work too well as

That didn’t work too well as the last few weeks we seem to be on the tail end of the cleaning process. So eating breakfast and coming back to a clean apartment hasn’t worked. Today, we ate our breakfast at Moby Dick’s, a different eating place from any other Friday mornings. After that, we hopped on the ferry and went for a ride out in the country. There was plenty to see. At nearby Ingleside we drove by the DuPont plant where workers are on strike, claiming a lock out. It has been an on-going strike as I recall seeing strikers on the picket line the day we ar- rived back on Jan. 1. Just across the road is a huge factory, under construction. It is part of an invest- ment by some Chinese investors. They are building the plant which will be building pipeline pipe. It has been under construc- tion for a couple of years and still has a long way to go. The next stop was the community of Taft, which calls itself the Cotton Pickin’ Capitol of Texas. I had hoped we’d see some farmers in the fields, but that wasn’t the case. The only thing being planted was some pipe for a new pipeline that will move oil from some of the new oil wells springing up in the area. The area also has numerous windmills which started appearing on the scene a few years ago.

ÓÓÓÓÓ Then it was back to Aransas Pass to get our weekly shopping done at one of

the dollar stores that can be found in the community. There is one of each, so what one doesn’t have, the other two probably do. Anyway, it is a good way to kill time. The next stop was the Aransas Pass harbor, which is always a yearly place to visit. At one time Aransas Pass was known as the shrimp capitol of Texas. That is, until the shrimpers pulled out for South America. The first years the harbor was sort of

a disaster. There were deserted buildings

along the waterfront, half sunk shrimp boats and a sight that was a bit depressing. Each year we came it seems like things were getting cleaned up. This year was probably the most change we have seen

yet. All the old buildings are gone, the old fishing boats are gone and in their place a yacht club and signs of even better things to come. One new structure is for boat storage.

It must be 100 yards long and close to 100

feet high. As you drive by you can see the boats stacked in tiers, probably put there

by a huge lifting device.

At long last we are finally getting some nice Texas weather. Today is a bit cooler,

but we had five great days of weather, warm enough to go around without a jacket. On top of that, the last three days had little or no wind, which made it much better.

It was a great time to just sit in Roberts

Park and watch all the activity on the ship channel and Inter-Coastal waterway. Ships, barges and fishing boats make for wonderful watching. Add to that the peli- cans, sea gulls and dolphins and it don’t get much better than that.

ÓÓÓÓÓ

I mentioned last week the Wisconsin

Coffee coming up, which is an annual event. It was a standing-room-only affair

this year. As it turned out, there was a gathering at one table, which we called the Clark County group. That included Don and Darlene Zukowski and Tom and Geri Nelson of Owen, Wayne and Jean Thomp- son of Dorchester, and Florence and I.

I met a lady from Clayton who didn’t

know exactly where Loyal was, but she did tell me she knows Scott Needham. Up there, they call him the Honorable Judge Scott Needham, another example of how someone from a small town can make good in the world.

ÓÓÓÓÓ There might have been enough room

for everyone to sit around a table if there wasn’t a need for so many tables to handle all the food that is brought to share. One problem I have down here is find- ing a salad bar that has any herring on it. Generally, Florence had been taking a plate of deviled eggs, which always seems to disappear. This year I decided that there has to be a lot more people who miss their herring, so

I convinced Florence that we should take

a bowl of them. It was a good thing that

I sampled a few before we left our apart-

ment, as the only thing left in the bowl was

a few strips of onions.

ÓÓÓÓÓ One of the benefits of living here at the Sandcastle Condo, instead of the one we lived at last year, is the housekeeping services provided. We no longer have to change the sheets and sweep the floor. The housekeepers take care of that. The only problem we have is getting used to their schedule. They were good about telling us the fifth floor is done on

Friday, but which side of the condo do they start at? The first week they were here a bit after nine, so we decided it was

a good morning to slip out early and eat

breakfast.

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318 N. Main St.
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Main St. Loyal, WI 54446 (715) 255-8531 news@trgnews.com SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Neillsville Seventh Day Adventist

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST

Neillsville Seventh Day Adventist Church

5th & Clay Streets • Neillsville • 715-743-7988 DAVID SCHOFIELD, PASTOR Saturday Services: 9:30 a.m. - Sabbath school 11 a.m. - Worship, 6:30 p.m. - Thursday Bible study

CATHOLIC

Christ the King Church

101 Wendel • Spencer • 715-659-4480

REV. SAMUEL MARTIN 4 p.m. - Saturday evening mass • 8 and 10 a.m. - Sunday morning mass Masses for Holy Days of Obligation evening before, 8 p.m.; day of, 5:30 p.m.

Holy Family Catholic Church

Willard • 715-255-8017 • FATHER STEVEN BRICE 4 p.m. - Saturday mass

St. Anthony’s Catholic Church

FATHER STEVEN BRICE

407 N. Division • Loyal • 715-255-8017

6:30 p.m. - Saturday mass, 10:30 a.m. - Sunday morning mass

St. Mary’s Parish

Greenwood • 715-255-8017 • FATHER STEVEN BRICE 8:30 a.m. - Sunday morning mass

MISSOURI SYNOD St. Paul Lutheran

North Green Grove • P.O. Box 206 • N13510 Cty. Rd. E • Colby, WI • 715-223-1726 • REV. PAUL HUNSICKER

9 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Christ Lutheran - Chili

REV. DANIEL SCHOESSOW 9 a.m. - Sunday worship service, 10 a.m. - Sunday school Holy Communion celebrated the first and third Sundays of each month.

Trinity Lutheran

(Missouri Synod)

109

W. Clark • Spencer • 715-659-4006 REV. DAVID DEPAOLI

7

p.m. - Saturday worship service

8:40 a.m. - Sunday school; 10 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Zion Lutheran

W2894 Granton Road, Granton • 715-238-7318 REV. DANIEL SCHOESSOW 9:15 a.m. - Sunday school, 10:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service Holy Communion celebrated first and third Sundays of each month.

LUTHERAN Emmanuel Lutheran - ELCA

W5752 Colby Factory Road • Town of Longwood PASTOR BRIAN CAMPBELL 10:45 a.m. - Sunday worship service Holy Communion celebrated second and fourth Sundays of each month.

Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran

(Wisconsin Synod) (rural Neillsville) REV. JOHN E. WARMUTH

9 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Holy Communion celebrated the first Sunday of each month.

Nazareth Lutheran - ELCA

North County T • Withee • 715-229-2051 REV. BONNIE CAIN 10 a.m. - Sunday worship service. Everyone welcome.

Our Savior’s Lutheran - ELCA

110 W. Begley • Greenwood • 715-267-6142 PASTOR BRIAN CAMPBELL

9 a.m. - Sunday worship service

St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church

(Wisconsin Synod) Christie • 715-743-2480 REV. JOHN E. WARMUTH 10:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service Holy Communion celebrated the first Sunday of each month.

St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran

(Wisconsin Synod) 711 W. 5th St. • Neillsville • 715-743-2944 REV. TIMOTHY BIEBERT 9 a.m. - Sunday worship service; 10:15 a.m. - Sunday school and Bible class 7 p.m. - Monday worship

St. Paul’s Lutheran - ELCA

1131 Meridian St. • Curtiss Church: 715-223-4000 • Office: 715-785-7975 stpauls@dwave.net REV. KRIS BJERKE-ULLIMAN 10:15 a.m. - Sunday worship service; 9:30 a.m. - Sunday school

St. John’s Lutheran - ELCA

Riplinger • 715-659-5158 • EVERYONE WELCOME REV. REBEKAH TARRAS

11 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Communion every second Sunday of the month.

St. John’s Lutheran - ELCA

B3750 Hwy. 13 • Spencer • 715-659-5158 sjlcoffice@frontier.com EVERYONE WELCOME REV. REBEKAH TARRAS 9 a.m. - Sunday worship with communion 6:30 p.m. - Wednesday evening worship with communion Handicapped accessible

Trinity Lutheran ELCA

201 S. Washington St., Unity • 715-223-2155 • Pastor Al Houts

9 a.m. - Sunday school • 10 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Memorial Day to Labor Day: 9 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Trinity Lutheran ELCA

201 N. West • Loyal • 715-255-8880 ALL ARE WELCOME REV. DANIEL E. ZIMMERMAN

7 p.m. - Saturday worship service 9:15 a.m. - Sunday school 10:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Zion American Lutheran ELCA

Granton • 715-238-7269 INTERIM PASTOR JAY WELSHONSE 9:15 a.m. - Sunday school 10:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service

MORMON Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

2207 W. 5th St., Marshfield • 715-384-4559

9:30-10:20 a.m. - Priesthood, Relief Society, Young Women 9:30-11:15 a.m. - Primary 10:25-11:15 a.m. Sunday school

11:20 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. - Sacrament meeting

CHURCH OF CHRIST Church of Christ

B3942 State Highway 13, Spencer

9 a.m. - Sunday Bible study; 10 a.m. - Sunday worship service

7 p.m. - Wednesday Bible study

Evangelist: Clint A. Oppermann - 715-650-1970

Web site: www. spencercoc.com

• E-mail: preacher@spencercoc.com

Immanuel United Church of Christ

3 mi. w. on G, 1 mi. n. on Hwy. O. • Greenwood Phone 715-267-6547 • REV. ASAFA RAJAOFERA 8:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Living Hope Evangelical Free Church

Hwy. 10 & Fairground Ave. • Neillsville • 715-743-2471 REV. STEVE WENTZ DIRECTOR OF STUDENT MINISTRIES - MARY GARDNER 9:15 a.m. - Sunday school; 10:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Our Father’s House Christian Community Church

W770 County Trunk H, Chili • 715-683-2889 REV. RON JOHNSON 9:30 a.m. - Sunday school 10:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service

METHODIST Immanuel United Methodist

Chili • 715-683-2886 • 10:30 a.m. - Morning worship

Granton United Methodist

Granton • REV. DONG SUE LEE

8 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Loyal United Methodist

Loyal • Office 715-255-9213 • Home 715-255-8737 PASTOR PATSY ROE

9:15 a.m. - Sunday school; 10:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service

Spencer United Methodist

Church Office • 715-659-5551 • REV. MICHAEL CARLSON 9:30 a.m. - Sunday Bible study 10:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service

United Methodist

209 W. Clark St., P.O. Box 533 • Colby JANINE JOHNSON, lay speaker 7 p.m. - Wednesday worship service No Sunday services Church school as announced prior to evening service

York Center United Methodist

Office 715-255-9213 • Home 715-255-8737 PASTOR PATSY ROE

9 a.m. - Sunday worship service; 10 a.m. - Sunday school

EPISCOPAL St. Katherine’s Episcopal Church

206 E. 3rd St. • Owen, WI • 715-229-2643 • REV. TONY RING 10 a.m. - Wednesday morning prayer & Holy Communion 10:30 a.m. - Sunday worship service

BAPTIST

Bible Baptist

700 E. 15th St. • Neillsville • 715-743-4695 PASTOR MARK A. FUGATE

9:30 a.m. - Sunday school; 10:30 a.m. - Worship service,

3 p.m. - Sunday afternoon service

7 p.m. - Wednesday night Bible studies

Missionary Baptist

302 N. Main • Greenwood • 715-267-6114

REV. ROBERT LOVE 9:30 a.m. - Sunday school for all ages 10:30 a.m. - Sunday morning worship service 6:30 p.m. - Wednesday ALL FOR HIM (grades 7-12) 6:30 p.m. - Wednesday AWANA club ( age 3-grade 6)

This page is proudly sponsored by the advertisers below. Along with the advertisers, the listed churches invite you to join them for services.

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If you would like to advertise in this section, call Phil Greschner at 715-255-8531 or

715-613-0766.

The cost is $7.50 per square, per week.

Page 4 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Wednesday, February 18, 2015

OBITUARY

Mary Ann Wehrman

 
Mary Ann Wehrman  

Mary Ann Wehrman, 81, Loyal, passed away on Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015, at the Clark County Health Care Center, Owen. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., on Tuesday, Feb. 17, at St. Anthony Catholic Church, Loyal. Rev. Steve Brice officiated. Burial followed in the parish cemetery. Pallbearers were Kevin Colby, Shane Hopkins, Austin Colby, Derek Wehrman, Gage Wehrman, Justin Rothamer, Kyle Rothamer and Luke Wehrman. Mary Ann Davel was born on Aug. 14, 1933, in Loyal, the daughter of Bernard and Katherine (nee DeYoung) Davel. She was raised and received her education in Loyal, graduating from Loyal High School in 1951.

After completing her education, Mary Ann moved to Waukegan, Ill., and worked for Walgreens. She married Allan F. Wehrman on May 29, 1956, at St. Anthony Catholic Church in Loyal. They lived in Waukegan until moving back to Loyal in 1959. Mary Ann raised her family, did baby sit- ting and worked seasonally at the Loyal Cannery. She also enjoyed raising and selling raspberries during the summer. After her children were raised, Mary Ann worked at Figi's and at Weinbrenner Shoe Company. Her husband, Allan, died on Dec. 24, 1999. She continued to reside in Loyal until entering the Clark County Health Care Center in May 2001. She had many interests, but especially enjoyed sewing, canning, baking, gardening, ice skating when she was younger, and watching wrestling on TV. Mary Ann was a member of St. Anthony Catholic Church and its PCCW, the Loyal American Legion Auxiliary, Royal Neighbors, and the Catholic Knights. She will be dearly missed by her children, Sandy (Jay) Sanko, Loyal, Mike (Jenna) Wehrman, Loyal, Randy (Mandy Pieper) Wehrman, Loyal, and Dave Wehrman, Loyal; 15 grandchildren; 18 great-grandchildren; three sisters, Sally Bauer, Wisconsin Rapids, Marcy (Don) Peters, Marshfield, and Jackie Wardesky, Milwaukee; two brothers, Dan Davel, Loyal, and Tom Davel, Nekoosa; and several nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband: Allan; one daughter, Barbara; and five brothers, Kenneth, Richard, Jerry, Tim and Pat Davel. Online condolences may be expressed at www.cuddiefh.com. Cuddie Funeral Home, Loyal, assisted the family with arrangements.

 

PAID OBITUARY

7-165632

 

CARD OF THANKS

  PAID OBITUARY 7-165632   C ARD OF T HANKS A heartfelt thank you for all

A heartfelt thank you for all prayers, cards and help to get us through Floyd's pass- ing. God bless.

Virginia Plautz

E-mail your news to:

news@trgnews.com

Annual HCE Day planned for April 11 in Greenwood

Everyone is invited to attend HCE Day on April 11 from 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Greenwood High School. You do not need to be a member of Clark County Associa- tion for Home & Community Education (HCE) to attend and bring a friend with you. There will be a presentation by Rev. Nancy Amacher, who will be presenting, “Food and the various ways that women are crafters to help their families.” The crafting will focus mainly on Palestin- ian women who are residents of various places in the West Bank of Israel. Also there will be a choice of three mini sessions. -- A Walk on Foster’s Railroad: Jeff Trunkel: Jeff Trunkel has over the past three years done extensive research into the old railroad known as the F & NE that ran from Fairchild through Greenwood, to Owen. Besides the research he also walked the old rail bed from Fairchild to Greenwood. His presentation is about the journey he made and what he learned along the way. Class not limited– no extra cost. -- Garden Glass; June Noeldner: June brings together the artistry of “Garden Glass.” Utilizing old dishware that you bring with, like dishes, and flower vases , June will show you how to glue together to

make a piece of art that you can set in your garden, flowerbed, or patio. Class limited 10-15 people, bring your own dishes, and extra cost $2 payable at door -- Comfort Foods -- Sandy Fritz: Nothing beats whipping together a “Comfort Food” meal. Join Sandy in creating a meal that is sure to entice. You will be making white turkey chili, a chopped veggie salad, and yummy blueberry bread pudding. Class limited 10-15 people, extra cost $3 payable at the door. HCE members may bring in cultural art projects to be judged during the pro- gram. The winners will be entered for fur- ther judging at the State HCE Conference which will be held at Cable in September. Also this year will be a category, “Some- thing Sparkly” which one will be chosen to represent Clark County at the Conference. Coffee and juice is offered before the sessions and the day concludes with a potluck to be enjoyed by all. Bring your favorite dish to pass, along your own plate, cup and silverware. For more information contact Sandy Fritz at 715-229-2323, or Susan Caacbay at the UW-Extension Office, 715-743-5121. To request a registration form (for the event and/or to sign up for the Sparkly project) Registration deadline is March 27.

Programs help nd lost subjects

NEILLSVILLE -- The Clark County Emergency Services Association (ESA), in conjunction with LoJack, has imple- mented a program designed to locate in- dividuals, who have cognitive conditions and have been reported missing. This program has been active in Clark County since 2009. The ESA is comprised of local law enforcement, EMS and fire departments within Clark County. When an individual registers with Safe- tyNet by LoJack they receive a bracelet that has a unique digital identification. The bracelet is then registered to that specific individual. When a client is re- ported missing, Clark County Emergency Services Association (ESA) personnel

respond to the last known location of the missing person. The ESA personnel then use RF radio receivers to tune into the frequency of the client’s bracelet and conduct a canvass search of the area. The ESA has a 100 percent success rate in locating individuals who participate in this program. The program has proven to locate persons within the community who suffer from cognitive disorders. If more information is needed go to www.safetynetbylojack.com or 877-4-FIND- THEM (434-6384). The Clark County ESA’s coordinator for this program is Detective Jason Bour- get. Detective Bourget can be contacted at (800) 743-2420 or e-mail at Jason.Bourget@ co.clark.wi.us.

COMING EVENTS presented by Grassland Dairy Products, Inc. • N8790 Fairground Ave. • P.O. Box
COMING EVENTS
presented by
Grassland Dairy Products, Inc. • N8790 Fairground Ave. • P.O. Box 160
Greenwood, WI 54437 • 1-800-4butter
TF-20049

This “Coming Events” column is for non- fundraising events. The exception is for fundraisers which are accompanied by a paid advertisement. Social Security ofce hours for Clark County are by appointment only. Appointments can be made by calling 715-845-1321 on weekdays from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Feb. 18-19

The 35th Annual Marsheld Farm Show will take place each day from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the Marsheld Mall.There will be more than 160 booths, farm machinery displays, and more.

Feb. 20

The Greenwood American Legion will serve its monthly sh fry from 4-7:30 p.m. Carry-outs will be available.

Feb. 20

The Loyal American Legion will serve an all-you-can-eat seafood buffet from 5-8:30 p.m.

Feb. 24

St. John’s Lutheran Church north of Spencer on Highway 13 will serve its monthly Community Meal for Everyone, from 5-6 p.m. All who would like a hot meal and fellowship are welcome.

Feb. 26

The Granton Community Library will offer a free basic computer class, from 5-9 p.m. Bring your own computer or use a library laptop. Topics will vary depending on group requests. RSVP by calling 715-

238-5250.

Feb. 28

The University of Wisconsin Marching Band will perform at 1 p.m., at the Neillsville High School Fieldhouse. Tickets are available at banks and grocery stores in Greenwood, Loyal, Granton and Neillsville.

March 1

Trinity Lutheran Church, Loyal, will serve

its annual pancake supper from 4-8 p.m., at the church. For carry-outs or delivery in the city of Loyal, call Dick or Janet Halverson at 715-255-9375.

March 2

The Loyal senior citizens will meet at 1 p.m., at Loyal City Hall. All seniors 50 and older are welcome.

March 7

The Missoula Children’s Theatre -- with dozens of local youths -- will perform “Blackbeard the Pirate” at 3 and 7 p.m., at the LuCille Tack Center for the Arts in Spencer.

FAMILY

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Page 5

Lucky Clovers 4-H Club holds monthly meeting

The Lucky Clovers 4-H club meeting was held on Feb. 9, at 7 p.m. Demonstrations were completed by: Kaden and Nathan Dux on Build-a- Bear, Kaleb Force demonstrated differ- ent breeds of chickens, Steven Woods showed how to a make a potholder, and Violet Woods demonstrated making a tie blanket. Old business:

Jacob Morrell gave a report on the club’s ice skating night at the Neillsville Hockey and Figure Skating Rink. Nicolas, Nathan, and Rachel Steinman attended the 4-H speaking contest. An outing to Bruce Mound is sched- uled for Feb. 13 -- the group will go snow tubing. The 4-H volleyball tournament will be held in Neillsville, on April 18-19.

Birth

The club discussed the idea of holding a community breakfast. The issue was tabled at this time. New business:

The club will research options for going bowling in the Clark County area and discuss a date at the next meeting. The Bright as Stars 4-H Club has given the Lucky Clovers a generous donation of cups, plates, and bowls. The deadline for signing up for shoot- ing sports is Feb. 20. There must be at least eight kids to participate in the Neillsville location. After the meeting, the club made val- entine cards for the veterans. The next meeting will be held on March 9, at 7 p.m., at the Globe Church. Brooke Magnus, reporter

9, at 7 p.m., at the Globe Church. Brooke Magnus, reporter Korie Ellen Hinkelmann A daughter,

Korie Ellen Hinkelmann A daughter, Korie Ellen, was born to Derrick and Tania Hinkelmann, Spencer, on Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015, at 10:42 p.m. She weighed 5 pounds, 14 ounces, and was 19 inches long. Grandparents are Glenn and Cindy Kosch, Coleman; and Harlan and Missy Hin- kelmann, Loyal. Great-grandparents are Ellen Kosch, Coleman; Melvin and June Brault, Pound; and Noel and Maryanne Olson, Loyal.

The Women’s Bridge Club met Tuesday, at 1 p.m., at Shelby’s in Loyal. This week’s
The Women’s Bridge Club
met Tuesday, at 1 p.m., at
Shelby’s in Loyal. This week’s
winners were: Betty Edgar
(substitute from the O-W club)
rst, and Georgia Janssem and
Alice Kennedy tied for second.

The Spencer High School honor roll printed in the Feb. 11 issue of the TRG inadvertently left out the name of senior Mitchell Susa, who achieved high honors.

SOLID OAK SET Double Pedestal Table (extends to 96 in.) andand 6 upholstered caster chairs
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Loyal, WI • 715-255-8244
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Furniture & Carpet Loyal, WI • 715-255-8244 7-165600 RECIPE CORNER Fried wonton tacos 1 lb. ground

RECIPE

CORNER

Fried wonton tacos

1 lb. ground beef

1 pkg. taco seasoning mix

16 wonton wrappers

1 c. Mexican blend shredded cheese

1 large chopped tomato

In a skillet, brown hamburger until no longer pink. Drain hamburger. Add taco seasoning and 1/4 cup water. Let simmer. Chop tomato, lettuce and tomato. Set aside.

Fill wonton wrappers with 1 tablespoon of hamburger, sprinkle with cheese and

fold in triangle. Brush edges of wontons with remaining water to seal the seams. In a medium skillet, warm oil over medium high heat. Add wontons, brown on each side, about 2 minutes. Remove from skillet once golden and crispy. Place on paper towels to absorb any grease.

Add toppings, as you would a taco. Serve with refried beans and rice, or as an

appetizer.

1/2 c. shredded lettuce 1 small onion, diced 1 can black olives, sliced 1/2 c. water 3/4 c. canola oil

Quick clam chowder

1 (10.75-oz.) can condensed cream of celery soup

1 (10.75-oz.) can condensed cream of potato soup

1 (10.75-oz.) can New England clam chowder

2 (6.5-oz.) cans minced clams

1 qt. half-and-half cream

1 pt. heavy whipping cream

Mix cream of celery soup, cream of potato soup, clam chowder, one can undrained

clams, one can drained clams, half-and-half cream, and whipping cream into a slow

cooker. Cover, and cook on low for 6 to 8 hours.

BLT bowls

18 slices bacon

1 1/2 cups cherry tomatoes, halved

1 head butter lettuce - rinsed, and torn

1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese (optional)

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Turn two muffin tins upside down, and cover the outside of nine cups with aluminum foil. Set aside. Weave the bacon into a mat that is nine strips across and nine strips wide. Cut into nine even squares. Place each square over one of the foil covered muffin cups. Bake the bacon in the preheated oven until crisp, about 10 minutes. Remove the bacon cups from the pan and allow to cool completely. Once cooled, fill each with some lettuce and tomato halves. Top with shredded cheddar cheese. Serve at room temperature.

CLARK

COUNTY

HUMANE

SOCIETY

Adopt-A-Pet sponsored by:

CLARK COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY Adopt-A-Pet sponsored by: SPORTSPORT && SPINESPINE CLINICCLINIC OF GREENWOOD
SPORTSPORT && SPINESPINE CLINICCLINIC OF GREENWOOD 133 S. Main, Greenwood • 715-267-4583 Chad Bogdonovich,
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OF GREENWOOD
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Valentino: Wow!This is one very cute puppy. Little Valentino is only 9 weeks old and is a Border Collie/Beagle mix. He weighs 9 pounds, has the most beautiful markings and just a great personality. Be sure to stop in to meet him. He’s got a lot of friends, who are also waiting for their new homes. If you have room in your heart and home for him or any of the other pets, go to the Web site and see the pictures and descriptions of them. There are 39 cats or kittens and 27 dogs or puppies here. Surely there’s one just right for you. Check them out at www.cchs-petshelter.org/id8.html. Do you know we get all the adoptable cats from Marshfield after their stray hold is up? Did you also know that we get all the stray dogs from fiveWood County townships? CCHS is a very busy place and if you have found a pet, or are missing your pet, be sure to check here. Stop at our Paws & Claws Adoption Center in the Marshfield Mall. We have lots of cats and kittens just waiting for people to adopt and many are free! Paws & Claws is right next to Furniture & ApplianceMart and is open every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Come on in to visit, spend some time with the kitties, and browse our large selection of special, pet merchandise (greeting cards, shirts, jewelry, giant cat furniture, etc.) or even get your pet microchipped!

CLARK COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY • STATE LICENSE # (268235-DS) • 715-743-4550

M, W, F & Sat. 12-3 p.m. • W3926 St Hwy 73 • P.O. Box 127, Neillsville, WI 54456 • www.cchs-petshelter.org

Page 6 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Agriculture, water technology, biotechnology all experience growth in exports

MADISON -- Wisconsin businesses ex- ported $23.43 billion in goods worldwide in 2014 -- an all-time high for the state and a 1.4 percent increase over 2013. In the last four years, Wisconsin’s total exports have jumped by 18.3 percent. Wisconsin’s agricultural exports rose by 13.6 percent in 2014 to a record $3.7 bil- lion. The state’s increase was nearly three times greater than the growth rate for total U.S. agriculture exports in 2014 and marks the fifth straight year the Wisconsin’s numbers have risen. “This is great news for Wisconsin farmers, as well as businesses of all sizes and all industries,” said Governor Scott Walker. “We are taking the necessary steps to improve our business climate, and help Wisconsin companies improve their position in the global market. Promoting Wisconsin business and products in help- ing job creators realize that exporting can open the doors to new markets and new customers. The latest record-breaking numbers are a true indication that our efforts are paying off.” Wisconsin’s export growth in 2014 was spurred by an increase in shipments to Canada and Mexico, Wisconsin’s top two

export destinations. Exports to Mexico jumped by 12.7 percent to $2.84 billion, primarily because of an increase in the export of vehicle parts, plastics, and dairy products. Exports to Canada -- the state’s number one export destination -- were up 5.5 percent to $7.94 billion, due primar- ily to an increase in organic chemicals, ethanol, fur skins, and beverage exports. In addition to agriculture, Wisconsin saw increases in other key sectors, includ- ing water-technology-related products (up 7.4 percent to $5.03 billion); biotechnology (up 6.8 percent to $3.11 billion); and health care (1 percent increase to $1.89 billion). “Wisconsin companies realize export- ing is no longer a luxury. It’s imperative for any Wisconsin company seeking a competitive advantage in the 21st cen- tury,” said Reed Hall, secretary of CEO of the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation. “These strong export num- bers show that Wisconsin companies are well positioned to serve the global marketplace.” Industrial machinery continues to be the Wisconsin’s top export product cat- egory at $6.37 billion, accounting for 27 percent of all state exports. The second-

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largest product category is medical and scientific instruments, which accounts for 9 percent of all state exports at $2.17 billion. Other exporting highlights from 2014 include:

-- Wisconsin ranked 19th in the U.S. in total exports -- behind Massachusetts and ahead of Minnesota. The state ranked 13th in agricultural exports. -- Wisconsin leads the nation in exports of more than 40 different products, includ- ing cranberries, whey, ginseng roots, out- board engines, refrigeration equipment, firefighting vehicles, fire extinguishers, and bicycles. -- Wisconsin businesses exported to 206 different countries.

-- Exports to European Union countries increased by 8.1 percent, due in part to increases in exports of automatic data process machines and tractors, trucks and other vehicles. -- The state saw an 8.6 percent increase

in the exports of plastics, which surpassed

the $1 billion mark in 2014. Canada is the destination of 42 percent of the state’s plastic exports. -- Aircraft and spacecraft exports rose by 32 percent to $404.9 million. The United Kingdom was the leading destination of products in that category. -- The state continues to experience a rise in exports of fur skins. The $269 mil- lion in fur skin exports is up 53 percent from 2013 and 123 percent from 2012.

Spring 2015 Level I Master Gardener Program available In Clark County

NEILLSVILLE -- The Clark County UW-Extension is offering a spring 2015 “Level I Master Gardener Program”. This program will provide the basic skills for home gardening. The training consists of archived presentations from UW-Ex- tension specialist and county Extension agents provided online. In addition, there

will be hands on training. Training location and dates for the program will be determined after people

interested in the class are surveyed for

a best time and location. The goal is to

select a central location in Clark County. Training will continue for 12 weeks and all of the trainings are available online. The hands on training will be determined as the class progresses. Generally, the class will meet eight times “face to face” for hands on training. Contact the Clark Coun-

ty UW-Extension office at 715-743-5121 if interested in participating in this pro- gram. The deadline to reg- ister is March 2. Participant cost will be $100 for the class materials and includes the cost of a state volunteer background check. After training Mas- ter Garden volunteers are expected to return 24 hours of service to their com- munity in exchange for the 36 hours of training they receive.

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Memorial Medical Center

prenatal classes

two-class session Tuesday,March 3,6:00 to 9:00 p.m. Wednesday.March4, 6:00 to9:00 p.m. ManzConference Room

(gift basket

newborn and safety care I breastfeeding body changes I emotions I nutrition exercise I labor & deliver I hospitalstay

Prenatal classes helpyou Theyalso helpyou prepare tobethe very best parent youcan be. Your health careisour # l priority.

youcan be. Your health careisour # l priority. 7-165517 To reg er for classes LoriGregorich, RN,

7-165517

To reg er for classes LoriGregorich, RN,

Prenatal Class Coordinator

715.743.3101

ext. 3007

Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

216 Sunset Place, Neillsville, WI 54456 716-743-3101 IFax 716-743-6242

www.MemorialMedCenter.org

F FoodFood ood a andand nd F FunFun un UNIVERSITYUNIVERSITY OFOF WISCONSINWISCONSIN MARCHINGMARCHING BANDBAND

FFoodFoodood aandandnd FFunFunun

F FoodFood ood a andand nd F FunFun un UNIVERSITYUNIVERSITY OFOF WISCONSINWISCONSIN MARCHINGMARCHING BANDBAND
F FoodFood ood a andand nd F FunFun un UNIVERSITYUNIVERSITY OFOF WISCONSINWISCONSIN MARCHINGMARCHING BANDBAND
F FoodFood ood a andand nd F FunFun un UNIVERSITYUNIVERSITY OFOF WISCONSINWISCONSIN MARCHINGMARCHING BANDBAND
UNIVERSITYUNIVERSITY OFOF WISCONSINWISCONSIN MARCHINGMARCHING BANDBAND COMINGCOMING TOTO NEILLSVILLENEILLSVILLE
UNIVERSITYUNIVERSITY OFOF
WISCONSINWISCONSIN MARCHINGMARCHING BANDBAND
COMINGCOMING TOTO NEILLSVILLENEILLSVILLE
Saturday, February 28 • 1 p.m.
at the Neillsville H.S. Fieldhouse
(Approximately 120 UW-Wisconsin
Marching Band members)
Area high school bands performing 1/2 hour before the performance
General admission
Advance tickets
At the door
Adults
$8
$10
Students (grades 1-12)
$4
$5
Tickets available at local banks and grocery stores
in Greenwood, Loyal, Granton and Neillsville, and
from Kiwanis members.
The band is sponsored by the Neillsville
Kiwanis Club with support and sponsorship
by many local businesses.
Proceeds will be invested back into
the community.
7-165486
AMERICAN LEGION POST 175 All you can eat SEAFOOD BUFFET February 20, March 6, March
AMERICAN LEGION
POST 175
All you can eat
SEAFOOD BUFFET
February 20, March 6,
March 20, April 3
Serving from 5-8:30 p.m.
Adults: $12 • 6-12: $6
5 and under:
FREE
LOYAL AMERICAN LEGION CLUB
N. Union St., Loyal • 715-255-8373
302
7-1654707-165470

Wednesday, February 18 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Page 7

Here’s hoping the second half is more productive

(I first wrote this six years ago now, and said to myself then, “You know, if you haven’t been indicted for federal tax fraud, you ought to run it again in 2015.” Since I’m a man of my word, well, here it is. I know, you’re welcome.) People often tell me, “Dean, just about anybody could do your job.” “Yes,” I usually answer, “that may be absolutely correct, but not everyone could waste this much time at it for so few results.” And they know I’m right, and, oohh, they just hate that, so we usually part ways at that point, they to doing whatever important thing it is that they do, and me going back to, well, this. I know, some days I wonder where it all went wrong. I have another birthday coming this week, my 46th, -- well, thank you, that’s so nice -- and it’s kind of an important one because it’s halfway between my age when I graduated from college and when I will turn 70, which is the age I have targeted for full retirement. That means my working life is half over, which seems to me a good point to evaluate, take stock, and measure my progress so far. Oh, don’t worry, I don’t think there’ll be any crying; I took my pills this morning. One measure of career progress, of course, is advancement in one’s position within the structure of an organization. On that scale, I’ve done all right for myself, starting just out of college as a lowly grunt, working my way up to useless whiner, and nally becoming a valued employee who was no longer greeted each morning by an “I thought I told you to never come back here” from the boss. Before long, I was a

senior executive, and then, against all odds,

I became chairman of the board and chief

executive ofcer. All I had to do was buy the place, and the best part of it is, if I live to be 138, I might even have it paid off someday. Speaking of buying, wealth is another mea-

sure of one’s career status. I will not reveal it, but I have a nancial goal for myself, and at this midway point between starting and retir- ing, I suppose I should be halfway there right about now. Well, OK, give me just a second here, if I add the total value of my investments to my cash assets to my real estate to the contents of my change pail, then subtract my debts, personal IOUs to my Mob connections

and my other liabilities, I should

that can’t be right. Let me do that math one

OK, there, that’s more like it. If my

goal at 70 is to possess $124.67, yup, I’m right on track. I just hope the value of that analog television set stock holds up long enough. So, OK, maybe wealth is not the best measure of progress. Let’s look ahead at my

personal satisfaction level, i.e., do I feel as if

I am halfway to making all the difference in

the world that I set out to achieve. Looking back at myself when I was 22 and fresh out of college, my ambitions were as wide as the sky. I gured I’d change the world during my working career, and not in some small way, oh, no, I was thinking big, like curing some major disease, or negotiat- ing global peace, or inventing a new form of transportation powered by lime Jello (because, after all, who’d want to eat it?). In that regard, I’d have to say I’m not quite halfway there yet, but that’s one of those things where you spend

many years putting the pieces in place so you can accomplish great things in your later years.

whoa, wait,

more ti

great things in your later years. whoa, wait, more ti THE BORN LESAR by TRG Editor

THE

BORN

LESAR

in your later years. whoa, wait, more ti THE BORN LESAR by TRG Editor Dean Lesar

by TRG Editor Dean Lesar

whoa, wait, more ti THE BORN LESAR by TRG Editor Dean Lesar town community newspaper doesn’t

town community newspaper doesn’t have any benchmarks from which to base an evaluation. I suppose I could approach this purely mathemati- cally, and determine that I have now sold 1.5 million newspaper copies (give or take a million), therefore, it’s been a successful career so far, or that I’ve now written 40 million profound words (I may dene “pro- found” more loosely than you) and because of that, I can rest assured

that I’m well on my way to building my legend as a respected journalist. Or maybe, it’s enough just to say that I’ve survived for almost a quarter-century already

in a business that’s been known to chew lesser people up and spit them in the trash, and my staying power alone is enough to convince me that at age 46, halfway between 22 and 70, I am where I ought to be. I do have to wonder sometimes how things might have been different if I would have pursued some other career, you know, maybe joined the military after high school, or went to medical school (just think, I could be operating on you tomorrow), or joined the clergy and embarked on mission work in the remote back hill country of southern Uganda.

I mean, just what if, where would I be now,

at age 46, in those careers? Happy? Content? Satised? Famous? Rich? Or in the case of southern Uganda, full of tape worms from eating raw monkey brains?

Back to my opening line, it’s true, sure, most anybody could do my job, but not for

this long for so little pay. Anyone else would have moved along by now, but not me. What?

I can’t go yet, I’m barely half done.

Put another way, I have no idea whatsoever

how I’ll ever make a difference in this world.

I don’t have a clue. When I think that I’m

almost the same age as Barack Obama, and he’s president of the United States and I’m here, it almost makes me sick to my stomach. Of course, that could be just the lime Jello. I had to do something with it when it wouldn’t burn in my lawnmower engine. I suppose I should give myself some credit for the steps I have taken to further my professional career. See, when I started in the newspaper business, I knew less about it than I did about nuclear ssion, and now, 24 years later, I still don’t know anything about nuclear ssion. Some of you say I still don’t know squat about the newspaper business,

either, but I’ve got a whole garage full of back issues that I can’t sell that say otherwise. And when the value of old, wet, moldy newsprint skyrockets and I’m rolling in so much money

I don’t know where to put it all, you won’t be

laughing at me anymore, or at least not to my

face. There’s a big difference there. You know, this is harder to measure than I thought it might be, because running a small

AAnn OutdoorsmanOutdoorsman‛‛ss JJournalournal bbyy MMarkark WWaltersalters Victory on the Mississippi! Hello
AAnn OutdoorsmanOutdoorsman‛‛ss
JJournalournal
bbyy MMarkark WWaltersalters
Victory on the Mississippi!
Hello friends,
This week my 14-year-old daughter, Selina, and I headed down to
Prairie du Chien to visit our very good friends, Gary and Joan Howe,
and fish out of a boat on the ice.
Saturday, Feb. 7 -- high 39, low 13
As is sometimes the case, this week’s column is all over the map so
here goes. Gary Howe, Selina and I are headed to Guttenberg, Iowa.
When we arrive we will launch Gary’s 16-foot flat bottom boat across
a
patch of ice and then hit the open water at Lock and Dam number 10
and fish for walleye and sauger by vertical jigging.
Gary Howe has been a good buddy of mine since the mid ‘90s, owns
a
few papers in the area, and every year we try to do a warm weather
and cold weather outing together.
Twice in the past I have fished this method with Gary Howe. This
winter Gary and his comrades Bob Titlbach, Jerry Finney, Jeff Wolf,
John Howe and Dave Coorough have been having excellent success at
catching walleye and sauger in this somewhat crazy method of fishing.
Here is what you do, if your motor starts (Mr Howe’s froze up this
morning and had to be thawed). You ease your way over to the dam which
is where the only open water is and grop your vertical jig amongst the
always changing ice flow that is flowing through the dam.
Just launching your boat can be very interesting as first you drop it
on the ice, then you push it to open water, then you push it in the river,
making sure to jump in the boat on time. Trailering your boat can be
very physical and somewhat dangerous.
So Selina and I are listening to the nonstop stories of our good buddy,
the air temp to start our outing is a crisp 13 and the local school of
walleye and sauger are not hungry.
For the most part we are jigging 1/2-ounce jigs tipped with a minnow
caught more fish then Selina and I.
In one burst of energy Gary did catch a 20- and 18-inch walleye but
that lasted about as long as you can see a falling star.
We topped off our day ice fishing and did not catch a fish, but as
usual laughed a lot.
Sunday, Feb. 8 -- high 33, low 17
Now here is the real joke! I have fished in Prairie du Chien’s annual
fisheree (65th) off and on for about 16 years. I have never caught a fish
in it. Our plan today was to tip-up fish in this fisheree that is run by
the Chamber of Commerce, the PDC Jaycees and the American Legion
baseball team and is run out of Lakeview Resort, which is a very cool
bar and restaurant on the north end of town.
This fisheree is a big deal in the area and attracts a lot of people and,
by God, I needed to get on the board with a fish. So we have our tip-ups
out and Selina, who has not gotten a bite all weekend, gets a flag. My
little girl does an excellent job of landing a gator that would later weigh
just shy of 10 pounds. Moments later Selina tells us where she wants
to put her third tip-up. It was not 10 minutes and the flag goes up and
Selina ices a gator that tipped the scale at 6.5 pounds.
Ten minutes later I have a flag and I catch a gator that was only about
15 inches but I got the monkey off my back.
We head over to Lakeview and after weighing Selina’s two gators
find out that she is now in first and second place in the kids division
with her two northern pike. We ate lunch, visited with a whole bunch
of people and when the weigh-ins closed at 2 p.m., my little girl who was
in her first fisheree had taken first and second in the gator division for
the kids end of this fisheree!
Soon after that we were headed home to Necedah and Selina told me
that she wants to make this an annual trip.
We laughed a lot on this trip and were very tired when we got home!
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or Sonars. There are a total of five boats below the dam and quite often
you may be bumping your neighbor, as the current and ice flow are the
real bosses out here.
As always we snack on pickled eggs (Selina declines) and hope the
fish will get hungry.
Of all the activities in the outdoors that I take part in this may be the
one that is the combo platter of the most dangerous while requiring the
most skill. None of us lit the river on fire with a hot bite but everyone
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Page 8 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Clark County effort seeks to identify/solve broadband problems

Clark County Economic Development Corporation & Tourism Bureau wants/ needs to hear from you. What is our need countywide as we look into the future of broadband and connectivity for the good of communication right here in Clark County -- to keep us competitive and progressive meeting the needs of future technology and communica- tion for agriculture, schools, residents, medical services, cities and townships, emergency, businesses, tourism, homes? Everyone and every walk of life need to give us input so our county can create a plan that futuristically satisfies all our long term connectivity needs, wants and demands. A meeting on broadband connectivity

will be held on Feb. 19 at 4p.m. at the cafe- torium of Greenwood High School. Hear from the many folks who understand the frustration and the need -- Ross Wilson, CESA 10; and Jill Hietpas, UW-Extension, regional broadband educator; Chris Straight, West Central Regional Planning – Region 3 Broadband Committee Facili- tator; and many more. Also, a panel of representatives from all over the county will give input on issues and needs. From the meeting on Feb. 19, a Clark County Connectivity Consortium will be formed and a 6-9 month investiga- tive process will be done. The net result will be a documented plan sharing what Clark County residents and all entities require in connections to provide for a

solid future strengthening our ability to compete and succeed. If you have ever had things like this happen, you may want to participate, give your input and become involved in the future of connectivity:

-- Doctor at your clinic needs to refer you to another clinic because X-ray was not conclusive or transmittable. -- Slow or no internet connection. -- Dropped calls (or just no bars at all in spotty locations in county). -- You must use or pay others to trans- mit your data to a state or federal agency because you have bad or no connection. -- You need to send large document and end up mailing it because your internet is too slow.

munication available. -- Tractor tire repair or product deliv- ery never came -- bad/no communica- tion. -- Tried to call in an emergency/no bars on cell phone. -- Farmers in the field need to com- municate with robots milking/no con- nectivity available. Township cannot send data to state and federal agencies/connection/trans- mission failure/transmission capacity not large enough. This is the public and private coming together to address an issue and find the end opportunity for connectivity for our county for the future. State Senator Terry Moulton and Representatives Bob Kulp and Kathy Bernier will also be in attendance to hear information and partake in the event. Call 715-255-9151 for more information and if you are interested in sitting on the panel representing a specific area for discussion or serving on the Consortium Committee.

 

-- Child

cannot do

homework

online.

 

-- Truck

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SSpportsorts

February 18, 2015

NGL advances eight wrestlers to Amery sectional

The red and black colors of the Neillsville-Greenwood- Loyal co-op wrestling team will be highly visible at the Feb. 21 WIAA Division 2 sectional tournament at Amery. Eight NGL wrestlers survived the Feb. 14 regional tour- ney at Melrose-Mindoro and are now just a few more matches from reaching the Feb. 27-28 state meet in Madison. Six NGL wrestlers took first place at the regional meet -- sophomore Skylar Barth at 106 pounds, junior Kanyon Rachu at 126, sophomore Stetson Rueth at 132, junior Derrick Nielsen at 138, senior Jake Rueth at 170 and sophomore Nick Rueth at 220. Freshman Dylan Nielsen (120) and junior Andrew Buchanan (182) grabbed second- place finishes to also advance. The regional meet was dominated by NGL and Mel- rose-Mindoro/Gale-Ettrick-Trempealeau. Wrestlers from the two teams claimed 17 of the 28 available sectional spots. MM/GET won the regional title with 231.5 points and NGL was second with 218.5. Medford was a distant third at 129 and was followed by Black River Falls (115) OF/A/FC (111) and Abbotsford/Colby (63). At 106 pounds, Barth (36-6) cruised to a regional title with a 45-second pin in the semis and a pin over MM/GET’s Jack Marley (21-17) in 5:03 in the finals. At Amery, he’ll face junior Tanner Booth (30-8) of Baldwin- Woodville. Rachu (19-19) won the 126-pound regional title by defeating OF/A/FC’s Kyle Gjerseth on a 3-1 decison and then scoring a 5-1 decision over MM/GET sophomore Mike Horton (11-10) in the finals. Rachu’s first sectional match will be against Ellsworth sophomore Thaddeus Kosnopful (8-11). At 132 pounds, Stetson Rueth (33-8) had to win only one match to win a regional title. With only three wrestlers at his weight, Rueth scored a 5-0 decision over MM/GET sophomore Nathan Dornquast (26-13). Rueth will take on St. Croix Central sophomore Luke Smith (27-12) in the first round at Amery. Junior Derrick Nielsen (19-12) walked through his weight class at Melrose-Mindoro to also win a regional title. He got a pin in 3:52 in his semi-final match, and then pinned Medford sophomore Preston Carlson (20-9) in 2:38 in the finals. Nielsen’s first-round sectional match will be against Hayward junior Lane Deyo (25-10). NGL senior Jake Rueth (38-3) dominated the competi- tion at 170 pounds. He won by pin in 1:31 in the semis, and scored a technical fall over Black River Falls sopho- more Sam Rogstad (28-11) in the finals. A state qualifier last year, Rueth will continue another attempt at a state run with a first-round sectional match against Baldwin- Woodville sophomore Triston Thompson (18-17). Nick Rueth won the 220-pound regional title in one match. There were only three wrestlers at the weight at regoinals, and Rueth (37-4) took the title with a 6-3 decision over MM/GET junior Sam Higley (27-14). At Amery, Rueth will first tangle with Prescott junior River Christensen (15-16). Freshman Dylan Nielsen (24-11) also qualified for sec- tionals. There were only two wrestlers at his weight at

Please see Regionals, page 12

two wrestlers at his weight at Please see Regionals, page 12 DEAN LESAR/STAFF PHOTO Neillsville/Greenwood/Loyal’s

DEAN LESAR/STAFF PHOTO

Neillsville/Greenwood/Loyal’s Andrew Buchanan tries to end his 182-pound WIAA Division 2 regional nal match against Brad Ritger of Osseo-Fairchild/Augusta/Fall Creek but can’t quite get the pin. Ritger came back to turn the tables and win a wild 14-12 overtime match. Both wrestlers advanced to the Feb. 21 WIAA Division 2 sectional at Amery.

Four Rockets are sectional-bound

The Spencer wrestling team continued a strong 2014-15 season by advancing four wrestlers through the Feb. 14 WIAA Division 3 regional tournament at Auburndale. Senior Tim Bauer and freshman Hunter Luepke won regional titles to advance to the Feb. 21 sectional meet at Shawano. Freshman Bryce Shaw and senior Zach Schnei- der also advanced with runner-up finishes at Auburndale. Stratford -- the top ranked D3 team in the state -- domi- nated the regional standings with 237 points. Edgar was second with 189 and Spencer took third at 172.5. Other teams at the regional were Athens (155.5), Auburndale (126.5), Pittsville (86) and Marathon (68). Bauer (27-13) won the regional title in impressive fashion. He first pinned Athens freshman Kevin Al- brecht (23-15), then advanced to the finals with a pin in 3:07 over Edgar senior Kodi Chase (26-11). In the finals, Bauer scored a 7-5 overtime decision over Stratford junior Sam Wenzel (26-9). At the D3 Shawano sectional, Bauer will first wrestle against Shiocton freshman Sammy VanStraten (35-5). Lupeke improved his impressive freshman season record to 38-4 by winning the 195-pound weight class. He first pinned Athens sophomore Jordan Zinkowich (9-11) in 1:11, and in the finals notched a 4-2 overtime decision over Auburndale junior Kurt Jankowski (34- 8). At Shawano, Luepke will face Manawa senior Jake

Kaezorowski (26-14). Shaw (23-17) took the more difficult path to the sec- tional. He first scored a technical fall over Marathon junior Hunter Reed (20-13), but then was pinned in 1:34 by Stratford freshman Jeremy Schoenherr (36-1). Shaw got back to third place with a 7-3 win over Pittsville freshman Tyler Dammann (30-7), and was rewarded with a wrestle- back and a chance for second place. He took advantage, defeating Edgar freshman Colton Heil (27-11) on a 6-3 decision. At Shawano, Shaw will face Coleman junior Derick Teteak (29-10). Schneider (33-12) also needed a wrestle-back to advance past the regional. He pinned Stratford senior Kyle Martin (15-7) in 3:06 in the semis, but was pinned in 3:03 in the finals by Edgar senior Devin Lemanski (35-0). Schneider got a wrestle-back for second place against Athens junior Tannor Frahm (25-14) and took a 2-1 decion to move on to the sectional. There he will wrestle against Crandon senior Deven Groff (28-12). Several Rockets ended their seasons on the Auburn- dale mats. At 106 pounds, freshman Dominick Wichlacz (26-17) was beaten in the semis but came back to get third place. At 120, freshman Caden Schillinger (19-19) lost a 14-11 decision in the first round.

Please see Spencer, page 12

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Page 10 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Win this lottery and nd out what critters live on your property

Ever wonder what plants or animals call your land home? People who want to learn more about their land can enter a free lottery to win a free customized report to discover if unique plants, animals, soils and geology are potentially on their property based on what’s been found on nearby public lands. The lottery runs from now until March 15 and 100 landowners who voluntarily enter their name will be randomly selected to receive the customized report, known as Landowner Conservation Reports. Last year’s lottery was an overwhelming success, with more than three times as many landowners applying as were spots available, says Erin Crain, who leads the Department of Natural Resources’ staff that will provide the service. “We had such a tremendous response from landowners last year that we’re go- ing to do it again,” says Crain, director of the DNR Natural Heritage Conservation Bureau. “People love their land and are really interested in learning what plants and animals call it home.”

More than 85 percent of land in Wis- consin is privately owned, so having good habitat on private land is critical to conserving rare plants and animals, Crain says. “We want to reach out to landowners and share what we know from past plant and animal surveys,” she says. “What landowners do with the information is up to them; our hope is that they will consider ways to maintain and improve habitat for Wisconsin’s rare species.” To create the reports, DNR ecologist Alex Wenthe will review various DNR and federal databases containing information about the rare plants and animals found through field surveys of public lands or nongovernmental organization lands. Landowners can also choose to have a site visit from a DNR ecologist. Landowners will get a report that provides information about rare species found in the area, invasive species to be on the lookout for and general information about the soils, geology and hydrogeology in the area.

E-MAIL US WITH news/sports ideas; letters to the editor; and births, weddings, and engagement announcements
E-MAIL US WITH
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Information collected during the review process will not affect what land- owners can subsequently do with their property. The report will also contain general recommendations on improving habitat and controlling invasive species, a little information on where landowners can get technical and financial help for habi- tat work and a list of private contractors who can help landowners develop detailed

conservation plans and assessments. “The goal is to provide Wisconsin landowners with the best information available,” he says. “Whether you hope to restore land or want just to learn what’s outside your window, these customized re- ports can point you in the right direction.” People can learn more about Land- owner Conservation Reports and enter the lottery by visiting the DNR website, dnr. wi.gov and searching the keyword, “LCR.”

Deadlines are nearing for removing ice shing shacks

The first of a number of deadlines for ice anglers to remove ice fishing shelters from inland and boundary waters is this week. All ice fishing shelters must be removed from Wisconsin-Iowa bound- ary waters by Friday, Feb. 20. This ear- lier date, affecting the Mississippi River south of the Minnesota-Iowa border, is set to correspond with Iowa regulations. The deadlines for the other two bound- ary waters are March 1 for Wisconsin- Minnesota boundary waters and March 15 for Wisconsin-Michigan boundary waters. For inland Wisconsin waters, ice fish- ing shelters must be removed daily and when not occupied after the following dates:

-- Sunday, March 8 for waters south of Highway 64 (First Sunday following March 1). -- Sunday, March 15 for waters north of Highway 64, along with Lake Michigan, Superior and the Bay of Green Bay (First Sunday following March 12). One exception to this rule is that on the Fox River downstream from the De Pere dam in Brown County, ice fishing shelters must always be removed from the ice daily and when not in use. After these dates for removing ice fishing shelters from a frozen lake or river, an angler may continue to use a portable shelter but must remove it daily and when it is not occupied or actively being used.

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PUBLIC NOTICES

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Page 11

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUE OF TAX DEED STATE OF WISCONSIN ) )SS COUNTY OF CLARK ) TO: CHRISTOPHER D. CARPENTER; MICHELLE D. CARPEN- TER, Owners and/or Mortgagees, and/or Occupants and/or Lien- holders, their Heirs or Assigns, known or unknown, of the premises hereinafter described:

You and each of you are hereby noti ed that Clark County is the owner and holder of Tax Sale Certi cates, which are now deedable, on the following described land:

COM 165’ W OF NE COR OF NW-SE TH W 745.42’ ALG C/L OF TN RD TH S 33’ E 745.24’ TH N33’ TO POB SEC 28 TWP 27 N R 1 W And that after the expiration of three months from the service of this notice upon you, a deed of the land described above will be applied for.

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Dated at Neillsville, Wisconsin This 3rd day of February, 2015 Christina M. Jensen, Clark County Clerk

Spencer Board of Education Regular meeting Jan. 28, 2015 Board President Dawn Reckner called the regular meeting of the Spencer Board of Education to order at 6:30 p.m. Veri cation of compliance with open meeting law: Notice was published in the Tribune Record Gleaner (TRG), and posted at the village of ce, Heritage Bank and high school entrance. Roll call -- establish quorum: Reckner, Krasselt, Wienke, Zenner, and Post present. Quorum established. Recognition of visitors: Gary Ruder and Judy Barton. Agenda changes: A Youth Options request will become agenda item #10 and other agenda items will move down. Approve minutes of previous meetings: Motion by Krasselt, sec- onded by Zenner, to approve the minutes of the Jan. 14, 2015, regu- lar meeting. All ayes, motion carried. Discussion insurance consortium: John Preuss from M3 Insur- ance presented a Power Point on the insurance consortium. He dis- cussed the ve steps to becoming a co-op and the pros and cons to becoming a co-op. Discussion. Board consensus to continue with this process. Discussion/approval of summer projects: Project options for 2014-15 school year update. -- Generator: New batteries have been purchased and installed. The old batteries were only working at 60 percent of capacity. -- UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply): Battery back-up system

that would provide power to our servers and provide needed lighting to meet codes to safely exit the building. Server back-up would be quite complex with built-in measures to safely shut down servers

to avoid data loss. Bids were presented. Scott Johnson expressed

a preference for the bid from Klevseth Corp. Prices do not include

installation to be done by local electricians. Lighting back-up is being deferred at this time. Motion by Krasselt, seconded by Zenner, to award the bid to Klevseth for the UPS (Uninterruptible Power Sup- ply). All ayes, motion carried. -- LED lighting: Rough costs for the transition from current x- tures to LED. Room 135 has the Xcel LED replacement bulbs in-

stalled in all but ve xtures. To retro t other areas will have costs proportional to these rooms. Room 136 has xtures that cost approx- imately $140 per xture. Room 135 has replacement bulbs that cost approximately $90 per xture. Associated labor costs have not been included since there may be some exibility depending on the size of our order. Each classroom has, on average, 15 xtures -- this trans- lates to about $135 to $2,100 per classroom. Areas where complete xtures would have to be replaced would cost about $200 per xture. -- Asbestos removal: Main area considered at this point would be the elementary front hallway and the middle school front hallway and classrooms. We will also have a map to show areas that are left for asbestos removal in the overall building. Asbestos removal compa- nies are currently in the bidding process. They all have assured us that we will be able to secure a place in the schedule, which will allow for a June 15, 2015, completion date. -- Bathrooms: Rough estimates for xture removal and replace- ment and plumbing updates were shared. Tile and other redecorat- ing costs are being explored. -- Exterior door replacement: Two companies will be stopping in the next week to give estimates on the possible replacement of sev- eral exterior door assemblies. -- Digitalize the remaining air handlers: Complete control is work- ing on an estimate for the upgrade from pneumatic controls to digital controls for the last four remaining air handlers in the building. Approve Rookie Rocket employee: Discussion. Motion by Ze- nner, seconded by Wienke, to approve Kristy Schesel and Kathy Weyer for Rookie Rocket positions as discussed. All ayes, motion carried. Youth Options request: Motion by Zenner, seconded by Krasselt,

to approve one CNA Youth Options request. All ayes, motion carried.

Approve CESA 10 service contract: Discussion. Recommenda- tion by Endreas to approve the CESA 10 service contracts as pre- sented. Motion by Zenner, seconded by Post, to approve all of the CESA 10 contracts as presented. All ayes, motion carried. Second reading Policy #235 Athletic Director Job Description:

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7-165631

Discussion. Motion by Krasselt, seconded by Zenner, to approve the second reading of Policy #235 Athletic Director Job Description. All ayes, motion carried. Second reading Policy #236 School Counselor Job Description:

Discussion. Motion by Krasselt, seconded by Zenner, to approve the second reading of Policy #236 School Counselor Job Description. All ayes, motion carried. Approve 2015-16 school calendar: Discussion. Motion by Ze- nner, seconded by Krasselt, to approve the 2015-16 school calendar. All ayes, motion carried. Chose primary election Board of Canvassers: Board consensus that Mike Endreas, Nancy Kibbel, and Jerry Wienke will be the pri- mary election Board of Canvassers. Administrative reports:

Mrs. Schulz:

-- Reading curriculum: We have it narrowed down to two basal series (Reading Street and Wonders) and discussed the pros and cons of each. Curriculum Companion is another option that we have investigated. The group has found many pros and a few cons to each series. We are going to be contacting Thorp as we know that they are using Reading Street and will be contacting McGraw-Hill to see who in our area is using Wonders. Pricing of each will be the next step in the process. The group has stated that regardless of which option we choose we will be getting a quality product that is Common Core aligned, provides for differentiation in both reading and writing, is user friendly for both student and teacher, and utilizes technology to enhance the learning. -- PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports): Joann Roehl organized a meeting for Thursday afternoon with Cheryl Post from Marathon County special ed. This was a great time to discuss where we are in the "PBIS" process. Fortunately, we already have some very solid components in place with the common expectations and language throughout the building. We know that an area that we need to improve on is acknowledging the students for the posi- tive behavior. During our work time it was decided that we needed a "booster" assembly to review bathroom and recess procedures. We will have an activity and videos for the students. This will happen on Feb. 26, at 8:30. At this assembly we will also announce our rst in- centive/acknowledgement for positive behavior; we are working out the details for this. -- Highlights from January: 4th grade -- the fourth graders have been learning about biographies during the month of January. As a culminating project Mrs. Szymanski had the students become a per- son that they had done a biography on. The students each were able to dress up and put on a short skit or give a short speech as their person. I was able to "meet" George Washington and see the battle of Valley Forge, Maria Tallchief and see some of her ballet moves, Stan Lee as he developed Marvel comics, and many more. -- Be a SMART cookie -- READ!: If you visit the elementary you may notice some scary creatures in the halls. The students are de- veloping and writing about their very own cookie monsters. Their creatures and stories are very creative! Mr. Zanotteli:

-- Registration 2015: We registered students this year during our half day right after exams. It actually went very well and we got a major percentage of students able to register. We have about 20-24 kids that are not in attendance so we are registering them during this week. We have about 1/3 of the next year freshman registered and as Mrs. Eisfeldt completes her 8th grade conferencing we will regis- ter the rest of those students. -- CTE video (Career and Technical Education): Back at the end of November we changed our PLC groupings and I talked with our CTE teachers about creating a joint video for marketing purposes. They utilized their PLC time to create this video and I really like the way it turned out. When the video was done we put it out on the HS Facebook page, Mrs. Eisfeldt put it out on her Twitter page, I e- mailed a link to all 8-11 students, and we put it in the link section of the HS Web page. They had completed the video around Jan. 15, so we did get it out to all students before the registration period. -- Granton/Loyal: Within the week I will be contacting Granton and Loyal to see if they have completed registration to nd out what their numbers are for classes that we offered to both of them. I will also need to see if Granton has an idea of what hours they will be running their business classes so that we can begin our scheduling process here. -- Spanish: Mrs. Pickett is looking into a new Spanish program. Mr. Endreas:

-- Budget status: Discussion. -- WASB Convention: Mr. Endreas and Mr. Post reported that the convention was very informative and discussed various sessions they attended. Mr. Zenner reported that all resolutions passed at the convention. -- Tech consortium information: Endreas shared information gath-

PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION FOR BIDS FOR FARM IMPROVEMENTS CIOLKOSZ DAIRY- N16329 KOSER AVE., THORP, WI

Clark County will be accepting bids for farm improvements. Improvements planned for the site include: liquid-tight concrete manure storage, manure transfer systems, asphalt feed pad, seeding and waterway construction. Stormwater and erosion control practices are required. 33,500 sq. ft. concrete flatwork 1,000’ PVC waterstop Manure pumps and transfer lines 36,000 sq. ft. asphalt 10,000 cubic yards excavation 7,500 cubic yard earthfill 500 ft. waterways All quantities are estimates and subject to change. The Clark County Land Conservation Department (LCD) and Williams Engineering Services, LLC will hold a site showing Thursday, March 5, 2015, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Engineering plans can be obtained at the bid showing. After the bid showing, plans can be viewed at the project site or obtained from the LCD. Sealed bids must be received by Clark County no later than 4:00 p.m. Monday, March 16, 2015. Clark County reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any technicality and to accept any bid which is advantageous. Bid procedure follows the requirements established in NR 153.23(1)(c). Clark County is an equal opportunity employer. Clark County LCD

517 Court St., Room 102 Neillsville, WI 54456

715-743-5102

Williams Engineering Services, LLC

715-429-0826

7-165592

WNAXLP

ered from discussions with area schools to combine technology ser- vices. -- Rocket Newsletter: There will be a charge from Premier Print-

ing for extra pages in the Newsletter, due to more articles being sub- mitted. -- Slate meeting: Discussion. A technology interest survey will be sent out. -- Check run: Endreas asked for any questions regarding the check run. There were none. Committee reports: None. Executive session under WI S.S. 19.85 (1)(c): Discuss/review personnel matters including teaching and administrative staf ng: Mo- tion by Zenner, seconded by Krasselt, to move to executive session under WI S.S. 19.85 (1)(c): Discuss/review personnel matters includ- ing teaching and administrative staf ng. Roll call: Wienke, Reckner, Zenner, Krasselt and Post present. All ayes, motion carried. Reconvene in open session. Return to open session. Action (if needed): Motion by Zenner, seconded by Krasselt, to approve 2015-2017 contract for the business assistant coordinator. All ayes, motion carried. Motion by Zenner, seconded by Krasselt, to approve the 2015-2017 contract for the director of business services. All ayes, motion carried. Adjournment: Motion to adjourn by Krasselt, seconded by Ze- nner. All ayes, motion carried. Meeting adjourned. /s/Jerry Wienke, clerk Denise Bodendorfer, recording secretary

7-165549

WNAXLP

ADVERTISEMENT FOR QUOTES FOR CLARK COUNTY COURTHOUSE

Clark County Maintenance Department seeks to replace 24 variable air volume boxes and integrate into the existing Siemens Talon System. The project includes installing air dampers to each of the ducts for each floor. It also includes replacement of a motor on induction air handler with a new VFD. To pick up the bid specs, contact the county clerk’s offi ce at 715-743-5148. A walk thru is scheduled for Thursday, March 5, 2015, at 10:00 a.m. Proposals will be accepted until 4:00 p.m. on Friday, March 20, 2015, at the Clark County Clerk’s Office, Courthouse, 517 Court Street, Room 301, Neillsville, WI 54456. Clark County reserves the right to reject any and all quotes, to waive any technicality, and to accept any quote which is advantageous.

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WNAXLP

GOV. SCOTT WALKER AND THE STATE OF WISCONSIN want you to be aware of the
GOV. SCOTT WALKER AND THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
want you to be aware of the following public notices
published the week of FEB. 3, 2015:
GENERAL:
Public Hearings:
Change, Feb. 4; Rogers Memorial Hospital, need determination request, Feb. 1.
PUBLIC MEETING: LWSRB, monthly business meeting, Feb. 9; Wisconsin Investment
Board, Trustees, Feb. 9, 10.
AIR POLLUTION PERMITS: Richland Center Renewable Energy, Feb. 3; Madison Gas
& Electric, Feb. 6.
Search public notices from all state communities online at:
WisconsinPublicNotices.org is a public service made possible
by the members of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association.
7-165583

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF SPENCER

REGULAR SCHOOL BOARD MEETING

WED., FEB. 25, 2015 • 6:30-9:30 P.M. HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY

AGENDA:

1. Call to order by Board president

2. Veri cation of compliance with open meeting law

3. Roll call -- establish quorum

4. Recognition of visitors

5. Agenda changes

6. Approve minutes of previous meetings

7. Second reading Policy 860 Visitors to the School

8. Second reading Policy 860-Rule Visitors To The School Procedures

9. First reading Policy 533 Recruitment and Hiring of Professional Employees

10. First reading Policy 343.3 Youth Options Program

11. First reading Policy 331 Parent Rights and the Curriculum

12. First reading Policy 331-Rule Student Privacy Protection Procedures

13. Discussion possible action amendment of pupil transportation contract

14. Mid-year review of 2014-15 school Board goals

15. Administrative reports:

a. Mrs. Schulz

b. Mr. Zanotelli

c. Mr. Endreas

16. Committee reports

17. Executive session under WI S.S. 19.85(1),(c) :discuss/review

personnel matters including teaching and administrative staf ng

18. Return to open session

19. Action (if needed)

20. Adjournment

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Page 12 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Wednesday, February 18, 2015

SPORTS

Gleaner - Wednesday, February 18, 2015 S P O R T S Regional, from page 9

Regional, from page 9

Melrose-Mindoro. Nielsen dropped a 7-1 decision to MM/GET sophomore Les Lakey (25-13), but still advances. At Amery, Nielsen will face Rice Lake sophomore Brohde Aspseter (26-7). Buchanan (24-8) also took second at the regional to advance to Amery. He reached the finals by pinning MM/GET senior Cole Williams (26-13), but lost a frenetic 14-12 overtime decision to OF/A/FC junior Brad Ritger (29-7). At Amery, Buchanan has a first-round match against Amery

junior Bennett Paulson (37-2). Four NGL wrestlers had their seasons end at Melrose. Sophomore Kyle Gurney (28-14) lost his only match at 113 pounds. Freshman Jesse Buchanan (4-20) won his first match at 145 pounds by pin in 2:17, but then lost his next two and was eliminated. At 195 pounds, sophomore Sam Baumgart- ner (14-11) was pinned in the semis but bounced back for an 8-3 win to get back to third place. At 285 pounds, Josh Zupanc (13-13) was pinned in his only match.

pounds, Josh Zupanc (13-13) was pinned in his only match. DEAN LESAR/STAFF PHOTOS Neillsville-Greenwood-Loyal’s

DEAN LESAR/STAFF PHOTOS

Neillsville-Greenwood-Loyal’s Kanyon Rachu (above) tries to pull in the leg of Melrose- Mindoro/Gale-Ettrick-Trempealeau’s Mike Horton in the nals of the 126-pound weight class at the Feb. 14 WIAA Division 2 wrestling regional at Melrose. Rachu took a 5-1 decision to win the title and advance to the Feb. 21 sectional at Amery. At upper left, NGL’s Sam Baumgartner bends away from MM/GET’s Dakotah Dafnson in a semi-nal match at 195 pounds. Baumgartner placed third but did not advance to the sectional. Eight NGL wrestlers will compete at Amery for the chance to advance to the Feb. 27-28 state tournament in Madison.

Spencer, from page 9

Junior Austin Post (22-13) won his first regional match on a 7-3 decision, but was pinned in the semis by Stratford sopho- more Mason Kauffman (41-0). Post then lost an 11-10 decision to Athens freshman Klay Ellenbecker (24-9) to end his season. At 138 pounds, senior Daniel Wilke (35- 7) lost a 6-2 decision in the semis to Strat- ford sohomore David Marquardt (27-8). He came back to pin Pittsville freshman Riley Wayerski (13-19) in 1:13, but did not get a wrestle-back for second place because Marquardt lost in the finals. Junior Nathan Neumann (29-14) had his season end in the same way. After an opening-round win, he was pinned in 1:11 in the semis by Athens sophomore Austin

Engel (34-5). Neumann came back for a 4-0 decision over Stratford freshman Mark Handrick (16-12), but he also did not get a wrestle-back because Engel was beaten in the finals. Junior Hunter Hildebrandt (25-15) won his first match at 152 pounds but lost his next two to see his season end. At 160, sophomore Zack Hahn (9-13) also won his first match but lost his next two. At 182 pounds, senior Travis Stelson (3-9) won his first match, lost in the semis and came back for third place with a pin in 1:42 over Edgar freshman Bryce Imhoff (13-21). He did not get a chance to wrestle back for second.

(13-21). He did not get a chance to wrestle back for second. Spencer senior Tim Bauer
(13-21). He did not get a chance to wrestle back for second. Spencer senior Tim Bauer

Spencer senior Tim Bauer (above) battles Edgar’s Kodi Chase in the 138-pound semi- nals at the Feb. 14 WIAA Division 3 regional at Auburndale. Bauer pinned Chase and won the weight class title to advance to the Feb. 21 sectional at Shawano. At left, Rocket freshman Bryce Shaw controls Marathon’s Hunter Reed in rst-round action at 113 pounds. Shaw took second place and also advances. A t r i g h t , S p e n c e r ’s Hunter Hildebrandt pins Marathon’s Joe Sedivy in 4:54 at 152 pounds, but he did not advance.

g h t , S p e n c e r ’s Hunter Hildebrandt pins Marathon’s

SPORTS

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Page 13

Loyal clinches rst league title with win at Greenwood

The Loyal girls baskeball team offi- cally ended what little drama remained in the 2014-15 Eastern Cloverbelt Confer- ence race by cruising to a 70-38 win over rival Greenwood on Feb. 13. The victory clinched the Loyal girls’ program’s first- ever conference title since the sport began in Loyal 40 years ago,and the Greyhounds added an exclamation point on the season with a 59-37 win over second-place Owen

Withee on Feb. 16 to finish undefeated over the 16-game league schedule. At Greenwood on Feb. 13, there was still a slight mathematical chance for Loyal to let the league title get away. The Greyhounds weren’t about to let that happen, as they quickly sprang to an 8-0 lead. With Jaedyn Pieper and Missy Benz converting back-to-back 3-point plays and Karsyn Rueth draining a 3-pointer, the

3-point plays and Karsyn Rueth draining a 3-pointer, the DEAN LESAR/STAFF PHOTO Loyal’s Jaelynn Young scrambles

DEAN LESAR/STAFF PHOTO

Loyal’s Jaelynn Young scrambles for a loose ball to start a fast break as Greenwood’s Lexi Hinker (30) and Kassidy Lamovec give chase in Loyal’s 70-38 win at Greenwood on Feb. 13.

Greyhounds led 24-7 late

in the first quarter. Greenwood played ag- gressively on offense, and Taylor Opelt’s two scores brought the Indians back

to within 24-11 early in the

second period. Benz scored

again on the low block and drew a foul for another 3-point play, and Devyn

Schoonover scored on a fast break after the Loyal defense knocked away a pass. Opelt’s free throw kept Greenwood within 16, until Schoonover scored on an offensive rebound reload and then on a fast break off a loose ball for

a 36-16 Loyal lead. It was still a 20-point

Loyal lead at the half. Loyal erased any doubt of the game’s outcome with a 13-2 run to begin the sec- ond half. Rueth scored three times in the paint during the run and Kaitlin Hoeser finished it with a pair of free throws. Nata- lie Hackel stopped the run with a hoop on an in-bounds play at the 3:39 mark of the third quarter, but Loyal answered with a 10-0 run to push the score to 61-22. Benz led Loyal with 20 points, 12 of them coming on 3-point plays as she scored inside and drew fouls. Rueth scored 14 points and Schoonover had 11. Opelt led Greenwood with 14 points. Loyal finished its ECC season in un- beaten style by finishing the sweep of Owen-Withee on Monday night. Again Loyal scored early and often, building leads of 19-7 after one quarter and 39-17 at halftime.

EASTERN CLOVERBELT GIRLS BASKET- BALL STANDINGS

Loyal 16-0 Neillsville 13-3

Owen-Withee

13-3

Colby

10-6

Marsh. Columbus

8-8

Spencer

5-11

Gilman

3-13

Greenwood

3-13

Granton

1-15

Loyal held Owen-With- ee to 29 percent (13-45) shooting in the game. Loyal hit its shots at a 39 percent (23-59) rate and hit six of 14 shots from 3-point range. Jaelynn Young led Loyal with 14 points and Morgan Reinwand had 10. Benz pulled down eight re- bounds. Stephany Hegge- meier scored 17 points for Owen-Withee. Spencer 49 Greenwood 44 The Rockets notched their fifth win of the ECC season with a tight win over Greenwood on Mon-

day night. Greenwood led 10-6 after a quarter but Spencer regained control and led 20-15 at halftime. The Rockets added a point to their lead in the third quarter. Spencer won despite getting 12 fewer field-goal attempts. The Rockets shot 38 percent (17-45) and hit 13 of 27 free-throw attempts. Greenwood shot 28 percent (16-57) from the field and was 8-19 on free throws. Lexi Baehr led Spencer with 13 points. Nadia King scored 11 points and Liz En- dreas added 10. Abby Varsho had seven rebounds for the Rockets. Neillsville 46 Spencer 29 Spencer trailed 30-16 at halftime and 41-18 after three quarters in a Feb. 13 loss to Neillsville. Baehr scored eight points for Spencer and Varsho grabbed seven rebounds.

Geiger’s late score lifts Loyal to sweep over Greenwood

After 31 minutes and

EASTERN CLOVERBELT BOYS BASKET- BALL STANDINGS Spencer 12-1 Mar. 10-3 Neillsville 10-3 Owen-Withee 8-5 Loyal
EASTERN
CLOVERBELT
BOYS BASKET-
BALL STANDINGS
Spencer
12-1
Mar.
10-3
Neillsville
10-3
Owen-Withee
8-5
Loyal
7-7
Colby
5-8
Greenwood
5-8
Gilman
2-12
Granton
1-13

a 44-43 Indian lead Tyler Prust scored in- side for Loyal on a lob-in

pass with 3:46 to go. Loyal held that 1-point lead for a full minute, until Howard pushed it to 47-44 with two free throws at the 2:35 mark. Ryley Fischer added another free throw at 2:17. After Johnson mis- fired on a 3-point attempt for Greenwood, Howard released on the defensive rebound and was all alone for an easy fast-break and

a 50-44 lead with 1:33 to go. Game over?

Not yet. At the 1:22 mark, Dane Toburen hit two free throws for the Indians. Geiger missed a pair of free throws on Loyal’s next trip, and Bredlau drew Greenwood to within two on a drive and jump-stop in the lane at the 56-second mark. Loyal held the ball until there were 36 seconds left, and called time-out. On the in-bounds play from side court, Bredlau stepped in front of the pass at halfcourt and took it to the hole for a lay-up to tie the game with 33 seconds left. Loyal held the ball for a last shot, and Geiger stepped forward with about 10 seconds left. He drove from the right side and sank the runner that proved to be the game-winner. Geiger’s game winner gave him a team- high 14 points. Brussow scored 13 and Howard added nine points. Bredlau led Greenwood with 16 points and Johnson scored 14. Toburen added nine.

50 seconds of ties, lead

changes and comebacks, the fate of the Feb. 12 Loyal-Greenwood boys basketball game was in Riley Geiger’s hands. The sophomore point guard handled the pressure in fine fashion, sinking a short runner with six sec- onds left in the game to carry the Greyhounds to a 52-20 win and the season sweep over the Indians. Greenwood got a final chance on an open-look 3-point attempt from Lo-

gan Johnson at the buzz- er, but it found only rim and no net. The final miss ended a wild game at Greenwood, one reminiscent of Loyal’s 45-41 win over the

Indians on Dec. 23 in Loyal. The rematch was tight all the way, with a 9-9 score after a quarter and a 23-

21 Greenwood lead at halftime.The third

quarter decided little, as Loyal’s 37-34 lead on Cameron Brussow’s jumper at the buzzer was as big of a lead as either team would get. Loyal took a 39-34 lead early in the fourth period on two Derrick Howard free throws, but Johnson answered for Greenwood with two of his own from the line and Booker Bredlau’s 3-point play tied the score with 5:44 to go. Greenwood then took a 41-39 on Johnson’s hoop on an in-bounds play, but it was short-lived as Geiger hit two free throws. Geiger was at the line for two more with 4:14 to go and he connected twice. Bredlau followed with a 3-pointer from the wing for

twice. Bredlau followed with a 3-pointer from the wing for DEAN LESAR/STAFF PHOTO Loyal’s Derrick Howard

DEAN LESAR/STAFF PHOTO

Loyal’s Derrick Howard tries to swat the ball away from Greenwood’s Delten Schmitz in the rst half of the Greyhounds’ 52-50 win over Greenwood on Feb. 12. Loyal nished the season sweep over the Indians on Riley Geiger’s game winning shot with six seconds to play.

Page 14 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Wednesday, February 18, 2015

CLASSIFIEDS/PUBLIC NOTICES

GRANTON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT

HELP WANTED CHILD CARE WORKERS

Granton Area School District is accepting applications for child care workers for the Granton Community Child Care Center. Early Childhool Degree is preferred. Application may be picked up in the Granton Area School District Office or send a letter of interest plus résumé to: Charles Buckel, district administrator, Granton Area School District, 217 N. Main St., Granton, WI 54436. Application deadline is Feb. 23, 2015.

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CDL DRIVERS WANTED

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Amenities Include:
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• New appliances
Wisconsin
Apartments located in:
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Management
• Walk-in showers
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• Marathon City
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• Spencer
• Stratford
• Edgar
A better way
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living!
• Off-street parking
1-800-346-8581 for applications
TFOD-503032
Harmony Country Cooperative is looking for a qualified candidate to work in their Feed Division
Harmony
Country Cooperative
is looking for a qualified candidate
to work in their Feed Division in Colby.
Candidate must have CDL and be able
to work well with others. Interested
candidates please call Colby Feed Mill at
1-888-231-1889 or 715-223-2329.
7-165438

OVER 30 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS

207

S. Main, Loyal

this 1-story, 3-bedroom, 1 1/2-bath home looks brand new. Really nice oak cabinetry throughout the

this 1-story,

3-bedroom, 1 1/2-bath home looks brand new. Really nice oak cabinetry throughout the home. Basement has family room and an additional large bedroom. If the two-car garage isn’t enough, there is an additional storage building. Priced to move.

Neat as a pin

N18 County Road DD, Owen Country living is yours with this 3-bedroom home and new

N18 County Road DD, Owen Country living is yours with this 3-bedroom home and new 30x36 shed on 2.88 acres. This updated home has a new furnace, large decks, huge yard and more.

216

S. Union, Loyal

INCOME OPPORTUNITY -- Don’t miss out on this triplex. Unit A is spacious and has

INCOME OPPORTUNITY -- Don’t miss out on this triplex.

Unit A is spacious and has 2 bedrooms with new kitchen and ooring. Unit B is large

with 2 bedrooms. Unit C is an ef ciency 1-bedroom apartment. Own this and start getting a very good return on your investment.

T

Realty

ieman

Inc.

116 N. Main St., Greenwood, Wis.

715-267-7243

Realty ieman Inc. 116 N. Main St., Greenwood, Wis. 715-267-7243

7-165573

Dean Bogdonovich, WI Cert. General Appraiser Cert. No. 173 COMPLETE APPRAISAL & REALTY SERVICES

 

Dean Bogdonovich: 715-267-7600 • Roy Gregorich: 715-429-0571 Will Zalizniak: 715-897-4680

Granton Area School District Regular meeting Jan. 12, 2015 Meeting called to order at 6:45 p.m., by President Theresa Hasz. Roll call: Doug Eichten -- here, John Richmond -- here, Paul Knoff -- here, Dennis Kuehn -- here, Theresa Hasz -- here. Also present were District Administrator Charles Buckel, Principal Rhonda Opelt, Dr. James Streifel, and four community/staff members. Notice to public was posted at the Granton school, Citizens State Bank, Granton Post Ofce, and the school Web site, and published in the TRG. Pledge of Allegiance was led by President Theresa Hasz. Motion by Doug Eichten, and seconded by Dennis Kuehn, to ap- prove the agenda as presented. Voice vote. Motion carried. Motion by Paul Knoff, and seconded by Doug Eichten, to approve the minutes of the Dec. 8, 2014, regular school Board meeting and the Dec. 22, 2014, special school Board meeting. Voice vote. Motion carried. Open forum: None. Motion by Paul Knoff, and seconded by Dennis Kuehn, to ap- prove the second reading of School Board Policy chapter 10, section ZA, WI Technical Excellence Scholarship. Voice vote. Motion carried. Motion by Dennis Kuehn, and seconded by Doug Eichten, to ap- prove the rst reading of School Board Policy chapter 10, section DA, Open & Closed Campus Lunch. Voice vote. Motion carried. Motion by John Richmond, and seconded by Paul Knoff, to ap- prove Youth Options request. Voice vote. Motion carried. Motion by Paul Knoff, and seconded by Doug Eichten, to approve the open enrollment space available policy which states, 'The dis- trict will not deny open enrollment applications except in the case of special education programs that have a capacity or caseload limit". Voice vote. Motion carried. Discussion on time off without pay request moved to executive session. Discussion on curriculum and staf ng update moved to executive session. Discussion on certi cation of school Board candidates for spring election. Names were drawn for order to appear on ballot. Discussion on high school course selection book for the 2015-16 school year. Discussion on school calendar for the 2015-16 school year. Discussion on CESA 10 Act 32 report. TREASURER'S REPORT: Net of Funds 10, 21, 27, 29, 50, 80:

$1,321,020.83; Fund 10 (loan): $0; Fund 21 (trust and agency):

$1,782.68; Fund 38/39 (debt service): $62,170.94; Fund 60 (activity account): $44,516.35; Fund 72 (scholarships): $95,993.69; Fund 73 (trust fund): $256,922.41

The treasurer's report was given by John Richmond. Motion by

Dennis Kuehn, and seconded by Doug Eichten, to approve vouch-

ers 0100036832-0100036947 for $274,957.32, payroll taxes for

$55,964.16 and fund 60 (activity account) 6000019427-6000019432

for $16,792.84. Voice vote. Motion carried.

Dr. Streifel presented his monthly snapshot of the school budget.

SCHOOL BOARD COMMITTEE REPORT: None.

MAINTENANCE/TRANSPORTATION REPORT: None.

DAYCARE DIRECTOR REPORT: Information presented by La- donna Nickel. Principal's report: 1) Granton and Loyal HS Choirs holiday pro- gram on Dec. 8, MS/HS band holiday program on Dec. 15, elemen- tary holiday program on Dec. 18, and the elementary rotary holiday program on Dec. 22; team building exercises for MS/HS on Dec. 23; Financial Literacy Night on Dec. 15, next on Jan. 19; basketball season info; Forensics underway; Dorian Festival; nal exams Jan. 14-16; teacher in-service Jan. 22-23; 2) Student services -- incen- tive activities, attendance, Student Excellence trophy case update, Student Advisory Committees met; 3) Curriculum and instruction -- curriculum mapping, course descriptions and offerings updated, Granton Virtual School handbook, elementary standards-based grading; 4) Professional development -- upcoming late starts and in-service days, professional learning communities; 5) Social and public relations -- sleigh ride scheduled for Jan. 17, homeschool out- reach event, school/community liaison, fun and educational cookie event, SKOOLlive Kiosk. SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT: 1) School Board Convention info; 2) WASB presentation Jan. 13, in distance learning room. CORRESPONDENCE: None. Motion by John Richmond, and seconded by Doug Eichten, to convene in executive session at 7:52 p.m., under Wisconsin Statute 19.85 (1)(c)(e)(f) for the purpose of discussing/taking action on (c) Considering employment, promotion, compensation or performance evaluation data of any public employee over which the governmen- tal body has jurisdiction or exercises responsibility. (e) Deliberating or negotiating the purchasing of public properties, the investing of public funds, or conducting other speci ed public business, when- ever competitive or bargaining reasons require a closed session. (f) Considering nancial, medical, social, or personal histories or disci- plinary data of speci c persons, preliminary consideration of speci c personnel problems or the investigation of charges against speci c persons except where par. (b) apples which, if discussed in public, would be likely to have a substantial adverse effect upon the reputa- tion of any person referred to in such histories or data, or involved in such problems or investigations. Roll call vote: Eichten -- yes, Rich-

5-165062

VILLAGE OF GRANTON CLERK

This is a salaried position, with benefits. Hours for this posi- tion are 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Minimum qualifications for this position are 3 years of computer experi- ence or an associate’s degree in computer science. Additional experience or education in: accounting, payroll and bookkeep- ing. Experience or ability to learn municipal clerk functions, such as: licensing, billing, taxes, budget and elections. Other required duties may be assigned. Successful applicant must be able to qualify for Wisconsin Clerk certification and be bond- able for financial duties. Any questions regarding this job an- nouncement please contact: Village President (Tom Gorst) at 715-937-2751. A job description will be available for pickup in the Village Office starting Feb. 6, 2015. Résumés may be hand delivered to Village Office. No e-mailed or faxed résumés will be accepted. Résumés are required to be received no later than 5 p.m., Feb. 27, 2015. Résumés should be mailed to:

Thomas Gorst Attn: Village President N4529 County Hwy K Granton, WI 54436

Equal Opportunity Employer

mond -- yes, Knoff -- yes, Kuehn --yes, Hasz -- yes. Motion carried. Motion by Doug Eichten, and seconded by John Richmond, to move from executive session to regular session at 8:20 p.m. Roll call vote: Eichten -- yes, Richmond -- yes, Knoff -- yes, Kuehn -- yes, Theresa Hasz -- yes. Motion carried. School Board Clerk Paul Knoff reported no action was taken. Motion by John Richmond, and seconded by Doug Eichten, to approve staff request for time off without pay. Voice vote. Motion carried. Motion by John Richmond, and seconded by Paul Knoff, to ad- journ at 8:22 p.m. Voice vote. Motion carried. /s/Paul C. Knoff, clerk

/s/Theresa A. Hasz, president WNAXLP

7-165562

Loyal Board of Education Regular meeting Jan. 19, 2015 Members present: J. Acker, P. Gries, A. Luchterhand, T. Odeen, D. Roedel, K. Weiler, D. Zimmerman Administrators present: C. Jackson, C. Lindner The meeting was held in the high school library and open ses-

sion was called to order at 8 p.m., by Board President Gries. It was veri ed that the meeting agenda had been posted at the three usual sites on Jan. 8, 2015, and published in the TRG on Jan. 14, 2015. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited. A motion to approve the agen- da was made by Roedel, seconded by Zimmerman, and approved on voice vote. Public comments: None.

A motion to approve the Dec. 17, 2014, regular monthly Board

meeting minutes as presented was made by Odeen, seconded by Acker, and carried on voice vote. Treasurer’s report:

On Dec. 31, 2014, the General Fund balance was $904,405.42. General Fund deposits for December totaled $1,037,795.59; less disbursements for December of checks #38322-38497 of $431,089.76; net payrolls of $160,431.14; Board meeting pay of $1,693.66; junior high winter coach pay of $2,140.27, in lieu of in- surance pay of $8,014.94; and service charge of $150. The OPEB

Fund 73 -- checking account had a beginning balance on Dec. 1, 2014, of $315,135.56; plus a deposit of $8,353.41; less check 586 for $11,037.24 for a nal balance of $312,451.73. The district also has a Fund 73 OPEB CD for $51,046.67 which will mature on June 12, 2015, and another CD for $52,295.97 which will mature on Sept. 12, 2015. A motion to approve the treasurer’s report was made by Roedel, seconded by Weiler. Motion carried on voice vote. Committee reports and other recommendations, including Board approvals. B & G Jan. 12, 2015.

A motion to approve the report was made by Acker, seconded by

Odeen, and carried on voice vote. Old business: None. New business:

Approve: Out-of-state eld trip request by Trevor Odeen for stu- dents to go to Mall of America and Rodeo in Minneapolis, Minn., on Jan. 31. They will be traveling on bus with other neighboring schools. Motion to approve the request was made by Weiler, seconded by Zimmerman. Motion carried on voice vote. Discuss: District administrator evaluation. Board felt the evalua- tion form and process went ne. Discuss: District Mission and Vision Statement. Mr. Jackson re- ported that he had inquired with Big River Consulting Group regard- ing strategic planning. It would require some community involve- ment along with other stakeholders. They had an estimated cost of $4,000. After some discussion, it was recommended that the Board set up a long-range planning committee without spending money on an outside consultant. The Wisconsin Association of School Boards Association may have some resources also. Accept: Donation. The United Methodist Church donated $600 to the School District of Loyal to be used for school supplies. A motion to approve this donation was made by Odeen, seconded by Weiler. Motion carried on voice vote. Accept: Donation. Laura Kaiser presented the Board with a check for $160.34 which represents the proceeds from the can cage on the west side of the school. To date, she has donated $1,906.80 from the can cage. Discuss/approve: Recognizing gure skating as a sport at Loyal High School. Athletic Director Lambrecht recommends that we rec- ognize gure skating as an extra-curricular club. We currently have one student who participates in the Marsh eld Silver Laces Figure Skating Club. A motion to approve this request was made by Weiler, seconded by Zimmerman. Motion carried on voice vote. Discuss/approve: CESA contract. Administrator Jackson re- viewed the contract and the changes made. A motion to approve was made by Weiler, seconded by Odeen. Motion carried on voice vote. Discuss: Computer tech. needs. Administrator Jackson has been meeting with area schools to discuss the possibility of contracting with The Dirks Group for service work as a consortium to get better prices. No action taken. First reading: Head Lice Policy, Teacher and Support Staff Per- sons of the Year Policies; Bus Regulation Policy. A motion to approve the rst reading of the Head Lice Policy was made by Weiler, sec- onded by Roedel. Motion carried on voice vote. A motion to approve the rst reading of the Teacher and Support Person of the Year Poli- cies was made by Luchterhand, seconded by Odeen. Motion car- ried on voice vote. A motion to approve the rst reading of the Bus Regulation Policy was made by Weiler, seconded by Roedel. Motion carried on voice vote.

Other business: Mr. Lindner gave his report to the Board. He list- ed all of the activities that were held in the last month at the School District of Loyal. He listed upcoming events that the Board might want to attend. No action taken. Public comments: None. Upcoming meetings: Buildings and Grounds Committee: Feb. 9, 2015, at 7:30 p.m. Technology Committee: Feb. 2, 2015, at 3:30 p.m. Regular Board meeting: Monday, Feb. 16, 2015

A motion to adjourn was made by Weiler, seconded by Acker.

Motion carried on voice vote. The meeting was declared adjourned by President Gries, at 9:07 p.m. Tom Odeen, Board clerk

Eva Aumann, recording secretary WNAXLP

7-165580

E-mail your classified ads to: classsub@tpprinting.com
E-mail your classified ads to:
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CLASSIFIEDS

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Page 15

February 18, 2015 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Page 15 ***IRS Auction*** March 11th @ New

***IRS Auction*** March 11th @ New Richmond City Hall - 156 E 1st St New Richmond, WI @ 9:30 a.m. Property listed on National and State Historic registries! Jen- nifer: 618-713-0421 www.IRSauc- tions.gov (CNOW)

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HELP WANTED

DIETARY AIDE. Memorial Medical

Center of Neillsville, WI, is seek- ing a part-time (24-28 hours per week) dietary aide. Hours are pri- marily 10:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. and in- cludes every other weekend and

a holiday rotation. Duties include

institutional food preparation and food tray line service. Previous experience is a plus. Apply online at www.memorialmedcenter.org or in person at 216 Sunset Place, Neillsville, WI. EEO.

DRIVERS: Company CDL-A. Excellent pay & incentives, and $2,500 sign-on bonus. Regional

and long haul routes. CDL-A &

1 year experience required. 507-

696-7784.

LINDNER AG Services. Looking for drivers with drag line experi- ence. Also truck and tractor driv- ers. 715-937-2660.

MEYER MANUFACTURING Corporation is accepting ap- plications for CNC machinists, painters, press brake operator, production welders and general labor. Competitive wage, excel- lent fringe benefits. Normal work week is four 10-hour days - Mon- day through Thursday. Apply in

person at Meyer Mfg. Corp., Hwy.

A West, Dorchester, WI.

PERSON NEEDED For parlor milking and clean up, 40 hours/ week, $13/hour, every other weekend off. Call Abel Acres, 715-255-8779. Please leave a message.

TRUCK DRIVER Wanted for grain hopper division. Home week- ends. 715-571-9601.

HELP WANTED Bartenders,

nights and weekends. Apply at Behind Barr’s, N9302 County

 

AUTOS

 

FOR

SALE:

1996

4x4

Dodge

truck,

SLT,

with

70,000

miles,

runs good. $2,995 OBO. 715-

223-8703.

 
 

REAL ESTATE

100 ACRES Amish dairy farm. Lo- cated 2-1/2 miles south of Hwy.

K

on N10925 Badger Avenue,

Unity, WI 54488. Ben Stoltzfoos, by the schoolhouse. Will split 40 acres and buildings, and 60 acres with 8 acres woods.

MISCELLANEOUS

DAILY SPECIALS. Sunday:

stuffed chicken breast dinner.

Senior citizens size meal all week

on

any lunch special. Grandma’s

Kitchen of Loyal, 715-255-9014.

 

MOBILE/

 

MANUFACTURING

TWO BEDROOM Mobile home

in

Tucson, Arizona, in gated 55+

community. Large sun porch

overlooking mountains, carport, community pool, etc. $12,000 OBO. 715-297-7300 or 715-308-

7200.

 
 

RUMMAGE/

 
 

GARAGE SALE

BAG SALE At Colby Public Li- brary: $4 per bag of movies and magazines. February 23-28 dur- ing regular library hours.

in bonus! Call 877-968-7986 or Road O, Greenwood. 715-267- FARM MACHINERY SuperServiceLLC.com (CNOW) 6733. N
in bonus! Call 877-968-7986 or
Road O, Greenwood. 715-267-
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G
715-797-5970.
E
R
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D
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ATTENTION TRUCK RECRUIT-
ERS: RECRUIT an applicant in
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O
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GUN SHOW February 27-March
W
1 Barron Community Center, 800
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6633 preferred, or 715-429-0207.
1 BEDROOM FLOOR PLANS
Affordable Rent Is Based on Income
FOR RENT In Loyal: 2 bedroom,
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FOR RENT Or sale: 3 bedroom,
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5-165059
SPORTS/NEWS REPORTER The Record-Review, an award winning family owned weekly newspaper in central Wisconsin, is
SPORTS/NEWS REPORTER
The Record-Review, an award winning family owned weekly newspaper in
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Send cover letter, resume, and writing samples to:
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7-165582
PETS HELP WANTED BOXER PUPPIES, two left, price reduced; also some Shih Tzu and some
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OTHER FOR SALE
#1 CALIFORNIA Navel oranges
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Page 16 - Tribune Record Gleaner - Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Memorial Medical Center introduces new pediatric waiting room

NEILLSVILLE -- The Memorial Medi- cal Center Foundation would like to recognize two special donors that are making our community a better place. Omar and Sheryl Young from Granton, along with their children, Ceasar (13), Kennedy (6), and Liberty (4), recently made a visit to Memorial Medical Center to check out the new pediatric waiting room at the clinic. The project was made possible by a donation from the family in honor of the services they have received at MMC. All three children are patients under the care of Dr. Kenneth Weimer, Pediatrician. “Dr. Weimer is like family,” begins Sheryl “not only does he treat our kids with great medical care, he really knows them. Liberty sees him, her face lights up, and she runs up to give him a big hug. You don’t get that kind of treatment in a bigger city.” Omar continued, “We saw a need at the clinic for a proper waiting room for young patients. We thought it was a per- fect idea to donate money to create the best waiting experience for our children and the community.” The donation from the Young family enabled the Memorial Medical Center Foundation to create a new and excit- ing waiting room for the youngest of patients. The project began with a mural painting by local artist Jodi Sorenson. Then, new furniture was purchased from a local Amish woodworker. Finally, in

each of the pediatric exam rooms, IPADS were securely mounted to the walls, allowing the kids to play educational games while waiting for their doctor to see them. “Omar and Sheryl were amazed at how far we could stretch their donor money to create a wonderful experience for our young patients” commented Shelley Janke, executive director of the Foundation. “We have all heard that the cost of health care is high. What people might not realize is that the cost to offer health care to our community is just as high. Donations such as the Young dona- tion allow MMC to improve what we offer, and allow donors to receive a tax-benefit” continued Janke. “What an amazing improvement to MMC. It’s evident that we need this hos- pital in our community, and it was our honor to help it improve. I would like to challenge everyone in our community to help support MMC by becoming a donor” Omar commented. So the next time you visit Memorial Medical Center, stop over to the lower clinic and visit the pediatric waiting room. Take a peek at the artwork and look for the names of Omar and Sheryl’s children, embedded on the waiting room walls as a reminder of their generous gift to the community. For more information on the Memo- rial Medical Center Foundation, contact

715-743-8456.

Memo- rial Medical Center Foundation, contact 715-743-8456. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO The Young family visits the Memorial

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The Young family visits the Memorial Medical Center pediatric waiting room for the rst time.

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•NDE Vertical TMR Mixers •Tube-Line Inline Wrappers
•McHale Bale Wrapper
•Skidsteer Attachments
•Headlocks
•Waterers
•Scales
•Animat
•Barn Equipment
•Teagle Bale Processors
•Fans
•Augers
Model 175
Model 420
Patent Pending
Sizes Available: 285 cu. ft. to 1,000 cu. ft.
ROTO PRESS BAGGERS
•Heavy-duty mixing tub •Left, right or rear discharge
•21” knives for fast hay & baleage processing
Norbco, J&D, Loyal, PB Zimm., Freudenthal,
Hoover Metals
Call for more information.
– In-Stock –
•Sizes available 350 - 1,725 cu. ft.
New WIC Feed Carts in stock!
Register for Door Prizes!
RisslerRissler MixersMixers
•30 in. wide bale wrap,
net wrap and twine
•Steel Gates - 8 ft., 4 in.
1st Grand Prize $1,000 Gift Certificate for Cloverdale Equipment, LLC
2nd Grand Prize $500 Gift Certificate for Cloverdale Equipment, LLC
3rd Grand Prize $250 Gift Certificate for Cloverdale Equipment, LLC
OpenOpen HouseHouse
10%10% DiscountDiscount
onon Rissler–Rissler–
Animat Alley Rubber
LUNCH WILL BE SERVED!
(Need not be present to win. Drawing Thursday, Feb. 27. Only one entry per family.)
NewNew MixersMixers
Grand Prizes for the Dairy Industry only
Located 2 miles South of Curtiss on Hwy. E
&& PartsParts
Other daily door prizes for everyone!
715-223-3361 or 1-866-387-7727
20%
OFF
7-165411