Sie sind auf Seite 1von 154

Heinrich Breem

18th Century Immigrant


from Germany
and
Some of His Descendents

by
Gary Bream
Ninth Generation Descendent

December 2005

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section and Page

I.
II.

ORIGINS ................................................................................................................... 1
IMMIGRATION........................................................................................................ 1
1. The Journey............................................................................................................. 1
2. Arrival ..................................................................................................................... 4
III. SETTLEMENT.......................................................................................................... 1
1. The First Decade 1740 to 1750............................................................................ 1
2. The Second Decade 1751 to 1760 ....................................................................... 4
IV. GENERATIONS........................................................................................................ 1
1. First Generation ...................................................................................................... 1
1.1 Heinrich Bream (1700 1751-1762)................................................................... 1
2. Second Generation Children of Heinrich Bream and Catherine.......................... 1
2.1 Jacob Bream (1722 1794) ................................................................................. 1
2.2 Anna Maria Bream (UNK - >1780)..................................................................... 5
3. Third Generation Children of Jacob Bream and UNKNOWN............................ 1
3.1 Samuel Bream (1744-52 - 1800).......................................................................... 1
3.2 Henry Bream (1744-52 - 1828)............................................................................ 8
3.3 Jacob Bream (1750-55 1839).......................................................................... 19
3.4 Margaretha Elisabetha Bream (1755 UNK) ................................................... 23
3.5 Catharina Bream (1756-65 1820-30) .............................................................. 23
4. Fourth Generation Children of Henry Bream and Barbara Leathers................... 1
4.1 Elizabeth Bream (1771 1830-50)...................................................................... 1
4.2 Jacob Bream (1771 1835) ................................................................................. 2
4.3 Mary C Bream (1774 1845).............................................................................. 4
4.4 Catherine Bream (1776 1856)........................................................................... 6
4.5 Henry Bream (1781 1865) ................................................................................ 6
4.6 Magdalena Bream (1789 1852) ...................................................................... 11
4.7 John S Bream (1788 1876) ............................................................................. 12
4.8 Susannah Bream (1793 1850-60) ................................................................... 15
4.9 Daughter Bream (1795-1800 UNK) ............................................................... 15
5. Fifth Generation Children of Jacob Bream and Catherine Phlieger .................... 1
5.1 Anna Bream (UNK died in infancy)................................................................. 1
5.2 Susannah Bream (1797 1850-60) ..................................................................... 1
5.3 Joseph Bream (1799 1877) ............................................................................... 1
5.4 Jacob H Bream (1801 1885) ............................................................................. 3
5.5 Daniel Bream (1802 1877)................................................................................ 4
5.6 Henry Bream (1804-10 1820-30)...................................................................... 6
5.7 Mary (Polly) Bream (1805 1883) ..................................................................... 7
5.8 Catherine (Katie) Bream (1808 1885) .............................................................. 7
5.9 John Bream (1811 1899)................................................................................. 10
5.10 Matilda Bream (1815 1900-10) .................................................................... 10
5.11 Samuel Bream (1815 1881) .......................................................................... 11
5.12 William E Bream (1818 1891)...................................................................... 12
6. Sixth Generation Children of Daniel Bream and Mary Arnold........................... 1
6.1 Jacob H Bream (1837 1913) ............................................................................. 1
6.2 Amelia Bream (1839 1911) .............................................................................. 1
i

6.3 Edward (Edwin) Bream (1841 1864)................................................................ 2


6.4 Ephraim Bream (1843 1923) .......................................................................... 14
6.5 Daniel Bream (1845 1923).............................................................................. 16
6.6 Ezra Bream (1847 1927)................................................................................. 17
6.7 Emma Frances Bream (1849 1930) ................................................................ 19
6.8 Mary Catherine Bream (1852 1925) ............................................................... 19
6.9 Howard Bream (1853 1919) ........................................................................... 19
6.10 Rev. Ira Franklin Bream (1855 1952)........................................................... 20
7. Seventh Generation - Children of Ezra Bream and Emma Cooley ........................ 1
7.1 Myrtle L Bream (1869 1935)............................................................................ 1
7.2 Mary Estella Bream (1881 1968)...................................................................... 1
7.3 Willis Ivan Bream (1882 1975) ........................................................................ 1
7.4 Bertie Julie May Gula Bream (1887 - 1888).................................................... 2
7.5 Horace Ezra Bream (1889 1890) ...................................................................... 2
7.6 Harry Samuel Bream (1892 1991).................................................................... 3
7.7 Myrna Mazell Bream (1897 1993) ................................................................... 7
V. APPENDICES ........................................................................................................... 1
Appendix 1 Ancestors of Catherine UNKNOWN wife of Heinrich Bream......... 1
Appendix 2 Ancestors of UNKNOWN wife of Jacob Bream .............................. 1
Appendix 3 Ancestors of Barbara Leathers wife of Henry Bream....................... 1
Appendix 4 Ancestors of Catherine Phlieger wife of Jacob Bream ..................... 1
Appendix 5 Ancestors of Mary Arnold wife of Daniel Bream............................. 1
Appendix 6 Ancestors of Emma Cooley wife of Ezra Bream .............................. 1
Appendix 7 Ancestors of Kathryn Taughinbaugh wife of Harry Bream.............. 1

ii

I.

ORIGINS

Heinrich Bream emigrated from Germany in the mid-18th century, during a time
of heavy immigration from the region. It is not known for certain where Heinrich
was from in Germany. The ship list generated on his arrival in Philadelphia
indicates that Heinrich and his fellow passengers were Palatines. It is entirely
likely that Heinrich was from the Palatinate in Germany, significant numbers of
immigrants in this time period came from that region. Unfortunately, during the time of Heinrichs
immigration, the Pennsylvania authorities used the term Palatine to refer to any person
emigrating from Germany, regardless of their place of origin. 1 The areas of heaviest emigration
during the early 18th century included the area along both sides of the middle Rhine River and its
tributaries, the Main, Mosel and Neckar Rivers. 2 In addition to the Palatinate, this area
encompassed the districts of Darmstadt and Hanau, Franconia (including the area around the
cities of Nuremburg, Baireuth and Wurzburg), the Archbishopric of Mayence, the Archbishopric
of Treves, Wrttemberg, and the districts of Spires, Worms, Hesse-Darmstadt, Zweibrucken,
Nassau, Alsace and Baden.

Areas of Highest 18th Century German Emigration 3

The Palatinate
was
divided
between two
small territorial
clusters:
the
Rhenish,
or
Lower,
Palatinate
(Rhenish Pfalz)
and the Upper
Palatinate
(Oberpfalz).
The
Lower
Palatinate was
located
in
southwest
Germany
encompassing
both sides of the
middle Rhine

River between its Main and Neckar River tributaries (see map on next page 4 ). The Upper
Palatinate was located in north Bavaria, on both sides of the Naab River as it flows south toward
the Danube River. The Lower Palatinate was the more important region for immigration to
Pennsylvania in the 18th century.
1

Frank Ried Diffenderffer, The German Emigration into Pennsylvania through the Port of Philadelphia from 1700 to 1775 (Baltimore, MD, 1977)

2 The history in this section is a synthesis of information from Walter Allen Knittle, Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigrations (Philadelphia,

PA, 1937) and The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume XI, online edition, 2003 http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11415b.htm
3

http://www.progenealogist.com/germanemigration.htm

Don Yoder, Rhineland Emigrants: Lists of German Settlers in Colonial America (Baltimore, MD, 1981), 291.

Page I-1

Page I-2

The Lower Palatinate


was the land of the
count palatine.
In
early
medieval
Germany,
counts
palatine served as
stewards of royal
territories in the
absence of the Holy
Roman emperors. In
1356 they won the
right to participate in
the election of the
emperor and were
thereafter known as
the electors palatine,
the leading secular
princes of the Holy
Heidelberg Castle in 1684 5

Roman Empire. The capital of the Palatinate until the 18th century was at Heidelberg.
The Palatinate remained
Roman Catholic during the
early
Reformation
but
adopted Calvinism in the
1560s when the lands and
electoral power passed to
Elector Frederick III (15591576) of the PalatinateSimmern line. His grandson
Modern view of Heidelberg Castle 6
Elector Frederick IV (15921610) championed Protestantism, becoming the head of the Protestant military alliance known as
the Evangelical Union in 1608. His son Elector Frederick Vs (1610-1623) acceptance of the
Bohemian crown in 1619 contributed to the beginning of the Thirty Years War (1618-1648).
Frederick lost Bohemia and his German lands and electoral power in 1623, which were given to
Bavaria. At the Peace of Westphalia (1648), the Lower Palatinate and electoral power were
restored to Frederick Vs son Elector Karl Ludwig (1648-1680), but the Upper Palatinate
remained with Bavaria.

5 http://mediaspec.com/castles/rhein/
6 http://mediaspec.com/castles/rhein/

Page I-3

In 1685 the government of the Lower Palatinate passed


to the Catholic line of Palatinate-Neuberg with the
ascension of Elector Philip Wilhelm (1685-1690). The
elector at Heinrich Breams birth was Philip Wilhelms
son, Elector Johann Wilhelm (1690-1716). Johann
Wilhelms brother, Elector Karl Phillip (1716-1742), was
in power at the time of Heinrichs emigration. Because of
friction with Protestants in Heidelberg, Karl Philip
transferred the capital of the Palatinate from
Heidelberg to Mannheim in 1720, where he constructed
an ornate palace in the French style.

Elector Karl Philip 7

Palace at Mannheim 8

There were probably several reasons leading to the mass migration of Germans from the
Palatinate and surrounding regions to America in the early to mid 18th century. The area was the
scene of near constant warfare over the previous century. The Thirty Years War (1618-1648) was
particularly devastating to the region although the area rebounded quickly under the leadership
of Elector Karl Ludwig. The respite was short lived as the Palatinate came under repeated assault
from the armies of Louis XIV of France in 1674 and during the War for Reunions (1683-1684), the
War of the Grand Alliance (1689-1697) and again in 1707 in the War for Spanish Succession
(1701-1714). To add to the devastation caused by repeated invasions, an extraordinarily cold
winter in 1708-1709 led directly to one of the first big waves of German emigration to America in
late 1709. A third contributing factor was the heavy taxation during this time period as rulers in
Germany sought to emulate the extravagance of Louis XIV at Versailles. A fourth reason was
religious persecution although this may not have been as significant a reason as sometimes
supposed. 9 In the early 18th century the principle of Cuius region eius religio, which was
established in 1555 at the Peace of Augsburg, was still the official policy of the government. It
recognized three churches: Catholic, Lutheran and Calvinist. It also provided that the religion of
the ruler should be the religion of the people. As a result, the Neuberg line which was in power
during Heinrichs lifetime did tend to favor Catholics over Protestants. The emigrants from the
earlier part of the 18th century however (~1710) did not report religious persecution as a factor in
their choosing to emigrate. 10 It is not known if it became more significant by 1740 when Heinrich
7

Ralph Beaver Strassburger and William John Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers: A Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of

Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808. Volume 1, (Rockport, ME, 1992), 360


8

http://www.schloesser-magazin.de/eng/objekte/ma/ma_saekue.php

Walter Allen Knittle, Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigrations (Philadelphia, PA, 1937), 6-11

10

Ibid, 11

Page I-4

left.
In addition to the conditions in the Palatinate itself, emigration was actively assisted by England
as part of its attempts to secure religious and civil rights for Protestants on the European continent.
On March 23, 1709 England passed its first general naturalization law for naturalizing foreign
born Protestants. The bill included provisions that all children of naturalized parents were to be
considered natural-born subjects, that naturalized citizens were allowed to purchase land which
could be transmitted to their children, and that naturalized citizens were permitted to take part in
trade and commerce.
An additional cause of emigration for many
Germans was the desire to acquire land for
themselves that could then be passed on to
their children. This desire for land was fed by
numerous pamphlets then in circulation
throughout the Rhine Valley extolling the
virtues of the New World. William Penn
himself had made several trips to the Rhine
region, and German translations of his brief
description of the new province were in
circulation within the Rhine Valley. Penn had
offered to sell one hundred acres of land for
two English pounds and a low rental. Agents
for the English proprietors of the American
Colonies were sent throughout the Palatinate
to induce emigration. These companies had
received large bounties in land from the
government and were anxious to recruit
colonists to settle their lands and make them
revenue producing. Not all of these agents
were reputable however and some actively
of William Penns
defrauded unsuspecting emigrants. These less Title page of German Version
Letters 11
than reputable agents were known to the
Dutch as Zeilverkooper, or soul-sellers, but to the Germans as Neulanders or Newlanders. 12
Many Germans were induced to emigrate based on letters from earlier emigrants sent back to
Germany which provided favorable reports of the New World. There were those however who
used this same process to dupe unsuspecting emigrants. Unscrupulous shipmasters would
sometimes destroy or alter letters sent back to Germany that described anything negative about
the New World. In addition, in Germany a business grew around forging letters presenting a
favorable impression of the New World. 13

11

Knittle, Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigrations 35

12

Diffenderffer, The German Emigration into Pennsylvania, 171.

13

Sharon V Salinger, To Serve Well and Faithfully: Labor and Indentured Servants in Pennsylvania 1682-1800, (Bowie, MD, 2000), 85

Page I-5

George Christofel Brehm: A Possible Family for Heinrich Bream


George Christofel Brehm was born on June 8, 1707 in Weisbaden, Germany. Weisbaden was located near
Frankfurt on the Main River in the Hessen-Nassau district of Germany. He was the son of Johann Nicholas
Brehm and Maria Elisabetha Ambrosius. He immigrated on the ship Edinburgh on September 16, 1751,
settling in the vicinity of Adamstown, Lancaster County where he died in June of 1782. Many of his
descendents moved on to North Carolina.
There is at least one personal family tree which indicates George Christofel had three bothers, Heinrich,
Peter and Jacob, although no documentary source of the information is given, so its authenticity cannot be
verified. There are records for Breams with each of those Christian names emigrating from Germany:
George Christofel in 1751 and Heinrich and Jacob in 1740. There were records for two Peter Breams
immigrating: one in 1751 on board the Edinburgh with George Christofel who was probably Georges son
Peter who would have been 17 years old at that time. A second Peter (age 39 years) immigrated on August
27, 1739 aboard the ship Samuel. This Peter settled in York County, where he died sometime before April
of 1750 in Manchester Twp, York County. Other than these four Breams, the only other Bream appearing
in the published ships lists is a Loui (Lodwick) Prim who immigrated on the ship Patience in 1753. 14
Lodwick (Brem) appears to have settled in Berks County by the late 1750s.
Thus far Ive found no interactions between George Christofel and either Heinrich or Peter in Pennsylvania
that suggests that they were related. There is a possible connection between Peter and Heinrich however
which hints at a possible familial relationship. Peters wife Anna Catharina was party in an
Administration Bond to William Plumstead as part of the settlement of her husband Peters estate in
1750. 15 In addition to Anna Catharina, Andrew Swartz and Bartholomew Maul were also parties to the
bond. Heinrich Bream and his wife Catherine were sponsors of the baptism of Andrew Swartzs son
Heinrich in 1751. 16 Peter and Heinrich were also both present in the records of Christs Lutheran Church in
the city of York. 17 So circumstantial evidence suggests that there may have been a relationship between
Peter and Heinrich. Based on their respective ages, this relationship could have been as brothers. It is still
not known for certain whether either of these immigrants was related to each other or was related in any
way to the family of George Christofel.

14

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1 , 526

15

Estate papers of Peter Prem, York County Historical Society

16

Kieth A Dull, Early German Settlers of York County, Pennsylvania (Bowie, MD, 2003), 362

17

Marlene S Bates and F Edward Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records of the 18th Century, Vol 2 (Westminster, MD, 2001)

Page I-6

II.

IMMIGRATION

1.

The Journey
Heinrich and his family probably began their trip in the spring (most likely May or
June) of 1740. Having decided to leave Germany, Heinrich would have been
required to take official leave of the local government. If he owned property, he
would have had to sell it and pay 10% of its value to the state treasury. If he was
living in vassalage he would have had to apply for manumission as well as permission to emigrate.
Many emigrating families would often attend a final church service in their home parish to bid
farewell to the community. 18

Die Pfalz Castle on the Rhine River near Bacharach 19

Heinrich would have had


to secure passage for his
family down the Rhine
River to Rotterdam in
Holland,
probably
initiating this journey
further upstream on one of
the Rhines tributaries. The
trip down the Rhine often
lasted 4-6 weeks, in part
because of the numerous
stops at custom houses, at
least 36 between the cities
of Heilbronn (just south of
Heidelberg on the Neckar

River) and Rotterdam,


where custom officials
examined the ships and
required the passengers
to pay tolls. Once in
Rotterdam there was a
further delay of about 56 weeks, during which
time families might spend
the last of their money. 20

Stolzenfels Castle on the Rhein River near Koblenz 21


18 Yoder, Rhineland Emigrants: Lists of German Settlers in Colonial America, x.
19

http://mediaspec.com/castles/rhein/

20 Gottlieb Mittelbergers Journey to Pennsylvania in the year 1750 and return to Germany in the year 1754, translated by Oscar Handlin and

John Clive (Cambridge, MA, 1960), 11.


21 http://mediaspec.com/castles/rhein/

Page II-1

In Rotterdam, Heinrich would have had to secure passage on a ship to Pennsylvania by striking a
bargain with a ships captain. If he
had sufficient funds he could
purchase his families passage
outright. If he lacked the funds he
would have had to sail as a
redemptioner, either as an
indentured servant who entered
into a contract to serve a term of
years to a master before setting
sail, or as a free willer who
agreed to sell themselves and
their families upon arrival to
repay the cost of their
transportation. 22
Heinrich secured passage on the
ship Loyal Judith which was
(from Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania Pioneers; p. 424)
commanded by Lovell Paynter. The Loyal Judith was a type of ship referred to as a pink which
was in reference to its having a narrow stern. The Loyal Judith made at least 5 trips transporting
German emigrants to Pennsylvania between the years of 1732 to 1743. 23 It is not clear if Lovell
Paynter made other voyages transporting German immigrants. There are records of an Edward
Paynter who made crossings in September of 1738 commanding the Winter Galley and in
September of 1739 commanding the Loyal Judith 24 . Its unknown whether Lovell and Edward
are in fact the same person.
Conditions were often overcrowded on the ships the people are packed densely, like herrings, so
to say, in the large sea vessels. One person receives a place scarcely two feet wide and six feet
long in a bedstead, while many
a ship carries four to six hundred
souls; not to mention the
innumerable implements, tools,
provisions, water barrels and
other things which likewise
occupy much space. 25
Leaving Rotterdam, probably
sometime in August of 1740, the
Loyal Judith first sailed to the
port of Deal, on the southeast
coast of England near Dover.
Depending on the winds, this

View of Rotterdam Harbor - 1729

22 Diffenderffer, The German Emigration into Pennsylvania, 171.


23

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 3, 218:

24 Ibid, Volume 1, 198,264.


25 Mittelbergers Journey, 11.

Page II-2

trip could take from 2 to 4 weeks. Once in Deal there was often another delay of 1 to 2 weeks
when the ships were waiting either to be passed through the custom house or waiting for favorable
winds. In Deal everything would have been reexamined and additional custom charges levied.
For many families this meant spending the last of their money. Families that had planned to arrive
in Pennsylvania free, would often times end up as redemptioners instead. 26
While not always the case, the ocean voyage proper was often perilous.
As Gottlieb Mittelberger writes, When the ships have for the last time
weighed their anchors [], the real misery begins. 27 The passengers
were often without proper food and water, and diseases such as
dysentery, scurvy, typhoid and smallpox were common. Children were
the most vulnerable and died in large numbers. 28 In some instances
these poor conditions were simply the result of bad luck, such as
unfavorable winds, but in other cases the results were premeditated.
Because transportation rules specified that if a passenger survived the
Sailing Vessel of the
half-way point in the journey the family was responsible for the cost of
Eighteenth Century
the passage, whether or not they ultimately survived, unscrupulous
captains would only provide sufficient provisions for half of the journey, literally starving the
passengers during the final half of the journey. 29 Estimates for the mortality rate of the German
emigrants during the voyages range from 20 to 50%. 30
Excerpts from Gottlieb Mittlebergers account of his voyage to Pennsylvania
During the voyage there is on board these ships terrible misery, stench, fumes, horror, vomiting, many kinds of
sickness, fever, dysentery, headache, heat, constipation, boils, scurvy, cancer mouth-rot and the like, all of which come
from the old and sharply salted food and meat, also from very bad and foul water so that many die miserably.
Add to this, want of provisions, hunger, thirst, cold, heat, dampness, anxiety, want, afflictions and lamentations,
together with other troubles such as lice which abound so plentifully, especially on sick people, that they can be
scraped off the body. The misery reaches the climax when a gale rages for two or three days and nights, so that
everyone believes that the ship will go to the bottom.
Children from one to seven years rarely survive the voyage; and many a time parents are compelled to see their
children miserably suffer and die from hunger, thirst and sickness, and then cast into the water. I witnessed such
misery in no less than thirty-two children in our ship, all of whom were thrown into the sea.
That most of the people get sick is not surprising, because, in addition to all other trials and hardships, warm food is
served only three times a week, the rations being very poor and very small. These meals can hardly be eaten on
account of being so unclean. The water which is served out on the ships is often very black, thick and full of worms, so
that one cannot drink it without loathing, even with the greatest thirst.
Toward the end we were compelled to eat the ships biscuit which had been spoiled long-ago; though in a whole
biscuit there was scarcely a piece the size of a dollar that had not been full of red worms and spiders nests. Great
hunger and thirst force us to eat and drink everything; but many do so at the risk of their lives. 31
26

Salinger, To Serve Well and Faithfully, 88

27

Gottlieb Mittelbergers Journey to Pennsylvania in the year 1750 and return to Germany in the year 1754, translated by Carl Theo Eben

(Philadelphia, PA, 1888), 18.


28

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers:, Volume 1. xxxiv

29

Salinger, To Serve Well and Faithfully, 94

30

Ibid, 93

31

Mittelbergers Journey to Pennsylvania translated by Carl Theo Eben (Philadelphia, PA, 1888),

Page II-3

When the ships finally reached the Delaware River and Philadelphia was in sight, many ships
had to endure yet another delay. Each ship was visited by a health officer. If any passengers with
infectious diseases were discovered on board, the ship was required to remove one mile from the
city. 32 Passengers could often remain onboard for another 2 to 3 weeks during which time many
of the sick died. 33
2.

Arrival
The Loyal Judith arrived in Philadelphia on Friday, November 25, 1740. It is not
known who else Heinrich may have been traveling with. While many ship lists
recorded wives and children as well, the ship list for the Loyal Judith only recorded
males greater than 16 years. In addition to Heinrich (who was listed as 40 years old)
the list also recorded a Jacob Bream, probably Heinrichs son. Jacob was listed as 18 years old. If
Heinrich was traveling with any other male children, they must have been under 16 years old.

View of Philadelphia Harbor in 1768 34

Heinrich probably carried with him a passport which all emigrants were supposed to be provided.
The passport of Andrew Lorentz provides an example:
We, the Burgomaster and Council of the city of Chur in the Canton of the Grisons, confess herewith
that, through the grace of God, we enjoy at present in our city and neighboring places, a good, healthy
and pure air and that no dangerous plague or infectious disease prevails.
In testimony whereof the bearer of this, Mr. Andrew Lorentz, a citizen here, and single, who intends to
travel to Amsterdam, for the purposes of business, has been given this certificate, provided with the
seal of our chancery, so that he may pass and repass at all places, freely and unimpeded.
Given the 8th of September 1784. 35

Heinrich may have also carried a letter of recommendation, issued by the pastor of Heinrichs
church in the Palatinate. An example is provided by the letter carried by John Michael Paulus:
The bearer of this letter, John Michael Paulus, hitherto a member of our congregation at Essenheim
and Catharine, his lawful wife, both members of our Church, Reformed according to the Word of God,
are willing and have the intention, in the name of God, to undertake the journey to the American
32

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. xxxv

33

Salinger, To Serve Well and Faithfully, 90

34

http://www.mapsofpa.com/18thcentury/1768jeffreyssh.jpg

35

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers:. Volume 1. xxxviii

Page II-4

Colonies, belonging to England, that they may find there a more abundant livelihood. They are
herewith commended, upon their difficult and dangerous journey, to the protection of the Almighty,
the love of our faithful Savior Jesus Christ and the communion of the Holy Spirit, to keep them in
body and soul. I recommend them faithfully to all ecclesiastical and secular authorities, as well to the
Christian and charitable consideration of every person.
Given at Essenheim in the Electoral Palatinate, near the city of Mayence, May 2, 1742.
J. Radernher, pastor of the Reformed Church here. 36

After the ship docked, the immigrants were led


in procession to the courthouse where they
signed the Oath of Allegiance and the Oath of
Abjuration in the presence of the LieutenantGovernor of Pennsylvania, George Thomas and
the Mayor of Philadelphia, Samuel Hassell.
Heinrich signed his own name at the bottom of
the document and spelled his last name Brem,
Brim or possibly Breem. 37 Jacob apparently
could not write. His name was written by a
clerk and he ascribed to the oath by making his
mark beside his name.

(from Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania Pioneers)

The Oath of Allegiance


We Subscribers, Natives and Late Inhabitants of the Palatinate upon the Rhine & Places adjacent, having
transported ourselves and Families into this Province of Pensilvania (sic), a Colony subject to the Crown of Great
Britain, in hopes and Expectation of finding a Retreat & peaceable Settlement therein, Do Solemnly promise &
Engage, that We will be faithful & bear true Allegiance to his present MAJESTY KING GEORGE THE
SECOND, and his Successors, Kings of Great Britain, and will be faithful to the Proprietor of this Province; And
that we will demean ourselves peaceably to all His said Majesties Subjects, and strictly observe & conform to the
Laws of England and of this Province, to the utmost of our Power and best of our understanding. 38

Heinrich and Jacob also affixed their signatures to


the Oath of Abjuration. Heinrich again signed for
himself, with the spelling of his surname appearing
to be Breem, while Jacob again provided his mark
by his name which was written by a clerk. 39
36

Ibid, Volume 1. xxxviii

37

Ibid, Volume 2. 289

38

Ibid:, Volume 1. 4

39

Ibid, Volume 2. 291

Page II-5

The Oath of Abjuration


I _____ do solemnly & sincerely promise &
declare that I will be true & faithful to King
George the Second and do solemnly
sincerely and truly Profess Testifie (sic) &
Declare that I do from my heart abhor, detest
& renounce as impious & heretical that
wicked Doctrine & Position that Princes
Excommunicated or deprived by the Pope or
any Authority of the See of Rome may be
deposed or murthered (sic) by their Subjects
or any other whatsoever. And I do declare
that no Forreign (sic) Prince Person Prelate
State or Potentate hath or ought to have any
Power Jurisdiction Superiority Preeminence
or Authority Ecclesiastical or Spiritual
within the Realm of Great Britain or the
Dominions thereunto belonging.
I ____ do solemnly sincerely and truly
acknowledge profess testify & declare that
King George the Second is lawful & rightful
King of the Realm of Great Britain & of all
others his Dominions & Countries thereunto
belonging, And I do solemnly & sincerely
declare that I do believe the Person
pretending to be Prince of Wales during the
Life of the late King James, and since his
Decease pretending to be & taking upon
himself the Stile & Title of King of England
by the name of James the third, or of
Scotland by the name of James the Eighth or
the Stile & Title of Great Title whatsoever to
the Crown of the Realm of Great Britain, nor
any of the Dominions thereunto belonging.
And I do renounce & refuse any Allegiance
or obedience to him & do solemnly promise
that I will be true and faithful, & bear true
Oath of Abjuration 40
allegiance to King George the Second& to
him will faithful against all traitorous Conspiracies & attempts whatsoever which shall be made against his Person
Crown & Dignity & I will do my best Endeavours (sic) to disclose & make known to King George the Second & his
Successors all Treasons and traitorous Conspiracies which I shall Know to be made against him or any of them. And I
will be true & faithful to the Succession of the Crown against him the said James & all other Persons whatsoever as
the same is & stands settled by An Act Entitled An Act declaring the Rights & Liberties of the Subject & settling
the Succession of the Crown to the late Queen Anne & the Heirs of her Body being Protestants, and as the same by
one other Act Entituled (sic) An Act for the further Limitation of the Crown & better securing the Rights & Liberties
of the subject is & stands settled & entailed after the Decease of the said late Queen, & for Default of Issue of the
late said Queen, to the late Princess Sophia Electoress & Dutchess Dowager of Hannover & the Heirs of her Body
being Protestants; and all these things I do plainly & sincerely acknowledge promise & declare according to these
express Words by me spoken & according to the plain & common Sense and understanding of the same Words,
without any Equivocation mental Evasion or secret Reservation whatsoever. And I do make this Recognition
Acknowledgement Renunciation & Promise heartily willingly & truly. 41

40 http://www.docheritage.state.pa.us/documents/oathsfidelity.asp
41

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1: 4-6

Page II-6

Following the signing of the Oaths, all of the immigrants were brought back to the ship.
Announcements were printed in the newspapers stating how many of the new arrivals were to be
sold. If Heinrich had paid for his passage he would have been free to go at this point. If not, buyers
would have come aboard ship to inspect the remaining passengers and bargain with them for
indentures for a certain number of years. The buyer would pay for the immigrants passage and
other debts and receive from the government a document which made the immigrant the buyers
property for a finite period. 42 One final insult endured by many of these immigrants, when
leaving the ship with their possessions they often found that their chests were missing or their
possessions had been stolen. Sometimes their belongings had never made it on board. 43
Further Accounts of Gottlieb Mittleberger
When the ships have landed at Philadelphia after their long voyage no one is permitted to leave them except
those who pay for their passage or can give good security; the others who cannot pay must remain on board the
ships till they are purchased, and are released from the ships by their purchasers. The sick always fare the worst,
for the healthy are naturally preferred and purchased first; and so the sick and wretched must often remain on
board in front of the city for two or three weeks, and frequently die, whereas many a one if he could pay his debt
and was permitted to leave the ship immediately, might recover.
Every day Englishmen, Dutchmen and high German people come from the city of Philadelphia and other
places, some of great distance [] and go on board the newly arrived ship that has brought and offers for sale
passengers from Europe, and select among the healthy persons such as they deem suitable for their business, and
bargain with them how long they will serve for their passage money, for which most of them are still in debt.
When they have come to an agreement, it happens that adult persons bind themselves in writing to serve three,
four or six years for the amount due by them according to their age and strength. But very young people, from ten
to fifteen years, must serve until they are twenty-one years old.
Many persons must sell and trade away their children [] for if their children take the debt upon themselves, the
parents can leave the ship free and unrestrained; but as the parents often do not know where and to what people
their children are going, it often happens that such parents and children, after leaving the ship do not see each
other again for years, perhaps no more in all their lives.
When people arrive who cannot make themselves free, but have children under five years of age, they cannot
free themselves by them; for such children must be given to somebody without compensation to be brought up,
and they must serve for their bringing up till they are twenty-one years old. Children from five to ten years, who
pay half-price for their passage, must likewise serve for it until they are twenty-one years old; they cannot,
therefore, redeem their parents by taking the debt of the latter upon themselves. But children above ten years
can take part of their parents debts upon themselves.
A woman must stand for her husband if he arrives sick, and in a like manner a man for his sick wife, and take the
debt upon herself or himself, and thus serve five or six years not alone for his or her debt, but also for that of the
sick husband or wife. But if both are sick, such persons are sent from the ship to the hospital, but not until it
appears probable that they will find no purchasers. As soon as they are well again they must serve for their
passage or pay if they have the means.
It often happens that whole families, husband, wife and children, are separated by being sold to different
purchasers, especially when they have not paid any part of their passage money. 44

42

Ibid. Volume 1. xxxvii

43

Salinger, To Serve Well and Faithfully, 90

44

Mittelbergers Journey to Pennsylvania in, translated by Carl Theo Eben (Philadelphia, PA, 1888),

Page II-7

III.

SETTLEMENT

1.

The First Decade 1740 to 1750


Apart from the record of their arrival in November of 1740, neither
Heinrich, Jacob nor any other potential members of their family have been
identified in the Pennsylvania records for approximately the first decade
after their arrival. Their absence from the records would be consistent with
them spending some period of time after their immigration as indentured servants, although it
does not prove it. The first record of Heinrich in the New World is from 1751 which places him
near Yorktown (city of York) in York County. Several other possible family members (based on
circumstantial evidence only; see Section III-2) are also active in York County during this time
period, specifically Manchester, Hellam and Lower Windsor Twps. This concentration of activity
would put the family in the region of York County just west of the Susquehanna River.
Heinrichs migration westward from Philadelphia to the west side of the Susquehanna River
would have naturally followed the roads available in the time period prior to 1751. The most
direct route to York County at that time would have been the Lancaster Road from Philadelphia
to Lancaster, continuing westward to the Susquehanna River at Wrights Ferry (see 1749 Evans
Map of Pennsylvania). The familys concentration of activities around the area of this ferry
suggests they may have crossed at or near that location.
John Wrights Ferry had been in operation since 1730. 45 On the western bank of the
Susquehanna River, the Old Monocacy Road led directly from the ferry to Yorktown (see 1770
map of York County Roads and Ferries). Built in 1739, the Old Monocacy Road was the oldest
road in York County. Passing through Yorktown, it continued through Hanover and Littlestown
before heading into Maryland and Virginia. It was one of the main routes taken by settlers
migrating from Philadelphia into Western Maryland, Virginia and the Carolinas. 46 Another
crossing was at Andersons Ferry, located just upstream from Wrights Ferry near the present city
of Marietta. Andersons Ferry was established in 1730. The Accomac Road, which led from the
ferry to the Old Monacacy Road, was built in 1748. 47
There was a possible association of Heinrichs family with the Conojohela settlement south of
Wrights Ferry (see Section III-2). Located in the current Lower Windsor Twp, the Conojohela
settlement on the Conojohela and Cabin Creeks and the Kreutz settlement just to the north on
Kreutz (or Grist) Creek were two of the earliest settlements west of the Susquehanna River. 48 A
ferry operated by Thomas Cressap (later referred to as the Blue Rock Ferry) was established in the
area of these settlements prior to 1737. 49 Its possible that Heinrich and his family could have
crossed the Susquehanna here and possibly spent some time in the settlement.

45 George R Prowell, History of York County Pennsylvania (Chicago, IL, 1907), Volume 1, Part I. 05

46 Robert L Bloom, A History of Adams County, Pennsylvania 1700-1990 (Gettysburg, PA, 1992), 30.
47 Prowell, History of York County, Volume 1, Part I.. 105
48 Charles H Glatfelter, Pastors and People: German Lutheran and Reformed Churches in the Pennsylvania Field, 1717-1793, Volume I, Pastors and

Congregations (Breinigsville, PA, 1980), 461.


49

Prowell, History of York County, Volume 1, Part I. 106.

Page III-1

Lewis Evans 1749 Map of Pennsylvania 50

50 http://www.mapsofpa.com/18thcentury/1749evans.jpg

Page III-2

York County Roads and Ferries as shown in W. Sculls map of 1770 51


51 http://www.mapsofpa.com/18thcentury/1777fadenatlaspa.jpg

Page III-3

There is a possible reference to Jacob Bream that would place him in Bethel Twp, Lancaster
County (now part of Berks and Lebanon Counties) in 1755 (see Section III-2). If this is true it
suggests that Heinrich and Jacob may not have been traveling together. Jacob may have taken a
more northerly road west, leading up through Reading. It is also conceivable that Heinrich was
traveling with Jacob as well, but went on ahead into York County. If Jacob was truly in Bethel
Twp, he may have made his way back down to Lancaster before heading west across the
Susquehanna, or he could have crossed on the several ferries nearer to Harrisburg (Harris Town;
see 1749 map). John Harris established a ferry at the site of Harrisburg in 1733. 52 Roads linking
Harrisburg to York were in place by 1745. 53 Other ferries operating between Harriss Ferry in the
north and Andersons Ferry in the south included William Chesneys Ferry near New Market,
Robert Chambers Ferry below New Cumberland (est. 1735), Nathan Husseys Ferry near
Goldsboro (est. 1738), and Joshua Lowes Ferry above the falls at York Haven (est. 1737). 54
2.

The Second Decade 1751 to 1760


There are a handful of references to Breams in York County during the 1750s that
hint at potential relationships between the several individuals mentioned.
Heinrich Bream is mentioned in a record from Christs Lutheran Church in York.
This is the only record of Heinrich Bream in the New World that has been
identified.

Heinrich Bream
The church records indicate that on November 17, 1751, Heinrich (Brehm) and his wife Catherine
sponsored the baptism of Heinrich Swartz, the son of Andrew (Andreas) and Anna Margaret
Swartz. 55 The pastor was probably Helfrich Schaum who was the pastor of the church at that time

Christ Lutheran Church, York 56

A Lutheran church was organized in York,


shortly after the founding of the city, in
1741 with John Casper Stoever as its
pastor. Stoever had been pastoring to the
people of the area since at least 1733 as he
traveled throughout the newly settled area.
During the years prior to the churches
founding, Bartholomew Maul conducted
religious services during Stoevers
absence; he also taught the first parochial
school connected with the church. The
first church structure was built in 1743-4
from logs. The cornerstone for the stone
church (shown right) was laid on June 2,
The
1761 and completed in 1762.
schoolhouse is shown to the right rear of
the church. 57

52 Ibid, Volume 1, Part I. 105


53 Ibid, Volume 1, Part I. 98-100
54 Ibid, Volume 1, Part I. 105
55

Dull, Early German Settlers of York County, 362

56

Glatfelter, Pastors and People: German Lutheran and Reformed Churches in the Pennsylvania Field, 1717-1793, Volume II The History. 185.

57

Ibid Vol I . 476-481.

Page III-4

(1748-1754). 58 This is the only record of Heinrichs wifes name.


Andrew (Andreas) Swartz Family
Andrew Swartz was born in Germany around 1720. Its not known when he emigrated, although he may have been a
son of the Andreas Swartz who emigrated on the ship Friendship on October 16, 1727. Of the 52 adult males listed on
the Friendships register, 10 were listed as sick and 6 were listed as dead. 59 An Abraham Swartz was also on board.
Andrew Swartz named one of his sons Abraham suggestive of a possible link of Andrew to these Swartzs. Andrew was
living in Shrewsbury Twp, York County by 1762. This is the same Andrew Swartz who was a party, along with
Catherine Prem and Bartholomew Maul (the schoolmaster), in an Administration Bond to William Plumstead as part
of the settlement to Catherine Prems husband Peters (possibly Heinrichs brother; see Section I Origins) estate in
1750. 60 Two 8th generation descendents of Andrew Swartz, Viola Fiscel and Clarence Swartz, married 8th generation
descendents of Heinrich Bream (see Section IV-7.6).

Peter Bream
A descendent of Peter and Catherine Prem (Brehm) also appears in the records for Christ
Lutheran Church. The records document the death of Peter and Catherines daughter Justina on
October 14, 1760 and her burial two days later. 61 Justina was born on March 2, 1742 and was
married to George Beck
on January 22, 1760.
Justina died shortly
after the birth of her
daughter
Christina
Beck.
Christinas
baptism is also recorded
at Christ Lutheran
Church. Christina was
baptized on the same
day of her birth,
October 6, 1760. 63
Witnesses were George
Becks parents George
and Anna Susanna
Beck. Lucas Raus was
most likely the pastor
involved (served 17581763 at Christ Lutheran
th
62
Church). 64
Title page of 18 century Lutheran hymnal

58 Ibid, Vol I, 481.


59

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers:. Volume 1. 16

60

Estate papers of Peter Prem, York County Historical Society

61

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 2 , 285

62

Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I. 446

63

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 2 , 169

64

Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I. 481

Page III-5

Anna Catherine Bream


The death of an Anna Catherine Bream (Brehm) is recorded in the register for Christ Lutheran
Church. She died on May 9, 1753 and was buried the following day in the city. 65 Rev. John
Samuel Schwerdtfeger was likely presiding at her burial. 66 She was listed as 54 years old. Given
that both Heinrich and Peters wives were named Catherine and that both had at least some
association with the church, it cannot be concluded which Catherines death is being recorded.
Anna Maria Bream
Another Bream in the York County records from the 1750s is Anna Maria Bream (Bremm). Anna
Maria, along with Jacob Henrich (childs uncle), sponsored the baptism of Jacob Henrich in
1755. 67 Jacob was the son of Nicholas and Margaretha Henrich (Henry). Nicholas had settled in
Shrewsbury Twp by 1762 and possibly as early as 1754. 68
Jacob (Jr) was born on December 18, 1755. The baptism
Schusters Union Church
is recorded in the register for Schusters Union Church
in Shrewsbury (now Springfield) Twp, York County in
The best documented evidence
suggests that Schusters Union
1768 but may have occurred elsewhere. 69 Jacob
Church was organized in 1763,
married Anna Catharina Swartz, the daughter of
although land had been set aside
Andrew and Anna Margaretha Swartz (see note above
for a church as early as 1753.
regarding Andrew Swartz) and the sister of Henrich
John Nicholas Helle and Nicholas
Swartz whose baptism was sponsored by Heinrich and
Henry, trustees for the church,
took out a warrant for the
Catherine Bream. 70
Anna Maria (Brehm) was married to Johannes (Mathias)
Demuth on February 15, 1757. Their wedding is
recorded in the church register for Candochly Union
Church in Lower Windsor Twp. 71 They were married by

property on November 24, 1768.


This warrant indicates that a
church was already built on the
property. The first parish register
was established in January of
1763. 72

John Samuel Schwerdtfeger (served 1755-1758). Rev.


Schwerdtfeger had been the pastor at Christ Lutheran Church from 1753-1754. 73 Mathias and
Anna Maria had their son Abraham baptized in Christ Lutheran Church in 1759. 74 Rev. Lucas
Raus most likely presided; he was also the pastor at Canadocholy Union Church at that time
(served 1758-1763). 75 Also married at Conodochly Union Church by Rev. Schwerdtfeger was
Jacob Phlieger and Anna Maria Catherine Traut (married February 25, 1755). 76 Jacobs daughter

65

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 2 , 278

66 Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I 481


67

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 1 , 1

68 Mary Marshall Brewer, Land Records of York County Pennsylvania 1746-1764 (Lewes, Deleware, 2004), 106.
69 Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I 475
70

Dull, Early German Settlers of York County, 313

71

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 3 , 125

72

Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I. 475

73 Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I 481


74

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 2 , 164

75 Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I 462


76 Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 1 , 125

Page III-6

Maria Catherine, who was baptized at Christ Lutheran Church in 1780, 77 married Heinrich
Breams great-grandson Jacob.
Canadochly Union Church
Canadochly Union Church was organized about 1753. The first pastor was John Samuel Schwerdtfeger
(served 1755-1758) who established the first church register in 1755. He was followed by Lucas Raus
who served from 1758-1763. Services were originally conducted in a schoolhouse, with the first church
built about 1764. 78

Circumstantial evidence and physical proximity suggest that Anna Maria was related to
Heinrich Bream. George Christophel Bream in Lancaster County had a daughter Anna Maria
Margaretha of about the appropriate age but she is known to have married John Steinhauser by
1756. Assuming Anna Maria was at least 18 when she married, she would have been born prior to
Heinrichs emigration. Given her age, if she was related to Heinrich she was most likely a
daughter.
Jacob Bream
The first possible mention of Jacob Bream (Brehm) in the Pennsylvania records is a record in John
Casper Stoevers private register documenting the baptism of a daughter in Bethel Twp,
Lancaster (now Berks and Lebanon) County. 79 Margaretha Elizabetha was born on February 9,
1755 and was baptized on February 16, 1755. The sponsors were Robert Grain and wife. Its only
speculation that this is the Jacob Bream who emigrated with Heinrich. His location in Bethel
Twp would place him outside the general sphere of activity of the other members of Heinrichs
family at that time. A Lodwig Brem was living in Rockland Twp, Berks County by 1757 80 so its
possible that this Jacob is related to him instead.
Jacob Bream received a survey for 124 acres of land on September 28, 1759 in Warrington Twp,
York County. 81 It is unclear for how long Jacob may have occupied the property before obtaining
the survey. The original warrant for the land had been issued to John Smith for 100 acres on April
1, 1751 82 . The land had been occupied since about 1746. This is the first record of any Bream
establishing a permanent residence in the New World. Given that by this point Jacob had been
living in Pennsylvania for almost 20 years, he had almost certainly been settled somewhere prior
to this time as well; perhaps he had spent time living in Bethel Twp. Jacob would remain on this
Warrington Twp property until his death in 1794. After Jacobs death the property was
transferred to Abraham Miley. Neighbors at the time Jacob received his survey included
Sebastian Keller, Andrew Paulley, Martin Huber, and the heirs of Joseph Ulrich. Neighbors in
1795 when Abraham Miley received a new survey of the property included Henry Weaver
(formerly Frederick Rider received from Henry Flick), Michael Ulrich, John Davies and Henry
Weaver.
77

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 2 , 218

78

Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I 461

79 Records of Rev. John Casper Stoever: Baptismal and Marriage, 1730-1779 (Harrisburg, PA, 1896)
80 I Daniel Rupp, History of the Counties of Berks and Lebanon (Lancaster, PA, 1844), 243
81 York County Heritage Trust
82

Neal Otto Hively, Original Pennsylvania Land Record Series: Warrington and Washington Townships (2002), 57

Page III-7

Jacobs land was located just


north of where the
Bermudian Creek enters
Conewago Creek near the
McAllister Mill Road. This
road,
which
led
northwesterly out of York to
Trents Gap (Mt Holly
Springs Gap), had been
opened in 1749 and
provided a route into the
Cumberland Valley. The
property is near the current
intersection of Winding Rd
and Harmony Grove Rd on
the Washington Twp/
Warrington Twp border. Nearby landholders included Frederick Leathers whose daughter
Barbara would marry Jacobs son Henry, Frederick Rider whose daughter Hannah would marry

Page III-8

Jacobs son Jacob, and George Heiges whose son Valentine would marry Jacobs granddaughter
Magdalena (daughter of Jacobs son Samuel) (see fold-out map at back).
A Note on the Pennsylvania Land Acquisition Process in the 18th Century 83
Land acquisition in Pennsylvania in the 18th century involved five steps:
The process was initiated with an (1) Application to Warrant to the Proprietors from interested settlers.
This resulted in the issuance of a land warrant.
A (2) Warrant was an official order from the colony to the Deputy Surveyor of the county to initiate a
field survey of the described tract of land. The warrant certificate detailed the county, township, the
person to whom the warrant was issued, the approximate acreage desired, and the date of issue.
There would then follow the official (3) Survey that was authorized by the warrant.
The (4) Application for Patent was a preliminary step that led to an official review prior to full granting
of the Patent. During this step the property boundaries were reviewed for accuracy and validity.
A (5) Patent was the official granting of full, clear release and title of the land by the Proprietors of
Pennsylvania. This step was always at the owners initiative. Some families delayed applying for a
Patent until as late as the mid 1870s.

83 Ibid. 18-19.

Page III-9

IV. GENERATIONS
1.

First Generation

1.1 Heinrich Bream (1700 1751-1762)


Heinrich Bream was born ~1700 in Germany. He emigrated to Pennsylvania on November 25,
1740 aboard the Loyal Judith, Lovell Paynter, Commander. His whereabouts in Pennsylvania
until 1751 are unknown. In 1751 he was documented to be in York County and had possibly
settled there. Heinrich was able to write, at least his name. He was the last male Bream for a
couple of generations following to be able to write.
He married Catherine (surname unknown). It is possible that Henrich's wife was named Catherine
Herschel although that is based on family legend only. This could be confusion with Catherine
Hartzel who married Heinrichs great-grandson Henry. The date and location of Heinrich and
Catherines marriage are unknown although a dowry chest inscribed with the date 1722, which
supposedly belonged to Catherine, still exists in the Bream family. A marriage date of 1722
would be consistent with the ages of Heinrich and Catherine and also suggest that Jacob was the
oldest child. Her chest has been handed down to the eldest son of each generation. Mark Bream
(with no male heir), son of Henry Lawrence Bream and grandson of Francis Bream, passed the
chest to Glen Bream, son of Henry Lawrence Breams son Robert Bream. He is the most recent
owner of the chest (circa 2004).
On November 17, 1751, Heinrich Brehm and his wife Catherine sponsored the baptism of
Heinrich Swartz, the son of Andrew (Andreas) and Anna Margaret Swartz (see Section III-2).
Heinrich had the following children:
i.
ii.

Jacob (1722 - 1794) m. UNK


Anna Maria (<1737 - >1780) m. Mathias Demuth

Heinrichs date of death is unknown, but he may have died prior to 1762 as he does not appear in
the 1762 tax list for York County. His burial location is unknown. Heinrichs wife Catherine may
be the Anna Catherine Brehm whose death was recorded in the register of Christ Lutheran
Church, York. This Catherine Brehm died on May 9, 1753 and was buried the following day in
the city. She was listed as 54 years old and therefore born in 1699. It is possible that this
Catherine may have been the wife of Peter Prem instead, whose family was also active in Christ
Lutheran Church at that time (see Section III-2).

IV-1.1

2.

Second Generation Children of Heinrich Bream and Catherine

2.1 Jacob Bream (1722 1794)


Jacob Bream was born ~1722 in Germany. He emigrated to Pennsylvania with his father
Heinrich on November 25, 1740 aboard the Loyal Judith, Lovell Paynter, Commander. The
identity of Jacobs wife is unknown, however if the family followed the normal German naming
conventions for their children her name may have been Maria. Her parents names may have been
John/Samuel and Margaretha Elizabetha.
Jacob may have been in Bethel Twp, Lancaster (now Berks and Lebanon) County in 1755. He
received a survey for 124 acres of land in Warrington Twp, York County on September 28, 1759
(see Section III-2). Jacob is included in the Warrington Twp Tax Lists for the years:
1762-1778
1779 - 100 acres, 2 horses, 3 cattle, 55 pounds tax
1780 - 120 acres, 2 horses, 3 cattle, 25 pounds tax
1781 - 125 acres, 2 horses, 2 cattle, 3 pounds tax
1782 - 125 acres, 2 horses, 2 cattle, 7 pounds tax
1783 - Either 90 or 100 acres, either 4 or 5 inhabitants (cannot distinguish from his son
Jacob)
1784-1789
Jacob is reported as not possessing property in 1788 (other than one horse and one cow), and this
may have been true as early as 1785-86. Son Samuel reappears in the Warrington Twp tax lists
beginning in 1786 (see Section IV-3.1) so its possible Samuel took possession of at least part of his
fathers farm.
Jacob was deeded 50 acres in Dover Twp, York County (which adjoins Warrington Twp) from
Joseph Taylor on April 17, 1772. 84 He is in the records as James (English variant of Jacob)
Brahm. Jacob conveyed the land to Dewalt Gonter on Oct 4, 1774. It is also possible that this
could be Jacobs son Jacob as well although Jacob Jrs age would seem to be too young.
Two inhabitants can be accounted for in Jacobs household in 1783: Jacob and his daughter
Catharina who does not seem to have been married yet. Sons Henry and Jacob were living on
their own by 1783. It is possible that Jacob may have had his son Samuel and Samuels two young
daughters living with him in 1783 (see Section IV-3.1). If true, it would mean Jacob Sr was the
Jacob listed with 5 inhabitants in 1783. Only one Jacob is listed in the 1790 census for
Warrington Twp and it is unknown whether this refers to this Jacob or his son. This may be a
mistake however as two Samuel Breams are listed in Warrington Twp, but there is only one
Bream known with this given name for this time period.

84

Neal Otto Hively, Original Pennsylvania Land Record Series: Dover and Conewago Townships (2002), 109

IV-2.1

Where Jacob worshipped is not known with


certainty. He is noticeably absent from the church
records, which may in part reflect that his children
were probably all born prior to his settling in
Warrington Twp so that he would not have had to
participate in activities such as baptisms which
would generally result in entries in church registers.
The Lutheran church in closest proximity to Jacob
would have been Strayers Lutheran Church in
Dover Twp, York County which was established
about 1757. 85 There is no evidence of Jacob
participating in this congregation however. The next
closest Lutheran church would have been Lower
Bermudian Lutheran Church. Jacobs father was

Lower Bermudian Lutheran Church


The Lower Bermudian Lutheran Church
was organized March 19, 1745 at the home
of Heinrich Weidenbach. Heinrich was the
grandfather of Conrad Chronister.
Conrads father Johannes was a Deacon of
the church. The first pastors were Helfrich
Schaum (served 1748-1753) and George
Bager (served 1753-1758). Rev. Lucas
Raus began the register in 1758. He
served the church from 1758-1774. Rev.
Raus was also serving the congregation at
Christ Lutheran Church York during part
of this period (served in York from 17581763). 86

associated with Christ Lutheran Church in York, at least in 1751. Jacob may have continued the
association with this church as at least two of his sons (Henry and Jacob) married into families also
associated with this church. By 1783 Jacobs place of worship may have shifted to Lower
Bermudian Church. Two entries in the records of this church are probably referring to this Jacob
Bream. A Jacob Bream (Brem, Brehm) is listed as one of the communicants on the 18th Sunday
after Trinity in 1787 and on the 23rd Sunday after Trinity in 1790. 87 In support of the possibility
that Jacob began worshiping at Lower Bermudian Lutheran Church, Jacobs neighbor George
Heiges regularly attended the church. 88 Georges son Valentine married Jacobs granddaughter
Magdalena (daughter of Samuel; see Section IV-3.1). Other regular members of the Lower
Bermudian Lutheran Church who were associated with Jacob Breams family include Johannes
Chronister, whos son Conrad married Jacobs daughter Catherine (see Section IV-3.5) around
1783, and Peter Arnold whos granddaughter Mary Arnold married Jacobs great-grandson
Daniel Bream (see Section IV-5.5).
Jacob had the following children:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.

Samuel (1744-52 - 1800) m. UNK


Henry (1744-52 - 1828) m. Barbara Leathers
Jacob (1750-55 1839) m. Hannah Reiter
Margaretha Elisabetha (1755 UNK) m. UNK
Catharina (1756-65 1820-30) m. Conrad Chronister

Jacob died in 1794. His will was written on January 10, 1794 and witnessed by Jacob Bott, Henry
Weber and Elihu Underwood. It was probated on June 9, 1794 in Warrington Twp. 89 Executors
were sons Samuel, Henry and Jacob. Children listed were Samuel, Henry, Jacob and Catharine
(listed as wife of Conrad Chronister) and grandson Jacob Chronister. Since his wife was not
85 Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I. 467
86 Ibid. Vol II. p. 224.
87 F Edward Wright, Adams County Church Records of the 18th Century, (Lewes, DE, 1989), 46-47
88 Ibid, 2-48
89 Estate file of Jacob Bream, York County Historical Society

IV-2.2

mentioned, it is likely she had already died. If my speculation about the family members at home
with Jacob in 1783 is accurate (see above), then she may have died prior to 1783. Jacob willed for
his property to be sold at public auction and the proceeds distributed equally among his four
listed children. He willed that his grandson Jacob Chronister receive his riding horse. If
Margaretha Elisabetha was truly a daughter of Jacobs she must have died prior to 1794. Jacob
apparently never learned to write as he signed his will with his mark, just as he had the Oaths of
Allegiance and Abjuration when he arrived in Pennsylvania.
The inventory of Jacobs property was written in German. Among his possessions was a German
testament. He had outstanding bonds due from Isaac Peff (Pfaff, Paup?), John Henry of Codorus
Twp (possible relation to the Henrys [Heinrichs] whose baptisms the Bream were associated
with?), Berbel(?) Kronbach of Dover Twp, Philip Traub of Warrngton Twp (father Paul), Frederick
(Leather?), Peter Eicholtz from Dover Twp, Behrnardt Ruppert of Warrington Twp (in Berwick
Twp by 1800), Phillip and Christopher Vogelgosong of Warrington Twp and York, respectively,
and John Olverholtzer (Reading Twp, Adams). Jacobs place of burial is unknown but he may
have been buried in the Prim family cemetery in Tyrone Twp which is listed in the Adams
County Historical Society Records. This may have been a family plot on the property of Jacobs
sons Samuel and Henry. The cemetery is listed as destroyed.

IV-2.3

Jacob Breams Will probated June 9, 1794

IV-2.4

2.2 Anna Maria Bream (UNK - >1780)


Anna Marias date of birth is unknown but was she was probably born in Germany sometime
before 1740. Her relationship to Heinrich is not proven, but if she was related to him she was
likely a passenger with him on the Loyal Judith. Anna Maria sponsored the baptism of Jacob
Henrich (Henry), along with the childs uncle (also named Jacob Henrich) (see Section III-2).
Jacob was born on December 18, 1755 however the baptism was not recorded in the register for
Schusters Union Church in Shrewsbury (now Springfield) Twp until 1768. He was the son of
Nicholas and Margaretha Henrich. Jacob Heinrich married Anna Catharina Swartz, the sister of
Henrich Swartz whose baptism was sponsored by Heinrich and Catherine Bream. If Anna Maria
was an adult (at least eighteen) at the time she sponsored this baptism, it would mean she would
have been born on or before 1737.
Anna Maria was married to Johannes (Mathias) Demuth on February 15, 1757. They were married
by John Samuel Schwerdtfeger in Candochly Union Church in Lower Windsor Twp. Mathias was
the son of Johannes Demuth and UNKNOWN. Johannes is believed to have emigrated on
September 25, 1751 aboard the ship Phoenix. 90 Mathiass date of birth is unknown, but since he
was not listed on the ship list he was probably born after 1735. Mathias and Anna Maria were
some of the earliest members of Canadochly Union Church which was established about 1753.
Mathias received a Warrant for 25 acres in Hellam Twp on June 1, 1762. 91
Mathias and Anna Maria had the following children:
i.
Johann Jacob (1757 - UNK) m. UNK
ii.
Abraham (1759 - UNK) m. Tuth UNK
iii.
Peter (UNK - UNK) m. UNK
iv.
John (1768 1836) m. Susan Croll
v.
Henry (UNK - UNK) m. UNK
vi.
Elizabeth (UNK - UNK) m. UNK
vii.
Anna Maria (UNK - UNK) m. UNK
Johann Jacob Demuth was born on November 30, 1757 and baptized on December 27, 1757 in
Canadochly Union Church. Sponsors were Johann Jacob Hester and Johannes Demuth (the
childs grandfather). 92
Abraham Demuth was born on September 18, 1759 and baptized on September 24, 1759 in Christ
Lutheran Church, York. 93 Abrahams family was one of the early families of Kreutz Creek Union
Church in Hellam Twp. 94
John and wife Susan had a daughter Anna Maria who was born on May 22, 1794 and baptized in
June of 1794 at Christ Lutheran Church, York. 95
90

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 471

91

Neal Otto Hively, The Manor of Springettsbury, York County, Pennsylvania: Its History and Early Settlers (1993), 170

92

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 3 , 105

93

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 2 , 164

94

Hively, The Manor of Springettsbury,, 63

IV-2.5

Mathias died in 1778. He did not have a will. A Widow Demuth is listed on the Hellam Twp tax
lists for 1779 and 1780. Anna Maria was remarried to Sebastian Brown sometime between 1780
and 1786. Sebastian and Anna Maria are not believed to have had any children together.
Sebastian died in 1805 in Hellam Twp. His will was probated on March 2, 1805 in Hellam Twp. 96
An Anna Maria Brown died in 1839 in Hellam Twp. Its unclear if this is the same Anna Maria, she
would have probably been over 100 years old if it was.

95

Bates and Wright, York County, Pennsylvania Church Records, Vol 2 , 252

96

Estate file of Sebastian Brown, York County Historical Society

IV-2.6

3.

Third Generation Children of Jacob Bream and UNKNOWN

3.1 Samuel Bream (1744-52 - 1800)


Samuel Bream (Prehm) was probably born between 1744 and 1752. The identity of his wife is
unknown. Although Samuel was occasionally listed in the records with his surname beginning
with B, he is frequently listed with a P as well.
Samuel bought land in Tyrone Twp on June 7, 1773 from John Wilson Jr. 97 (This land was
reported as being approximately 150 acres in the original transfer from John Wilson to Samuel,
but was
reported as 198 acres when it was transferred to
Samuels brother Henry Bream). Samuel and Henry
John Wilson, Jr.
were probably some of the first Germans to move into
In addition to the land which John Wilson
this area. The 1762 tax list for Tyrone Twp lists only 36
sold to Samuel Bream, he also owned
unique surnames and nearly all are English and/or
approximately 191 acres of property
Scotch-Irish 98 (see also the fold out map for the names
which adjoined the eastern border of
of the original landowners in the area immediately
Samuel Breams property. In addition to
surrounding Samuel and Henrys property).
Henry and Samuel, John Wilsons land
This land was originally owned by Jasper Wilson who
probably occupied the land from as early as March 1,
1759. In his will Jasper transferred the property to
Leonard Hatton and John Wilson, Sr, the executors of
his estate. The property was subsequently sold to John
Wilson, Jr on August 18, 1771 who then sold it to Samuel
Bream. Samuel farmed this property with his brother
Henry.

adjoined property of Stephen Faulk,


Valentine Fickes, Anthony Swisher and
John Pope. John Wilson had 100 acres of
his adjoining land confiscated for
treason; he had joined the British forces
in New York during the Revolutionary
War. 99 This land was sold to William
Delap. The remainder of John Wilsons
land was eventually obtained by Peter
Spangler.

Both appear in the Tyrone Twp tax lists for 1774 through 1778 and both are listed as occupying
this property in the survey for an adjoining property of John Wilson. It is possible that Samuel and
Henry split this property, even if Samuel retained ownership, since the Tyrone Twp tax records for
the 18th century consistently list Henry as occupying only 100 acres of this 198 acre property. It is
possible that Samuel sublet the remainder of the property after 1778. Samuel retained ownership
of the Tyrone Twp property in its entirety until his death. His heirs, Valentine and Magdalena
Heiges and Esther Bream sold the property to Samuels brother Henry for 125 on May 14, 1801. 100
Samuel and Henrys property was located at the intersection between the present day Upper
Bermudian Rd and Bull Valley Rd near Upper Bermudian Lutheran Church.

97 Deed Record Book A. p. 341-342 Adams County Historical Society


98 South Central Pennsylvania Genealogical Society, Inc, Special Publication Number 6: An Alphabetical Listing of the Assessed Inhabitants of

York County, Pennsylvania, for the Year 1762. (York, PA)


99

Pennsylvania Archives, Sixth Series, Vol 13 (Harrisburg, PA, 1907), 122-135

100

Deed Record Book A. p. 341-342 Adams County Historical Society

IV-3.1

The property was surveyed for Samuels nephew Jacob Bream on August 9, 1809. 101

101 Pennsylvania Warrant Register B-17.

Survey Book Volume B, No. 6, p. 30.

IV-3.2

The outlines of this property (highlighted in yellow) are still evident in an Adams County plat
map from 1977. The location of Upper Bermudian Church is underlined in green.

Samuel served as the constable in Tyrone Twp in 1776. He disappears from the tax and census
records after 1778. 102 Sometime between 1778 and 1786 Samuel moved back to Warrington Twp.
His activities and his whereabouts between 1778 and 1786 are unknown although it is possible
that Samuel moved back to his father Jacobs farm. It appears that Samuels wife died young,
perhaps sometime prior to 1782, the latest age of his youngest daughter. This could account for
the 5 inhabitants listed for one of the Jacob Breams in Warrington Twp in 1783: Jacob, daughter
Catharina, son Samuel and Samuels two daughters Magdalena and Esther. In 1787 Samuel is
listed with 80 acres. There are two possibilities for this Samuel in the 1790 census for Warrington
Twp. Samuel Brain is listed with one male greater than 16 years old and 2 females. A Samuel
Pream is listed with one male greater than 16 years old, two males less than 16 years old and 1
female. Given that Samuel had no known sons and had at least two known daughters, I believe
Samuel Brain is most likely the Samuel referred to here. The identity of the second Samuel is

102

Joan R Hankey, Index to Adams County Pennsylvania Septennial Census 1779-1821 (Gettysburg, PA, 1999), 34, 39

IV-3.3

unknown, although it may be an error and should refer to Samuels father Jacob who is otherwise
unaccounted for in the 1790 census.
Heirs of Samuel Bream to Henry Bream Deed Record May 14, 1801 (page 1)

IV-3.4

Heirs of Samuel Bream to Henry Bream Deed Record May 14, 1801 (page 2)

In 1795 Samuel is recorded in Warrington Twp with property of 80 acres and 2 cattle and 2
horses. In 1798 it was recorded as 78 acres which was valued at $508 and adjoined land of Martin
Forsht (Foust?). It contained a 2-story log and stone house (26x22 ft) with 11 windows, a log barn
(45x20 ft) and an old smith shop. 103
On April 5, 1776 the General Assembly of Pennsylvania imposed a fine on all able-bodied
effective male white persons capable of bearing arms, not associators, between the ages of sixteen
and fifty years (ministers of the gospel of all denominations, schoolmasters in actual employ and
servants purchased bona fide and for valuable consideration only excepted. An Act of Assembly
passed on February 14, 1777 directed the mode of collecting the fines imposed on persons who did
not meet and exercise in order to learn the art military. 104 Samuel was fined 1 10 shillings. His
brothers Henry and Jacob were also fined (see Sections IV-3.2 and IV-3.3).

103

1798 Direct Tax List for Warrington Twp, York County

104

York County, Pennsylvania in the American Revolution: A Source Book Volume II.. p 199, 221, 226. York County Heritage Trust

IV-3.5

Samuel had the following children:


i.
Magdalena (1775-80 1820-1840) m. Valentine Heiges
ii.
Esther (1775-82 - UNK) m. UNK
Samuel died in 1800. His will was written on June 6, 1800 and witnessed by John Hipple and
Isaac Vanansdaln (van Arsdalen). It was probated on August 9, 1800 in Warrington Twp. 105
Executors were Frederick Wealer and Samuels son-in-law Valentine Heiges. Samuels will
identifies his daughters Magdalena (wife of Valentine Heiges) and Esther who was still at home.
The will does not record Esther as a minor, so she was likely born prior to 1782. Samuel could not
write as evidenced by his signing his will with his mark.
Samuel Breams Will probated August 9, 1800 (page 1)

105

Estate papers of Samuel Prem, York County Historical Society

IV-3.6

Samuel Breams Will probated August 9, 1800 (page 2)

The Administration Account 106 for Samuels estate shows Samuel had outstanding bonds to Aaron
Garretson, Elihu Underwood, William Lamer, Martin Roopert, Abraham Miley, Lawrence Heiges,
John Heiges, Michael Wahle, George Kniesley, and Michael Fulweiler. He had outstanding debts
due from Anthony Trimmer, Jacob Bream, Abraham Beals, Stophel Keiver, Conrad Chronister,
Casper Groop, Henry Bream, John Hipple, Frederick Furst, and Philip Erhart. Samuels estate
inventory did not provide the names of the individuals who purchased his property.

106

Estate papers of Samuel Prem, York County Historical Society

IV-3.7

Samuel Breams Estate Inventory August 9, 1800


Item
1 Riding horse and bridle
Wearing apparel
1 Young bay horse
1 Cow and bell
1 Lame cow
1 Heifer
1 Sow and 4 pigs
2 Large barrows
1 Sled
1 Plow and irons
1 Doubletree and 2 Swingletters
1 Old wheelbarrow
1 Mawl and wedges
1 Mattock
2 Rakes
1 Hay fork
1 Cutting box and knife
12 Empty beehives
4 Riddles
9 Wooden beehives
2 Open-ended barrels
Planks for a trough and ???
2 Cow chairs
Pine boards and lathes
1 Scythe and snead
1 Spade and 1 corn hoe
2 Pair of fetters

Item
Horse ???
1 Windmill
1 Shapp of bees
3 Shapp of bees
1 Apple mill
1 Grindstone
12 Bundles of flax
Hay by the ton
Rye by the bushel
Oats by the bushel
1 Ten plate stove
1 Bed, bedstead and cord
1 Bedstead
1 Chest
1 Large table
1 Little table
7 Yards of tow linen
4 Yards of woolen cloth
1 Looking glass
1 Lamp
6 Books
1 Pair of spectacles
6 Bread baskets
2 Drawing knives, 2 augers
1 Kunk shell
1 Pair sheep shears
6 Bags

Item
1 Basket and tools
1 Box and shoemaker tools
1 Basket, 1 plane, 1 old jug
Bushel of leather
1 Old wheel and swifts
Flax and tow yarn
1 Check reel
1 Hatchel
1 Cabbage knife
2 ??? and glass
23 ? of wool
2 Bushel of flax seed
1 Iron kettle
1 Little kettle
4 Barrel vessels
1 Churn
1 Doughtrough
10 Earthen blocks
1 Kitchen Dresser
1 Pot back
4 Knives and 4 forks
2 Frying pans
2 Iron pots
1 Griddle
2 Iron ladles and flesh fork
1 Water bucket
1 Crosscut saw

Samuels wife had died prior to 1800 and based on the census data for 1790 its likely she died
prior to 1790. If my speculation about Samuel moving back with his father is accurate she may
have died around 1779 in Tyrone Twp, the time Samuel disappears from the tax records. Samuels
place of burial is unknown but he may have been buried in the Prim family cemetery.
3.2 Henry Bream (1744-52 - 1828)
Henry Bream was probably born between 1744 and 1752. He married Barbara Leathers. The
date and location of their wedding is unknown. Barbara was born sometime prior to 1755,

IV-3.8

probably in York County. She was the


daughter of Frederick Leathers and
Barbara Strickler (sp?).
Barbara
Leathers is identified as the wife of
Henry Bream in documents from The
Mifflin County Circuit Court
(December 1797) pertaining to the
Leathers siblings dispute with their
stepmother. 107
Barbaras father
Frederick owned several properties in
Dover Twp, York County which were
within approximately one mile of Jacob
Breams (Henrys father) farm in Warrington Twp.
Henry moved to Tyrone Twp with his brother Samuel in 1773, where he farmed land which was
owned by Henrys brother Samuel (See Section IV-3.1). Henry continued to live on this property
after his brother Samuel returned to Warrington Twp, although Samuel retained ownership.
Henry may have only occupied a portion of this property as 18th century tax lists consistently
report Henry as occupying only 100 acres of the 198 acre property. If Samuel did in fact sublet a
portion of the property after he moved away, the tenants have not been identified in the records.
In 1796, Henry received the rights to 236 acres on Bermudian Creek in Tyrone Twp from Arthur
Orr, Sr. The original Warrant on these 236 acres was to Arthur Orr, Sr for 150 acres on November
26, 1785 (adjoining lands of Stephen Folk, John Leas, John Dodds and heirs of Rev. Adam Boid).
Arthur Orr deeded this property to Henry Bream on January 15, 1796. In 1808 Henrys son Henry
Jr took possession of 100 acres of this property although Henry Sr ostensibly conveyed the
rights to the entire 236 acres of land to his son John Bream on February 7, 1824. 108 In the tax
records John is only listed as possessing a portion of this property for tax purposes. In 1829
neighbors included heirs of Robert Murdoch, John Dodds, Arthur Orr, Christopher Pehtel, and
Peter Spengler. Although the rights to the entire 236 acres were transferred to Henrys son John
in 1824, Henry divided this 236 acre property between his son John and his son Henry (see
Sections IV-4.1 and IV-4.3).
Henry relocated to this new property in 1796, shortly after acquiring it. This property spanned the
Bermudian Creek and was located in both Tyrone and Huntington Twps. Its present location is
bisected by the Upper Bermudian Rd near Lime Rock Mill Rd and Funt Rd.

107 Mifflin County Court Records, Centre County Library and Historical Museum
108

Pennsylvania Warrant Register O-39. Survey Book Volume C, No. 156, p. 207.

IV-3.9

IV-3.10

In 1798, this farm consisted of 198 acres valued at $990. It adjoined land of John Dodds. There
was a one story log house (30x22 ft) with two windows and a log barn (60x24 ft) on the
property. 109 In 1801, Henrys estate was valued at $1,208. 110
The property was surveyed for Arthur Orr on April 6, 1787. 111 The adjoining land listed as vacant
in the survey was either part of, or adjacent to, Upper Bermudian Church.

109

1798 Direct Tax List for Tyrone Twp, York County

110 History of Cumberland and Adams Counties, Pennsylvania (Chicago, IL, 1886), 342
111

Pennsylvania Warrant Register O-39. Survey Book Volume C, No. 156, p. 207.

IV-3.11

The outlines of this property (highlighted in blue) are still evident in an Adams County plat map
from 1977. The location of Upper Bermudian Church is underlined in green.

Henrys other property, still owned by his brother Samuel (highlighted in yellow), was located just
to the southeast of Henrys new property. Henrys son Jacob began farming Henrys 100 acre
portion of Jacobs Uncle Samuels property beginning in 1796 (see Section IV-4.1). In 1798 the
farm consisted of a one story log house (30x21 ft) with 2 windows, a log barn (50x23 ft) and a log
stable (21x16 ft). The farm was valued at $539 and adjoined property of Peter Spangler. If the
remainder of Samuels property was being sublet, the tenant has not been identified. One
possibility was that it was occupied by Henrys brother-in-law Conrad Chronister who was
farming land in Tyrone Twp which must have been in close proximity to Henrys property as it also
adjoined property of Peter Spangler (see Section IV-3.5). Henry received the rights to the entire
198 acre property from the heirs of his brother Samuel for 125 on May 14, 1801 (see Section IV3.1). Henry sold this property to his son Jacob for 550 on October 17, 1803. 112

112

Deed Record Book B. p. 212-214 Adams County Historical Society

IV-3.12

Henry Bream and wife Barbara to Jacob Bream Deed Record October 17, 1803 (page 1)

IV-3.13

Henry Bream and wife Barbara to Jacob Bream Deed Record October 17, 1803 (page 2)

IV-3.14

Henry Bream and wife Barbara to Jacob Bream Deed Record October 17, 1803 (page 3)

Henry acquired a lot in Heidlersburg


(Lot #21) in 1817. It appears that he
may have moved to this lot in 1825-26.
He is listed in the 1825 tax records as
without land and in 1826 as only
possessing Lot #21. This lot was
located near the center of
Heidlersburg and is highlighted in
green in the 1872 I. W. Field & Co.
map of Heidlersburg (reproduced from
the 1994 reprint by the Adams
County Historical Society). In 1829,
following Henrys death, the lot is
listed as belonging to Henrys heirs,
however by 1830 the lot was in the
possession of Henry Jr.

IV-3.15

Its not certain where Henry may have worshipped; he does not appear in any 18th century church
records for Adams, Cumberland or York Counties. He could have been worshipping at Upper
Bermudian Church which was established in the early 1780s. The church register does not begin
until 1791 however and his children would have probably been baptized prior to that date, so his
absence from the records of this church could be coincidental. The first record of association of the
Breams with this church is from 1800. Interestingly, this generation of Breams had a significant
association with Reformed Protestantism. The Leathers were Mennonite. In addition, Henrys
children Mary, Henry and Elizabeth married into Reformed families. Henrys daughter Mary
baptized herself as an adult suggesting that she may not have been baptized as a child.
Upper Bermudian Union Church
The Lutheran and Reformed congregations were probably formed in the early 1780s. The first log church
was built about 1782. The first brick church was dedicated August 21, 1835. Many of the early members
had just moved into the area from Lehigh County. A Warrant for 50 acres was granted to John Cooley and
Peter Spangler on February 5, 1791 in trust for the church. The first register was established in 1819 to
which entries as far back as 1791 were entered.

Henry was fined in 1777 for being a non-associator during the Revolutionary War, as were his
brothers Samuel and Jacob. 113 Henry was fined 1 10 shillings, the same as his brother Samuel (see
Section IV-3.1). In 1783 and 1784 Henry was registered on the muster roll of Captain James
Elliot's Company of York County. 114 In 1796 Henry served as the Supervisor of the Highways in
Tyrone Twp.
113

York County, Pennsylvania in the American Revolution: A Source Book Volume II.. p,221. York County Heritage Trust

114

Harold Ditzler. Keystones of Adams County No. 81. York County Heritage Trust

IV-3.16

Henry and Barbara had the following children:


i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.

Elizabeth (January 8, 1771 1830-50) m. Leonard Stentz; m. Philip Group


Jacob (December 23, 1771 September 6, 1835) m. Katherine Phlieger
Mary C (March 23, 1774 March 12, 1845) m. George Hartzel
Catherine (May 1, 1776 February 12, 1856) m. George Group
Henry (January 30, 1781 February 8, 1865) m Catherine Hartzel
Magdalena (March 11, 1786 October 16, 1852) m. John Smith
John S (1788 February 11, 1876) m. Sarah Hanes
Susannah (1793 1852) m. John Simmons
Daughter (1795-1800 UNK) m. UNK

That Henry and Barbara had one additional unidentified daughter is not certain. She is
speculation based on census entries and are supported by a biographical sketch of grandson
William Bream that states that Henry and Barbara were the parents of three sons and six
daughters. 115 The 1783 tax lists for Tyrone Twp indicate Henrys household comprised 7
inhabitants.
It is possible that Henry also had a son named Andrew, although this is speculation based solely
on the tax records for Tyrone and Huntington Twps. 116 In 1805 an Andrew Bream appears for the
first time in the tax records, living in Huntington Twp. Assuming he had just reached the age for
taxation, he was probably born in the 1780s. He is listed as possessing 40 acres. In this same year,
the land holdings for tax purposes for Henry Bream drop from 200 acres to 160 acres. His land
holdings had been consistently reported as 200 acres since 1796. Andrew is listed with 40 acres
in the years 1806 and 1807. Also listed is Henry Bream Srs son Henry Jr, who is listed as not
possessing any land. Andrew disappears from the tax records after 1807 and never appears in a
census, suggesting he may have died. In 1808 Henry Jr first appears in the Huntington Twp tax
records with landholdings; he owned 100 acres. That same year Henry Srs landholdings dropped
to 100 acres. It looks, at least superficially, like Andrew may have been involved with land
transfers with Henry Sr. Andrews presumed age would suggest that he may have been a son.
On the surface however, the census records do not appear to support Henry having four sons.
Henry died around 1828. His will was written on November 15, 1826 and was witnessed by his son
John Bream along with Solomon Harris. 117 His will was probated on March 14, 1828 in Tyrone
Twp. The executor was his son Henry. Of his children, his will only identifies his son Henry. Henry
did not sign his will himself as evidenced by his signing with his mark. It is intriguing however
that Henry did sign the deed transferring land to his son Jacob and he spelled his surname as
Bream. It is possible that Henrys health prevented him from signing his will for himself. Henrys
wife Barbara died between 1820 and 1828.

115

History of Cumberland and Adams Counties, Pennsylvania (Chicago, IL, 1886), 382

116 Tyrone Twp and Huntington Twp Tax Records, Adams County Historical Society
117

Estate papers of Henry Bream, Adams County Historical Society

IV-3.17

Henry Breams Will probated March 14, 1828

IV-3.18

The Administrative Account for Henrys estate lists Henrys possessions as well as those persons
who purchased his effects. Many of those listed were either Henrys sons (Jacob, Henry, John),
sons-in-law (George Hartzel, George Groop, John Smith, John Simmons), or grandsons-in-law
(Henry Spangler). It is possible that one of those listed may be a son-in-law, married to Henrys
unidentified daughter. William Meals was a friend of the family, married to Elizabeth Hartzell,
sister of George and Catherine Hartzel, Henry Breams son-in-law and daughter-in-law,
respectively. Jacob Razune (Razor) was a neighbor and also a close family friend. Henrys sons
Henry and John served as the witnesses to Jacob Razunes will in 1838.
Item
1 Teapot and jug
2 Bread baskets
1 Copper mill
1 Large Iron pot
1 Saddle bags
1 Side saddle
1 Spinning wheel
1 Mans saddle
1 Bridle
1 Broad Ax
1 Post Ax
1 Pick
1 Small skillet
1 Flat skillet
1 Pot rack
1 Small pot
1 Frying pan
2 Raking irons
1 Fire shovel
1 Dough trough and scraper
1 Gage reel
1 Basket and sundries
1 Pewter basin
1 Pewter basin
1 Pewter dish
1 Pewter dish
2 Pewter plates
2 Pewter plates
1 Pewter plate

Purchased By
George Hartzel
Jacob Smith, Sr
George Hartzel
John Thomas
Philip Saurbaugh
Philip Saurbaugh
John Thomas
Jacob Bream
Jacob Smith, Jr
Henry Bream
Tobias Byers
William Meals
Henry Bream
Jacob Bream, Jr
Peter Snyder
Henry Spangler
George Groop
John Simmons
John Bream, Sr
George Hartzel
George Groop
John Thomas
Henry Schriver
Jacob Bream
Henry Bream
George Hartzel
Jacob Slaybaugh
Jacob Slaybaugh
Jacob Razune

Item
8 Tablespoons
2 Tins and 2 spoons
1 Tin bucket
2 Chairs
2 Chairs
2 Windsor chairs
1 Windsor chair
1 Arm chair
1 Arm chair
1 Bed ?
1 Blanket
1 Feather tick
1 Bed quilt
2 Sheets
2 Towels and 1 tablecloth
4 Pillow slips
1 Lot of linen cloth
1 Sheet
2 Small bottles
Knives and forks
1 Large chest
1 Large table
1 Stove and pipe
1 Bed, bedding and stead
1 Bed, bedding and stead
1 Small table and stand
1 Shears
1 Crout ? knife
1 German testament

Purchased By
Henry Spangler
John Bream
George Hartzel
John Bream, Jr
William Meals
John Simmons
John Smith
Samuel Rhodes
Henry Bream
George Hartzel
Henry Bream
Jacob Bream
John Simmons
John Thomas
Jacob Smith, Jr
John Thomas
George Ebert
John Thomas
Henry Bream
Jacob Slaybaugh
Jacob Smith, Jr
George Groop
John Bream, Jr
Henry Bream
John Yeatts
John Bream, Jr
Jacob Smith
John Bream
Henry Bream

3.3 Jacob Bream (1750-55 1839)


Jacob Bream (Prame) was probably born between 1750 and 1755. He married Hannah Reiter
(Rider). The date and location of their wedding is unknown. Hannah was the daughter of
Frederick Reiter of Washington Twp, York County. Jacob is identified as the husband of Hannah
in the Administrative account of Frederick Reiters estate. 118

118

Estate papers of Frederick Rieter, York County Historical Society

IV-3.19

Frederick owned land in Warrington Twp as early as 1754 which abutted Jacobs property.
Hannahs mothers identity is unknown but she was the daughter of Henry Lehman. Henry
Lehmans origins are unknown, but he may have been associated with the Lehmans of Hellam
Twp, York County. Jacob Breams niece, Eilizabeth Bream (daughter of Henry Bream; see Section
IV-3.2), married Leonard Stentz whose mother was a Lehman from Hellam Twp.
Jacob is included in the Tax Lists for Warrington Twp for the years:
1779 - 0 acres, 10 pounds tax
1780 - 0 acres, 10 pounds tax
1781 - 0 acres, 1 horse, 2 cattle 4 pounds tax
1782 - Not listed
1783 - Either 90 or 100 acres, 4 or 5 inhabitants (cannot distinguish from father Jacob Sr)
1784-1840 (from 1789 on he is listed as possessing 150 acres)
If Jacob and his wife had two or three children in 1783 to account for the 4 or 5 inhabitants in his
household, these children cannot all be accounted for by the ages of his known surviving children.
In addition, in the 1790 census Jacob had up to 8 children listed including 4 males under 16 years
old. It is possible Jacobs older children died or that some of these inhabitants were farm hands or
domestic servants. In 1800 Jacob lists only 3 children, all female.
In 1798 Jacob owned 148 acres in Warrington Twp valued at $740. He had a 1-story log house
(28x22 ft) with 3 windows and a log barn (40x20 ft). The land was adjacent to property of Daniel
Davies. Jacob remained in Warrington Twp until his death. 119
Jacob was fined in 1777 for being a non-associator during the Revolutionary War, as were his
brothers Samuel and Henry. 120 Jacob was fined 3 10 shillings, more than either brother (see
Sections IV-3.1 and IV-3.2). In 1781 Jacob was named on a list of recruits for the 8th Class of
Warrington Twp for the Continental Army. No record of Jacob serving in the Revolutionary War
has been identified, although Jacob is absent from the Warrington Twp tax list in 1782.
Jacob had the following children:
i.
Catharine (<1784 1839-50) never married
ii.
Mary (1788-1800 1870-80) never married
iii.
Hannah (1790 1850-60) m. John Paup
iv.
Elizabeth (May 30, 1790 April 13, 1876) never married
v.
Barbara (1794 1850-60) never married
vi.
Esther (1798 1850-60) m. George Craumer
119

1798 Direct Tax List for Warrington Twp, York County

120

York County, Pennsylvania in the American Revolution: A Source Book Volume II.. p,221. York County Heritage Trust

IV-3.20

It appears that Jacobs daughter Barbara may have had a daughter Julia Ann out of wedlock.
Julia married George Raffensperger the son of David Raffensberger and UNKNOWN. They had
no children. Hannahs husband John Paup died between 1810-1820. Hannah and her 4 children
(2 sons and 2 daughters) were living with Jacob in 1820 and 1830. All of Jacob and Hannahs
children remained in York County with the exception of Esther and her husband George
Craumer who moved to Carlisle.
Hannah probably died in 1810. Jacob died without a will sometime prior to April 2, 1839. His
Orphan Court Records indicate six daughters: Barbara, Elizabeth, Mary, Hannah, Esther and
Catherine. 121
The Administrative Account for Jacobs estate lists Jacobs possessions as well as those persons
who purchased his effects. Many of those listed included Jacobs unmarried daughters as well as a
Jacob Paup who may have been a grandson. The list also includes David Raffensberger who was
most likely the father of George Raffensberger who married Jacobs granddaughter Julia Ann.
The Frederick Rider listed may have been the brother of Jacobs wife Hannah.

121

Estate papers of Jacob Prame, York County Historical Society

IV-3.21

Item
1 Side saddle
1 Spade
1 Pickel stand and auger
3 Sickles
1 Frow
Mall rings
2 Iron wedges
1 Trowel and hand ax
3 Wagon boxes and hoe
1 Square and drawing knife
1 Flax hackle
1 Log shain
3 Gimbleth and campias
1 Broad ax
1 inch auger and hammer
2 inch auger
1 Bell, horn and chisel
1 Foot adz
1 Hammer and pinchers
1 Log chain
1 Hammer and jug
Tooth drawers
1 Chest
1 Spinning wheel
1 Flour barrel
1 Iron kettle
1 Tub and bucket
1 Iron pot
1 Wood wheel
1 Mattock
3 Corn hoes
1 Grid iron and 1 bedstead
1 Blow horn
1 Lot of walnut boards
1 Long leather
?? Boards
1 Wagon
Stretchers
2 Break chains
3 Cow chains
2 Cow chains
1 Shivel shear
1 Dung hook
1 Dung fork
Hay lathers
1 Harrow
Hay lathers
1 Feeding trough
1 Crupper and breech band
2 Sets of plow gears
1 Breech band and crupper
1 Set of plow gears and bridle
2 Blind bridles
1 Collar
2 Pitch forks

Purchased By
David Raffensberger
James Rofs
Jacob Swoverhand
Benjamin Hollinger
Reuben Land
Jonas Spangler
Jonas Spangler
Christian Sipe
Peter Trimmer
Henry Sheffer
Peter Happ
Peter Happ
Jacob Drorbaugh
Christian Zinn
Jacob Paup
Jacob Paup
Samuel Gephert
Ludwich Wollet
Samuel Parks
Jacob Paup
Jacob Sheffer
John Hollander
Lewis Wollet
Catharine Lawrence
Jacob Paup
Barbara Prame
David Raffensberger
Mary Prame
Jacob Sheffer
John Garver
Jacob Biers
Barbara Prame
Isaac Bower
John Walker
David Raffensberger
Jacob Paup
Daniel Groop
George Beck
Jacob Leighty
Isaac Bower
John Happ
Jacob Paup
Samuel Sheleberger
John Happ
William Hollowerher
Jacob Drorbaugh
Isaac Bower
Christian Garver
Cornelius Hagney
Jacob Paup
John Garver
Jacob March
Jacob Paup
Jacob Paup
John Earnst

Item
2 Rakes
3 Rakes
1 Pitch fork
1 Grind stone
1 Cutting box
1 Saddle
?? and sundries
1 Bay horse
2 Halter chains
1 Ram
1 Sled
1 Flax break and wheelbarrow
Wood lathers
1 Small heifer
1 Small heifer
1 Small black heifer
1 Black muley cow
1 White bark cow
1 Brindle cow
1 Calf
1 Calf
1 Calf
1 Barrel
1 Lot tin ware
Ladles and forks
1 Lot of spoons
1 Pewter dish
1 Pewter dish
1 Pewter dish
1 Lot of plates
1 Large copper tea kettle
1 Small copper tea kettle
1 Bottle
1 Shovel and tongs
2 Chairs
2 Chairs
1 Chair
1 Bench
1 Keel
1 Bench
Stilyands
1 Shotgun
1 Pot rack
Flat irons
1 Dough trough
1 Table
1 Churn
1 Dresser
2 Barrels
1 24-hour clock
1 Table
1 Bench
1 Cupboard
1 Bench
1 Stove and pipe
1 Case of drawers

Purchased By
Frederick Rider
Samuel Parks
John Happ
Peter Happ
Jacob Paup
David Raffensberger
Jacob Drorbaugh
Jacob Paup
Jacob Paup
William March (Mich?)
James Brown
Jacob Sheffer
Lewis Wollet
James Brown
James Rop
William Coldwell
James Brown
Elizabeth Prame
Barbara Prame
Jacob Drorbaugh
Jacob Drorbaugh
John Hollwerher
George Stough
Abraham Mayers
Jonas May
John Happ
William Lenhart
Jacob Taylor
Jacob Taylor
Elizabeth Prame
Jacob Paup
Mary Prame
John Kinsey
Catharine Lawrence
Barbara Prame
Maty Prame
Elizabeth Prame
Jacob Paup
Mary Prame
Barbara Prame
Barbara Prame
George Saurs
Elizabeth Prame
Mary Prame
Elizabeth Prame
Barbara Prame
Elizabeth Prame
Jacob Sheffer
Jacob Paup
Elizabeth Prame
Elizabeth Miley
Jacob Paup
Elizabeth Prame
Elizabeth Miley
Barbara Prame
Elizabeth Prame

IV-3.22

3.4 Margaretha Elisabetha Bream (1755 UNK)


Its not certain that Margaretha is a daughter of Jacobs. Margaretha Elizabetha was born to a
Jacob Brehm on February 9, 1755 and was baptized February 16, 1755 in Bethel Twp, Lancaster
(now Berks and Lebanon) County by John Casper Stoever. The sponsors were Robert Grain and
wife. If Margaretha was Jacob Breams daughter she must have died prior to 1794 since she is not
mentioned in Jacobs will.
3.5 Catharina Bream (1756-65 1820-30)
Catharina Bream was probably born between 1756 and 1765. She married Conrad Chronister
sometime prior to 1784.
Conrad Chronister was born on August 25, 1758 and was baptized on August 27, 1758 at Lower
Bermudian Lutheran Church. 122 He was confirmed at the church on Easter Sunday, 1777. 123 He
was the son of Johannes Michael Chronister and Maria Barbara Weidenbach. Conrads father
emigrated on September 5, 1738 on the ship Winter Galley (Edward Paynter, Captain) from the
Mittlefranken region of Bavaria. His mother Maria Barbara emigrated from Trippstadt in the
Palatinate with her parents on September 1, 1736 on the ship Harle (Ralph Harle, Master).
Michael Chronister purchased land in Huntington Twp in 1742. He purchased adjoining land in
1769. These properties adjoined or were near land owned by Caspar Elliker, Richard Cox, Jacob
Bowman, Peter Arnold, John Grist, John Hunt, Michael Bower, and Thomas Kenworthy.
Conrad was living in Warrington Twp, York County in 1781-1783. He did not own property and
was possibly unmarried. His occupation was listed as cooper (maker of barrels and casks).
Conrad and Catharina were still living in Warrington Twp in 1790, but had moved to Tyrone Twp
by 1798 where they were living on a 133 acre property. This land adjoined land of Peter Spangler
and was valued at $399. It contained a 1 story log house (26x22 ft) with 3 windows and a log barn
(40x20 ft). 124 They remained in Tyrone Twp through at least 1810, but by 1820 they had relocated
to Southampton Twp in Cumberland County.
Conrad and Catharina sponsored the baptism of Jacob Peter Spangler, son of Peter and Barbara
Spangler, on September 3, 1800 at Upper Bermudian Union Church. This is the earliest record of
the Breams in the register of this church. 125
Conrad and Catharina had the following children:
i.
Jacob (1784 - 1844) m. Elizabeth UNK
ii.
Henry (1794 - 1860) m. Elizabeth Helm
iii.
daughter (1785-90 UNK) m. UNK
iv.
daughter (1790-93 UNK) m. UNK

122

Wright, Adams County Church Records, 20

123

Ibid, 45

124

1798 Direct Tax List for Tyrone Twp, York County

125

Wright, Adams County Church Records, 52

IV-3.23

Their son Jacob moved to Halfmoon Twp in Centre County, Pennsylvania in 1813 and their son
Henry moved to Union Twp, Adams County, Indiana in 1847. That Conrad and Catharina had
two daughters is not certain. They are speculation based on census entries.
Catharina died between 1820 and 1830, while Conrad died between 1840 and 1850 both in
Southampton Twp.

IV-3.24

4.

Fourth Generation Children of Henry Bream and Barbara Leathers

4.1 Elizabeth Bream (1771 1830-50)


Elizabeth Bream was born on January 8, 1771. She married Phillip Group date unknown. Philip,
born on March 28, 1773, was the son of Peter Group (Grube) and Susannah Sweitzer. He was the
brother of George Group who married Elizabeths sister Catherine. The origins of the Grubes are
not known, but Peter was living in Huntington Twp by 1772.
Elizabeth and Phillip had the following children:
i.
male (1810-20 1820-30)
ii.
Anna (February 21, 1812 UNK) m. UNK
iii.
female (1810-15 UNK) m. UNK
iv.
female (1810-20 UNK) m. UNK
v.
Hannah (August 17, 1817 UNK) m. UNK
Phillip and Elizabeth lived in Huntington Twp their entire lives. Elizabeth died between 1830-50
and Phillip died between 1830-40.
There was also a second Elizabeth Bream in the records for this time period. This Elizabeth Bream
was born sometime prior to 1783. She married Leonard Stentz on March 16, 1800 in Harrisburg,
Dauphin County. Leonard Stentz, born on February 8, 1780 in Hellam Twp, York County, was the
son of Jacob Stentz and Anna Maria Lehman. Jacob Stentz emigrated with his parents Heinrich
Stentz and Maria Dorothea Bosserth on the ship Elizabeth on August 27, 1733 (Edward Lee,
Captain) from Inheim in the Bavarian Palatinate. 126 Heinrich Stentz was one of the early settlers
in Kreutz Creek Valley, receiving a Warrant for 250 acres in Hellam Twp on October 30, 1736. 127
The Warrant was transferred to Jacob Stentz on May 23, 1767. Jacob was one of the early families
in Kreutz Creek Union Church, appearing in the register for the Reformed congregation as early
as 1766. 128
Elizabeth and Leonard had the following children:
i.

Jacob (March 10, 1802 August 22, 1863), m Mary UNK

Their son Jacob moved to Fishing Creek Valley, near Linglestown, Pennsylvania. Leonard died in
1804. Elizabeths date and location of death are unknown.
There is no direct evidence linking either of these two Elizabeths to Henry Bream, although there
ages would make Henry the most likely father. It is conceivable that both of these Elizabeths
could be the same person. Leonard Stentz died in 1804. Philip Group had a first wife named
Margaretha. By 1808 Philip was married to Elizabeth. It is possible that following the death of her

126

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 114

127

Hively, The Manor of Springettsbury,, 144

128

Ibid, 64

IV-4.1

first husband Leonard Stentz in 1804, Elizabeth was remarried to Phillip Group between 1805 to
1808.
4.2 Jacob Bream (1771 1835)
Jacob Bream was born December 23, 1771. Jacob married Maria Catherine (Katy) Phlieger
sometime prior to 1797. Maria Catherine was the daughter of Jacob Phlieger and Anna Maria
Catherine Trout. She was
born on August 18, 1780 in
York County, Pennsylvania
and christened on October
29,
1780
in
Christ
Evangelical Church, York,
Pennsylvania. An orphan
court petition of Catherines
brother Jacob regarding
their fathers estate identifies
Catherine as the wife of
Jacob Bream. 129
Jacob was living at home in 1790, but took over the farming of ~100 acres of the 198 acre property
owned by his Uncle Samuel, and which had previously been farmed by Jacobs father Henry (see
Sections IV-3.1 and IV-3.2). In 1798 the farm contained a one story log house (30x21 ft) with 2
windows, a log barn (50x23 ft) and a log stable (21x16 ft). The farm was valued at $539 and
adjoined property of Peter Spangler. In 1801 Jacob's estate was worth $860. On October 17, 1803
Jacob purchased the entire 198 acre property from his father Henry for 550. Jacob received a
Warrant on this 198 acres property on August 28, 1809. According to the Warrant this land
appears to have been occupied from as early as March 1, 1759, probably from when it was
originally owned by Jasper Wilson. The property was referred to as "Aughnacloy". The
significance of this name to the Breams is unknown. Aughnacloy is the name of a town in County
Tyrone, Ireland. Its possible that the name was given by the Wilson family. In 1809 the land
adjoined property of Rudolph Spangler, Peter Spangler, John Delap, Jacob Smith and George
Smith.
Jacob appears to have been a relatively successful farmer, acquiring several additional properties
over his lifetime. Around 1814 Jacob came into possession of 137 acres in Huntington Twp. This
property was located near Idaville, in the vicinity of the intersection of Upper Bermudian Rd East
and Upper Bermudian Rd West. This property remained in the family for several generations.
Jacobs son Joseph occupied the property as of 1826 and was eventually occupied by Josephs son
Adam.
In 1827 Jacobs son Jacob Jr was occupying 80 acres in Tyrone Twp, however this land may have
been owned by Jacob Sr since, in the 1835 tax lists, Jacob Sr was taxed on an 80 acre property
while Jacob Jr was taxed on a 125 acre property. The location of this property is not certain.

129

Estate file of Jacob Phliegar, York County Historical Society

IV-4.2

Also in 1827 Jacob acquired an additional 135 acres in Tyrone Twp. The 1835 tax list does not list
this property under Jacob. Its possible that this is the 125 acre property occupied by his son Jacob
Jr. The location of this property is not certain.
Around 1833 Jacob acquired the title to 14 acres located at the intersection of Cranberry Rd and
Funt Rd in Tyrone Twp which contained a tannery. This property was adjacent to David Cooley.
This was possibly the tannery which was seized by the Sheriff from the Estate of Samuel Neely in
1831. 130 The property contained a two-story log house, log stable, tanyard, log shop, log mill house
and an orchard. It appears that the tannery was run for Jacob by William and Lewis Champlain.
After Jacobs death the property remained with Jacobs son Samuel and then Jacobs wife
Catharine. After her death the tannery was sold to the Champlains around 1853.
Jacob remained in Tyrone Twp until his death. Catherine remained in Tyrone Twp after Jacobs
death. She was living on her own with her son William in 1840 and was living with son Williams
family in Butler Twp in 1850.
Jacob and Catherine had the following children:
i.
Anna (UNK UNK) died in infancy
ii.
Susannah (June 17, 1797 1850-60) m. Henry Spangler
iii.
Joseph (May 19, 1799 August 22, 1877) m. Mary C Hartzel
iv.
Jacob H (May 15, 1801 April 6, 1885) m. Susanna Forney
v.
Daniel (November 5, 1802 August 12, 1877) m. Mary Arnold
vi.
Henry (1804-10 1820-30)
vii.
Mary (Polly) (April 11, 1805 June 6, 1883) m. George Leas
viii.
Catherine (Katie) (October 9, 1808 December 13, 1885) m. Samuel Diehl
ix.
John (October 5, 1811 March 27, 1899) m. Margaret Myers
x.
Matilda (December 25, 1815 1900-10) m. Eli Cover
xi.
Samuel (December 25, 1815 November 24, 1881) m. Eliza Eyster
xii.
William E (March 2, 1818 April 20, 1891) m. Henrietta (Harriet) Myers
Daughter Susanna was baptized at Benders Church. Mary, Catharine, John and William E were
baptized at Upper Bermudian Union Church. Their children all remained in Adams County with
the exception of Mary and her husband George Leas who moved to Ohio by 1850 and Matilda
and her husband Eli Cover who moved to Illinois by 1860.
At his death Jacob possessed three properties:

No. 1 of about 212 acres adjoining property of Abraham Trostle and Henry Spangler. This
would be the original property Jacob received from his father Henry.
No. 2 of about 100 acres adjoining properties of John Lease and John Haines. (location
unknown)
No. 3 of about 15 acres adjoining properties of Jacob Bream and David Cooley. (located
at the intersection of Cranberry and Funt Rds)

130 Gettysburg Star, November 8, 1831

IV-4.3

Jacob died on September 6, 1835, Catherine died on October 5, 1850. Both were buried in the
cemetery at Upper Bermudian Union Church.

Jacob died intestate. The heirs could not agree upon the division of the estate and resorted to
petitioning a judge to settle the dispute. 131 Not all of the heirs were satisfied with the judges
decision. In the initial decision, Jacob's son, Daniel, was given $715; however, he felt he deserved
$35 more for work he had done on his father's farm after the age of twenty-one. Seeking what he
felt was just compensation, Daniel took the other heirs to court. Daniel hired A. R. Stevenson to
plea his side, while the rest of the heirs were represented by Thaddeus Stevens. More than two
years after Jacob's death, the matter was finally resolved. On December 1, 1837, the court
awarded Daniel $925 ($750 for his inheritance plus interest, legal costs, and payment for an
auditor). In the end, the heirs received the following amounts: Joseph $1,012.25, Jacob $899.25,
John $45.00, Samuel $10.00, Susan $113.50, Catherine $106.50, and Mary $106.50. The family
farm was also split and distributed, with Joseph, John, and Samuel each receiving a portion of it.
4.3 Mary C Bream (1774 1845)
Maria (Mary) C Bream was born on March 23, 1774. She had herself baptized as an adult at
Benders Union Church in Butler Twp, Adams County on July 31, 1796. 132 Mary married George
Hartzel sometime prior to 1796.

131

Ty Bream, A Brief History of the Bream Family, (unpublished, 2000). 6.

132

Wright, Adams County Church Records, 59

IV-4.4

George Hartzel was born on December 13, 1771 in Hecktown Twp, Northampton County,
Pennsylvania. Georges grandfather George and great-grandparents George Hirzel and Anna
Margaretha Conrad emigrated on September 18, 1727 on the ship William and Sarah (William
Hill, Master) from the Eppigen region of the Palatinate (located on a tributary of the Neckar
River). 133 The family settled in Northampton County. Georges parents, George Hartzel and
Hannah Phillitz Kreiling moved the family to Menallen Twp about 1780 establishing a sawmill on
about 150 acres of land on Possum Creek.
George and Mary were living in Menallen Twp in 1800, Cumberland Twp in 1810, Menallen Twp
again in 1820, and Franklin Twp in 1830.
George and Mary were very
active in the Reformed
congregation at Benders
Church, baptizing most of their
children there and also
sponsoring numerous baptisms
including that of their niece
Susanna Bream, daughter of
Marys brother Jacob on
October 15, 1797. 134

Benders Church
The Lutheran and Reformed congregations were probably formed
about 1781 on land provided by Jacob Bender. On September 24,
1781, Jacob transferred two acres to George Meals, Barnabas
Gilbert, Ludwig Rosenmiller, Henry Slaybaugh, Philip Baker,
Francis Knouse, Nicholas Deatrick, Jacob Greenmayer, George
Hartzel and Philip Fidler, trustees of the Lutheran High Dutch
and Calvinist Dutch Presbyterian congregations. The union
register was begun in 1786. The first church was built in 1781.
The present brick church was built in 1811. 135

George and Mary had the following children:


i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.

Jacob (May 16, 1796 1800-10)


George (March 9, 1798 June 13, 1853) m. Mary Gelwig
Leonhardt (February 8, 1800 UNK) m. Sara UNK
Johannes (August 23, 1802 UNK) m. Christina UNK
Elisabeth (October 4, 1804 March 21, 1883) m. UNK
John Henry (August 4, 1806 1888) m. Catharine Kann
Marie (August 3, 1808 1870-80) m. Thomas Blocher
Susanna (December 18, 1810 1880-1900) m. David Schriver
Joseph (May 31, 1813 October 25, 1863) m. Mary Thomas
Samuel E (June 9, 1816 March 18, 1895) m. Rebecca Thomas
Hannah (January 16, 1817 January 13, 1901) m. Fredrick Herr

Their children are all believed to have remained in Adams County.


George died on December 12, 1838 in Franklin Twp. Mary died on March 12, 1845. They are
buried at Benders Church.
133

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers:. Volume 1. 10

134

Wright, Adams County Church Records, 60

135

Glatfelter, Pastors and People, Vol I. 228

IV-4.5

4.4 Catherine Bream (1776 1856)


Catherine Bream was born on May 1, 1776. She married George Group sometime prior to 1799.
George, born on April 27, 1773, was the son of Peter Group (Grube) and Susannah Sweitzer. He
was the brother of Phillip Group who married Catherines sister Elizabeth.
Catherine and George had the following children:
i.
Jacob (August 5, 1799 October 5, 1858), m1 Eve Peters; m2 Margaret Bender
ii.
Susanna (1801 UNK) m. John Peters
iii.
Sara (1803 UNK) m. John Kime
iv.
Peter (1805 UNK) m. Nancy Carn
v.
Nicholas (1807 1809)
vi.
Mary (October 3, 1809 September 3, 1862) m. John Fickes
vii.
Elizabeth (1811 UNK) m. William P Rice
viii.
Catherine (1814 UNK) m. never married?
ix.
George (January 17, 1817 February 2, 1901) m. Elizabeth UNK
x.
Henry (April 26, 1819 November 3, 1882) m. Martha Young
xi.
Rachel (October 28, 1822 UNK) m. Uriah Carson
George and Catherine lived in Huntington Twp through 1810, but had moved to Menallen Twp by
1820 where they remained. Catherine died on February 12, 1856 and George died on May 5,
1857. Both are buried in Clines Cemetery, Menallen Twp, Adams County, Pennsylvania.
4.5 Henry Bream (1781 1865)
Henry Bream was born on January 30, 1781. Henrys first wife was Elizabeth UNKNOWN. That
Henry was first married to an Elizabeth is documented in the records of Upper Bermudian
church. 136 Those records document the baptism of Sarah (Salome) Bream, daughter of Henry and
Elizabeth Bream, on September 18, 1801. The witness to this baptism was Henrys sister-in-law,
and future second wife, Catharina Hartzel.
Elizabeth died prior to 1802. Henry married Catharina Hartzel shortly therafter (by at least
1802). Catharina was born on May 8, 1775 and baptized on May 21, 1775 at Dryland Reformed
Church in Northampton Twp. She was the sister of George Hartzel who had married Henry
Breams sister Mary (see Section IV-4.2).
Henry was living at home through 1800. On October 18, 1806 ~116 acres 137 of land that had
originally been a part of the 236 acres Henry Sr had received from Arthur Orr (see Section IV3.2) were parceled out based on a new survey. Henry Jr took possession of this property by 1808.

136

Wright, Adams County Church Records, 52

137 Adams County Historical Society

IV-4.6

This property adjoined that of his brother John, still listed as belonging to their father Henry in the
1806 survey. The property also adjoined land of Peter Spangler, Rudolf Spangler, John Dodds,
Leonard Eple, John Leas, Jacob Smith and Jacob Razor. The small triangle of land listed as
vacant was either part of, or adjacent to, Upper Bermudian Church. Henrys residence was on
the Huntington Twp side of Bermudian Creek. The outline of Henry Jrs property (highlighted
in pink) is still evident in an Adams County plat map from 1977. The remaining land that Henrys
father (Henry Sr) had purchased from Arthur Orr is highlighted in blue. The location of Upper
Bermudian Church is underlined in green.

IV-4.7

Henry remained in Huntington Twp through 1840. On April 1, 1850 Henry sold the land to his son
George. Henry then moved to Bendersville where he continued to live until his death. Portions of
Henrys land were occupied by his sons George and John H in 1858. By 1872 John H had died and
his portion of the property was now occupied by his son Abraham T Bream.
By 1830, Henry was in possession of Lot #21 in Heidlersburg which had belonged to his father. It
is not clear how this property was eventually disposed.

IV-4.8

Henry had the following children with Elizabeth:


i.

Sara (Salome) (June 17, 1801 April 18, 1868) m. Conrad Weaner

Henry had the following children with Catharina:


ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.

John H (September 3, 1802 November 3, 1863) m. Elizabeth Trostle


Maria (April 25, 1804 1870-80) m. John Weigle
Francis (July 19, 1805 April 19, 1882) m. Mary Elizabeth Slaybaugh
Jacob (March 13, 1807 1810-20)
Henry (February 15, 1809 1810-20)
Susanna (June 30, 1812 January 5, 1880) m. Charles Myers
Catharine (February 5, 1814 May 11, 1878) m. George Jacobs
George (October 26, 1815 February 3, 1885) m. Hannah S Bauer
Lea (December 21, 1815 <1820)
Elisabeth (March 2, 1818 October 22, 1901) m. John Yeagy
Hannah (1826 April 26, 1897) never married

Daughter Sarah was baptized on September 18, 1800 at Upper Bermudian Union Church. The
witness was her future stepmother Catharina Hartzel. 138 Henry was married to Catharina by
1802 so it is believed that John Hs mother was Catharina.
Hannahs parents are not known. Her inclusion as a daughter of Henry and Catharina is
speculation based on a census entry indicating an otherwise unidentified female was living with
Henry. Hannah had a daughter Anamethea (Annie) M out of wedlock. Annie married John
Warner. Annies husband John donated money for the creation of the Gettysburg Hospital as a
138

Wright, Adams County Church Records, 52

IV-4.9

Thank You for her


recovery from a bout of
influenza. The hospital
was known as the
Annie M Warner
Hospital until recently.
Hannah
is
not
mentioned in Henry
Breams
estate
139
records.
Henry and Catharines
children all remained in
Adams County. Their
son Francis was a sheriff
and a well known owner
Blackhorse Tavern
of the Blackhorse
Tavern, an inn at the Marsh Creek crossing of Fairfield Road. In addition, Francis also owned two
properties on Herr Ridge Rd, one on the north side and one on the south side of the intersection of
with Old Mill Rd. Francis also owned a property near the Black Horse Tavern on Plank Rd near
Marsh Creek. It is possible that several of Francis children were living in some of these properties.
Son John H lived in Huntington Twp on part of the land owned by his father. This property was
located near Upper Bermudian Church and was later occupied by Johns son Abraham. John also
owned a property on Cranberry Rd in Huntington Twp near the intersection of Lime Rock Mill Rd
and Old Zeigler Mill Rd. This property was located next to several mills operated by the Trostle
family, relatives of Johns wife Elizabeth Trostle. Johns son Cornelius later lived near by or
possibly on this property. Johns other son Henry Franklin lived further east on Cranberry Rd
roughly halfway between the crossroads of White Oak Tree Rd and Farm View Rd.
Son George lived in Huntington Twp on part of the land owned by his father. Georges property
was located near Upper Bermudian Church at the intersection of Upper Bermudian Rd and
Ground Oak Church Rd.
Henrys wife Elizabeth died sometime prior to 1802. His second wife Catharina died on July 21,
1848 and was buried at Upper Bermudian Church. Henry died on February 8, 1865 and was also
buried at Upper Bermudian Church.

139 Estate file for Henry Bream, Adams County Historical Society

IV-4.10

4.6 Magdalena Bream (1789 1852)


Magdalena (Mary) Bream was born on March 11, 1786. She married John Smith sometime around
1810. John was born on January 10, 1778. The origins of the Smith family are unknown. John must
have had a first wife with which he had a son John B, born ~1800, who died in Illinois in 1846.
Magdalena and John had the following children:
i.
Emmanuel (December 29, 1808 February 15, 1896) m. Mary Ann UNK
ii.
Susan (1809 >1850) m. UNK Snyder
iii.
Mary Magdalena (Polly) (November 17, 1810 July 2, 1893) m. David Slaybaugh
iv.
Joseph (October 11, 1813 December 30, 1884) m. Susanna UNK
v.
Odilla (December 12, 1815 - <1820)
vi.
Catharina Barbara (June 5, 1817 <1820)
vii.
Barbara (1820 >1846) m. UNK
viii.
Maria (1824 >1846) m. UNK
ix.
Lovina (October 27, 1824 <1846)
x.
Sarah (1825-30 >1846) m. Henry B Lynn
xi.
Boras (1826 April 30, 1865) m. Lydia Spangler
xii.
Daniel (1828 >1846) m. UNK
xiii.
Henry (October 14, 1829 December 14, 1903) m. Sarah A
John and Magdalena lived in Huntington all their lives. John died on February 21, 1846. John
Bream, Magdalenas brother, and Emmanuel Smith were the executors of John Smiths will.
Magdalena was living with her son Emmanuel in Huntington Twp in 1850. She died on October
16, 1852. Both are buried in Upper Bermudian Cemetery.

IV-4.11

4.7 John S Bream (1788 1876)


John S Bream was born in 1788. He married Sarah Hanes sometime around 1818. Sarah was born
on December 26, 1790, probably in Reading Twp. She was the daughter of Conrod Hanes and
Barbara UNKNOWN. Conrod and family were residing in Reading Twp, Adams County by
1798. The origins of Sarahs family are unknown.
John was living with his parents through at least 1810. He appears for the first time in the tax lists
for Tyrone Twp in 1811, listed as a single man without property; he was probably still living with his
parents. This remains the same through 1817. In 1819 he is no longer listed as single, but still does
not have any property for tax
purposes although he does
own livestock. By 1820 he
was living independently
with his new family in Tyrone
Twp, but probably not on
land he owned based on tax
list entries. John received the
rights to ~125 acres of land
from his father Henrys 236
acre estate on February 7,
1824 (see Section IV-3.2) and
was living on this property by 1825. Johns brother Henry was already in possession of the other
half (~116 acres) of their fathers estate (see Section IV-4.3). John received a Patent for the entire
236 acre property on June 11, 1829. 140 In 1829 neighbors included heirs of Robert Murdoch, John
Dodds, Arthur Orr, Christopher Pehtel, and Peter Spengler. The Bermudian Creek passed
140

Pennsylvania Warrant Register O-39. Patent Book Volume H, No. 26, p. 452

IV-4.12

through Johns property and he operated a Grist Mill on the creek. John continued to live in
Tyrone Twp until his death.
The outline of Johns property (highlighted in blue) is still evident in an Adams County plat map
from 1977. The adjacent land that was occupied by Johns brother Henry is highlighted in pink.
The land owned by Johns brother Jacob is highlighted in yellow. All three of these properties
owned by the brothers John, Henry and Jacob had originally been owned by their father Henry
Sr. The yellow highlighted property was first purchased by Johns Uncle Samuel and had been
in possession of the family since 1773. The location of Upper Bermudian Church is underlined in
green.

IV-4.13

John and Sarah had the following children:


i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.

Conrad (November 14, 1818 January 12, 1880) m. Katherine Bream (daughter of
Jacob H Bream and Susanna; see Section IV-5.4)
Leah B (September 13, 1821 January 25, 1903) m. Jonas Sterner
Maria (December 25, 1823 November 28, 1905) m. Jacob Pitzer
Franklin (October 2, 1828 October 23, 1853) never married
Henry (March 7, 1831 April 27, 1833)
Sarah Anna (March 1834 February 5, 1922) m. Jacob Bream (son of Joseph Bream
and Mary Hartzel; see Section IV-5.3)
John Hanes (June 17, 1837 <1840)

Johns children Conrad, Leah, Franklin and Henry were all baptized in Upper Bermudian Church.
John and Sarahs children all remained in Adams County. Son Conrad lived next to his father on
Upper Bermudian Rd, near the intersection with Funt Rd. Daughter Maria died in Altoona while
living with her son William Anderson Pitzer. Viola Fiscel, a fifth generation descendent of John
Bream married Maurice Bream, a 6th generation descendant of Johns father Henry.
Sarah died on January 5, 1862 and was buried in Upper Bermudian Lutheran Church Cemetery.
John continued to live on his own after Sarahs death, being taken care of by his granddaughter
Lydia Sterner in 1870. John died on February 11, 1876 and was also buried in Upper Bermudian
Lutheran Church Cemetery.

IV-4.14

4.8 Susannah Bream (1793 1852)


Susannah Bream was around 1793. She married John Simmons sometime between 1812-15. John
was born on January 18, 1793. The origins of the Simmons family are unknown. Adam Simmons
was the first Simmons to settle in that region of Adams County, settling in Huntington Twp by at
least 1772. John and Susannah were witnesses to the baptism of their niece Lea Bream, daughter
of Henry and Catherine (Hartzel), at Upper Bermudian Church on June 16, 1816.
Susannah and John had the following children:
i.
Georg (August 20, 1818 - <1820)
ii.
female (1815-20 UNK) m. UNK
iii.
female (1815-20 UNK) m. UNK
iv.
Moses (1821 1894) m. Leah Bowen
v.
John (October 16, 1824 September 26, 1897) m. Charlotte Boyer
vi.
female (1820-25 UNK) m. UNK
vii.
male (1825-30 UNK) m. UNK
viii.
Howard (1830 UNK) m. Mary Baer
ix.
Enoch (November 1, 1830 February 12, 1907) m. Catherine Riley
x.
George (1833 UNK) m. UNK
xi.
William (November 18, 1836 August 14, 1903) m. Lydia A Boyer
xii.
male (1835-40 <1850)
John and Susannah moved to Ohio between 1831-33, settling as a farmer in Brown Twp, Carroll
County. Susannah died in 1852 in Stark County, Ohio. Following her death, John moved to
Buchanan County, Missouri with his sons Moses, John and William. John died on December 16,
1863 and was buried in Bowen Cemetery, Buchanan County, Missouri. Son Enoch served in Co. K
of the 2nd Ohio Cavalry during the civil war. By 1860 Enoch and his family had moved to St.
Joseph County Indiana.
4.9 Daughter Bream (1795-1800 UNK)
Nothing is known about this possible daughter of Henry and Barbara other than information from
the census records. She was living with her parents through at least 1820 and can no longer be
accounted for after 1820.

IV-4.15

5.

Fifth Generation Children of Jacob Bream and Catherine Phlieger

5.1 Anna Bream (UNK died in infancy)


5.2 Susannah Bream (1797 1850-60)
Susannah Bream was born on June 17, 1797 and was baptized on October 15, 1797 at Benders
Church in Butler Twp, Adams County. Her baptism was sponsored by her aunt and uncle George
and Mary (Bream) Hartzel. Susannah married Henry Spangler sometime between 1810 and 1814.
Henry was born in 1791. Nothing is known of Henrys origins, but he was most likely related to the
family of Peter Spangler who was a neighbor to the Breams in Tyrone Twp. Henry and Susannah
lived on part of Susannahs father Jacobs property on Cranberry Rd, just west of the intersection
with Upper Bermudian Rd. Both Henry and Susannah died between 1850 and 1860 in Tyrone
Twp.
Henry and Susannah had the following children:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.

Elizabeth (1814 UNK) m. UNK


Catharine (1819 UNK) m. UNK
Emmanuel (1820 1880-1900) m. Maria
Jacob (1823 1880-1900) m. Susanna
Susan (1829 UNK) m. UNK
Barbara (1835 UNK) m. UNK

Emmanuel and Jacob both remained in Tyrone Twp, living on their fathers property. The
whereabouts of Henry and Susannahs daughters is not known.
5.3 Joseph Bream (1799 1877)
Joseph Bream was born on May 19, 1799. Joseph married Mary C Hartzel sometime prior to 1821.
Mary was born in 1801. Her parents are unknown, but she was almost certainly related to the
Hartzel family that had married into the previous generation of Breams.
Joseph was a farmer and he and Maria resided in Huntington Twp all of their lives. Joseph first
appears in the tax lists for Huntington Twp in 1822. He did not possess land, but did own livestock.
By 1826 he had obtained 120 acres in Huntington Twp from his father Jacob. This land was
located along Upper Bermudian Rd, north of Upper Bermudian Church toward Idaville. It was
located on either side of the intersection with Upper Bermudian Rd East and West. Joseph was
living with his son Jeremiah in 1870.
Mary died on March 13, 1865 and Joseph died on August 22, 1877. Both are buried in Upper
Bermudian Cemetery.

Page IV-5.1

Joseph and Mary had the following children:


i.
Andrew (December 1, 1821 November 10, 1892) m. Rebecca Plank
ii.
Rebecca (March 13, 1824 August 16, 1910) m. Benjamin B Miller
iii.
Adam (August 27, 1825 January 4, 1900) m. Anna Elizabeth Deatrick
iv.
Catherine (January 21, 1828 September 25, 1899) m. Solomon Meals
v.
Jacob (February 4, 1831 March 13, 1916) m. Sarah Anna Bream (daughter of John S
and Sarah (Hanes) Bream; see Section IV-4.7)
vi.
John Peter (April 21, 1834 May 25, 1915) m1. Hannah Sophia Bream (daughter of
John H and Elizabeth (Trostle) Bream; see Section IV-4.3); m2 Lucinda B
Slaybaugh
vii.
Jeremiah (October 15, 1836 April 20, 1920) m1 Elizabeth Meals; m2 Elizabeth Ann
Asper
viii.
Priscilla (January 9, 1839 October 16, 1893) m. Cornelius Bream (son of John H and
Elizabeth (Trostle) Bream; see Section IV 4.5)
Their children all remained in Adams County. Andrew was living in Tyrone Twp on Cranberry
Rd near the intersection with Funt Rd. This land may have originally belonged to his grandfather
Jacob. Adam remained on his fathers property, possibly on part of Josephs original land holdings.
He possessed at least three properties, two on Upper Bermudian Rd north of the intersection with
Upper Bermudian Rd East, and one property on Upper Bermudian Rd East. Jacob remained in
Huntington Twp on Upper Bermudian Rd, just south of his fathers property. John Peter lived in
Huntington Twp on Cranberry Rd, just east of the intersection with Oxford Rd. Jeremiah
remained on his fathers original property.
Page IV-5.2

Sons Andrew, Jacob, John Peter and Jeremiah were all drafted during the Civil War (Andrew,
Jacob and John Peter in the October 1862 draft and Jeremiah in the August 1863 draft). All
avoided military service by either providing substitutes (Andrew - William B Fissel; Jacob D
Taylor; John Peter Samuel Fitzgerald) or by paying a commutation (Jeremiah).
5.4 Jacob H Bream (1801 1885)
Jacob H Bream was born on May 15, 1801. He married Susanna Forney sometime prior to 1825.
Susanna was born around 1790. Her parents were Marx and Elizabeth (Ziegler) Forney. Susannas
great-grandfather John Adam Forney emigrated on October 16, 1721 with his wife Elizabeth
Lowisa.
Jacob was a farmer and he and Susanna resided in Tyrone Twp all of their lives. Jacob first
appears in the tax records for Tyrone Twp in 1826. By 1827 he owned 80 acres. It is unclear where
this land may have been located, although it is believed that Jacob eventually lived on at least
part of the property originally purchased by his great-uncle Samuel Bream. Jacob was living
with his son Marks in 1870 and 1880.
Jacob and Susanna had the following children:
i.
Katherine (February 28, 1825 November 24, 1911) m. Conrad Bream (son of John S
and Sarah (Hanes) Bream; see Section IV-4.7)
ii.
Elizabeth (February 17, 1827 February 1, 1915) m. David Meals
iii.
Marks Farney (August 22, 1829 November 4, 1909) m1. Juliann Hutton; m2 Susan
Livelsberger
iv.
William (1836 1863-70) m. Juliann UNK
v.
son (1849 UNK)
Their children remained in Adams County with Marks continuing to farm his fathers property,
part of Henry and Samuels original land purchase.
Susanna died on May 17, 1856. Jacob died on April 6, 1885. Both are buried in Upper Bermudian
Cemetery.

Page IV-5.3

5.5 Daniel Bream (1802 1877)


Daniel Bream was born on November 5, 1802. He was of medium height and build, fair skinned,
and dark haired. 141 Daniel married Mary Arnold on December 26, 1836 in York County, at the
home of his Mother-in-law. 142 They were married by Rev. Jonathan Oswalt.
Mary was born on January 11, 1813 in York County. She was the daughter of George Arnold and
Georges second wife Maria Carl. Daniel became afflicted with rheumatism about 1856 and was
unable to do much labor. 143 Much of the farm work fell to his children.
Daniel was a farmer who lived his entire life in Tyrone Twp. He first appears in the tax records for
Tyrone Twp in 1826, listed as single and without property. This remains the same through at least
1831 (last year examined). He continued to live with his parents through at least 1830. By 1840 he
had acquired his own property.

141

Ty Bream, A Brief History of the Bream Family, (unpublished, 2000). 7

142 Mary Bream Declaration for Pension for son Edwin, Military Pension FileNational Archives
143

Ibid

Page IV-5.4

At his death Daniel possessed two


properties in Tyrone Twp. A 170 acre
tract was located near Heidlersburg, on
the north side of Frazer Rd near the
intersection with Company Farm Rd.
The property contained a two-story
weatherboarded house, double log barn
with wagon shed and corn crib attached,
hog pen, spring house, smoke house and
apple orchard. At Daniels death this
property was sold to Howard S Yeatts
for $2200. 144
The family lived on a 206 acre
tract which fronted Rock Valley
Rd just north of the first property
listed. He purchased this land
from Daniel S Diehl in 1866 for
$48/acre. The family home was a
two-story stone farmhouse with a
one-story
stone
kitchen
attached. 145 The family lived in a
log cabin while the stone house
was being built. Also on the
property were a barn and several
outbuildings. Daniels son Ezra
continued to live on this property
after Daniels death.
Daniel died on August 12, 1877 at 4:15 PM. His wife continued to live on the farm after Daniels
death with son Ezra and daughters Emma and Mary C. Mary died at 2:30 AM on June 12, 1890.
Both Daniel and Mary are buried in Upper Bermudian Cemetery.

144

Estate file for Daniel Brame, Adams County Historical Society

145

Ty Bream, A Brief History of the Bream Family, (unpublished, 2000). 7

Page IV-5.5

Daniel and Mary had the following children:


i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.

Jacob H (October 16, 1837 July 23, 1913) m. Elisabeth A Raffensberger


Amelia (April 9, 1839 November 13, 1911) m. Simon B Labaw
Edward (March 16, 1841 June 1, 1864) never married
Ephraim (January 17, 1843 March 14, 1923) m1. Ellen Catharine Bowers; m2. Mary
Catherine Klugh
Daniel (April 6, 1845 July 7, 1923) m. Kitty A Haller
Ezra (June 14, 1847 May 8, 1927) m. Emma Amelia Cooley
Emma Frances (February 3, 1849 April 4, 1930) never married
Mary Catherine (December 7, 1852 December 8, 1925) never married
Howard (July 15, 1853 April 8, 1919) m. Rosanna Margaret Miller
Rev. Ira Franklin (November 12, 1855 October 22, 1952) m. Naomi (Nannie)
Elizabeth Meals

Most of Daniel and Marys children remained in Adams County. Amelia moved with her husband
to Indiana. Son Daniel moved to Ohio around 1867 where he was married to Kitty Haller. Son Ira
moved to Carlisle, Cumberland County.
5.6 Henry Bream (1804-10 1820-30)
Henry is only known through census entries. He was born between 1804 and 1810. He died
between 1820 and 1830.

Page IV-5.6

5.7 Mary (Polly) Bream (1805 1883)


Mary Bream was born on April 11, 1805. Mary married George Leas on August 10, 1823. George
was born on April 2, 1794 in Reading Twp, Adams County. His parents were John and Sophia
(Zeigler) Leas. Georges grandfather, Leonard Leas, received a deed from the Penn brothers for
land in Reading Twp, Adams County in 1743. Georges father John had various properties in
Reading Twp, Monaghan Twp (York County) and Huntington Twp. John served as a private in the
Revolutionary War, in Captain Norths 4th Battalion of Pennsylvania Infantry.
Georges sister, Margaret Leas, married Nicholas Taughinbaugh. Kathryn Taughinbaugh, a greatgranddaughter of Nicholas and Margaret, married Harry Bream, a 7th generation descendant of
Heinrich Bream (see Section IV-7.6). The Leas and Taughinbaughs were both active in Upper
Bermudian Church during this time period.
George Leas was a farmer. He moved with Mary and their family to Ohio, settling in Green Twp,
Harrison County Ohio by 1850. George died on March 7, 1870 in Ohio. Mary was living in Green
Twp with her son Addison in 1870 and her son John in 1880. She died on June 6, 1883. Both are
buried in Bethel Church Cemetery, Harrison County, Ohio.
George and Mary had the following children:
i.
George (April 22, 1826 March 20, 1891) m. Jane Birney
ii.
Sophia (July 21, 1827 July 27, 1829)
iii.
Jane (1829 October 14, 1891) never married
iv.
Jeremiah (January 23, 1830 April 19, 1914) m. Susannah Henderson
v.
Mary (August 19, 1831 February 10, 1918) m. Aaron Hitchcock
vi.
Elizabeth (September 7, 1833 May 21, 1873) m. Samuel Crowe
vii.
Jacob Bream (October 25, 1836 December 27, 1863) never married
viii.
Margaret (August 2, 1839 March 12, 1932) m. John Mattern
ix.
John (July 2, 1843 April 7, 1921) m. Margaret Rebecca Ramsey
x.
Addison (December 10, 1852 March 30, 1932) m. Mary Jane Mitchell
Most of their children remained in Ohio. Son Jeremiah and daughter Mary with her husband
Aaron Hitchcock both eventually moved on to Iowa.
5.8 Catherine (Katie) Bream (1808 1885)
Catherine Bream was born on October 9, 1808. She was baptized on June 25, 1809, most likely at
Upper Bermudian Church. Catherine married Samuel Diehl on June 5, 1828. Samuel Diehl was
born on April 18, 1797 in Adams County. His parents were Johann Frederick and Mary (Moehler)
Diehl. Samuels sister Hannah Diehl married Michael Fissel. Viola Fiscel, a great-greatgranddaughter of Michael and Hannah Fiscel, married Maurice Bream, an 8th generation
descendant of Heinrich Bream (see Section IV-7.6).
Samuel Diehl was a farmer in Butler Twp. Samuel died on March 20, 1863. Catherine was
keeping house for John Reiter in Butler Twp in 1880. Its possible that this Reiter may have been
related to Hannah Reiter (Rider), wife of Jacob Prame (see Section IV-3.3). Catherine died on

Page IV-5.7

December 13, 1885. They may have been buried on the Diehl family farm in Butler Twp, Adams
County.
Samuel and Catherine had the following children:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.

Julianna (1829 - <1916) m. Isaac Koons


Amandah (1832 June 8, 1852) never married
Mary (1838 - <1916) m. John Miller
Joseph (1840 - <1916) m. Anna Mary Heagy
John W (January 8, 1843 - <1910) m. Mary A Robinson
Sarah E (1844 December 15, 1866) m. Simon B Labaw
Eleanora Lavina (March 1848 June 1916) m. William F Saddler

Samuel and Catherines children remained in Adams County except for son John B who moved to
Illinois sometime prior to 1880. Samuel and Catherines daughter Sarah E married Simon Labaw
on December 7, 1865 in Fountain County, Indiana. Simon remarried Sarahs cousin Amelia Bream
(daughter of Daniel and Mary (Arnold) Bream; see Section IV-6.2) after Sarahs death on
December 15, 1866. It is unclear where Simon was living between 1865 and 1880, but the family
was living in Indiana by 1880.

Page IV-5.8

Diehl Family
The first Diehl to arrive in America was Johann Frederick Diehl who was born on January 5, 1743 in
Shornheim, Landkreis Alzey, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany. He arrived in America on October 21,
1761 on the ship Snow Squirrel. He originally settled in Skippack Twp, Montgomery County where
he joined the Brethern Church. Around the time of his second marriage he moved to Upper Saucon
Twp, Northampton County. He purchased land in Forks Twp, Northampton County by 1775. In 1787
Frederick and his brother Philip purchased land on Plum Creek in Heidelberg Twp, York County
where he built a sawmill. In 1788 he purchased an additional 193 acres from Christian Graff and in
1789 he built a house near McSherrystown. On November 24, 1796 he bought 280 acres in Butler
Twp, Adams County from James Cooper. In 1798 his property consisted of 276 acres on the
Conewago Creek with a one story log house (40x25 ft), a stone kitchen (21x12 ft), a bank barn
(72x36 ft) and a smith shop (18x18 ft). His property adjoined land of Nicholas Benger. In 1809 he
built a stone mill which served
as grist, saw, fulling and oil
mill. The mill was located east
of Biglerville at the end of
Plainview Rd off of the Old
Harrisburg Rd. The sawmill
originally went to sons John
and David after Fredericks
death, but it was eventually
operated by his son Samuel
until 1863 when it was sold to
S.A. Hershey.
Fredericks third wife, Mary
Moehler, was the mother of
Samuel and Hannah Diehl. Frederick died on March 15, 1816 and Mary died on August 1, 1822.
Both are buried in a family plot in Butler Twp near the mill. Neither stone was standing in 2004.

Page IV-5.9

5.9 John Bream (1811 1899)


John Bream was born on October 5, 1811. He was baptized on June 7, 1812 at Upper Bermudian
Church. John married Margaret Myers prior to 1840.
Margaret Myers was born on July 31, 1820. Her parents were John and Mary (Smith) Myers.
Margarets sister Henrietta Myers married John Breams brother William E Bream. Nothing is
known about the origins of the Myers family.
John Bream was a farmer in Butler Twp. He lived on property on Heidlersburg Rd west of
Opossum Creek. He and Margaret were living with their son John A in Butler Twp in 1880.
Margaret died on October 19, 1895. John died on March 27, 1899. Both are buried in Biglerville
Cemetery in Biglerville, Pennsylvania
John and Margaret had the following children:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.

William D (March 24, 1839 April 29, 1910) m. Anna E Rebert


Keziah (Kate) M (July 1, 1841 - <1922) never married
John A (April 7, 1842 April 1, 1924) m. Florence Markley
Julia Ann (July 1, 1844 1920-30) m. Daniel E Weigle
Charlotte L (March 12, 1846 - >1922) m. Burdon S Brownwell

All of John and Margarets children were baptized at Benders Church. Their sons William and
John A both remained in Adams County. William originally settled in Butler Twp possibly near
his uncle William on Heidlersburg Rd, but moved to Straban Twp by 1880. John settled in Butler
Twp by 1880. Julia Ann and husband Daniel Weigle moved to Iowa between 1870 and 1880.
Keziah moved with her sister Julia Ann and was living with Daniel and Julia Ann in 1880.
Charlotte and her husband Burdon moved to Iowa prior to 1880. They moved to Santa Clara,
California between 1900 and 1910. William was drafted for military service in the Civil War in
the August 1863 draft.
5.10 Matilda Bream (1815 1900-10)
Matilda Bream was born on December 25, 1815. She married Eli Cover on August 10, 1837.
Eli Cover was born on February 27, 1816. He was the son of Jacob Cover and Mary Jones. Elis
great-grandfather Daniel Kober emigrated on the ship Two Brothers on September 15, 1748,
settling in Germantown, PA then the Lehigh Valley. The family eventually moved to
Westminster, MD where they owned 75 acres along Hwy 97 about 2 miles north of Westminster.
Elis father Jacob moved to the Gettysburg area in the early 1800s.
Eli was a farmer in Menallen Twp. Between 1850 and 1860 the family moved to Knoxville, Knox
County, Illinois where they continued farming. Eli served in Company D of the 7th Illinois cavalry
in the Civil War. In 1870 Eli was a constable in Knoxville Twp and a mail carrier in 1880.

Page IV-5.10

Eli and Matilda had the following children:


i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.

Mary S (May 1938 1910-20) m. Charles Fash


George H (May 18, 1841 December 25, 1856)
William Mark (December 30, 1841 April 19, 1921) m. Helen Elizabeth Cane
John A (July 13, 1844 February 4, 1858)
Benjamin (May 1849 UNK) m. UNK
Charles T (1851 UNK) m. UNK
Albert J (December 1852 UNK) m. Emma
Emma M (1856 UNK) m. John Namper

Eli and Matildas children Albert and Emma and families remained in Illinois. Daughter Mary
remained in Illinois with her husband Charles Fash. Charles Fash was born in New York but was
living with his first wife Frances in San Joaquin California in 1860. He moved to Illinois and was
remarried to Mary between 1860 and 1870. Son William remained in Illinois through 1870 then
relocated to Kansas by 1880 where he remained. Several of Williams children moved to
Oklahoma where their mother Helen died in 1929. Son Benjamin was a farm laborer living in
Montezuma Twp, Solano County, California in 1870. His whereabouts after that are unknown.
Son Charles was living with his parents in 1870. His whereabouts after that are unknown.
Eli died on March 23, 1883 and was buried in the Knoxville Cemetery, Knox County, Illinois.
Matilda was living with her widowed daughter Mary in 1900. Matilda died between 1900 and
1910.

5.11 Samuel Bream (1815 1881)


Samuel Bream was born on December 25, 1815. He married Eliza Eyster on October 24, 1840.
Eliza was born on December 12, 1819. She was the daughter of Jacob Eyster and Catherine Wentz.
The first Eyster emigrant (Jacob Eyster and wife Catharine Wurterich) arrived around 1717 and
settled in Berks County. Eliza was a great-great granddaughter.

Page IV-5.11

Samuel was a farmer and he and Eliza resided in Tyrone Twp through 1850 but then moved to
Menallen Twp between 1850 and 1860 where they remained. By 1872 Samuel was living in
Bendersville.
Samuel died on November 24, 1881. Eliza died on September 28, 1894.
Samuel and Eliza had the following children:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.

Howard William (August 21, 1841 - <1914) m. Anna


Mary Ann Catharine (September 11, 1845 March 21, 1848)
Henry Jacob (Jacob H) (September 11, 1845 January 4, 1932) m. Elizabeth Ann
Crum
Samuel Wesley (September 11, 1847 October 15, 1928) never married
Sarah Jane (June 1, 1849 July 19, 1937) m1 UNK Crall, m2 Samuel Meals
Matilda (Tillie) (November 1858 October 17, 1914) never married

With the possible exception of Matilda, all of Samuel and Elizas children were baptized at Trinity
Lutheran Church in York Springs. All of their children remained in Adams County. Howard,
Henry and Samuel were all settled in Menallen Twp by 1880.
5.12 William E Bream (1818 1891)
William was born on March 2, 1818. He was baptized on October 4, 1818, probably at Upper
Bermudian Church. He married Henrietta (Harriet) Myers on October 27,
1840.
Henrietta was born on February 11, 1822. Her parents were John and Mary
(Smith) Myers. Henriettas sister Margaret Myers married William
Breams brother John Bream. Nothing is known about the origins of the
Myers family.
William was a minor at the time of his fathers death. Abraham Trostle
was appointed his guardian. Abrahams daughter Elizabeth married
Williams cousin, John H Bream (son of Henry Bream and Elizabeth UNKOWN; see Section
IV-4.3).
William was a farmer who resided in Butler Twp all of his life. He lived on the Heidlersburg Rd,
near the stream crossing west of Quaker Run Rd. William died on April 20, 1891. Henrietta died
on September 21, 1898. Both are buried in Biglerville Cemetery, Biglerville, Pennsylvania.
William and Henrietta had the following children:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.

Sarah Catherine (June 15, 1842 January 12, 1898) m. William Henry Cronise
Matilda (July 2, 1844 November 29, 1862) never married
Samuel (June 11, 1846 February 7, 1932) m. Sarah E Peters
William Eli (June 24, 1848 September 11, 1925) m. Anna Mary E Cronise
Mary Elisabeth (February 7, 1850 1910-20) m. Amos Howard Peters
Page IV-5.12

vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.

Susan Margaret (April 2, 1852 January 15, 1942) m. William F Spangler


Alice Emmaline (August 14, 1854 May 10, 1937) m. Americus Casper Cronise
John M (August 28, 1856 December 9, 1954) m1. Emma R Gardner; m2. Dessa Mae
Wertz
Hannah M (September 29, 1858 June 4, 1938) m. Rev. Elias Daniel Weigle
Anna Rebecca (April 30, 1861 November 24, 1904) m. Eli Penn Garretson
Ida May (October 9, 1863 January 4, 1864)
Henry (September 23, 1864 September 26, 1864)

Sarah, Matilda and Samuel were all baptized in Benders Church. Except for daughters Sarah
Catherine and Alice Emmaline who married into the Cronise family, William and Henriettas
children remained in Adams County. William and Henriettas son Samuel was a pioneer apple
farmer in Adams County. 146 Daughter Hannahs husband Elias Weigle was a pastor at St. Pauls
Lutheran Church in Littlestown around 1880.
William Cronise was the son of Frederick and Anna (Nicodemus) Cronise. Americus Cronise and
Anna Mary Cronise were Williams nephew and niece, respectively, both the children of
Williams brother Jacob. The family was originally from Creagerstown, Frederick County, MD.
Brothers William and Jacob moved to Botetourt County, Virginia between 1860 and 1870, after
William had been married to Sarah Catherine. William remained in Botetourt County. He and
his wife are buried in Wheatland Cemetery. Americus and Alice Emmaline moved from Virginia
to Frederick Maryland in 1900. They are buried in Mt Olivet Cemetery in Frederick.

146

Bloom, A History of Adams County, Pennsylvania, 242.

Page IV-5.13

6.

Sixth Generation Children of Daniel Bream and Mary Arnold

6.1 Jacob H Bream (1837 1913)


Jacob H was born on October 16, 1837. He married Elizabeth (Lizzie) A Raffensberger on March
13, 1861. Elizabeth was born in November of 1838. Her parents were Martin and Lydia (Bare)
Raffensberger. Its unknown who Martins parents were.
Jacob was a farmer who resided in Tyrone Twp all of his life. In 1864 he bought the Jeremiah
Diehl farm on Spicer Rd, just south of the Harrisburg Rd. He died on July 23, 1913 and was buried
in Evergreen Cemetery. Elizabeth was living with her son Franklin in 1920. She died sometime
after 1923.
Jacob and Elizabeth had the following children:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.

A. (son) (June 25, 1861 March 17, 1863)


Minnie (December 1862 August 29, 1923) m. Emmanuel Clayton Fidler
Daniel Charles (1866 - <1880)
Irene N (1868 - <1880)
Anna Mary (1869 - <1870)
Jacob Martin (November 1870 June 14, 1948) m. Ida Mae Zepp
Franklin Frank Howard (June 1873 July 23, 1957) m. Elsie L Lough
Willis Sell (1875 UNK) m. Mary Alice UNK
John Clinton (February 16, 1878 March 18, 1953) m. Margaret Zora Mae Weigle
Floyd Luther (1881 - <1900)

Jacob and Elisabeths children Minnie, Jacob, Franklin and John all remained in Adams County.
Son Willis was a railroad station agent who moved to Ohio sometime prior to 1910.
6.2 Amelia Bream (1839 1911)
Amelia was born on April 9, 1839. She was baptized on August 25, 1839 at Upper Bermudian
Church. She married Simon B Labaw on December 10, 1867.

IV-6.1

Simon was born on July 15, 1841 in Indiana. His parents


were Benjamin and Phoebe (Crane) Labaw. Simons
grandfather David Labaw was born in New Jersey around
1775, but he had moved to Montgomery County, Ohio by
1807, where Simons father was born in 1808. Benjamin
moved the family to Fountain County, Indiana around
1835.
Before marrying Amelia, Simon had been married to
Amelias cousin Sarah Diehl (daughter of Samuel and
Catherine [Bream] Diehl; see Section IV-5.8). Sarah died
on December 15, 1866. She is buried in Browns Chapel
Cemetery, Fountain County, Indiana.
Simon was a farmer who resided in Indiana. Simon served in the 154th Indiana Volunteers,
Company C during the Civil War. He enlisted in the spring of 1865, for one year, and served near
Winchester, VA in the Shenandoah Valley, doing garrison duty. He was retained in the service
until August 1865. Three of Simons brothers were killed in the Civil War.
Amelia died on November 13, 1911. Simon died on May 30, 1916. Both are buried in Browns
Chapel Cemetery Shawnee Twp, Fountain County, Indiana.
Simon and Sarah Diehl had the following child:
i.

Emery G (November 27, 1866 November 22, 1915) m1. Lulu Suits; m2. Mary
Ophelia Graham; m3. Annie Davidson

Simon and Amelia had the following children:


ii.
Mary E (December 29, 1868 April 18, 1901) never married
iii.
Laura Belle (May 11, 1871 July 14, 1886)
iv.
Etta Elizabeth (March 4, 1873 October 12, 1899) m. Ezra V Zeigler
v.
Edwin (September 9, 1874 March 3, 1875)
vi.
Lillian (August 25, 1876 April 19, 1970) m. William Freeman Clark
vii.
Derrick Francis (April 17, 1883 December 19, 1903) m. Edna Miriam Board
All of Simons children remained in Indiana.
6.3 Edward (Edwin) Bream (1841 1864)
Edwin Bream was born on March 16, 1841. He was 5 foot 6 inches tall with a dark complexion. He
had grey eyes and light hair and his occupation was listed as carpenter. 147 Because of his father
Daniels rheumatism, Edwin provided significant support to the running of the family farm. 148

147 Inventory of Effects for Edward Brame, Military Pension FileNational Archives
148

Mary Bream Declaration for Pension for son Edwin, Military Pension FileNational Archives

IV-6.2

At age 21, Edwin enlisted as a private in the military in response to President Lincolns call for
volunteers in July of 1862. He was enrolled by Capt James H Walter at Bendersville on August
29, 1862 and was mustered into service at Harrisburg on the same day. 149 At Harrisburg Capt
Walters Company was organized with nine other Companies into the 138th Pennsylvania Infantry
Regiment. Captain Walters company became Company G. The other companies were recruited
from Montgomery, Bedford and Bucks Counties in addition to one other Company (Company B)
which was also recruited in Adams County, primarily from within Gettysburg.
Enlisting along with Edwin was his cousin William Howard Bream (son of Edwins Uncle Samuel
and Eliza [Eyster] Bream; see Section IV-5.11). Several other more distant relatives also enlisted in
Company G including:

Three grandsons of Edwins Great Aunt Mary C Bream (married to George Hartzel; see
Section IV-4.2)
o Elias N Hartzel (son of Samuel E and Rebecca [Thomas] Hartzel),
o John C Schriver (son of David and Susanna [Hartzel] Schriver), and
o Daniel K Hartzel (son of John Henry and Catherine [Kann] Hartzel),

One grandson of Edwins Great Uncle John S (married Sarah Hanes; see Section IV-4.7)
o William Anderson Pitzer (son of Jacob and Maria [Bream] Pitzer)

Two grandsons of Edwins Great Aunt Magdalena (married John Smith; see Section IV-4.6)
o John P Slaybaugh (son of David and Mary Magdalena [Bream] Slaybaugh; see
Section 4.6)
o Cornelius Slaybaugh (son of David and Mary Magdalena [Bream] Slaybaugh;
see Section 4.6)

One step-grandson of Edwins Uncle Samuel (married Eliza Eyster; see Section IV-5.8)
o Isaiah Meals (step-son of Samuel and Sarah Jane [Bream] Meals)
In addition several others who enlisted with Edwin either married into or had other associations
with the Bream family including:

o William F Saddler who married Edwins cousin Eleanora Diehl (daughter of


Samuel and Catherine [Bream] Diehl; see Section IV-5.8),
o John S Forney who married Mary E Schriver, sister of John C Schriver and
granddaughter of George and Mary C [Bream] Hartzel (see Section IV-4.2),
o Isaac McKonly who married Margaret Jane Walker, mother of Ezra Breams
illegitimate daughter (see Section IV-6.6)
Shortly after Edwin enlisted, his cousins Marks and William (sons of Edwins Uncle Jacob H
Bream; see Section IV-6.1) were drafted in the October 1862 draft. Both enlisted into the 165th
Pennsylvania infantry in November of 1862. Also enlisting in the 165th was Samuel Cooley, father
of Ezra Breams wife Emma Cooley (see Appendix 6).

149 Except where noted otherwise, the historical information for the 138th PA Regimant comes from: Osceola Lewis. History of the One Hundred

and Thirty-Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (Norristown, PA 1866)

IV-6.3

On August 30, 1862 the regiment was transported to Baltimore


via the Northern Central Railroad. They were ordered to a
station on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad known as
Washington Junction or Relay House as part of the Middle
Department 8th Army Corp. The Relay House was located
nine miles from Baltimore and 31 miles from Washington near a
stone bridge known as the Washington Viaduct which
spanned the Patapsco River. The regiment remained at the
Relay House until June 16, 1863 when, with the Army of
Northern Virginia marching toward Pennsylvania preparatory

Relay House 150

to the Battle of Gettysburg, the regiment was ordered to Harpers Ferry. Edwins second cousin
John P Slaybaugh died of disease on December 6, 1862 while stationed at the Relay House.
Harpers Ferry was evacuated on July 1 and the regiment was transported to
Washington via the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. They moved on to Frederick by
rail where the Harpers Ferry troops, including the 138th PA were organized into the
Third Division and assigned to the 3rd Army Corp of the Army of the Potomac on July 8. The
regiment accompanied the Army of the Potomac in pursuit of General Lee after the Battle of
Gettysburg, crossing into Virginia at Harpers Ferry on July 17 where, in the evening, the 138th
made its first encampment on Virginia soil.

On the Road to Warrenton 151

The regiment continued southward arriving near


Manassas Gap on July 23. A small battle took
place nearby on Wapping Heights. While the
138th was not engaged, it came under occasional
fire while lying in reserve. Along with the rest of his
Regiment, this would have been Edwins first
exposure to the sights and sounds of battle. The
regiment continued on to Warrenton, Virginia and
then on to the Rappahannock River near Foxs Ford
where they established a temporary summer camp.

150

Selected Civil War Photographs, The Library of Congress, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html

151

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Volume 4 (New York, NY, 1888). 85.

IV-6.4

The Area of Operation of the 138th PA Infantry Regiment from June of 1863
until it was Disbanded in June of 1865 152
152

Bruce Catton. A Stillness at Appomattox. (Garden City, NY, 1953). end piece

IV-6.5

Warrenton Junction 153

Warrenton Court House 154

The regiment remained at Foxs Ford until September 15 when it was ordered to march to
Culpeper Court House, arriving on the
following day. The regiment remained at
Culpeper until October 10 when they, along
with the entire Army of the Potomac were
ordered to retreat to cut off an advance by
General Lee toward Washington. The 138th
began crossing the Rappahannock River at
Freemans Ford at 9 PM on the evening of
October 11. The regiment was assigned to
guard the ammunition trains and the Corps
ambulances.
Culpeper Court House 155

The regiment proceeded northward through Greewich, arriving in Centreville on the 14th. A
battle at Bristow Station involving other elements of the Army of the Potomac resulted in the
repulse of Lees northward
movement. As a result, on
October 19 the 138th was
ordered
to
advance
southward again, reaching
Gainesville on the 20th and
Catletts Station on the
Orange and Alexandria
railroad on the 21rst. On the
28th the regiment was ordered
to Bealton Station where it
remained in camp until the
Bealton Station 156
Orange and Alexandria railroad, which had been destroyed during Lees retreat, was repaired.
153

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Volume 4 (New York, NY, 1888). 86.

154

Selected Civil War Photographs, The Library of Congress, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html

155

Ibid

156

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Volume 4 (New York, NY, 1888). 98.

IV-6.6

Destroyed rails on the Orange and Alexandria


railroad 157

Catletts Station 158

On November 7 the regiment was ordered to advance and again crossed the Rappahannock
River, this time at Kellys Ford. On the 8th, while about two and a half miles from Brandy Station
on the Orange and Alexandria railroad, the regiment encountered elements of the Confederates
rear guard. The 138th, with the
rest of the Brigade, was ordered
to advance and drive the enemy
from a hill which they occupied
with guns in position. The 138th
and the 110th Ohio regiments
were deployed with the 138th on
the eastern side of the railroad
and the 110th to the west. The
advance began about 1 PM and
the regiments soon came under
Brandy Station 159
artillery fire.
Shells whizzed over our heads and through our ranks, tore up the turf before and
behind us; fragments of shrapnel hummed about our ears; and solid shot bounded
over and around us. 160
The line pushed on rapidly and soon carried the hill, the enemy artillery narrowly escaping. The
reason given for the failure to capture the guns was the hindrance to rapid movement caused by
the requirement to carry 8 days of rations. The advance pushed on to the south of Brandy Station
and succeeded in capturing the Confederates winter quarters which were in the process of
construction. This was Edwins first full engagement in battle since his enlistment. The regiment
157

Selected Civil War Photographs, The Library of Congress, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html

158

Ibid

159

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Volume 4 (New York, NY, 1888). 98.

160

Lewis. History of the One Hundred and Thirty-Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry,, 43

IV-6.7

lost 1 killed and 6 wounded, none in Company G.


The regiment remained at Brandy Station in relative quiet until November 26 when they were
again ordered to advance. The regiment crossed the Rapidan River at Jacobs Ford on the 26th
and in the morning of the 27th they encountered General Ewells Confederate Corps near Mine
Run. The 138th was heavily involved in this conflict. According to the regimental historian,
Our first battle (Brandy Station) had given us the harsh experience of artillery
fire, and in this we became fully acquainted with a musketry conflict with its
bloody charges and repulses, the staggering effect of its volleys, and the
destructiveness of its sharpshooting 161
The battle lasted throughout the day. At dusk the regiment was withdrawn and replaced due to
the exhaustion of ammunition. In the morning the regiment advanced to Mine Run in a drenching
rain. The Confederates were found to be in a strong defensive position along Mine Run and were
not pursued. In this Battle of Locust Grove the regiment lost 7 killed and 42 wounded, 2 and 6
respectively in Company G.
On December 1 the regiment recrossed the Rapidan and on the 3rd, returned to their old
encampments at Brandy Station. There the regiment settled into its winter quarters
appropriating the huts
previously erected and
abandoned
by
the
Confederates. The huts were
built in backwoodsmancabin style cemented with
clay or mud. Chimneys were
usually constructed with
wood although occasionally
brick or stone was used,
procured from abandoned
buildings. The roofing was
usually of shelter tents.
Rough split shingles were
occasionally used which
necessitated the need for
windows to permit light.
Some cabins would hold up
Winter Quarters at Brandy Station 162
to 12 people while some
would hold as few as two. The army remained in their winter quarters until early May of 1864.
In March of 1864 the regiment received Springfield rifled muskets to replace
the 69 caliber US smooth bore muskets they had been issued in August of 1862.
The smooth bore muskets had replaced old Austrian muskets the regiment
161 Ibid, 54
162

Selected Civil War Photographs, The Library of Congress, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html

IV-6.8

had received initially. These old Austrian muskets were considered almost worthless. Also in
March the Army of the Potomac was reorganized. The 3rd Corp, to which the 138th PA was
assigned, was dissolved and the regiment, along with the rest of its 3rd Division, was attached to
the the 2nd Brigade, Third Division of the Sixth Corp. Additionally, General Ulysses Grant was
promoted to Lt General, based on his success on the Mississippi River. He was made overall
commander of the Union Armies, but remained in the field with the Army of the Potomac which
was still led by General Gordon Meade.
On May 4, 1864 the 138th PA left their winter quarters and began the first movements of the
upcoming military campaign. The regiment was roused at 2:30 AM and broke camp by 4 AM.
There was a halt for
breakfast at 7 AM. 163
By 4 PM the regiment
had reached the
Rapidan River and
crossed to the south
side by way of a
pontoon bridge at
Germanna Ford. The
regiment bivouacked
for the night near the
ford, worn out from the
warm day and the
6th Corp Crossing the Rapidan River at Germanna Ford 164
unaccustomed
exertion. Around noon on the 5th the regiment resumed its march down Germmana Ford Road
towards Wilderness Tavern. The 138th PA was in the rear of the 6th Corp advance and by the time
they neared Wilderness Tavern the Battle of the Wilderness was well underway.
On arriving at the battle, the 138th was positioned on the right flank of the 6th Corp in the second
line of battle. At about 6 PM on May 5th the lines advanced and engaged the Confederates for
about two hours until ammunition was exhausted. The battle was not renewed that evening and
the regiment bivouacked for the night. Throughout the night the Confederates could be heard
chopping, working, fortifying in our front [] and moving artillery into position. The following
morning (May 6) the 138th was moved to the front line and an advance was initiated around 7 AM.
On-on-moved our lines until within fifty yards of the rebel works, and the smoke
and flash of the enemies guns were plainly visible through the trees and bushes.
Felled trees and tangled branches were formidable obstacles to our successThe
enemy from behind well-constructed entrenchments poured forth a most
destructive blaze of musketry and from well trained artillery came shrieking shell
and humming charges of canister. We were enfiladed and almost surrounded but
our men stood firmThe strife fiercely continued for upwards of an hour, when
orders cameto retire, there being no hope of further success. 165
163 Gordon C Rhea, The Battle of the Wilderness May 5-6, 1864 (Baton Rouge, LA 1994), 64
164

Selected Civil War Photographs, The Library of Congress, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html

165 Lewis. History of the One Hundred and Thirty-Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 85-88

IV-6.9

Edwins second cousin Cornelius Slaybaugh was killed during the fighting on May 6, 1864.
Following the fighting the 138th was again placed in reserve and the regiment remained quiet
behind hastily constructed fortifications throughout the afternoon. The regiment had just begun
to light fires to cook supper at about 6 PM when the Confederates launched a surprise attack
upon the right flank of the regiment. The 138th was brought forward to check the enemies
advance but yielding to the temporary panic, also fell to the rear. 166 The retreat progressed
down a narrow wagon road for about two miles before the disordered troops were reformed.
Other elements of the 5th and 6th Corps pushed the advancing Confederates back to their original
positions. That evening the 138th along with the rest of its brigade was reassembled and the troops
bivouacked along the Chancellorsville Road. The morning of May 7th was spent fortifying a
defensive position in preparation for a continuation of the battle, but by the evening the Army of
the Potomac was on the move again and the battle was over. All told during the Battle of the
Wilderness the 138th lost 27 killed and 94 wounded. Company G lost 5 killed and 11 wounded.
One of the wounded was Elias Hartzel.
About 9:30 on the evening of May 7, the 138th PA began marching southeastward toward
Spotsylvania
Courthouse
via
Chancellorsville. They
marched all night,
arriving within 2 miles
of the courthouse by 6
PM on May 8 where they
were deployed in order
of battle. The Battles for
Spotsylvania
Court
House took place from
May 10 though May 12.
The 138th PA was mostly
held in reserve and saw
little action during these
battles.
Union positions at Spotsylvania Court House the 6th Corp
occupied the wooded area to the left 167

Through the remainder of the month of May, the 138th endured a series of marches and
countermarches. The regiment reached the North Anna River on May 24 which was crossed at
Jericho Mills on the 25th. In the evening of the 26th the regiment countermarched and recrossed
the North Anna and moved to Chesterfield Station about 8 to 10 miles distant.
This march was known as the mud march because of the intensely muddy and
almost impassable conditions of the roads. [] they were knee deep with mud and
water and in some places pools were encountered into which men would sink to
their waistsThe night was very darkmen fell and lost their muskets some their

166 Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I, Vol 36, Part I (Washington DC, 1891), 729.
167

Gordon C Rhea, The Battles for Spotsylvania Court House and the Road to Yellow Tavern May 7-12, 1864. (Baton Rouge, LA 1997), after p. 150

IV-6.10

shoes buried deep in the mire and it is believed that a few actually perished from
prostration and suffocation in the mud. 168

Pontoon Bridge Crossing at Jericho Mills 169

Soldiers Bathing in the North Anna River 170

On the 27th the regiment reached the Pamunkey River which was crossed on the 28th. On the
30th the regiment marched to Tolopatomoy Creek and on the 31rst joined in a small action against
the Confederates at that location. Regimental losses at Spotsylvania and during the march to the
Tolopatomoy totaled 1 killed and 12 wounded, none in Company G.
At midnight on May 31rst the regiment began a forced march in the direction of Cold Harbor
which lasted all night and through the day.
The 1rst of June 1864 was one of the sultriest days of the season, and we were
plodding a weary way on a forced march to Cold Harbor. The roads were
intolerably dusty, the heat of the atmosphere was intense, and the movement
being rapid, was one of severe trials 171
The regiment arrived at Cold Harbor about 3 PM and was deployed in line of battle with the 138th
on the front left of the brigade, to the right of the Garthright house.

168

Lewis. History of the One Hundred and Thirty-Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 100-101

169

Selected Civil War Photographs, The Library of Congress, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html

170

Ibid

171 Lewis. History of the One Hundred and Thirty-Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry,, 108

IV-6.11

Garthright House

Modern view of Garthright House

The front line of the 2nd Brigade consisted of the 6th Maryland and the 138th PA
regiments, and these two regiments were the first to encounter a galling fire from
the enemys sharpshooters and a difficult swamp which had to be crossed. These
obstacles overcome, the rebel main line, situated on a ridge thickly wooded with
pine, was found to be defended by strong numbers. The 6th and 138th were the first
troops to clamber the works and break the rebel front, which was only
accomplished by a solid rush and hard fighting.
The confusion and flight of the enemy resulting from the breach in their line was
quickly followed up, and in a short time the tworegiments had captured more
prisoners than their own number.
in our zeal to drive the enemy, soon distanced all supporting columns to the
jeopardy of our own safety. At one period the men of our regiment drove the
gunners from a battery; but when within a few yards of its position, and about to
seize it, our scattered and weakened numbers became apparent to the enemy,
who rallied heavily against us, returned to their guns, and checked our further
advance by a raking charge of canister. We were hard pressed, but the captured
ground was maintained. 172

The Cold Harbor Battlefield 173

Union Breastworks at Cold Harbor 174

172 Ibid 104-105


173

Selected Civil War Photographs, The Library of Congress, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html

IV-6.12

Edwin was killed during this fighting. The losses for the regiment were 6 killed and 54 wounded
or missing. In Company G, Edwin was the only soldier killed. Five soldiers in Company G were
wounded, including Isaac McConly.
It is not known where Edwin was buried. His effects could not be recovered from the field. It is
possible that he is buried in one of the unmarked graves at the Cold Harbor National Cemetery or
perhaps in the mass grave at that cemetery. 175

The State of Pennsylvania erected a memorial at the Cold Harbor National Cemetery: 176

174

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Volume 4 (New York, NY, 1888). 224.

175

http://www.kimshockey.com/cw/coldharborcem.html

176

Ibid

IV-6.13

Edwins cousin William mustered out with the rest of Company G on June 23, 1865 at
Washington DC as did all of the other extended members of the Bream family with the exception
of Daniel Hartzel who was discharged from the Company on October 6, 1863 for unspecified
reasons and Elias Hartzel who was killed on April 6, 1865 at the Battle of Sailors Creek, 3 days
before General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House. The only other casualty from the
Bream family members of Company G was William Saddler who was wounded at the Battle of
Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864.
6.4 Ephraim Bream (1843 1923)
Ephraim Bream was born on January 17, 1843. He was baptized on January 18, 1843 at Upper
Bermudian Church. Ephraim married Ellen Catherine Bowers prior to 1867. Ellen was born on
November 2, 1847. She was the daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Yeatts) Bowers.
Following Ellens death on February 10, 1889, Ephraim was remarried to Mary Catherine Klugh.
Mary was the daughter of Henry and Eliza (Knisely) Klugh. Marys paternal grandparents were
George and Hannah (Arnold) Klugh. Hannah Arnold (daughter of George and Gloria [Asper]
Arnold) was the stepsister of Mary Arnold (daughter of George and Maria [Carl] Arnold),
Ephraims mother and Daniel Breams wife.
Ephraim was a farmer who remained in Tyrone Twp. He lived on property on the south side of
Chestnut Hill Rd just west of the intersection with Chestnut Hill Rd East. He was drafted for
military service in the Civil War in the July 1864 draft, but he was not known to have served. He
died on March 14, 1923 and was buried at Upper Bermudian Church. His wife Mary was living on
her own in Tyrone Twp in 1930. She died on May 22, 1933 and was buried in Dillsburg Cemetery,
York County.

IV-6.14

Ellen Catherine (Bowers) Bream

Ephraim and Ellen had the following children:


i.
ii.
iii.
iv.

Bertie Emma (1867 January 6, 1928) m. Wilbert Selkirk Houck


Mervin Oscar (June 1872 1910-1918) m. Annie A March
Grace B (1882 October 15, 1965) m. Cajus B Gardner
Charles Daniel (1886 - 1886)

Ephraim and Mary did not have any children.


All of Ephraim and Ellens children remained in Adams County. The parents of Cajus Gardner
(Ephraims son-in-law) were Henry J and Mary Alice (Bream) Gardner. Mary Alice was the
daughter of Jacob and Sarah Anna (Bream) Bream (see Sections IV-5.3 and IV-4.7, respectively).
Cajus and Graces son Ralph Brame Gardner died on June 7, 1944 of wounds received June 6
during the D-Day invasion of Normandy, France. Mervins son Ralph Emerson was a pharmacist
mate first class with the Naval Railway Battery No. One during World War I. 177 He helped in
disabling of the German super guns at Soissons. He died October 25, 1918 after developing
influenza and pneumonia and is buried the American Cemetery, Souilly Meuse, France.

177

Percy S Eichelberger. Adams County in the World War. (Harrisburg, PA, 1921). 43

IV-6.15

6.5 Daniel Bream (1845 1923)


Daniel Bream was born on April 6, 1845. He was baptized on May 24, 1845 at Trinity Lutheran
Church in York Springs. Daniel married Kitty A Haller in 1873. Kitty was born in 1847 in
Maryland. She was the daughter of Henry Haller and Elizabeth Barger. Kitty was previously
married to Holister W Beck with whom she had one son.
Daniel moved to Ohio, while still single, about 1867. In 1870 Daniel was living as a farm hand
with John Ewing who was a gardener. Daniel took up the profession and was working
independently by 1880. He continued to work as a gardener, retiring between 1910-20. Daniel
died on July 7, 1922 in Harrison Twp, Montgomery County, Ohio. His wife Kitty died between
1900 and 1910.
Daniel and Kitty had the following children:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.

Elmer Daniel (February 17, 1875 UNK) m. Clarissa S Reese


Mary C (1876 1880-82)
Grace A (1879 1880-82)
Olive K (December 1, 1887 February 7, 1975) m. Abram A Harshbarger
Child (UNK - <1882)
Child (UNK - <11882)

Elmer and Olive both remained in Ohio. Olive married late in life (at age 37) and had one child.
Both Elmer and son-in-law Abram took up the gardening profession.

IV-6.16

6.6 Ezra Bream (1847 1927)


Ezra Bream was born on June 14, 1847 (his birth date in the Upper Bermudian Church records is
given as April 13, 1847). He was baptized on September 5, 1847 at Upper Bermudian Church.
Ezra was about five and a half feet tall and weighed between 140 and 150 pounds. He was fair
skinned, and in his later years, he went bald and suffered from skin sores (probably as a result of
sun exposure). 178
Ezra married Emma Amelia Cooley on October 26, 1876. Emma was born on March 12, 1848 to
Samuel Amos and Lydia A (Johnston) Cooley. Samuel had served in the civil war, first with the
165th Pennsylvania Infantry and then with Company K of the 184th Pennsylvania Infantry with
which he fought at Cold Harbor, Virginia in 1864 as a part of the 2nd Corp of the Army of the
Potomac. With Samuel in Company K of the 184th PA were his brother Philip and Ezra Breams
cousins Marks and William Bream (sons of Jacob H and Susanna (Forney) Bream; see section
IV-5.4).

Prior to his marriage to Emma, Ezra fathered an illegitimate daughter with Margaret (Maggie)
Jane Walker in 1869. The daughter, Myrtle L Bream, was born in June of 1869. In November of
1869, Ezra was convicted by the State of Pennsylvania of fornication and bastardy on the oath of
Margaret Walker. Margaret was the daughter of Arnold B and Sarah A (Delap) Walker. She was
born in September of 1846. In 1870 Margaret and her infant daughter were living in Huntington
Twp with Margarets parents. In 1874 Margaret married Isaac McKonly. Isaac had served in
Company G of the 138th Pennsylvania Infantry with Ezra Breams brother Edwin. Isaac had three
children by a previous wife Sarah. He and Margaret had one child of their own, a daughter Viola
born in 1878. By 1900 Isaac, Margaret and family had moved to Cumberland County. Margaret
died in March of 1940 and was buried in St Johns Cemetery in Shiremanstown, Cumberland
County.
Ezra was a farmer who lived his entire life in Tyrone Twp. In 1880, Ezra was married to Emma, but

178

Ty Bream, A Brief History of the Bream Family, (unpublished, 2000), 8

IV-6.17

was still living at home with


his mother Mary and two
sisters Emma and Mary C.
His wife Emma was living
with Emmanuel and Mary
Ann Smith in Huntington
Twp, Adams County, serving
as a domestic servant. In
1900 Ezra was on his own
farm (the 206 acre property
of his father Daniel near
Heidlersburg which fronted
the north side of Rock Valley
Rd near the intersection with
Company Farm Rd.), which
he owned without mortgage.
Emma died on March 3, 1899 from pneumonia and was buried at Upper Bermudian Church. Ezra
never remarried. His eldest daughter, Estella, then eighteen years old, raised the younger
children while their father and Willis worked the farm. 179 By 1910, Ezra was living by himself on
the farm. Due to his illness, Ezra was forced
to spend time living with his children.
Willis and his wife refused to house Ezra so
the other three living children shared the
duty. In 1920 he was living with Myrna.
Ezra died from a heart condition at 6:30
PM on May 8, 1927 at the home of his
daughter Myrna near Roudebush's Mill in
Tyrone Township. 180 Funeral services were
held at the Upper Bermudian Church
where he was buried alongside his wife
and his two infant children.
Ezra and Margaret Walker had the following child:
i.
Myrtle L (June 1869 April 20, 1935) m. Henry Edward Lerew
Ezra and Emma Cooley had the following children:
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.

Mary Estella (March31, 1881 August 9, 1968) m. Ernest Mervin Bittinger


Willis Ivan (October 10, 1883 November 19, 1975) m1 Amy C Bittinger; m2 Helen
Nelson
Bertie Julie May Gula (April 24, 1887 April 4, 1888)
Horace Ezra (August 16, 1889 March 14, 1890)

179

Ty Bream, A Brief History of the Bream Family, (unpublished, 2000), 8

180

Ty Bream, A Brief History of the Bream Family, (unpublished, 2000), 9

IV-6.18

vi.
vii.

Harry Samuel (June 20, 1892 November 11, 1991) m. Kathryn Mae Taughinbaugh
Myrna Mazell (September 16, 1897 September 22, 1993) m. James Hiram Heller

All of Ezras children remained in Adams County.


6.7 Emma Frances Bream (1849 1930)
Emma (Amy) Bream was born on February 3,
1849. She was baptized on June 10, 1849 at
Trinity Lutheran Church in York Springs.
Emma never married.
In 1880 Emma was still living on the family
farm with her mother, brother Ezra and her
sister Mary. Emma was living independently in
Tyrone Twp with her sister Mary in 1900, 1910
and 1920. In 1930 Emma was living with her
brother Ira in Carlisle. Emma died on April 4,
1930 and was buried in Upper Bermudian
Church Cemetery.
6.8 Mary Catherine Bream (1852 1925)
Mary Catherine Bream was born on December
7, 1852. She was baptized on June 9, 1851 at
Trinity Lutheran Church in York Springs. Mary
never married.
In 1880 Mary was still living on the family farm
with her mother, brother Ezra and her sister
Emma. Mary was living in Tyrone Twp with her
sister Emma in 1900, 1910 and 1920. Mary died
December 8, 1925 and was buried in Upper
Bermudian Church Cemetery.

6.9 Howard Bream (1853 1919)


Howard Bream was born on July 15, 1853. He was baptized on October 9, 1853 at Trinity
Lutheran Church in York Springs. Howard married Rosanna Margaret Miller on February 8,
1876. Rosanna was born on March 12, 1859. She was the daughter of James and Harriet (UNK)
Miller. Rosannas brother Elmer Herr Miller married Laura A Bream, the daughter of Jeremiah
and Elizabeth (Meals) Bream (see Section IV-5.3).
Howard was a farmer who lived in Tyrone Twp through at least 1900. He moved to Straban Twp
sometime prior to 1910. Howard died on April 8, 1919 after being trampled by a mule team and
crushed by a roller. Rosanna was seriously injured in the accident. Rosanna died on July 1, 1923.
Both are buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg, PA.

IV-6.19

Howard and Rosanna had the following children:


i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.

Magnertus (May 11, 1878 May 18, 1878)


Cora Amelia (April 9, 1879 February 16, 1962) m. George E Cleveland
Effie Jane (June 16, 1880 March 20, 1969) m. Jefferson Claude Cassett
Harriet Naomi I (October 8, 1881 November 17, 1916) m. Mervin Uriah Topper
Emory Ellsworth (February 18, 1883 November 14, 1929) m. Ella Viola Shanebrook
Harvey D (December 27, 1884 November 1954) m. Emma S Orndorff
Oscar Howard (October 24, 1886 UNK) m. Mary E Haner
Franklin C (January 25, 1889 November 13, 1948) m. Bessie Blanche Geisler
James Roy (September 8, 1890 April 18, 1891)
Edna Mary Elizabeth (March 27, 1892 December 27, 1974) m. John David Eckert
Goldie S (January 4, 1894 March 8, 1920) m. Howard E Eckert
Archie William (March 23, 1902 April 19, 1976) m. Annie Catherine Mickey

Most of Howard and Rosannas children remained in Adams County. Harvey had moved to
Franklin County by 1920. Oscar was living in Gettysburg in 1920 working as a laborer in a
furniture factory. By 1930 he was managing a farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Archie was
living with his brother-in-law Jefferson Cassett in 1920. In 1930 he was confined in the Adams
County Prison for larceny. He was living in McSherrystown at the time of his death.
6.10 Rev. Ira Franklin Bream (1855 1952)
Ira Franklin Bream was born on November 12, 1855. He was baptized on April 1, 1856 at Trinity
Lutheran Church in York Springs. Ira married Naomi (Nannie) Elizabeth Meals on July 31, 1889.
Naomi was born on September 7, 1862. She was the daughter of William B and Maria (Shaeffer)
Meals.
Ira was a Lutheran Minister who moved to Carlisle, Cumberland County prior to 1900. He
originally planned a career as a teacher preparing at the Select School in East Berlin after
attending Chestnut Hill School. He taught at Chestnut Hill School for three years before
enrolling in Gettysburg College (then Pennsylvania College) where he graduated in 1887. He
graduated from the Lutheran Theological Seminary in 1890 accepting the West End Charge in
Bedford and Somerset Counties where he preached for one year. In 1891 he became pastor of the
Lower Frankford Church in Cumberland County where he remained for 28 years. His last
pastorate was at McAllisterville where he preached from 1919 until his retirement in 1929. He
was known as the marrying parson of Cumberland County.
Naomi died on March 24, 1942. Ira died on October 22, 1952. Both are buried in Westminster
Cemetery in Carlisle.

IV-6.20

Ira and Naomi had the following children:


i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.

Lottie Blanche (October 20, 1890 November 13, 1890)


Edna Grace (October 15, 1891 October 6, 1958) never married
Emma Lucille (November 16, 1893 February 1978) m. Mark Sheldon Dietrich
Luther Franklin (May 3, 1895 March 1977) m. Martha C Shaeffer
Rev. Edward Grant (January 6, 1897 May 15, 1970) m1 Sue Musser, m2 Sara
Elizabeth Sweigert
Kathryn Marian (March 17, 1899 August 1986) m. John Nissley Ulrich

IV-6.21

7.

Seventh Generation - Children of Ezra Bream and Emma Cooley

7.1 Myrtle L Bream (1869 1935)


Myrtle Bream was born in June of 1869. She married Henry (Harry) Edward Lerew in 1894.
Henry was born in September of 1858. He was the son of Daniel and Lydia (Dick) Lerew.
Henry was living as a journeyman with B F Livelsberger in Straban Twp in 1880. He took up
farming and moved to Huntington Twp by 1900. He moved to Straban Twp by 1910 where he
continued farming until his death on November 29, 1932. He is buried in the New Oxford
Cemetery. Myrtle died on April 20, 1935 and is buried in the New Oxford Cemetery.
Henry and Myrtle had the following children:
i.
ii.

Margaret A (June 1895 July 6, 1947) m. John Clair Sanders


Helen Weidner, foster daughter (1909 UNK) m. C J Lease

Daughter Margaret and husband John Clair Sanders lived with Henry and Myrtle from 1920
through at least 1930. Margaret was a teacher who taught in Adams County and Hanover. They
had one child, a son named Clare Lerew Sanders who died in April of 1947 without any children.
7.2 Mary Estella Bream (1881 1968)
Estella Bream was born on March 31, 1881. She married Ernest Mervin Bittinger April 6, 1902.
Ernest was born on July 2, 1880. He was the son of Ananias and Elmira (Grammer) Bittinger and
the brother of Amy Bittinger who married Estella Breams brother Willis (see Section 7.3).
Ernest was a farmer who lived in Menallen Twp from sometime prior to 1910 through at least 1930.
Ernest died on February 10, 1965 and is buried in the Greenmount Cemetery in Arentsville.
Estella died on August 9, 1968 and is buried in the Greenmount Cemetery in Arentsville.
Ernest and Estella had the following children:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.

Myrna Elmira (1903 June 6, 1939) m. Harvey L Kline


Myrtle M (May 9, 1904 September 2, 1992), never married
LeRoy M (September 17, 1905 September 1974) m. Margie L Chronister
Amy O (February 1916 March 1916)
Bruce W (December 10, 1918 January 10, 1952) m. Clara M Harbaugh

Daughter Myrna and husband Harvey Kline had moved to Franklin County by 1930.
7.3 Willis Ivan Bream (1882 1975)
Willis Bream was born on October 10, 1883. He married Amy C Bittinger in 1910. Amy was born
in 1888. She was the daughter of Ananias and Elmira (Grammer) Bittinger and the sister of Ernest
Bittinger who married Willis Breams sister Estella (see Section 7.2).
Willis was a farmer. In 1910 he was a farm laborer living with Eliza Bowers. He was farming on his
own in Tyrone Twp by 1920 and in Butler Twp by 1930. Amy died on January 1, 1960 and is
IV-7.1

buried in Biglerville Cemetery. Following Amys death Willis married Helen Nelson. Willis died
on November 19, 1975 in Florida and is buried in the Biglerville Cemetery.
Willis and Amy had the following child:
i.

Anna M (September 21, 1911 August 30, 1988) m. UNK Gaither

7.4 Bertie Julie May Gula Bream (1887 - 1888)


Gula was born on April 24, 1887. She died on April 4, 1888 from measles and is buried at Upper
Bermudian Church. Her name is also given as Bertie Zula May.

7.5 Horace Ezra Bream (1889 1890)


Horace was born on August 16, 1889. He died on March 14, 1890 from measles and is buried at
Upper Bermudian Church.

IV-7.2

7.6 Harry Samuel Bream (1892 1991)


Harry Bream was born on June 20, 1892 in Chestnut Hill near Heidelersberg. He was baptized
on July 11, 1893 in Carlisle by his uncle Rev. Ira Bream (see Section IV-6.10).

Harry was a farmer and a teacher. He attended Chestnut Hill Elementary School, the Perkiomen
Academy near Valley Forge, the Cumberland Valley State Normal School at Shippensburg and
Gettysburg College. He received his teaching certification from Shippensburg University, and a
Diploma from the Teacher Training department of the Pennsylvania State Sabbath School on
May 29, 1924.

IV-7.3

Harry taught school for 41 years, retiring in 1956. Throughout most of his life, he taught full-time
and did farm work during the summers. In his younger days, he worked summers on relative's
farms. 181 Later he worked his own self-sufficient farm.
Harry was married to Kathryn Mae Taughinbaugh. He had met Kathryn at a local mill. 182

181

Ty Bream, A Brief History of the Bream Family, (unpublished, 2000), 9

182

Ibid, 9

IV-7.4

Kathryn was the daughter of William David and Rosa Anna (Raffensberger) Taughinbaugh. She
was born on July 20, 1892. She attended Hunterstown School and at 18 completed the Course of
Studies in the Common Branches.

Harry and Kathryn were married on November 23, 1916 by Rev. W D Nicoll. The wedding took
place at St. Pauls The Pines Lutheran Church in New Chester, Straban Twp.

At the time of his wedding, Harry was residing in Mt Pleasant Twp, Adams County and was
teaching at Swift Run School. They resided with Kathryn's parents in Hunterstown after the
wedding. In 1920 Harry and his family were living on their own in Straban Twp. In 1930 he and
his family were living in Hamilton Twp where he also served as a township assessor for several
years.
Later in life Harry owned a farm located in Hunterstown, Straban Twp on the northwestern corner
of Hunterstown-Hampton Rd and Red Bridge Rd, near Beaverdam Creek. In 1872 the farm was
owned by George Grass. The hotel across the street was owned by J.L. Grass.

IV-7.5

Harry and Kathryn celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary in 1966.

When Harry retired from teaching and farming he moved to Biglerville. On May 30, 1968, shortly
after moving, Kathryn died. Harry died on November 11, 1991. Both Harry and Kathryn are buried in
the The Pines Cemetery in New Chester, near their sons Clyde and Harold.

IV-7.6

Harry and Kathryn had the following children:


i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.

Clyde William (November 29, 1917 December 2, 1917)


Maurice Ezra (March 21, 1919 Living) m. Viola Catherine Fiscel
Kathryn Elizabeth (January 27, 1921 Living) m. Henry Albert Weikert
Harold Eugene (November 4, 1923 July 16, 1975) m. Helen Hensley
Myrna Irene (October 3, 1929 Living) m. Clarence Leroy Schwartz

7.7 Myrna Mazell Bream (1897 1993)


Myrna Bream was born on September 16, 1897. She married James Hiram Heller in March of 1921.
James was born on May 6, 1889. He was the son of Hiram and Mary E (Mummert) Heller. James
great-great grandfather, Christian George Forney, was the brother of Marx Forney. Marx was the
father-in-law of Jacob H Bream (see Section IV-5.4).
James was a fruit farmer who was living in Tyrone Twp in 1930. James died on January 13, 1968
and is buried in the Biglerville Cemetery. Myrna died September 22, 1993 and is buried in the
Biglerville Cemetery.

IV-7.7

James and Myrna did not have any children.

IV-7.8

V.

APPENDICES

Page A-1

Appendix 1 Ancestors of Catherine UNKNOWN wife of Heinrich Bream


The origins of Catherines family are unknown.

Page A-1.1

Appendix 2 Ancestors of UNKNOWN wife of Jacob Bream


The identity of Jacobs wife is unknown.

Page A-2.1

Appendix 3 Ancestors of Barbara Leathers wife of Henry Bream


Barbara Leathers was born sometime prior to 1755 in York County. She was the daughter of
Frederick Leathers and Barbara Strickler (sp?). She married Henry Bream, son of Jacob Bream
and UNKNOWN. She died between 1820 and 1830 in Tyrone Twp, Adams County.
1. Parents Frederick Leathers and Barbara Strickler
Frederick Leathers was born ~1729 in York County. He was the son of Frederick Leder and Anne
Elizabeth UNKNOWN. Barbara Strickler was born ~1732. She died in 1769. Nothing is known
about her ancestors.
After his fathers death in 1749, Frederick lived with Martin Eichelberger (Frederick was about 17
at the time). He married Barbara Strickler around 1753. On January 26, 1753 Martin
Eichelberger along with George Swoope transferred all of their rights and title to a 100 acre
property in Dover Twp, York County to Frederick for 160 pounds. 183 The warrant on this property
was transferred to Frederick on January 6, 1772.
In addition, Frederick obtained the rights to several other properties in Dover Twp which brought
his total land holdings to about 400 acres. 184 He received a survey for 223 acres on February 21,
1758. The patent for this property was issued to his son John Leather for 248 acres on July 7, 1812.
On January 6, 1772 he received a warrant for 100 acres called Stony Hill and 100 acres called
Piney Ridge.
Frederick's
properties
bordered the east side of
the Conewago Creek
where the Bermudian
Creek enters.
The
property was within
approximately one mile
of Jacob Breams (Henry
Breams father) farm in
Warrington
Twp.
Frederick occupied this
property from about 1753
until approximately 1790,
when he moved to
Halfmoon Twp in Centre
County, Pennsylvania.
Frederick served in the American Revolution with the 3rd Battalion, 2nd Company of the
Lancaster Militia. He is listed as inactive status.

183

Hively, Dover and Conewago Townships, 73, 88

184

Ibid, 88

Page A-2.1

Frederick died in 1796 in Centre County, Pennsylvania. His Will was probated on December 14,
1796 in Bald Eagle Twp, Centre County. Executors were his second wife Jane and James
Williamson. His will mentions his wife, sons Frederick, Jacob, John, and Daniel, and his daughters
Barbara, Mary, and Susannah.
Fredericks wife Barbara is
probably buried in York
County. Frederick is buried
in Sand Hill Cemetery,
Howard Twp, Centre County,
Pennsylvania. His gravestone
is no longer standing, but
many Leathers are buried in
the cemetery.

2. Grandparents
2.1 Frederick Leder and Anne Elizabeth UNKNOWN
Barbaras grandfather Frederick (Leder) was a Mennonite who emigrated, possibly from
Switzerland via Germany, on August 19, 1728 on the ship Mortenhouse (John Coultas, Master). 185
Frederick was born around 1691 in Germany or possibly Switzerland. He married Anne Elizabeth
UNKNOWN around 1728 in Germany. She was born around 1707 in Germany.
Frederick was one of the early settlers in Kreutz Creek Valley receiving a Warrant for 300 acres
in Manchester Twp, York County on October 30, 1736. 186 This land was located on Codorus
Creek, north of York in the area surrounding Blackbridge Rd roughly between the intersections
of Point Dr and Toronita St.
Frederick died on September 30, 1746 in Manchester Twp, York County. His children were all
still minors at his death. His wife Anne Elizabeth died shortly thereafter in 1749. Frederick died
without a will. His children were present in Orphan's Court in Lancaster County on June 6,
1749. 187

185

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 18

186

Hively, The Manor of Springettsbury,, 113

187

Edward N Wevodau. Abstracts of Lancaster County. PA, Orphans Court Records, 1742-1767. (Apollo, PA, 2001). 16

Page A-2.2

Appendix 4 Ancestors of Catherine Phlieger wife of Jacob Bream


Maria Catherine (Katy) Phlieger, daughter of Jacob Phlieger and Anna Maria Catherine Trout,
was born on August 18, 1780 in York County, Pennsylvania. She was christened on October 29,
1780 in Christ Evangelical Church, York, Pennsylvania. Catherine married Jacob Bream
sometime prior to 1797. Catherine died on October 5, 1850 in Tyrone Twp, and was buried in
Upper Bermudian Cemetery.
1. Parents Jacob Phlieger and Anna Maria Catherine Trout
Jacob Phlieger was born ~1732 in York County. He was the son of Hans Georg Frederick Phlieger
and Eve UNKNOWN. Jacob married Anna Maria Catherine Trout on February 25, 1755. They
were married by Rev. John Samuel Schwerdtfeger in Candochly Union Church, York County.
Anna Maria Catherine was born on June 10, 1736 in Hoffenheim, Sinsheim/Elsenz, Germany. She
was probably the daughter of Jacob Trout and Maria Eva UNKNOWN. She emigrated with her
parents on the ship Jacob, Captain Adolph De Grove on October 2, 1749.
Jacob Phlieger was living in North Codorus Twp, York County by 1766. 188 He received a
Warrant for 250 acres in York Twp on December 19, 1766 called "Catharina". Much of this
property was passed down
to his son-in-law Samuel
Weiser. Jacobs property
was at the intersection of the
West and South branches of
Codorus Creek and was
surrounded by Codorus
Creek on 3 sides. The
property is bisected by the
present day Days Mill Rd,
near where it intersects with
Croll School Rd. and is
crossed by the Stewartstown
Railroad. His land adjoined
property of Simon Minnich,
Henry
Schaeffer,
and
Baltzer Spangler.
Jacob died in May of 1800. His wife preceded him in death. Jacob died intestate. An orphan
court petition of his son Jacob mentions his sons George, Jacob, Philip (now deceased), Frederick,
Michael, John and Berhnard, and daughters Eve (wife of Samuel Weiser), Peggy (wife of Jacob
Smith), Mary (wife of Jacob Diehl), and Catherine (wife of Jacob Braim).

188

Hively, The Manor of Springettsbury,, 82

Page A-4.1

2. Grandparents
2.1 Hans Georg Frederick Phlieger and Eve
Hans Georg Frederick Phlieger was born in 1703 in Germany. He was the son of Hans Jerg
Phluger and UNKNOWN. He married Eve UNKNOWN in Germany. George Frederick and his
wife and children emigrated on August 16, 1731
aboard the ship Samuel (Hugh Percy,
Commander). 189 They were settled in the Kreutz
Creek region of York County by 1737. 190
Georges signature upon immigration 191

George Frederick died in York County around 1759. The date of death of his wife Eve is not
known.
2.2 Jacob Trout and Maria Eva UNKNOWN
Jacob Trout, the son of Adam Traud and Anna Catherine Geisler, was born on July 14, 1709 in
Elsenz, Germany. Jacob married Maria Eva UNKNOWN on May 24, 1735. He emigrated with
his wife and children on the ship Jacob, Captain Adolph De Grove on October 2, 1749. The
emigrants on this ship were listed as coming from Swabia, Wirtemberg and Darmstadt Germany.

189

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 40

190

Hively, The Manor of Springettsbury,, 27

191

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 2. 33

Page A-4.2

Appendix 5 Ancestors of Mary Arnold wife of Daniel Bream


Mary was born on January 11, 1813 in York County. She was the daughter of George Arnold and
Georges second wife Maria Carl. Mary was married to Daniel Bream by Rev. Jonathan Oswalt on
December 26, 1836 at the home of her mother in York County. Mary died at 2:30 AM on June 12,
1890. She was buried in Upper Bermudian Cemetery.
1. Parents George Arnold and Maria Carl
George Arnold was born in York County on November 17, 1764. He was the son of Peter Arnold
and Anna Margreth UNKOWN. George first married Gloria Asper around 1798. He then
married Maria Carl around 1805 following Glorias death. Maria was born July 22, 1777. Her
origins are unknown.
In 1798 George was listed with property of 174 acres in Warrington Twp, York County adjacent to
land of William Nelson. 192 On the proprty was a 1-story log house (24x20 ft), a second "old" log
house (38x18 ft), a wood and stone barn (40x20 ft) and 1 round log barn (40x20 ft). Following the
death of his father, George purchased the inheritance rights of his brothers and sisters, and with
his mother's permission, sold the family farm in 1801. He purchased a farm in Franklin Township
containing 278 acres adjoining lands of John Rucks, Henry Hikes, G. P. Arnold and others. At his
death George owned two tracts of land in Franklin Twp, York County ~66 acres adjoining lands
of John Horting, George Byers, John Bloper, Heirs of Abraham Heikes, and an adjoining tract of
126 acres which adjoined property of his brother George P, Heirs of Henry Heikes, Henry Heikes,
Hoke, John Heikes. This land may have been part of the original Warrant to George Heigas
known as "Long Swamp".

This land was located roughly south of Franklin Church, near the intersection of Franklin
Church Rd and Willow Glen Rd.

192

1798 Direct Tax List for Warrington Twp, York County

Page A-5.1

George died on August 16, 1824 and was buried at


Franklin Church. Maria died on June 19, 1830. Her
place of burial is unknown. George died intestate
leaving a widow and eleven children. Administrators
of his estate were Peter and George Arnold, his eldest
sons. A petition of son-in-law John Livelsberger
named George's 11 surviving children: Peter, Hannah
(wife of George Klugh), George, Rebecca (wife of
Michael Dutry), John, Catharine, Samuel, Mary,
Susanna, Benjamin, and Martin. 193
In 1825, following her husband Georges death, Maria
petitioned the Orphan's Court to appoint Martin
Carl, probably her brother, as guardian of her
daughter Mary. 194 In April of 1831, when she turned
18, Mary petitioned the Orphans Court for a change
in guardian from Michael Carl to Michael Duttery
who was the husband of Marys sister Rebecca.
2. Grandparents
2.1 Peter Arnold and Anna Margreth UNKOWN
Peter was born in Pfalz, Bavaria, Germany around 1732. He was the son of Nicholas Arnold and
UNKNOWN. Peter emigrated on the ship St. Andrew on September 14, 1751. 195 He originally
settled in Montgomery County, moving
first to Northampton County and then on to
Huntington Twp, Adams County in 1764
Peters signature upon emigration 196
where he purchased land from Michael
193

Estate file for George Arnold, York County Historical Society

194

Ibid

195

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 457

196

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 2. 536

Page A-5.2

Torerbaugh. He was active in Lower Bermudian Lutheran Church appearing on the communion
list as early as 1765. 197 He served as deacon in the church in 1769. He served with the 2nd
Batallion, 6th Company of the Lancaster Militia during the Revolutionary War. He died in 1795.
His wife Anna Margreth died after 1801. They are both likely buried in Lower Bermudian
Cemetery although no markers have been found. After his death, Peters property in Huntington
Twp was sold to David McMillan for 1100. Peters will was probated on March 6, 1795 in
Warrington Twp. 198 Andrew Roose and Elihu Underwood Esqr. were the executors. Witnesses
were Jacob Cook and Peter Arnold. Peters will mentions nine children, Catharine (Detter), John,
George Peter, Margret (Reiber), John George, Christiana (Underwood), Peter, Elizabeth and
Nicholas.

197

Wright, Adams County Church Records. 43

198

F Edward Wright. Abstracts of York County, Pennsylvania Wills 1749-1819. (Westminister, MD, 2000). 148

Page A-5.3

Appendix 6 Ancestors of Emma Cooley wife of Ezra Bream


Emma was born on March 12, 1848 to Samuel Amos and Lydia A (Johnston) Cooley. Emma
married Ezra Bream on October 26, 1876. Emma died March 3, 1899 from pneumonia and was
buried at Upper Bermudian Church.
1. Parents Samuel Amos Cooley and Lydia A Johnston
Samuel was born in Tyrone Twp on November 7, 1834. He was the son of David and Elizabeth
(Nitschmann) Cooley. Samuel was a shoemaker. He was 5 foot 6 inches tall with a dark
complexion, hazel eyes and dark hair. 199 He married Lydia A Johnston. Lydia was born on
November 18, 1835 in Warrington Twp. She was christened May 27, 1843 at the Lutheran Church
in Rossville, Warrington Twp. Lydia was the daughter of Benjamin Johnston and Sarah
UNKNOWN.
Samuel served in the civil war, first with Company F of the 165th Pennsylvania Infantry and then
with Company K of the 184th Pennsylvania Infantry with which he fought at Cold Harbor,
Virginia in 1864 as part of the 2nd Corp of the Army of the Potomac. With Samuel in Company F
of the 165th were his brother Philip and Ezra Breams cousins Marks and William Bream (sons of
Jacob H and Susanna (Forney) Bream; see section IV-5.4).
Lydia died on April 25, 1860. She was buried at Upper Bermudian Church. Samuel and Lydias
only surviving child was Emma. Samuel was remarried to Elizabeth Stevens with whom he had 11
additional children. Samuel died on July 29, 1915 and was buried in the Lutheran Church
Cemetery in Wenksville.

199

Federal Pension File for Samuel Cooley, National Archives

Page A-6.1

2. Grandparents
2.1 David Cooley and Elizabeth Nitschmann
David was born in Tyrone Twp on February 7, 1790. He was the son of David Cooley and
Margaret UNKNOWN. David married Elizabeth Nitschmann. Neither Elizabeths date of birth
nor her origins are known although there is circumstantial evidence that she may be descended
from Martin Nitschmann, a Moravian born on March 19, 1713 in Zauchtenthal, Moravia,
Czechoslovakia. He immigrated to New York with a colony of Moravians on the ship Irene on
May 12, 1749 as did his wife Susanna Weicht although they weren't married until after they
arrived in America (married June 15, 1749). Martin died on November 26, 1755 at the
Gnadenhutten Massacre. His wife Susanna died ~1766 in Indian captivity near Tioga,
Pennsylvania. Martins son John was living in Reading Twp, Adams County by 1780. Another
John Nitschmann, possibly Johns son, was living in Tyrone Twp in 1820 near to David Cooley.
David Cooley owned land in Tyrone
Twp that adjoined, on its eastern
boundary, the land owned by Henry
Bream (transferred to his son John
Bream; see Section IV-3.2). This land
was located on the north side of
Cranberry Rd, just west of the
intersection with Funt Rd.

David died on July 14, 1856. Elizabeth died February on 23, 1872. Both are buried at Upper
Bermudian Church.

Page A-6.2

2.2 Benjamin Johnston and Sarah UNKNOWN


Benjamin was born around 1810-12. His wife Sarah was born around 1814. Benjamin's origins are
unclear. He and wife Sarah were living in Warrington Twp, York County in 1840. Five of their
children were baptized in the Lutheran Church in Rossville, Warrington Twp in 1843 although
they were born in earlier years. In 1850 the family had moved to Dickinson Twp, Cumberland
County where they remained. Several of their children were living with William Johnston and
wife in Montour Twp, Madison County Pennsylvania. Sarah died between 1850 and 1860.
Benjamin died between 1870 and 1880.
3. Great-Grandparents
3.1 David Cooley and Margaret UNKNOWN
David was probably born sometime after 1768. He died in 1792 in Menallen Twp. He was married
to Margaret whose name appears in the probate records for Davids property after his death. 200
Their children were minors although they are not named. It is possible that David may be the son
of William Cooley who was also living in Menallen Twp.

200

Estate file for David Cooley, Adams County Historical Society

Page A-6.3

Appendix 7 Ancestors of Kathryn Taughinbaugh wife of Harry Bream


Kathryn was born on July 20, 1892. She was the daughter of William David and Rosa Anna
(Raffensberger) Taughinbaugh. Kathryn married Harry Bream on November 23, 1916 at St. Pauls
The Pines Lutheran Church in New Chester. They were married by Rev. W D Nicoll. Kathryn
died on May 30, 1968.
1. Parents William David Taughinbaugh and Rosa Anna Raffensberger.
William David Taughinbaugh was born in Straban Twp in July of 1865. He was the son of
Jeremiah and Ann Marie (Minnich) Taughinbaugh. William married Rosa Anna Taughinbaugh
in 1891. Rosa Anna was born in Straban Twp on October 9, 1869. She was the daughter of George
Mummert and Catherine B (Jacobs) Raffensberger.
William spent most of
his life as a farmer. His
farm was located in
Straban Twp on the
south side of Pine Tree
Rd, near the intersection
with
HunterstownHampton Rd. This land
was the northern tract of
his father Jeremiahs
property which William
bought
at
public
auction on August 17,
1901 for $2353.05. 201

The last 17 years of Williamss life were spent as a merchant. Rosa Anna was employed as a
merchant for 35 years. She was Brethren and was a member of Mummerts Meeting House. She
was also a member of The Home Department at The Pines Church.
William died at 10 PM on the evening of
June 7, 1933 and was buried at The Pines
Cemetery. Rev J Harold Little presided at
his funeral. Rosa Anna died at 7:55 PM on
the evening of February 4, 1951. Rev J.M.
Danner of Mummerts Meeting House and
Rev Samuel Clarke presided at her
funeral.

201

Estate file for William Taughinbaugh, Adams County Historical Society

Page A-7.1

2. Grandparents
2.1 Jeremiah Taughinbaugh and Ann Marie Minnich
Jeremiah Taughinbaugh was born in Straban Twp on February 2, 1819. He was the son of Nicholas
and Margaret (Leas) Taughinbaugh. Jeremiah was married to Ann Marie Minnich by Rev John
Ulrich on December 24, 1846. Ann Marie was born in Menallen Twp on March 22, 1822. She was
the daughter of George and Elizabeth (Schlosser) Minnich.
Jeremiah was a farmer in
Straban Twp. His farm was
located on the northwest
corner of the intersection of
the Hunterstown-Hampton
Rd and Coleman and Swift
Run Rds. Upon Jeremiahs
death, his sons John L and
William D were granted
Letters of Administration on
his estate. Both petitioned
the Orphan's Court for
permission to bid on
Jeremiah's two properties at
the public sale held August
17, 1901. John L bought the property to the south, fronting the Hunterstown-Hampton Rd.
William D purchased the land on the north side of John L's.
Following the death of Ann Marie, Jeremiah was remarried to the widow Jane Little by Rev
G.J.M. Ketner on January 17, 1897. Jeremiah died on March 2, 1901 and Ann Marie died on July 9,
1893. Both are buried in The Pines Cemetery.

Page A-7.2

2.2 George Mummert Raffensberger and Catherine B Jacobs


George Mummert Raffensberger was born in Paradise Twp, York County on April 24, 1844. He
was the son of Martin and Sarah Ann (Mummert) Raffensberger. He was 5 feet 1 1/4 inches with a
fair complexion, brown hair and brown eyes. 202
Both of Georges parents died while he was still a minor. George went to live with his uncle
Samuel Mummert who was named Georges guardian. George attended school at Pine Run,
Hamilton Twp. He clerked in a store at Abottstown for several years and at age 18 enlisted in
Company L of the 16th PA Cavalry with his cousin John S Mummert (John was in Company H of
the 16th PA Cavalry). He mustered in on October 28, 1862 in Harrisburg. He was discharged due
to a hernia on April 10, 1863. He had served for ~3 months when, returning from picket duty
around March 1, 1863, he was thrown forward on the pummel of the saddle and disabled (listed on
1883 pension record as "disease of abdominal viscera"). He continued driving wagons for the army
in Washington for the duration of the war. His discharge papers describe him as having a feeble
constitution and not strong enough for a soldier.
Following the war, George
was married to Catherine
B Jacobs by Rev Adam
Brown on September 18,
1866. Catherine was born
in Warrington Twp on
January 14, 1839. She was
the daughter of William
and Elizabeth (Brown)
Jacobs.
George and
Catherine had a farm
located in Hunterstown on
the west side of Milhimes
Rd, midway between the
Hunterstown-Hampton
Rd and Swift Run Rd.
George died on February 26,
1923. He was buried on
March 1, 1923 at Mummerts
Meeting House. Catherine
died on February 21, 1927.
She was buried on February
27, 1927 at Mummerts
Meeting House.

202

Federal Pension File for George Raffensberger, National Archives

Page A-7.3

3. Great-Grandparents
3.1 Nicholas Taughinbaugh and Margaret Leas
Nicholas Taughinbaugh was born in Tyrone Twp on April 17, 1775. He was the son of Mathias and
Anna (Kurz) Taughinbaugh. On September 22, 1804 Nicholas married Margaret Leas, the
daughter of John and Sophia (Ziegler) Leas. Margaret was born in Reading Twp on October 21,
1786.
Nicholas moved to Straban Twp
sometime prior to 1810. He
received a survey for 75 acres in
Straban Twp on January 17,
1822 located on the north side
of the Hunterstown-Hapton Rd,
bordering the west side of the
town of New Chester. This
property adjoined lands of
Jacob Myers, Daniel Deardorff,
Henry Martzall, George Horn,
Abraham Fickes and the town
of New Chester on the east side.
His son Theodore occupied the
land after Nicholas's death.
Nicholas died on September 6, 1847 and is buried in the Pines Cemetery. Following Nicholass
death, Margaret was living with her children Mary Ann, Margaret and Theodore. A note in the
census listings for 1850 indicates they were living in the temperance house. By 1870 Margaret was
living with Jacob Sanders and wife. Margaret died on January 14, 1873 and is buried beside her
husband in The Pines cemetery.

Page A-7.4

3.2 George Minnich and Elizabeth Schlosser


George Minnich was born in Menallen Twp on July 22, 1793. He was the son of Michael and
Catharine (Nehlig) Minnich. George married Elizabeth Schlosser. Elizabeth was born in Menallen
Twp on November 8, 1800. She was the daughter of Peter and Maria Elizabeth (Baer) Schlosser.
George died on May 29, 1875. He died intestate. Elizabeth renounced her right to act as
administrator and asked to have son-in-laws Jeremiah Taughinbaugh and Joseph Wolf
appointed executors. 203 This petition mentions George and Elizabeths children Leah (wife of
Jacob Eppelman), Ann Maria (wife of Jeremiah Taughinbaugh), Ann Caroline (wife of John B
Hoffman), Ann Eliza (wife of Joseph Wolf) and Elizabeth J (wife of S Adam Burkholder). At his
death George possessed 7 separate properties, all in Menallen Twp:
1.

House and lot on Main Street Bendersville adjacent to GP House, Samuel Burkholder and
Nancy Morrison with a 2-story brick house, woodhouse and storehouse. This lot was
purchased by Robert Wickersham. The property was located at the convergence of the
Aspers-Bendersville Rd and Rampike Hill Rd at the square in Bendersville.

2. A tract located on the State Rd composed of two tracts, one of 17 acres purchased from
Cornelius Rice and Sarah Jane and one of 16 perches purchased from George McGrail
which bordered lands of Cornelius Rice, George McGrail, School Lot, Daniel and Amos
Rice, and Barbara Hoffman (widow). The land was improved with a 2-story weather
boarded house and a frame stable. This tract was purchased by Eliza Wolf. This property
may have been located just north of Bendersville on the Opossum Creek just off the
Bendersville-Wenksville Rd north of the intersection with Creek Rd. This may have been
the location of Georges father Michael Minnich's land.
3. 18 acres adjoining lands of George Elder, Luther Cashman and Henry Eppleman. The
tract, purchased from Henry Eppleman and Eliza, was all arable except for a small portion
of woodland and was improved with a small shop. This property was purchased by Henry
Eppleman. This property was possibly located near Aspers.
4. 12 acres on Whitestown Rd composed of two tracts, one of 8 acres purchased from Henry
Eppleman (administrator of John Eppelman deceased) and one of 4 acres purchased from
Amos Schlosser and Catharine. This was all tillable land containing an apple orchard
adjoining lands of Samuel Johnson, Edward Blocher, Dr EW Mumma and Daniel Peters.
This plot was purchased by EC Blocker. The location has not been identified.
5. A quarter-acre lot in Bendersville bounded on the south by Henry Crum and by Elisha
Penrose and on the east and north by public alleys improved with a frame barn and hog
pen. This lot was purchased by Robert Wickersham. The location has not been identified.
6. Lot in Bendersville of 40 square ft adjoining lands of Dr EW Mumma, Samuel Brame and
public alleys improved with a stone springhouse. This lot was purchased by Robert
Wickersham. This property was located on the east side of Main St Bendersville, just
north of the square.
7. Lot in Bendersville on Whitestown Rd adjoining lands of Samuel Burkholder on the west,
public alleys on the east and south, and fronting Whitestown Rd, improved with a frame
203

Estate file for George Minnich, Adams County Historical Society

Page A-7.5

stable, a garden and an orchard. This lot was purchased by Elizabeth Minnich. The
location has not been identified.
Elizabeth died on June 13, 1882. She and George are both buried at Bendersville Lutheran
Church.

3.3 Martin Raffensberger and Sarah Ann Mummert


Martin Raffensberger was born in Paradise Twp, York County on August 18, 1815. He was the son
of Martin and Dorthea (Haverstick) Raffensberger. He was still a minor when his father died. His
mother was remarried to Daniel Raffensberger. On January 6, 1835 Martin and his sister
Catharine petitioned the Orphans Court to have their step-father Daniel Raffensberger
appointed as their guardian.
On January 27, 1842 Martin was married to Sarah Ann Mummert by Rev J Albert. Sarah was
born in Hamilton Twp, Adams County in 1817. She was the daughter of George and Rachael
(Miller) Mummert. Sarah died in 1854. Following her death, Martin married Amanda
UNKNOWN. Martin died on January 23, 1859. The burial location of Martin and Sarah has not
been identified. Martins will was written on January 25, 1859. 204 He named his step-father
Daniel Raffensberger as executor. At the Orphans Court on April 12, 1859 Samuel Mummert was
named guardian of Martins sons George and Andrew; Daniel Becker was named guardian of
children Elizabeth and Hiram Clinton.
3.4 William Jacobs and Elizabeth Brown
William Jacobs was born in Paradise Twp, York County on March 15, 1815. William is believed to
be the son of a William Jacobs, but the identity of this father has not been confirmed. His
grandfather may have been Philip Jacobs who was married to Susanna Mummert. William was
married to Elizabeth (Rebecca) Brown on November 14, 1833 at St. Matthew's Lutheran Church,
Hanover Pennsylvania. Elizabeth was born in Reading Twp on June 28, 1815. She was the
daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth (Jacobs) Miller.
204

Estate file for Martin Raffensberger, York County Historical Socirty

Page A-7.6

William had a farm in


Hunterstown, located north of the
Hunterstown-Hampton
Rd
between Milhimes Rd and Sibert
Rd.

Elizabeth died on August 26, 1873 and William died on January 4, 1893. Both are buried at
Hampton Brethren Church. Williams will was probated on January 14, 1893. 205 The executors
were Williams sons William, John and son-in-law George Hykes. Witnesses were Thomas D
McCreary and Charles Rummel. The will names Williams wife Rebecca and children William,
David, John, George, Susan (Hykes), Elizabeth (Zepp), Catharine (Raffensberger), Jacob B, Peter,
Alfred, and Abraham. A prenuptial agreement required the establishment of a trust for Williams
wife Elizabeth of $1000 from which she was to receive the interest proceeds yearly.

4. Great-Great-Grandparents
4.1 Mathias Taughinbaugh and Anna Kurz
Mathias Taughinbaugh was born in New Hanover Twp, Montgomery County Pennsylvania in
1744. He was the son of Martin Dachenbach and Margaretha UNKNOWN. Mathias married
Anna Kurz on March 29, 1767 in New Hanover Twp. Anna was born around 1740. The origins of
her family are not known.
205

Estate file for William Jacobs, Adams County Historical Society

Page A-7.7

Mathias arrived in Adams County sometime prior to 1779. He was listed as "taxable, not sworn" in
the 1779 tax list for Huntington Twp. He appears to not have any land up until 1783 when he is
listed with 6 acres. He was listed in Tyrone Twp in 1786 and Huntington again in 1793. He
remained in Tyrone Twp from 1800 to 1814.
Mathias died around 1814. Anna died on August 6, 1809. Both may have been buried at Upper
Bermudian Church although no stones remain.
4.2 John Leas and Sophia Zeigler
John Leas was born in Adams County on September 10, 1755. He was the son of Leonard and
Sarah (Worley) Leas(t). John married Sophia Zeigler on February 6, 1780 in Hanover,
Pennsylvania. Sophia was born in Codorus Twp, York County on April 13, 1761. She was the
daughter of George and Anna Margaretha (Hamspacher) Zeigler.
In 1798, John owned 188 acres in Huntington Twp adjoining land of Leonard Shimp, valued at
$1034. 206 John served as a private with Captain North, 4th Battalion of Pennsylvania Infantry,
commanded by Major Hezeker in a Regiment commanded by Col. Anthony Wayne, afterwards
General Wayne.
John died on May 20, 1847 and Sophia died on September 16, 1852. Both are buried at Upper
Bermudian Church. Johns will was probated on May 28, 1847 in Tyrone Twp. 207 The executors
were grandson William Taughinbaugh and Jacob King. Witnesses were Nicholas Deatrick and
William Starner. The will mentions Johns wife Sophia, sons William, George, Jacob, Leonard, and
John, and daughters Sally, Mary, Margaret, Susanna, and Elizabeth. Also mentioned are grandsons
David Hartzell, John Taughinbaugh, John L Slaybaugh, John Leas and grandaughters Christina
(daughter of son George), Elizabeth (daughter of son John), and Sophia (daughter of son Jacob)

206

1798 Direct Tax List for Huntington Twp, Adams County Historical Society

207

Estate file for John Leas, Adams County Historical Society

Page A-7.8

4.3 Michael Minnich and Catherine Nehlig


Michael Minnich was born on May 27, 1760, possibly in York County. He was the son of Philip
Simon and Catherine Elisabeth (UNKNOWN) Minnich. Michael may have had a first wife
named Elizabeth Lehman. Michael married Catherine Nehlig on August 16, 1785. Catherine was
born on February 6, 1765. The origins of her family are unknown, but she may be related to the
Nelig family that settled in Whitehall Twp, Northampton County. The original Nelig in this
family was Heinrich. The family mostly remained in that section of Pennsylvania, however a
daughter Eva Maria Margaretha Nehlig married Conrad Schlosser. Conrad as well as his brother
Peter moved to Menallen Twp, and Peter's daughter Elizabeth married Michael Minnich's son
George so there may be an interconnection between these families.
Michael had 168 acres in Menallen Twp
which bordered on Possum Creek. 208
Michael's property was originally
Warranted to John Wright on October
26, 1786 (for 160 acres). The original
Survey was also to John Wright on April
13, 1787 for 167 acres.
Michael
purchased this land from John Wright
on September 27, 1839 for $1.88.
Michael also owned 50 acres on Big
Conewago Creek which was originally
warranted to William Kelsey on April
12, 1771.
Michael sold his farm to his son-in-law
William Rex prior to his death. In 1798
Michael's farm contained a 1-story stone
house (30x25 ft) with 4 windows, a log
barn (60x22 ft) and a smith shop. 209 It
was valued at $1092 and adjoined land
of Christian Lehman (first husband of
Hannah Diehl who remarried Michael Fiscel; see Section IV-5.8). The property was located just
north of Bendersville near Michael Fiscel's mill on the Opossum Creek. This is just off the
Bendersville-Wenksville Rd north of the intersection with Creek Rd.
Michael died on February 14, 1847 and was buried two days later at Benders Church near
Biglerville. Catherine had died on December 10, 1843 and was also buried at Benders Church.
Michael left a will dated June 20, 1843 and codicil dated June 11, 1845 which named his wife
Catharine and children George, Michael, Henry, John, Daniel Catharine (wife of Daniel Rex),
Barbara (wife of John Schlosser), Elizabeth (wife of Jacob Schlosser), Margaret (wife of William
Rex), and Rebecca (wife of David Steiner). 210 Also named were grandsons David, Moses, John, and

208

Pennsylvania Warrant Register W-212. Survey Book Volume D, No. 14, p. 23-24 and Volume D, No. 61, p. 19..

209

1798 Direct Tax List for Menallen Twp, Adams County Historical Society

210

Estate file for Michael Minnich, Adams County Historical Society

Page A-7.9

Michael (Steiner). The will was probated in Adams County on Feburary 18, 1847. The executors
were sons Henry and George. Witnesses were John Eppleman and Daniel Sheffer.

4.4 Peter Schlosser and Maria Elizabeth Baer


Peter Schlosser was born around 1754 in Whitehall Twp, Northampton County. He was the son of
Peter and Catherine (UNKOWN) Schlosser. Peter married Maria Elizabeth Baer on January 6,
1781 at Unionville in Lehigh County. Maria was born on June 15, 1760. The origins of her family
are not known.
Peter served during the Revolutionary War in the Northampton Militia, 2nd Battalion, 8th
Company, 7th Class. He died on June 2, 1841 in Menallen Twp. Maria died on September 29,
1831.
4.5 Martin Raffensberger and Dorothea Haverstick
Martin Raffensberger was born in Paradise Twp, York County on November 16, 1790. He was the
son of Christian and Catherine (Sarbach) Raffensberger. Martin married Dorothea Haverstick.
She was born in Paradise Twp on June 15, 1794 and was the daughter of Philip and Barbara
(Breber) Haverstock.
Martin died on January 21, 1822. On August 5, 1823 his wife Dorothea petitioned the Orphans
Court to appoint Henry Jacobs guardian to all 4 children. 211 This was apparently not completed
because in August 2, 1824 she petitioned to have Michael Shelley appointed guardian to sons
Philip and Martin, and Christian Raffensberger appointed guardian to Christian and Catharine.
On January 6, 1835 Michael Shelley and Christian Raffensperger petitioned to be relieved of
their responsibilities as guardians. The remaining minors Martin and Catharine petitioned to
have their father-in-law Daniel Raffensberger appointed guardian.
211

Estate file for Martin Raffensberger, Adas County Historical Society

Page A-7.10

Dorothea was remarried to Daniel Raffensberger. She died on September 3, 1847. Both she and
Martin are buried at Holschwamm Church in Paradise Twp, York County.

4.6 George Mummert and Rachael Miller


George Mummert was born in Hamilton Twp, Adams County on September 26, 1786. He was the
son of John and Magdalena (UNKNOWN) Mummert. George married Rachel Miller. Rachel was
born in Adams County on February 22, 1789. She was the daughter of Andrew and Annie
(Danner) Miller.
George owned property
located in Hamilton Twp on
Brough Rd near the
intersection with Fox Meadow
Dr.

George died on March 23, 1863. Rachel died on May 11, 1879. Both are buried at Mummerts
Meeting House.

Page A-7.11

4.7 Abraham Brown and Elizabeth Jacobs


Abraham Brown was born in Reading Twp, Adams County on October 8, 1786. He was the son of
Daniel and Susanna (Bosserman) Brown. Abraham married Elizabeth Jacobs. She was born in
Reading Twp on August 10, 1789. She was the daughter of Philip and Susanna (Mummert) Jacobs.
Abraham died on March 30, 1855 in Dover Twp, York County. He is buried at the Bosserman
farm cemetery. Elizabeths date of death is unknown as is her burial location.
5. Great-Great-Great-Grandparents
5.1 Martin Dachenbach and Margaretha UNKNOWN
Martin Dachenbach was born on May 17, 1710 in Germany. The names of his parents are not
known. He emigrated to America on the ship Elizabeth on October 30, 1738. 212 Martin married
Margaretha UNKNOWN probably in America. She was born prior to 1719 and died prior to
1765. He was remarried to Maria Margareth UNKNOWN.
Martin settled in Falckner Swamp, Montgomery County: On December 16, 1750 Martin
announced in Sower's Newspaper that he was located at Falckner Swamp, Montgomery County;
on March 16, 1751, he announced that he was at Falckner Swamp on McCall's land, Douglass Twp,
Montgomery County. 213 Martin died on November 17, 1794 and was buried in the New Hanover
Church Cemetery.
5.2 Leonard Leas(t) and Sarah Worley
Leonard Leas was born around 1710. The names of his parents are not known. He married Sarah
Worley. She was born in 1726. The identity of her parents is not known.
212

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 244

213

Edward W Hocker. Genealogical Data Relating to the German Settlers of Pennsylvania and Adjacent Territory. (Baltimore, MD, 2003). 24-

25.

Page A-7.12

Leonard first appears in the records when he recorded a deed from the Penn brothers for land in
Reading Twp in 1743. Per the 1783 Tax list, Leonard owned 120 acres.
Leonard died on November 11, 1792 and is buried in the Markey Burial Ground near Markey's
fording on Conewago Creek. Sarah died on December 19, 1810 and is buried at Upper Bermudian
Church. Her tombstone inscription of, "Here rests the
dear Solme Least, died the 19th of December 1810, 84
years old" was written in German. Leonards will was
probated on December 9, 1782 in Reading Twp,
Adams County. 214 The executors were Mathias
Malaun and Michael Kimmel. The will mentions
Leonards children William, Mary (wife of George
Neas), Ursilla (wife of John Cough), Eleanor (wife of
UNK Fahnstick), Abraham, John, Benjamin,
Catharine, Jacob, Sarah, Daniel and granddaughter
Mary Jones. The will gives Leonards land to his wife
and unmarried children to live with their mother
providing they help their mother "work the place", but
those that do not, "must turn off and provide for
themselves". One year after his decease, the executors
were authorized to sell the plantation and tract of land.
Leonards son Daniel was given a portion of the land.
5.3 George Zeigler and Anna Margaretha Hamspacher
George Zeigler was born on February 12, 1711 in Weiler, Baden, Germany. He was the son of
George Philip and Anna Martha (Mayer) Zeigler. He emigrated on the ship William and Sarah
on September 18, 1727 with his parents. George married Anna Margaretha Hamspacher on
January 17, 1738 in Codorus Twp, York County. She was born in 1721 in Eppingen, Germany. She
was the daughter of George and Anna Barbara (Reppert) Hamspacher (Amspacher). Anna
Margaretha and her parents also emigrated on the ship William and Sarah with her future
husband.
George received a Warrant for 20
acres in N. Codorus Twp on August 6,
1753. 215 He bought 100 acres from
Jacob Ob on January 1, 1754 in N
Codorus Twp, adjacent to Brillhart
(Peter). He sold this property to
Philip Zeigler on January 6, 1759.
Georges property was located on
Panther Hill Rd near the intersection
with Green Valley Rd in North
Codorus Twp, near Seven Valleys.
George was the first constable of
Codorus Twp in 1749.
214

Wright. Abstracts of York County, Pennsylvania Wills 1749-1819. 78

215

Neal Otto Hively, Original Pennsylvania Land Record Series North Codorus Twp. (1991). 69

Page A-7.13

George may have died around 1764. Annas date of death is not known.
5.4 Philip Simon Minnich and Catherine Elisabeth UNKOWN
Philip Simon Minnich was born on August 25, 1728 in Freisbach, Palatinate, Germany. He was the
son of Peter and Maria Christina Barbara (Oster) Minnich. Philip emigrated with his parents on
the ship Samuel on August 30, 1737. He married Catherine Elisabeth UNKNOWN.
Philip received a Warrant for 15 acres in Springfield Twp, York County on January 2, 1790. 216
The survey was for 16 acres dated June 7, 1794. His land was in the northern section of Springfield
Twp, likely within the current city limits of the town of Jacobus.
Philip died in 1797 in Shrewsbury Twp, York County. The date of death of Catherine is unknown.
5.5 Peter Schlosser and Catherine UNKNOWN
Peter was born in Pennsylvania around 1735. He was the son of Leonhardt and Anna Barbara
(UNKNOWN) Schlosser. Peter married Catherine UNKNOWN who was born around 1735 in
Whitehall Twp, Northampton County Pennsylvania.
Peter served in the Revolutionary War along with his son Peter in the Northampton Militia, 2nd
Battalion, 8th Company, 7th Class. He died in August of 1802 in Northampton Twp. Catherine
died in May of 1809. Peters will was probated August 6, 1802.
5.6 Christian Raffensberger and Catherine Sarbach
Christian Raffensberger was born on October 31, 1746 in Rheinland, Prussia, Germany. He was
the son of Peter and Juliana (UNKNOWN) Raffensberger (Rotenberger). Christian emigrated
with his parents on the ship Brotherhood on November 3, 1750. He married Catherine Sarbach.
She was born around 1750, possibly in York County. She was the daughter of Jacob and
Catherine (UNKNOWN) Sarbach.
Christian was a farmer and a blacksmith. He and his
brother Martin were settled in Paradise Twp,
York County by 1779. Christian served in the
Revolution in Capt Andrew Bollys 6th Company, 5th
York County Battalion. He owned 109 acres in
Paradise Twp adjoining lands of George Julius, Peter
Altland, William Trimmer and brother-in-law George
Oderman. George Oderman had provided land for
Holtzschwamm Church. Christian's land spanned
Dover and Jackson Twps. It was bisecked by Wren Rd
between Shady Dell Rd and Pinchtown Rd (north of
present Rte 234).
Christian died on August 31, 1802. He was active in
Emmanuel Reformed Church in Abbotstown although
he was buried in Holschwamm Cemetery in Paradise
Twp. Catherine died in 1806. Christian died intestate.
A court petition of his son Jacob lists Christians
children Christian, Peter, John, David, Martin, Elias,
216

Neal Otto Hively, Original Pennsylvania Land Record Series Shrewsbury and Springfield Twps. (1992). 164

Page A-7.14

Daniel, Catherine (wife of Michael Yoe), Elizabeth (wife of Jacob Zinn), and Christina. 217
5.7 Philip Haverstock and Barbara Breber
Philip Haverstock was born on December 12, 1749 in Bacht, Germany. He was the son of Tobias
and Christina Catharina (Hann) Haverstock (Hafferstock). Philip emigrated with his parents on
the ship Chance on September 9, 1765. He married Barbara Breber around 1774. Barbara was
born in Bacht, Germany on May 14, 1754. The origins of Barbaras family are not known.
Philip served in the Revolutionary War with the
York Militia, 5th Battalion, 7th Class, Capt
Peter Zollinger. He served primarily at Camp
Security. Camp Security was a stockade built in
1782 by Col. James Wood on land of Daniel
Brubaker. 218 British Troops of Burgoynes army
were imprisoned here and guarded by York
County militia. It is located just east of the City
of York on Rte 462 in Springettsbury Twp.
Camp Security housed over 1000 British and
Canadian prisoners of war between the summer
of 1781 and the spring of 1783.

Location of Camp Security 219

Philip died on December 19, 1831 and Barbara died on May 14, 1812. Both are buried at St Johns
Church in Abbotstown.

217

Estate File for Christian Raffensberger, York County Historical Society

218

http://hometown.aol.com/stough1752/History.html

219

http://hometown.aol.com/stough1752/Archaelogy.html

Page A-7.15

5.8 John Mummert and Magdalena


John Mummert was born in Paradise Twp, York County in 1757. He was the son of William and
Catherine (Malaun) Mummert. John married Magdalena UNKOWN. Magdalena was born in
Paradise Twp, York County on December 31, 1749. John died on October 18, 1821 and Magdalena
died on June 15, 1825. Both are buried at Mummerts Meeting House.

5.9 Andrew Miller and Annie Danner


Andrew Miller was born in Adams County in 1762. He was the son of Andreas and Barbara (Noll)
Miller (Muller). Andrew married Annie Danner on October 28, 1785. Annie was born in York
County on May 6, 1768. She was the daughter of Heinrich and Elizabeth (Kehr) Danner.
Andrew received a survey for 135 acres in Codorus Twp on August 28, 1784. 220 The Patent was
issued to Andrew on June 20, 1809 for 306 acres. His land was located in the western corner of
Codorus Twp, York County.
Annie died on October 29, 1808. Andrew was remarried to Elizabeth Utz who was born in 1781.
Andrew died on October 12, 1835. Both he and Annie are buried at Trinity Roths Reformed
Church in Jackson Twp, York County although markers have not been located.
5.10 Daniel Brown and Susanna Bosserman
Daniel Brown was born in Reading Twp, Adams County in 1756. He was the son of George and
Eve (Snider) Brown. Daniel married Susanna Bosserman around 1780. Susanna was born in
Reading Twp on August 20, 1756. She was the daughter of Michael and Christina (Dierdorff)
Bosserman.
220

Neal Otto Hively, Original Pennsylvania Land Record Series Codorus Twp (1988). 80

Page A-7.16

Daniel died on December 3, 1790 and Susanna died on August 20, 1790. Both are buried on the
Bosserman farm cemetery.
5.11 Philip Jacobs and Susanna Mummert
Philip Jacobs was born on March 1, 1738, possibly in Germany. He was the son of Heinrich and
Maria Catherine (Sibilia) Jacobs. Philip married Susanna Mummert around 1762 although he
may have had a previous wife. Susanna was born in Reading Twp on February 20, 1740. She was
the daughter of Dietrich and Anna (UNKNOWN) Mummert (Memart). Philip served in the
Revolution in the 5th Battalion York County, 2nd Class under Peter Zollinger.
Philip received a survey on February 3, 1763 for 60 acres in Paradise Twp and the Patent on April
20, 1790 for 60 acres. 221 Philips land was located just north of Holtzschwamm Lutheran Church.
The property was in the southeast corner of the intersection of Church Rd and Rte 234.
Philip died on April 13, 1792 and Susana died on February 13, 1787. Both are buried at Altlands
Meeting House although neither marker remains. Philips will was probated on May 30, 1792. 222
The executors were Samuel Arnold and Philip Altland. While Philips will lists his wife's name as
Barbara, the will of Dietrich Mummert lists Susannah's husband as Philip Jacobs. Dietrich died in
1770, so it is possible that Philip took a second wife after Susannah died in 1787.
6. Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandparents
6.1 George Philip Zeigler and Anna Martha Mayer
George Philip Zeigler was born on April 1, 1677 in Weiler, Baden, Germany. He was the son of
Hans George and Sara (UNKNOWN) Zeigler. George married Anna Martha Mayer in June of
1702 in Weiler, Germany. Anna was born on September 10, 1681 in Reihen, Germany. She was the
daughter of Daniel and Barbara (Gucher) Mayer. He and Anna emigrated on the ship William
and Sarah on September 18, 1727 with their children. 223 He had to pay 24 florins 19 kreuzer
emigration tax. 224
George received a Warrant (Blunston
License) for 200 acres in West
Manchester/Franklin/Dover Twp on
October 30, 1736. 225 The Survey was
issued for 328.8 acres on April 8, 1746.
This property was transferred to his son
Philip on October 16, 1767. This property is
located on Honey Run near the
intersection of Salem Church Rd and Route
234 between Briarwood and Honey Run
golf courses.
221

Neal Otto Hively, Original Pennsylvania Land Record Series Paradise and Jackson Twps. (2000). 71

222

Wright. Abstracts of York County, Pennsylvania Wills 1749-1819. 133

223

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 9

224

Yoder, Rhineland Emigrants: Lists of German Settlers in Colonial America, 7.

225

Hively, The Manor of Springettsbury, 71

Page A-7.17

George died about 1756 and Anna died about 1750, both in West Manchester Twp, York County.
6.2
George Hamspacher and Anna Barbara Reppert
George Hamspacher (Amspacher) was born around 1674 in Kolbering, Germany. His parents are
not known. He was married to Anna Barbara
Reppert on January 30, 1720. George also had
a first wife named Anna Maria Schmidt. Anna
Georges signature upon emigration 226
Barbara was born around 1796 in Bonfeld,
Germany. She was the daughter of Melchior and Barbara (UNKNOWN) Reppert. He and Anna
emigrated on the ship William and Sarah on September 21, 1727 with their children. 227
George received a Warrant (Blunston License) for 150 acres in Manchester Twp on October 30,
1736, that was assigned to Georg Ness on February 11, 1744. 228 George's land was located in
Manchester Twp, York County, just north of York. The land was mostly to the east of Susquehanna
Tr (Rte 295) at the split with Lewisberry Rd.
The dates of George and Annas deaths are not known.
6.3 Peter Minnich and Maria Christina Barbara Oster
Peter Minnich was born around 1698 in Freisbach, Palatinate, Germany. He was the son of Johann
Philip Minnich and UNKNOWN. Johann Philip was a weaver. Peter married Maria Christina
Barbara Oster on September 19, 1724 in Freisbach, Germany. Marias date of birth is unknown.
She was the daughter of Leonhard Oster and UNKNOWN. Peter and Maria emigrated on the
ship Samuel on August 30, 1737 with their children and Peters brother Simon. 229
As of 1738 Peter was in Tulpehocken, Lancaster (later Berks) County. On March 29, 1750 he
purchased 300 acres in Pine Grove Twp, Lancaster (later Berks, now Schuylkill) County.
Maria died around 1755. Following her death Peter married Eva Maria Ritzman on May 30, 1756.
Peter died about 1776 in Pinegrove Twp, Berks County. The administration rights to Peters estate
were granted to wife Eva on May 15, 1766. Peter was listed as "beyond the Blue Mountains".
6.4 Leonhardt Schlosser and Anna Barbara UNKNOWN
Leonhardt Schlosser was born on October 4, 1704 in Hilsbach, Germany. He was the son of Johan
Joost and Margaretha (Frey) Schlosser. Leonhardt first married Anna Maria Wolf, possibly in
Germany. Following Anna Marias death he married Anna Barbara UNKNOWN, possibly in
America. Anna Barbara was probably born prior to 1721. Leonhardt emigrated on the ship
Dragon on September 30, 1732. 230 He died in 1756 in Whitehall Twp, Northampton County and
was buried in Unionville Cemetery. Anna Barbara outlived Leonhardt but her date of death is
unknown.

226

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 2. 1

227

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 9

228

Hively, The Manor of Springettsbury, 107

229

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 169

230

Ibid. 96

Page A-7.18

6.5 Peter Raffensberger and Juliana UNKNOWN


Peter Raffensberger (Rotenberger) was born between 1710 and 1720 in Rheinland, Germany. The
identity of his parents is unknown. He married Juliana UNKNOWN around 1741 in Germany.
Juliana was born prior to 1714. Peter, Juliana and
their family emigrated on the ship Brotherhood on
November 3, 1750. 231 Peter was naturalized on
Peters signature upon emigration 232
October 24, 1755 by Chief Justice William Allen.
Peter and family settled in Warwick Twp, Lancaster County. He was active in Cocalico Reformed
Church, Ephrata Twp, Lancaster County. Peter and Juliana both died sometime after 1773.
6.6 Jacob Sarbach and Catherine UNKNOWN
Jacob Sarbach was born prior to 1724 in Rheinland Germany. The identity of his parents is
unknown. Jacob married Catherine UNKNOWN, possibly in Germany. She was born prior to
1728 in Rheinland Germany. Jacob emigrated on the
ship Francis and Elizabeth on September 21, 1742. 234
Jacob and family were settled in Berwick Twp, Adams
233
County by 1762. He was active in Emmanuel Reformed
Jacobs signature upon emigration
Church in Abbotstown. Jacob died in 1787 and
Catherine died
in 1795, both in Berwick Twp. Jacobs will was probated on September 26, 1787. 235 The executors
were his wife Catherine and his son Christian. Another executor was to also be Jonas Wolf (the
authors maternal great-great-great-great-grandfather), however he preceded Jacob in death by
several days. The will mentions Jacobs children Christiana, Elizabeth, Jacob, David, Susanna,
Michael, and Catharina (wife of Christian Raffensberger).
6.7 Tobias Haverstock and Christina Catharina Hann
Tobias Haverstock (Hafferstock) was born in 1729 in Switzerland. The identity of his parents are
unknown. Tobias married Christina Catharina Hann in 1748 in Bacht, Germany. Christina was
born in 1728 in Beuerbacht, Hessen, Nassau, Germany. The identity of her parents is unknown.
Tobias and family emigrated on the ship Chance on September 9, 1765. 236
On February 21, 1771 Tobias purchased 84 acres of land in Paradise Twp from Henry Herring
which was part of a 130 acre tract adjacent to Philip Herring and John Cott. 237 The land was
originally Warranted to John Brady on July 5, 1745. Tobias's land was located in Paradise Twp,
York County, near Beaver Creek. It was located on the north side of Maple Grove Rd, near the
intersection of Pigeon Hills Rd.
Catharina died in 1768. The date of Tobiass death in unknown, but he died in Paint Twp, Wayne
County, Indiana.
231

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 448

232

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 2. 521

233

Ibid. 340

234

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 327

235

Wright. Abstracts of York County, Pennsylvania Wills 1749-1819. 105

236

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 705

237

Hively, Paradise and Jackson Twps, 71

Page A-7.19

6.8 William Mummert and Catherine Malaun


William Mummert was born on April 7, 1726 in Germany. He was the son of Deitrich and Anna
(UNKOWN) Mummert. William emigrated with his parents on the ship Harle on September 1,
1736. William married Catherine Malaun in America. Catherine was born May 4, 1732 in
Pennsylvania. It is unclear whether she was born in Germany or America. She was the daughter
of Mathias and Hannah (UNKNOWN) Malaun.
In 1763 William was living in Reading Twp on land near his brother John, Winebert Tschudy,
Henry Sale and Daniel Zacharia. For 11 pounds, 14 shillings, 6 pence William secured a tract of
land by Warrant on December 4, 1790 containing 117 acres in Paradise Twp, York County called
which was called "Mummerts Delight". 238 William sold this property to Andrew Trimmer after his
death. This land in Paradise Twp was located adjacent to land of Henry Jacobs. It was south of
Paradise Run and just east of, and bordering on, Canal Rd.
William served in the Revolutionary War in the 5th Battalion, Third Company York County
Militia under Capt Peter Zollonger. Also in this Company were Williams sons John, William and
Richard. His son Mathias belonged to the Sixth Company. William was a contributor to a special
appeals fund to finance the Lutheran Church in Abbottstown in 1778.
William died on February 4, 1800. His wife Catherine had died on April 17, 1789. Both are
buried at Mummerts Meeting House. Williams will was probated on February 17, 1800 in
Paradise Twp, York County. 239 The executors were Mathias Mummert and Samuel Fahnestock.
The will mentions Williams children Richard, John, William, Jacob, Peggy (wife of Christian
Swobenland), Anna (wife of Ludwig Swobenland), Susanna (wife of Jacob Nagel), Catharine (wife
of Mathias Myer).

238

Ibid, 56

239

Wright. Abstracts of York County, Pennsylvania Wills 1749-1819. 179

Page A-7.20

6.9 Andreas Miller and Barbara Noll


The birth date and location of Andreas Miller (Muller) are unknown. He was the son of Andreas
Miller Sr and UNKNOWN. Andreas married Barbara Noll. Her birth date and the origins of
her family are unknown.
Andreas received a Warrant for 50 acres in North Codorus Twp on April 1, 1751. 240 This property
was located next to his brother George. The survey was recorded June 16, 1786 for 75 acres to his
son(?) John Miller. The Patent was returned on June 8, 1809 for 75 acres to Michael Miller. This
land was located on the north side of Prospect Hill Rd near the junction with Jefferson Rd (Rte
516).
Andreas died sometime between 1773 and 1796 in Codorus Twp. Barbara died in 1817.
6.10 Heinrich Danner and Elizabeth Kehr
Heinrich Danner was born on February 12, 1742 in Pennsylvania. He was the son of Michael and
Susanna (Bend?) Danner. Heinrich married Elizabeth Kehr around 1767 in York. Elizabeth was
born on September 28, 1744 in Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Christian and Anna O
(UNKNOWN) Kehr.
Heinrich received a Warrant
on December 27, 1766 for
150 acres in Codorus and
Heidelberg Twps known as
"Grievous Valley" and a
Warrant on July 6, 1785 for
50 acres. 241 Both properties
were located adjacent to his
father on the west side of
Codorus Creek just north of
the current Hilltop Dr East
near Porter's Sideling.

Due to his religious views, Heinrich did not serve during the Revolutionary War. Heinrich died on
February 5, 1814. Elizabeth died on January 17, 1828. Both are buried at Bair's Mennonite
Church, located just east of Hanover. Heinrichs will was probated on February 28, 1814 in
Manheim Twp. 242 The executors were his wife Elizabeth and son David. The will mentions
Heinrichs children Henry, David, Anna, Rachel, Leah and Salome. His daughters Barbara and
Elizabeth were not listed in his will.

240

Hively, North Codorus Twp, 48

241

Ibid, 46, 57

242

Wright. Abstracts of York County, Pennsylvania Wills 1749-1819. 243

Page A-7.21

6.11 George Brown and Eve Snider


George Brown was born in 1735 in Reading Twp, Adams County. He was the son of Rudolph and
UNKNOWN Brown. George married Eve Snider around 1755. Eve was born around 1736 in
Reading Twp. She was the daughter of Adam and Sarah (UNKNOWN) Snider. George died in
1777 in Reading Twp although he may have spent some time in Huntington Twp. Eves date of
death is unknown.
6.12 Michael Bosserman and Christina Dierdorff
Michael Bosserman was born on December 19, 1726 in Dornigheim, Germany. He was the son of
Johann Daniel and Appolonia (UNKNOWN) Bosserman (Basserman). Michael emigrated on the
ship Hampshire on September 7, 1748. 243 He married
Christina Dierdorff in America. Christina was born on
May 22, 1742 in York County. She was the daughter
Michaels signature upon emigration 244
of Johannes and Anna Maria (Ehrhardt) Dierdorff.
Michael settled in Reading Twp. He served on the Standing Committee for the Annual
Conference along the Big Conewago in the year 1785.
Michael died in November of 1793 and Christina died in April of 1794. Both were originally
buried in the Bosserman Farm Cemetery, but their markers were moved to Mummerts Meeting
House. Michaels will was probated on November 19, 1793 in Reading Twp. 245 The executors
were his wife Christina, Michael Basserman, and Daniel Brown. The witnesses were Solomon
Brown and Herman Blaessar. The will mentions Michaels, sons Abraham, Philip, Peter, Daniel
(oldest), Michael, John and daughters Susannah (wife of Daniel Brown), Margaret (wife of Peter
Hoch), Christina (wife of Jacob Diehl), Catharine (wife of Jacob Sherfig), Mary. The will also

243

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 373

244

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 2. 409

245

Randy J Miller. Abstracts of Adams County, Pennsylvania Wills (1745-1800). (Gettysburg, PA, 1994). 10.

Page A-7.22

mentions Michaels grandchildren Michael, Hannah, Samuel, Susannah all children of Michaels
son Daniel.

6.13 Heinrich Jacobs and Maria Catherine Sibilia


Heinrich Jacobs was born around 1690 in Autland, Germany. The identity of his parents is not
known. Heinrich married Maria Catherine Sibilia around 1728, possibly in England. Maria
Catherines date of birth and the identity of her parents is not known. The time of Heinrichs
emigration is not known with certainty, but has been reported to have been on the ship Dragon in
1723. He may have spent approximately 5 years in England before completing his journey to
America in 1729.
Henry initially settled in Lower Sarecan Twp, Bucks County. He was a neighbor of Daniel Boone
and Mordecai Lincoln, the grandfather of Abraham Lincoln. After 14 years he sold the estate to
John Rothrock. On April 22, 1749 he moved to Adams County at Beaver Creek near East Berlin.
He settled on 461 acres along Beaver Creek having purchased 686 acres from William Penn.
Henry's land was located in both Berwick Twp, Adams County and Paradise Twp, York County. It
was located where Paradise Run enters Codorus Creek. Jacob's Mill Rd runs through Henry's
property in the area surrounding the intersection of Jacobs Mill Rd and Beaver Creek Rd. Present
day Adams County Fairground was part of this settlement. He built a log cabin and later
developed a mill. Upon retiring, Henry divided up his land and sold the homestead to his son
Phillip. Phillip was not interested in farming and sold out to his brother, George.
Heinrich died in 1774 in Paradise Twp. Maria Catherine died sometime after September 12, 1774.

Page A-7.23

6.14 Dietrich Mummert and Anna UNKOWN


Dietrich Mummert (Memart) was born in 1707 in Germany. The identity of his parents is unknown.
Dietrich married Anna (UNKNOWN) in 1724 in Germany. Dietrich and his family emigrated on
the ship Harle on September 1, 1736. 246
Dietrich settled in Reading Twp, Adams County. In 1747 he signed a petition for the
establishment of York County. Dietrich died in 1770 in Reading Twp. Anna died in 1742.
Dietrichs will was probated on March 26, 1770 in Reading Twp. 247 The executors were Philip
Heneman and B. Hockinbough. The will lists Dietrichs children William, Margaret (wife of
David Erhart), Mary (wife of Samuel Webster), Susanna (wife of Philip Jacobs), Elizabeth (wife of
Abraham How), and Catharine.
7. Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandparents
7.1 Dietrich Mummert and Anna UNKNOWN
See Section 6.14 above.
7.2 Mathias Malaun and Hannah UNKNOWN
Mathias Malaun was born around 1707 in Germany. The identity of his parents is unknown.
Mathias married Hannah UNKNOWN in 1731. The date of Mathiass emigration is unknown.
Mathias died on or before April 2, 1772 in Reading Twp. Hannah died after October 11, 1784.
Mathiass will was probated on April 2, 1772 in Reading Twp. 248 Executors were his sons Mathias
Malaun and John Malaun. His will mentions his children Mathias, John, Rebecca, Hannah,
Catharine (wife of William Mummert), Mary (wife of John Lighty), and Anna (wife of Jacob Holl).
7.3 Andreas Miller and UNKNOWN
Andreas Miller was born in 1716 in Germany. The identity of his parents and his wife are
unknown. Andreas emigrated on the ship Samuel on December 3, 1740. 249 He died sometime
prior to 1762.
7.4 Michael Danner and Susanna Bend(?)
Michael Danner (Tanner) was born in Mannheim in the Grand Duchy of Baden, Germany in 1696
and was christened on May 7, 1696 in Schopfheim, Waldshut, Baden. He was the son of Ulrich
and Chrystina (Reitlickerin) Tanner. Michael married Susanna Bend (unsure of surname) possibly
in Germany. Susanna was born around 1734 in Germany. The identity of her parents is unknown.
Michael and his family emigrated on the ship James Goodwill on September 27, 1727. 250

246

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 155

247

Wright. Abstracts of York County, Pennsylvania Wills 1749-1819. 30

248

Ibid, 36.

249

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 290

250

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 10

Page A-7.24

At first Michael settled near


Philadelphia, then crossed the
Susquehanna River to southern
York County. He settled in the
area south of Hanover as early
as 1762. The homestead
included land near Porters
Sideling a small town built near
a railroad siding in North
Codorus Township. He owned
several tracts of land on the
western bank of Codorus Creek in Heidelberg Twp totaling over 600 acres. 251 The property was
located just north of the current Hilltop Dr East near Porter's Sideling.
Micheal spoke both German and English. He was involved in local government and the local
religious community. He was responsible for the purchase of the land for the Bair Meeting House
a Mennonite church located on Route 116 near Hanover. 252
Michael died on May 29, 1781
and Susanna died in 1828. They
are both buried in the cemetery
at Bairs Methodist Church.
Their original markers are gone
but the church replaced them
with a commemorative marker.

251

Neal Otto Hively, Original Pennsylvania Land Record Series Manheim and Heidelberg Twps (2000), 29, 66

252

Ibid, 65.

Page A-7.25

7.5 Christian Kehr and Annie O UNKNOWN


Christian Kehr was born in 1703 in Switzerland. The identity of his parents is unknown. Christian
married Annie O UNKNOWN.
Christian emigrated on
the ship Hope on
August 28, 1733. 253
Christian received a
Warrant for 150 acres
in Heidelberg Twp,
York
County
on
254
September 10, 1750.
The property was
located near Porter's
Sideling to the north of
the Oil Creek tributary
of Codorus Creek, to
the southwest of Iron
Ridge Rd.
Christian died sometime
after 1770. Annas date
of death is unknown.
Both are buried at Bairs
Methodist
Church
although markers have
not been located.

7.6 Rudolph Brown and UNKNOWN


Rudolph Brown was born in 1702 in Germany. The identity of his parents and his wife is unknown.
Rudolph emigrated on the ship Loyal Judith on September 25, 1732. 255 He was living in Berwick
Twp, Adams County on the Little Conewago Creek. His land was adjacent to land of Isaac
Patterson (originally owned by Martin Tillinger, then Abraham McConnel, then Isaac). Rudolph
253

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 116

254

Neal Otto Hively, Original Pennsylvania Land Record Series Manheim and Heidelberg Twps (2000), 29, 68

255

Strassburger and Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. Volume 1. 87

Page A-7.26

died sometime prior to January 4, 1764 and was buried at Mummerts Meeting House although
the markers are no longer present.
7.7 Adam Snider and Sarah UNKNOWN
Adam Snider was born around 1700 in Germany. The identity of his parents is unknown. Adam
married Sarah UNKNOWN around 1725. Sarah was born around 1704 in Germany. Adams date
of emigration has not been identified. The Adam Snider family was among the communicants of
the Church of the Brethren in Conewago, pastored by George Brown. Adam died prior to
September 9, 1782 in Menallen Twp. 256 Executors of his will were Henry Wireman Sr and
William Delap. His will mentions his children Adam, Abraham, John, Sarah (wife of John Kegy).
Marlina (wife of Jacob Letshaw), Eve (wife of George Brown) and Grandson Samuel Grabill.
7.8 Johannes Dierdorff and Anna Maria Ehrhardt
Johannes Dierdorff was born around 1715 in Neuwied, Rhineland Pfalz, Germany. He was the son
of Anthony and Christina (Rodebusch) Dierdorff. Johannes emigrated with his parents possibly as
early as 1719. Johannes married Anna Maria Ehrhardt on May 22, 1740 at Christ Lutheran
Church in York. Anna Maria was born in 1719 possibly in Holland. She was the daughter of Philip
Reinhard and Anna Barbara (Blum) Ehrhardt. She emigrated with her parents possibly around
1723.
Johannes received a warrant for 248.5 acres of land in Reading Township on August 24, 1742. He
died in Reading Twp in 1776. Anna Maria died in 1779. Johanness will was probated on
February 7, 1776 in Reading Twp. 257 Executors were Abrham Stouffer and Christian Cloas. The
will mentions his children Anthony, Christiana (wife of Michael Bosserman), Margaret (wife of
UNK Thomey), Barbara (wife of William Thomas), Hannah (wife of Nicholas Myers), Catharine
(wife of Adam Cunkeland), Abraham, Susanna, John, and Daniel.
8. Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandparents

256

Miller. Abstracts of Adams County, Pennsylvania Wills (1745-1800).. 62.

257

Ibid, 21.

Page A-7.27

8.1 Anthony Dierdorff and Christina Rodebusch


Anthony Dierdorff was born on November
11, 1683 in Schriesheim, Baden, Germany
near Heidelberg. He was the son of
Anthony Dierdorff and UNKNOWN.
Anthony married Christina Rodebusch
around 1708, possibly in Germany.
Christina was born around 1683 in
Heidelberg, Baden, Germany.
The
identity of her parents is unknown.
The History of the Church of the Brethren
of Eastern Pennsylvania (p.163) states:
The history of the Church of the Brethren
in New Jersey begins in 1733. In the fall of
that year, John Nass with four other heads
of Dunkard families, vis; Anthony
Dierdorff, Jacob More, Rudolph Harley
and John Laushe, crossed the Delaware River into what is now Hunterdon County, NJ, and settled
near Amwell, 38 miles NE of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and organized the first German Baptist
Church in America."
Anthony and his family may have fled Germany by way of Holland and England to escape
religious persecution, and to maintain their beliefs in non-violence and other doctrines espoused
by the "Tunkers". Anthony was an active and loyal supporter of the local congregations in the
area in which he made his home. A number of his descendants became prominent in the church
ministry. For several generations, his descendants remained members of the Dunkard faith, and
many of them also became prominent in the Old German Baptist Brethren congregations
throughout Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana. Anthony was a leader in spreading the concept of
brotherly love and lived peaceably among the Indians in his area all during his lifetime.
(from Some Descendants of Anthony Dierdorff, Jr., page 5-6).
Anthony died in November of 1785 in Amwell Twp, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. He may be
buried at Brethrens Burial Ground in Germantown. Christina died sometime after 1745 in
Germantown Pennsylvania. Anthonys will was probated on March 15, 1746/47 in Hunterdon
County, New Jersey.
8.2 Philip Reinhard Ehrhardt and Anna Barbara Blum
Philip Reinhard Ehrhardt was born in 1696 in Germany and was christened on April 1, 1696 in
Iggleheim Church, Pfalz, Germany. He was the son of Hans Michael and Maria Catharina
(UNKNOWN) Ehrhard. Philip married Anna Barbara Blum on May 19, 1716 in Iggleheim
Church. Philip and his family may have emigrated around 1723. Philip died on February 25,
1739 in Manatawny Twp, Mongomery County, Pennsylvania. Anna Barbara died prior to 1739.

Page A-7.28