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COUNTY GOVERNMENT OF UASIN GISHU

COUNTY TREASURY

SECOND QUARTER PROGRESS REPORT


OCTOBER-DECEMBER 2014

JANUARY 2015

A Prosperous and Attractive County in Kenya and Beyond

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014

The County Treasury P. O. Box 40-30100 ELDORET, KENYA


Email: info@uasingishu.go.ke
Website: www.uasingishu.go.ke

1 | Page

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

TABLES AND FIGURES


LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1: Revenue Performance

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Summary Maize and Bean Stocks as at December, 2014
Table 2: Food consumption compared to population and production in the county
December, 2014
Table 3: Crop Targets and Achievements 2014
Table 4: Revenue collection during the quarter
Table 5: Extension Services
Table 6: Livestock Population
Table 7: Main Livestock Types (Estimated Numbers As At 31st December 2014)
Table 8: Milk Production
Table 9: Dairy Cattle Population
Table 10: Milk Production and Value (Dairy Enterprise)
Table 11: Trend Milk Production and Value (Dairy Enterprise)
Table 12: Pond Statistics (FFEPP & Old Ponds)
Table 13: Pond Harvesting/Production (Kg)
Table 14: Fish Market Statistics
Table 15: Dam Fisheries
Table 16: Vaccination against Notifiable Diseases
Table 17: Summary of Hectare, Volume and Value by Category, 2013- 2014
Table 18: Livestock Census as per 31st December 2014
Table 19: Revenue from Farm Produce

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 20: Achievements from Trainings and other Extension Services during
reporting period
Table 21: Educational visits
Table 22: Demonstrations/ Field- Days/Video Shows
Table 23: Summary of revenues generated during the periods July-December 2014
Table 24: Annual Work Plan Progress
Table 25: Summary Breakdown of Revenue Collected Per Section
Table 26: Performance in the Survey Section
Table 27: Revenue Collection per Section
Table 28: Monthly Collections per Estate October-December 2014
Table 29: Arrears per Estate 31st December 2014
Table 30: Budget/Implementation Matrix, Roads
Table 31: Grading and Gravelling of Roads
Table 32: Environmental Offenders Charged in Court
Table 33: Status/Achievement, Central Registry Section
Table 34: Status/Achievement, Human Resource Section
Table 35: Status/Achievement, Payroll Section
Table 36: Status/Achievement, Enforcement and Security Section
Table 37: Summary of Vital Statistical Information on Co-operatives in the County
Table 38: Monthly Revenue Performance per Stream78
Table 39: County Expenditure by Department
Table 40: Summary of Health Facilities per Sub-county
Table 41: Health Outcome Milestones, Issues and Challenges
Table 42: Health Output Milestones, Issues and Challenges
Table 43: Water Production
ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
A.I.A

Appropriation in Aid

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

AFP

Acute Flaccid Paralysis

APR

Annual Progress Report

ASDSP

Agricultural Sector Development Strategy Program

AI

Artificial Insemination

AMS

Agricultural Mechanization Station

ATC

Agricultural Training College

BQ

Black Quarter

CARPS

Capacity Assessment & Rationalization of Public Service

CBROP

County Budget Review Outlook Paper

CDLP

County Director of Livestock Production

CBD

Central Business District

CDF

Constituency Development Fund

CEC

County Executive Committee

CIDP

County Integrated Development Plan

CLTS

Community Led Total Sanitation

CMTF

County Mechanical and Transport Fund

DCA

Dairy Commercialization Areas

EAAPP

East Africa Agricultural Productivity Program

ECDE

Early Childhood Development Education

EMCA

Environmental Management Coordination

ELDOWAS :

Eldoret Water and Sewerage

ESP

Economic Stimulus Program

FBO

Faith Based Organization

GIS

Geographical Information Systems

GAP

Good Agricultural Practices

HIV/AIDS :

Human Immunodeficiency Virus

ICT

Information Communication Technology

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

IT

Information Technology

KECOSO

Kenya Communication Sports Organization

KeNHA

Kenya National Highways Authority

KeRRA

Kenya Rural Roads Authority

KURA

Kenya Urban Roads Authority

KEMRI

Kenya Medical Research Institute

KEPH

Kenya Essential Package for Health

KVDA

Kerio-Valley Development Fund

KFS

Kenya Forest Service

LAN

Local Area Network

LVNWSB

Lake Victoria North Water Service Board

LIC

Livestock Improvement Centre

MTP

Medium Term Plan

MTRH

Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital

MDR-TB

Multi-Drug Resistant TB

NEMA

National Environment Management Authority

NLC

National Land Commission

NCPB

National Cereals and Produce Board

NGO

Non Governmental Organization

NKCC

New Kenya Cooperatives Creameries

PSB

Public Service Board

RAP

Relocation Action Plan

R.V.T.T.I

Rift Valley Technical Training Institute

SPA

Service Provision Agreement

SGBV

Sexual Gender Based Violence

TMR

Total Mixed Rotation

USA

United States of America

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

WASCA

Water Companys Sports Associations

WHO

World Health Organization

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The County Second Quarter Progress Report for the 2014/2015 was developed to
inform the county government, stakeholders and the general public of the progress
made in during the period October-December 2014.

The County Executive Committee Member for Finance and Economic Planning
acknowledges the effort by the Planning Unit in compiling this report. He also
appreciates contributions by Chief Officers, Directors and staff in the departments
and other agencies of the County Government that led to the successful
development of this report.

Participation of various stakeholders in the countys development process is also


appreciated.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This County Second Quarter Progress Report covers the periods between 1 st
October 2014 and 31st December 2014. It reports on activities undertaken by the
various county government departments and other agencies of the county
government as reflected in their work plans. The report, therefore, reports on
progress in implementing the plans, challenges encountered and way forward. The
report is therefore important in informing the county government, stakeholders and
the general public on progress made in the second quarter of the financial year.
This report captures major activities undertaken during the period under review
and achievements made. It also reports on challenges and way forward of each
department/agencies of the county government. However, detailed information is
contained in the various departmental reports. The quarterly report also made an
assessment of the budget implementation for the period under review by analyzing,
among other issues, budget execution and expenditure trends. During the period,
substantial progress was made by different departments in the face of various
challenges ranging from inadequate technical staff, inadequate transport, lack of
enough office space, inadequate resources to delays in disbursement of funds by
the national government.
The government is committed to the improvement of implementation of
programmes and projects, and to ensuring that residents get value for money in
service delivery. Periodic reports are useful documents for gauging the
performance of various county government departments and entities with the aim
of

improving

the

effectiveness

implementation and service delivery.

and

efficiency

in

programme/project

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLES AND FIGURES.........................................................................................2
ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS..................................................................4
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.........................................................................................7
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.......................................................................................8
CHAPTER ONE: BACKGROUD INFORMATION..............................................11
1.1 INTRODUCTION..........................................................................................................................11
1.1.1

Vision.....................................................................................................................................11

1.1.2

Mission..................................................................................................................................11

1.2 COUNTY BACKGROUND...........................................................................................................11


1.3 KEY DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES.......................................................................................13
1.4 METHODOLOGY.........................................................................................................................13
1.5 LIMITATION OF THE REPORT...................................................................................................13

CHAPTER TWO: POLICY REVIEW....................................................................14


CHAPTER THREE: PROGRESS REPORTS........................................................16
3.1 INTRODUCTION..........................................................................................................................16
3.2 EDUCATION, CULTURE, YOUTH AFFAIRS AND SOCIAL SERVICES.................................16
3.2.1

Education...........................................................................................................................16

3.2.2

Culture...............................................................................................................................16

3.2.3

Youth Affairs......................................................................................................................17

3.2.4

Social Services...................................................................................................................18

3.2.5

Sports.................................................................................................................................18

3.3 AGRICULTURE, LIVESTOCK AND FISHERIES.......................................................................19


3.3.1

Agriculture.........................................................................................................................19

3.3.2

Agricultural Mechanization Station (AMS).......................................................................24

3.3.3

Livestock...........................................................................................................................26

3.3.4

Fisheries.............................................................................................................................33

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015


3.3.5

CHEBORORWA ATC........................................................................................................38

3.4 LANDS, HOUSING AND PHYSICAL PLANNING....................................................................46


3.4.1

Lands.................................................................................................................................47

3.4.2

Physical planning...............................................................................................................48

3.4.3

Survey Section...................................................................................................................53

3.4.4

Housing..............................................................................................................................55

3.5 ROADS, TRANSPORT AND PUBLIC WORKS..........................................................................58


3.5.1

Roads.................................................................................................................................58

3.5.2

Transport............................................................................................................................58

3.5.3

Public Works......................................................................................................................58

3.5.4

Electrical............................................................................................................................59

3.6 ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY, WATER AND NATURAL RESOURCES......................................62


3.6.1

Water..................................................................................................................................62

3.6.2

Environment......................................................................................................................63

3.7 PUBLIC SERVICE MANAGEMENT...........................................................................................66


3.8 TRADE, INDUSTRIALIZATION, COOPERATIVE & ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT,
TOURISM & WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT........................................................................................70
3.9 FINANCE AND ECONOMIC PLANNING..................................................................................77
3.10 HEALTH SERVICES.....................................................................................................................80
3.11 ELDOWAS.....................................................................................................................................90
3.12 ICT AND e-GOVERNMENT........................................................................................................92
3.13 THE COUNTY ASSEMBLY.........................................................................................................94

CHAPTER FOUR: CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION.......................97

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

CHAPTER ONE: BACKGROUD INFORMATION


1.1

INTRODUCTION

This County Second Quarter Progress Report covers the periods between 1 st
October 2014 and 31st December 2014. It reports on activities undertaken by the
various county government departments and other agencies of the government as
reflected in their work plans.

The report, therefore, reports on progress in

implementing the plans, challenges encountered and way forward.


1.1.1 Vision
A Prosperous and Attractive County in Kenya and Beyond.
1.1.2 Mission
To serve and improve our peoples livelihoods through good leadership, innovative
technology and efficient infrastructure.
1.2

COUNTY BACKGROUND

Uasin Gishu County is one of the 47 counties in the Republic of Kenya. It lies
between longitudes 34 degrees 50 east and 35 degrees 37 West and latitudes 0
degrees 03 South and 0 degrees 55 North. It is a highland plateau with altitudes
falling gently from 2,700 meters above sea level to about 1,500 meters above sea
level. The topography is higher to the east and declines gently towards the western
border. The county experiences high and reliable rainfall which is evenly
distributed throughout the year. The average rainfall ranges between 624.9 mm to
1,560.4mm with two distinct peaks occurring between March and September; and
May and August. Dry spells occur between November and February. The
temperatures range between 7 degrees Celsius and 29 degrees Celsius.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Uasin Gishu County shares common borders with Trans Nzoia County to the
North, Elgeyo Marakwet County to the East, Baringo County to the South East,
Kericho County to the South, Nandi County to the South West and Kakamega
County to the North West. It covers a total area of 3,345.2 Sq. Km. with a
population, according to the 2009 Population and Housing Census, of 894,179
people. This population was projected to increase to 1,002,153 in 2012, and
1,123,165 and 1,211,853 in 2015 and 2017 respectively. It has six Sub-counties
(constituencies), namely, Soy, Turbo, Kesses, Kapseret, Ainabkoi and Moiben. The
county has thirty (30) County assembly Wards. In addition, there are two divisions,
Kesses and Kapsaret, with fifty one (51) locations and ninety seven (97) sublocations.
Uasin Gishu Countys economy is largely driven by agriculture; it is agro-based. It
has large and fertile lands which can be classified as high potential. The average
farm size in the county is 2-10 acres with a wide range of crop and livestock
enterprises. The crop enterprises include food crops, cash/industrial crops and
horticultural crops. Large scale farming supports wheat, maize, tea, coffee, flowers
and other horticultural crops for export. However, crop farming is mainly
concentrated on maize and wheat. Livestock enterprises include dairy, poultry,
sheep, goats, pigs, bee keeping and fish farming. But concentration is mainly on
dairy. The county can also support agribusiness and industries and this is yet to be
fully exploited. There are manufacturing, wholesale and retail activities taking
place in the county.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

1.3

KEY DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES

Uasin Gishu County, just like any other county in the country, grapples with
challenges inherent in development endevour. During the period under review, the
county encountered a number of development challenges. The county had shortfall
of technical staff and capacity as the county was yet to undertake comprehensive
recruitment to fill staff and capacity gaps, an exercise not taken awaiting ongoing
staff rationalization and harmonization. HIV/Aids scourge put pressure on the
county resources, compounding the effects already felt due to the high poverty
level. Uasin Gishu County also had inadequate infrastructure, in the poor state of
roads especially during rainy season; water supply; and electricity. Severe
geological and geographical conditions in the county affect the roads sub-sector.
There were not enough infrastructures in schools and other institutions of learning,
though the county government and other devolved programs like CDF made efforts
to address this. There were also not enough teachers in a number of schools and
county polytechnics in the county. Inadequate access to credit and deforestation
were other development challenges in the county.
1.4

METHODOLOGY

This report was compiled incorporating input from the various county government
departments by forwarding their respective reports to the Planning Unit of Budget
and Planning section, Finance and Economic Planning Department.
1.5

LIMITATION OF THE REPORT

This report does not incorporate all the literature and narratives contained in the
respective departmental reports. It only reported on major activities and
achievements, challenges and way forward of each department. However, detailed
departmental reports contain information in details on departmental activities.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

CHAPTER TWO: POLICY REVIEW


This chapter gives key policy priorities and objectives guiding development
process in the county in line with CIDP, Vision 2030 and the Medium Term Plan
(MTP). Development process in the county continues to be informed by the desire
to create employment mainly for the youth and women as a way of incorporating
their participation in economic development; food security and poverty alleviation;
development of physical infrastructure to reduce cost of production, improved
competitiveness and provide access to the markets for both goods and services;
development of human resources for enhanced capacity to adopt innovative
approaches to development; and Information Communication Technology, a
growth sub-sector with immense potential of unlocking many opportunities in
business, education, agriculture, industry and security.
By the end of the CIDP (2013-2017) Uasin Gishu County anticipates to realize the
following broad development outputs/outcomes:
Improved physical infrastructure in the county roads network, electricity,
renewable energy technology promotion, housing;
Improved

food

security

and

poverty

alleviation

promotion

of

commercialization of dairy industry, increased agricultural and livestock


production, and trade;
Clean and secured environment and access to clean and affordable water and
sanitation. Also improved environmental regulation in line with EMCA 1999
for environmentally friendly extraction of natural resources such as quarrying
activities;
Improved school infrastructure for enhanced access to education

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Improved health of residents of Uasin Gishu County through improved health


infrastructure and health care and reduced incidences of diseases and conditions
such as malaria, HIV/Aids, tuberculosis e.t.c.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

CHAPTER THREE: PROGRESS REPORTS


3.1INTRODUCTION
This chapter gives progress reports by the various county government departments
and other agencies.
3.2EDUCATION,

CULTURE,

YOUTH

AFFAIRS

AND

SOCIAL

SERVICES
The department comprises four sections, namely, Education, Culture, Youth Affairs
and Social Services. The following sub-sections give progress in each of the
aforementioned departmental sections.
3.2.1 Education
Assessment of 67 ECDE centres to ensure proper teaching and care of ECDE
children.
Identified, in consultation with Member of County Assembly, 90 ECDE centres
to benefit from Kshs. 45M allocated in the financial year 2014/2015 for
classrooms construction.
Continued with the disbursement of 2013/2014 bursary allocation to the
identified beneficiaries by the Ward Committees.
3.2.2 Culture
The following activities were carried out during the quarter under review.
Capacity building workshop for Adjudicators, Trainers, Team Leaders on 17 th
October, 2014 at the TAC center.
Held County Talent and Cultural festival between 1st and 2nd November, 2014 in
Town Hall.
Participated in Regional Talent and Cultural festival in Baringo.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Participated in National Talent and Cultural festival in Nakuru between the


periods 3rd-9th December, 2014. The county sponsored choir and kalya
traditional dancers, and the rest of the team sponsored themselves.
In collaboration with EMAC Ensemble, organized a one day Uasin Gishu
performing arts festival on 29th November 2014 at Sirikwa Hotel.
Participated in organizing Mashujaa Day celebrations, 20th October 2014.
3.2.3 Youth Affairs
Uasin Gishu County has eight youth polytechnics, namely, Lainguse Youth
Polytechnic, Eldoret Youth Polytechnic, Ainabkoi Youth Polytechnic, Sogorik
Youth Polytechnic, Kanetik Youth Polytechnic, Sesia Youth Polytechnic,
Mugundoi Youth Polytechnic, and Sergoek Youth Polytechnic.
This section carried out the following activities:
Quality assurance in Sergoit, Sogorik, Ainabkoi, Sesia, Lainguse, Eldoret,
Kanetik Youth Polytechnics.
Preside over the disbursement of Kshs. 30M allocated as TVET loan scheme. A
total of six hundred (600) students benefitted, and were undertaking various
courses at Rift Valley Technical Training Institute.
Conducted and supervised the National examinations between 9th and 20th
November, 20014.
Infrastructure development in polytechnics had been allocated Kshs. 21M, for
which funds had been requisitioned for implementation.
3.2.4 Social Services
This section seeks to facilitate positive change of individuals or groups through
guiding and counseling services. It also mobilizes community to participate in
decision making, offer advisory services to individuals or youth/women groups as
well as empowering them through training, support and linkages to other service
providers.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

The following activities were undertaken during the period under review.
Social Welfare: facilitated positive change to individuals and groups through
guiding and counseling strategies. The following were also undertaken:
identification of clients; case assessment and histories of clients; guiding and
counseling; follow ups; home visits; rescue and repatriation of street children;
and referrals to government agencies or NGOs for support.
Community development: visited various groups and offered the following
services advisory, presided over election, attended groups annual meetings;
participated in executive committee meetings on Relocation Action Plan (RAP)
at the TAC centre; and preparatory meetings and Execution of Governors
Christmas tree.
3.2.5 Sports
This section coordinated and supervised the following sporting activities in the
county.

Kimbilio Road Race 4th October 2014


Family Bank Half Marathon 5th October 2014
Ndalat Cross Country 12th October 2014
Kass Marathon 16th November 2014
Tuskeys Cross Country 23rd November 2014
County Soccer Mini League 15th-16th November 2014
Badminton Open Tournament, Gulab Lochab Hall 6th December 2014
Handball National League, Wareng High School 8th November 2014
3.3AGRICULTURE, LIVESTOCK AND FISHERIES

This department has four sections Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries and


Veterinary services. The department seeks to improve the livelihoods of residents
of the county by promoting competitive farming as a business. It seeks to realize its
objectives through appropriate policy environment, effective support services and

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

sustainable natural resources management, create a favorable policy and legal


framework for the sustainable development of the crop and livestock sectors and
facilitate sustainable management and development of fishery resources for
accelerated socio- economic development through research. Due to its central role
in the economy, the County Government is supporting all initiatives geared
towards improving the livelihood of the farmers. The county government is also
investing in the sector through improvement of infrastructure and policy
framework in order to provide enabling environment for both local and foreign
investors.
3.3.1 Agriculture
Main crops grown in the county are maize and wheat. However, other food crops
are also produced; these include beans, Irish potatoes, sorghum, millet, sweet
potato, cassava, arrow roots and horticultural crops. Main industrial crops
produced are tea, coffee, pyrethrum, sugar cane and barley, with minor ones being
ground nuts, sunflower and soya beans.
Most of the food crops are grown through rain fed production. During the period
under review the county was generally dry. The dry spell was generally favorable
for harvesting and drying of maize.
Achievements
The Horticulture Business Strategy continued with the promotion of export of
vegetables and fruits. This resulted to an increase in demand for certified
seedlings of the same. The strategy distributed avocado seed to farmers of
which most of it germinated and about to be grafted. The screen net and shade
nets were delivered and the nursery construction was set to begin. ASDSP is

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

also promoting passion fruit value chain and groups had been funded to support
passion fruit production in the county.
Under the business strategy the bulk of the materials procured had been
delivered and was awaiting distribution. These included screen nets, pesticides,
farm tools, water tanks and materials for construction of nurseries. The main
fruit tree nursery at Chebororwa ATC was commissioned by the Governor
during the annual field day.
A sensitization workshop was organized for staff and farmers on MRLS and
EPA on export fruits and vegetables. KEPHIS also organized a one day
workshop on various issues touching on horticultural production. SNV was
rolling out a project that would boost the production and marketing of beans
and potatoes in the county.
Two dams in the county, Chepchobit dam in Tembelio Ward and Sosiani dam in
Sosiani location, Kamagut Ward, were funded by the National government for
desilting under the Water Harvesting for Food Security Programme. Desilting
was ongoing at Chebchobit dam.
Food Situation Update
During this period, food situation for the County was good as there were no major
incidences of food shortage. The Sub counties remained relatively food secure
(most households had adequate and stable access to food). Maize, beans and Irish
potatoes were available in the market at fair prices.
Food Stocks
The stocks of maize at household level were good in the County. Both maize &
bean stocks at household level remained stable in the County.
Table 1: Summary Maize and Bean Stocks as at December, 2014

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Crop

Farmers
2,807,230

Traders
560,621

31,185
Beans
NB: Weight 90kg bags

8,182

Maize

Millers
NCPB
61,000 1,022,243
0

Total
4,451,094
39,367

Remarks:
There were approximately 4 million bags of maize in the hands of NCPB,
farmers, traders, millers and NGOs. The total bean stocks were 39,367 bags as
at mid December 2014.
The maize stocks would be enough to last for 41 months (the stocks exclude
that with NCPB). The bean stocks were enough to last for three months.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 2: Food consumption compared to population and production in the county


December, 2014
Crop

Population
County

Monthly
consumption (90
Kg bags)

Current stocks (90


KG bags)- Exclude
NCPB

End of this
month surplus
(90 Kg bags)

End of this
month deficit
(90 Ks bags)

Maize

912,213

83,098

3,428,851

3,345,753

Beans

912,213

15,195

39,367

24,172

Table 3: Crop Targets and Achievements 2014

Crop

Maize
Beans
Irish potatoes
Wheat
Finger millet
Sorghum
Barley
Sweet
potatoes
Cassava
Arrowroots
Sunflower
Pyrethrum
Coffee(tons)
Tea(tons)
sugar
cane(Tons)

Targets 2014
Achieved (2014)
Target area
Target production
Area(Ha)
Production(Bags/Tons)
(Ha)
( bags/tons)
S Tota
S Tota
LR
LR
SR
Total
LR
LR
SR
Total
R l
R l
93,9
93,9 4,695,0
4,695,0 96,6
4,224,7
4,224,7
00
00
00
00
54
41
41
23,5 88 24,4 129,44 8,42 137,87 15,3 64 15,9
2,33
41 5
16
6
4
0
46 6
92 43,689
4 46,023
1,05 43 1,48 102,38 43,4 220,05
15 1,13 142,23 14,0 156,23
2 4
6
0
35
0
978 4
2
0
00
0
30,5
30,5 1,017,4
1,017,4 18,8
18,8 488,39
488,39
48
48
65
65
29
29
5
5
502
502
9,305
9,305
268
268
1,730
1,730
128
128
1,970
1,970
86
43
911
911
500
500 25,000
- 25,000
955
955 32,375
- 32,375
110
28
15
21
19
5
5

96
4
10
63
12

221
33
23
31
82
5
17

1,058
254
197
367
31
5

910
61
230
79
-

1,984
377
300
597
109
57

77
19
10
8
3
4
-

10
1
63
99
52

87
11
11
66
103
52

796
126
29
228
189
156
-

20
-

816
126
29
228
189
156
52

56

56

5,113

5,113

876

876

67,609

67,609

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Challenges:
Crop production in general was mainly affected by:
Late planting due to the late onset of the long rains (started late).
Prolonged dry period over months of March and April that resulted in crops being
water stressed.
High incidence of pests and diseases.
Increased cost of production as farmers had to purchase additional inputs for
gapping or to completely replant entire farms.
High cost of machinery and farm inputs (fertilizer, pesticides, fungicides &
herbicides).
Inadequate maize driers leading to post harvest losses.
Inadequate storage facilities at farm level.
Declining soil fertility leading to low yield per unit area.
Exploitation from the middle men that led to low farm gate prices hence low
incomes.
Poor marketing strategies for the produce no organized farmers group.

Remarks:
All the 6 Sub Counties had cases of MLND. The most affected crop is the late planted
crop. The early planted crop may be affected but this maybe manifested after harvest.

3.3.2 Agricultural Mechanization Station (AMS)


Activities carried out:

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Desilting of Chepchobit dam: The exercise was carried out during the quarter, but is
yet to be completed. There was shortage of fuel and other consumables for the
machines and staff.
Cutting and baling of fodder for livestock in the county.
Surveying of dam site in Pokot County for design for the National Government.
Machinery Performance:
CAT D6E Crawler Tractor GK Z975
The machine was returned to the station from Chepchobit due to worn out truck
rollers and was replaced by KBZ 338 D from the Ministry of Roads, Transport &
Infrastructure. It was still awaiting procurement of spares by the County
procurement.
Dragline GKA073F
The machine was at Chepchobit Dam. We experienced some delays due to Dam
encroachment among other administrative issues.
GK B444DChanglin Bull Dozer
The machine continued works for the Ministry of Roads, Transport &
Infrastructure and continued into December under the operation and supervision of
the same ministry.
Grader GK A140T
The grader broke down and was towed back to AMS Station and later returned to
the County yard to await repair.
GK V644 &GK A577R (FARM TRACTORS)
The two carried out cutting and baling of fodder within the County. They
experienced minor breakdowns which were rectified with some difficulty. Funds
for purchasing fast moving spares were not accessible.
The A.I.A earned and collected during the quarter was Kshs. 352,220 and Kshs.
322,000 respectively as shown in the table below.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 4: Revenue collection during the quarter


Machine

GK Z975

Activity

Location

AMS
Station
Min of
RTI
AMS
station
Chepchobi
t Dam
UG
County

GK B444D

Various

GK A 140T

GK A 073F

FARM
TRACTOR
S
HOUSE
RENT

Cutting
&
baling

Total

Non
Productive
Revenue (kshs)
productive
(hrs)
Earne Collecte
(hrs)
d
d
0
0
0
0

Remarks

Defective

Defective

Good

143,32
0

113,100

208,900

208,90
0
352,22
0

322,000

Challenges:
Breakdowns of machines and slow pace of repair and maintenance.
Administrative issues in connection with Chepchobit dam desilting exercise.
3.3.3 Livestock
Livestock section seeks to improve livestock production in the areas of breeding,
feeding, routine animal husbandry practices, pests and disease control and marketing.
The livestock subsector in the county comprises mainly of milk production from dairy
cattle and goats, beef/meat from cattle, sheep & goats, hides and skins, eggs/meat from
poultry, honey from beekeeping and wool production from sheep.
The department offers extension services in the development of the entire livestock
production enterprises. The extension approach is demand driven and to realize
meaningful development in any given area, involvement of all relevant stakeholders

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

are always brought on board at all levels of planning and implementation of any
livestock related project activities.
Achievements:
In the quarter under review, the section managed to undertake the following extension
services:
Table 5: Extension Services
Activity

Planne
d

Field days
Demonstration

Individual farm visits

Achieve
d

Remarks

12 World Food day, SDCP and other stake


holders

12

18 Silage, feed formulation, hay utilization,


among other technologies were done in
various wards in the county.

250

420 Carried out in various farms in the


County.

Farmer trainings

38 At farm and group venues.

Advisory group visits

12

Public barazas

12

12

Supervision/backstopping

12

24

Participating & holding ASK


Show, Agri-business Trade fair
& Livestock Breeders Show

3 Trade fair University of Eldoret,


Chepkoilel and Eldoret ASK Show
Preparation

Professional group meetings

Collaborative meetings

Compile reports and


administrative support

Tours

5 3 by IFAD;
1 by farmers.

Information desk
CDLP MGT Meeting

150

340

These are periodical reports for


different enterprises and others.

At Ward, sub county and County HQs.


At CDLPs office

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Livestock Production:
Table 6: Livestock Population
Enterprise

Estimated
Numbers

Quantit
y

Product

Beef Cattle

37,250 BEEF (kg)

486,975

Hair Sheep

120850 Mutton (kg)

49,849

Meat Goat

Pigs
Poultry
Meat(Kg)
Poultry
Exotic:

81650 Chevon (kg)

9335 Pig Meat (kg)


Poultry Meat
628112 (kg)

Price
Remarks
Av.
Range
Price
(KSH)
163,136,625 300-400
350

Worth
(Value)

10,468,238

400-450

420

17,096

3,590,160

400-450

420

53,506

16,586,783

270-350

310

14,071

5,628,200

350-600

450

56,180

18,539,318

92815 Eggs (trays@


30 )

360-420
Total Value

340

Meat goat
was in high
demand in
December

Local eggs
range from
390-480/= per
tray.

217,949,324

Table 7: Main Livestock Types (Estimated Numbers As At 31st December 2014)


Livestock
Enterprise
s

Soy

Beef cattle

Kapsere
Kesses
t

UG
Count
y

Turbo

Ainabko
i

Moibe
n

6,347

5,193

12,940

7,844

2,603

4,836

39,763

Hair sheep

44,592

16,786

19,197

20,951

9,286

17,247

128,05
9

Wool sheep

7,250

5,933

5,442

1,646

5,994

11,133

37,398

Meat goat

11,658

3,886

3,892

56,856

2,624

3,884

82,800

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Pig

711

525

1,052

428

9,293

683

12,692

Exotic
chicken

31,919

39,925

15,620

9,979

32,272

14,133

143,84
8

Local
chicken

143,97
9

159,23
7

66,183

131,06
7

92,883

114,37
7

707,72
6

Dairy Production:
In the quarter under review the dairy sub sector earned farmers a total of Ksh.1.5
billion from a dairy herd cattle population of 327,843 in the entire Uasin Gishu.
Table 8: Milk Production

Milk
Production
Home
Consumption
(Lts/Yr) + Calf
Surplus Milk

Quantity - Milk (Kg)


2014
2013
196,083,09 190,055,23
0
9
81,593,834

79,993,955

108,461,40
5

106,334,71
1

Worth (Value)
2014
2013
4,902,077,25 3,991,160,01 HHs:202,291;
POP: 894,179;
0
8
FFs:126,804
1,713,470,51 1,679,873,05
Consumption:
4
5
0.25lt/Day/Person
2,277,689,50 2,233,028,93
4
0

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 9: Dairy Cattle Population


Sub-County
Soy
Turbo
Ainabkoi
Moiben
Kapseret
Kesses
UG COUNTY
YEAR
2,014
2,014
2,014
2,014
2,014
2,014
2,014
Dairy cattle
49,527
39,067
102,465
66,133
37,742
32,909
327,843
The dairy herd comprises approximately 20% pure breeds, 70% crosses and 10%indigenous cattle.
GENERAL REMARKS: The upward trend in the production and productivity of all livestock enterprises has been steadily rising
in the county and the tempo should be maintained if not surpassed. The dairy herd comprises approximately 20% pure breeds, 70%
crosses and 10%indigenous cattle.

Table 10: Milk Production and Value (Dairy Enterprise)


Estimated Numbers
Dairy Cattle

2014
327,843

2014 (Q2 Oct-Dec)


Product
Quantity
Milk (Kg)
58,824,927

Worth (Value)
1,470,623,175

Av. Price Kshs


28

Table 11: Trend Milk Production and Value (Dairy Enterprise)


Enterprise
Dairy Cattle

Estimated Numbers
2014
2013
2012
327,8 317,7 310,0
43
86
35

Product
Milk
(Kg)

Quantity
WORTH (VALUE)
2014
2013
2012
2014
2013
2012
196,08 190,05 186,32 4,902,0 3,991,1 3,912,9
3,090
5,239
8,666 77,250 60,018 01,978

Av. Price Kshs


2014
2013
2012
28

25

25

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Challenges and way forward:

Challenge/ Constraint

Way Forward (Suggested solution)


Train farmers on appropriate production systems (Intensive system on dairy keeping);
Establish on-farm demonstrations integrated production systems;
Train livestock producers on forage and pasture establishment, conservation, storage and
utilization and establishing demonstration plots;
Promote private/institution livestock breeding and multiplication farms;
Promote registration and record keeping of livestock breeding stock.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Low Dairy Production

Inadequate provision of
extension services

Organize farmer tours to model farms and develop training materials;


Capacity build extension service providers on new technologies;
Train extension officers on ICT in provision of extension services;
Procure vehicles for the department.

Inappropriate production
systems

Encourage livestock farmer cooperatives to mobilize resources.

Poor livestock nutrition

Train farmers on how to make Total Mixed Ration (TMR).

Animal pests and diseases

Cary out animal disease surveillance zero monitoring;


Carry out livestock vaccination.

Low quality genetics


Artificial Insemination (AI)
and embryo transfer
technologies

Licensing AI service providers;


Train stakeholders and AI service providers on management and control of breeding
diseases;
Promote livestock breeding technologies (AI, use of sexed semen and Embryo transfer).

Weak linkages between


livestock research,
extension services and
farmers

Identify areas of possible investment;


Build a data inventory for extension service providers;
Increase extension staff strength.

Low Investment and


Inadequate Value Addition

There is need to undertake a business development exercise to identify viable areas of


possible investment. Few strong farmer groups exist in the sector around which investment
initiatives can coalesce;
Build capacity of the Department in value addition of livestock products and by-products;
Capacity built farmers on value addition of various livestock products (processing,
packaging, storage and distribution);
Train farmers on clean milk production and udder care management.

Poor Market Access

Establish milk coolers with other stake holders;

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

3.3.4 Fisheries
This section seeks to improve fish production in the county. It has the following main objectives:
To enhance good corporate Governance.
To enhance revenue levels of the County.
To enhance the implementation of the CIDP.
To increase fish production and productivity in the county.

To improve value addition and market access of fish and fish products in the County.
Planned activities for the financial year 2014/2015 include the following:
Create an enabling environment through development and review of 1 policy and legal instruments by end of June
2015.
To promote Good Aquaculture Practices (GAPs) in all aspects of fish farming by reaching 20,000 farmers through
dissemination of 3,000 extension material, 30 trainings/Field days, 5 bench marking tours and 5 demonstrations by
end of June 2015.
Promote production of high quality Fish feeds.
To promote Fish and Fish products safety by visiting fish preparation and selling points the year to ensure the Fish
handlers adhere to the recommended food safety standards and Issue licenses/permits to establishments who meet the
standards to raise Kshs. 40,000 in A.I.A.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

To mobilize fish farmers into groups and oversee election of leaders from ward, sub county to county level and
support them to register Uasin Gishu Fish Farmers cooperative by end of September 2015.
Recruit 100 new fish farmers through aggressive promotion of Fish Farming.
Improve aquaculture technology through construction of a modern fish hatchery by end of September 2015.
Increase fish production by stocking Fish ponds/ dams with 500,000 fish fingerlings by April 2015.
Publish at least 12 Fisheries related articles in the County e-page during the contract period.
Promote fish and fish products marketing and consumption in the County by conducting at least six eat more fish
campaigns.
Achievements:
438 visits to individual farmers were made.
Held 3 field days and 2 farmers trainings.
Attendance of departmental meetings and workshops, Agricultural Sector Development Strategy Programme meetings
(ASDSP) and stakeholders meetings.

Market data collection and fish quality control.

Table 12: Pond Statistics (FFEPP & Old Ponds)


Districts
No. of

Moiben
288

Ainabkoi Turbo
281

287

Soy

Kesses
271

278

Kapsaret
322

Totals
1,727

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Farmers
No. of
Ponds
Area of
ponds
(M2)

294

295

301

296

283

354

1,823

80,250

88,450

89,045

82,880

74,430

106,200

521,255

Sub-Counties
No. of ponds

Moiben

Soy

Kesses

Kapsaret

Total

41

37

32

77

61

304

16,800

12,300

11,100

9,600

23,100

18,300

91,200

6,440

4,715

4,255

3,680

8,855

7,015

34,960

2,898,000

2,121,750

1,914,750

3,984,750

3,156,750

15,732,000

harvested (m2)
Weight of fish

Harvested (Kshs)

Turbo

56

harvested
Area of ponds

harvested
(Kg)
Value of Fish

Ainabkoi

1,656,00
0

Table 13: Pond Harvesting/Production (Kg)


Market Statistics:
A total of 222,641kg of fish worth Kshs71,530,000 was sold in market centres in the County. Data on market statistics
are tabulated below.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 14: Fish Market Statistics


Species

Quantity (Kgs)

Fresh Tilapia
Processed Tilapia
Processed Mbuta
(Nile Perch)
Omena
Total

73,600
56,300
17,100
82,000
229,000

Price Per Kg
Total Value
(Kshs.)
400
29,440,000
350
19,705,000
350
5,985,000
200

16,400,000
71,530,000

Dam Fisheries:
Table 15: Dam Fisheries
S/No
.
1
2
3
4
5

Name
Kesses
Soy
Makonge
Ziwa
Kibuswa

Area
(Acres)
500
8
3
21
8

Production for
Projected Value @ 400
rd
3 Quarter
Kshs/kg
(Kg)
17,257
6,902,800
622
272,400
512
248,800
1,300
520,000
9,013
3,605,200

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Straback
Total

3
543

490
29,194

196,000
11,745,200

Challenges:
Transport for field visits and market inspections due lack of reliable departmental vehicle.
Streamlining of financial facilitation to the department.
Veterinary Services
The mandate of this section involves animal disease control and zoonosis control through vaccinations against infectious,
notifiable diseases and zoonotic diseases. It also does veterinary extension and training through field days, farmers open
days and training seminars.
Achievements:
Vaccinated against notifiable diseases in the county as follows:

Table 16: Vaccination against Notifiable Diseases


Disease

Cases Per Sub County.


Turbo

Soy

Moiben

Ainabko

Kesses

Vaccination
Kapsare

Figures done.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

i
FMD

3350

5500 nil

259

nil

100

9209

ANTHRAX nil

400

500

nil

nil

50

950

LSD

nil

400

nil

nil

nil

nil

400

RABIES

nil

190

nil

199

Note: A total of Kshs 8.1 million was used for purchase of 100,000 doses of FMD vaccines; this would be used to
vaccinate cattle in the entire county beginning January 2015. The farmers also supported the control of Black quarter
(BQ) Anthrax and Rabies diseases through purchase of vaccines on private capacity in their specific farms on private
capacity.
A total of Kshs.30 M was allocated for rehabilitation of 165 cattle dips in the county. The dips are currently under
rehabilitation at different stages with management by dip committee members of every dip in collaboration with
veterinary staff in specific wards.
A total of 2,080 Bovines, 4,849 Ovines, 2,078Caprines and 261Porcines carcasses were inspected.
The rehabilitated Eldoret Municipal slaughter house wasoperating smoothly, but the slaughter figures were low due to
the festive season of December. Bill of quantities for Burnt Forest and Turbo slaughter houses were being prepared.
There was need to provide protective clothing and inspection gears for the meat inspectors in all the slaughter
facilities.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Hides and skins traders sold 62.5 tonnes of hides, 3971pieces of goat skins and 11,739 pieces of sheep skins worth
Ksh.6,967,000 to Athi River and Nairobi. Ken- Knit (K) Limited exported 149.2tonnes of wool to United Kingdom
and India.
East Africa Agricultural Productivity programme (EAAPP) is being carried out in the entire County using sexed
semen to improve dairy cattle. There were a total of 2 calves born during the period.
The principal secretary in charge of state department of livestock graced the launch of liquid nitrogen plant at Eldoret
veterinary investigations laboratory during the period. This will assist to lower down the cost of Artificial
inseminations (A.I) in the county.
Challenges:
Inadequate veterinary vaccine supply.
Inadequate vaccination equipment.
Inadequate personnel transport and office space.
3.3.5 CHEBORORWA ATC
Chebororwa ATC was started in late 1957 as a holding ground for livestock. It was later converted to livestock
improvement centre (L.I.C.) by veterinary department before being changed to Farmers Training Centre in 1959. It is
among the oldest ATCs in the country. The institution was devolved from the national government to the County
Government of Uasin Gishu in February 2014 and is therefore being administered from Moiben sub-county. It trains
farmers from Trans-Nzoia, Uasin Gishu, West Pokot and Elgeyo-Marakwet counties, which form part of its mandate
districts.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

There are two interdependent sections in the institution, namely, the school and farm. The school comprises of the
training facilities including classrooms, conference rooms, hostels, dining hall and the kitchen. The farm acts as bulking
and multiplication centres for improved production materials for crop and livestock as well as germplasm conservation.
Achievements:
Farm Operations during the Quarter:
Table 17: Summary of Hectare, Volume and Value by Category, 2013- 2014
Achieved
Area (Ha)
201
3

Volume (MT)

2014

2013

Value (Million
Kshs.)

2014
(achieved
)

2013

Remarks

2014
(targets
)

Seed
Maize

68

68

120.6
3

80

7.601

5.0 M Drying is still


going on in
KSC

Seed
Wheat

40

52

54

117

1.40

3.9M Drying is still


going on in
KSC

22.5

8.8

0.170

Irish
potatoes

0.12 M

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Fruit Tree
Nursery
(no.)

15,00
0

12,000

0.004
0

Total

1.1M Will be sold in


February
10.3 M

Expected

Remarks on fruit tree nursery:


Avocado
12000 avocado seedlings in the fruit tree nursery
3000 grafted avocado seedlings (1600 being kwete variety and 1400 hass variety)
8700 avocado seedlings not yet grafted
300 avocado seedlings are ready for sale
Passion fruits
1050 passion fruits already grafted
3550 passion fruits seedlings not yet grafted
Plans are underway to introduce tissues culture bananas and mangoes
Comments:
During the 2014 growing period, rains were very erratic leading to prolonged crop stress leading to poor crop yields.
Table 18: Livestock Census as per 31st December 2014

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Enterprises

Numbers

Dairy herd

50

Sahiwal herd

74

Gala goats

147

Dorper sheep

73

Dairy goats

62

Remarks:
Milk revenue doubled due to availability of animal feeds during the periods July-December 2014
Table 19: Revenue from Farm Produce
Month
July 2014
August 2014
September 2014

Income
Expenditure
(Kshs)
(Kshs)
94,420.00
101,476.90
99,280.00

October 2014

127,346.00

November 2014

179,351.30

Remarks

Revenues from seed


maize and wheat will be
757,365.00
known by the end of
January 2015 when KSC
319,394.50 will have completed
drying them.
861,087.00

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

December 2014

303,130.00

Total

905,004.20

Remarks:
Income increased with the increase of milk production due to supplement of feeds from the county and some processed at
farm. Yields for the 2014 were low due to poor rains during planting season.
Table 20: Achievements from Trainings and other Extension Services during reporting period
Type of
course

Attendance
Title

Date

Adults
M

RC

Education Bench Marking

RC

Education Bench Marking

NRC
RC

Education Day
Registration Of Births
Schools Strategic Plan

Total
58

World
Vision

51

World
Vision

200

World
Vision

20

World
Vision

33

World
Vision

20

8-Jun-14
120

80

12

25JUL-14
29JUL-14
13

38

11-Jul-14
31

NRC

F M

10-Jul-14
20

Sponsor

Youth

20

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015


NRC

Outside Catering

29JUL-14
37

RC

Child Rights & Protection

13-Aug-14
30

RC
RC
NRC
RC
RC

Community Health Workers


Guiding And Counselling
Outside Catering
Alcoholism And Drug Abuse
Climate Change

NRC

Community Voice In Action

38

20

11

20

12-Sep-14
7-Sep-14
23

17

81

63

12-Sep-14
29SEP-14

NRC

Prayer Day

RC
RC
RC
NRC

Elders Of Dispute Resolution


Asdsp Climate Change
Strategic Plan
Outside Catering

World
Vision

58

World
Vision

31

World
Vision

40

World
Vision

144

World
Vision

95

`Trans Nzoia
county-+

40

World
Vision

31

World
Vision

30

1-Oct-14
17

43

33

29SEP-14
10

World
Vision

13

17-Aug-14

62

47
10

14

10-Oct-14
23

17

14 OCT-14
20 OCT-14
8-OCT-14

23

E.Marakwet
county

23
23

Uasin Gishu
county

13

World
Vision

23

World

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015


Vision
RC
RC
RC
RC
NRC

Kapslm Project
Health Club
Channel Of Hope
Dairy Project
Outside Catering

30 OCT-14

208
75

133

11-Nov-14

10

16-NOV-14
35

17

15

12

18-NOV-14
20 NOV-14
7

RC

Marakwet Highland Farmers

Good Governance

23-NOV-14

Scouts Training

23-NOV-14

Pilot Grazing Management

5-DEC-14

Total

812

World
Vision

27

World
Vision

13

World
Vision

3
1

Marakwet
Highland
Farmers

23

Cherangani
Hills CBO

65

Nature
Kenya

40

Kenya
Forestry
Service

15

14-DEC-14
37

52

13

40
RC

World
Vision

13

10
RC

18

18
RC

3
610

10

Trans Nzoia
county

1450

Type of course: RC-Residential or NRC-Non-residential

There was an increase of 30% in trainings compared with the same period last financial year

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 21: Educational visits


Name of School /
Institution/Group

Date

Attendance

Sosiot sec school

1st Aug, 2014

21

19

40 Learning new agri. Technologies

Kapsiliot sec school

4th Oct, 2014

22

22 Learning new agri. Technologies

Chebororwa sec school

4th Oct 2014

30

30 Learning new agri. Technologies

Chebiemit sec school

4th Oct 2014

15

16

31 Learning new agri. Technologies

Total

36

87

Total

Purpose

123

Table 22: Demonstrations/ Field- Days/Video Shows


Type of
Group

Date

Attendanc
e

Purpose

Stakeholders

14th Oct 2014

8213

Driving Agribusiness towards food


security and sustainable
development

Field day

Note: There an increase of farmers attendance to this years field day by about 3000 persons
Table 23: Summary of revenues generated during the periods July-December 2014
Item

DFF farm
revenue

DFF Training
and

TRAC
Debts

Total
Revenue

Remarks

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

DFF Kshs.

Kshs.

905,004.20

accommodatio
n revenue
(TRAC) Kshs.
2,201,580.00

(Inclusive
Of Debt)
659,600.0
0

3,766,184.2
0

Other payments
from KSC still
awaited for seed
Maize and wheat
Note: Drying of seed wheat and maize is still going on in KSC. A net payment of about 6 Million was expected by end of
January 2015.
Challenges:
Diminishing rainfall as a result of climate change in the ATC environment leading to reduced crop yields. Adaptation
to the changing climate change is the way forward.
Water flows to the station have diminished and no longer sufficient to satisfy water needs. This is due to old, rusted
and clogged pipes.
The original fence of the institution has been vandalized by the surrounding community leading to intrusion by
outsiders and recurrent illegal grazers, leading to increased insecurity and animal disease outbreak within the farm.
The centre has two tractors and old farming implements. The two tractors were fairly in working condition although
breakages were still experienced because of their old nature.
The demand for residential training is increasing and the station has only one modern hostel which can accommodate
21 clients. The other two hostels are old and not attractive to our clients.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Demand for practical dairy skills has increased since the revival of dairy industry. The station has no model dairy unit
for practical training despite offering training in this area. The existing unit was old and required complete overhaul.
The ATC depended on rain fed Agriculture for its Agricultural activities and this limited its attainment of maximized
production.
Way Forward:

There is need to increase funding for fencing the institution boundaries.


Construction of additional modern hostel which can accommodate at least 50 clients.
Construction of a complete modern dairy unit that can accommodate at least 10 dairy cows.
Venture into the production of high value crops for local and international markets through irrigation by constructing a
dam using a seasonal river passing through farm, and which offers a good opportunity for the dam construction.

Surveys were done by county engineers and are yet to develop the bill of quantities for the project.
A wide availability of crop and livestock products within the catchment of the ATC offers an opportunity for Agro
processing and value addition. This is already being implemented.
Introduction of short agricultural courses for the youth and farmers for enhanced knowledge and skill transfer,
increased self-employment and reduced food insecurity.
3.4LANDS, HOUSING AND PHYSICAL PLANNING
This department reports on activities carried out by Lands, Housing and Physical Planning sections. It is charged with the
following broad mandates.
Land Administration and Management
Planning, Management, Administration and Development of County Houses

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Physical Planning and Development Control


Land Survey and Mapping
Boundaries and Fencing
The department seeks to meet the following objectives.
To ensure order in developments through spatial planning and development control.
To secure land rights through efficient administration and management.
To disseminate information on new approaches and technologies in house construction.
To maintain county houses in good condition.
To carry out research on housing in the county.
To reduce land disputes through speedy settlement of boundary disputes and promote use of alternative disputes
resolution mechanisms in settling land disputes.
To regulate survey services through quality controls and production of quality maps.
To implement court orders.
3.4.1 Lands
The achievements outlined in this section were realized in the county head quarters.

Achievements:

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Formation of the following ad hoc committees to assist in discharging some duties,


o Lands committee
o Housing committee
o Development control and Plan approval committee
Completed preparation of departmental organization structure.
Documentation of public land (Draft report ready).
Completed the process of nomination of County Land Management Board members and forwarded the list to NLC for
formal appointment.
The department participated in formulation and presentation of Finance Bill 2014/2015.
The department procured land for High Altitude Training Centre at Chagaiyat and land at Langas for Langas Youth
Polytechnic.
Development of Bills and Cabinet papers
o Housing Policy
o Housing Corporation Bill
o Physical Planning Bill
o Rating Bill
o Extension of valuation roll for Eldoret town and preparation of valuation rolls for Burt Forest and Turbo towns.
o Street naming and management of billboards and advertisements.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

o Interim Lang Use Regulatory Framework 2014-2017.


3.4.2 Physical planning
Core functions of the section include:

Preparation of physical development plans


Implementation of physical development plans
Processing and approving development applications
Surveillance, monitoring and control of developments
Professional and administrative services
Achievements:
Table 24: Annual Work Plan Progress
DEPARTMENT DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS
Objective

To
complete
Karandili
Trading
Centre
Local
Physical
Developm
ent

Tasks/
Activities
2nd Stakeholders
meeting
Send invitation
letters
Purchase
materials
(Stationery)
Organize for
venue

Duration
/Time
July-Dec.
2014

Cost
(Kshs)
60,000

1st Half
Allocation
-

Targets
For The
2nd
Quarter
100%

%
Complete

Comments

100%

Completed

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

(advisory)
Plan
To
complete
Ziwa
Local
Developm
ent Plan

To
Prepare
Zoning
Plan
Eldoret
Town

Plan amendments
and Editing
Submission to the
Minister of approval
2nd Stakeholders
meeting
Send invitation
letters
Purchase
materials
(stationery)
Organize for
venue

July-December
2014

100,000

July-December
2014

60,000

Plan Amendments
and Editing
Submission to the
Minister of approval
Reconnaissance
Consult with the
County Executive
Committee(CEC)
member and
Chief Officer
Land
Draft and send
notice of
intention to the
media
Review of
Secondary data

July-December
2014

100,000

July-December
2014

100,000

50%

100%

0%

Completed

0%

0%

100%

0%

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

To
prepare
Zoning
Plan along
the ByPass
Corridor
Plan
1. Mois
Bridge
2. Burnt
Forest
3. Chepti
ret
4.
Classificat
ion
5. CSDP

Objective

including the
existing
development
plans
Contracted out to
private consultants
-Department to
Supervise
Prepare TORs
-Advertisement
-Tendering of
RFPs
-Contracted out to
private consultants
-Department to
Supervise
Prepare TORs
-Advertisement
-Tendering of RFPs

Tasks/
Activities

July-December
2014

100,000

100%

0% 1. TORs
completed
2. RFP
completed

July-December
2014

100%

- 1. TORs
completed
2. RFP
completed

Time

ROUTINE WORK
Cost
1st Half
(Kshs)
Allocatio
n

Duration

No in 1st
Half

Comments

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

To provide
Administr
ative and
Profession
al Services

Allocate duties
Appraise Staff
Consult County
Executive
Member (CEC)
Member Land,
County chief
Officer Land,
County Heads of
Departments,
Members of
Public
Convene and
attend
Development
control
Committee
Meetings

July-December
2014

Stationery LPO
Fuel
Mail
Registers

Continuo
us

Continuou
s

July 2014-June
2015(per
schedule)

Stationery LPO
Fuel
pool
Mail
Registers
Member
allowance

Once in
fortnight

Stationery LPO
Fuel
Mail
Registers

Quarterly

Prepare Staff and Quarterly


2014-2015
Work Plan
progress Reports

Challenges
in
convening
the meeting
since
members
of the
committee
are from
different
County
Department
s
Excess
work load

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Scrutinize/Inspect
development
applications and
recommend

July-Dec. 2014

Stationery LPO
Vehicle
Fuel

Daily

Monitoring and
Control

July-Dec. 2014

Stationery LPO
Vehicle
Fuel
Mail
Registers
Develop
ment
applicatio
n register

Daily

506

Physical Planning Department generated a total of Ksh.7, 718,634 A-in-A for the first half (July -Dec) 2014/2015
Financial year both in forward planning and development control section.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 25: Summary Breakdown of Revenue Collected Per Section


Section
Forward planning

Application Type

No. of
Applications

Building Plans/Architectural
drawings
Change users
Extension of users
Extension of leases
Subdivision Scheme plans
Inspection of Registers

Total Revenue
Collected
(Kshs)

506
10
12
8
1
6
935,800.00

Development
control

Architectural drawings
Change/ extension of users
Extension of leases
Subdivisions
6,782,834.00

Challenges:
Inadequate transport the section has only one vehicle Double Cabin KAQ918, used for enforcement and
surveillance. The forward planning has no vehicle.
Inadequate and/or intermittent untimely office supplies stationery and sanitary provisions.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Way Forward:
Procurement of vehicle.

3.4.3 Survey Section


Achievements:
Table 26: Performance in the Survey Section
Performance
Objective

Task/Activities

Expected
Output

Actual

Remarks

Departmental

Individual

Collection of AIA

Enhance collection
of A.I.A

To collect
125,000/= per
month

Subdivision
process in the
county banned

Processing of
Mutation Surveys

Amendment of
RIMs

To amend 900
parcels per
week

Nil for the County

Subdivision in the
county banned

Retracing of wornout Registry Index


Maps

To retrace 3
RIMs per
week

Nil for the County

Subdivision in the
process in the
county banned

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Enlargement of
To fair draw 1
small scale Registry sheet per
Index Maps
month

Nil for the County

Subdivision in the
process in the
county banned

Implementation of
Boundary Disputes
and Court Orders

Assist the Land


Registrar in
Boundary Dispute
resolutions

Attend to 2
disputes per
week

16

Lack of transport

Production of
Dyeline Prints

Print and sell RIM


prints to customers

To print and
sell 32 RIM
prints per
week

NIL FOR THE


COUNTY

Subdivision in the
county banned

Ensure Compliance
with Set Standards

- Check mutations
- To check 30
presented for
mutations per
accuracy, plotability week
and reliability for
amendments

NIL

Subdivision in the
process in the
county banned

Discourage
Encroachment of
Public Utilities

Survey of public
utility plots

30

Poor
implementation

Improve Survey
Services

Purchase of survey
equipment

-I Total Station - 1 RTK


- 1RTK

-1 3 IN ONE
PLOTTER

Inadequate
Allocations

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

- 13 IN ONE
PLOTTER

Challenges:
Lack of Reliable transport.
Inadequate equipment and tools.
Allocations not cascaded to sections.
Table 27: Revenue Collection per Section
No
.
1.
2.
3.
4.

Section

Collection (Ksh.)

Housing
Physical Planning
Survey
Lands (Land Rates)
Total

25,449,439
7,718,634
Data with Finance
33,168,073

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

3.4.4 Housing
Achievements:

During the period under review, the following activities were undertaken at the estates.
Eviction of rent defaulters was carried out in all county estates and the vacant houses were allocated to new tenants.
Kodhek estate tenancy was terminated to pave way for renovation of the houses.
Unblocking of blocked sewer lines and opening of storm water drainages was carried out in several estates during the
period.
Bush clearing and litter collection was carried out in all the estates.
Tenants complaints concerning rent balances were attended to.
Transfer of AMS houses which were formerly under the Ministry of Agriculture was transferred to County Housing

Department and rent received from the estate was deposited to the County revenue account.
Renovation of staff house in Elgon view block 8/85 was done and house allocated to county staff.
Preparation of tender documents for construction of 2 no. staff houses at Elgon view done.
Preparation of county housing policy and bill done and forwarded for approval.
Slum upgrading infrastructural activities under Kisip commenced in the informal settlements of Munyaka, Kamukunji
and Huruma Mwenderi.The ongoing projects were: construction of bitumen roads, installation of high-mast lights,

ablution blocks and rehabilitation of sewer lines.


Preparation of social economic survey reports also under Kisip was 90% complete in regard to 4 other settlements,
namely, Hill School, Racecource, Kimumu, Kambi Nairobi and Hawaii.
Table 28: Monthly Collections per Estate October-December 2014
S/No

Estate

Units

Rent P/M

Expected

Oct.

Nov. Rent

Dec. Rent

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Rent P/M
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

MACHARIA
KILIMANI
TOM MBOYA
KURIA
MAYABI
KODHEK
KAMANDA
UHURU
TRANSIT
PIONEER -I
PIONEER-II
ST MARYS
KIDIWA -K
TEACHERS I
TEACHERS II
AMS ESTATE

256
800
186
2,000
48
2,000
88
3,500
58
5,000
21
12,000
66
3,500
240
4,000
16
1,200
76
4,500
124
5,000
16
800
12
2,000
18
5,000
14
3,000
117
600-1,800
Payroll rent deductions
Totals

204,800
372,000
96,000
308,000
290,000
252,000
231,000
960,000
19,200
342,000
620,000
12,800
24,000
90,000
42,000
143,800
4,007,600

Rent
Paid
195,235
460,809
65,720
222,750
379,830
0
186,350
871,020
15,800
1,315,08

Paid

Paid

359479
724174
280095
811660
478427
0
522430
2066595
42260
1342176

145,205
121,278
68,750
57,830
82,500
0
28,000
294,190
11,750
459,260

7,100
29,900
75,500

11565
38270
258155

15,695
8,840
47,800

314,580
4,139,674

345,000
7,280,286

344,800
1,685,898

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 29: Arrears per Estate 31st December 2014


S/N
o

Estate

No
Of
Unit
s

Rent/
Unit

Expecte
d
Monthl
y Rent

Arrears
30th Nov
2014

1
2
3

256
186
48

800
2000
2000

204800
372000
96000

302945
415950
134640

204800
372000
96000

507745
787950
230640

4
5
6

Macharia
Kilimani
Tom
Mboya
Kuria
Mayabi
Kodhek

Less
Dec
Total
Paymen
ts
145,205
121,278
68,750

88
58
21

308000
290000
252000

403040
213760
0

308000
290000
252000

711040
503760
252000

57,830
82,500
0

653,210
421,260
252,000

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

Kamanda
Uhuru
Transit
Pioneer-I
Pioneer-II
St Mary's
Kidiwa-K
Teachers

66
240
16
76
124
16
14
46

3500
5000
1200
0
3500
4000
1200
4500
5000
800
2000

231000
960000
19200
342000
620000
12800
28000
132000

153630
858110
17480
921423

231000
960000
19200
962000

384630
1818110
36680
1883423

28,000
294,190
11,750
459,260

356,630
1,523,920
24,930
1,424,163

12800
28000
132000

76825
48980
1147000

15,695
8,840
47,800

61,130
40,140
1,099,200

64025
20980
1,015,00
0
0

344,800

-344,800

46,30
0

3,867,80
0

4,520,98
3

3,867,80
0

8,388,783

1,341,09
8

7,047,685

Payroll
deductions DEC
2014
1,25
Totals
5

Challenges:

Dec
Monthl
y Rent

Arrears
As At
1stDec201
4

Arrears As
At 31st Dec
2014

362,540
666,672
161,890

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Transport the section has no vehicle to move round the estates taking into consideration the expansiveness of the
county.
Ownership dispute of Elgon view staff houses still remains a challenge since the occupants claim ownership of the
houses.
Most teachers are reluctant to pay rent to the County Government as usual because they have been told by Education
Office to remit rent to respective schools accounts.

Most of the county estates were constructed several years back and are dilapidated and maintenance was not
commensurate to the income.

Secondment of building maintenance staff to the department needs to be hastened to ensure the operations in that
section take place as required.

Office accommodation for the housing staff in one central location requires to be addressed to improve productivity.
3.5ROADS, TRANSPORT AND PUBLIC WORKS

This department is vested with the responsibility of providing a holistic and integrated transport system within the county
as well as operating and maintaining an efficient, safe and cost effective transport system.
3.5.1 Roads
The Subsector is responsible for development, rehabilitation and maintenance of road network in the county (all roads
except those currently classified as KeNHA, KURA and KeRRA).

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

3.5.2 Transport
The Subsector is responsible for transport policy formulation and development of regulatory framework, transport
infrastructure and management of the vehicle fleet.
3.5.3 Public Works
The Subsector is responsible for development, maintenance and rehabilitation of Government buildings and other public
works in the county. The county fire and disaster management unit is included in this section.
3.5.4 Electrical
The Subsector is responsible for development, maintenance and rehabilitation of street lights and other electrical works
on Buildings.
Achievements:
Table 30: Budget/Implementation Matrix, Roads
S/N
o

Sub Sector

Roads

Activity
Construction of Donyo
Lessos-Pan Villa Rd

Budget
Estimate

Implementation
Status

20,000,000 Contract Signing

Remarks

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Construction of Iten Rd
Jnc-Vetinery- PCEA Rd

8,000,000 Contract Signing

Construction of Oldonyo
Lessos Bridge

20,000,000 Contract Signing

Street Lights Eldoret


CBD

Contract
12,000,000 documentation

Grading and Gravelling


of County Roads

150,000,00
0 Ongoing (Table 2)

Purchase/ Lease of
Borrow pits

Prequalification
30,000,000 Complete

Drainage works and


Bush Clearing

45,000,000 Tendering stage

Survey of County Roads

10,000,000 Ongoing

Construction of
NMT(Foot/Cycle Paths)

Public
Works

Design and
Contract
4,000,000 documentation

Bridges and Foot


Bridges

Design and
Contract
50,000,000 documentation

Design of County
Headquarters

Contract
5,000,000 documentation

Lift/Ramp Installation at
County Headquarters

Contract
5,000,000 documentation

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Transport

Purchase of specialized
Equipment

260,000,00
0 Ongoing

Purchase of fuel Tankers

Contract
10,000,000 documentation

Purchase of Mobile
Workshop

Contract
10,000,000 documentation

Purchase of assorted
asphalt equipment

Contract
5,000,000 documentation

Construction and
Equipping of
Mechanical workshop

County
Corporation
s

10,000,000 Design Completed

Purchase of Rapid
response Fire Vehicle

5,000,000 Tendering Ongoing

Purchase of essential fire


Equipment

Contract
2,790,000 documentation

County Mechanical and


Transport Fund(CMTF)

3,000,000 Bill Drafting

County Roads Authority

3,000,000

Bill Drafting

Tender documentation and advertisement for the construction of two roads were complete and the tenders open for
Bids. The other works for bridges construction were at contract documentation. Grading and gravelling was on-going.
Designs for the mechanical workshop had been finalised. Tenders would be floated for the construction of the same.
Tenders for the acquisition of the essential fire equipment had already been done.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

The public works section had been undertaking projects funded by the county government as well as those funded by
the national Government.
Challenges
The grading and gravelling programme had just been launched within the county and delivery of fuel to the equipment
was posing a challenge due to pickups being used. However, this was being addressed by the procurement of the fuel
tanker and a mobile workshop.
The newly acquired motor graders had already started working, but four of them were not being used optimally.
The county budget was pegged on only 50% of all vote heads hence this had affected recurrent expenditure on
servicing of field supervision vehicles.
Lack of enough office space for the department.
Congestion and unsustainable infrastructure in the CBD.
Way forward
The department to expedite the procurement of a fuel tanker and mobile workshop in order to curb the challenge of
delayed fuel delivery and repair work.
The department to collaborate with development partners and other stakeholder to explore ways of utilising the
available resources to attain maximum benefits.
The department to collaborate with the National Government to develop the CBD. This entails surveying and
designing of by-passes, new roads, walkways and cycle ways. This would be followed by construction of the designed
passages.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

New plant operators had already been recruited for the new equipment hence beefing up the construction and
maintenance of roads. However, recruitment of new drivers for the tippers also needed to be finalised.
Table 31: Grading and Gravelling of Roads
Activity
Grading
Gravelling
Dozing
Total

Km
517.2
14.6
2.6
534.4

Cost
5,428,367.00
4,695,897.00
364,805.00
10,489,069.00

3.6ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY, WATER AND NATURAL RESOURCES


The Department of Environment, Energy, Water and Natural Resources was created to oversee the devolved functions
within this area. However, there were some grey areas on the department that should squarely fall within its jurisdiction
but still ran by the national government, a good example being forestry. To achieve the 10% forest cover by 2030, the
mandate of forestry should have been given to the county governments.
3.6.1 Water
The mandate of the subsector is to coordinate water supply and catchment protection within the county. The functions of
this section include: Water, sewerage & sanitation services provision; Water infrastructure development and maintenance;
Local water catchment protection; and County water sector co-ordination. The county is endowed with a number of water
sources which includes rivers, dams and underground water. It also has six gazetted water supplies: Turbo water supply;

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Moisbridge water supply; Burnt forest water supply; Sosiani water supply; Sambut water supply; and Kipkabus water
supply.
3.6.2 Environment
The mandate of this section involves Waste management; Control of air pollution, noise pollution, Public nuisance and
outdoor advertising; and Implementation of national government policies on natural resources and environmental
conservation.
Achievements:
The department undertook twelve major sensitization campaigns on waste management at Kimumu, Kamkunji,
Langas, Market, CBD, and Kipkaren estates.
Prequalified service and goods providers who would facilitate implementation of its programmes.
The department also floated an expression of interest on recycling of wastes at the main dump site at Kipkenyo. The
objective of this was to put into economic use the hundreds of tons of waste whilst at the same time creating space at
the dump site.
The department introduced the seven day street cleaning by creating a team that would work within the CBD on
Sundays and be compensated by offs within the course of the week.
30 permits were issued for solid wastes from outside the county to be dumped at the dumpsite.
The department received 40 skip loader containers and five refuse trucks were ordered. This would improve efficiency
of waste collection in the county.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

An additional 40 skip loader containers and two tractor operated skip loaders were tendered and evaluation to
establish a suitable supplier was.
The department floated an expression of interest for purchase of a suitable dump site at Burnt Forest and Mois bridge
areas.
Control of air pollution, noise pollution, Public nuisance and outdoor advertising: 125 noise permits were issued
within the county and 26 Environmental Impact Assessment reviews were done.
Enforcement: The department enforced environmental laws as stipulated in the Environment Management and
Coordination Act. As a result, several environmental offenders were apprehended and charged in a court of law as
shown on the table below.
Table 32: Environmental Offenders Charged in Court
No
1
2

4
5

Offender
Unlicensed quarry
Uncooperative
landlord
(Kamukunji)
Oasis hotel

Pamoja Restaurant
Uncooperative
landlord
(roadblock)
Unlicensed Hotels

Type of offence
Illegal quarrying
Illegal dumping

Fine charged (Ksh)


600,000
20,000

Illegal discharge of
effluent into the
environment
Illegal dumping
Illegal dumping

120,000

Illegal discharge of

120,000

30,000
60,000

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

effluent into the


environment

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

The department allocated Ksh 3,000,000 for purchase of seedlings to enrich catchment areas.
The department identified these areas across the county and indigenous trees will be planted during the
commencement of the long rains next year.
The department has also planned to carry out sensitization campaigns on protection of water bodies and sources within
the county in the next quarter.
Maintained all the six water supplies running.
Supervision and management of the ongoing Kipkabus water project was done and the project is expected to be
completed by 31st March 2015.
Bids for rehabilitation of the 6 water supplies & 2 ward water projects had been opened and award set to be done
before 15th January 2015. The next set of bids for ward water projects was set to be floated by 9th January 2015.
The department liaised with various stakeholders, LVNWSB, NWC&P, KVDA, National Youth Service, in planning
and development of various projects in the county which included;
o Disilting of 4 dams
o Construction of 5 water pans
o Planning for implementation of 2 community, Barsombe & Kiplombe, which were on hold due to funding
constraint from the donor.
The department carried out designs of ward projects and floated quotations for tendering. The department expects to
have completed all the ward projects.
Challenges

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

The implementation of the Kipkabus water project faced resistance from the neighbours upstream and KFS whose
land the dam was located.
The inherited staff from the defunct municipal and county councils resisted the change but the county government has
now managed to develop systems that suits it governance
Funding constraints from donors has made some projects to be hold.
Way forward
There is need to sensitize the public on the devolved functions and the constitution as a whole.
The National government should in the subsequent financial years disburse funds in time for proper planning and
execution of projects.
3.7PUBLIC SERVICE MANAGEMENT
Public Service Management is made up of five sections, namely, Human Resource Management, public Relations,
Security and Enforcement, Governors office and international relations and the legal section.
It is a service department that co-ordinates service delivery in the county, with the strategic theme being Re-defining
service delivery for efficient and timely service delivery.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Achievements:
Central Registry Section
Table 33: Status/Achievement, Central Registry Section
N
o
1

Planned Activities

Period

Status/Achievement

Remarks

Mail management
(Administration and Plots)

1St October to 31St


December 2014

825 Correspondences
were received, circulated
and filed

Procurement of 48,500 spring


files from the Government
Printers

1st October to 31st


December, 2014

Wrote a letter to
Government Printers and
a quotation of
Ksh.12,603,400 given

Opening of new plot files for


rates

1St October to 31St


December 2014

682 Plot files opened.

Computerization/Digitization of 1St October to 31St


records
December 2014

Files
forwarded to
action
officers
A Memo to
Ag. CO PSM
to procure the
files in three
phases
The files
were
forwarded to
rates office
for action
The process
is ongoing

Preservation and conservation

Human Resource Section

1St October to 31St


December 2014

530 Plot files were


computerized
Acted files returned

Files kept in
the cabinets

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 34: Status/Achievement, Human Resource Section


N
o
1

Planned
Activities
Capacity
Assessment and
Rationalization of
the Public Service
at the National
and County
Governments
(CARPS).
Tendered for the
Group Personal
Accident Cover
and the Group
Life Cover

Period

Status/Achievement

Remarks

8th to 19th December


2014

A total of 11 reports
generated from various
departments. The activity
was done at Noble Hotel

Final reports with the


County Human Resource
Manager

1st October to 31st


December, 2014

The two companies have


brought back their
acceptance letters and
the legal department is in
the process of preparing
the contracts

Branding RFP

1st October to 31st


December, 2014

Medical Cover

1st October to 31st


December, 2014

The evaluation was done in


the month of December 2014
and the tender committee
awarded Porim Insurance
Brokers to provide for
WIBA/GPA with a total
Kshs. 14,162,496 and Jubilee
insurance was awarded to
provide for the Group Life
Insurance at the cost of Kshs.
10,965,590.
Branding evaluation was also
done in the month of
November 2014 and the
tender committee awarded
Brand Associates
The cover was left pending at
the end of the year and it is at
the tender committee level

They are yet to begin


rolling out their work as
from the month of
January 2014
The SRC have provided
an advisory to the
County Government of

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

however the time frame for


issuing the tender has lapsed.

Disciplinary
Cases

Training of the
staff reporting to
the Directors
level at the Kenya
School of
government -

1st October to 31st


December, 2014

The disciplinary committee


had a session on 11th
December 2014 and among
the staff that were invited for
the disciplinary hearing are;
John Kipyego Bii
Simon Kibii
Stanslas Ondimu
Samuel Kerich
Zephaniah Kurgat
One staff was also suspended
for negligence of duty and
she is called Lilian Akinyi
Onyango.
The training was conducted
by the external consultant Mr
Magotsi and Individual
development plans were
generated and the service
charters finalized

Uasin Gishu to procure


the medical scheme for
the State/Public officers
and that is what has been
used by PSM department
to request for the
cancellation of the initial
tender and procuring of
the new tender.
The disciplinary
committee made their
recommendations to the
County Public Service
Board for Action

Her case is pending


waiting for the
disciplinary committee to
convene the hearing

All the documents are


with the consultant and
he is awaiting the
launching date

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Baringo

Payroll Section
Table 35: Status/Achievement, Payroll Section
N
o
1

Planned
Activities
Retirees

Period

Status/Achievement

Remarks

1st October to 31st


December, 2014

Party was organized for


the retirees on 23rd
December 2014

Non
Compliance
Case effected
in the payroll
Resignations,
transfers and
incoming staff

December 2014

Staff Arrears

December 2014

A total of 46 employees retired


from service in the month of
October to December 2014 (The
list is attached to the report)
As a result of Lilian Akinyi
suspension, her basic pay was
withheld but she was paid the
house allowance
Timothy Kipsang payroll
number 2011244067 transferred
to Uasin Gishu and Samuel
Emasit Okalebo payroll number
2010030439 resigned from
employment
A total of Kshs. 46,546,407.31
was paid to the former defunct
local authority staff however the
Union dues were not paid
because union dues are never
paid in arrears.

November and
December 2015

The status quo remains


until the disciplinary
committee and the CPSB
concludes her case
They have all exited from
payroll

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Total salary
paid through
IPPD

1st October to 31st


December, 2014.

Oct. 2014 Kshs. 134,754,087.55 The cost for November is


Nov. 2014 Kshs. 154,812,243.90 high due to the leave
Dec. 2014 Kshs. 142,973,377.95 travelling allowance paid
to the defunct local
authority staff and the
cost for December is still
high because leave
allowance was paid to the
staff devolved from the
National Government

Enforcement and Security Section


Table 36: Status/Achievement, Enforcement and Security Section
N
o
1

Planned
Activities
Revenue
collection

Period

Status/Achievement

Remarks

1St October to 31St


December 2014

Total collections per month;


Oct. 2014 Kshs. 1,114,900
Nov. 2014 Kshs. 1,097,791
Dec. 2014 Kshs. 737,700

The revenue for the month of


December 2014 dropped
because of the following
reasons:
The Magistrate went on leave
for one week;
Lack of enforcement lorries due
to breakdown of KAM 075T
and KAN 089.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

3.8TRADE, INDUSTRIALIZATION, COOPERATIVE & ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT, TOURISM &


WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
This department is responsible for the implementation, formulation, coordination and administration of activities in
respect to Trade, Industrialization, Tourism, Wildlife and Cooperative Development sectors at the County Level.

Weights & Measures


The subsection is fully staffed and is guided by an Act of Parliament which is in force and we implement the same.
Specifically the law relating to weights and measures, known internationally by the name Legal Metrology is not only a
vital instrument of consumer protection but is also vital for the scientific, technical and industrial development of the
county. Legal metrology law has application in almost all spheres of human activity within Uasin Gishu County ranging
from ordinary trade transactions in the market place to those measurements needed for ensuring public health and human
safety. We ensured that in ordinary trade transactions, the sale of any commodity in loose form, the quantity delivered to
the purchaser is not less than the quantity contracted for and paid for.
Weights and measures subsection is mandated to do the following:
Calibration of Machines
Inspection of Standards
Prosecution in case of failure to comply with the set standards

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Betting Control and Licensing Board


This subsection seeks to regulate and control betting, lotteries and gaming activities, protect members of the public
against Fraud, eradicate illegal gambling and promote responsible gaming in Uasin Gishu County. We are committed to
ensuring that gaming is conducted honestly and competitively with minimum costs but maximum contribution to the
County of Uasin Gishu and that it is free from criminal activities like money laundering.
There is only one fully pledged casino at Wagon wheel hotel which operates from Monday to Saturday and closed on
Sunday.
Trade
Trade section is charged with the development of trade and investment activities in the county. It seeks to realize the
following.

Promotion of Trade
Capacity building of traders/groups
SMEs promotion/Exhibitions and trade fairs
Investor/Jual Kali promotion

The department embarked on creating an enabling environment for all the players in the sector to have an equal
opportunity in doing their businesses. This was done through various programme activities that included; development of
wholesale and retail markets, receiving applications for financing of micro small and medium enterprises through Uasin
Gishu Trade Dev. Joint Loan Board, attended and funded organized trade forums to boost inter-county and intra-county

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

trade activities, organized training programmes for MSMEs to upscale their entrepreneurial skills and worked in
collaboration with other ministries in trying to decongest the CBD through relocation of hawkers, kiosk owners. This is to
pave way for the planning of the kiosks in the town and the fabrication/erection of over 5000 modern kiosks in designated
areas of the town.
Wildlife and Tourism
Uasin Gishu County is well known in terms of sports, and particularly in athletics. The county has branded itself as a
home of champions because it has produced international athletes who have won several races and scooping medals for
many years. Uasin Gishu hosts several training camps which include 64 Stadium, Kipchoge Keino Stadium, Eldoret
Sports Club, Rosa Training camp and the proposed Timboroa High Altitude Training camp.
Main functions of the section include: Tourism promotion and marketing; Research and development; and Tourism
product development.
The department also has Industrialization and Enterprise Development, and Cooperative Development section which
never registered substantial activities during the quarter.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Achievements
Carried out spot checks on pool table inspection combined with illegal gambling Inspection during the quarter as well
as gambling and checking on unlicensed pool tables.
Staff at various levels attended money laundering workshop in Nairobi, induction course, senior clerical courses and
senior secretarial course at the Kenya School of Government.
Collected Kshs 1,034,500 by end of second quarter.
Conducted Miss Tourism grand finale was at the Gulab Leisure Hall on 31 st October 2014. The event was attended by
the County officials from the neighboring counties that is Trans-zoia, Elgeyo Marakwet, Baringo, Nandi and Narok.
During the grand finale Miss Tourism sponsors were identified and they included; ACE Motors, Medheal group of
hospitals, Boma Inn Hotel, Marriot Hotel, Poa place.
The process of reviving dormant cooperative societies started and 29 meetings were held across the county with 14
societies with prospects of fully revived with follow up. Other activities in the second quarter were as follows:
o

Capacity building and member education; 18 meetings were held in separate cooperative societies with total
attendance of 1,714 members.

Capacity building for management committee meeting; 17 meetings were held with total attendance of 154
members.

A total of 27 meetings were held for pre cooperative societies with attendance of 1,252 members.

A total of 5 Seminars and workshops were held with a total attendance of 132 members.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

A total of 19 AGMs, 15 First AGMs and 36 SAGMs were held with issues arising adequately addressed.

A total of 35 committee meetings were held in which monthly reports and AGM reports discussed and
prepared.

A total 14 conflict resolution meetings were held mainly in the matatu saccos on issues of management and
route management issues.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Table 37: Summary of Vital Statistical Information on Co-operatives in the County


Item

Description

No. of Societies Registered

468

Dormant

298

Active

122

Under Liquidation

48

Employment in the Co-operative


Societies

274

Membership

35,305

Share Capital and Deposits

2.95 billion

Turnover

1.2 billion

Total Assets

800 million

Uasin Gishu Trade Development Loans Board Scheme


Loan Recoveries:
The office received monies from regular loanees and pursued loan defaulters with a view to recovering money to improve
the lending base of the Board.
o Total amount recovered from 1st July, 2014 to 31st December, 2014 Kshs. 2,047,030.00

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

The office provided business counseling and advisory services to 150 traders as well as business
registration information.

Vetting of loan applicants:


Received application and started verification and vetting process
o

417 traders applied for loans/ funds to expand their businesses.

The total amount applied for was Kshs. 69,450,000.00.

Applications recommended were 293.

Total amount recommended Kshs. 39,890,000.00.

Total number of applicants rejected were 124.

Loan Disbursements - July 2014 to December 2014:


Loans were not disbursed in the period under review as the tenure of the board members had expired in February, 2014
for National Government and September, 2014 for County Government board members. Extension of their tenure for one
year is in process.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

3.9FINANCE AND ECONOMIC PLANNING


Finance and Economic Planning is a Service Department that finances all the activities of the County Government of
Uasin Gishu. During the second quarter of financial year 2014/2015 local revenue collection stood at Kshs.
125,754,152.65. The half year (Jul-Dec 2014) local revenue collection was at Kshs. 376,743,078.60. In the same period,
cumulative recurrent expenditure amounted to Kshs. 1,300,068, 117 and development expenditure amounted to Kshs.
487,564,307. This gave total cumulative expenditure of Kshs. 1,787,632,424.
Revenue stood at Kshs. 40,860,481 in the month of October, then increased to Kshs. 53,643,584.50 before dropping to
Kshs. 31,250,087.50.
This is illustrated in the figure 1below.

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

Figure 1: Monthly Revenue Performance


GRAND TOTALS
140,000,000.00
120,000,000.00
100,000,000.00
80,000,000.00
60,000,000.00
40,000,000.00
20,000,000.00
Oct-14

Nov-14

Dec-14

total

Table 38: Monthly Revenue Performance per Stream


No.

ITEM

Quarter I

Quarter II

Oct-14

Nov-14

Dec-14

Total

Year Total

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

(Jul-Sept)

1.

7,280,908.0
Court

3,936,371.00

1,373,206.00

1,074,641.00

896,690.00

3,344,537.00

Financial Management Unit

3,394,358.00

255,126.00

437,844.00

388,510.00

1,081,480.00

Street Parking

20,124,180.00

6,241,512.00

5,990,375.00

5,534,025.00

17,765,912.00

Land Rates Management Unit

86,951,465.00

1,604,614.00

3,357,288.00

3,209,741.00

8,171,643.00

Business Permit Unit

5,972,942.00

1,241,335.00

674,870.00

152,505.00

2,068,710.00

Cess Management Unit

9,882,127.80

1,338,418.00

534,401.00

47,910.00

1,920,729.00

14,000.00

13,000.00

12,000.00

2,500.00

27,500.00

13,554,685.00

4,888,469.00

8,978,916.00

2,905,558.00

16,772,943.00

198,100.00

104,500.00

20,800.00

3,800.00

129,100.00

2.

4,475,838.0

3.

37,890,092.0

4.

95,123,108.0

5.

8,041,652.0

6.

11,802,856.8

7.

41,500.0
Home Craft Center Management

8.

30,327,628.0
Housing Management Units

9.

327,200.0
Nursery School Fees

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

10.

1,592,080.0
Epidemic Control and Inspection Unit

968,430.00

187,450.00

230,800.00

205,400.00

623,650.00

Cemetery Unit

236,000.00

41,300.00

81,700.00

61,200.00

184,200.00

Food Quality Inspection Fee

268,360.00

45,130.00

20,995.00

24,440.00

90,565.00

Health Centers Former EMC

621,700.00

320,750.00

139,650.00

170,000.00

630,400.00

Refuse Collection Unit

673,380.00

2,081,252.00

90,559.30

32,920.00

2,204,731.30

Slaughter House Management Unit

945,880.00

299,650.00

672,120.00

788,625.00

1,760,395.00

16,070,266.00

6,247,650.00

4,105,275.00

4,029,069.00

14,381,994.00

242,500.00

94,500.00

115,000.00

96,500.00

306,000.00

3,783,479.00

2,154,785.00

1,764,257.00

1,640,903.00

5,559,945.00

18,274,535.00

6,312,485.00

5,998,115.00

6,144,905.00

18,455,505.00

11.

420,200.0

12.

358,925.0

13.

1,252,100.0

14.

2,878,111.3

15.

2,706,275.0

16.

30,452,260.0
Engineering & Urban Planning Management Unit

17.

548,500.0
Fire Fighting & Ambulance Management Unit

18.

9,343,424.0
County Markets

19.

36,730,040.0
Bus Parks

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015

20.

184,380.0
Cooperative societies Audit and supervision

56,530.00

68,550.00

59,300.00

2,336,006.00

227,000.00

50,000.00

160,000.00

7,313,530.00

1,224,815.00

0.00

2,172,817.70

Direct Banking

55,010,101.15

2,322,166.30

Grand Totals

250,988,925.95

40,860,481.00

127,850.00

21.

3,087,006.0
Alcoholic Drinks License

474,000.00

751,000.00

160,000.0

22.
Stadium Hire

23.

12,559,200.0
Devolved functions

2,392,600.00

1,628,255.00

5,245,670.00

2,172,817.70

16,842,077.85

2,812,631.50

21,976,875.65

53,643,584.15

31,250,087.50

125,754,152.65

2,172,817.7

24.
Conservancy Eldowas

25.

No.

76,986,976.8

Department

Budget Allocation (Kshs)


Recurrent

Governor's
1 Office
Finance and
2 Economic
Planning

Development

EXPENDITURE (Kshs)
Total

Recurrent

Development

376,743,078.6

BALANCE (Kshs)
Total

Recurrent

Development

Total

102,187,569

10,000,00
0

112,187,5
69

23,584,225

23,584,225

78,603,34
4

10,000,00
0

88,603,344

447,078,406

153,316,00
0

600,394,4
06

160,043,103

160,043,103

287,035,30
3

153,316,00
0

440,351,303

Second Quarter Progress Report 2014/2015


Public
Service
3
Management
ICT and E4 Government
Roads,
Transport
and
5
Infrastructure
Lands,

402,785,405

59,960,00
0

462,745,4
05

190,352,535

190,352,535

212,432,87
0

59,960,00
0

272,392,870

33,983,360

140,557,00
0

174,540,3
60

3,054,828

50,999,52
5

54,054,353

30,928,53
2

89,557,47
5

120,486,007

270,107,609

1,538,453,400

1,808,561,00
9

129,573,349

201,361,69
4

330,935,043

140,534,26
1,337,091,706
0

1,477,625,966

6 Housing and
physical
Water,
7 Environment,
Energy and
Health
8 Services
Agriculture,
Livestock
and
9
Fisheries
Trade,

145,312,143

107,373,00
0

252,685,1
43

3,119,192

14,524,00
0

17,643,192

142,192,95
1

92,849,00
0

235,041,951

204,135,011

214,805,62
5

418,940,6
36

13,760,450

13,760,450

190,374,56
1

214,805,62
5

405,180,186

795,832,282

316,882,92
5

1,112,715,20
7

328,819,668

88,338,49
4

417,158,162

467,012,61
4

228,544,43
1

695,557,045

349,392,980

216,765,81
6

566,158,7
96

157,192,996

45,067,33
8

202,260,334

192,199,98
4

171,698,47
8

363,898,462

10 Cooperatives,
Tourism
and
Education,

82,195,655

151,290,00
0

233,485,6
55

9,528,927

9,528,927

72,666,72
8

151,290,00
0

223,956,728

11 Social
Cultural,
County
Public Service
Board
County
Assembly

259,041,035

434,109,40
0

693,150,4
35

89,802,539

177,075,795

169,238,49
6

346,836,14
4

516,074,640

34,870,280

3,732,00
0

38,602,2
80

3,479,219

3,479,219

31,391,06
1

3,732,00
0

35,123,061

577,195,603

68,500,00
0

645,695,6
03

187,757,086

187,757,086

389,438,51
7

68,500,00
0

457,938,517

3,415,745,166 7,119,862,504

1,300,068,117

2,404,049,221 2,928,180,859

5,332,230,080

Total

3,704,117,338

Table 39: County Expenditure by Department

87,273,25
6

487,564,307

1,787,632,424

Achievements:
Payment of personnel emoluments was done.
Funds were made available at the time required.
Supplementary budget done and approved.
Challenges:
Inadequate number of technical staff.
Late disbursement of funds by the national government.
Way forward:

Recruit and deployment of technical staff.


Timely disbursement of shareable funds to the county.
Fast track implementation of projects.
Enhance revenue collection.

3.10 HEALTH SERVICES


Uasin Gishu County has 185 health facilities ranging from level 2 to 6. Of these
113 are public health facilities and others are either private or faith based. Of the
113 public facilities, 6 are categorized as level IV, 18 as level III and 98 as level II.
Most of the facilities are concentrated within Eldoret urban area. The average
distance to a health facility in the county is 7 Km which is slightly higher than the
recommended 5 Km.

Table 40: Summary of Health Facilities per Sub-county


Sub County

Public

FBO

NGO

Private

Total

Ainabkoi
Kapsabet

17
18

3
6

2
0

12
11

34
27
93 | P a g e

Kesses
Moiben
Soy
Turbo
County Total

18
21
22
17
113

3
1
4
11
28

0
0
0
1
3

7
6
7
12
55

27
26
34
39
185

Achievements, Issues and Challenges


Health Outcome Milestones, Issues and Challenges
Table 41: Health Outcome Milestones, Issues and Challenges
Policy
Objective
Accelerate
reduction of
the burden of
Communicable
Conditions

Keph Services

Milestones Achieved

Immunization

Launching of measles 2 and rotavirus

Child Health

Carried out malezi bora


Trained staff on IMCI
Successful integration of deworming in
ECDs
Food supplements i.e. plumby nuts,
formula milk F75 and
F100
Sensitization on malaria commodity
management for hcw
Improved supply of RDTs
Integration of TB screening in ANC &CCC

Screening for
communicable
conditions
Antenatal Care

FANC trainings done leading to increase in


4th ANC visit
Consistency supply of LLITNs
Consistency supply of iron and folic
supplements

Prevention of
Mother to
Child HIV
Transmission

Staff train sensitize on PMTCT


Integration of KMMP in PMTCT

Key Issues, and/or


Challenges
Shortage of KEPI gas and
fridges;
Staff shortage;
Inconsistency maintenance of
fridges;
Erratic supply of gas;
Insufficient monitoring charts;
Religious factor believes.
Shortage of vitamin A100000
iu
Stock out of mother child
booklets and monitoring
equipment i.e. height
weighing machines
Weak defaulter TB tracing
and screening by cough
monitors
Misdiagnosis of malaria cases
Late reporting of IDSR
Stock outs of ANC profile
reagents.
Stock out of mother child
booklets.
Lack of monitoring and
diagnostic equipment e.g.
ultra sound and BP machines
Shortage of staff
Shortage of HIV test kits
Religious factors
Delay in PCR results
94 | P a g e

First ANC visit delay


Lack of adherence on PMTCT
package and early infant
feeding options
Lots of documentation
Poor use of LLITNs
converted to kuku net
Inadequate resources for
community sensitization
Lack of support from
stakeholders collaboration
Inconsistence supply of
household sprays for vector
control

Integrated
Vector
Management

Consistency supply of LLITNs


Health messages on vector control
management

Good hygiene
practices

Health messages on good hygiene practices


School health messages on hand washing
Supply of hand washing containers

Availability latrines in household


Presence of safe drinking water

Ignorance on good
hygiene practices
Poor socio economic
status
Poor sensitization by
CHWs
Lack of IECs materials.
low coverage of school
health programmes.
Low health education and
promotion.

HIV and STI


prevention

HIV program in place


Staff train and sensitized on HIV and STI
management
Availability of drugs
Availability of screening
Staff reinforcement by partners
Constant condom supply

Poor adherence to drugs


Religious factors
Stigma among clients and
service providers
Poor adherence on condom
use

Port health

24 hr service provision
Availability modern ambulance

Shortage of staff
Insufficient infrastructure
Lack of awareness by public.
Lack of quarantine / isolation
space
Lack of tools and equipment
e.g. thermometer guns,
scanners and sampling kit.

Control

No budgeted supply kit


95 | P a g e

Halt, and
reverse the
rising burden
of noncommunicable
conditions

&prevention
neglected
tropical
diseases
Community
screening for
NCDs
Institutional
Screening for
NCDs

Workplace
Health
&Safety

Reduce the
burden of
violence and
injuries

No focal person to coordinate


activity
Presence of community units

Cervical &breast cancer screening


Integrated in family planning
Supply of cryotherapy in model health
centre
Availability of anthropometric equipment
Screening of hypertension in OPD
Sensitization of health workers on infection
prevention
Supply of hand washing containers
Supply hand sanitizers
Staff sensitization on a prick management

Lack of CHW package


Lack of sensitization among
CHWs
Lack of equipments
Lack of motivation
Lack of knowledge and skills
Lack of social mobilization
Shortage of staff
Poor stakeholder
collaboration
Poor signages
Poor infrastructure
Lack of incinerators in the
peripheral facilities

Food quality
&Safety

Inspection and licensing of food premises


Examination and vaccination of food
handlers
Food sampling Seizure of food items
Prosecution to those who contravene public
health ACT (Cap, 242 and 254)

Inadequate supply of
Sampling kit Delayed results
from the national labs Poor
stakeholder collaboration
Shortage of staff

Pre hospital
Care
Community
awareness on
violence and
injuries
Disaster
management
and response

Staff sensitization on injection safety

Lack of SOPs
Insufficient incinerators
Lack of funds for sensitization
No collaboration with
stakeholders

Provide
Outpatients
essential health
services

Emergency

Public sensitization.

Availability of consistence partner


Community sensitization
Availability of referral system
Health workers trained on ETAT for
triaging of Patients in OPD
Essential drugs and supplies available
Standard guidelines in use to improve
quality of services
24 hr service in sub counties hospitals and
modern health centers
Availability of ambulances

No signage in the buildings


Lack of equipment to be used
No functional committee in
place
Inadequate staff
High Staff turn over
Inadequate funding
Stock outs of commodities
Inadequate space
High workload
Insufficiently equipped
96 | P a g e

Staff trained on emergency preparedness

ambulances Referral system


not well coordinated Poor
road infrastructure
Lack of central control unit
Staff shortage and affecting
skilled delivery in level 2 &3
of care
Erratic supply of essential
supplies and commodities
Lack of equipment and
supplies in level 2 of care
facilities
Acute shortage of essential
drugs and supplies
Staff shortage
Inadequate machines and
equipments
High staff turn over
Inadequate infrastructure and
space
Land owner ship dispute
No consultants
Inadequate staff
Inability to perform
specialized test
High staff turn over
Inadequate infrastructure and
space Inadequate
equipments
Most GoK facilities do not
offer
Staff shortage

Maternity

Implementation of free maternity services


Increased skilled deliveries
Training of staff on BMOC

In patient

Donation of equipments/beds from


partners
Wards round being conducted
Health education conducted in the wards
CMEs for health workers conducted

Clinical
laboratory

Regional blood transfusion center.


Availability of PIMA machine
Supply of RDTs to all facilities
Supply HIV test kits

Specialized
laboratory

Availability of facility MTRH, Eldoret


Hospital, Medheal and St. Lukes

Radiology

Availability of facility MTRH, Eldoret


Hospital, Medheal and St. Lukes

Most Gok facilities do not


offer
Radiology staff shortage

Operative
services

Availability of facility MTRH, Eldoret


Hospital, Medheal and St. Lukes

Specialized
therapy

Availability of facility MTRH, Eldoret


Hospital, Medheal and St. Lukes

Most Gok facilities have poor


and insufficient infrastructure
Most facilities offer only
minor
Most Gok facilities do not
offer

Specialized

Most Gok facilities do not


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services
Rehabilitation

Minimize
Health
exposure
to Promotion
health
risk including
factors
health
Education

Collaborative partner in place for


physically disable
Availability of staff coordinating activity in
the county
Established youth friendly services in one
model health centre
Collaboration with stakeholders on matters
with youth friendly

Inadequate IEC materials


Inadequate funds
Inadequate Community units
Inadequate staff

Sexual
education

Collaboration with stakeholders on matters


with youth friendly
Integration of sexual education in some
sample schools in county supported with
stakeholders

Substance
abuse

Availability of youth friendly health


facilities

Cultural and religion barriers


Age factor
Inadequate IEC materials
Lack of space, infrastructure
and shortage of human
resource
Lack of space, infrastructure
and shortage of human
resource

Micronutrient
deficiency
control

Strengthen
collaboration
with
health
related sectors

offer
Most Gok facilities do not
offer
staff shortage

Physical
activity
Safe water

Availability of Iron and folic acid


Availability of vitamin angles for
expectant/lactating mothers
Availability of vitamin A for under 5
Availability of multi vitamin
supplements for school going children
Nutrition educational on micronutrient
deficiency control

Erratic supply of
micronutrient supplements
Lack of kits and reagents
for testing iodine in salt
Shortage of staff/training
materials
Lack of willing partner
Lack of counseling rooms

No data tool capture

Availability of running safe water


Supply of chlorine and water PUR
Protection of water sources
Installation of water tanks in schools
Supply and installation of water tanks
to health facilities
Health promotions of safe water in
schools and communities

Low coverage of piped treated


water at 40%
Inadequate funding
No collaboration

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Sanitation and
hygiene

Availability of running safe water


Supply of chlorine and water PUR
Protection of water sources
Installation of water tanks in schools
Supply and installation of water tanks
to health facilities
Health promotions of safe water in
schools and communities

Nutrition
services

Pollution
control

Screening of children in ECDs


Collaboration with
stakeholders
Household screening for pre scholars
Deworming of school going
children
Supply of RTUF and other
supplements
Screening for non
communicable diseases
Supplementation of
micronutrients
Health/nutrition education

Joint assessment between


NEEMA health department

Housing

No data tool capture


No pollution control and
bi laws in place

Inadequate housing
facilities.
Lack of collaboration with
land owners and health
authorities for better
plans.
Health facilities have land
ownership dispute
Shortage of staff
Lack of collaboration with
stakeholders

School health

Availability of designated staff


Interns are attached on the
program

No data tool capture


Lifestyle and negative
attitude
Poor law enforcement
No policy and bi laws
Acute staff shortage in
environment
Shortage of transport and
storage equipments
Poor management of
disposal sites
No recycling policy
Acute staff shortage (10 in
county)
Lack of supporting
partners
Lack of reporting tools
Inadequate
anthropometric
equipments
Lack of IEC and
community training
materials
Lack of counseling rooms

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Water and
Sanitation
Hygiene
Food
fortification

Population
management

Road
infrastructure
and Transport

Initiation of home grown


school meals program MDA Jigger
treatment and prevention
Provision of school sanitation that
includes hand washing facilities
Training of school
management committees on school
sanitation sustainability
Supply of water tank and borehole
construction

Improved access to a variety


of fortification
Foodstuffs (maize flour, wheat flour,
salt, sugar, vegetable oils and
fats)
Community Sensitized on
consumption of fortified food stuffs
Mortaring and report on
stocking of fortified food stuff
conducted

Supply of FP commodities
Health workers trained on
Long acting and permanent
methods of Family planning
All modern methods of Family
Planning available.
Collaboration of stakeholders
Adequate utilization health
services by the community
Availability of ambulance in
some facilities
Availability of utility vehicles
Improved access of road
network to rural areas

Lacking of budgetary
allocations
Over riding of
responsibilities

Illiteracy levels are high


High Poverty levels make
community not to access
the fortified food
Inadequate funding for
sensitization, supervision
Inadequate staff

Cultural and religious


believes on FP
Ignorance by communities
Inadequate staff trained on
BTL Inadequate staff for
Family planning Low
male involvement

No data tool capture


Poor maintenance of road
network
Insufficient maintenance
of ambulances and utility
vehicles

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Health output milestones, issues and challenges


Health outputs in Uasin Gishu County had its own challenges and milestones.
Among the challenges noted included staff shortage which was common in many
facilities; however they were able to offer good quality service to the public.
Availability of drugs was also not constant and a number of facilities experience
ran out of stock for up to a month. Table 44 below gives more detail.
Table 42: Health Output Milestones, Issues and Challenges
Output area

Intervention area

Milestones achieved

Issues and/ or
challenges

Improving
Access to
services

Availability of critical
inputs (Human Resources,
Infrastructure,
Commodities)

Employment of ESPs
Construction of 13 health
facilities
Procure assorted
equipments
Printing of monitoring
and evaluation tools

Renovation of 39 health
facilities level 2 & 3
Ongoing construction of
community health
facilities
Securing of land titles

Functionality of critical
inputs (maintenance,
replacement plans, etc)

Readiness of facilities to
offer services (appropriate
HR skills, existing water /
sanitation services,
electricity, effective
medications, etc)

Capacity building
Training of staff on
IMCI, Nutrition long
terms of family planning
methods and PAC/CAC
Connection of power for

Inadequate human
resource to deliver
efficient quality
service
Insufficient machines
and equipments
Inadequate supply of
health commodities
Inadequate funding
Lack of involvement
and ownership by the
community
Shortage of staff
Inadequate of
knowledge and skills
for repair and
maintainance of
machines and
equipments
Lack of prioritizing
machines and
equipments
Lack of prioritizing
machines and
equipments
Lack of incinerators
in some health
facilities
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Improving
Quality of care

Improving patient/client
experience

Assuring patient/client
safety (do no harm)

Assuring effectiveness of
care

Improving
demand for
services

Improving health
awareness amongst the
communities

25 rural facilities

Shortage of staff

Reduce patient waiting


time
Training of staff on
emergency preparedness
Timely supply of health
commodities
Exit client interview
Availability of service
charter displayed at
entrance in most facilities
On-job training
Support supervision
SOPs in service points

Shortage of staff
Inadequate funding
for capacity building

Lack of quality
improvement team
Under utilization of
working space
in some facilities.

Health workers
Health workers trained
on infection prevention
Improved health care
waste management
Strengthen defaulter
tracing system
Construction of ramp for
easy movement of
physically challenge

Updates of service
delivery i.e. malaria
IMCI nutrition & HIV
management
Availability of updated
policy guidelines for
various cases
management
Availability of SOPs in
service delivery point
Staff trained on quality
assurance and
improvement (KQMH)

Availability of
community units
Collaborative
stakeholders

Lack of incinerators
in some health
facilities
Lack of IPC
High staff turnover

Small working space


Inadequate
maintenance of
structures
Some facilities have
old structures

Lack of IEC
materials
CHWs not
remunerated
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Improving health seeking


behaviors in the
communities

Health messages to
clients in waiting bay

Health education and

promotion
Outreaches done

Stakeholders and partners


collaboration
Use of community health
workers

Shortage of staff
Socio cultural
religious believes
Staff
movement/shortage

3.11 ELDOWAS
Eldoret Water and Sanitation Company Limited is a corporate entity established in
1997 under companies Act CAP 486 of the laws of Kenya and started operations in
the year 2000. Under the Water Act 2002 Eldowas carries out its functions as a
Water Service Provider under Service Provision Agreement (SPA) with the Lake
Victoria North Water Services Board (LVNWSB). LVNWSB has engaged
ELDOWAS to be a Water Service Provider in Eldoret and its environs through
service provision agreement (SPA) as required by the water Act 2002. ELDOWAS
is, therefore, expected to provide water services efficiently and economically in
Eldoret and its environs in compliance with SPA.
Achievements
A total of 2,676, 517 m3 of water was produced over the period under review as
shown in the table below.
Table 43: Water Production
Month

Chebara
(M3)

July 2013
August 2014
September

509517
483964
468,944.00

Sosiani
(M3)
390510
400298
382,350.00

Kapsoya
(M3)
0
0
2,244.00

Kesses

13490
12770
12430

Total
Production
(M3)
913517
461464
865968
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October
November
Total
Average daily
production
% utilization of
Plant

444645
675700
2,582,770

418381
386610
1,978,149

7387
13523
23,154

13280
14910
66880

883,693
1,090,743
4,215,385

16880.8

12,929.08

151.33

437.12

27,551.5

68.34%

91%

5%

82%

The company maintained the distribution network satisfactorily. Reported leaks


and bursts were attended to and continuous improvement of the system was also
undertaken within the period.
Laying of 50 mm pipeline at the Chiefs Camp (length: 900m) was completed
in the 2nd quarter at a cost of Kshs. 237,329.40. Kahoya project (laying of 80mm
pipeline -550m) also completed at a cost of Ksh. 201,184.00.
Over the period under review, a total of 437 sewer blockages were reported and
cleared within the network and 95 new sewers connected.
94% of all the drinking water samples was collected, analyzed and complied
with the WHO Physico-Chemical Parameter while 100% of the samples
complied with the Bacteriological Parameters.
During the period under review, the scheduled preventive maintenance was
undertaken and breakdowns addressed whenever they occurred.
The companys billing for water services amounted to Kshs. 180,235,398.18
and collected a total of Ksh. 177,124,602.7 equivalent to 98.27% collection
efficiency.
During the period under review, a total of 1,104 customer complaints were
received out of which 1,022 were resolved equivalent to 92.57% of the
complaints received.
Challenges

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Quarry Sewage Treatment Plant experienced breakdown of the mechanical


screen from August to October which necessitated shut down for repairs. All the
wastewater was redirected to Boundary Sewage Treatment Plant.
Way forward
Reported leaks and bursts to be attended on time to avoid shortage of water.
Continuous improvement of the system to be undertaken.
3.12 ICT AND e-GOVERNMENT
This report gives a synopsis of the status of project implementation and assesses
the performance of the Department of ICT & e-Government in the first quarter of
financial year 2014/2015.
The key strategic objectives of the department are:
To develop an ICT4D policy and legal framework to guide integration of ICT in
all sectors of the County development;
To automate key priority aspects of the County including revenue collection and
management (cashless operations of the county), staff (Online HR
Management), supporting infrastructure (back office support components) and
security surveillance (CCTV, access control, information / data); and
To develop a program for empowering youth using ICT platforms for
participation in opportunities within County and Central Government (eagriculture, e-revenue, e- business, e-tender).
Achievements
Procurement of County Revenue System. During the Second Quarter of the
2014/2015 Financial Year, the department awarded a tender for Supply,
Customization, Installation and Implementation of County Revenue Collection,
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Cash-flow Management and funds Requisitioning System at a cost of KSh


38,751,377.60 through Tender No CGU/T/011/2014-2015.
Renovation of ICT Offices and procurement of office furniture. During this
quarter, the department renovated the ICT offices which were launched on the
25th November, 2015 by the Principal Secretary, Ministry of Information
Communication Technology.
Completion of 2014/2015 Projects. During this period, the department
completed development of the 2013/2015 Financial Year that culminated in the
launch of ICT projects on the 25th November 2015.
Challenges
Procurement delays due to Capacity Challenges in the procurement section.
Under Staffing in ICT and e-Government department: Though the same have
been presented to County Assembly and Public Service Board, little has been
done to allow recruitment process proceed as initially planned. Now ICT is
relying on its 5 staff members to delivery on the huge mandate.
There is a challenge of lack of corporation by departments to avail vehicles to
be fitted with the car tracking systems.
Way forward
Need for more staff in the department.
Need to have mutual cooperation by departments and avail vehicles to be fitted
with the car tracking systems.
Completed Projects:
County Data Centre
This project was completed and launched on 25th November, 2014.

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CCTV
This project was completed and launched on 25th November, 2014.
LAN installation
This project was completed and launched on 25th November, 2014.
Car Tracking and Fleet Management System
This project is at 92% completion. The challenge has been lack of corporation by
departments to avail vehicles to be fitted with the car tracking systems. This also
has made it difficult to move to the next phase i.e. training and capacity building of
staff.
GIS System
This project was completed and launched on 25 th November, 2014. The GIS portal
is available online at http://gis.uasingishu.go.ke. The department is currently in the
process of completing the setting up a GIS facility/centre in collaboration with the
department of Land & Housing.
Teleconferencing Facility
This project was completed and launched on 25th November, 2014.
3.13 THE COUNTY ASSEMBLY
Article 174 (1) of the Constitution of Kenya (2010) stipulates that There shall be a
County Government for each County consisting of County Assembly and County
Executive. The County Assembly of Uasin Gishu consists of 30 elected members
and 14 nominated members.

It is headed by the Speaker who is the Chief

Executive. The function of County Assembly as prescribed in the Constitution of


Kenya includes but not limited to Legislation, Representation, and Oversight.

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Achievements:
Bills passed included:
o The Uasin Gishu County Trade and Markets Bill 2014.
o The Uasin Gishu County Bursary and Skills Development Support Fund
Disbursement (Amendment) Bill 2014.
o The Uasin Gishu County Transport Bill 2014.
o The Finance Act 2014.
o The Uasin Gishu County Appropriation Bill (Bill No. 24) 2014.
o The Uasin Gishu County Corporations Bill (Bill No. 12) 2014.
Motions passed included:
o Motion on the Fourth Report of the Committee on transport, Roads and
Public Works.
o Motion of the Fifth Report of the Health Services Committee on Petition
from Kenya National Union of Nurses (KNUN), Uasin Gishu branch.
o Motion on the Second Report on County Governments ICT and eGovernment Department in respect of 2014-2015 work plan and strategic
activities.
o Motion on the First Report of the Committee on Lands, Housing and
Physical Planning in respect of the Uasin Gishu County Land Use
Regulatory Framework (2014-2017).
o Motion on the Maize Lethal Necrosis Disease.
o Motion on the Third Report of Public Investment and Accounts
Committee in respect of The Report of Auditor General on the County
Government of Uasin Gishu and its Defunct Local Authorities for the
period covering 1st January-30th June 2013.
o Motion on the County Finance Bill.
Challenges:
Inadequate staff.
Irregular funds transfer.

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CHAPTER FOUR: CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION


During the period under review, a number of departments made quite substantial
progress. However, the county government needs to look at the challenges
highlighted by various departments for further the gains being experienced.

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