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CHAPTER 3

COUNTY TREASURY
INTRODUCTION
The County Annual Progress Report covers the periods between 1st July 2013 and 30th June
2014. It reports on activities undertaken by the various county government departments and
other agencies of the government as reflected in their work plans. The report, therefore,
reports on progress in implementing the plans, challenges encountered and way forward.
County Background
Uasin Gishu County is one of the 47 counties in the Republic of Kenya. It lies between
longitudes 34 degrees 50 east and 35 degrees 37 West and latitudes 0 degrees 03 South and
0 degrees 55 North. It is a highland plateau with altitudes falling gently from 2,700 metres
above sea level to about 1,500 metres above sea level. The topography is higher to the east
and declines gently towards the western border. The county experiences high and reliable
rainfall which is evenly distributed throughout the year. The average rainfall ranges between
624.9 mm to 1,560.4mm with two distinct peaks occurring between March and September;
and May and August. Dry spells occur between November and February. The temperatures
range between 7 degrees Celsius and 29 degrees Celsius.
Uasin Gishu County shares common borders with Trans Nzoia County to the North, Elgeyo
Marakwet County to the East, Baringo County to the South East, Kericho County to the
South, Nandi County to the South West and Kakamega County to the North West. It covers a
total area of 3,345.2 Sq. Km. with a population, according to the 2009 Population and
Housing Census, of 894,179 people. This population was projected to increase to 1,002,153
in 2012, and 1,123,165 and 1,211,853 in 2015 and 2017 respectively. It has six Sub-counties
(constituencies), namely, Soy, Turbo, Kesses, Kapseret, Ainabkoi and Moiben. The county
has thirty (30) County assembly Wards. In addition, there are two divisions, Kesses and
Kapsaret, with fifty one (51) locations and ninety seven (97) sub-locations.
Uasin Gishu Countys economy is largely driven by agriculture; it is agro-based. It has large
and fertile lands which can be classified as high potential. The average farm size in the
county is 2-10 acres with a wide range of crop and livestock enterprises.
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The crop enterprises include food crops, cash/industrial crops and horticultural crops. Large
scale farming supports wheat, maize, tea, coffee, flowers and other horticultural crops for
export.
However, crop farming is mainly concentrated on maize and wheat. Livestock enterprises
include dairy, poultry, sheep, goats, pigs, bee keeping and fish farming. But concentration is
mainly on dairy.
The county can also support agribusiness and industries and this is yet to be fully exploited.
There are manufacturing, wholesale and retail activities taking place in the county.
Key Development Challenges
Uasin Gishu County, just like any other county in the country, grapples with challenges
inherent in a development endevour. During the period under review, the county encountered
a number of development challenges. The county had shortfall of technical staff and capacity
as the county was yet to undertake comprehensive recruitment to fill staff and capacity gaps,
an exercise not taken awaiting ongoing staff rationalization and harmonization. HIV/Aids
scourge put pressure on the county resources, compounding the effects already felt due to the
high poverty level. Uasin Gishu County also had inadequate infrastructure, in the poor state
of roads especially during rainy season; water supply; and electricity. Severe geological and
geographical conditions in the county affect the roads sub-sector. There were not enough
infrastructures in schools and other institutions of learning, though the county government
and other devolved programmes like CDF made efforts to address this. There were also not
enough teachers in a number of schools and county polytechnics in the county. Inadequate
access to credit and deforestation were other development challenges in the county.
Methodology
The report was compiled with input from the various departmental heads of the county
government by forwarding their respective reports to the Planning Unit of Budget and
Planning section, Finance and Economic Planning Department.
Limitation of the report
This report does not incorporate all the literature and narratives contained in the respective
departmental reports. It only reported on major and key activities and achievements,
challenges and way forward of each department. Nonetheless, detailed information is
obtainable from respective departmental reports.
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POLICY REVIEW
This section gives key policy priorities and objectives guiding development process in the
county in line with CIDP, Vision 2030 and the Medium Term Plan.
Development process in the county was informed by the desire to create employment mainly
for the youth and women as a way of incorporating their participation in economic
development; food security and poverty alleviation; development of physical infrastructure to
reduce cost of production, improved competitiveness and provide access to the markets for
both goods and services; development of human resources for enhanced capacity to adopt
innovative approaches to development; and Information Communication Technology, a
growth sub-sector with immense potential of unlocking many opportunities in business,
education, agriculture, industry and security.
By the end of the CIDP (2013-2017) Uasin Gishu County anticipates to realize the following
broad development outputs/outcomes:

Improved physical infrastructure in the county roads network, electricity, renewable


energy technology promotion, housing;

Improved food security and poverty alleviation promotion of commercialization of


dairy industry, increased agricultural and livestock production, and trade;

Clean and secured environment and access to clean and affordable water and sanitation.
Also improved environmental regulation in line with EMCA 1999 for environmentally
friendly extraction of natural resources such as quarrying activities;

Improved school infrastructure for enhanced access to education

Improved health of residents of Uasin Gishu County through improved health


infrastructure and health care and reduced incidences of diseases and conditions such as
malaria, HIV/Aids, tuberculosis e.t.c.

DEPARTMENTAL PROGRESS REPORTS


This section gives progress reports by the various county government departments and other
agencies.

EDUCATION, CULTURE, YOUTH AFFAIRS AND SOCIAL SERVICES

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This department has four sections, namely, Education, Culture, Youth Affairs and Social
Services.
Education
The county has one public ECDE and twenty private ECDE training colleges which offers
training services. They offer both certificate and diploma courses. The county also has 7
public and 6 private universities offering ECDE teacher education programmes at diploma
and degree levels.
The county has 480 public and 553 private ECDE centres with total enrolment of 34,141 and
11,675 respectively.
Achievements:

1000 ECDE teachers employed on a three-year contract and deployed to teach in public
ECDE centres.

90 ECDE classrooms under construction, 3 in each of the 30 county assembly wards, at


an average cost of Kshs. 555,000.00 per classroom. A committee was constituted in each
of the funded ECDE centres to oversee the implementation of the construction.

Drafted ECDE Bill 2014 which was presented to the County Executive Committee.

BQs prepared for 2 schools per ward identified for infrastructure improvement.

Vetting of TVET Loan Scheme applicants at ward level under way.

Challenges:

Immobility of the field officers.


Unclear placement of ECDE officers/trainers.
Limited number of schools that provide feeding programme.
Poor linkages between service providers in ECDE.
Unclear legal framework on ECD education and provision.
Assessment and evaluation at ECD level is academically oriented.
Over teaching at ECD level for job security.
Poor transition from ECD to primary.
Hired training facilities.
Unclear structures on management of the public ECDE Training College.

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Way forward:

Provide adequate means of transport for ECDE officers for effective monitoring and

supervision of projects and programmes.


Provide clear roles, duties and responsibilities for officers/trainers.
Sensitize and mobilize communities on importance of feeding programme.
Harmonization of ECDE activities for uniformity.
Sensitization of all ECDE stakeholders on policies governing ECDE services.
Operationalize the existing ECDE Policy Framework.
Assessment and evaluation at ECDE level should address holistic development of

children.
Intensify school advisory visits and monitoring to curb the problem of over teaching.
Sensitization seminars for lower primary teachers on importance of smooth transition of

children from ECDE to primary.


Development of training facility at the 20 acre piece of land allocated for ECDE for
ECDE development.

Culture
Achievements:

Capacity building workshop was organized to sensitize adjudicators, trainers and group
leaders on the content of Uasin Gishu Kenya Music & Cultural Festival syllabus such as
the classes categories, set the county festival standards and the general organization of

the festival.
Teams from Uasin Gishu participated in Uasin Gishu and regional Music and Cultural

festivals held in Uasin Gishu and Kericho respectively.


The section of Culture conducted capacity building workshop training for young
upcoming performing artist from all the sub-counties in Uasin Gishu and were trained on

how to benefit from their creative works.


The section also conducted capacity building workshop for herbal practitioners, with

about 40 herbal practitioners gathering for the workshop.


Conducted experience sharing activity where 31 herbal practitioners exhibited their herbal
products.

Challenges:

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Information gap among musicians and other artists on how to protect their creative works

and make money from them (Entrepreneurs).


Most of local artist lack marketing strategies for their products.
Tribalism and related issues affect their work.
Lack of packaging of their products therefore missing on market penetration.
It was noted that there was a big information gap among herbalist.
Some herbal practitioners were selfish and want to treat one patient for a number of
diseases other than referring him/her to a specialized herbalist.

Way forward:

Setting up the county infrastructure for art county theatre to be established in the

county.
Organize trainings for upcoming talents in sports and entertainment industry and be given

recognition.
Create linkages for youths (provide platform /space for art)
Standards should be established for herbal practitioners guiding their operations in the
county. This should be intended to promote alternative medicine as well as protecting
their patients.

Youth Affairs
Uasin Gishu County has eight youth polytechnics, namely, Lainguse Youth Polytechnic,
Eldoret Youth Polytechnic, Ainabkoi Youth Polytechnic, Sogorik Youth Polytechnic, Kanetik
Youth Polytechnic, Sesia Youth Polytechnic, Mugundoi Youth Polytechnic, and Sergoek
Youth Polytechnic.
Enrolments were as follows:
Lainguse Youth Polytechnic
1st Year Enrolment

2nd Year Enrolment

Total

Fashion design & garment making

14

15

Motor vehicle technology

Carpentry & joinery

Course Name

135

Electrical & electronic technology

Building technology

ICT

All

All

All

All

All

All

24

10

34

19

15

34

Total

Eldoret Youth Polytechnic


No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Trade
Motor vehicle Technology
Building Technology
Carpentry and Joinery
Electrical Technology
Food technology
Garment making
ICT
Total

M
10
5
2
15
2
0
All
34

1st Years
F
2
1
0
1
3
7
All
14

2nd Years
TOTAL
12
6
2
16
5
7
all
48

M
11
4
1
5
1
1
All
23

F
0
0
0
0
0
4
all
4

TOTAL
11
4
1
5
1
5
All
27

The following projects were ongoing at Eldoret Youth Polytechnic.


No.
1
2
3
4

Names
Green House
CAP
ICT Packages
Hatchery
Maize Planting 1I/2

Funding Agency
MOYAS
CAP YEI (NGO)
Eldoret YP
MOYAS
EYP

Amt
-

Status
100% Complete
100% Complete
70% Operational
100% Complete
40%

Kanetik Youth Polytechnic


No.
1
2
3
4
5

Department
Motor Vehicle Technology
Building Construction Technology
Hair Dressing And Beauty Therapy
Electrical Installation Technology
Garment Making And Fashion Design
Grand Total

Female
0
0
13
0
09
28

Summary of student population at Kanetik Youth Polytechnic


136

Male
11
7
0
10
01
23

Total
11
7
13
4
10
51

No
1
2
3
4
5

Department
Motor Vehicle Technology
Building Construction Technology
Hair Dressing And Beauty Therapy
Electrical Technology
Garment Making And Fashion Design
Grand Total

Female
2
0
33
02
17
56

Male
26
8
0
23
01
58

Total
28
8
33
25
18
114

Sogorik Youth Polytechnic


2nd Years (2014)

Trade

MALE

TOTA

Electrical Installation

L
11

Building Construction
Motor Vehicle Mechanics
Ac & J
Garment Making
Hair Dressing Beauty Therapy
Welding & Fabrication.
Agri Business
ICT
Total

7
10
0
0
5
0
30

0
0
20
20
0
1
44

7
10
20
20
5
1
74

1 St Years (2014)
MALE

TOTAL

15

19

8
10
0
0
0
0
0
35

0
0
0
16
27
2
0
47

8
10
0
16
27
2
0
82

Projects at Sogorik Youth Polytechnic


No.
1

Project
Agribusiness

Duration Status
complete

Remarks
Grilled security door for the greenhouse
fabricated and fitted
Tomatoes planted

1
2
3
4

Eco Jiko
Repair (Desks)
Lecture Chairs
Masonry

5.

Classroom
Technical

complete
complete
complete

Complete

Drawing Boards

Water tank needed


In use
23 desks repaired
20 chairs fabricated
Rehabilitation undertaken to make the room
available for teaching purposes
16 TD boards in place, 16 more boards
needed

Sesia Youth Polytechnic


Due to extensive campaign done by the instructors at the beginning of the year 2014, the
school enrolment increased. Enrolments were as follows: First years 56 trainees; Second year
41 trainees.
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Achievements

Construction of two workshops at Lainguse Youth Polytechnic courtesy of CDF funding

ongoing.
Rural Electrification Authority embarked on installing electricity to Lainguse Youth

Polytechnic, and it is 45 percent complete.


Sesia Youth Polytechnic partnered with the World Vision Meibeki Valley IPA leading to

donation of a number of tools, equipment and accommodation facilities to the institution.


Trainees were subjected to requisite industrial attachments before their examinations.
Construction of three-storey building and two toilets at Mugundoi Youth Polytechnic

benefitted, courtesy of CDF. The institution was also given greenhouse.


Construction of three classrooms at Sergoek Youth Polytechnic by CDF.

Challenges:

Low trainee enrolment. Trainee enrolment was unimpressive partly due to lack of

boarding facility.
Inadequate classrooms and workshops. In addition, some structures are dilapidated.

Inadequate tools and equipment for training purposes.


Inadequate textbooks and training materials.
Inadequate teaching staff and non-teaching staff.
Perennial water shortage.
Frequent Power outages.
Impassable roads during rainy season.

Low staff capacity.

Way forward:

There is need to provide boarding facility.


Construction of more classrooms/workshops and renovation of dilapidated structures.
Stakeholders should intensify sensitization of the public on the polytechnic programs.
There is need for more tools and equipment in order to effectively conduct training and

make the NAVCET program a success.


There is need to increase the number of textbooks and training materials to meet the

requirements for NAVCET curriculum


There is need to conduct training/refresher courses for the current serving instructors in
management skills and emerging trends in their respective trade areas in line with the
implementation of the NAVCET curriculum and current trends in job market.

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There is need to conduct training/refresher courses for the current serving instructors in
management skills and emerging trends in their respective trade areas in line with the

implementation of the NAVCET curriculum and current trends in job market.


Way should looked into to ensure availability of water.
Improve existing access roads.

Social Services
This section seeks to facilitate positive change of individuals or groups through guiding and
counseling services. It also mobilizes community to participate in decision making, offer
advisory services to individuals or youth/women groups as well as empowering them through
training, support and linkages to other service providers.
Achievements

Conducted capacity building for persons with disability and HIV/AIDS. Officials of at

least three registered groups from each ward in the county were trained.
The social workers were able to make visits to various homes of clients who are either

destitute, HIV/IDS patients etc.


A total of 345 children who were rescued from the streets of Eldoret were repatriated and
reintegrated with their families or guardians in various counties during the period under

review.
The section mobilized and facilitated training of 36 women who had abandoned illicit
brew. They were advised to organize themselves into groups so as to access funding from

government agencies.
The officers visited groups to offer advisory services, training, monitoring and evaluation,
annual meetings among others.

Challenges:

The section is understaffed and more community development officers and social workers

are required to cover the entire county.


The section requires a full time vehicle to fast-track movements and to enable staff access

people at the village level.


The funding is not adequate for the county considering the population of the county and
the various social challenges.

Way forward:
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There is need for the county to set aside funds to assist vulnerable groups.
There is need to set aside funds to build capacity of these groups and engage them in

income generating activities.


Formation of ward development committees.
Funds for youth /women programmes should be set aside by county to build their capacity
and engage them in income generating activities.

Sports
There are two stadia in the county Kipchoge Keino Stadium and 64 Stadium. Sports section
has been funding and supervising the running of 9 youth under-15 sports training centres
proving tracking kit and paying allowances to the coaches for the last 3 years in the county.
The centres train youth in various sporting activities such as football, athletics, volleyball and
netball.
Achievements:

Kipchoge Keino Stadium has undergone some substantial face lift. The following have
been done.
The playground has been done to completion.
Track and field events facilities are about 60% complete.
The inner perimeter wall is 80% complete.
The main pavilion has been substantially improved.
The changing rooms are complete and usable.
The VIP and public toilets have been substantially improved.
Sports stakeholders forum was held bringing together all sports stakeholders in the
county. This was meant to bring in sports experts, athletes both trained and practicing,
sponsors, business community, well-wishers and all people of good will to brainstorm and
chart a way forward for sports development in the county. This forum came up with
resolutions that form way forward in sports development in the county.

The county organized and or participated in a number of competitions Moi University


Peace X-Country, AMACCO National Open and Nyaberi Volleyball Tournaments, Family
Bank Half Marathon, Ndalat X-Country, Kimbilio Marathon Kipkaren, Baringo Half
Marathon, Kass International Marathon, and National Cycling Competition. One of our
officers also attended International Coaching Clinic in Athletics. Teams from the county

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participated in Nation-wide league (3 teams), Provincial League (12), County League (9),

Sub-county League (57).


Other sporting activities that were also active include ajua, netball, basketball, rugby,
cricket golf among others.

Challenges:

Lack of reliable recreational and sporting alternatives for our people.


Limited access to sporting and recreational facilities.
Lack of awareness on the benefits of physical activities/sports to children, youth

expectant mothers, aged people, physically challenged and people with chronic diseases.
Non exposure of children into sports/physical activity at the earliest age possible.
Lack of home based sports programs.
Lack of information on how to choose best ways of relaxing and how to develop proper

recreational habit.
Lack of sufficient office space and equipment.
Lack of transport facilities.
Lack of necessary sports equipment.

Way Forward:

Sports facilities should be: diversified; widespread (throughout the county to award levels

and beyond); accessible to all; sustainable (sustainability to be considered).


Sports equipment and facilities to be availed, accessible to and user friendly for all

including the disabled.


Parents and guardians to be encouraged to expose children to sporting activities at family

levels encourage mini sports.


Industries, big businesses, factories be encouraged to sponsor sporting events as part of

the corporate social responsibility.


Economic, health and social benefits e.g. sports. To develop sports as a profession, an
industry, health management, recreation fitness, tourist attraction and foreign exchange

earner and social integration and pescle initiatives.


Talent nurturing and development. There is need to establish sports academies and youth
sports training centres and sports training camps; organize yearly county sports week;
organize youth sports competitions regularly; organize competitive sporting leagues and

tournaments for every sporting event/activity.


Sponsorship proposal. Form taskforce to spearhead proposal writing for sports
development funding through elite and prominent retired athletes.

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Need to reward and recognize model winners and name streets after prominent sports

persons.
Federations should prepare and submit their calendar of events early enough to facilitate

easy interventions on their sports development programmes.


Develop a documentation centre (hall of fame) for all sports peoples information, photos,

trophies, medals etc.


Introduce an annual sports development kitty drawn from memberships, stadia and other
facilities revenue, sponsors, donors, well-wishers, and from the business community to

support sports development activities.


Develop county sporting teams in various sporting disciplines with the aim of promoting
them to international standards.

AGRICULTURE, LIVESTOCK AND FISHERIES


This department has four sections Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries and Veterinary services.
The department seeks to improve the livelihoods of residents of the county by promoting
competitive farming as a business. It seeks to realize its objectives through appropriate policy
environment, effective support services and sustainable natural resources management, create
a favorable policy and legal framework for the sustainable development of the crop and
livestock sectors and facilitate sustainable management and development of fishery resources
for accelerated socio- economic development through research.
Agriculture
Achievements

Supplied adequate subsidized fertilizer (DAP, NPK - 23:23:0, 17:17:17 & CAN) through
NCBP. Transported 2800 bags of the subsidized fertilizers to small-scale farmers located
further from the NCPB depots.

County Horticulture Business Strategy saw construction of 12 charcoal coolers, 12


grading sheds and 2 diffuse light stores; distribution of 4,000 grafted avocado seedlings
and passion fruit across the county; and distribution of 10,000 tissue culture bananas
plantlets.

Soil fertility in Uasin Gishu County has been declining due to continuous use of D.A.P
over the years, leading to acidic soils. As a result, thirty three soil samples were taken
from each of the thirty wards for testing. The contracted firm, Soil Cares Initiative,

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trained 40 staff members on soil sampling, and analyzed the 1,000 samples. Release of
the results yet to be done.

Promoted on-farm drying and storage of maize through mobile maize driers and group
grain stores to minimize on post-harvest losses. The county has two mobile driers to assist
farmers to dry cereals. Construction of 2 grain stores with a capacity of 30,000 bags each
on-going.

Conducted county-wide farmer sensitization campaign on the management of Maize


Lethal Necrosis Disease (MLND).

Planters calibration in preparation for the 2014 planting season

Eldoret ASK show successfully concluded in March 2014.

Conducted field surveillance on postharvest issues and demonstrations to farmers on use


of post-harvest pesticides before storage of cereals.

Conducted field days, exhibitions, trainings, and demonstrations to disseminate


agriculture technologies to farmers.

Campaigns on the importance of ware house receipting system being done by the
department of Agriculture in collaboration with East Africa Grain growers Council

Challenges:

High cost & Inaccessibility to farm inputs-fertilizer and certified seeds.

Environmental degradation and declining soil fertility.

High incidence of pests and diseases.

Post- harvest losses.

Climate change- unpredictable weather & seasonal variations in the onset of the rains.

Livestock
Livestock section seeks to improve livestock production in the areas of breeding, feeding,
routine animal husbandry practices, pests and disease control and marketing.

Achievements:
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In the period under review livestock section did not have any development funds. However, it
has had several donor funded projects:
a. Through Smallholder Dairy Commercialization Programme (SDCP)-IFAD operating in
the county in the three (3) pilot Dairy Commercialization Areas (DCA1 Kapseret
Location, DCA2 Mois Bridge Location, DCA3- Sugoi Location) and funded by IFAD
(Loan/Grant)/GoK and the local community contribution, with an emphasis on
commercialization of dairy and dairy products through the Market Oriented Dairy
Enterprises (MODE) approach, the following achievements were recorded:
A total of 49 dairy groups were formed and registered with membership of 2111(male:

female percentage of 56:44) farmer beneficiaries.


Capacity building of DGs on Group Organization: Training in Business skills and
approaches, Training needs assessments.

Two (2) milk marketing cooperatives formed and registered in DCA 3 in Turbo
Division Sugoi Alliance FCS (427 members, 300 Male and 147 Female) and Mois
Bridge Muungano FCS in DCA2 Soy Division; each bulking on average over
1,000kgs of milk per day, milk delivered to NKCC at an average of Kshs 28/= per

litre.
Most of these farmers usually get A.I. services at subsidized prices from the DCAbased A.I Service Providers. Number of farmers using A.I is over 1,500 in the
3DCAs.

b. EADD East Africa Dairy Development Programme is an NGO which has been
Promoting Dairy Programme through sourcing of milk coolers for the communities.
c. It is funded by Bill Gate Financial Trust Fund and the communities in collaboration with
Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries staff.
Currently 3 cooling plants have been installed: Two in Kesses Division, namely,
Toragoon and Chuiyat Dairies, and one in Ziwa Sirikwa, Soy Division. These coolers
are currently doing an average of 4000 litter of milk per day.

Ministry of Agriculture through the Director of Livestock Production proposed to give


coolers to the following areas: Wounifer (Ainabkoi sub county); Uhuru kaptagat

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(Ainabkoi sub county; Garage (Moiben sub county); Chebororwa (Moiben sub
county); and Chepkatet (Kapseret sub county: SDCP-IFAD)
Challenges:

There was low livestock production.

Inadequate provision of extension services.


Inappropriate production systems.
Poor livestock nutrition.
Animal pests and diseases.
Low quality genetics Artificial Insemination (AI) and embryo transfer technologies.
Weak linkages between livestock research, extension services and farmers.

Presence of low investment and inadequate value addition.

Poor Market Access (inadequate market information, processing facilities - milk


processing plants/coolers), the average market price is low due to the lack of a strong
and coordinated farmers voice.

Way forward:

Train farmers on appropriate production systems.


Organize farmer tours to model farms and develop training materials.
Encourage livestock farmer cooperatives to mobilize resources.
Train farmers on how to make Total Mixed Ration (TMR).
Cary out animal disease surveillance & livestock vaccination.
Promote livestock breeding technologies (AI, use of sexed semen and embryo transfer).
Identify areas of possible investment, build a data inventory for extension service
providers, and increase extension staff strength.

There is need to undertake a business development exercise to identify viable areas of


possible investment.

Build capacity of the department in value addition of livestock products and by-products.
Establish milk coolers with other stake holders.
Collect, analyze and disseminate livestock market information.
Encourage farmer groups to have binding contracts with livestock product buyers.
Build capacity of the existing farmer groups on livestock marketing.
Promote quality milk based payment.
Develop a traceability system for livestock products.

Fisheries
Achievements:
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Extension services.
Market data collection and fish quality control.
Collection of A-I-A and money realized surrendered to the Ministry.
Conducted eat-more-fish campaign in Turbo
Conducted Field Days
Collaboration through Agricultural Sector Development Strategy Programme (ASDSP)

was held.
A-I-A collections amounting to 19,600.00.

Challenges:

The departmental vehicle is old and therefore not reliable.


Transport for field visits and market inspections due lack of sectional driver.

Veterinary Services
The mandate of this section involves animal disease control and zoonosis control through
vaccinations against infectious, notifiable diseases and zoonotic diseases. It also does
veterinary extension and training through field days, farmers open days and training
seminars.

Achievements:

Capacity building.
Vaccination of over 30,000 cattle.
Rehabilitation of Eldoret slaughter house through.
Rehabilitation of cattle dips across the county at a cost of Ksh. 30,000,000.

Challenges

Disease outbreaks foot and mouth, rabies, lumpy skin disease and anthrax.
Lack of adequate technical staff.
Low budgetary provision for extension service delivery.

LANDS, HOUSING AND PHYSICAL PLANNING


This department reports on activities carried out by Lands, Housing and Physical Planning
sections.
Lands
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Achievements:

Solving of boundary disputes (4No.).

Documented public land (Draft report ready).

Fencing of public utility land 5No.


Registration of public utility land 4No.
Preparation of physical development plans (5No.).
Preparation of TORS for preparation of county spatial plan.
Settlement of Turbo squatters in Turbo forest (Manzini) public participation on EIA

report.
Survey of public utility plots.
Procurement of survey equipment.
Purchase of land for public utilities for proposed High altitude training centre in

Chagaiya and proposed Youth polytechnic in Langas.


Repair of county houses 4No.
Development of planning standards to guide urban and rural development.

Physical planning
Achievements:
Preparation of inventory of public land which is ongoing (This was a team work under the
leadership of physical planning section).

Preparation of draft planning and development standards for Eldoret municipality and the
sub urban zone and subjected them to public participation.

Preparation of Ziwa Local Physical Development Plan.

Preparation of draft TORs for County Spatial Plan.

No.

Activity

Total

1.

Building plans

2.

Change/Extension of users

30

3.

Subdivisions

77

4.

Issuance of Certificate of Compliance

18

Extension of Leases

31

6.

Sale of maps

Comments on EIA

672

147

Survey Section
Achievements:
No.

Activity

Total

1.

Court orders implemented/attended

22

2.

Boundary disputes attended

20

3.

Map amendments

45

4.

Mutations presented for processing

45

5.

RIM Retraced

6.

Sale of Registration maps

8
110

In addition, the section gave advisory services to both members of the public and government
agencies. The department also participated in county management meetings.
Housing
This section registered the following achievements.

Achievements:

Refurbishment of county houses as an ongoing activity

Maintenance of housing records

Dissemination of new housing technologies

Management of allocation of county houses

Implementation of County Finance Act 2013 in adjustment of house rents

Identification of land for construction of ABT centre at Ainabkoi.

Challenges:

Shortage of personnel in critical areas like planning, surveillance, technical staff in GIS
and Drafting.

Staff from national and those from former local authorities have not been fully integrated
for smooth operations and improved service delivery.
148

Lack of means of transport leading to underperformance in some sections whose activities


are field oriented like survey and physical planning.

Despite the above challenges the department met the set targets for the period under review.
Way forward:

Integration of all staff including those devolved from national government and those from
the defunct local authorities.

Recruitment of technical personnel, deployment and redistribution of staff.

Provision of means of transport for field activities.

ROADS, TRANSPORT AND PUBLIC WORKS


This department is vested with the responsibility of providing a holistic and integrated
transport system within the county as well as operating and maintaining an efficient, safe and
cost effective transport system.
Roads
The Subsector is responsible for development, rehabilitation and maintenance of road
network in the county (All roads except those classified as KeNHA, KURA and KeRRA).
Transport
The Subsector is responsible for transport policy formulation and development of regulatory
framework and transport infrastructure.
Public Works
The Subsector is responsible for development, maintenance and rehabilitation of Government
buildings and other public works in the county.
Electrical
The Subsector is responsible for development, maintenance and rehabilitation of street lights
and other electrical works on Buildings. The department decided to invest in both Solar and
Electrical Street lighting System at a cost of Kshs 95,445,428.00.
Achievements:
149

The departmental organizational structure was completed and a total of eleven (11) new
Engineers and surveyors for survey, design and supervision of roads and road corridor

demarcation recruited.
The department purchased enough machinery for both routine and development of roads
in the county. The department also procured enough supervision vehicles which will
enhance the activities of supervision team.

Drainage works within the Eldoret municipality has been done using the youth and
women.

Other satellite townships and regions within the county are targeted to be done in phase
two of the drainage works and routine maintenance of the road works. Special
maintenance contracts for the road works have been packaged for the youth, women and
people with disabilities; the contracts have been tendered and awarded to these
contractors.

In a bid to improve and upgrade existing earth roads to gravel standards and improve and
maintain drainage on various roads within the county, 876km of Roads were graded,

77km graveled and 10km of new roads opened.


Kimathi Street approx. 1.85 km was also rehabilitated. This was to improve drainage and

road shoulders including asphalt concrete overlay.


Eight (9) bridges and one box culvert commissioned and are underway - The bridges are
Oldonyo lessos bridge, Kaptoro bridge, Lower Sosiani bridge, St. Georges-St. James
bridge in Kapseret, Songoliet-Megun bridge, soy-Kipsoba bridge, Kanyangi bridge,

Kaboi bridge and Kaptai bridge.


Upgrading of graveled roads to bitumen standard and Rehabilitation of important link
roads has been finalized totaling 5 Kms. These are 64 Street, Kago Street, Muliro Street

and Kimathi streets within the former municipal council.


Works at Eldoret Hawkers Market in the CBD at the cost of Kshs. 89M (under KMP) are
underway and are at an advanced stage (95%). Tarmacking of the hawkers market road is

substantially completed.
The county fire fighting, rescue and disaster management department has been handled
emergency responses within and outside the county. It handles life safety, property
protection and preservation of the environment. The department has been assisting
neighboring counties like Elgeyo Marakwet, Nandi, Bungoma and Trans-Nzoia.
The county has been collaborating with the twin City of Minneapolis, USA in the
provision of firefighting equipment and other disaster response tools. A new fire station

150

has been proposed and tendered for to be located at Maili Nne where long distance trucks
have been experiencing a lot of fire disasters.
Challenges:

Inadequate Machinery, there is not enough machinery to repair and maintain the road

network within the county.


Frequency of breakdown of the few available machinery and long time to repair due to

nature of procurement process to acquire the spare part.


The funding is not enough to meet the needs of stakeholders demand in part of

infrastructure within the county.


There is not enough equipped office space for the department.
Traffic Congestion in CBD, Eldoret Town.

Way forward:

The department in collaboration with development partners and other stakeholder are

exploring ways of utilizing the available resources to attain maximum benefits.


The department is planning to purchase a mobile workshop next financial year to curb the

challenge of delayed repair work.


The department in collaboration with KENHA is developing the CBD. This entails
surveying and designing of by-passes, new roads, walkways and cycle ways. This will be
followed by constructing the designed passages. Care will be taken to provide for parking
and emergency services such as fire and ambulances. The second part of this strategy
entails developing a comprehensive urban development plan which provides for all
services and amenities expected of a modern city.

ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY, WATER AND NATURAL RESOURCES


The Department of Environment, Energy, Water and Natural Resources was created to
oversee the devolved functions within this area. However, there were some grey areas on the
department that should squarely fall within its jurisdiction but still ran by the national
government, a good example being forestry. To achieve the 10% forest cover by 2030, the
mandate of forestry should have been given to the county governments.
Water
The functions of this section include: Water, sewerage & sanitation services provision; Water
infrastructure development and maintenance; and County water sector co-ordination.
151

Environment
The mandate of this section involves Waste management; Control of air pollution, noise
pollution, Public nuisance and outdoor advertising; and Implementation of national
government policies on natural resources and environmental conservation.
Achievements:

Rolling out of the devolution of staff, finances and functions has been smooth and
completed.

Infrastructure expansion in progress (Kipkabus Water Project)

Upgrading and maintenance of water supplies (Turbo and Burnt forest)

Improved solid waste management

Procuring and planting 240,000 tree seedlings in public schools

Improvement of solid waste management was being undertaken.


A number of sensitization campaigns have been done within the county and measures to
address illegal dumping have been put in place. Kipkabus water project awarded to a
contractor out and expected to be completed by September 2014. The water distribution will
be by gravity flow thus making it sustainable compared to pumping mode.
Sensitization on protection of Water catchment areas carried out in the month of March 2014.
The objective of this exercise was to sensitize the public on the need to protect the water
catchment areas for sustainable water supply.
Challenges:

Encroachment of wetlands riparian zones.


Inadequate funding for development of new projects and maintenance of existing

projects.
Low water volume productions from the existing treatment plants which do not meet not

meet the current demand.


Inherited staff from the defunct municipal and county councils initially resisted the
change but this was managed by the county government.

Way Forward:

152

There is need to sensitize the public on the need not to encroach on wetlands riparian

zones.
Adequate and timely funding of development projects.

1.1

PUBLIC SERVICE MANAGEMENT

Public Service Management is made up of five sections, namely, Human Resource


Management, public Relations, Security and Enforcement, Governors office and
international relations and the legal section.
It is a service department that co-ordinates service delivery in the county, with the strategic
theme being Re-defining service delivery for efficient and timely service delivery.
Achievements:

Implementation of the headcount report.


Implementation of the devolved payroll and payroll clean up.
Civic education programmes for information sharing through the local media house, Kass

FM.
International relations with the national government and partnerships with other

countries.
Participatory decision making through engagement of local citizens in public participation

as well as those in diaspora.


Sensitization meetings on devolution and the structure of the county government.
Staff motivation through capacity building workshops and recognition of performing
individuals and teams as employees of the year on a quarterly basis.
List of bills assented to and passed into law:

ACT

Finance Act

POLICY MAKER
C.E.C Finance and Economic Planning

County Assembly Ward Offices Act


Alcoholic Drinks Control Act

C.E.C Public Service Management

Bursary and Skill Development

Support Disbursement Act


County Assembly Car and Mortgage
Scheme Act

C.E.C Health Services


C.E.C Education, Culture, Youth Affairs and
Social Services
C.E.C Finance and Economic Planning

153

.
List of bills assented to and in the process of gazetement:
ACT

Education Revolving Fund Bill

POLICY MAKER
C.E.C Education, Culture, Youth Affairs
and Social Services

Flag Emblems and Name Bill


C.E.C Public Service Management.

Public Appointments Bill

Project Implementation and

C.E.C Public Service Management.

Management Bill
C.E.C Finance and Economic Planning

Supplementary Appropriation Bill

Way Leaves Bill

C.E.C Finance and Economic Planning

C.E.C Roads, Transport and Public Works


List of bills prepared and one motion (debate) in County Assembly:
ACT

County Corporations Bill


County Co-operative Enterprise
Development Fund Bill

Trade Licensing Bill

County Roads Bill

Emergency Fund Bill

Polytechnics Bill

Disaster Management Bill

POLICY MAKER
C.E.C Trade , Industrialization, Cooperatives and Tourism Management
C.E.C Trade , Industrialization, Cooperatives and Tourism Management

C.E.C Trade , Industrialization, Cooperatives and Tourism Management


C.E.C Roads, Transport and Public Works
C.E.C Finance and Economic Planning
C.E.C Education, Culture, Youth Affairs
154

and Social Services


C.E.C Roads, Transport and Public Works

TRADE, INDUSTRIALIZATION, COOPERATIVE AND ENTERPRISE


DEVELOPMENT, TOURISM & WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
The Department of Trade, Industrialization, Cooperative and Enterprise development,
Tourism & Wildlife Management did not have major projects in the period under review.
However the following programs were proposed and or initiated and carried in the year.
Program /Project

Location

Estimated
cost
Kshs
25,000,000

Implementation
Status
Enterprise
Development Bill
establishing
forwarded to
County Assembly

Comments

Establishment of
Revolving fund

Headquarters

Revival of
Dormant
Cooperative
Societies

Sub County/
Ward level

Kshs
10,000,000

Break down of
expenses estimates
forwarded to
finance for
consideration in
February 2014

Moiben,
Ainabkoi,
Kessess ,
Kapseret,
Turbo,
Soy

Kshs 250,000 Trained/meetings as


follows:
Members 31
Committee 41
Leaders 1
Staff 1

Budget sits in the


Governors office
and issues raised
have been
addressed.
However amount
reduced to kshs
4.9m in Q4
supplementary
budget
Empowered both
members,
Management
Committees, Staff
and
leaders/Stakeholder
s in the cooperative
movement across
the County for
better management
and growth of the
Cooperative
Societies

Cooperative
a. Capacity
building

155

Bill has been taken


to public
participation but
amount reduced in
the Q4
supplementary
budget to Kshs 2M

Kshs 350,000
b. Education

As above
Carried out 14
strategic Seminars
and 1 tour visit for
both staff,
management
committees and
supervisors

Better
understanding of
Cooperative
Societies
governance issues
and comparison for
better practices
from successful
cooperatives in
central region

Conversion Rate of
17% way below the
Carried out and
minimum threshold
held 29 preof 25%. This is still
cooperative
a challenge in
meetings, registered embracing the
5 new Cooperative Cooperative
Societies and held 5 movement in the
1st Annual General
County
Meetings.
Annual routine
audit and
Kshs 500,000 Carried out and
registration of
registered audit of
accounts but some
50 Cooperative
societies still take
Societies , carried
long to bring books
out Inspection on 7 of accounts and
Cooperative
some
Societies, called for hide/deliberately
and attended 30
delay the process
Special Annual
which leads to
General Meetings
complaints from
and attend to and
members and hence
resolved conflicts in our intervention in
7 Cooperative
calling Special
Societies
AGM and
inspections
Kshs 150,000

c. Formation
&
registration
of new
Cooperativ
e Societies

d. Complianc
e&
regulation

As above

As above

Held meetings in 9
Dormant
Cooperative
Kshs 200,000 Societies and
Revived 6 of them
e. Revival of
Dormant
Cooperativ
e Societies

As above

156

Conversion rate of
67% which is
successful as it is
more than half.
There is potential
and interest in the
revival of Dormant
cooperatives in the
County hence the
allocation of Kshs

10m in the current


FY though it has
been amended to
kshs 4.9m in the
supplementary
budget

Trade
Development
i.
Capacity
Building
and
imparting
business
skills

ii.

iii.

Received
and carried
out
appraisals
on business
loan
application
s

Financial
Empowerm
ent

As above

As above

Kshs 100,000 Imparted business


skills on the
following groups ;
1. Youth groups
2. Women groups
3. Self help groups
4. Individuals

There is a lot of
interest in getting
basic business
skills across the
board and this is
bearing fruits from
the increased
interest and
inquiries on Joint
Loans Board
business loans

Received and
appraised aver 500
Kshs 200,000 loan application
forms

The number of
loan application is
many but not all of
them qualify due to
stringent
requirements by the
Joint loans Board
and lack of tangible
security required.

Kshs 14.7m
As above

157

The availability of
funds from
Approved a total of National
117 applicants with Government is
a total disbursement limiting and there is
of kshs 14.7m
need for the County
to Top Up in the
next FY in order to
benefit many
applicants as the
interest rate has
been lowered to 8%
p.a and maximum
loan amount
increased to kshs
300,000 payable up

to 24 months

iv.

Complianc
e&
regulation

Head
Quarters/As
above

Collected
over kshs 3m
in loan
repayment

Signed MoU with


Sarora Dairies and
receiving/reviewing
proposals from
other Investors

n/a
v.

vi.

New
Investment
Proposals

Stake
Holders
Forum

Loan repayments
up to date and
reconciliation of
bank account
regular with no
irregularities noted

Head quarters

Eldoret Town

Held dinner with


business
community in
Eldoret town and
the visitors from
Kshs 500,000 Sister City in USA
and held discussion
with delegation
from India State of
Gujarat in Nairobi

158

The default rate is


minimal in the new
loans due to
tangible
security/title deed
taken as collateral
though previous
loan default still
stand at
approximately kshs
4.m which the
Public Accounts
Committee of
Parliament declined
to write off as per
our
recommendation
Sarora Dairies Ltd
proposed to form
Lasso Dairies as
Joint Venture with
County and the
proposal forwarded
to County
Assembly for
consideration
though the same is
still subjected to
due diligence by
the Executive
Better
understanding by
the business
community and
other stakeholders
of the strategic
business direction
of the County
Government and
better mutually
beneficial
relationship with
our sister City in
USA and
discussion for
proposed business

incubation centres
in Eldoret town
with Indian
delegation

vii.

Embracing
the Jua
Kali sector

Kshs
2,500,000
Eldoret/Count
y

Held meetings with


County Jua Kali
officials and
potential exhibitors
on the upcoming
County and
National Jua Kali
exhibition in
August 2014

Embracing the Jual


Kali sector to spur
Economic growth
and income
distribution to the
grass root in the
County.

Tourism
a. Stakeholders
forum

b. Participated in
International
Tourism
Bourse

As above

ITB Berlin
Germany

Kshs 375,000 Held consultative


meeting with all the
CECs in the
Country and KTB
on the future
management of
tourism in the
Counties and the
North Rift Tourism
Association
( NTRA)

Kshs
1,000,000

159

Held meetings with


CECs of the North
Rift Counties with a
view to making
Uasin Gishu
County a regional
Tourism Hub
Showcase Tourism

Future fully
devolved tourism
function to the
Counties by the
National
Government and
effective working
relations with the
stake holders in the
tourism sector in
the region and the
county
Take advantage and
better utilize
tourism facilities in
Eldoret town

facilities in Uasin
Gishu County

c. Product
development

Profiled community
based tourism
products such as
Home Stays,
Kormosho
Waterfalls, Kesses
Dam, River Sosiani
Nature park/animal
Zoo and
Chebarorwa
wildlife
conservancy

n/a
County

Collaboration with
Kenya Tourism
Board and the
Regional
Integration in
making EA a
regional tourism
Hub

Support local
tourism at the
community level

d.

Community
based tourism

Kshs 75,000
County

Community
participation and
appreciation of
tourism as a
product and
opening the county
for other modern
tourism products;
Share the benefits
of community
tourism at the grass
root level.

Weights &
Measures
1. Compliance

County

Kshs 400,000 Calibration, testing


and certification of
Equipment in
Nairobi and across
the County
160

Compliance with
the law on weights
and measures

Obtained Seals and


stamps from UK
through National
Government

n/a
2. Tools and
equipment

Headquarters

Certification and
compliance with
the law

Revenue to the
County
County

Kshs 750,000

Eldoret

n/a

Cheques still
written in the name
of weights and
measures which
cant be deposited
to the county
revenue account
but taken up with
Finance and
economic planning
department

3. AIA

Betting Control
i.

Operations

ii.

iii.

Compliance
and
regulation

Conducted
draws/lottery

County

Eldoret
langas,
sirikwa hotel

Daily routine
management of the
Eldoret casino
Routine inspection
of pool tables,
licensing and
falsification of
licenses

n/a

Presided Omo draw


in Langas ward and
Twende Kazi na
Tusker at Sirikwa
Hotel

n/a

Smooth running of
the casino in
compliance with
the law
Confiscated fake
licenses and closed
unauthorized pool
tables in
conjunction with
sub county
administrators
Ensure Fair gaming
practices in the
county

FINANCE AND ECONOMIC PLANNING


Finance and Economic Planning is a Service Department that finances all the activities of the
County Government of Uasin Gishu. During the period under review the county government
managed to collect a total of Kshs. 563,669,444.00 as local revenue. In the same period,
recurrent expenditure amounted to Kshs. 2,557,015,357.00 accounting for 65 percent of total
161

expenditure. On the other hand development expenditure was Kshs. 1,377,418,697.00 thereby
accounting for 35 percent of total expenditure. Consequently, the county government
surpassed the minimum requirement of 30 percent of expenditure going towards
development.

Revenue performance during the period under review was as given below:
Month
July 2013
Aug'13
Sept'13
Oct'13
Nov'13
Dec'13
Jan'14
Feb'14
Mar'14
Apr'14
May'14
Jun'14
Total

Revenue
30,002,355
22,211,857
24,557,982
27,304,455
24,365,381
21,737,250
80,254,272
71,268,772
115,398,932
50,008,916
46,055,721
50,503,551
665,374,166

REVENUE
140,000,000
120,000,000
100,000,000
80,000,000
REVENUE

60,000,000
40,000,000
20,000,000
0

162

Recurrent and development Expenditures for the periods July 2013-June 2014
RECURRENT EXPENDITURE
S/NO.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

County Assembly
Office of the Governor and Deputy Governor
County Executive Committee
County Public Service
Finance
Agriculture
Environment & Natural Resources
Education, Youth Affairs & Social Services
Health Services
Physical Planning & Development
Public Works
Trade
TOTAL EXPENDITURE RECURRENT

Estimates
563,390,967
624,103,216
33,211,214
25,689,168
345,289,730
172,229,513
76,101,804
192,936,628
614,178,573
78,926,604
239,901,708
40,278,565
3,006,237,69
0

Expenditure
s
Balance
517,173,485
46,217,482
520,473,296
103,629,920
10,389,030
22,822,184
3,523,085
22,166,083
296,579,395
48,710,335
156,611,638
15,617,875
51,584,171
24,517,633
95,283,645
97,652,983
612,118,881
2,059,692
60,129,005
18,797,599
188,969,112
50,932,596
15,960,142 24,318,423
2,528,794,88
5
477,442,805

DEVELOPMENT EXPENDITURE
TOTAL EXPENDITURE DEVELOPMENT

1,624,300,00
0

203,769,554

1,420,530,44
6

TOTAL EXPENDITURES (REC+DEV)

4,630,537,69
0

2,732,564,43
9

1,897,973,25
1

163

3,500,000,000
3,000,000,000
2,500,000,000
2,000,000,000
RECURRENT EXPENDITURE Estimates
1,500,000,000

RECURRENT EXPENDITURE Expenditures

1,000,000,000
500,000,000
0
RECURRENT EXPENDITURE Balance

The development expenditure was on various development projects across the county.
Recurrent expenditure accounted for 65 percent while development expenditure accounted
for 35 percent.
Achievements:

The county integrated development plan (CIDP) was completed and approved by the

county assembly.
The county fiscal strategy paper was prepared and submitted to the county assembly by

28th February 2014 as required by PFMA 2012.


County Budget for the year 2014/2015 was prepared and approved by the County

Assembly.
Payment of personnel emoluments was done.
The County Executive approved 100% waiver on payment of land rates which realized

Kshs 90 million.
The operational Expenditure was 99.9% achieved.
Reports and Submissions to Budget Controller were up to date.
Funds were made available at the time required.
The supplementary budget was approved and implemented.
The County Budget and Economic Forum held the scheduled meeting.
Staff trained on Preparation of Statistical Sectoral Plans (SSP) and Project Monitoring
and Evaluation.

164

Revenue improved due to waiver on land rates penalties and engagement of National
Youth Service.

Challenges:

Late disbursement of funds by the national government.


At the close of the year the County was not able to complete the development projects
forcing the county government to re-budget the same in the 2014/2015 Financial Year

budget. This was due to late disbursement of the fund.


There is still a challenge on collection of revenue from the motor-cycles operations in the
outskirts of the town.

The Finance Department is committed to ensuring that all the activities of the County
regarding Operations and Development are implemented as per the Budget approved by the
County Assembly in a transparent and accountable manner for the benefit of the County of
Uasin Gishu County residents.
HEALTH SERVICES
The county has a total of 170 health facilities ranging from tier 2 to tier 4. Most of the
facilities are concentrated within Eldoret Municipality. The average distance to a health
facility in the county is 7 Kms, slightly higher than the recommended 5 Kms.
There is a total health workforce of 988 serving in 111 county public health facilities. The
countys doctor to population ratio is 1:10,034 while that of clinician/nurse to patient ratio is
1:2,331.
The health status of the population in Uasin Gishu County cannot be described as optimal
because it is faced with various health problems, common among them being HIV/Aids,
tuberculosis, pneumonia, diabetes, hypertension, and malaria among the adult population.
Whereas respiratory system diseases, diarrhea and skin diseases is common among children
under 5 years. Some of the risk factors affecting the population include poor hygiene and
sanitation, alcohol consumption, negative cultural practices among other risk factors.
Achievements:
165

In line with the county integrated development plan, the county government
developed the County Health Strategic Plan 2013-2017 to facilitate implementation of the
national health policy, the vision 2030 and the health provisions enshrined in the

constitution.
The county government improved a number of health indicators such as immunization
coverage from 66% to 70%. This improvement was due to immunization outreaches and

increased immunization sites.


Delivery of expectant mothers by skilled attendants increased from 28% to 52% largely
due to improved access from the free maternity program, improved health facilities and

referral of pregnant mothers by community health workers.


Family planning coverage improved from 32% to 48% as a result of availability of family

planning commodities and trained staff.


Other indicators which improved include PMTCT uptake from 18% to 48%, HIV

counseling and testing from 22.3% to 56.8% and latrine coverage from 73% to 78%.
On non-communicable conditions, the county government hosted the national
commemoration of the world cancer day on 4th February 2014. This event was graced by
H.E the governor and the cabinet secretary for health during which the county acquired 3
cryotherapy machines for cervical cancer treatment, while the public benefited from free
screening and treatment of breast, prostate and cervical cancers. The county has
decentralized cancer screening to the sub-county health facilities in order to increase
accessibility. With support from other health partners, the county intensified screening

and advocacy in hypertension and diabetes among other chronic diseases.


The county invested in health promotion activities to minimize exposure to health risks.
Youth friendly services in 21 health facilities were established to address health risk
factors among the youth. The county government also enacted the Alcoholic Drinks
Control Act and is in the process of carrying out quality audits, inspection and liquor
licensing pursuant to Part II of the Fourth Schedule to the Constitution. This will go a
long way in controlling the production, sale, distribution, promotion and use of alcoholic

drinks.
In addressing the huge burden of injuries arising from violence and road traffic
accidents, 30 nurses from 21 health facilities across the county have been trained in

management of sexual and gender based violence.


The county government procured and distributed to public health facilities essential

medicine and diagnostic reagents to the tune of Ksh. 40 million.


Infrastructure development was ongoing in more than 100 ward health facilities. The
aim is to decongest Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital especially of diseases that
166

could be handled by lower level facilities. The county government also plans to
upgrade one health facility to offer comprehensive maternity services. To improve
quality of care, the county government is in the process of acquiring modern
equipment including digital X-ray Machines, Ultrasound scanners and Theatre
equipment. Similarly, additional ambulances will also be purchased to strengthen

referral services across the county.


Human resource for health was strengthened through hiring of 17 new members of staff,

distribution and review of management structures.


Staff capacity development has been facilitated and a number of health workers
underwent various professional and management training. There are plans to hire more

health workers and promote those who have stagnated in one job group across all cadres.
The county conducted 2 stakeholder fora to map out and prioritize collaboration
among stakeholders. The county shall continue to mobilize health stakeholders to
develop strategies in order to address various health issues including HIV testing and
behavior change communication in the most at risk population (MARPs), health
management information systems, malaria control, safe motherhood and increasing
immunization coverage among others. This will aid in realizing the mission and vision of
the county and achievement of millennium development goals.
Challenges:

There were cases of children not completing full immunization schedule (defaulters) thus

affecting immunization coverage.


The county still lacked adequate capacity to handle non-communicable diseases.
Burden of injuries arising from road accidents and gender-based violence.
Way Forward:

Enhance defaulter tracing through community health workers in order to further improve

coverage in the year 2014.


Scale up control of non-communicable diseases through training of staff and equipping of

health facilities to handle non-communicable diseases.


Train motorbike riders in collaboration with other sectors to reduce the burden of
motorbike accidents as well as improving quality emergency care by equipping health
facilities along the highway to manage trauma cases arising from road traffic
accidents.

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ICT AND E-GOVERNMENT


This report gives a synopsis of the status of project implementation and assesses the
performance of the Department of ICT & e-Government in the financial year 2013/2014. The
report is a careful analysis of project implementation by the Department of ICT & eGovernment for the period 1st July 2013 30th June, 2014

Achievements

Online Recruitment System (jobs.uasingishu.go.ke)ICT Developed systems for

recruitment of Chief Officers, Sub-County Officers and Ward Administrators


Draft Report Done on Inventory of IT Assets and Systems
E-Staff Management Adoption i.e. Online GHRIS where now County Staff should
access payslips from www.ghris.go.ke

Health management information system (hmis) procured by the county

Online Capture of Budget and accurate reports; integrated to programme based budget
Establishment of GIS Baseline Datasets on-going
Trained various cadres of leaders on ICT literacy skills at RVVTI.
Automation of health care services done by Development Partnership - Afya Info and

Hi-tech
Automation of revenue and service delivery segments on-going by development
partners.

Challenges

Late release of exchequer to the Counties


Procurement Delays due to Capacity Challenges
Under Staffing in ICT and e-Government department
Insufficient Funds to support ICT and e-Government operations

Way forward

Establish a County Policy and Strategy for ICT integration in service delivery.
Create an e-leadership capacity development framework
Establishing ICT infrastructures.
To build a spatial infrastructure of the County
Create a capacity development framework and exchanges on best practices
Create a platform for collaboration amongst the youth

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CONCLUSION
The period under review was a transition one with a lot of challenges for the county
government attributed to the teething problems of any new system. However, the county
weathered all these to post substantial progress in its development endeavours. For further
meaning progress to be realized the challenges highlighted in the report need to be addressed.
In addition, all stakeholders need to work together in order that our goals are realized.

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