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Lab 2.2.

4 Establishing a Console Session with HyperTerminal

Objective

Connect a router and workstation using a console cable.

Configure HyperTerminal to establish a console session with the router.

Background/Preparation
HyperTerminal is a simple Windows-based terminal emulation program that can be used to connect
to the console port on the router. A PC with HyperTerminal provides a keyboard and monitor for the
router. Connecting to the console port with a rollover cable and using HyperTerminal is the most
basic way to access a router for checking or changing its configuration.
Set up a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements
may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600, 1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. The
following resources will be required:

Workstation with a serial interface and HyperTerminal

Cisco Router

Console (rollover) cable for connecting the workstation to the router

Step 1 Basic router configuration


a. Connect a rollover cable to the console port on the router and the other end to the PC with a DB9 or DB-25 adapter to the COM 1 port. This should be completed prior to powering on any
devices.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 2.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 2 Start HyperTerminal program


a. Turn on the computer and router.
b. From the Widows taskbar, locate the HyperTerminal program:
Start > Programs > Accessories > Communications > Hyper Terminal

Step 3 Name the HyperTerminal session


a. At the Connection Description popup, enter a name in the connection Name: field and select
OK.

Step 4 Specify the computers connecting interface


a. At the Connect To popup, use the drop down arrow in the Connect using: field to select COM1
and select OK.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 2.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 5 Specify the interface connection properties


a. At the COM1 Properties popup, use the drop down arrows to select:
Bits per second: 9600
Data bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop bits: 1
Flow control: None
Then select OK.

b. When the HyperTerminal session window comes up, turn on the router. If the router is already
on, press the Enter key. There should be a response from the router.
If there is, then the connection has been successfully completed. If there is no connection,
troubleshoot as necessary. For example, verify that the router has power. Check the connection
to the COM 1 port on the PC and the console port on the router. If there is still no connection,
ask the instructor for assistance.
c.

Record in the engineering journal the correct procedure for establishing a console session with
the router.

Step 6 Closing the session


a. To end the console session from a HyperTerminal session, select:
File > Exit
b. When the HyperTerminal disconnect warning popup appears, select Yes.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 2.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

The computer will then ask if the session is to be saved. Select Yes.

Step 7 Reopen the HyperTerminal connection, as shown in Step 2


a. At the Connection Description popup, select Cancel.

b. To open the saved console session from HyperTerminal, select:


File > Open
The saved session will now appear and by double-clicking on the name, the connection will open
without reconfiguring it each time.

Step 8 Terminating the HyperTerminal session


a. Close HyperTerminal.
b. Shut down the router.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 2.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 2.2.9 Command Line Fundamentals

Objective

Log into a router and go to the user and privileged modes.

Use several basic router commands to determine how the router is configured.

Use the router HELP facility.

Use command history and editing features.

Logout of the router.

Background/Preparation
HyperTerminal is a simple Windows-based terminal emulation program that can be used to connect
to the routers console port. A PC with HyperTerminal provides a keyboard and monitor for the router.
Connecting to the console port with a rollover cable and using HyperTerminal is the most basic way
to access a router for checking or changing its configuration.
Set up a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements
may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600, 1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. The
configuration output used in this lab is produced from a 1721 series router. Other routers may
produce slightly different output.
The following resources will be required:

1-3

Workstation with a serial interface and HyperTerminal

Cisco Router

Rollover, or console, cable for connecting the workstation to the router

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 2.2.9

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless specifically instructed
otherwise.

Step 1 Start HyperTerminal


a. Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.

Step 2 Log into the router


a. Log into the router. If prompted to enter the initial setup mode, answer no. If prompted for a
password, enter cisco.
b. If the prompt shows Router this is the default. Something other than that may appear if this
router has been named. What prompt did the router display? __________________________
c.

What does the prompt symbol following a router name mean? _________________________

Step 3 Use the HELP feature


a. Enter the help command by typing the ? at the user EXEC router prompt.
Router>?
List eight available commands from the router response.

Step 4 Enter privileged EXEC mode


a. Enter enable mode by using the enable command. If a password is asked for, enter class
when prompted.
Router>enable [Enter]
b. Was enable one of the commands available from Step 3? _________________________________
c.

What changed in the router prompt display and what does it mean?

_______________________________________________________________________
Step 5 Use the help feature
a. Enter the help mode by typing a question mark (?) at the router privileged EXEC prompt.
Router#?
b. List ten (10) available commands from the router response.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 2.2.9

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 List the show commands


a. List all show commands by entering show ? at the router privileged EXEC prompt.
Router#show ?
b. Is running-config one of the available commands from this mode?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 7 Examine the running configuration
a. Display the running router configuration by using the command show running-config at the
privileged EXEC router prompt.
Router#show running-config
b. List six key pieces of information shown with this command:

Step 8 Examine the configuration in more detail


a. Continue looking at the configuration.
b. When the word "more" appears, press the space bar. By pressing the space bar the router will
display the next page of information.
c.

What happened when the space bar was pressed ?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 9 Use the command history feature
a. Use the command history to see and reuse the previously entered commands. Press the up
arrow or Ctrl-p to see the last entered command. Press it again to go to the command before
that. Press the down arrow or Ctrl-n to go back through the list. This function lets the command
history be viewed.
b. What appeared at the router prompt when the up arrow was pressed?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 10 Logoff and turn the router off
a. Close HyperTerminal.
b. Shut down the router.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 2.2.9

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.1.2 Command Modes and Router Identification

Objective

Identify basic router modes of user EXEC and privileged EXEC.

Use commands to enter specific modes.

Become familiar with the router prompt for each mode.

Assign a name to the router.

Background/Preparation
Any router that meets the interface requirements may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. Refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly
identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration
output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce
slightly different output. The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless
specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps before
continuing with this lab.

Step 1 Login to the router in user EXEC mode


a. Connect to the router and login.
b. What prompt did the router display?

__________________________________________________________________________
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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 2 Login to the router in privileged EXEC mode
a. Enter enable at the user mode prompt.
Router>enable
b. If prompted for a password, enter the password class.
c.

What prompt did the router display?

__________________________________________________________________________
d. What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 3 Enter global configuration mode
a. Enter configure terminal at the privilege mode prompt.
Router#configure terminal
b. What prompt did the router display? ____________________________________________
c.

What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 4 Enter router configuration mode
a. Enter router rip at the global configuration mode.
Router(config)#router rip
b. What prompt did the router display? _________________________________________
c.

What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 5 Exit from router mode and go into interface configuration mode
a. Enter exit at the prompt to return to global configuration mode.
Router(config-router)#exit
b. Enter interface serial 0 at the global configuration mode prompt.
Note: See chart for the interface identifier.
Router(config)#interface serial 0
c.

What prompt did the router display? _____________________

d. What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
e. Enter exit at the prompt to return to global configuration mode.
Router(config-if)#exit

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Assign a name to the router


a. Router(config)#hostname GAD
b. What prompt did the router display? _____________________
c.

What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
d. What change has occurred in the prompt?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 7 Exit the router
a. Enter exit at the prompt to close out of the router.
GAD(config)#exit
b. From the privileged EXEC mode, type exit to logoff. Turn the router off.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.1.3 Configuring Router Passwords

Objective

Configure a password for console login to user EXEC mode.

Configure a password for virtual terminal (Telnet) sessions.

Configure a secret password for privileged EXEC mode.

Background/Preparation
Any router that meets the interface requirements may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. Refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly
identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration
output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce
slightly different output. The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless
specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Login to the router in user EXEC mode


a. Connect to the router and login.
b. What prompt did the router display?

__________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 2 Login to the router in privileged EXEC mode
a. Enter enable at the user EXEC mode prompt.
Router>enable
b. What prompt did the router display?

__________________________________________________________________________
c.

What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 3 Enter global configuration mode
a. Enter configure terminal at the privilege EXEC mode prompt.
Router#configure terminal
b. What prompt did the router display? ____________________________________________
c.

What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 4 Enter a hostname of GAD for this router
a. Enter hostname GAD at the prompt.
Router(config)#hostname GAD
b. What prompt did the router display?

__________________________________________________________________________
c.

What does this prompt mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 5 Configure and exit
Configure the console password on the router and exit from line console:
GAD(config)#line console 0
GAD(config-line)#password cisco
GAD(config-line)#login
GAD(config-line)#exit
GAD(config)#

Step 6 Configure and exit


Configure the password on the virtual terminal lines and exit line mode:
GAD(config)#line vty 0 4
GAD(config-line)#password cisco
GAD(config-line)#login
GAD(config-line)#exit
GAD(config)#
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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Configure the enable password


Configure the enable password on the router and exit from global configuration mode:
GAD(config)#enable password cisco
GAD(config)#exit

Step 8 Return to the user EXEC mode


Return to the user EXEC mode by entering the disable command:
GAD#disable

Step 9 Enter the privileged EXEC mode again


This time a prompt for a password will show. Enter cisco but the characters will not be seen on the
line.
GAD>enable
Password:cisco

Step 10 Return to the configuration mode


Return to the configuration mode by entering configure terminal:
GAD#configure terminal

Step 11 Configure the enable secret password


Configure the enable secret password and exit from global configuration mode:
GAD(config)#enable secret class
GAD(config)#exit
Note: Remember the enable secret password is encrypted from the configuration view. Also do
not type enable secret password class, or the secret password will be password, not
class.

Step 12 Return to the user EXEC mode


Return to the user EXEC mode by entering the command disable:
GAD#disable
GAD>

Step 13 Enter the privileged EXEC mode again


A prompt for a password will show. Enter cisco. The characters will not be seen on the line. If it fails,
continue until the bad secrets message is displayed:
GAD>enable
Password:cisco
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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Password:cisco
Password:cisco
% Bad secrets

Step 14 Enter the privileged EXEC mode again


A prompt for a password will show. Enter class. The characters will not be displayed on the line:
GAD>enable
Password:class
GAD#
Note: The enable secret password takes precedence over the enable password. So once an
enable secret password is entered the enable password no longer is accepted.

Step 15 Show the routers running configuration


GAD#show running-config
a. Is there an encrypted password? ______________________________________________
b. Are there any other passwords? _______________________________________________
c.

Are any of the other passwords encrypted? _______________________________________

Upon completion of the previous steps, logoff by typing exit. Turn the router off.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.1.4 Using Router show Commands

Objective

Become familiar with the basic router show commands.

Retrieve the current running configuration from RAM using show running-config.

View the backup configuration file in NVRAM using show startup-config.

View the IOS file information using show flash and show version.

View the current status of the router interfaces using show interface.

View the status of any configured Layer 3 protocol using show protocols.

Background/Preparation
This lab helps the student become familiar with the router show commands. The show commands
are the most important information-gathering commands available for the router.

1-4

show running-config (or show run) is probably the single most valuable command to help
determine the current status of a router, because it displays the active configuration file running
in RAM.

show startup-config (or show start) displays the backup configuration file that is stored
in non-volatile RAM (NVRAM). This is the file that will be used to configure the router when it is
first started or rebooted with the reload command. All the detailed router interface settings are
contained in this file.

show flash is used to view the available flash memory and the amount used. Flash is where
the Cisco Internetwork Operating System (IOS) file or image is stored.

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

show arp displays the routers address resolution table.

show interfaces displays statistics for all interfaces configured on the router.

show protocols displays global and interface-specific status of configured Layer 3 protocols,
such as IP and IPX.

Any router that meets the interface requirements may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. Refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly
identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration
output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce
slightly different output. The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless
specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.

Step 1 Log on to the router


a. Connect to the router and log on. If prompted, enter the password cisco.

Step 2 Enter the help command


a. Enter the help command by typing ? at the router prompt. The router responds with all
commands available in user mode.
b. What did the router reply with? ________________________________________________
c.

Are all router commands available at the current prompt? ____________________________

d. Is show one of the options available? ___________________________________________

Step 3 Display help for the show command


a. Enter the show ? command. The router responds with the show subcommands available in
user mode.
b. List three user mode show subcommands.
show Subcommand

Description

Step 4 Display IOS version and other important information with the show version
command
a. Enter the show version command. The router will return information about the IOS that is
running in RAM.
b. What is the IOS version? ____________________________________________________
c.

What is the name of the system image (IOS) file? __________________________________

d. Where was the router IOS image booted from? ____________________________________


e. What type of processor (CPU) and how much RAM does this router have?

__________________________________________________________________________
f.

How many Ethernet interfaces does this router have? _________How many serial interfaces?

_________
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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

g. The router backup configuration file is stored in non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM).
How much NVRAM does this router have? ______________________________________
h. The router operating system (IOS) is stored in Flash memory. How much Flash memory does
this router have? __________________________________________________________
i.

What is the configuration register set to? _________________________________________

Step 5 Display the time and date for the router


a. Enter the show clock command. What information is displayed? ______________________

Step 6 Display a cached list of host names and addresses


a. Enter the show hosts command. What information is displayed with show hosts?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 7 Display users who are connected to the router
a. Enter the show users command. What information is displayed with show users?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 8 Show the command buffer
a. Enter the show history command. What information is displayed with show history?

_______________________________________________________________________
Step 9 Enter privileged EXEC mode
a. From user EXEC mode, enter privileged EXEC mode using the enable command.
b. Enter the enable password class.
c.

What command did you use to enter privileged EXEC mode? __________________________

d. How do you know if you are in privileged EXEC mode? ______________________________

Step 10 Enter the help command


a. Enter the show ? command at the router prompt. What did the router reply with?

_______________________________________________________________________
b. How is this output different from the one you got in user EXEC mode in Step 3?

_______________________________________________________________________
Step 11 Show the router ARP table
a. Enter the show arp command at the router prompt. What is the ARP table?

_______________________________________________________________________
Step 12 Show information about the Flash memory device
a. Enter show flash at the router prompt.
b. How much Flash memory is available and used? ___________________________________
c.

What is the file that is stored in Flash memory? ____________________________________

d. What is the size in bytes of the Flash memory? ____________________________________


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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 13 Show information about the active configuration file


a. Enter show running-config (or show run) at the router prompt. What important information
is displayed with show run?

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Step 14 Show information about the backup configuration file
a. Enter show startup-config (or show start) at the router prompt. What important
information is displayed with show start, and where is this information kept?

_______________________________________________________________________
Step 15 Display statistics for all interfaces configured on the router
a. Enter show interfaces at the router prompt.
b. Find the following information for interface FastEthernet 0: (Refer to the chart at the end of the
lab to correctly identify the interface based on equipment)
1. What is MTU? ______________________________________________________
2. What is rely? _______________________________________________________
3. What is load? ______________________________________________________
c.

Find the following information for interface Serial 0


1. What is the IP address and subnet mask? __________________________________
2. What data link layer encapsulation is being used? ____________________________

Step 16 Display the protocols configured on the router


a. Enter show protocols at the router prompt. What important information is displayed?

__________________________________________________________________________
Upon completion of the previous steps, logoff by typing exit. Turn the router off.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.1.5 Configuring a Serial Interface

Objective

Configure a serial interface on each of two routers so they can communicate.

Background/Preparation
Any router that meets the interface requirements may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. Refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly
identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration
output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce
slightly different output. The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless
specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Basic Router Configuration


a. Configure the router. Connect the routers as shown in the diagram. This lab requires a null serial
cable and two rollover or console cables.

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 2 Configure the name and passwords for Router 1


a. On Router 1, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in the
chart.
b. Configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords. If there are any problems, refer to
the Lab 3.1.3 Configuring Router Passwords.

Step 3 Configure serial interface Serial 0


From global configuration mode, configure serial interface Serial 0 on Router GAD. Refer to Interface
Summary.
GAD(config)#interface serial 0
GAD(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0
GAD(config-if)#clock rate 56000
GAD(config-if)#no shutdown
GAD(config-if)#exit
GAD(config)#exit
Note: Once the interface configuration mode is entered, note the IP address of the interface.
Enter the subnet mask. Enter the clock rate only on the DCE side of the device. The command
no shutdown turns on the interface. Shutdown is when the interface is off.

Step 4 Save the running configuration


Save the running configuration to the startup configuration at the privileged EXEC mode:
GAD#copy running-config startup-config
Note: Save the running configuration for the next time that the router is restarted. The router can
be restarted either by a software reload command or a power shutdown. The running
configuration will be lost if the running configuration is not saved. The router uses the startup
configuration when the router is started.

Step 5 Display information about Serial interface 0 on GAD


a. Enter the command show interface serial 0 on GAD. Refer to interface chart.
GAD#show interface serial 0
This will show the details of interface serial 0.
b. List at least three details discovered by issuing this command.
c.

Serial 0 is ___________________. Line protocol is___________________ .

d. Internet address is _____________________.


e. Encapsulation _________________________
f.

To what OSI layer is the Encapsulation referring? _______________________________

g. If the Serial interface was configured, why did the show interface serial 0 say that the
interface is down?

__________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Configure the name and passwords for Router 2


a. On the Birmingham router, enter the global configuration mode. Configure hostname, console,
virtual terminal and enable passwords as shown in the previous chart.

Step 7 Configure serial interface Serial 0


From the global configuration mode, configure serial interface Serial 0 on Router BHM. Refer to
interface chart.
BHM(config)#interface serial 0
BHM(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0
BHM(config-if)#no shutdown
BHM(config-if)#exit
BHM(config)#exit

Step 8 Save the running configuration


Save the running configuration to the startup configuration at the privileged EXEC mode:
BHM#copy running-config startup-config

Step 9 Display information about Serial interface 0 on BHM


a. Enter the command show interface serial 0 on BHM. Refer to interface chart.
BHM#show interface serial 0
This will show the details of interface serial 0.
b. List at least three details discovered by issuing this command.
c.

Serial 0 is ___________________, line protocol is ___________________ .

d. Internet address is ___________________ .


e. Encapsulation ___________________
f.

What is the difference in the Line and Protocol status recorded on GAD earlier? Why?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 10 Verify that the serial connection is functioning
a. ping the serial interface of the other router.
BHM#ping 192.168.15.1
GAD#ping 192.168.15.2
b. From GAD, ping the BHM router serial interface. Does the ping work? _________________
c.

From BHM, ping the GAD router serial interface. Does the ping work? _________________

d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error.
Then ping the interfaces again until the answer to both questions is yes.
Upon completion of the previous steps, logoff by typing exit. Turn the router off. Remove and store
the cables and adapter.
3-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.1.6 Making Configuration Changes

Objective

Configure some basic router settings.

Bring interfaces up and down.

Make changes to the router configuration.

Background/Preparation
Any router that meets the interface requirements may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. Refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly
identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration
output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce
slightly different output. The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless
specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

1-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Basic router configuration


a. Connect the router as shown in the diagram. This lab requires a console (rollover) and a serial
cable.

Step 2 Configure hostname and passwords


a. On the GAD router, enter the global configuration mode. Configure the hostname as shown in
the chart. Configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords.

Step 3 Configure interface Serial 0


a. From the global configuration mode, configure serial interface 0 on Router GAD. Refer to
interface chart.
GAD(config)#interface Serial 0
GAD(config-if)#ip address 192.168.14.1 255.255.255.0
GAD(config-if)#no shutdown
GAD(config-if)#description Connection to the host
GAD(config-if)#exit
GAD(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


a. Save the running configuration to the startup configuration at the privileged EXEC mode.
GAD#copy running-config startup-config
Note: Save the running configuration for the next time that the router is restarted. The router can
be restarted either by a software reload command or a power shutdown. The running
configuration will be lost if the running configuration is not saved. The router uses the startup
configuration when the router is started.

Step 5 Verify the configuration


a. Issue the show running-config command from the privileged EXEC mode
b. If the configuration is not correct, reenter any incorrect commands.

Step 6 Modify the configuration


a. Based on the new table, reconfigure the GAD router. Change the router hostname. Change the
enable/VTY/console passwords. Remove the secret password and interface description. To
remove an old command, go to the proper command mode and retype the command exactly as
it was entered with the word no in front of it. For example:
GAD(config-if)#description Connection to the host
GAD(config-if)#no description Connection to the host
Note: Before making changes to the interface IP address and subnet mask bring the interface
down as shown in Step 7.

2-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router
Name

Serial 0
Address

Subnet
mask

GAD

172.16.0.1

255.255.0.0

Enable
Secret
password

Enable/VTY/Console
passwords
Cisco1

b. To change information, go to the proper command mode and retype the command with the new
information.

Step 7 Bring down Serial interface 0


a. Bring the interface down for maintenance by entering:
GAD(config)#interface Serial 0
GAD(config-if)#shutdown
GAD(config-if)#exit
GAD(config)#exit
GAD#
b. Issue the show interface Serial 0 and note the interface status.
c.

Issue the show running-config command and note the status of interface Serial 0:

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 8 Bring up Serial interface 0
a. To make the interface operational, enable the interface by entering:
GAD(config)#interface Serial 0
GAD(config-if)#no shutdown
GAD(config-if)#exit
GAD (config)#exit
b. Issue the show interface Serial 0 and note the interface status.
c.

Serial 0 is ________________. Line protocol is ________________.

Step 9 Verify the configuration


a. Issue a show running-config command from the privileged EXEC mode to see if the
modifications were properly made. If the configuration is not correct, reenter any incorrect
commands and verify again.
Upon completion of the previous steps, logoff by typing exit. Turn the router off.

3-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.1.7 Configuring an Ethernet Interface

Objective

Configure an Ethernet interface on the router with an IP address and a subnet mask.

Background/Preparation
In this lab, students configure an Ethernet interface on the router with an IP address and a subnet
mask.
Any router that meets the interface requirements may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. Refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly
identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration
output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce
slightly different output. The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless
specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the hostname and passwords on the GAD router


a. On the router, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in the
chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords.
1-4

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 2 Configure the FastEthernet 0 interface


Note: The designation for the first Ethernet interface on the router will vary. It may be ethernet 0,
fastethernet 0 or fastethernet 0/0 depending on the type of router.
GAD(config)#interface fastEthernet 0
GAD(config-if)#ip address 192.168.14.1 255.255.255.0
GAD(config-if)#no shutdown
GAD(config-if)#exit
GAD (config)#exit

Step 3 Save the configuration


a. Save the running configuration to the startup configuration at the privileged EXEC mode:
GAD#copy running-config startup-config

Step 4 Display the FastEthernet 0 configuration information


GAD#show interface fastethernet 0
Note: This will show the details of the Ethernet interface.
a. List at least three details discovered by issuing this command.
b. FastEthernet0 is __________________. Line protocol is ____________________.
c.

Internet address is ___________________________.

d. Encapsulation _________________________________
e. To what OSI layer is the Encapsulation referring? ______________________
Upon completion of the previous steps, logoff by typing exit. Turn the router off.

2-4

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.2.7 Configuring Host Tables

Objective

Create IP host tables that allow a router to use names to identify all of the attached interfaces on
that router. These names can be used in place of an IP addresses in commands that use IP
addresses to identify a location.

Set up a network similar to the one in the above diagram.

Background/Preparation
IP host tables allow a router to use names to identify all of the attached interfaces on that router.
These names can be used in place of an IP address in commands that use IP addresses to identify a
location such as ping or Telnet.
Any router that meets the interface requirements may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. Refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly
identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration
output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce
slightly different output. The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless
specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.
1-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the hostname and passwords on the GAD router


a. On the router, enter the global configuration mode. Configure the hostname as shown in the
chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords. If there are any
difficulties, refer to the Configuring Router Passwords lab.

Step 2 Configure the interfaces and routing protocol on the GAD router
a. Go to the proper command mode and enter the following text:
GAD(config)#interface fastethernet 0
GAD(config-if)#ip address 172.16.0.1 255.255.0.0
GAD(config-if)#no shutdown
GAD(config-if)#exit
GAD(config)#interface serial 0
GAD(config-if)#ip address 172.17.0.1 255.255.0.0
GAD(config-if)#clock rate 56000
GAD(config-if)#no shutdown
GAD(config-if)#exit
GAD(config)#router rip
GAD(config-router)#network 172.16.0.0
GAD(config-router)#network 172.17.0.0
GAD(config-router)#exit
GAD(config)#exit

Step 3 Save the GAD router configuration


GAD#copy running-config startup-config

Step 4 Configure the hostname and passwords on the BHM router


a. On the BHM router, enter the global configuration mode. Configure the hostname as shown in
the chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords. If there are any
difficulties, refer to the Configuring Router Passwords lab.

Step 5 Configure the interfaces and routing protocol on the BHM router
a. Go to the proper command mode and enter the following:
BHM(config)#interface fastethernet 0
BHM(config-if)#ip address 172.18.0.1 255.255.0.0
BHM(config-if)#no shutdown
BHM(config-if)#exit
BHM(config)#interface serial 0
BHM(config-if)#ip address 172.17.0.2 255.255.0.0
BHM(config-if)#no shutdown
BHM(config-if)#exit
BHM(config)#router rip
BHM(config-router)#network 172.17.0.0
BHM(config-router)#network 172.18.0.0
BHM(config-router)#exit
BHM(config)#exit

2-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Save the BHM router configuration


BHM#copy running-config startup-config

Step 7 Verify that the internetwork is functioning


Verify that the internetwork is functioning. Ping the FastEthernet interface of the other router.
a. From GAD, ping the BHM router FastEthernet interface. Does the ping work?

__________________________________________________________________________
b. From BHM, ping the GAD router FastEthernet interface. Does the ping work?

__________________________________________________________________________
c.

If the answer is no for either question troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error.
Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes.

Step 8 Configure the IP host table for the network


a. Create a name for each router in the network lab. Enter that name along with the IP addresses
of the routers interfaces. This is a local name and can be anything that is comfortable. Although
the name does not have to match the configured hostname of the router, that would be the
normal procedure.
Router Name

IP Address Ethernet 0

IP Address Interface Serial 0

b. From the global configuration mode, enter the command ip host followed by the name of each
router in the network, as well as all of the IP addresses of the interfaces on each of the routers.
For example to name the GAD router accessible from BHM by the name G, enter:
BHM(conf)#ip host G 172.16.0.1 172.17.0.1
c.

What commands did you enter on GAD?

__________________________________________________________________________
d. What commands did you enter on BHM?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 9 Exit configuration mode and test
a. Go to the enable, or privileged EXEC mode.
b. Examine the host table entries, using the show hosts command on each router.
c.

Are the host entries that were configured in the previous steps visible?
GAD _____________________

BHM ______________________

d. If there are no IP host entries go back and repeat Step 8.

3-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

e. Now ping the other router by host name. From the enable prompt type ping host. The host is
the ip host name that was configured in the previous steps. For example for a host name of G,
enter:
BHM#ping G
f.

Was the ping successful? ______________________

g. If the ping was not successful, check the accuracy of the IP host table entries.
h. From the enable prompt, enter the host name. Press Enter. For example for a host name of G,
enter:
BHM#G
i.

What happened? ________________________________________________________

Upon completion of the previous steps, logoff by typing exit. Turn the router off.

4-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.2.5a Connectivity Tests Ping

Objective

Use the ping command to send ICMP datagrams to target host.

Verify that the network layer between source and destination is working properly.

Retrieve information to evaluate the path-to-host reliability.

Determine delays over the path and whether the host can be reached or is functioning.

Use the extended ping command to increase number of packets.

Background/Preparation
The ping command is a good tool for troubleshooting Layers 1 though 3 of the OSI model and
diagnosing basic network connectivity. Using ping sends an ICMP packet to the specified device
(workstation, server, router or switch) and then waits for a reply. The IP address or host name can be
pinged. In order to ping the host name of a router, there must be a static host lookup table in the
router or a DNS server for name resolution to IP addresses.
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements
may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600, 1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. Refer
to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the
equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers.
1-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.5a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Any other router used may produce slightly different output. The following steps are intended to be
executed on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the GAD and BHM routers


a. If there are any difficulties configuring hostname or passwords, refer to the Configuring Router
Passwords lab. If there are any difficulties configuring interfaces or the routing protocol, refer to
the Configuring Host Tables lab.
b. This lab requires that IP hostnames are configured.
c.

Verify the routers configurations by performing a show running-config on each router. If not
correct, fix any configuration errors and verify.

Step 2 Login to Router 1 and verify the connection to Router 2


a. Login to the GAD router.
b. Verify the connection between the two routers. Ping the Serial 0 interface of the BHM router. If
the ping is not successful, return to Step 1 and troubleshoot the configuration.

Step 3 Display information about host to Layer 3 address mappings


a. Enter show host at the router prompt.
The router will display information about host to Layer 3 (IP) address mappings, how this information
was acquired, and the age of the entry.
b. List host names and the IP addresses listed for each one.
Host name

IP Address

Step 4 Use the ping command


a. Enter ping xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the previous listed IP address.
b. Repeat with all IP addresses listed.
c.

The router sends an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) packet to verify the hardware
connection and network layer address. The PC is acting as the console to the router, pinging
from one router to another router.

d. Did the IP addresses ping? ___________________________________


e. List four important pieces of information received back from issuing the ping command.

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

2-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.5a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 5 Examine the results of the ping command


a. Look at the example of the ping command generated by a router.
lab-b#ping 192.168.3.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echoes to 210.93.105.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
.!!!!
Success rate is 80 percent (4/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 68/68/168 ms
What does the exclamation point (!) indicate? ________________________________________
b. What does the period (.) indicate? _____________________________________________
c.

What does the ping command test for? _________________________________________

Step 6 Configure the workstations


a. The configuration for the host connected to the GAD Router is:
IP Address
IP subnet mask
Default gateway

192.168.14.2
255.255.255.0
192.168.14.1

b. The configuration for the host connected to the BHM Router is:
IP Address
IP subnet mask
Default gateway

192.168.16.2
255.255.255.0
192.168.16.1

Step 7 Ping from the workstation


a. From Windows go to Start > Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt. This will open a
Command Prompt window.
b. To test that the TCP/IP stack and default gateway on the workstation are configured and working
properly, use the MS DOS window to ping the routers by issuing the following command:
C:\> ping 192.168.14.1
The ping should respond with successful results. If not, check the configurations on the host and
directly connected router.

Step 8 Test Layer 3 connectivity


a. Using the command prompt enter ping and the IP address of all routers interfaces.
This will test Layer 3 connectivity between the workstation and the routers.
b. Is the output from the workstation ping command the same as the output from the ping
command from a router?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 9 From the Host, telnet to the directly connected router
a. Telnet to the connected router. Type telnet and the default gateway IP address of the router.
C:\>telnet 192.168.14.1
b. The password prompt will appear, enter cisco.

Step 10 Perform an extended ping


a. Enter into the privileged EXEC mode. Type enable and then the password class.
3-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.5a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Type ping and press Enter. Fill out the rest of the prompts as shown following:
Protocol [ip]:
Target IP address: 192.168.16.1
Repeat count [5]: 50
Datagram size [100]:
Timeout in seconds [2]:
Extended commands [n]:
Sweep range of sizes [n]:
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 50, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.16.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (50/50), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/40
ms
GAD#
b. Notice how fast the ping response is. What was the average response time? _____________

Step 11 Perform another extended ping


a. Type ping and press Enter. Fill out the rest of the prompts as shown following.
During the ping, remove the crossover cable from the BHM FastEthernet port after 10 pings have
responded.
Protocol [ip]:
Target IP address: 192.168.16.1
Repeat count [5]: 50
Datagram size [100]: 1500
Timeout in seconds [2]:
Extended commands [n]:
Sweep range of sizes [n]:
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 50, 1500-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.16.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!U.U...........!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Success rate is 72 percent (36/50), round-trip min/avg/max =
432/434/464 ms
GAD#
b. What does the output from this extended ping say? _________________________________
c.

Try doing this with a standard ping, can the cable be removed before the ping is over?

__________________________________________________________________________
d. What was the result of increasing the datagram size in the extended ping? _______________

Step 12 Perform an extended ping from the host


a. Exit the Telnet session and return to the host MS-DOS prompt. Type ping and press Enter.
b. Does the extended ping work the same way on the router as on the host? _______________
At the MS-dos prompt type:
C:\>ping 192.168.16.1 n 25
There should be 25 responses from the command.
c.

Experiment with other combinations of the extended ping commands on both the router and the
host.

Upon completion of the previous steps, logoff by typing exit. Turn the router off.

4-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.5a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.2 Configuring PPP Encapsulation

Objective

Configure the serial interfaces on two routers with the PPP protocol.

Test the link for connectivity.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface
requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of
their possible combinations:

800 series routers

1600 series routers

1700 series routers

2500 series routers

2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used
based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721
series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following
steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions sheet. Perform those steps on all routers in this
lab assignment before continuing.

1-5

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart:

The hostname

The console password

The virtual terminal password

The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Dublin interface as shown


Configure the Dublin router serial interface as follows:
Dublin(config)#interface serial 0
Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0
Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown
Dublin(config-if)#exit
Dublin(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Washington interface as shown


Configure the Washington router serial interface as follows:
Washington(config)#interface serial 0
Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0
Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000
Washington(config-if)#no shutdown
Washington(config-if)#exit
Washington(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Washington#copy running-config startup-config
Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on
Washington
Washington#show interface serial 0
a. This will show the details of interface serial 0.
b. Serial 0 is _____________, line protocol is_____________.
c.

Internet address is _____________________.

d. Encapsulation _________________________

2-5

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Dublin
Dublin#show interface serial 0
a. This will show the details of interface serial 0.
b. Serial 0 is _____________, line protocol is_____________.
c.

Internet address is _______________.

d. Encapsulation ___________________

Step 7 Change the encapsulation type


Change the encapsulation type to PPP by typing encapsulation ppp at the interface serial 0
configuration mode prompt on both routers.
Washington(config-if)#encapsulation ppp
Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation ppp

Step 8 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Washington


Washington#show interface serial 0
Encapsulation ___________________

Step 9 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Dublin


Dublin#show interface serial 0
Encapsulation ___________________

Step 10 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the
other router
Washington#ping 192.168.15.2
Dublin#ping 192.168.15.1
a. Can the serial interface on the Dublin router be pinged from Washington? ________________
b. Can the serial interface on the Washington router be pinged from Dublin? ________________
c.

If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error.
Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes.

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following:

3-5

Logoff by typing exit

Turn the router off

Remove and store the cables and adapter

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor).
Router>enable
At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config.
Router#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete
Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload.
Router(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
In the first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started!
Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

4-5

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary


Router
Ethernet
Ethernet
Serial
Serial
Model
Interface #1
Interface #2
Interface #1
Interface #2
800 (806)
Ethernet 0 (E0)
Ethernet 1 (E1)
1600
Ethernet 0 (E0)
Ethernet 1 (E1)
Serial 0 (S0)
Serial 1 (S1)
1700
FastEthernet 0 (FA0)
FastEthernet 1 (FA1)
Serial 0 (S0)
Serial 1 (S1)
2500
Ethernet 0 (E0)
Ethernet 1 (E1)
Serial 0 (S0)
Serial 1 (S1)
2600
FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0)
FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1)
Serial 0/0 (S0/0)
Serial 0/1 (S0/1)
In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and
how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of
configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of
interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a
specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in
parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface

5-5

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 6.1.6 Configuring Static Routes

Objective

Configure static routes between routers to allow data transfer between routers without the use of
dynamic routing protocols.

Background/Preparation
Setup a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements
may be used. Possible routers include 800, 1600, 1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination. Refer
to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the
equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers.
Any other router used may produce slightly different output. The following steps are intended to be
executed on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure both routers


a. Enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in the chart. Then
configure the console, virtual terminal, and enable passwords. If there are any difficulties, refer to
1-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 6.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

the Configuring router passwords lab. Configure interfaces and IP host tables. If there are any
difficulties, refer to the Configuring Host Tables lab. Do not configure a routing protocol.

Step 2 Configure the workstations


Configure the workstations with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway.
a. The configuration for the host connected to the GAD Router is:
IP Address 192.168.14.2
IP subnet mask 255.255.255.0
Default gateway 192.168.14.1
b. The configuration for the host connected to the BHM Router is:
IP Address 192.168.16.2
IP subnet mask 255.255.255.0
Default gateway 192.168.16.1
c.

Check connectivity between the workstations using ping. From the workstation attached to the
GAD router, ping the workstation attached to the BHM router.
C:\>ping 192.168.16.2
Pinging 192.168.16.2 with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Ping statistics for 192.168.16.2:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

d. Was the ping successful? __________________________________________________


e. Why did the ping fail? ______________________________________________________

Step 3 Check interface status


a. Check the interfaces on both routers with the command show ip interface brief.
b. Are all the necessary interfaces up? ____________________________________________

Step 4 Check the routing table entries


a. Using the command show ip route, view the IP routing table for GAD.
GAD>show ip route
output eliminated
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
C

2-6

192.168.14.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0


192.168.15.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 6.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Use the command show ip route, view the IP routing table for BHM.
BHM>show ip route
Output eliminated.
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
C
c.

192.168.15.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0


192.168.16.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0

Are all of the routes needed in the routing tables? __________________________________

d. "Based on the output from the show ip route command on the GAD and BHM routers, can a host
on network 192.168.16.0 connect to a host on network 192.168.14.0?"___________________
If a route is not in the routers to which the host is connected, the host cannot reach the
destination host.

Step 5 Adding static routes


a. How can this situation be changed so that the hosts can ping each other?
Add static routes to each router or run a routing protocol.
b. In global configuration mode, add a static route on Router1 to network 192.168.16.0 and on
Router2 to network 192.168.14.0.
GAD(config)#ip route 192.168.16.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.15.2
BHM(config)#ip route 192.168.14.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.15.1
c.

Why is a static route needed on both routers? ___________________________________

Step 6 Verify the new routes


a. Use the command show ip route, view the IP routing table for GAD.
GAD>show ip route
output eliminated
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
C
S

192.168.14.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0


192.168.15.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0
192.168.16.0/24 [1/0] via 192.168.15.2

b. Using the command show ip route, view the IP routing table for BHM.
BHM>show ip route
Output eliminated.
Gateway of last resort is not set
S
C
C
3-6

192.168.14.0/24 [1/0] via 192.168.15.1


192.168.15.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0
192.168.16.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 6.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Are all of the routes needed in the routing tables? __________________________________

d. Can a host on subnet 192.168.16.0 see a host on network 192.168.14.0? _________________

Step 7 ping host to host again


a. Check connectivity between the workstations using ping. From the workstation attached to the
GAD router, ping the workstation attached to the BHM router.
C:\>ping 192.168.16.2
Pinging 192.168.16.2 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.16.2: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=254
Reply from 192.168.16.2: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=254
Reply from 192.168.16.2: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=254
Reply from 192.168.16.2: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=254
Ping statistics for 192.168.16.2:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 20ms, Maximum = 20ms, Average = 20ms

b. If the ping was not successful, check routing table to make sure static routes are entered
correctly.
Upon completion of the previous steps, logoff by typing exit. Turn the router off.

4-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 6.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 7.2.2 Configuring RIP

Objective

Setup an IP addressing scheme using class B networks.

Configure the RIP dynamic routing protocol on routers.

Background/Preparation
Setup a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements
displayed in the above diagram, such as 800, 1600, 1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination,
may be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface
identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce a slightly different output.
The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless specifically instructed
otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.
1-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


a. From the global configuration mode, configure the hostname as shown in the chart. Then
configure the console, virtual terminal, and enable passwords. If there is a problem doing this,
refer to the configuring router passwords lab. Next, configure the interfaces according to the
chart. Refer to the Configuring Host Tables lab for assistance.

Step 2 Check the routing table entries


a. Using the command show ip route, view the IP routing table for GAD.
GAD>show ip route
output eliminated
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
C

172.16.0.0/16 is directly connected, FastEthernet0


172.17.0.0/16 is directly connected, Serial0

b. Using the command show ip route, view the IP routing table for BHM.
BHM>show ip route
output eliminated
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
C

172.17.0.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0


172.18.0.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0

Step 3 Configure the routing protocol on the GAD router


a. From the global configuration mode, enter the following:
GAD(config)#router rip
GAD(config-router)#network 172.16.0.0
GAD(config-router)#network 172.17.0.0
GAD(config-router)#exit
GAD(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the GAD router configuration


GAD#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Configure the routing protocol on the BHM router


a. From the global configuration mode, enter the following:
BHM(config)#router rip
BHM(config-router)#network 172.17.0.0
BHM(config-router)#network 172.18.0.0
BHM(config-router)#exit
BHM(config)#exit
2-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Save the BHM router configuration


BHM#copy running-config startup-config

Step 7 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask and default gateway
Step 8 Verify that the internetwork is functioning by pinging the FastEthernet interface of
the other router
a. From the host attached to GAD, is it possible to ping the BHM router FastEthernet interface?

_____________
b. From the host attached to BHM, is it possible to ping the GAD router FastEthernet interface?

_____________
c.

If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error.
Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes.

Step 9 Show the routing tables for each router


a. From the enable or privileged EXEC mode, examine the routing table entries using the show ip
route command on each router.
b. What are the entries in the GAD routing table?

__________________________________________________________________________
c.

What are the entries in the BHM routing table?

__________________________________________________________________________
Upon completion of the previous steps, log off by typing exit and turn the router off.

3-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 7.2.6 Troubleshooting RIP

Objective

Set up an IP addressing scheme using class B networks.

Configure RIP on routers.

Observe routing activity using the debug ip rip command.

Examine routes using the show ip route command.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements
displayed in the above diagram, such as 800, 1600, 1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination,
may be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface
identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce a slightly different output.

1-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless specifically instructed
otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


a. On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in the
chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords. If there is a problem
doing this, refer to the Configuring Router Passwords lab. Next configure the interfaces
according to the chart. If there is a problem doing this, refer to the Configuring Host Tables lab.
Finally configure the RIP routing. This is covered in the Configuring RIP lab if help is needed. Do
not forget to save the configurations to the startup configuration file.

Step 2 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask and default gateway
Step 3 Make sure that routing updates are being sent
a. Type the command debug ip rip and the privileged EXEC mode prompt. Wait for at least 45
seconds.
b. Was there any output from the debug command? __________________________________
c.

What did the output show ? __________________________________________________

d. To turn off specific debug commands type the no option, for example no debug ip rip
events. To turn off all debug commands type undebug all.

Step 4 Show the routing tables for each router


a. From the enable or privileged EXEC mode, examine the routing table entries, using show ip
route command on each router.
b. What are the entries in the GAD routing table?

__________________________________________________________________________
c.

What are the entries in the BHM routing table?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 5 Show the RIP routing table entries for each router
a. Enter show ip route rip
b. List the routes listed in the routing table? _________________________________________
c.

What is the administrative distance? ____________________________________________

Step 6 Verify that the internetwork is functioning by pinging the FastEthernet interface of
the other router
a. From the host attached to GAD, is it possible to ping the BHM router FastEthernet interface?

__________________________________________________________________________
b. From the host attached to BHM, is it possible to ping the GAD router FastEthernet interface?

__________________________________________________________________________

2-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations using show ip
route to find the error. Also check the workstation IP settings. Then do the pings again until the
answer to both questions is yes.

Upon completion of the previous steps, log off by typing exit and turn the router off.

3-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 7.2.9 Load Balancing Across Multiple Paths

Objective

Configure Load balance across multiple paths.

Observe the load balancing process.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements
displayed in the above diagram, such as 800, 1600, 1700, 2500, and 2600 routers, or a combination,
may be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface
identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce a slightly different output.
The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless specifically instructed
otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

1-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.2.9

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the hostname and passwords on the routers


a. On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in the
chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal, and enable passwords. If there are problems
doing this, refer to the Configuring Router Passwords lab. Next configure the interfaces and
routing according to the chart. If there are problems doing this, refer to the Configuring Host
Tables lab and the Configuring RIP lab. Make sure to copy the running-config to the
startup-config on each router so the configuration will not be lost if the router is powercycled.

Step 2 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask and default gateway
a. Test the configuration by pinging all interfaces from each host. If the pinging is not successful
troubleshoot the configuration.

Step 3 Check Basic Routing Configuration


a. Enter show ip protocol command on each router.
b. In the configuration, is "Routing protocol is RIP" displayed?

_____________________________________
c.

Enter the command show ip route on both routers. List how the route is connected (directly,
RIP), the IP address and via through what network. There should be four routes in each table.

GAD
Route connected

IP address

Through Network / Interface

BHM
Route connected

IP address

Through Network / Interface

d. Circle the evidence of load balancing in the above output.

Step 4 Make sure that the router load balance is on a per-packet basis
a. Configure the router to load balance on a per-packet basis. Both serial interfaces must use
process switching. Process switching forces the router to look in the routing table for the
destination network of each routed packet. In contrast, fast-switching, which is the default, stores
the initial table lookup in a high-speed cache and uses the information to route packets to the
same destination.
b. Enable process switching on both serial interfaces:
GAD(config-if)# no ip route-cache
BHM(config-if)# no ip route-cache
e. Verify that fast switching is disabled by using the show ip interface command.
f.

2-5

Was fast switching disabled? ______________________________________

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.2.9

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 5 Verify per-packet load balancing


a. Because there are two routes to the destination network, half the packets will be sent along one
path, and half will travel over the other. The path selection alternates with each packet received.
b. Observe this process by using the debug ip packet command on the GAD.
c.

Send 30 ping packets across the network from the host attached to BHM router to the host
attached to the GAD router. This can be done with the ping 192.168.16.2 n 30
command on the host. As the pings are responded to the router generates IP packet information.
Stop the debug by using the command undebug all on the GAD router.

d. Examine and record part of the debug output.


e. What is the evidence of load balancing in the output? _______________________________

Step 6 Verify per-destination load balancing


a. After verifying per-packet load balancing, configure the router to use per-destination load
balancing. Both serial interfaces must use fast switching so that the route-cache can be used
after the initial table lookup.
b. Use the command GAD(config-if)#ip route-cache.
c.

Use the show ip interface to verify that fast switching is enabled.

d. Is fast switching enabled? ______________________________________


e. The routing table is consulted only once per destination, therefore, packets that are part of a
packet train to a specific host will all follow the same path. Only when a second destination
forces another table lookup or when the cached entry expires will the alternate path be used.
Use the debug ip packet command and ping across the network. Note which serial
interface the packet was sent out on.
f.

Examine and record part of the debug output. Which serial interface was the packet sent out on?

__________________________________________________________________________
Upon completion of the previous steps, log off by typing exit and turn the router off.

3-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.2.9

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged exec mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class. If class does not work, ask the instructor for assistance.
Router>enable
At the privileged exec mode enter the command erase startup-config.
Router#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue?
[confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete
Now at the privileged exec mode enter the command reload.
Router#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
Type n and then Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
In the first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
Type n and then Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started!
Press Enter.
The router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

5-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary


Router
Ethernet
Ethernet
Serial
Serial
Interface
Model
Interface #1
Interface #2
Interface #1
Interface #2
#5
800 (806)
Ethernet 0 (E0)
Ethernet 1 (E1)
1600
Ethernet 0 (E0)
Ethernet 1 (E1)
Serial 0 (S0)
Serial 1 (S1)
1700
FastEthernet 0 (FA0)
FastEthernet 1 (FA1)
Serial 0 (S0)
Serial 1 (S1)
2500
Ethernet 0 (E0)
Ethernet 1 (E1)
Serial 0 (S0)
Serial 1 (S1)
2600
FastEthernet 0/0
FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0)
Serial 0/1
(FA0/0)
(S0/1)
In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify the type of router
as well as how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of
configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces
in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may
contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation
that can be used in IOS command to represent the interface.

6-6

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 7.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 2.3.1 Configuring the OSPF Routing Process

Objective

Setup an IP addressing scheme for OSPF area 0.

Configure and verify Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one shown in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface
requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. For example, router series 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, and 2600 or any such combination can be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of
the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The
configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may
produce slightly different output. Perform the following steps on each router unless specifically
instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

1-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in the
chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords. Next configure the
interfaces according to the chart. Finally, configure the IP hostnames. Do not configure the routing
protocol until specifically told to. If there are any problems configuring the router basics, refer to prior
lab Review of Basic Router Configuring with RIP.

Step 2 Save the configuration information from the privileged EXEC command mode
BERLIN#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]
a. Why save the running configuration to the startup configuration?

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
a. Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. Troubleshoot as necessary.
Remember to assign a specific IP address and default gateway to the workstation. If running
Windows 98, check by using Start >Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000, check by using
the ipconfig command in a DOS window.
b. At this point the workstations will not be able to communicate with each other. The following
steps will demonstrate the process required to get communication working using OSPF as the
routing protocol.

Step 4 View the routers configuration and interface information


a. At the privileged EXEC mode prompt type:
Berlin#show running-config
b. Using the show ip interface brief command, check the status of each interface.
c.

What is the state of the interfaces on each router?


Berlin:
FastEthernet 0: _______________________________________________
Serial 0: ___________________________________________________
Serial 1: ___________________________________________________
Rome:
FastEthernet 0: _______________________________________________
Serial 0: ___________________________________________________

d. Ping from one of the connected serial interfaces to the other.


Was the ping successful? __________________________________________
e. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the router configuration, until the ping is successful.

2-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 5 Configure OSPF routing on router Berlin


a. Configure an OSPF routing process on router Berlin. Use OSPF process number 1 and ensure
all networks are in area 0.
Berlin(config)#router ospf 1
Berlin(config-router)#network 192.168.1.128 0.0.0.63 area 0
Berlin(config-router)#network 192.168.15.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Berlin(config-router)#end
b. Examine the routers running configurations files.
c.

Did the IOS version automatically add any lines under router OSPF 1? _______________

d. If so, what did it add?

_________________________________________________
e. If there were no changes to the running configuration, type the following commands:
Berlin(config)#router ospf 1
Berlin(config-router)#log-adjacency-changes
Berlin(config-router)#end
f.

Show the routing table for the Berlin router.


Berlin#show ip route

g. Are there any entries in the routing table? __________________


h. Why? _______________________________________________________

Step 6 Configure OSPF routing on router Rome


a. Configure an OSPF routing process on router Rome. Use OSPF process number 1 and ensure
all networks are in area 0.
Rome(config)#router ospf 1
Rome(config-router)#network 192.168.0.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
Rome(config-router)#network 192.168.15.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Rome(config-router)#end
b. Examine the Rome running configuration files.
c.

Did the IOS version automatically add any lines under router OSPF 1? _______________

d. If so, what did it add?

_________________________________________________
e. If there were no changes to the running configuration, type the following commands:
Rome(config)#router ospf 1
Rome(config-router)#log-adjacency-changes
Rome(config-router)#end
f.

3-6

Show the routing table for the Rome router:

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Rome#show ip route
g. Are there any OSPF entries in the routing table now? __________________________
h. What is the metric value of the OSPF route? _______________________________
i.

What is the VIA address in the OSPF route? _______________________________

j.

Are routes to all networks shown in the routing table? __________________________

k.

What does the O mean in the first column of the routing table? ____________________

Step 7 Test network connectivity


a. Ping the Berlin host from the Rome host. Was it successful? ___________________
b. If not troubleshoot as necessary.
Once the previous steps are completed, log off by typing exit, and turn the router off. Then remove
and store the cables and adapter.

4-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class. If that does not work, ask the instructor for assistance.
Router>enable
At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config.
Router#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue?
[confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete
Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload.
Router(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
In the first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started!
Press Enter.
Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

5-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 2.3.2 Configuring OSPF with Loopback Addresses

Objective

Configure routers with a Class C IP addressing scheme.

Observe the election process for designated routers (DR) and backup designated routers (BDR)
on the multiaccess network.

Configure loopback addresses for Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) stability.

Assign each OSPF interface a priority to force the election of a specific router as DR.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one shown in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface
requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. For example, router series 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, and 2600 or any such combination can be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of
the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The
configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may
produce slightly different output. Perform the following steps on each router unless specifically
instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.

1-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in the
chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords. Next configure the
interfaces according and the IP hostnames. If there are any problems configuring the router basics,
refer to the lab Review of Basic Router Configuring with RIP. Do not configure loopback interfaces
and routing protocol yet.

Step 2 Save the configuration information for all the routers


Why save the running configuration to the startup configuration?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping all of the attached routers. That is because they are all part
of the same subnetwork. Troubleshoot as necessary. Remember to assign a specific IP address and
default gateway to the workstation. If running Windows 98, check by using Start > Run > winipcfg.
If running Windows 2000, check by using the ipconfig command in a DOS window.

Step 4 View the routers configuration and interface information


a. At the privileged EXEC mode prompt type: show running-config
b. Using the show ip interface brief command, check the status of each interface.
c.

What is the state of the interfaces on each router?


London:
FastEthernet 0: ________________________________________________________
Serial 0: _____________________________________________________________
Serial 1: _____________________________________________________________
Ottawa:
FastEthernet 0: ________________________________________________________
Serial 0: _____________________________________________________________
Serial 1: _____________________________________________________________
Brasilia:
FastEthernet 0: ________________________________________________________
Serial 0: _____________________________________________________________
Serial 1: _____________________________________________________________

Step 5 Verify connectivity of the routers


a. Ping all of the connected FastEthernet interfaces from each other.
b. Were the pings successful? __________________________________________________
c.

2-8

If the pings were not successful, troubleshoot the router configuration, until the ping is
successful.

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Configure OSPF routing on router London


a. Configure an OSPF routing process on the router London. Use OSPF process number 1 and
ensure all networks are in area 0.
London(config)#router ospf 1
London(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
London(config-router)#end
b. Examine the London router running configuration file.
c.

Did the IOS version automatically add any lines under router OSPF 1? ___________________

d. If there were no changes to the running configuration, type the following commands.
London(config)#router ospf 1
London(config-router)#log-adjacency-changes
London(config-router)#end
e. Show the routing table for router:
London#show ip route
f.

Are there any entries in the routing table? ___________________

g. Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 7 Configure OSPF routing on router Ottawa


a. Configure an OSPF routing process on the router Ottawa. Use OSPF process number 1 and
ensure all networks are in area 0.
Ottawa(config)#router ospf 1
Ottawa(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
Ottawa(config-router)#end
b. Examine the Ottawa running configuration file.
c.

Did the IOS version automatically add any lines under router OSPF 1? ___________________

d. If there were no changes to the running configuration, type the following commands.
Ottawa(config)#router ospf 1
Ottawa(config-router)#log-adjacency-changes
Ottawa(config-router)#end

Step 8 Configure OSPF routing on router Brasilia


a. Configure an OSPF routing process on the router Brasilia. Use OSPF process number 1 and
ensure all networks are in area 0.
Brasilia(config)#router ospf 1
Brasilia(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
Brasilia(config-router)#end

3-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Examine the Brasilia router running configuration file.


Did the IOS version automatically add any lines under router OSPF 1? ___________________
c.

What did it add? __________________________________________________________

d. If there were no changes to the running configuration, type the following commands:
Brasilia(config)#router ospf 1
Brasilia(config-router)#log-adjacency-changes
Brasilia(config-router)#end

Step 9 Test network connectivity


a. Ping the Brasilia router from the London router. Was it successful? ___________________
b. If not troubleshoot as necessary.

Step 10 Show OSPF adjacencies


a. Type the command show ip ospf neighbor on all routers to verify that the OSPF routing
has formed adjacencies.
b. Is there a designated router identified? __________________________________________
c.

Is there a backup designated router? ___________________________________________

d. Type the command show ip ospf neighbor detail for more information.
e. What is the neighbor priority of 192.168.1.1 from router Brasilia? _______________________
f.

What interface is Identified as being part of Area 0? _________________________________

Step 11 Configure the loopback interfaces


Configure the loopback interface on each router to allow for an interface that will not go down due to
network change or failure. This task is performed by typing interface loopback # at the global
configuration mode prompt, where the # represents the number of the loopback interface from 0 2,147,483,647.
London(config)#interface loopback 0
London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.31.11 255.255.255.255
London(config-router)#end
Ottawa(config)#interface loopback 0
Ottawa(config-if)#ip address 192.168.31.22 255.255.255.255
Ottawa(config-router)#end
Brasilia(config)#interface loopback 0
Brasilia(config-if)#ip address 192.168.31.33 255.255.255.255
Brasilia(config-router)#end

Step 12 Save the configuration information for all the routers


After saving the configurations on all of the routers, power them down and back up again.

4-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 13 Show OSPF adjacencies


a. Type the command show ip ospf neighbor on all routers to verify that the OSPF routing
has formed adjacencies.
b. Is there a designated router identified? __________________________________________
c.

Write down the router ID and link address of the DR. _______________

________________

d. Is there a backup designated router? ___________________________________________


e. Write down the router ID and link address of the BDR. _______________
f.

_______________

What is the third router referred to as? __________________________________________

g. Write down that Routers ID and link address. __________________

__________________

h. Type the command show ip ospf neighbor detail for more information.
i.

What is the neighbor priority of 192.168.1.1 from router Brasilia? _______________________

j.

What interface is Identified as being part of Area 0? _________________________________

Step 14 Verify OSPF interface configuration


a. Type show ip ospf interface fastethernet 0 on the London router.
b. What is the OSPF state of the interface? _________________________________________
c.

What is the default priority of the interface? _______________________________________

d. What is the network type of the interface? ________________________________________

Step 15 Configure London to always be the DR


To ensure that the London router always becomes the DR for this multi-access segment, the OSPF
priority must be set. London is the most powerful router in the network and so best suited to become
DR. To assign the London loopback a higher IP address is not advised, as the numbering system
has advantages for troubleshooting. Also London is not to act as DR for all segments to which it may
belong. Set the priority of the interface to 50 on the London router only.
London(config)#interface Fastethernet 0/0
London(config-if)#ip ospf priority 50
London(config-if)#end
Display the priority for Interface fastethernet 0/0.
London#show ip ospf interface fastethernet 0/0

Step 16 Watch election process


a. To watch the OSPF election process restart all of the routers using the reload command. Be
sure to save the running config before restarting the routers. As soon as the router prompt is
available type:
Ottawa>enable
Ottawa#debug ip ospf events
b. Which router was elected DR? ________________________________________________
5-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Which router was elected BDR? _______________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________
e. To turn off all debugging type undebug all.

Step 17 Show OSPF Adjacencies


a. Type the command show ip ospf neighbor on the Ottawa router to verify that the OSPF
routing has formed adjacencies.
b. What is the priority of the DR? ________________________________________________
Once the previous steps are completed log off by typing exit and turn the router off. Then remove
and store the cables and adapter.

6-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 2.3.3 Modifying OSPF Cost Metric

Objective

Setup an IP addressing scheme for Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) area.

Configure and verify OSPF routing.

Modify OSPF cost metric on an interface.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one shown in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface
requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. For example, router series 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, and 2600 or any such combination can be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of
the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The
configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may
produce slightly different output. Perform the following steps on each router unless specifically
instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname, console, virtual
terminal, and enable passwords. Next configure the interfaces and IP hostnames according to the
1-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

chart. Do not configure the routing protocol until specifically told to. If there are any problems
configuring the router basics, refer to the lab Review of Basic Router Configuration with RIP.

Step 2 Save the configuration information from the privileged EXEC command mode
Cairo#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]?[Enter]
Moscow#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]?[Enter]
Why save the running configuration to the startup configuration?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask and default gateway
a. Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. Troubleshoot as necessary.
Remember to assign a specific IP address and default gateway to the workstation. If running
Windows 9x/ME, check by using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows NT/2000/XP,
check by using the ipconfig command in a Command Prompt window.
b. At this point the workstations will not be able to communicate with each other. The following
steps will demonstrate the process required to get communication working using OSPF as the
routing protocol.

Step 4 View the routers configuration and interface information


a. At the privileged EXEC mode type:
Cairo#show running-config
b. Using the show ip interface brief command, check the status of each interface.
c.

What is the state of the interfaces on each router?

Cairo:
FastEthernet 0: ___________________________________________________________
Serial 0: ________________________________________________________________
Moscow:
FastEthernet 0: ___________________________________________________________
Serial 0: ________________________________________________________________
d. On a router, ping the serial interface of the other router.
e. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
f.

If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the router configuration until the ping is successful.

Step 5 Configure OSPF routing on router Cairo


a. Configure OSPF routing on each router. Use OSPF process number 1 and ensure all networks
are in area 0.
Cairo(config)#router ospf 1
Cairo(config-router)#network 192.168.1.128 0.0.0.63 area 0
2-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Cairo(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0


Cairo(config-router)#end
b. Examine the running configuration file.
c.

Did the IOS version automatically add any lines under router OSPF 1? ___________

d. What did it add? __________________________________________________________


e. If there were no changes to the running configuration, type the following commands:
Cairo(config)#router ospf 1
Cairo(config-router)#log-adjacency-changes
Cairo(config-router)#end
f.

Show the routing table for the Cairo router.


Cairo#show ip route

g. Are there any entries in the routing table? _______________


h. Why? __________________________________________________________

Step 6 Configure OSPF routing on router Moscow


a. Configure OSPF routing on each router. Use OSPF process number 1 and ensure all networks
are in area 0.
Moscow(config)#router ospf 1
Moscow(config-router)#network 192.168.0.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
Moscow(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
Moscow(config-router)#end
b. Examine the running configuration file.
c.

Did the IOS version automatically add any lines under router OSPF 1? _______________

d. If there were no changes to the running configuration, type the following commands:
Moscow(config)#router ospf 1
Moscow(config-router)#log-adjacency-changes
Moscow(config-router)#end

Step 7 Show the routing table entries


a. Show the routing table entries for the Cairo router.
Cairo#show ip route
b. Are there any OSPF entries in the routing table now? _______________________________
c.

What is the metric value of the OSPF route? ______________________________________

d. What is the VIA address in the OSPF route? ______________________________________


e. Are routes to all networks shown in the routing table? _______________________________
f.
3-7

What does the O mean in the first column of the routing table? _________________________

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 8 Test network connectivity


a. Ping the Cairo host from the Moscow host. Was it successful? _________________________
b. If not troubleshoot as necessary.

Step 9 Look at the OSPF cost on the Cairo router interfaces


Link Bandwidth

Default OSPF Cost

56 Kbps

1785

T1

65

10-Mbps

10

16-Mbps Token-ring

FDDI/Fast Ethernet

a. Show the properties of the Cairo router serial and FastEthernet interfaces using the show
interfaces command.
b. What is the default bandwidth of the interfaces?
c.

Serial Interface: _________________________

d. FastEthernet Interface: _________________________


8

e. Calculate the cost of a link divide 10 by the bandwidth in bps.


f.

Serial Interface: _________________________

g. FastEthernet Interface: _________________________

Step 10 Record the OSPF cost of the serial and FastEthernet interfaces
a. Using the show ip ospf interface command, record the OSPF cost of the serial and Fast
Ethernet interfaces.
b. OSPF cost of Serial Interface: _________________________
c.

OSPF cost of Ethernet Interface: _________________________

d. Do these agree with the calculations? _________________________

Step 11 Manually set the cost on the serial interface


On the Serial interface of the Cairo router, set the OSPF cost to 1562 by typing ip ospf cost
1562 at the serial interface configuration mode prompt.

Step 12. Verify cost


a. Note that it is essential that all connected links agree about the cost for consistent calculation of
the shortest path first algorithm (SPF) in an area.
b. Verify that the interface OSPF cost was successfully modified.
c.

Reverse the effect of this command by entering in interface configuration mode the command no
ip ospf cost.

d. Verify that the default cost for the interface has returned.

4-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

e. Enter the command bandwidth 2000 at the serial 0 interface configuration mode.
f.

Record the new OSPF cost of the Serial interface. _________________________

g. Can the OSPF cost of an Ethernet interface be modified in this way? ____________________
h. The speed can be set on an Ethernet interface. Will this affect the OSPF cost of that interface?

__________________________________________________________________________
i.

Verify or explain the above answer.

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
j.

Reset the bandwidth on the serial interface using the no bandwidth 2000 at the serial 0
interface configuration mode.

Once completion previous steps are completed, logoff by typing exit and turn the router off. Then
remove and store the cables and adapters.

5-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class. If that does not work, ask the instructor for assistance.
Router>enable
At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config.
Router#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue?
[confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete
Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload.
Router(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
In the first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started!
Press Enter.
Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

6-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 2.3.4 Configuring OSPF Authentication

Objective

Setup an IP addressing scheme for Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) area.

Configure and verify OSPF routing.

Introduce OSPF authentication into the area.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one shown in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface
requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. For example, router series 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, and 2600 or any such combination can be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of
the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in lab. The
configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may
produce slightly different output. Perform the following steps on each router unless specifically
instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname, console, virtual
terminal and enable passwords. Next configure the interfaces and IP hostnames according to the
1-5

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

chart. Do not configure the routing protocol until specifically told to. If there are any problems
configuring the router basics, refer to the lab Review of Basic Router Configuration with RIP.

Step 2 Save the configuration information from the privileged EXEC command mode
Dublin#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]
Washington#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]
Why save the running configuration to the startup configuration?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask and default gateway
a. Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. Troubleshoot as necessary.
Remember to assign a specific IP address and default gateway to the workstation. If running
Windows 9x/ME, check by using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows NT/2000/XP,
check by using the ipconfig command in a Command Prompt window.
b. At this point the workstations will not be able to communicate with each other. The following
steps will demonstrate the process required to get communication working using OSPF as the
routing protocol.

Step 4 Verify connectivity


a. On a router, ping the serial interface of the other router.
b. What the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
c.

If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the routers configurations, until the ping is
successful.

Step 5 Configure OSPF routing on both routers


a. Configure OSPF routing on each router. Use OSPF process number 1 and ensure all networks
are in area 0. Refer to the lab, Configuring Loopback Interfaces for review on configuring OSPF
routing if necessary.
b. Examine the Dublin router running configuration file. Did the IOS version automatically add any
lines under router OSPF 1? _____________
c.

Show the routing table for the Dublin router.


Dublin#show ip route

d. Are there any entries in the routing table?


e. Why? _________________________________________________________________

Step 6 Test network connectivity


a. Ping the Dublin host from the Washington host. Was it successful? _____________
b. If not troubleshoot as necessary.

2-5

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Setup up OSPF authentication


a. OSPF authentication is being established on the routers in the network. First, introduce
authentication only on the Dublin router.
b. In the interface configuration mode on Serial 0, enter the command ip ospf messagedigest-key 1 md5 7 asecret.
Dublin(config)#interface Serial 0
Dublin(config-if)#ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 ?
<0-7> Encryption type (0 for not yet encrypted, 7 for proprietary)
Dublin(config-if)#ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 7 ?
LINE The OSPF password (key)
Dublin(config-if)#ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 7 asecret
c.

What is the OSPF password being used for md5 authentication? _______________________

d. What encryption type is being used? ____________________________________________

Step 8 Enable OSPF authentication in this area, area 0


Dublin(config-if)#router ospf 1
Dublin(config-router)#area 0 authentication message-digest
a. Wait for a few seconds. Does the router generate any output? _________________
b. Enter the command show ip ospf neighbor.
c.

Are there any OSPF neighbors? _________________

d. Examine the routing table by entering show ip route.


e. Are there any OSPF routes in the Dublin router routing table?
f.

Can the Dublin host ping the Washington host? _________________

g. Enter these configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Washington#configure terminal
Washington(config)#interface serial 0
Washington(config-if)#ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 7 asecret
Washington(config-if)#router ospf 1
Washington(config-router)#area 0 authentication message-digest
h. Verify that there is an OSPF neighbor by entering show ip ospf neighbor command.
i.

Show the routing table by typing show ip route.

j.

Ping the Washington host from Dublin. If this was not successful troubleshoot as necessary.

Once the previous steps are completed, log off by typing exit and turn the router off. Then remove
and store the cables and adapter.

3-5

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class. If that does not work, ask the instructor for assistance.
Router>enable
At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config.
Router#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue?
[confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete
Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload.
Router(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
In the first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started!
Press Enter.
Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

4-5

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 2.3.5 Configuring OSPF Timers

Objective

Setup an IP addressing scheme for OSPF area.

Configure and verify OSPF routing.

Modify OSPF interface timers to adjust efficiency of network.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one shown in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface
requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. For example, router series 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, and 2600 or any such combination can be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of
the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in lab. The
configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may
produce slightly different output. Perform the following steps on each router unless specifically
instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

1-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname, console, virtual
terminal and enable passwords. Next configure the interfaces and IP hostnames according to the
chart. Do not configure the routing protocol until specifically told to. If there are any problems
configuring the router basics, refer to the lab Review of Basic Router Configuration with RIP.

Step 2 Save the configuration information from the privileged EXEC command mode
Sydney#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]
Rome#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]
Why save the running configuration to the startup configuration?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
a. Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. Troubleshoot as necessary.
Remember to assign a specific IP address and default gateway to the workstation. If running
Windows 9x/ME, check by using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running WindowsNT/2000/XP,
check by using the ipconfig command in a DOS window.
b. At this point the workstations will not be able to communicate with each other. The following
steps will demonstrate the process required to get communication working using OSPF as the
routing protocol.

Step 4 Verify connectivity


a. On a router, ping the serial interface of the other router.
b. What the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
c. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the router configurations, until the ping is successful.

Step 5 Configure OSPF routing on both routers


a. Configure OSPF routing on each router. Use OSPF process number 1 and ensure all networks
are in area 0. Refer to the lab, Configuring Loopback Interfaces for review on configuring OSPF
routing if necessary.
b. Did the IOS version automatically add any lines under router OSPF 1? ___________________
c.

Show the routing table for the Sydney router.


Sydney#show ip route

d. Are there any entries in the routing table? ________________________________________

Step 6 Test network connectivity


Ping the Sydney host from the Rome host. Was it successful? ___________________________
If not troubleshoot as necessary.

2-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Observe OSPF traffic


a. At the privileged EXEC mode type the command debug ip ospf events and observe the
output.
b. How frequently are Hello messages sent? ________________________________________
c.

Where are they coming from? ________________________________________________

d. Turn off debugging by typing no debug ip ospf events or undebug all.

Step 8 Show interface timer information


a. Show the hello and dead interval timers on the Sydney router Ethernet and Serial interfaces by
entering the command show ip ospf interface in privileged EXEC mode.
b. Record the Hello and Dead Interval timers for these interfaces
c.

Hello Interval: ____________________________________________________________

d. Dead Interval: ____________________________________________________________


e. What is the purpose of the dead interval? ________________________________________

Step 9 Modify the OSPF timers


a. Modify the Hello and Dead-Interval timers to smaller values to try to improve performance. On
the Sydney router only enter the commands ip ospf hello-interval 5 and ip ospf
dead-interval 20 for interface Serial 0.
Sydney(config)#interface Serial 0
Sydney(config-if)#ip ospf hello-interval 5
Sydney(config-if)#ip ospf dead-interval 20
b. Wait for a minute and then enter the command show ip ospf neighbor.
c.

Are there any OSPF neighbors? ________________________________________

Step 10 Examine the routing table


a. Examine the Sydney router routing table by entering show ip route.
b. Are there any OSPF routes in the table? ________________________________________
c.

Can the Sydney Host ping the Rome host? _______________________________________

Step 11 Look at the OSPF data transmissions.


a. Enter the command debug ip ospf events in privileged EXEC mode.
b. Is there an issue that is identified? ________________________________________
c.

If there is, what is the issue? ________________________________________

Step 12 Check the Rome router routing table status.


a. On the Rome router check the routing table by typing show ip route.
b. Are there any OSPF routes in the table? ________________________________________

3-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 13 Set the Rome router interval timers


a. Match the timer values on the Rome Serial link with the Sydney router.
Rome(config)#interface serial 0
Rome(config-if)#ip ospf hello-interval 5
Rome(config-if)#ip ospf dead-interval 20
b. Verify the OSPF neighbor by entering show ip ospf neighbor command.
c.

Show the routing table by typing show ip route.

d. Are there OSPF routes in the table? ________________________________________


e. Ping the Rome host from Sydney. If this was not successful troubleshoot the configurations.

Step 14 Reset the routers interval timers to the default values


Use the no form of the ip ospf hello-interval and the ip ospf dead-interval to reset
the OSPF timers back to their default values.

Step 15 Verify the interval timers are returned to the default values
a. Use the show ip ospf interface command to verify the timers are reset to their default
values.
b. Are the values back to the default? ________________________________________
c.

If not, repeat step 13 and verify again.

Once the previous steps are completed, logoff by typing exit and turn the router off. Then remove
and store the cables and adapter.

4-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class. If that does not work, ask the instructor for assistance.
Router>enable
At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config.
Router#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue?
[confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete
Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload.
Router(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
In the first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started!
Press Enter.
Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

5-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 2.3.6 Propagating Default Routes in an OSPF Domain

Objective

Setup an IP addressing scheme for OSPF area.

Configure and verify Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing.

Configure the OSPF network so that all hosts in OSPF area can connect to outside networks.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one shown in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface
requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. For example, router series 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, and 2600 or any such combination can be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of
the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The
configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may
produce slightly different output. Perform the following steps on each router unless specifically
instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the ISP router


Normally the ISP router would be configured by the Internet service provider (ISP). For the purpose
of this lab, after erasing the old configuration, configure the ISP router (Router 3) this way by typing:
Router>enable
Router#configure terminal
Router(config)#hostname ISP
ISP(config)#line vty 0 4
ISP(config-line)#password cisco
ISP(config-line)#login
ISP(config-line)#interface serial 1
ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.20.20.1 255.255.255.252
ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000
ISP(config-if)#no shutdown
ISP(config-if)#interface loopback 0
ISP(config-if)#ip address 138.25.6.33 255.255.255.255
ISP(config-if)#exit
ISP(config)#ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 200.20.20.2
ISP(config)#ip route 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 200.20.20.2
ISP(config)#end
ISP#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]
Building configuration...
[OK]
ISP#

Step 2 Configure the Area 0 OSPF routers


On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname, console, virtual
terminal and enable passwords. Next configure the interfaces and IP hostnames according to the
chart. Do not configure the routing protocol until specifically told to. If there are any problems
configuring the router basics, refer to the lab Review of Basic Router Configuration with RIP.

Step 3 Save the configuration information from the privileged EXEC command mode
Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]
Madrid#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]
Why save the running configuration to the startup configuration?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 4 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask and default gateway
a. Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. Troubleshoot as necessary.
Remember to assign a specific IP address and default gateway to the workstation. If running
Windows 9x/ME, check by using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows NT/2000/XP,
check by using the ipconfig command in a DOS window.
b. At this point the workstations will not be able to communicate with each other. The following
steps will demonstrate the process required to get communication working using OSPF as the
routing protocol.

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 5 Verify connectivity


a. Ping from the Madrid router to both the Tokyo and the ISP routers.
b. Were the pings successful? __________________________________________________
c.

If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the router configurations, until the ping is successful.

Step 6 Configure OSPF routing on both area 0 routers


a. Configure OSPF routing on each router. Use OSPF process number 1 and ensure all networks
are in area 0. Refer to the lab Configuring loopback interfaces for review on configuring OSPF
routing if necessary.
b. Did the IOS version automatically add any lines under router OSPF 1? ___________________
c.

Show the routing table for the Tokyo router.


Tokyo#show ip route

d. Are there any entries in the routing table? ________________________________________

Step 7 Test network connectivity


a. Ping the Tokyo host from the Madrid host. Was it successful? _________________________
b. If not troubleshoot as necessary.

Step 8 Observe OSPF traffic


a. At privileged EXEC mode type the command debug ip ospf events and observe the
output.
b. Is there OSPF traffic? ____________________________
c.

Turn off debugging by typing no debug ip ospf events or undebug all.

Step 9 Create a default route to the ISP


On the Madrid router only, type in a static default route through Serial 1 interface.
Madrid(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.20.20.1

Step 10 Verify the default static route


a. Verify the default static route by looking at the Madrid routing table.
b. Is the default route in the routing table? ____________________________

Step 11 Verify connectivity from the Madrid router


a. Verify connectivity from the Madrid router by pinging the ISP Serial 1 interface from the Madrid
router.
b. Can the interface be pinged? _________________________________________________
c.

Next, on the host attached to Madrid, open a Command Prompt and ping the serial 1 interface
on the ISP router.

d. Can the interface be pinged? _________________________________________________


e. This time, ping the loopback address of the ISP router, which represents the ISP connection to
the Internet.
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

f.

Can the loopback interface be pinged? __________________________________________

g. All of these pings should be successful. If they are not, troubleshoot the configurations on the
host and the Madrid and ISP routers.

Step 12 Verify connectivity from the Tokyo router


a. Verify the connection between the ISP and the Tokyo by pinging the serial 1 interface of the ISP
router on the Tokyo router.
b. Can the interface be pinged? _________________________________________________
c.

If yes, why? If not, why not? __________________________________________________

Step 13 Redistribute the static default route


a. Propagate the gateway of last resort to the other routers in the OSPF domain. At the configure
router prompt on the Madrid router type default-information originate.
Madrid(config-router)#default-information originate
b. Is there now a default route on the Tokyo router? __________________________________
c.

What is the address of the Gateway of last resort? _________________________________

d. There is an O*E2 entry in the routing table. What type of route it is? _____________________
e. Can the ISP server address at 138.25.6.33 be pinged from both workstations? ____________
f.

If no, troubleshoot both hosts and all three routers.

Once the previous steps are completed, log off by typing exit and turn the router off. Then remove
and store the cables and adapter.

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class. If that does not work, ask the instructor for assistance.
Router>enable
At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config.
Router#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue?
[confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete
Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload.
Router(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
In the first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started!
Press Enter.
Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 2.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.2.1 Configuring EIGRP Routing

Objective

Setup an IP addressing scheme for the network.

Configure and verify Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) routing.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one shown in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface
requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. For example, router series 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, and 2600 or any such combination can be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of
the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The
configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may
produce slightly different output. Perform the following steps on each router unless specifically
instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in the
chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords. Next configure the
interfaces according to the chart. Finally, configure the IP hostnames. Do not configure the routing
1-5

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

protocol until specifically told to. If there are any problems configuring the router basics, refer to the
lab Review of Basic Router Configuration with RIP.

Step 2 Save the configuration information from the privileged EXEC command mode
Paris#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask and default gateway
a. Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. Troubleshoot as necessary.
Remember to assign a specific IP address and default gateway to the workstation. If running
Windows 98, check by using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000, check by
using the ipconfig command in a DOS window.
b. At this point the workstations will not be able to communicate with each other. The following
steps will demonstrate the process required to get communication working using EIGRP as the
routing protocol.

Step 4 View the routers configuration and interface information


a. At the privileged EXEC mode prompt type:
Paris#show running-config
b. Using the show ip interface brief command, check the status of each interface.
c.

What is the state of the interfaces on each router?


Paris:
FastEthernet 0: ________________________________________________________
Serial 0: _____________________________________________________________
Warsaw:
FastEthernet 0: ________________________________________________________
Serial 0: _____________________________________________________________

d. Ping from one of the connected serial interfaces to the other.


e. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
f.

If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the routers configuration, until the ping is successful.

Step 5 Configure EIGRP routing on router Paris


a. Enable the EIGRP routing process on Paris, and configure the networks it will advertise. Use
EIGRP autonomous system number 101.
Paris(config)#router eigrp 101
Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.3.0
Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.2.0
Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.0.0
Paris(config-router)#end
b. Show the routing table for the Paris router.
Paris#show ip route
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Are there any entries in the routing table? _______________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 6 Configure EIGRP routing on router Warsaw


a. Enable the EIGRP routing process on Warsaw, and configure the networks it will advertise. Use
EIGRP autonomous system number 101.
Warsaw(config)#router eigrp 101
Warsaw(config-router)#network 192.168.2.0
Warsaw(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0
Warsaw(config-router)#end
b. Show the routing table for the Warsaw router.
Warsaw#show ip route

Step 7 Test network connectivity


Ping the Paris host from the Warsaw host. Was it successful? ____________________________
If not troubleshoot as necessary.
Once the previous steps are completed, log off by typing exit, and turn the router off. Then remove
and store the cables and adapter.

3-5

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.2.3 Verifying Basic EIGRP Configuration

Objective

Setup an IP addressing scheme for the network.

Configure and verify Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) routing.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one shown in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface
requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. For example, router series 800, 1600,
1700, 2500, and 2600 or any such combination can be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of
the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The
configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may
produce slightly different output. Perform the following steps on each router unless specifically
instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

1-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


On the routers, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in the
chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords. Next configure the
interfaces according to the chart. Finally, configure the IP hostnames. Do not configure the routing
protocol until specifically told to. If there are any problems configuring the router basics, refer to the
lab Review of Basic Router configuration with RIP.

Step 2 Save the configuration information from the privileged EXEC command mode
Paris#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]? [Enter]

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask and default gateway
a. Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. Troubleshoot as necessary.
Remember to assign a specific IP address and default gateway to the workstation. If running
Windows 98, check by using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000, check by
using the ipconfig command in a DOS window.
b. At this point the workstations will not be able to communicate with each other. The following
steps will demonstrate the process required to get communication working using EIGRP as the
routing protocol.

Step 4 View the routers configuration and interface information


a. At the privileged EXEC mode prompt type:
Paris#show running-config
b. Using the show ip interface brief command, check the status of each interface.
c.

What is the state of the interfaces on each router?


Paris:
FastEthernet 0: ________________________________________________________
Serial 0: _____________________________________________________________
Warsaw:
FastEthernet 0: ________________________________________________________
Serial 0: _____________________________________________________________

d. Ping from one of the connected serial interfaces to the other.


e. What the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
f.

If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the routers configuration until the ping is successful.

Step 5 Configure EIGRP routing on router Paris


a. Enable the EIGRP routing process on Paris, and configure the networks it will advertise. Use
EIGRP autonomous system number 101.
Paris(config)#router eigrp 101
Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.3.0
Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.2.0
Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.0.0
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris(config-router)#end
b. Show the routing table for the Paris router.
Paris#show ip route
c.

Are there any entries in the routing table? ________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 6 Configure EIGRP routing on router Warsaw


a. Enable the EIGRP routing process on Warsaw, and configure the networks it will advertise. Use
EIGRP autonomous system number 101.
Warsaw(config)#router eigrp 101
Warsaw(config-router)#network 192.168.2.0
Warsaw(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0
Warsaw(config-router)#end
b. Show the routing table for the Warsaw router.
Warsaw#show ip route
c.

Are there any EIGRP entries in the routing table now? _______________________________

d. What is the address type in the EIGRP 192.168.2.0 route? ___________________________


e. What does the D mean in the first column of the routing table? _________________________

Step 7 Show EIGRP neighbors


a. From the Paris router show any neighbors connected using the show ip eigrp neighbors
command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt.
b. Are any neighbors shown? ___________________________________________________

Step 8 Test network connectivity


a. Ping the Paris host from the Warsaw host. Was it successful? _________________________
b. If not troubleshoot as necessary.

Step 9 View the topology table


a. To view the topology table, issue the show ip eigrp topology all-links command.
b. How many routes are in passive mode? _________________________________________
c.

To view more specific information about a topology table entry, use an IP address with this
command:
Paris#show ip eigrp topology 192.168.1.0

d. Based on the output of this command, does it tell what external protocol originated this route to
192.168.2.0?

__________________________________________________________________________
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

e. Does it tell which router originated the route?

__________________________________________________________________________
f.

Finally, use show commands to view key EIGRP statistics. On the Paris router, issue the show
ip eigrp traffic command.

g. How many hello packets has the Paris router received? _____________________________
h. How many has it sent? ______________________________________________________
Once the previous steps are completed, log off by typing exit, and turn the router off. Then remove
and store the cables and adapter.

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class. If that does not work, ask the instructor for assistance.
Router>enable
At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config.
Router#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue?
[confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete
Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload.
Router(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
In the first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started!
Press Enter.
Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

5-6

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 3.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 6.2.2 Basic Switch Configuration

Objective

Configure a switch with a name and an IP address.

Configure passwords to ensure that access to the CLI is secured.

Configure switch port speed and duplex properties for an interface.

Save the active configuration.

View the switch browser interface.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from a 2950 series switch. Any other switch used may produce different output. The
following steps are to be executed on each switch unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Instructions are also provided for the 1900 Series switch, which initially displays a User Interface
Menu. Select the Command Line option from the menu to perform the steps for this lab.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
switches in this lab assignment before continuing.

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Enter privileged mode


a. Privileged mode gives access to all the switch commands. Many of the privileged commands
configure operating parameters. Therefore, privileged access should be password-protected to
prevent unauthorized use. The privileged command set includes those commands contained in
user EXEC mode, as well as the configure command through which access to the remaining
command modes is gained.
Switch>enable
Switch#
1900:
>enable
#
b. Notice the prompt changed in the configuration to reflect privileged EXEC mode.

Step 2 Examine the current switch configuration


a. Examine the following current running configuration file:
Switch#show running-config
b. How many Ethernet or Fast Ethernet interfaces does the switch have? ___________________
c.

What is the range of values shown for the VTY lines? _______________________________

d. Examine the current contents of NVRAM as follows:


Switch#show startup-config
%% Non-volatile configuration memory is not present
e. Why does the switch give this response?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 3 Assign a name to the switch
a. Enter enable and then the configuration mode. The configuration mode allows the management
of the switch. Enter ALSwitch, the name this switch will be referred to in the following:
Switch#configure terminal
Enter the configuration commands, one for each line. End by pressing Ctrl-Z.
Switch(config)#hostname ALSwitch
ALSwitch(config)#exit
b. Notice the prompt changed in the configuration to reflect its new name. Type exit or press CtrlZ to go back into privileged mode.

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 4 Examine the current running configuration


a. Exam the current configuration that follows to verify that there is no configuration except for the
hostname:
ALSwitch#show running-config
b. Are there any passwords set on the lines? _______________________________________
c.

What does the configuration show as the hostname of this switch? ______________________

Step 5 Set the access passwords (1900: Skip to Step 6)


Enter config-line mode for the console. Set the password on this line as cisco for login. Configure
the vty lines 0 to 15 with the password cisco as follows:
ALSwitch#configure terminal
Enter the configuration commands, one for each line. End by pressing Ctrl-Z.
ALSwitch(config)#line con 0
ALSwitch(config-line)#password cisco
ALSwitch(config-line)#login
ALSwitch(config-line)#line vty 0 15
ALSwitch(config-line)#password cisco
ALSwitch(config-line)#login
ALSwitch(config-line)#exit

Step 6 Set the command mode passwords


a. Set the enable password to cisco and the enable secret password to class as follows:
ALSwitch(config)#enable password cisco
ALSwitch(config)#enable secret class
1900:
ALSwitch(config)#enable password level 15 cisco
ALSwitch(config)#enable secret class
2950:
#show interface fastethernet 0/4
Or
#show interface gigabitethernet 0/1

(Note: this can be a trunk or access port)


(Note: this can be a trunk or access port)

b. Which password takes precedence, the enable password or enable secret password? _______

Step 7 Configure the layer 3 access to the switch


a. Set the IP address of the switch to 192.168.1.2 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 as follows:
Note: This is done on the internal virtual interface VLAN 1.
ALSwitch(config)#interface VLAN 1
ALSwitch(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0
ALSwitch(config-if)#exit
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

1900:
ALSwitch(config)#ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0
ALSwitch(config)#exit
b. Set the default gateway for the switch and the default management VLAN to 192.168.1.1 as
follows:
ALSwitch(config)#ip default-gateway 192.168.1.1
ALSwitch(config)#exit
1900:
ALSwitch(config)#ip default-gateway 192.168.1.1
ALSwitch(config)#exit

Step 8 Verify the management LANs settings (1900: Skip to Step 10)
a. Verify the interface settings on VLAN 1 as follows:
ALSwitch#show interface VLAN 1
b. What is the bandwidth on this interface? ______________________________
c.

What are the VLAN states: VLAN1 is __________, Line protocol is __________

d. Enable the virtual interface using the no shutdown command


ALSwitch(config)#interface VLAN 1
ALSwitch(config-if)#no shutdown
ALSwitch(config-if)#exit
e. What is the queuing strategy? ______________________________________

Step 9 Save the configuration


a. The basic configuration of the switch has just been completed. Back up the running configuration
file to NVRAM as follows:
Note: This will ensure that the changes made will not be lost if the system is rebooted or loses
power.
ALSwitch#copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]?[Enter]
Building configuration...
[OK]
ALSwitch#
1900:
b. The configuration is automatically saved to NVRAM within approximately one minute of entering
a command. To save the configuration to a TFTP server, enter the following:
ALSwitch#copy nvram tftp://tftp server ip add/destination_filename
c.

4-7

Configuration upload is successfully completed.

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 10 Examine the startup configuration file (1900: Skip to Step 11)
a. To see the configuration that is stored in NVRAM, type show startup-config from the
privileged EXEC (enable mode).
ALSwitch#show startup-config
b. What is displayed? ________________________________________________________
c.

Are all the changes that were entered recorded in the file? ____________________________

Step 11 Exit the switch


Logoff the switch by typing exit as follows:
ALSwitch#exit
Once these steps are completed, logoff by typing exit, and turn all the devices off. Then remove
and store the cables and adapter.

5-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and Reloading the Switch


For the majority of the labs in CCNA 3 and CCNA 4 it is necessary to start with an unconfigured
switch. Use of a switch with an existing configuration may produce unpredictable results. These
instructions allow preparation of the switch prior to performing the lab so previous configuration
options do not interfere. The following is the procedure for clearing out previous configurations and
starting with an unconfigured switch. Instructions are provided for the 2900, 2950, and 1900 Series
switches.
2900 and 2950 Series Switches
1. Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor).
Switch>enable
2. Remove the VLAN database information file.
Switch#delete flash:vlan.dat
Delete filename [vlan.dat]?[Enter]
Delete flash:vlan.dat? [confirm] [Enter]
If there was no VLAN file, this message is displayed.
%Error deleting flash:vlan.dat (No such file or directory)
3. Remove the switch startup configuration file from NVRAM.
Switch#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete

4. Check that VLAN information was deleted.


Verify that the VLAN configuration was deleted in Step 2 using the show vlan command. If
previous VLAN configuration information (other than the default management VLAN 1) is still
present it will be necessary to power cycle the switch (hardware restart) instead of issuing the
reload command. To power cycle the switch, remove the power cord from the back of the
switch or unplug it. Then plug it back in.
If the VLAN information was successfully deleted in Step 2, go to Step 5 and restart the switch
using the reload command.
5. Software restart (using the reload command)
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: This step is not necessary if the switch was restarted using the power cycle method.
a. At the privileged EXEC mode enter the command reload.
Switch(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
b. Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm] [Enter]
The first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the switch has reloaded, the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
c.

Type n and then press Enter.


The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started! [Enter]

1900 Series Switches


1. Remove VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) information
#delete vtp
This command resets the switch with VTP parameters set to factory
defaults.
All other parameters will be unchanged.
Reset system with VTP parameters set to factory defaults, [Y]es or
[N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
2. Remove the switch startup configuration from NVRAM.
#delete nvram
This command resets the switch with factory defaults. All system parameters will revert to their
default factory settings. All static and dynamic addresses will be removed.
Reset system with factory defaults, [Y]es or [N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 6.2.3 Managing the MAC Address Table

Objective

Create a basic switch configuration.

Manage the switch MAC table.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from a 2950 series switch. Any other switch used may produce different output. The
following steps are to be executed on each switch unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Instructions are also provided for the 1900 Series switch, which initially displays a User Interface
Menu. Select the Command Line option from the menu to perform the steps for this lab.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
switches in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the switch


Configure the hostname, access and command mode passwords, as well as the management LAN
settings. These values are shown in the chart. If problems occur while performing this configuration,
refer to the Basic Switch Configuration lab.

Step 2 Configure the hosts attached to the switch


Configure the hosts to use the same IP subnet for the address, mask, and default gateway as on the
switch.
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Verify connectivity


a. To verify that hosts and switch are correctly configured, ping the switch IP address from the
hosts.
b. Were the pings successful? __________________________________________________
c.

If the answer is no, troubleshoot the hosts and switch configurations.

Step 4 Record the MAC addresses of the host


a. Determine and record the layer 2 addresses of the PC network interface cards.
If running Windows 98, check by using Start > Run > winipcfg, then click on More info.
If running Windows 2000, check by using Start > Run > cmd > ipconfig /all.
b. PC1: ___________________________________________________________________
c.

PC2: ___________________________________________________________________

Step 5 Determine the MAC addresses that the switch has learned
a. To determine the MAC addresses the switch has learned, use the show mac-address-table
command as follows at the privileged EXEC mode prompt:
ALSwitch#show mac-address-table
b. How many dynamic addresses are there? ________________________________________
c.

How many total MAC addresses are there? _______________________________________

d. How many addresses have been user defined? ___________________________________


e. Do the MAC addresses match the host MAC addresses? _____________________________

Step 6 Determine the show MAC table options


a. To determine the options the show mac-address-table command has use the ? option as
follows:
ALSwitch#show mac-address-table ?
b. How many options are available for the show mac-address-table command? __________
c.

Show only the MAC addresses from the table that were learned dynamically.

d. How many are there? _______________________________________________________

Step 7 Clear the MAC address table


To remove the existing MAC addresses use the clear mac-address-table command from the
privileged EXEC mode prompt as follows:
ALSwitch#clear mac-address-table dynamic

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 8 Verify the results


a. Verify that the mac-address-table was cleared as follows:
ALSwitch#show mac-address-table
b. How many total MAC addresses are there now? ___________________________________
c.

How many dynamic addresses are there? ________________________________________

Step 9 Determine the clear MAC table options


a. To determine the options available use the command clear mac-address-table ? at the
privileged EXEC mode prompt as follows:
ALSwitch#clear mac-address-table ?
b. How many options are there? _________________________________________________
c.

In what circumstances would these options be used? _______________________________

Step 10 Examine the MAC table again


a. Look at the MAC address table again using the show mac-address-table command at the
privileged EXEC mode prompt as follows:
ALSwitch#show mac-address-table
b. How many dynamic addresses are there? ________________________________________
c.

Why did this change from the last display? _______________________________________

d. The table has not changed yet. Ping the switch IP address from the hosts two times each and
repeat Step 10.

Step 11 Exit the switch


a. Type exit, as follows to leave the switch welcome screen.
Switch#exit
b. Once the steps are completed, logoff by typing exit, and turn all the devices off. Then remove
and store the cables and adapter.

Erasing and Reloading the Switch


For the majority of the labs in CCNA 3 and CCNA 4 it is necessary to start with an unconfigured
switch. Use of a switch with an existing configuration may produce unpredictable results. These
instructions allow preparation of the switch prior to performing the lab so previous configuration
options do not interfere. The following is the procedure for clearing out previous configurations and
starting with an unconfigured switch. Instructions are provided for the 2900, 2950, and 1900 Series
switches.

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

2900 and 2950 Series Switches


1. Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor).
Switch>enable
2. Remove the VLAN database information file.
Switch#delete flash:vlan.dat
Delete filename [vlan.dat]?[Enter]
Delete flash:vlan.dat? [confirm] [Enter]
If there was no VLAN file, this message is displayed.
%Error deleting flash:vlan.dat (No such file or directory)
3. Remove the switch startup configuration file from NVRAM.
Switch#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete

4. Check that VLAN information was deleted.


Verify that the VLAN configuration was deleted in Step 2 using the show vlan command. If
previous VLAN configuration information (other than the default management VLAN 1) is still
present it will be necessary to power cycle the switch (hardware restart) instead of issuing the
reload command. To power cycle the switch, remove the power cord from the back of the
switch or unplug it. Then plug it back in.
If the VLAN information was successfully deleted in Step 2, go to Step 5 and restart the switch
using the reload command.
5. Software restart (using the reload command)
Note: This step is not necessary if the switch was restarted using the power cycle method.
a. At the privileged EXEC mode enter the command reload.
Switch(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Type n and then press Enter.


The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm] [Enter]
The first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the switch has reloaded, the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
c.

Type n and then press Enter.


The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started! [Enter]

1900 Series Switches


1. Remove VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) information.
#delete vtp
This command resets the switch with VTP parameters set to factory
defaults.
All other parameters will be unchanged.
Reset system with VTP parameters set to factory defaults, [Y]es or
[N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
2. Remove the switch startup configuration from NVRAM.
#delete nvram
This command resets the switch with factory defaults. All system parameters will revert to their
default factory settings. All static and dynamic addresses will be removed.
Reset system with factory defaults, [Y]es or [N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.

5-5

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 6.2.5 Configuring Port Security

Objective

Create and verify a basic switch configuration.

Configure port security on individual FastEthernet ports.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from a 2950 series switch. Any other switch used may produce different output. The
following steps are intended to be executed on each switch unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Instructions are also provided for the 1900 Series switch, which initially displays a User Interface
Menu. Select the Command Line option from the menu to perform the steps for this lab.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
switches in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the switch


Configure the hostname, access and command mode passwords, as well as the management LAN
settings. These values are shown in the chart. If problems occur while performing this configuration,
refer to the Basic Switch Configuration lab.

1-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 2 Configure the hosts attached to the switch


a. Configure the hosts to use the same IP subnet for the address, mask, and default gateway as on
the switch.
b. There is a third host needed for this lab. It needs to be configured with the address 192.168.1.7.
The subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 and the default gateway is 192.168.1.1.
Note: Do not connect this PC to the switch yet.

Step 3 Verify connectivity


a. To verify that hosts and switch are correctly configured, ping the switch IP address from the
hosts.
b. Were the pings successful? __________________________________________________
c.

If the answer is no, troubleshoot the hosts and switch configurations.

Step 4 Record the host MAC addresses


a. Determine and record the layer 2 addresses of the PC network interface cards.
If running Windows 98, check by using Start > Run > winipcfg. Click on More info.
If running Windows 2000, check by using Start > Run > cmd > ipconfig /all.
b. PC1____________________________________________________________________
c.

PC2____________________________________________________________________

Step 5 Determine what MAC addresses that the switch has learned
a. Determine what MAC addresses the switch has learned by using the show mac-addresstable command as follows, at the privileged exec mode prompt:
ALSwitch#show mac-address-table
b. How many dynamic addresses are there? ________________________________________
c.

How many total MAC addresses are there? _______________________________________

d. Do the MAC addresses match the host MAC addresses? _____________________________

Step 6 Determine the show MAC table options


a. Enter the following to determine the options the mac-address-table command has use the ?
option:
ALSwitch(config)#mac-address-table ?

Step 7 Setup a static MAC address


Setup a static MAC address on FastEthernet interface 0/4 as follows:
Note: Use the address that was recorded for PC4 in Step 4. The MAC address 00e0.2917.1884
is used in the example statement only.
ALSwitch(config)#mac-address-table static 00e0.2917.1884 interface
fastethernet 0/4 vlan 1

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

2900:
ALSwitch(config)#mac-address-table static 00e0.2917.1884 fastethernet
0/4 vlan 1
1900:
ALSwitch(config)#mac-address-table permanent 00e0.2917.1884 ethernet
0/4

Step 8 Verify the results


a. Enter the following to verify the MAC address table entries:
ALSwitch#show mac-address-table
b. How many total MAC addresses are there now? ___________________________________

Step 9 List port security options


a. Determine the options for setting port security on interface FastEthernet 0/4.
2950:
ALSwitch(config-if)#switchport port-security
aging
Port-security aging commands
mac-address Secure mac address
maximum
Max secure addrs
violation
Security Violation Mode
<cr>

1900:
ALSwitch(config)#interface ethernet 0/4
ALSwitch(config-if)#port secure ?
max-mac-count Maximum number of addresses allowed on the port
<cr>
b. To allow the switchport FastEthernet 0/4 to accept only one device enter port security as
follows:
ALSwitch(config-if)#switchport mode access
ALSwitch(config-if)#switchport port-security
ALSwitch(config-if)#switchport port-security mac-address sticky
1900:
ALSwitch(config-if)#port secure

Step 10 Verify the results


a. Enter the following to verify the macaddress table entries:
ALSwitch#show mac-address-table
b. How are the address types listed for the two MAC addresses? ______________________

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Show port security settings.


ALSwitch#show port-security
1900:
ALSwitch#show mac-address-table security

Step 11 Show the running configuration file


a. Are there statements that directly reflect the security implementation in the listing of the running
configuration? ____________________________________________________________
b. What do those statements mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 12 Limit the number of hosts per port
a. On interface FastEthernet 0/4 set the port security maximum MAC count to 1 as follows:
2950:
ALSwitch(config-if)#switchport port-security maximum 1
1900:
ALSwitch(config)#interface Ethernet 0/4
ALSwitch(config-if)#port secure max-mac-count 1
b. Disconnect the PC attached to FastEthernet 0/4. Connect to the port on the PC that has been
given the IP address 192.168.1.7. This PC has not yet been attached to the switch. It may be
necessary to ping the switch address 192.168.1.2 to generate some traffic.
c.

Record any observations.

___________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 13 Configure the port to shut down if there is a security violation
a. It has been decided that in the event of a security violation the interface should be shut down.
Enter the following to make the port security action to shutdown:
2900XL:
ALSwitch(config-if)#switchport port-security violation shutdown
1900:
ALSwitch(config-if)#port security action shutdown
The default action upon address violation is suspend
b. What other action options are available with port security? ____________________________
c.

If necessary, ping the switch address 192.168.1.2 from the PC 192.168.1.7. This PC is now
connected to interface FastEthernet 0/4. This ensures that there is traffic from the PC to the
switch.

d. Record any observations.

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 14 Show port 0/4 configuration information


a. To see the configuration information for just FastEthernet port 0/4, type show interface
fastethernet 0/4, as follows, at the Privileged EXEC mode prompt:
ALSwitch#show interface fastethernet 0/4

b. What is the state of this interface?


FastEthernet0/4 is _________________________, line protocol is ____________________

Step 15 Reactivate the port


a. If a security violation occurs and the port is shut down, use the no shutdown command to
reactivate it.
b. Try reactivating this port a few times by switching between the original port 0/4 host and the new
one. Plug in the original host, type the no shutdown command on the interface and ping using
the DOS window. The ping will have to be repeated multiple times or use the ping
192.168.1.2 n 200 command. This will set the number of ping packets to 200 instead of 4.
Then switch hosts and try again.

Step 16 Exit the switch


Type exit to leave the switch welcome screen:
Switch#exit
Once the steps are completed, logoff by typing exit, and turn all the devices off. Then remove and
store the cables and adapter.

5-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and Reloading the Switch


For the majority of the labs in CCNA 3 and CCNA 4 it is necessary to start with an unconfigured
switch. Use of a switch with an existing configuration may produce unpredictable results. These
instructions allow preparation of the switch prior to performing the lab so previous configuration
options do not interfere. The following is the procedure for clearing out previous configurations and
starting with an unconfigured switch. Instructions are provided for the 2900, 2950, and 1900 Series
switches.
2900 and 2950 Series Switches
1. Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor).
Switch>enable
2. Remove the VLAN database information file.
Switch#delete flash:vlan.dat
Delete filename [vlan.dat]?[Enter]
Delete flash:vlan.dat? [confirm] [Enter]
If there was no VLAN file, this message is displayed.
%Error deleting flash:vlan.dat (No such file or directory)
3. Remove the switch startup configuration file from NVRAM.
Switch#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete

4. Check that VLAN information was deleted.


Verify that the VLAN configuration was deleted in Step 2 using the show vlan command. If
previous VLAN configuration information (other than the default management VLAN 1) is still
present it will be necessary to power cycle the switch (hardware restart) instead of issuing the
reload command. To power cycle the switch, remove the power cord from the back of the
switch or unplug it. Then plug it back in.
If the VLAN information was successfully deleted in Step 2, go to Step 5 and restart the switch
using the reload command.
5. Software restart (using the reload command)
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: This step is not necessary if the switch was restarted using the power cycle method.
a. At the privileged EXEC mode enter the command reload.
Switch(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
b. Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm] [Enter]
The first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the switch has reloaded, the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
c.

Type n and then press Enter.


The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started! [Enter]

1900 Series Switches


1. Remove VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) information.
#delete vtp
This command resets the switch with VTP parameters set to factory
defaults.
All other parameters will be unchanged.
Reset system with VTP parameters set to factory defaults, [Y]es or
[N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
2. Remove the switch startup configuration from NVRAM.
#delete nvram
This command resets the switch with factory defaults. All system parameters will revert to their
default factory settings. All static and dynamic addresses will be removed.
Reset system with factory defaults, [Y]es or [N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 6.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 8.2.4 Verifying VLAN Configurations

Objective

Create a basic switch configuration and verify it.

Create two VLANs.

Name the VLANs and assign multiple member ports to them.

Test functionality by moving a workstation from one VLAN to another.

Background/Preparation
When managing a switch, the Management Domain is always VLAN 1. The Network Administrator's
workstation must have access to a port in the VLAN 1 Management Domain. All ports are assigned
to VLAN 1 by default. This lab will also help demonstrate how VLANs can be used to separate traffic
and reduce broadcast domains.
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from a 2950 series switch. Any other switch used may produce different output. The
following steps are to be executed on each switch unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Instructions are also provided for the 1900 Series switch, which initially displays a User Interface
Menu. Select the Command Line option from the menu to perform the steps for this lab.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
switches in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the switch


Configure the hostname, access and command mode passwords, as well as the management LAN
settings. These values are shown in the chart. If problems occur while performing this configuration,
refer to the Basic Switch Configuration lab.

1-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 2 Configure the hosts attached to the switch


Configure the hosts to use the same subnet for the address, mask, and default gateway as on the
switch.

Step 3 Verify connectivity


a. To verify that the hosts and switch are correctly configured, ping the switch from the hosts.
b. Were the pings successful? __________________________________________________
c.

If the answer is no, troubleshoot the host and switch configurations.

Step 4 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan
1900:
Switch_A#show vlan-membership
b. Which ports belong to the default VLAN? ________________________________________

Step 5 Create and name two VLANs


Enter the following commands to create and name two VLANs:
Switch_A#vlan database
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 2 name VLAN2
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 3 name VLAN3
Switch_A(vlan)#exit
1900:
Switch_A#config terminal
Switch_A(config)#vlan 2 name VLAN2
Switch_A(config)#vlan 3 name VLAN3
Switch_A(config)#exit

Step 6 Assign ports to VLAN 2


Assigning ports to VLANs must be done from the interface mode. Enter the following commands to
add ports 4, 5 and 6 to VLAN 2.
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/4
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 2
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/5
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 2
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/6
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 2
Switch_A(config-if)#end
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

1900:
Switch_A#config terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface ethernet 0/4
Switch_A(config-if)#vlan static 2
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/5
Switch_A(config-if)#vlan static 2
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/6
Switch_A(config-if)#vlan static 2
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step7 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan
1900:
Switch_A#show vlan-membership
b. Are ports 4 through 6 assigned to VLAN 2?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 8 Assign ports 7, 8, and 9 to VLAN 3
Enter the following commands to add ports 7, 8 and 9:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/7
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 3
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/8
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 3
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/9
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 3
Switch_A(config-if)#end
1900:
Switch_A#config terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface ethernet 0/7
Switch_A(config-if)#vlan static 3
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/8
Switch_A(config-if)#vlan static 3
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/9
Switch_A(config-if)#vlan static 3
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step 9 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

1900:
Switch_A#show vlan-membership
b. Are ports 7 through 9 assigned to VLAN 3?

__________________________________________________________________________
Step 10 Test the VLANs
Ping from the host in port 0/4 to the host in port 0/1.
a. Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in port 0/1 to the host in port 0/4.
c.

Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in port 0/4 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
e. Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________
f.

Why? __________________________________________________________________

Ping from the host in port 0/1 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.


g. Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________
h. Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 11 Move a host


Move the host in port 0/4 to port 0/3. Wait until the port LED goes green and then go to the next step.

Step 12 Test the VLANs


Ping from the host in port 0/3 to the host in port 0/1.
a. Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in port 0/1 to the host in port 0/3.
c.

Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________

Ping from the host in port 0/3 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.


d. Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________

Step 13 Move hosts


Move the host in port 0/3 to port 0/4 and the host in port 0/1 to port 0/5. Wait until the port LEDs go
green and then go to the next step.

Step 14 Test the VLANs


Ping from the host in port 0/4 to the host in port 0/5.
a. Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Ping from the host in port 0/5 to the host in port 0/4.
c.

Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________

Ping from the host in port 0/4 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.


d. Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________
Ping from the host in port 0/5 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
e. Was the ping successful? ____________________________________________________
f.

Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 15 Move hosts


Move the host in port 0/4 to port 0/8. Wait until the port LED goes green and then go to the next step.

Step 16 Test the VLANs


Ping from the host in port 0/4 to the host in port 0/8.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in port 0/8 to the host in port 0/4.
c.

Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________

Ping from the host in port 0/4 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.


d. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
Ping from the host in port 0/8 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
e. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
Once the steps are completed, log off by typing exit, and turn all the devices off. Then remove and
store the cables and adapter.

5-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and Reloading the Switch


For the majority of the labs in CCNA 3 and CCNA 4 it is necessary to start with an unconfigured
switch. Use of a switch with an existing configuration may produce unpredictable results. These
instructions allow preparation of the switch prior to performing the lab so previous configuration
options do not interfere. The following is the procedure for clearing out previous configurations and
starting with an unconfigured switch. Instructions are provided for the 2900, 2950, and 1900 Series
switches.
2900 and 2950 Series Switches
1. Enter into the Privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor).
Switch>enable
2. Remove the VLAN database information file.
Switch#delete flash:vlan.dat
Delete filename [vlan.dat]?[Enter]
Delete flash:vlan.dat? [confirm] [Enter]
If there was no VLAN file, this message is displayed.
%Error deleting flash:vlan.dat (No such file or directory)
3. Remove the switch startup configuration file from NVRAM.
Switch#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete

4. Check that VLAN information was deleted.


Verify that the VLAN configuration was deleted in Step 2 using the show vlan command. If
previous VLAN configuration information (other than the default management VLAN 1) is still
present it will be necessary to power cycle the switch (hardware restart) instead of issuing the
reload command. To power cycle the switch, remove the power cord from the back of the
switch or unplug it. Then plug it back in.
If the VLAN information was successfully deleted in Step 2, go to Step 5 and restart the switch
using the reload command.
5. Software restart (using the reload command)

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: This step is not necessary if the switch was restarted using the power cycle method.
a. At the Privileged EXEC mode enter the command reload.
Switch(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
b. Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm] [Enter]
The first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the switch has reloaded, the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
c.

Type n and then press Enter.


The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started! [Enter]

1900 Series Switches


1. Remove VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) information.
#delete vtp
This command resets the switch with VTP parameters set to factory
defaults.
All other parameters will be unchanged.
Reset system with VTP parameters set to factory defaults, [Y]es or
[N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
2. Remove the switch startup configuration from NVRAM.
#delete nvram
This command resets the switch with factory defaults. All system parameters will revert to their
default factory settings. All static and dynamic addresses will be removed.
Reset system with factory defaults, [Y]es or [N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
7-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 8.2.6 Deleting VLAN Configurations

Objective

Create a basic switch configuration and verify it.

Create two VLANs.

Name the VLANs and assign multiple member ports to them.

Remove an interface from a VLAN and Delete a VLAN

Understand why it is not possible to delete VLAN 1.

Background/Preparation
When managing a switch, the Management Domain is always VLAN 1. The Network Administrator's
workstation must have access to a port in the VLAN 1 Management Domain. All ports are assigned
to VLAN 1 by default. This lab will also help demonstrate how to remove an interface from and
existing VLAN and how to delete an entire VLAN.
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from a 2950 series switch. Any other switch used may produce different output. The
following steps are to be executed on each switch unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Instructions are also provided for the 1900 Series switch, which initially displays a User Interface
Menu. Select the Command Line option from the menu to perform the steps for this lab.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
switches in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the switch

1-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configure the hostname, access and command mode passwords, as well as the management LAN
settings. These values are shown in the chart. If problems occur while performing this configuration,
refer to the Basic Switch Configuration lab.

Step 2 Configure the hosts attached to the switch


Configure the hosts to use the same subnet for the address, mask, and default gateway as on the
switch.

Step 3 Verify connectivity


a. To verify that the hosts and switch are correctly configured, ping the switch from the hosts.
b. Were the pings successful? __________________________________________________
c.

If the answer is no, troubleshoot the host and switch configurations.

Step 4 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan
1900:
Switch_A#show vlan-membership
b. Which ports belong to the default VLAN? ________________________________________

Step 5 Create and name two VLANs


Enter the following commands to create and name two VLANs:
Switch_A#vlan database
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 2 name VLAN2
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 3 name VLAN3
Switch_A(vlan)#exit
1900:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#vlan 2 name VLAN2
Switch_A(config)#vlan 3 name VLAN3

Step 6 Assign ports to VLAN 2


Assigning ports to VLANs must be done from the interface mode. Enter the following commands to
add ports 4, 5 and 6 to VLAN 2.
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/4
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 2
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/5
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 2
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/6
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
2-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 2


Switch_A(config-if)#end
1900:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface Ethernet 0/4
Switch_A(config-if)#vlan static 2
Switch_A(config-if)#interface Ethernet 0/5
Switch_A(config-if)#vlan static 2
Switch_A(config-if)#interface Ethernet 0/6
Switch_A(config-if)#vlan static 2
Switch_A(config)#end

Step 7 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan
1900:
Switch_A#show vlan-membership
b. Are ports 4 through 6 assigned to VLAN 2? _______________________________________

Step 8 Assign Ports to VLAN 3


Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan
Switch_A(config-if)#end

0/7
3
0/8
3
0/9
3

Step 9 Display the VLAN Interface Information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt.
Switch_A#show vlan
b. Are ports 7-9 assigned to VLAN 3? _____________________________________________

Step 10 Test the VLANs


Ping from the host in port 0/4 to the host in port 0/1.
a. Was the ping successful? _____________________________________________
Why? _____________________________________________
3-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Ping from the host in port 0/1 to the host in port 0/4.
b. Was the ping successful? _____________________________________________
Why? _____________________________________________
Ping from the host in port 0/4 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
c.

Was the ping successful? _____________________________________________

d. Why? _____________________________________________
Ping from the host in port 0/1 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
d. Was the ping successful? _____________________________________________
Why? _____________________________________________

Step 11 Delete a Host from a VLAN


To remove a host from a VLAN, use the no form of the switchport commands in the port interface
configuration mode.
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/4
Switch_A(config-if)#no switchport access vlan 2
1900:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface Ethernet 0/4
Switch_A(config-if)#no vlan-membership 2
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step 12 Display the VLAN Interface Information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt.
Switch_A#show vlan
b. Is port 0/4 removed from VLAN 2? _____________________________________________

Step 13 Delete a VLAN


a. To remove an entire VLAN, enter the VLAN database mode and use the negative form of the
command.
Switch_A#vlan database
Switch_A(vlan)#no vlan 3
Deleting VLAN 3
Switch_A(vlan)#exit
1900:
Switch_A#config terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface ethernet 0/7
Switch_A(config-if)#no vlan 3
Switch_A(config-if)#exit

4-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 14 Display the VLAN Interface Information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt.
Switch_A#show vlan
b. Is VLAN 3 removed? _______________________________________________________
c.

What happened to the ports that were released from VLAN 3? ______________________

Step 15 Delete VLAN 1


a. Try to delete VLAN 1, which is the default VLAN, the same way that you deleted VLAN 3.
Switch_A#vlan database
Switch_A(vlan)#no vlan 1
A default VLAN may not be deleted.
Switch_A(vlan)#exit
1900:
Switch_A#config t
Switch_A(config)#no vlan 1
Switch_A(config)#no vlan 1
^
% Invalid input detected at '^' marker.
Switch_A(config)#exit
b. The default VLAN cannot be deleted.
Once the steps are completed, logoff by typing exit, and turn all the devices off. Then remove and
store the cables and adapter.

5-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and Reloading the Switch


For the majority of the labs in CCNA 3 and CCNA 4 it is necessary to start with an unconfigured
switch. Use of a switch with an existing configuration may produce unpredictable results. These
instructions allow preparation of the switch prior to performing the lab so previous configuration
options do not interfere. The following is the procedure for clearing out previous configurations and
starting with an unconfigured switch. Instructions are provided for the 2900, 2950, and 1900 Series
switches.
2900 and 2950 Series Switches
1. Enter into the Privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor).
Switch>enable
2. Remove the VLAN database information file.
Switch#delete flash:vlan.dat
Delete filename [vlan.dat]?[Enter]
Delete flash:vlan.dat? [confirm] [Enter]
If there was no VLAN file, this message is displayed.
%Error deleting flash:vlan.dat (No such file or directory)
3. Remove the switch startup configuration file from NVRAM.
Switch#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete

4. Check that VLAN information was deleted.


Verify that the VLAN configuration was deleted in Step 2 using the show vlan command. If
previous VLAN configuration information (other than the default management VLAN 1) is still
present it will be necessary to power cycle the switch (hardware restart) instead of issuing the
reload command. To power cycle the switch, remove the power cord from the back of the
switch or unplug it. Then plug it back in.
If the VLAN information was successfully deleted in Step 2, go to Step 5 and restart the switch
using the reload command.
5. Software restart (using the reload command)
6-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: This step is not necessary if the switch was restarted using the power cycle method.
a. At the Privileged EXEC mode enter the command reload.
Switch(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
b. Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm] [Enter]
The first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the switch has reloaded, the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
c.

Type n and then press Enter.


The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started! [Enter]

1900 Series Switches


1. Remove VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) information.
#delete vtp
This command resets the switch with VTP parameters set to factory
defaults.
All other parameters will be unchanged.
Reset system with VTP parameters set to factory defaults, [Y]es or
[N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
2. Remove the switch startup configuration from NVRAM.
#delete nvram
This command resets the switch with factory defaults. All system parameters will revert to their
default factory settings. All static and dynamic addresses will be removed.
Reset system with factory defaults, [Y]es or [N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
7-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 8.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 9.1.5b Trunking with 802.1q

Objective

Create a basic switch configuration and verify it.

Create multiple VLANs, name them, and assign multiple member ports to them.

Create an 802.1q trunk line between the two switches to allow communication between paired
VLANs.

Test the VLANs functionality by moving a workstation from one VLAN to another.

Background/Preparation
Trunking changes the formatting of the packets. The ports need to be in agreement as to which
format is being used to transmit data on the trunk or no data will be passed. If there is different
trunking encapsulation on the two ends of the link they will not able to communicate. Similar situation
will occur if one of the ports is configured in trunking mode (unconditionally) and the other one is in
access mode (unconditionally).
When managing a switch, the Management Domain is always VLAN 1. The Network Administrator's
workstation must have access to a port in the VLAN 1 Management Domain. All ports are assigned
to VLAN 1 by default. This lab will also help demonstrate how VLANs can be used to separate traffic
and reduce broadcast domains.
1-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.1.5b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Cable a network similar to one of the diagram. The configuration output used in this lab is produced
from 2950 series switch. Any other switch used may produce different output. The following steps
are intended to be executed on each switch unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
switches in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the switch


Configure the Hostname, access and command mode passwords, as well as the management LAN
settings. These values are shown in the chart. If problems occur while performing this configuration,
refer to the Basic Switch Configuration lab. Do not configure VLANs and trunking yet.

Step 2 Configure the hosts attached to the switch


Configure the IP address, mask, and default gateway on each host. Be sure to choose addresses
that are on the same subnet as the switch.

Step 3 Verify connectivity


a. To verify that the host and switch are correctly configured, ping the switch from the hosts.
b. Were the pings successful? __________________________________________________
c.

If the answer is no, troubleshoot the host and switches configurations.

Step 4 Display the VLAN interface information


On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan
Note: There should be an entry for VLAN 1 and the default VLANs (1002 +). If other VLANs appear,
they could be deleted as instructed in Step 2 of the Erasing and Reloading instructions at the end of
this lab or refer to the Lab Exercise: Deleting VLAN Configurations.

Step 5 Create and name three VLANs


Enter the following commands to create and name three VLANs:
Switch_A#vlan database
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 10 name Accounting
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 20 name Marketing
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 30 name Engineering
Switch_A(vlan)#exit
Use the show vlan command to verify that the VLANs have been created correctly.

Step 6 Assign ports to a VLAN 10


Assigning ports to VLANs must be done from the interface mode. Enter the following commands to
add ports 0/4 to 0/6 to VLAN 10:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/4
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
2-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.1.5b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan
Switch_A(config-if)#end

0/5
10
0/6
10

Step 7 Assign ports to VLAN 20


Enter the following commands to add ports 0/7 to 0/9 to VLAN 20:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/7
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/8
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/9
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step 8 Assign ports to VLAN 30


Enter the following commands to add ports 0/10 to 0/12 to VLAN 30:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/10
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 30
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/11
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 30
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/12
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 30
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step 9 Create VLANs on Switch_B


Repeat Steps 5 through 9 on Switch_B to create its VLANs

Step 10 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On both switches, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan
b. Are ports 0/10 through 0/12 assigned to VLAN 30?

__________________________________________________________________________

3-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.1.5b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 11 Test the VLANs


Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/12 to the host in Switch_B port 0/12.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/12 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
c.

Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 12 Create the trunk


On both switches, Switch_A and Switch_B, type the following command at the fastethernet 0/1
interface command prompt. Note that it is not necessary to specify the encapsulation on a 2950,
since it only supports 802.1Q.
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/1
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_A(config-if)#end
Switch_B(config)#interface fastethernet 0/1
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_B(config-if)#end
2900:
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
Switch_A(config-if)#end
Switch_B(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
Switch_B(config-if)#end

Step 13 Verify the trunk


a. To verify that port Fast Ethernet 0/1 has been established as a trunk port, type show
interface fastethernet 0/1 switchport at the Privileged EXEC mode prompt.
b. What type of trunking encapsulation is shown on the output results?

__________________________________________________________________________
c.

According to the output with show interface fastethernet 0/1 switchport on


Switch_B, is there a difference from the Administrative Trunking Encapsulation from the
Operational Trunking Encapsulation?

__________________________________________________________________________
d. On the fragment Trunking VLANs Enable from the output, what does the word ALL mean?

__________________________________________________________________________
e. What would happen if the two ports of the trunk were using different encapsulation? _________
f.

4-8

Explain _________________________________________________________________

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.1.5b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 14 Test the VLANS and the trunk


Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/12 to the host in Switch_B port 0/12.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/12 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
c.

Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 15 Move host.


Move the host in Switch_A from port 0/12 to port 0/8. Wait until the port LED goes green and then go
to the next step.

Step 16 Test the VLANS and the trunk


Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/8 to the host in Switch_B port 0/12.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/8 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
c.

Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 17 Move host


Move the host in Switch_B from port 0/12 to port 0/7. Wait until the port LED goes green and then go
to the next step.

Step 18 Test the VLANS and the trunk


Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/8 to the host in Switch_B port 0/7.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/8 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
c.

Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 19 Move hosts


Move the host in Switch_A from port 0/8 to port 0/2. Wait until the port LED goes green and then go
to the next step.

Step 20 Test the VLANS and the trunk


Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/2 to the host in Switch_B port 0/7.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/2 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.

5-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.1.5b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________


c.

Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 21 Move host


Move the host in Switch_B from port 0/7 to port 0/3. Wait until the port LED goes green and then go
to the next step.

Step 22 Test the VLANS and the trunk


Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/2 to the host in Switch_B port 0/3.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_B port 0/3 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
c.

Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_B port 0/3 to the switch IP 192.168.1.3.
e. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
f.

Why? __________________________________________________________________

g. What conclusions can be drawn from the testing that was just performed in regards to VLAN
membership and VLANs across a trunk?

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Once the steps are complete, logoff by typing exit, and turn all the devices off. Then remove and
store the cables and adapter.

6-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.1.5b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and Reloading the Switch


For the majority of the labs in CCNA 3 and CCNA 4 it is necessary to start with an unconfigured
switch. Use of a switch with an existing configuration may produce unpredictable results. These
instructions allow preparation of the switch prior to performing the lab so previous configuration
options do not interfere. The following is the procedure for clearing out previous configurations and
starting with an unconfigured switch. Instructions are provided for the 2900, 2950, and 1900 Series
switches.
2900 and 2950 Series Switches
1. Enter into the Privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
Switch>enable
If prompted for a password, enter class, if that does not work, ask the instructor.
2. Remove the VLAN database information file.
Switch#delete flash:vlan.dat
Delete filename [vlan.dat]?[Enter]
Delete flash:vlan.dat? [confirm] [Enter]
If there was no VLAN file, this message is displayed.
%Error deleting flash:vlan.dat (No such file or directory)
3. Remove the switch startup configuration file from NVRAM.
Switch#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete

4. Check that VLAN information was deleted.


Verify that the VLAN configuration was deleted in Step 2 using the show vlan command. If
previous VLAN configuration information (other than the default management VLAN 1) is still
present it will be necessary to power cycle the switch (hardware restart) instead of issuing the
reload command. To power cycle the switch, remove the power cord from the back of the
switch or unplug it. Then plug it back in.
If the VLAN information was successfully deleted in Step 2, go to Step 5 and restart the switch
using the reload command.
5. Software restart (using the reload command)

7-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.1.5b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: This step is not necessary if the switch was restarted using the power cycle method.
a. At the Privileged EXEC mode enter the command reload.
Switch(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
b. Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm] [Enter]
The first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the switch has reloaded, the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
c.

Type n and then press Enter.


The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started! [Enter]

1900 Series Switches


1. Remove VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) information.
#delete vtp
This command resets the switch with VTP parameters set to factory
defaults.
All other parameters will be unchanged.
Reset system with VTP parameters set to factory defaults, [Y]es or
[N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
2. Remove the switch startup configuration from NVRAM.
#delete nvram
This command resets the switch with factory defaults. All system parameters will revert to their
default factory settings. All static and dynamic addresses will be removed.
Reset system with factory defaults, [Y]es or [N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
8-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.1.5b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 9.2.5 VTP Client and Server Configurations

Objective

Create a basic switch configuration and verify it.

Create multiple VLANs, name them and assign multiple member ports to them.

Configure the VTP protocol to establish Server and client switches.

Create an 802.1q trunk line between the two switches to allow communication between paired
VLANs.

Then test the VLANs functionality by moving a workstation from one VLAN to another.

Background/Preparation
When managing a switch, the Management Domain is always VLAN 1. The Network Administrator's
workstation must have access to a port in the VLAN 1 Management Domain. All ports are assigned
to VLAN 1 by default.
Cable a network similar to the one of in diagram. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from a 2950 series switch. Any other switch used may produce different output. The
following steps are to be executed on each switch unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
1-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
switches in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the switch


Configure the hostname, access, and command mode passwords, as well as the management LAN
settings. These values are shown in the chart. If problems occur while performing this configuration,
refer to the Basic Switch Configuration lab.

Step 2 Configure the hosts attached to the switch


Configure the IP address, mask, and default gateway on each host. Be sure to choose addresses
that are on the same subnet as the switch.

Step 3 Verify connectivity


a. To verify that the host and switch are correctly configured, ping the switch from the hosts.
b. Were the pings successful? __________________________________________________
c.

If the answer is no, troubleshoot the host and switches configurations.

Step 4 Display the VLAN interface information


On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan
Note: There should be an entry for VLAN 1 and the default VLANs (1002 +). If other VLANs appear,
they could be deleted as instructed in Step 2 of the Erasing and Reloading instructions at the end of
this lab or refer to the Lab Exercise: Deleting VLAN Configurations.

Step 5 Configure VTP


a. VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) needs to be configured on both switches. VTP is the protocol that
will communicate information about which VLANs exist from one switch to another. If VTP did
not provide this information, VLANs would have to be created on all switches individually.
b. By default, the Catalyst switch series are configured as VTP servers. In the event that the server
services are turned off, use the following command to turn it back on:
Switch_A#vlan database
Switch_A(vlan)#vtp server
Switch_A(vlan)#vtp domain group1
Switch_A(vlan)#exit

Step 6 Create and name three VLANs


Enter the following commands to create and name three VLANs:
Switch_A#vlan database
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 10 name Accounting
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 20 name Marketing
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 30 name Engineering
Switch_A(vlan)#exit
Use the show vlan command to verify that the VLANs have been created correctly.

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Assign ports to VLAN 10


Assigning ports to VLANs must be done from the interface mode. Enter the following commands to
add ports 0/4 to 0/6 to VLAN 10:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/4
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/5
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/6
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step 8 Assign ports to VLAN 20


Enter the following commands to add ports 0/7 to 0/9 to VLAN 20:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/7
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/8
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/9
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step 9 Assign ports to VLAN 30


Enter the following commands to add ports 0/10 to 0/12 to VLAN 30:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/10
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 30
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/11
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 30
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/12
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 30
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step 10 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Are ports 0/10 through 0/12 assigned to VLAN 30?

__________________________________________________________________________

Step 11 Configure VTP client


Enter the following commands to configure Switch_B to be a VTP client:
Switch_B#vlan database
Switch_B(vlan)#vtp client
Switch_B(vlan)#vtp domain group1
Switch_B(vlan)#exit

Step 12 Create the trunk


On both switches, Switch_A and Switch_B, type the following command at the fastethernet 0/1
interface command prompt. Note that it is not necessary to specify the encapsulation on a 2950,
since it only supports 802.1Q.
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/1
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_A(config-if)#end
Switch_B(config)#interface fastethernet 0/1
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_B(config-if)#end
2900:
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
Switch_A(config-if)#end
Switch_B(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
Switch_B(config-if)#end

Step 13 Verify the trunk


a. To verify that port fastethernet 0/1 has been established as a trunk port, type show interface
fastethernet 0/1 switchport at the Privileged EXEC mode prompt
b. What type of trunking encapsulation is shown on the output results? ____________________

Step 14 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On Switch_B, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_B#show vlan
b. Do VLANs 10, 20, and 30 show without having to type them in? ____________________
c.
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Why did this happen? ______________________________________________________

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 15 Assign ports to a VLAN 10


Although the VLAN definitions have migrated to Switch_B using VTP, it is still necessary to assign
ports to these VLANs on Switch_B. Assigning ports to VLANs must be done from the interface mode.
Enter the following commands to add ports 0/4 to 0/6 to VLAN 10.
Switch_B#configure terminal
Switch_B(config)#interface fastethernet 0/4
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_B(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/5
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_B(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/6
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_B(config-if)#end

Step 16 Assign ports to VLAN 20


Enter the following commands to add ports 0/7 to 0/9 to VLAN 20:
Switch_B#configure terminal
Switch_B(config)#interface fastethernet 0/7
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_B(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/8
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_B(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/9
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_B(config-if)#end

Step 17 Assign ports to VLAN 30


Enter the following commands to add ports 0/10 to 0/12 to VLAN 30:
Switch_B#configure terminal
Switch_B(config)#interface fastethernet 0/10
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport access vlan 30
Switch_B(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/11
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport access vlan 30
Switch_B(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/12
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_B(config-if)#switchport access vlan 30
Switch_B(config-if)#end

Step 18 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On Switch_B, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_B#show vlan

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Are ports 0/10 through 0/12 assigned to VLAN 30? _________________________________

Step 19 Test the VLANS and the trunk


Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/12 to the host in Switch_B port 0/12.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/12 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
c.

Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________

Step 20 Move hosts


Move the host in Switch_A from port 0/12 to port 0/8. Wait until the port LED goes green and then go
to the next step.

Step 21 Test the VLANS and the trunk


Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/8 to the host in Switch_B port 0/12.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/8 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
c.

Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________

d. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Once the steps are complete, logoff by typing exit, and turn all the devices off. Then remove and
store the cables and adapter.

6-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and Reloading the Switch


For the majority of the labs in CCNA 3 and CCNA 4 it is necessary to start with an unconfigured
switch. Use of a switch with an existing configuration may produce unpredictable results. These
instructions allow preparation of the switch prior to performing the lab so previous configuration
options do not interfere. The following is the procedure for clearing out previous configurations and
starting with an unconfigured switch. Instructions are provided for the 2900, 2950, and 1900 Series
switches.
2900 and 2950 Series Switches
1. Enter into the Privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
Switch>enable
If prompted for a password, enter class, if that does not work, ask the instructor.
2. Remove the VLAN database information file.
Switch#delete flash:vlan.dat
Delete filename [vlan.dat]?[Enter]
Delete flash:vlan.dat? [confirm] [Enter]
If there was no VLAN file, this message is displayed.
%Error deleting flash:vlan.dat (No such file or directory)
3. Remove the switch startup configuration file from NVRAM.
Switch#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete

4. Check that VLAN information was deleted.


Verify that the VLAN configuration was deleted in Step 2 using the show vlan command. If
previous VLAN configuration information (other than the default management VLAN 1) is still
present it will be necessary to power cycle the switch (hardware restart) instead of issuing the
reload command. To power cycle the switch, remove the power cord from the back of the
switch or unplug it. Then plug it back in.
If the VLAN information was successfully deleted in Step 2, go to Step 5 and restart the switch
using the reload command.
5. Software restart (using the reload command)
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: This step is not necessary if the switch was restarted using the power cycle method.
a. At the Privileged EXEC mode enter the command reload.
Switch(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
b. Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm] [Enter]
The first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the switch has reloaded, the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
c.

Type n and then press Enter.


The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started! [Enter]

1900 Series Switches


1. Remove VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) information.
#delete vtp
This command resets the switch with VTP parameters set to factory
defaults.
All other parameters will be unchanged.
Reset system with VTP parameters set to factory defaults, [Y]es or
[N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
2. Remove the switch startup configuration from NVRAM.
#delete nvram
This command resets the switch with factory defaults. All system parameters will revert to their
default factory settings. All static and dynamic addresses will be removed.
Reset system with factory defaults, [Y]es or [N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
8-8

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 9.3.6 Configuring Inter-VLAN Routing

Objective

Create a basic switch configuration and verify it.

Create multiple VLANs, name them and assign multiple member ports to them.

Create a basic configuration on a router.

Create an 802.1q trunk line between the switch and router to allow communication between
VLANs.

Test the routing functionality.

Background/Preparation
When managing a switch, the Management Domain is always VLAN 1. The Network Administrator's
workstation must have access to a port in the VLAN 1 Management Domain. All ports are assigned
to VLAN 1 by default. This lab will also help demonstrate how VLANs can be used to separate traffic
and reduce broadcast domains.
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from a 2950 series switch. Any other switch used may produce different output. The
following steps are to be executed on each switch unless specifically instructed otherwise.
Instructions are also provided for the 2900 and 1900 Series switches. The 1900 Series switch initially
displays a User Interface Menu. Select the Command Line option from the menu to perform the
steps for this lab.
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: The router used must have a Fast Ethernet interface in order to support trunking and interVLAN routing. The 2500 series router cannot be used for this lab.
Start a HyperTerminal session.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all
switches in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the switch


Configure the hostname, access, and command mode passwords, as well as the management LAN
settings. These values are shown in the chart. If problems occur while performing this configuration,
refer to the Basic Switch Configuration lab.

Step 2 Configure the hosts attached to the switch


Configure the hosts using the following information.
a. For the host in port 0/5:
IP address

192.168.5.2

Subnet mask

255.255.255.0

Default gateway

192.168.5.1

b. For the host in port 0/9:


IP address

192.168.7.2

Subnet mask

255.255.255.0

Default gateway

192.168.7.1

Step 3 Verify connectivity


Check to see if the hosts can ping the switch.
a. Ping the switch IP address from the hosts.
b. Were the pings successful? __________________________________________________
c.

Why or why not? __________________________________________________

Step 4 Create and name two VLANs


Enter the following commands to create and name two VLANs:
Switch_A#vlan database
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 10 name Sales
Switch_A(vlan)#vlan 20 name Support
Switch_A(vlan)#exit
1900:
Switch_A#config terminal
Switch_A(config)#vlan 10 name Sales
Switch_A(config)#vlan 20 name Support
Switch_A(config)#exit

Step 5 Assign ports to VLAN 10


Assigning ports to VLANs must be done from the interface mode. Enter the following commands to
add ports 0/5 to 0/8 to VLAN 10:

2-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/5
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/6
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/7
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/8
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 10
Switch_A(config-if)#end
1900:
Switch_A#config terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface ethernet 0/5
Switch_A(config-if)vlan static 10
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/6
Switch_A(config-if)vlan static 10
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/7
Switch_A(config-if)vlan static 10
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/8
Switch_A(config-if)vlan static 10
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step 6 Assign ports to VLAN 20


Enter the following commands to add ports 0/9 to 0/12 to VLAN 20:
Switch_A#configure terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/9
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/10
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/11
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet0/12
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode access
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport access vlan 20
Switch_A(config-if)#end
1900:
Switch_A#config terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface ethernet 0/9
Switch_A(config-if)vlan static 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/10
Switch_A(config-if)vlan static 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/11
Switch_A(config-if)vlan static 20
Switch_A(config-if)#interface ethernet 0/12
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Switch_A(config-if)vlan static 20
Switch_A(config-if)#end

Step 7 Display the VLAN interface information


a. On Switch_A, type the command show vlan at the Privileged EXEC prompt as follows:
Switch_A#show vlan
b. Are ports assigned correctly? _________________________________________________

Step 8 Create the trunk


On Switch_A, type the following commands at the Fast Ethernet 0/1 interface command prompt.
Note that Ethernet 0/1 and the other access ports on a 1900 switch only support 10 Mbps Ethernet
and cannot be used as trunk ports. The trunk ports (if present) on a 24-port 1900 are typically Fast
Ethernet 0/26 and 0/27.
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_A(config-if)#end
2900:
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
Switch_A(config-if)#switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
Switch_A(config-if)#end
1900:
Switch_A#config terminal
Switch_A(config)#interface fastethernet0/26
Switch_A(config-if)#trunk on

Step 9 Configure the router


a. Configure the router with the following data. Note that in order to support trunking and interVLAN routing, the router must have a Fast Ethernet interface.
Hostname is Router_A
Console, VTY, and enable passwords are cisco.
Enable secret password is class.
b. Then configure the Fast Ethernet interface using the following commands:
Note: If working with a 1900 switch, replace the dot1q encapsulation with isl in the following
router configuration commands.
Router_A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0
Router_A(config-if)#no shutdown
Router_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/0.1
Router_A(config-subif)#encapsulation dot1q 1
Router_A(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
Router_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/0.2
Router_A(config-subif)#encapsulation dot1q 10
Router_A(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0
Router_A(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/0.3
Router_A(config-subif)#encapsulation dot1q 20
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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router_A(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.7.1 255.255.255.0


Router_A(config-subif)#end

Step 10 Save the router configuration


Step 11 Display the router routing table
a. Type show ip route at the Privileged EXEC mode prompt.
b. Are there entries in the routing table? ___________________________________________
c.

What interface are they all pointing to? __________________________________________

d. Why is there not a need to run a routing protocol? __________________________________

Step 12 Test the VLANS and the trunk


Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/9 to the host in port 0/5.
a. Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________
b. Why? __________________________________________________________________
Ping from the host in Switch_A port 0/5 to the switch IP 192.168.1.2.
c.

Was the ping successful? ___________________________________________________

Step 13 Move the hosts


a. Move the hosts to other VLANs and try pinging the management VLAN 1.
b. Note the results of the pinging.

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Once the steps are complete, logoff by typing exit, and turn all the devices off. Then remove and
store the cables and adapter.

5-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and Reloading the Switch


For the majority of the labs in CCNA 3 and CCNA 4 it is necessary to start with an unconfigured
switch. Use of a switch with an existing configuration may produce unpredictable results. These
instructions allow preparation of the switch prior to performing the lab so previous configuration
options do not interfere. The following is the procedure for clearing out previous configurations and
starting with an unconfigured switch. Instructions are provided for the 2900, 2950, and 1900 Series
switches.
2900 and 2950 Series Switches
1. Enter into the Privileged EXEC mode by typing enable.
Switch>enable
If prompted for a password, enter class, if that does not work, ask the instructor.
2. Remove the VLAN database information file.
Switch#delete flash:vlan.dat
Delete filename [vlan.dat]?[Enter]
Delete flash:vlan.dat? [confirm] [Enter]
If there was no VLAN file, this message is displayed.
%Error deleting flash:vlan.dat (No such file or directory)
3. Remove the switch startup configuration file from NVRAM.
Switch#erase startup-config
The responding line prompt will be:
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
Press Enter to confirm.
The response should be:
Erase of nvram: complete

4. Check that VLAN information was deleted.


Verify that the VLAN configuration was deleted in Step 2 using the show vlan command. If
previous VLAN configuration information (other than the default management VLAN 1) is still
present it will be necessary to power cycle the switch (hardware restart) instead of issuing the
reload command. To power cycle the switch, remove the power cord from the back of the
switch or unplug it. Then plug it back in.
If the VLAN information was successfully deleted in Step 2, go to Step 5 and restart the switch
using the reload command.
5. Software restart (using the reload command)

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CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Note: This step is not necessary if the switch was restarted using the power cycle method.
a. At the Privileged EXEC mode enter the command reload.
Switch(config)#reload
The responding line prompt will be:
System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:
b. Type n and then press Enter.
The responding line prompt will be:
Proceed with reload? [confirm] [Enter]
The first line of the response will be:
Reload requested by console.
After the switch has reloaded, the line prompt will be:
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]:
c.

Type n and then press Enter.


The responding line prompt will be:
Press RETURN to get started! [Enter]

1900 Series Switches


1. Remove VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) information.
#delete vtp
This command resets the switch with VTP parameters set to factory
defaults.
All other parameters will be unchanged.
Reset system with VTP parameters set to factory defaults, [Y]es or
[N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
2. Remove the switch startup configuration from NVRAM.
#delete nvram
This command resets the switch with factory defaults. All system parameters will revert to their
default factory settings. All static and dynamic addresses will be removed.
Reset system with factory defaults, [Y]es or [N]o?
Enter y and press Enter.
7-7

CCNA 3: Switching Basics and Intermediate Routing v 3.1 - Lab 9.3.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 11.2.2a Configuring Extended Access Lists

Objective

Configure, and apply an extended ACL to permit or deny specific traffic.

Test the ACL to determine if the desired results were achieved.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements
displayed on the above diagram, such as 800, 1600, 1700, 2500, 2600 routers, or a combination,
may be used. Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface
identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is
produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce a slightly different output.
The following steps are intended to be executed on each router unless specifically instructed
otherwise.
Start a HyperTerminal session as performed in the Establishing a HyperTerminal session lab.
Note: Go to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on the
router in this lab assignment before continuing.

1-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 11.2.2a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the hostname and passwords on the GAD router


a. On the GAD router, enter the global configuration mode and configure the hostname as shown in
the chart. Then configure the console, virtual terminal and enable passwords. Configure the
FastEthernet interface on the router according to the chart.
b. Allow HTTP access by issuing the ip http server command in global configuration mode.

Step 2 Configure the hosts on the Ethernet segment


a. Host 1
IP address
Subnet mask
Default gateway

192.168.14.2
255.255.255.0
192.168.14.1

b. Host 2
IP address
Subnet mask
Default gateway

192.168.14.3
255.255.255.0
192.168.14.1

Step 3 Save the configuration information from the privileged EXEC command mode
GAD#copy running-config startup-config

Step 4 Confirm connectivity by pinging the default gateway from both hosts
a. If the pings are not successful, correct the configuration and repeat until they are successful.

Step 5 Connect to the router using the Web browser


a. From a host, connect to the router using a Web browser to ensure that the Web server function
is active.

Step 6 Prevent access to HTTP (port 80) from the Ethernet interface hosts
a. Create an access list that will prevent Web browsing access to FastEthernet 0 from the
192.168.14.0 network.
b. At the router configuration prompt type the following commands:
GAD(config)#access-list 101 deny tcp 192.168.14.0 0.0.0.255 any eq 80
GAD(config)#access-list 101 permit ip any any
c.

Why is the second statement needed? __________________________________________

Step 7 Apply the access list to the interface


a. At the FastEthernet 0 interface mode prompt type:
GAD(config-if)#ip access-group 101 in

Step 8 Ping the router from the hosts


a. Were these pings successful? ________________________________________________
b. If they were, why? _________________________________________________________

2-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 11.2.2a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 9 Connect to the router using the web browser


a. Was the browser able to connect? _____________________________________________

Step 10 Telnet to the router from the hosts


a. Were you able to Telnet successfully? __________________________________________
b. Why or why not? __________________________________________________________

Upon completion of the previous steps, logoff by typing exit. Turn the router off.

3-5

CCNA 2: Routers and Routing Basics v 3.1 - Lab 11.2.2a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.