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JetPlan User Manual

JetPlan User Manual


VERSION 7.0

Copyright 2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Document Revision History


NOTE For additional change history information, see the User Manuals page on
JetPlan.com.

Version

Release Date

7.0

19 February 2015

Changes
In the Route Commands chapter, information on the updated
ERAD flight plan option (ERAD 2.0) has been added.
In the Scenario Database chapter, the definition of the
Optimization Type parameter has been revised with the new
ERAD 2.0 option, Trajectory Optimized RAD Compliant Route
Selection.
In the Route Commands chapter, information on the North
Atlantic Data Link Mandate has been added.
In the Customer Aircraft Database and Route Constraint
Database chapters, the AUSEP Approved Certification parameter
has been removed because the parameter is no longer in use.
In the Aircraft Fleet Database chapter, the input value has been
revised for the Time-Limited Systems Cruise FL parameter.
In the MEL Database chapter, command-line codes for the
ICAO 2012 degradation parameters have been added.

Brief Contents
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
CHAPTER 1
JetPlan Command-Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
CHAPTER 2
Option Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
CHAPTER 3
Point of Departure and Point of Arrival Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
CHAPTER 4
Restricted Area Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
CHAPTER 5
4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive Airspaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
CHAPTER 6
Route Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
CHAPTER 7
Hold-Alternate Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
CHAPTER 8
Estimated Time of Departure Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285

Brief Contents

CHAPTER 9
Profile Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
CHAPTER 10
Aircraft Type Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
CHAPTER 11
Cruise Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
CHAPTER 12
Cost Index Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
CHAPTER 13
Operational Weight Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
CHAPTER 14
Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391
CHAPTER 15
Fuel Off/On and Payload Off Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451
CHAPTER 16
Departure and Arrival Bias Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457
CHAPTER 17
Message Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469
CHAPTER 18
Forward Plans and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475
CHAPTER 19
ATC Filing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 489
CHAPTER 20
Reclear Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
CHAPTER 21
ETOPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569
CHAPTER 22
Overwater Driftdown and Terrain Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573

JetPlan User Manual

iv

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Brief Contents

CHAPTER 23
Optimal Scenario Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 633
CHAPTER 24
Enroute Charges and FIR Traversal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 649
CHAPTER 25
Archiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 663
CHAPTER 26
Customer Aircraft Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 679
CHAPTER 27
Aircraft Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773
CHAPTER 28
Generic Airport Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 791
CHAPTER 29
Customer Airport Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801
CHAPTER 30
Airport Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 825
CHAPTER 31
City Pair Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 849
CHAPTER 32
City Pair Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 861
CHAPTER 33
Customer Alternate Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 885
CHAPTER 34
Flight Brief Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 893
CHAPTER 35
Minimum Equipment List Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 919
CHAPTER 36
Master Database (MDB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

JetPlan User Manual

Brief Contents

CHAPTER 37
Restricted Area Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 961
CHAPTER 38
Customer Route Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 971
CHAPTER 39
Route Constraint Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1035
CHAPTER 40
Scenario Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1053
CHAPTER 41
Customer Schedule Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1067
CHAPTER 42
Coded Departure Routes Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1079
CHAPTER 43
Customer Controlled Avoid and Alert Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1087
CHAPTER 44
User-Defined Restrictive Airspace Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1091
CHAPTER 45
Weather Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1095
CHAPTER 46
Text Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1105
CHAPTER 47
Graphic Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1123
CHAPTER 48
JEPPFAX Weather Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1169
CHAPTER 49
Vertical Wind Shear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1173

JetPlan User Manual

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February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Contents
Tables

xxxiii

Introduction

About JetPlan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Document Overview and Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User ID and Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default Flight Plan Output Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customer Support Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3
4
4
5
5
5
7

User ID/Attribute File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7


Customer Preferences Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Chapter 1: JetPlan Command-Line Interface

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Understanding the Command-Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Command-Line Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Information Provided by the CADB Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Optional Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Understanding the Batch Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17


Command-Line and Batch Method: Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Command-Line and Batch Method: Similarities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Chapter 2: Option Commands

21

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Flight Plan Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Contents

Flight Plan Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24


Flight Plan OptionsOutput . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsWeather Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsRouting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsPerformance Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsFeature Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsFlight Management Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsMiscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

26
30
32
36
37
42
44

Additional Command-Line Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Support Information and Action Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weather Services Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Messages Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Transmission Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46
46
54
55
56
56
57

Chapter 3: Point of Departure and Point of Arrival Commands

61

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airport Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diversion Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

63
64
64
64

Sequential Entry Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65


Paired-Entry Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

ETP Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Determination of Bounding Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interval Halving Between Bounding Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Variations in ETP Calculation Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default ETP Calculation Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Second ETP Calculation Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Third ETP Calculation Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETP and Diversion Airport Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

66
71
73
74
74
75
75
76

User-Defined Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Station Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
In-Flight Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Running In-Flight-Start ETP Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Taxi Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Taxi Parameters in the Customer Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Ad Hoc Taxi Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Adding the Taxi-Out Value to the ETD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Takeoff Alternate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

Chapter 4: Restricted Area Commands

89

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

JetPlan User Manual

viii

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Contents

Using the RST Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92


Delineated Boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Restrictions By Route Structure Element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
FIR/UIR Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airway Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airway Altitude Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checkpoint Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customer Route Database Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

95
95
96
97
98

Applying Restricted Area Database Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99


Applying Multiple Restricted Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Omitting a Restricted Area Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

Chapter 5: 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive Airspaces

103

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the CCAA Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creation of the Initial CCAA Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Source Restrictive Airspace Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

105
105
107
108
108

Restrictive Airspace Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Source Restrictive Airspace Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generic Restrictive Airspace Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organized Tracks Restrictive Airspace Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turbulence Restrictive Airspace Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FIR/UIR Restrictive Airspace Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Geopolitical Country Restrictive Airspace Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User-Defined Restrictive Airspace Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

108
109
110
110
110
110
111
111
111
111
111
112
112

Understanding the Contents of CCAA Database Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112


The RSA Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The ICAO Code in the RSA Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Default SCA Type and Default Avoidance Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the SCA Type and the Avoidance Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

112
113
114
116

Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Understanding the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Using the CCAA, CCAAN, and CCAAF Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Using the CCAA Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Using the CCAAN Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Using the CCAAF Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Using the ORTRKA and ORTRKN Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124


Using the GCAA and GCAN Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Using the AVDERR Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

JetPlan User Manual

ix

Contents

Using the EXSS Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126


Using the EXCD Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Using the CCAAQ Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Understanding the City Pair and City Pair Fleet Database CCAAQ Parameters . . . . 128

Overriding an Avoidance Level on a Flight Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert Customer Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4D Altitudes (4DALTS) Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AVDERR Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CCAAQ Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 6: Route Commands

129
132
132
132
133
134

137

About Route Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Route Optimizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Navigation Database and Route Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JetPlan Defined Route Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Route Inputs General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JetPlan-Defined Flight Plan Types and the Route Segment Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Input Segments Basic Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RTD and RTA Segments Input Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Waypoint Identification (RTD/RTA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Waypoint External Output (RTD/RTA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Waypoint Ambiguity (RTD/RTA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RTW Segment Input Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Route Optimizer and SID/STAR Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Route Proof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

139
141
141
144
146
147
148
149
151
152
152
153
154
155

Applying Route Inputs Domestic Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157


Optimized Direct Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NAV Optimized Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airway Optimized Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nav Optimized Routing Between Specific Waypoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airway Optimized Routing Between Specific Waypoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

157
158
158
159
159

Domestic Planning All 3 Route Segments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159


Applying Route Inputs International Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Optimized Direct Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
POD and POA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enroute Waypoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overwater Waypoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nav Optimized Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airway Optimized Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nav Optimized Routing Between Specific Waypoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airway Optimized Routing Between Specific Waypoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JetPlan Designated Preferred Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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160
161
161
162
162
163
164
164

International Planning Organized Track Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164


North Atlantic Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165

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February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Contents

North Atlantic Tracks Basic Route Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


North Atlantic Tracks Preferred Route Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Area 1 Preferred Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preferred Routes Without the NATs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preferred Route Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Atlantic Tracks Flight Level Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Atlantic Data Link Mandate (NAT DLM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Atlantic Track Input Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the Optimal Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Specific Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Westbound Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eastbound Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Atlantic Tracks Crossing Without The NATS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pacific Organized Track Structures (PACOTS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flex Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flex Tracks Route Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PACOTS Far East To/From North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PACOTS Route Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AUSOTS Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

166
168
168
170
170
171
172
173
173
174
174
175
176
176
177
177
178
178
180

Route Input Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182


POD and POA in the Same Route Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
POD and POA in Different Route Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

Electronic Route Availability Document Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185


Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Possible Error Messages with ERAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186

Upper-Level Winds and Temperature Forecasts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186


Accessing ERAD 2.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
ERAD 2.0 Options and Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
ERAD Point of Departure (POD) and Point of Arrival (POA) Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERAD Route Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERAD and the NATS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERAD Flight-Level Input Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERAD Conditional Route Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERAD and the Restricted Areas Option and Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avoiding Checkpoints and Airways with ERAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avoiding Countries by ICAO Code with ERAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ignoring RAD Rules with ERAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avoiding Two-Dimensional Restricted Areas and FIRs with ERAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERAD and the Four-Dimensional Avoid and Alert Restrictive Airspaces Options . . .
ERAD and the Time, Fuel, and Cost Optimization Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERAD Special Remarks in the Filing Strip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Suppressing ERAD Special Remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ERAD 2.0 Flight Plan Options Supported Only in the Command-Line Interface

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196
197
197

198

Include DAL/TOC/BOC Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198


Runway to Runway Flight Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Dynamic SID/STAR Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198

National Route Program (NRP) Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199

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Contents

NRP Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199


NRP Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Route Summary Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Filing Strip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201

Non-Restrictive Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202


High-Altitude Redesign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
HAR Phases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
NRS Waypoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203

High-Altitude RNAV Routes (Q Routes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Pitch and Catch Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NRR Levels of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NRR Flight Planning Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NRR Setup Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

204
204
205
206
207

Customer Preferences Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207


Customer Aircraft Database (CADB) Equipment Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
City Pair Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208

NRR Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208


NRR with HAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Pitch and Catch Points in an NRS-Optimized Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NRR with PTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NRR with SRS Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NRR and NRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MEL RNAV Degradation and NRR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

209
209
210
210
211
211
211
212

Specific Route Selector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


The Navigation Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRS Facts and Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRS Syntax Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

213
214
214
215

The Dash Delimiter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Input Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting/Ending Route With a Waypoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting/Ending Route With an Airway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

215
216
216
217

SRS Input Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218


LAT/LONG Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unnamed LAT/LONG Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User-Named LAT/LONG Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charted (External) Name Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charted Names (No Modifier) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charted Names Using NAVAID Type Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charted Names Using Coordinate Approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RNAV Waypoint Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airway Name Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charted Airway Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User-Specified Airway Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SID/STAR Name Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Contents

Runway Name Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


NAVAID/Radial Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NAVAID/Radial Intersecting a NAVAID/Radial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NAVAID/Radial Intersecting an Airway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NAVAID/Radial to a Waypoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NAVAID/Radial/Distance Waypoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Great Circle Route Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Segment Great Circle Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multi-Segment Great Circle Route: Latitudinal or Longitudinal Crossings . . . . .
Multi-Segment Great Circle Route: Latitudinal and Longitudinal Crossings . . .
Predominantly East/West Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Predominantly North/South Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Great Circle Route Segment(s) Between Any Two SRS Waypoints . . . . . . . . . .
JetPlan SRS Distance Override/Bias Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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226
227
227
228
228
229

SRS Routing for User-Defined Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231


SRS Naming Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
VOR, VORDME, VORTAC, TACAN and NDB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Named RNAV Waypoints, Intersections, and Reporting Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
One-Word Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multi-Word Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

232
232
232
232

Combination (SRS Route Optimizer) Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233


Input Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Combination Routing Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Route Optimizer to SRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRS to Route Optimizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRS to Route Optimizer to SRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Optimizer to SRS to Route Optimizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Switch Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRS Static Preferred Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Published Preferred Routing (High Altitude) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Limited Navigational Capability Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

235
235
236
236
236
237
237
237

Route Line Editing for Route Optimizer and SRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239


Route Line Editing Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Changing a Field Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Deleting a Field Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Inserting a Field Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242

Using Customer Route Database Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Route Line Editing of a CRDB Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Coded Departure Route (CDR) Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About Coded Departure Routes (CDRs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the Customer Coded Departure Route Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a Coded Departure Route Database Record As a Flight Plan Input . . . . . .

Chapter 7: Hold-Alternate Commands

245
246
247
247
248
248

251

Hold-Alternate Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253

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Contents

Hold-Alternate Fuel Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254


Hold Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Alternate Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
Uplift Option (EU-OPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256

Alternate Flight Level Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Customer Alternate Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Distance Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

256
258
258
259

Route Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260

CALT Database Overrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Hold-Alternate Command-Line Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Alternate Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Selection Criteria and Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

260
261
264
265

Criteria Tests at Compute Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267


About the TAF Time Window (TAFWINDW) Customer Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267

Alternate Selection Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268


Departure (Takeoff) Alternates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Destination Alternates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETOPS/Overwater Driftdown Enroute Alternates (Diversion Airports) . . . . . . . . . . .
EU-OPS Enroute Alternates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Automatic EU-OPS ERA Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EU-OPS Qualification Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

269
269
270
271
271
272
272

Automatic Alternate Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273


Setting Up the Customer Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Customer Airport Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure Airport (POD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arrival Airport (POA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alternate Airport (ALT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customer Airport Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 8: Estimated Time of Departure Commands

274
275
276
277
281

285

ETD Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


The Standard ETD Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Wind and Temperature Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROGS Time Output on Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online Winds Sources and Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ADF Format (Default) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NWS Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UKMO Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

287
288
289
289
289
290
291
291
291

UK MET Office Historical Winds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292


Reliability Equivalent Winds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Confidence Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293

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Contents

Reliability Equivalent Wind Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293


Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294

Required Arrival Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295


Required Arrival Time Cost Index (Fixed ETD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
RATCI Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
RATCI and the Customer Aircraft Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297

Required Arrival Time (Variable ETD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298


RAT Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299

ORBIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
ORB Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
ORB and RAT Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302

Chapter 9: Profile Commands

305

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Altitude Flight Rule Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Altitude Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auto Step Climb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Flight Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

307
308
309
311
311
311

Waypoints As Constraint Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Altitude Change After Waypoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Altitude Change at Waypoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Constraint Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

312
312
313
313

Altitude Control Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Maximum Altitude Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance Index (Fuel, Time, and Cost) Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Time Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cost Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

314
316
318
318
319
319

Order of Precedence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320

Chapter 10: Aircraft Type Commands

321

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the JetPlan Aircraft Library (Generic Aircraft) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retrieving Library Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retrieving Generic Aircraft Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying a Generic Aircraft to a Flight Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Customer Aircraft Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 11: Cruise Mode Commands

323
324
325
328
331
333

335

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Determining an Aircrafts Cruise Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338

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Standard Cruise Mode Designations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339


Stored Cruise Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339
Non-Stored Cruise Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340

Primary Cruise Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342


Multiple Primary Cruise Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Cost Index Cruise Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Multiple Primary Cost Index Cruise Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346

Auxiliary Cruise Mode Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Auxiliary Cruise with Multiple Primary Cruise Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Climb and Descent Schedule Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
First Principles Aircraft Model Secondary Climb and Descent Options . . . . . . . .
Secondary Climb Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

347
348
349
349
350

FPM Secondary Climb Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350

Secondary Descent Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351


FPM Secondary Descent Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352

Bias Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354


Bias Input Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
Climb Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CF Climb Fuel Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CT Climb Time Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CD Climb Distance Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cruise Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FF Fuel Flow Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AS True Airspeed Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Descent Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DF Descent Fuel Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DT Descent Time Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DD Descent Distance Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alternate Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AF Alternate Fuel Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AT Alternate Time Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AD Alternate Distance Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combined Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

356
356
356
356
357
357
358
358
358
359
359
360
360
360
361
361

Applying MEL Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362


MEL Input Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362

Chapter 12: Cost Index Commands

365

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
Cost Index Cruise Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
Cost Index Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Requirements and Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cost Index Application (Static Method) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cost Index Application (Dynamic Method) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cost Index vs. Other Economy Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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369
370
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Contents

Minimum Adjusted Cost Index Cruise Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374


MACI and Required Arrival Time Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MACI Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Customer Databases for MACI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAPDB Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPFDB Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default Block Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crew Cost Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lateness Time Segments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAPFDB and ACFDB Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

374
375
377
377
379
379
380
380
381
383

Related JetPlan Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384

Chapter 13: Operational Weight Commands

387

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Operational Weight Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390

Chapter 14: Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel Commands

391

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Load Performance Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Payload, Fuel, and Weight Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Payload Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

393
394
396
396

xxxxx (Specify Actual Payload Amount Fuel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


xxxxx,T (Specify Actual Payload Amount Weight) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wxxxxxx/nnnnn (Waypoint Arrival Fuel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
W (Maximize the Payload Amount) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ZW (Maximize the Payload Amount) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F (Maximize the Payload Amount) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ZF (Maximize the Payload Amount) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xxxxx,Z (Zero Fuel Weight) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

396
396
397
397
397
398
398
399

POD or POA WT/Fuel Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399


Dxxxxx (Departure Case) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Axxxxx (Arrival Case) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DM (Departure Case, Maximum Load) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AM (Arrival Case, Maximum Load) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

399
399
400
400

POD or POA WT/Fuel Secondary Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400


MFODxxxx (Minimum Fuel Over Destination) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AFxxxx (Arrival Fuel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FC=xxxxx (Fuel Capacity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FD=x.xx (Fuel Density) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TO=xxxxxx (Takeoff Weight) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LA=xxxxxx (Landing Weight) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERA=xxxx (Enroute Alternate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bxxxxx (Ballast Fuel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MAXT=xxxxx (Maximum Tanker Fuel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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401
402
402
402
403
403
403
404

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MCHT=xxx (Minimum Contingency Holding Time) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404


MCCT=xxx (Minimum Contingency Cruise Time) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405
PN=1234 (Multi-Sector Tankering) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405

Domestic, International, and Island Reserves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405


Dxxx (Domestic Reserves) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ixxx (Island Reserves) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I (International Reserves) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xxx (International Reserve Policy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B43X=xx (B43 International Reserve Policy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the B43 Reserve Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How JetPlan Supports B43 Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B43 Flight Plan Inputs and Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

406
406
407
407
409
409
409
410

Other Options that Affect Payload, Fuel, and Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415


Hold Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reserve Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Max Fuel Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Weight Reiteration (Autoweight) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

415
416
416
416

Application of Load Performance Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Arrival Fuel Case/Known Payload Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure Fuel Case/Known Payload Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arrival Weight Case/Unknown Payload Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure Weight Case/Unknown Payload Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure Fuel Case/Unknown Payload Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure Weight Case/Tanker Fuel Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arrival Weight Case/Tanker Fuel Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comparing Max Fuel Capacity Plans with MFOD Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single-Leg Tankering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Index Tankering: TANK1 and TANK1X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

418
418
419
421
422
423
424
425
425
428
429

Database Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Decision to Tanker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maximum Tanker Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

429
431
431
432

Fuel Cost Tankering: TANK2, TANK2X, TANK3, and TANK3X Options . . . . . 432
Database Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Decision to Tanker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TANK2/TANK2X Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TANK3/TANK3X Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Bonded Fuel Prices in Tankering Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maximum Tanker Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tanker Limiting Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fuel Savings Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Multi-Sector Tankering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Weight Reiteration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arrival Fuel Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arrival Weight Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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435
436
438
439
440
440

441
442
444
444
445

February 19, 2015


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Contents

Departure Fuel Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446


Departure Weight Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447
Reclear Flight Plans And Landing Burnoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447

Chapter 15: Fuel Off/On and Payload Off Commands

451

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Offloading and Onloading Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Offloading Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Onloading Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Offloading Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 16: Departure and Arrival Bias Commands

453
454
454
454
455

457

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure and Arrival Biases and the Customer Aircraft Database . . . . . . . . . . .
Climb/Descent Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Climb/Descent Fuel Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Climb/Descent Time Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Climb/Descent Distance Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

459
459
460
460
460
461

Climb Distance Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Climb Bias - TOC Before First Waypoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Climb Bias - TOC After First Waypoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Climb Bias - Flattening Climb Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Descent Distance Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

461
462
463
463
464

Combining Bias Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 465


Interaction Between Bias Database Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467

Chapter 17: Message Commands

469

Creating Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Packaging JetPlan Products in Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combining Products Using the MG Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Message No Number - MGNN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 18: Forward Plans and Messages

471
472
473
474

475

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AFTN, ARINC, and SITA Designators and Priority Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AFTN Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ARINC Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SITA Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fax Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

477
478
479
479
480
480

Basic Fax Forwarding Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480


Enhanced Fax Forwarding Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481

ACARS Uplink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484

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Character Length Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487

Chapter 19: ATC Filing

489

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491
JetPlan Automatic Filing Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492
Filing a Flight Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492
The Filing Program Command Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Support for the Filing Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Customer Aircraft Database (CADB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Flight Brief Database (FBDB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Minimum Equipment List (MEL) Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Customer Preference Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The JetPlan Flight Plan Filing Database (FDB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overriding the Flight Plan Filing Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

493
508
508
510
510
510
511
513

ICAO 2012 Flight Plan Filings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514


Summary of ICAO 2012 Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514
ICAO 2012 Changes to Item 10a/b and Item 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514
ICAO 2012 Changes to the JetPlan Automatic Filing Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517
ICAO 2012 Changes to Customer Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519

Before Filing the ICAO 2012 Flight Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519


Reducing the Likelihood of Flight Plan Rejects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519

Filing Priority and Timeliness Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520


File Immediately . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AFTN Priority Code Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delaying Filing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lead Time Filing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filing at a Specified Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Canceling Filed ICAO Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Changing Filed ICAO Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filing Reclear Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Filing Status and History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

521
521
522
523
523

524
524
526
526

Using the STAT Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526


Using the SHOW Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527
Working with Domestic Flight Plan Sequence Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530

Short Autofile Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531


Domestic U.S. Filing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 533
Canceling a Domestic Flight Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535

Chapter 20: Reclear Commands

537

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plan Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Commands, Options, and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Output Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reclear Command Line Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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540
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543
544

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Contents

Reclear Point Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 544


Reclear Airport/Alternate Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546
Auto Selection (Reclear Airport and Alternate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546

Other Reclear Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548


Route Selection for Reclear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550
User-Defined Routing for Reclear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551
Routing when Using the Auto Select Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552

Reclear Scenario Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Known Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Known Takeoff Weight/Optimum Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Known Takeoff Fuel/Optimum Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Known Landing Weight/Optimum Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Landing Burnoff Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Examples of Reclear Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inputs for Known Payload (Arrival Fuel Case) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inputs for Unknown Payload (Departure Weight Case) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inputs for Unknown Payload (Departure Fuel Case) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reclear Example Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Decision Point Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DPP Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

554
554
554
555
556
557
558
558
559
559
560
566
566

EU-OPS Attribute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567

Chapter 21: ETOPS

569

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571

Chapter 22: Overwater Driftdown and Terrain Analysis

573

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575
FAR Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575
FAR 121.191 One Engine Inoperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576
FAR 121.193 Two Engines Inoperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576

Overwater (Basic) Driftdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578


Overwater Driftdown Setup Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578
Customer Airport Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579
ETP Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580
Driftdown Performance Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583

Overwater Driftdown Flight Plan Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583


Diversion Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETP Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Critical Fuel Calculation Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Depressurized Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
One-Engine and Two-Engines Inoperative Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Highest Terrain Diversion Path Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

584
585
585
586
587
588

Overwater Driftdown Data on the Flight Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 589

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Terrain Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 592


Terrain Analysis Key Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 592
Terrain Analysis Setup Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
Customer Preferences Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customer Database Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customer Airport Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customer Airport Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customer Aircraft Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
City Pair Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Minimum Equipment List (MEL) Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application of Weight Penalties to Terrain Analysis Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . .
Escape Routes Database Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

595
597
598
598
600
602
603
603
605

Terrain Analysis Flight Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 606


Terrain Analysis Front-End Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrain Clearance Computations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrain Clearance Output on the Flight Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mountain Driftdown Computations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mountain Driftdown Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mountain Driftdown Output on the Flight Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mountain Driftdown Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

608
613
615
617
620
623
627

Terrain Database Extract Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 628


Segment Terrain Profile Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enroute Terrain Profile Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Off-Route Terrain Profile Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Raw Terrain Data Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 23: Optimal Scenario Analysis

628
629
630
631

633

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 635
Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636
Internal Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636
External Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637
Internal and External Scenario Interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637

OSA Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OSA Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic OSA Examples And Explanations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple External Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Explicit External Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Explicit External Scenario Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Outcome Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optimizing Direct vs. Specific Route Selector (SRS) Great Circle . . . . . . . . . . . .

638
638
640
641
642
643
644
645

Enroute Charges and OSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 646


Enroute Charge Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 646
Enroute Charge Print Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 647
Route Cost Summary Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 647

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Contents

Chapter 24: Enroute Charges and FIR Traversal

649

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing Enroute Charges Through JetPlanIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating an Ad Hoc Enroute Charges Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Exchange Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

651
652
653
656

Viewing and Modifying Customer Exchange Rate Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 658

Generating a FIR/UIR Traversal Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 660

Chapter 25: Archiving

663

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 665
Enroute Charges Archive and Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 666
Archive Commands (EC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 668
To save a record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To cancel a record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To change the ETD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To print a record (or records) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

668
668
669
669

Automatic Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Archive and Report Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cosmic Radiation Archive and Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Archive Commands (CR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

670
671
672
673

To save a record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To cancel a record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To change the ETD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To print a record (or records) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

673
674
674
674

Automatic Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 677

Chapter 26: Customer Aircraft Database

679

About the Customer Aircraft Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


CADB Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching Generic Aircraft Records for FPM and OUTFLT Information . . . . .
CADB Parameters by Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters Weights Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: Fuels Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: Miscellaneous Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: Modes Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: Cutoff Weight Tables Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: Bracket Modes Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: Mode Coupling Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: Tanker Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: Equipment Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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681
682
683
684
688
690
690
692
695
704
705
706
707
710
711

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Overview of RAIM Prediction Report Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 711

CADB Parameters: Certified Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


CADB Parameters: ATS Plan Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: ETP Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: ETOPS Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETOPS Flag and Factor Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

716
719
722
729
736

ETOPS Activation Flag Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


ETOPS Situation Flag Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETOPS Special Flag Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETOPS Factor Code Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CADB Parameters: Driftdown Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


CADB Parameters: Biases Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: Special Bias Modifications Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: ICAO 2012 Certification and Equipment Section . . . . . . .

737
738
738
739

743
746
748
749

How the CADB Supports the ICAO 2012 Filed Flight Plan Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Customer Database Changes for ICAO 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before Using the ICAO 2012 CADB Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reducing the Likelihood of Flight Plan Rejects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Parameters: ICAO 2012 Certification and Equipment Section . . . . . . . . . . . . .

749
752
752
753
754

Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 766


Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 766
File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 766
File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 767

CADB Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 768


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 768
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 771

Chapter 27: Aircraft Fleet Database

773

About the Aircraft Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


SCM Data Sets and the ACFDB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

775
775
778
789
789

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 789


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 789

ACFDB Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 790


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 790
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 790

Chapter 28: Generic Airport Database

791

About the Generic Airport Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 793


Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 794
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 798

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Contents

Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 798


File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 798
File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 798

Generic Airport Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 799


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 799
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800

Chapter 29: Customer Airport Database

801

About the Customer Airport Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

803
804
821
821

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 821


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 821

CAPDB Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 822


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 822
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 823

Chapter 30: Airport Fleet Database

825

About the Customer Airport Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


About Taxi Time Adjustment Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

827
827
828
843
843

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 843


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 843

CAPFDB Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 844


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 845
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847

Chapter 31: City Pair Database

849

About the City Pair Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

851
852
858
858

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 858

CPDB Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 859


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 859
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 859

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Contents

Chapter 32: City Pair Fleet Database

861

About the City Pair Fleet Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 863


About Taxi Time Adjustment Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 863
Taxi Time Adjustment Set Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 865
Order of Precedence for Taxi Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866

SCM Sets and the CPFDB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 867


About ETOPS SCM Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 867
Setting a Default ETOPS SCM Set in a City Pair Fleet Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 868
Order of Precedence for ETOPS SCM Set Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 868

Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 869


Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 879
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 879
File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 879
File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 879

CPFDB Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 880


CPFDB File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 881
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 883

Chapter 33: Customer Alternate Database

885

About the Customer Alternate Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Flight Plan Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

887
887
888
890
890

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 890


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 890

CALT Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 891


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 891

Chapter 34: Flight Brief Database

893

About the Flight Brief Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 895


The Flight Brief Database and the ICAO 2012 FPL Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 896
Before Using the ICAO 2012 Flight Brief Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 896

Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Brief Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

898
914
914
914

File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914

File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 916

Chapter 35: Minimum Equipment List Database

919

About the MEL Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 921

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Contents

How the MEL Database Supports the ICAO 2012 FPL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 922
Before Using the ICAO 2012 MEL Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 923

Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 924


Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 938
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 938
File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 938
File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 938

MEL Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 939


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 939
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 940

Flight Plan Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Applying True Airspeed and Fuel Flow Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Multipliers to Fuel Flow Bias and Weight Penalties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying the Phase of Flight Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Weight Penalties to Terrain Analysis Flight Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Equipment and Certification Degradations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 36: Master Database (MDB)

942
942
944
944
945
947

949

About the Master Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

951
952
954
954

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954

MDB Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 956


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 956
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 957

Flight Plan Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 959

Chapter 37: Restricted Area Database

961

About the Restricted Area Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Flight Plan Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Schedule Database Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overriding a Restricted Area Database record Built Into a Schedule . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

963
964
964
964
964
966
966

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 966


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 966

Restricted Area Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 967


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 967
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968

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Contents

Chapter 38: Customer Route Database

971

About the Customer Route Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Route Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Segment Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Pre-Effective Database Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

973
973
974
976

Getting Help on Using the Pre-Effective Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 977

Sending FMS Route Output to Jeppesen NavData . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Segment Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

977
978
978
984
987
987

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 987


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 988
File Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 988

Customer Route Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 989


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 989
Generate Command (RT,GEN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 989
Modify Command (RT,CHG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 992
Delete Command (RT,DEL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 994
Rename Command (RT,RN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 996
Update Command (RT,UPD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 996
Route Group Command (RG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1001
Route Group Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1002
Group Name Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1002
Add Command (RG,ADD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1002
Delete Command (RG,DEL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1003
Using Group Names to Select Route Files in a Flight Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1003
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1004
Print Command (RT,PRI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1005
List Command (RT,LST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1006
Route Proof Command (RT,RP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1009
Summary Command (RT,SUM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1011
Total Command (RT,TOT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1014
Record Identifier Command (RT,RID) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1016
Search Command (RT,SRH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1016
Airway/Checkpoint Search Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1017
Customer Route Database File Content Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1020
Check Command (RT,CHK) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1022
Check List (RT,CHK,LST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1022
List (LST) Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1024
Check Route Proof (RT,CHK,RP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1024
OK Command (RT,OK) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1025
Changing Failed Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1026
Customer Route Database Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1027
Creating a Customer Route Database File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1027

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Contents

Changing a Customer Route Database File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Displaying a Customer Route Database File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renaming a Customer Route Database File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Customer Route Database File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying a Route Proof of All Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying a Route Proof of a Specific File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying a Summary of All Airports in Customer Route Database . . . . . . . .
Displaying a Summary of All Stored Routes in Customer Route Database . . . .
Displaying a Summary of All Stored Routes To/From an Airport . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying a Summary of All Stored Routes Between Two Airports . . . . . . . .

1028
1029
1030
1030
1031
1031
1032
1032
1032
1033

Flight Plan Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1034

Chapter 39: Route Constraint Database

1035

About the Route Constraint Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1037


Canned Route Optimization Versus Random Route Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . 1038
Route Constraint Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1039
Canned Route Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Random Route Optimization (Route Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Random Route Optimization (Restricted Area Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Random Route Optimization (Route & Restricted Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1039
1040
1041
1043

Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1045


Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1047
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1047
File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1047
File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1047

Route Constraint Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1048


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1048
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1050

Flight Plan Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1051


Precedence and Overrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1051

Chapter 40: Scenario Database

1053

About the Scenario Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1055
1056
1062
1062

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1062


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1062

Scenario Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1062


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1063
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1065

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Contents

Chapter 41: Customer Schedule Database

1067

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interaction Between the CSDB and the Customer Aircraft Database . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1069
1070
1071
1071

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1071


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1071

CSDB Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1072


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1072
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1075

Flight Plan Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Using CSDB Files (Without Deferred Inputs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using CSDB Files (With Deferred Inputs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ad Hoc Restricted Area/Restricted Area Database File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overriding CRAD Files Stored in CSDB Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 42: Coded Departure Routes Database

1076
1076
1076
1077
1078

1079

About the Customer Coded Departure Routes (CDRs) Database . . . . . . . . . . . .


Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Database Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using JetPlan to Manage the Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1081
1082
1083
1083

File Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1083


File Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1083

Coded Departure Routes Database Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1083


File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1084
File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1085

Chapter 43: Customer Controlled Avoid and Alert Database

1087

About the CCAA Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1089

Chapter 44: User-Defined Restrictive Airspace Database

1091

About the User-Defined Restrictive Airspace Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1093

Chapter 45: Weather Introduction

1095

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weather Commands and Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quick Reference Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hourly Reports, Special Observations, and Terminal Forecasts . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Report Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Reports/Complete Briefings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Great Circle Weather Briefing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1098
1101
1101
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Contents

Chapter 46: Text Weather

1105

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types Of Weather Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminal Forecasts And Surface Observations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Surface Observations And Special Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Regional Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1107
1108
1108
1108
1109

Regional Surface Observations (METARs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1109


Terminal Forecasts (TAFs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1109

Terminal Forecasts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Area Forecast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NOTAMs - Jeppesen NOTAM Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Winds and Temperatures Aloft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pilot Reports - PIREPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1111
1111
1112
1113
1115

U.S. PIREPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1115

SIGMETs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1115
SIGMETs, AIRMETs - U.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1115
Convective SIGMETs - U.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1116

Convective Outlook - U.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


SIGMETs - Atlantic, Pacific, Caribbean and Canadian Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Severe Weather Watches and Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typhoon, Hurricane Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NWS Meteorological Forecast Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NWS Offshore Marine Forecast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ATC Center Weather Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Great Circle Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weather Enroute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 47: Graphic Weather

1123

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing Weather Maps Through JetPlan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weather Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Caribbean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
East Pacific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Europe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Europe/Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Indian Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Middle East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1117
1117
1118
1118
1119
1119
1119
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1122

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1126
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1132
1133
1135
1137
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North Atlantic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Pacific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
South America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
South Pacific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1146
1149
1151
1152
1154

U.S. Regional (Alaska) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


U.S. Regional (Hawaii) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U.S. Regional (North Central) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U.S. Regional (Northeast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U.S. Regional (Northwest) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U.S. Regional (South Central) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U.S. Regional (Southeast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U.S. Regional (Southwest) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 48: JEPPFAX Weather Maps

1157
1159
1161
1162
1163
1164
1165
1166

1169

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1171

Chapter 49: Vertical Wind Shear

1173

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1175
Shear Value Interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1176

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Tables
JetPlan Command-Line Interface
Table 1-1:
Table 1-2:

Command-Line Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
JetPlan Interface Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Option Commands

21

Table 2-1:
Table 2-2:
Table 2-3:
Table 2-4:
Table 2-5:
Table 2-6:
Table 2-7:
Table 2-8:
Table 2-9:
Table 2-10:
Table 2-11:
Table 2-12:
Table 2-13:
Table 2-14:

24
26
30
32
36
37
42
44
46
54
55
56
56
57

Flight Plan Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Flight Plan OptionsOutput . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsWeather Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsRouting Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsPerformance Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsFeature Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan Options/CommandsFMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan OptionsMiscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Support Information and Action Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan CommandsWeather Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan CommandsMessages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Transmission Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flight Plan CommandsCustomer Database Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Restricted Area Commands


Table 4-1:

89

Route Structure Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Tables

4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive Airspaces


Table 5-1:

103

Default SCA Types and Avoidance Levels in CCAA DB Records . . . . 114

Route Commands
Table 6-1:
Table 6-2:
Table 6-3:
Table 6-4:
Table 6-5:
Table 6-6:
Table 6-7:
Table 6-8:
Table 6-9:
Table 6-10:
Table 6-11:

137

Internal Identifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
International Track Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
International Track Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Atlantic Tracks (Eastbound Examples) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North Atlantic Tracks (Westbound Examples) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
North American Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NAT DLM Phase 2A Required Item 10a/b Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Inputs Supported with ERAD 2.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Inputs Planned for a Future Version of ERAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Inputs Not Supported or Not Recommended for Use with ERAD
FP_CDR Classifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hold-Alternate Commands
Table 7-1:
Table 7-2:
Table 7-3:
Table 7-4:
Table 7-5:

251

Hold-Alternate Command Line Sample Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


CAPFDB POD Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAPFDB POA Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAPFDB Alternate Airport Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAPDB Alternate Airport Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Profile Commands
Table 9-1:

152
165
166
166
167
168
172
187
188
188
192

261
275
276
277
281

305

Flight Rules Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308

Cruise Mode Commands

335

Table 11-1: Cruise Mode Designators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339


Table 11-2: Ad Hoc Bias Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
Table 11-3: MEL Record Name Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362

Cost Index Commands


Table 12-1:
Table 12-2:
Table 12-3:
Table 12-4:

CAPDB CI Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB CI Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MACI Cost Computation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Operating Cost Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

JetPlan User Manual

xxxiv

365
371
372
376
378

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Tables

Table 12-5:
Table 12-6:
Table 12-7:
Table 12-8:
Table 12-9:
Table 12-10:

CADB RAT Max/Min CI Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


CAPDB MACI Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPFDB Default Block Time Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPFDB Crew Costs Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Lateness Segments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPFDB Lateness Segment Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel Commands


Table 14-1:
Table 14-2:
Table 14-3:
Table 14-4:
Table 14-5:
Table 14-6:
Table 14-7:
Table 14-8:
Table 14-9:
Table 14-10:
Table 14-11:

391

Common International Reserve Policy Formulas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Arrival Fuel Case/Known Payload Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure Fuel Case/Known Payload Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arrival Weight Case/Unknown Payload Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure Weight Case/Unknown Payload Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure Fuel Case/Unknown Payload Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Departure Weight Case/Tanker Fuel Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arrival Weight Case/Tanker Fuel Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Index Tankering - Database Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Cost Tankering - Database Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tanker Limiting Factors Output Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Forward Plans and Messages


Table 18-1:
Table 18-2:
Table 18-3:
Table 18-4:
Table 18-5:

408
418
420
421
422
423
424
425
429
433
440

475

Network Designators (AFTN, ARINC, SITA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Priority Codes (SITA, ARINC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Priority Codes (AFTN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fax Forwarding Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Character Length Control Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ATC Filing
Table 19-1:
Table 19-2:
Table 19-3:
Table 19-4:

378
379
380
381
382
382

478
478
479
482
487

489
JetPlan Automatic Filing Program Command Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Links Between Item 18 PBN/ and Item 10a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FI,SHOW Input Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FI,SHOW Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Reclear Commands

494
516
528
529

537

Table 20-1: Canned Tracks Available for Reclear Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

JetPlan User Manual

xxxv

Tables

Overwater Driftdown and Terrain Analysis


Table 22-1:
Table 22-2:
Table 22-3:
Table 22-4:
Table 22-5:
Table 22-6:
Table 22-7:
Table 22-8:
Table 22-9:
Table 22-10:
Table 22-11:
Table 22-12:

573

Airport Fleet Database Parameters Used in Overwater Driftdown . . . .


Overwater Driftdown ETP Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overwater Driftdown Summary Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrain Analysis Customer Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrain Analysis Customer Airport Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . .
Terrain Analysis Airport Fleet Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrain Analysis Customer Aircraft Database Parameters . . . . . . . . .
Terrain Analysis City Pair Fleet Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrain Analysis MEL Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Escape Route Record Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terrain Analysis Front-End Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mountain Driftdown Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enroute Charges and FIR Traversal

579
580
590
595
598
598
600
602
603
606
609
627

649

Table 24-1: Enroute Charges Prompts and Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 653

Archiving

663

Table 25-1: Enroute Charges Archive Record Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 667


Table 25-2: Cosmic Radiation Archive Record Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 673

Customer Aircraft Database


Table 26-1:
Table 26-2:
Table 26-3:
Table 26-4:
Table 26-5:
Table 26-6:
Table 26-7:
Table 26-8:
Table 26-9:
Table 26-10:
Table 26-11:
Table 26-12:
Table 26-13:
Table 26-14:

CADB Record Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


CADB Record: Weights Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Fuels Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Section: Miscellaneous Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Modes Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Cutoff Weight Tables Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Bracket Modes Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Mode Coupling Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Tanker Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Equipment Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Certified Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: ATS Plan Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: ETP Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: ETOPS Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

JetPlan User Manual

xxxvi

679
685
690
692
696
704
706
707
709
710
712
716
719
723
730

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Tables

Table 26-15:
Table 26-16:
Table 26-17:
Table 26-18:
Table 26-19:
Table 26-20:
Table 26-21:
Table 26-22:
Table 26-23:
Table 26-24:
Table 26-25:
Table 26-26:
Table 26-27:
Table 26-28:

ETOPS Activation Flag Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


ETOPS Situation Flag Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETOPS Special Flag Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETOPS Factor Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
APU Burn Factor Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MAP Burn Factor Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETOPS Hold Burn Factor Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ETOPS Cruise Distance Factor Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Driftdown Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: Biases Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Links Between Item 18 PBN/ and Item 10a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB Record: ICAO 2012 Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CADB File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Aircraft Fleet Database


Table 27-1:
Table 27-2:
Table 27-3:
Table 27-4:

737
738
738
739
741
741
741
742
743
746
751
755
768
771

773

CADB/ACFDB SCM Data Set Overlap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Aircraft Fleet Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ACFDB File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ACFDB File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Generic Airport Database

776
778
790
790

791

Table 28-1: Generic Airport Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 794


Table 28-2: Generic Airport Database File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . 799
Table 28-3: Generic Airport Database File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800

Customer Airport Database

801

Table 29-1: Customer Airport Database (CAPDB) Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 804


Table 29-2: CAPDB File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 822
Table 29-3: CAPDB File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 823

Airport Fleet Database


Table 30-1:
Table 30-2:
Table 30-3:
Table 30-4:

825

Customer Airport Fleet Database (CAPFDB) Parameters . . . . . . . . . . .


CAPFDB Record Key Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAPFDB File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAPFDB File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

828
844
845
847

JetPlan User Manual

xxxvii

Tables

City Pair Database

849

Table 31-1: City Pair Database (CPDB) Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 852


Table 31-2: CPDB File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 859
Table 31-3: CPDB File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 859

City Pair Fleet Database


Table 32-1:
Table 32-2:
Table 32-3:
Table 32-4:
Table 32-5:

861

Order of Precedence for Taxi Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


City Pair Fleet Database (CPFDB) Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPFDB Record Key Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPFDB File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPFDB File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Customer Alternate Database

866
869
880
881
883

885

Table 33-1: Customer Alternate (CALT) Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888


Table 33-2: CALT Database File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 891

Flight Brief Database

893

Table 34-1: Flight Brief Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 898


Table 34-2: Flight Brief Database File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 915
Table 34-3: Flight Brief Database File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 916

Minimum Equipment List Database

919

Table 35-1: MEL Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 924


Table 35-2: MEL Database File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 939
Table 35-3: MEL Database File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 940

Master Database (MDB)


Table 36-1:
Table 36-2:
Table 36-3:
Table 36-4:

949

Master Database (MDB) Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


MDB Record Key Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MDB File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MDB File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Restricted Area Database

952
955
956
957

961

Table 37-1: Restricted Area Database File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . 967


Table 37-2: Restricted Area Database File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968

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February 19, 2015


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Tables

Customer Route Database


Table 38-1:
Table 38-2:
Table 38-3:
Table 38-4:
Table 38-5:

971

Route Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 979


Route Segment Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 984
Route Group Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1002
List (LST) Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1024
OK Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1026

Route Constraint Database


Table 39-1:
Table 39-2:
Table 39-3:
Table 39-4:

1035

Qualifying Parameters in the CADB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Route Constraint Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Constraint Database File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . .
Route Constraint Database File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Scenario Database

1037
1045
1048
1050

1053

Table 40-1: Scenario Database Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1056


Table 40-2: Scenario Database File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1063
Table 40-3: Scenario Database File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1065

Customer Schedule Database

1067

Table 41-1: CSDB File Maintenance Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1072


Table 41-2: CSDB Database File Display Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1075

Coded Departure Routes Database

1079

Table 42-1: Customer Coded Departure Routes (CDRs) Database Parameters . . . 1082
Table 42-2: Coded Departure Routes Database File Maintenance Commands . . . . 1084
Table 42-3: Coded Departure Route Database File Display Commands . . . . . . . . 1085

Weather Introduction

1095

Table 45-1: Weather Commands and Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1098


Table 45-2: Single Report Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1101
Table 45-3: Multiple Reports Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1102

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

JetPlan User Manual

xxxix

Tables

Text Weather
Table 46-1:
Table 46-2:
Table 46-3:
Table 46-4:
Table 46-5:
Table 46-6:
Table 46-7:
Table 46-8:
Table 46-9:
Table 46-10:
Table 46-11:
Table 46-12:
Table 46-13:
Table 46-14:
Table 46-15:

1105

NWS Weather Bulletins: Regional Surface Observations (METARs)


NWS Weather Bulletins: Regional Terminal Forecasts (TAFs) . . . . .
Mexico Region: Hourly Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
United States: Area Forecast Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
International: Area Forecast Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NOTAM Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
United States: SIGMET/AIRMET Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
United States: Convective SIGMET Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
United States: Convective Outlook Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Atlantic, Pacific, Caribbean, and Canadian: SIGMET Stations . . . . . .
United States: Severe Weather Watches and Warnings Stations . . . . .
Other Regions: Severe Weather Warnings Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Regions: Typhoon and Hurricane Report Stations . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Reports Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NWS Report Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Graphic Weather
Table 47-1:
Table 47-2:
Table 47-3:
Table 47-4:
Table 47-5:
Table 47-6:
Table 47-7:
Table 47-8:
Table 47-9:
Table 47-10:
Table 47-11:
Table 47-12:
Table 47-13:
Table 47-14:
Table 47-15:
Table 47-16:
Table 47-17:

xl

1123

Type: Satellite (Africa) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Africa) . . . . . . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Africa) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (Africa) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (Africa) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Asia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Asia) . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Asia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (Asia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (Asia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Australia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Australia) . . . . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Australia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (Australia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (Australia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Canada) . . . . . . . . .

JetPlan User Manual

1109
1109
1110
1111
1112
1112
1115
1116
1116
1117
1117
1118
1118
1119
1120

1126
1126
1126
1127
1127
1128
1128
1128
1129
1129
1130
1130
1130
1130
1131
1132
1132

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Tables

Table 47-18:
Table 47-19:
Table 47-20:
Table 47-21:
Table 47-22:
Table 47-23:
Table 47-24:
Table 47-25:
Table 47-26:
Table 47-27:
Table 47-28:
Table 47-29:
Table 47-30:
Table 47-31:
Table 47-32:
Table 47-33:
Table 47-34:
Table 47-35:
Table 47-36:
Table 47-37:
Table 47-38:
Table 47-39:
Table 47-40:
Table 47-41:
Table 47-42:
Table 47-43:
Table 47-44:
Table 47-45:
Table 47-46:
Table 47-47:
Table 47-48:
Table 47-49:
Table 47-50:
Table 47-51:
Table 47-52:
Table 47-53:

Type: High-level Significant Weather (Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Type: Winds and Temps Aloft (Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation HazardS (Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Caribbean) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Caribbean) . . . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Caribbean) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (Caribbean) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (Caribbean) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (East Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (East Pacific) . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (East Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (East Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (East Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Europe) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Europe) . . . . . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Europe) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (Europe) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Europe/Asia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Europe/asia) . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Europe/asia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (Europe/asia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (Europe/asia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Indian Ocean) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Indian Ocean) . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Indian Ocean) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds and Temps Aloft (Indian Ocean) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (Indian Ocean) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Mexico) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Mexico) . . . . . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Mexico) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (Mexico) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (Mexico) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Middle East) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Middle East) . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Middle East) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (Middle East) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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JetPlan User Manual

xli

Tables

Table 47-54:
Table 47-55:
Table 47-56:
Table 47-57:
Table 47-58:
Table 47-59:
Table 47-60:
Table 47-61:
Table 47-62:
Table 47-63:
Table 47-64:
Table 47-65:
Table 47-66:
Table 47-67:
Table 47-68:
Table 47-69:
Table 47-70:
Table 47-71:
Table 47-72:
Table 47-73:
Table 47-74:
Table 47-75:
Table 47-76:
Table 47-77:
Table 47-78:
Table 47-79:
Table 47-80:
Table 47-81:
Table 47-82:
Table 47-83:
Table 47-84:
Table 47-85:
Table 47-86:
Table 47-87:
Table 47-88:
Table 47-89:

Type: Aviation Hazards (Middle East) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Type: Satellite (North Atlantic) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (North Atlantic) . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (North Atlantic) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds and Temps Aloft (North Atlantic) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (North Atlantic) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (North Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (North Pacific) . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (North Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds and Temps Aloft (North Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (North Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (South America) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (South America) . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (South America) . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds And Temps Aloft (South America) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (South America) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (South Pacific) . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (South Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds and Temps Aloft (South Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (South Pacific) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (U.S.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Radar (U.S.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (U.S.) . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (U.S.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds and Temps Aloft (U.S.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (U.S.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Alaska) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Alaska) . . . . . . . . .
Type: High-level Significant Weather (Alaska) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds and Temps Aloft (Alaska) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (Hawaii) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (Hawaii) . . . . . . . . .
Type: Winds and Temps Aloft (Hawaii) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Aviation Hazards (Hawaii) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Satellite (U.S. North Central) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type: Radar (U.S. North Central) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

JetPlan User Manual

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2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Tables

Table 47-90: Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (U.S. North Central)
Table 47-91: Type: Satellite (U.S. Northeast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-92: Type: Radar (U.S. Northeast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-93: Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (U.S. Northeast) . . .
Table 47-94: Type: Aviation Hazards (U.S. Northeast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-95: Type: Satellite (U.S. Northwest) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-96: Type: Radar (U.S. Northwest) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-97: Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (U.S. Northwest) . .
Table 47-98: Type: Satellite (U.S. South Central) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-99: Type: Radar (U.S. South Central) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-100:Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (U.S. South Central)
Table 47-101:Type: Aviation Hazards (U.S. South Central) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-102:Type: Satellite (U.S. Southeast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-103:Type: Radar (U.S. Southeast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-104:Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (U.S. Southeast) . . .
Table 47-105:Type: Aviation Hazards (U.S. Southeast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-106:Type: Satellite (U.S. Southwest) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-107:Type: Radar (U.S. Southwest) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 47-108:Type: Surface & Low-level Significant Weather (U.S. Southwest) . .
Table 47-109:Type: Aviation Hazards (U.S. Southwest) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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JetPlan User Manual

xliii

Introduction

Introduction
About JetPlan

About JetPlan
Welcome to JetPlan, the complete flight planning and aviation data system provided by
Jeppesen, a world leader in aviation information and services. JetPlan is the core engine
behind flight-planning user interfaces such as JetPlanner, Jeppesen Dispatch Control, and
JetPlan.com. JetPlan features include but are not limited to:
Flight plan optimization
Weather and NOTAM information
Automated flight plan filing
Customized customer databases
Once you enter JetPlan through any of its user interfaces, you can access an extensive range of
flight planning features and information. Simply submit your inputs to JetPlan, and it
calculates or retrieves the information you need. Whether you are requesting a local terminal
area forecast (TAF) or computing a flight plan that traverses half the globe, JetPlan is your
resource for increased efficiency and for aviation information.

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JetPlan User Manual

Introduction
About this Manual

About this Manual


NOTE Check the JetPlan.com website for the most current online version of this
document. Printed versions of this manual may not contain the latest changes. If you
have questions about your JetPlan.com logon information, contact your Jeppesen
account manager.

The JetPlan User Manual provides information on requesting, retrieving, and maintaining
JetPlan information. This manual covers the general principles behind user inputs and the
resulting JetPlan calculations and output, providing valuable information to users of any of the
interfaces to JetPlan. These interfaces include the traditional JetPlan interactive Question and
Answer command-line interface and graphical user interface (GUI) applications such as
JetPlanner, JetPlan.com, and Jeppesen Dispatch Control.

Document Overview and Conventions


In this manual, each flight-planning topic is discussed and then demonstrated with examples of
user input. Sometimes, a sample of the JetPlan output is provided, illustrating the relationship
between the input and the resulting output.
This manual contains examples of command-line prompts and commands. Historically, the
command-line interface was the main method of flight planning using JetPlan, and some users
still use this interface. For examples of flight planning with a Jeppesen flight-planning GUI
application, see the user documentation for that product.

NOTE Notes are offset as shown here. They provide important information to
consider when using JetPlan.

JetPlan User Manual

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Introduction
Getting Started

Getting Started
The following sections describe what you need to get started using JetPlan.

User ID and Password


To use the JetPlan system, you must be assigned a user ID and password. Your customer user
ID is a unique, permanent identifier that allows Jeppesen to track your system usage for
accounting and billing purposes. Your password is a unique code that provides secure access
to JetPlan.
Upon request, Jeppesen can assign more than one password to a customer user ID for data
security purposes. For example, some organizations prefer to restrict database management to
specific personnel trained in that function. Jeppesen can provide additional passwords, each
conferring unique privileges.
For information on getting or changing a user ID and password or passwords, contact your
Jeppesen account manager.

Default Flight Plan Output Format


An important element of any flight planning system is the flight plan output it produces. The
flight plan output needs to provide all of the basic and critical information for the flight in a
clear and simple-to-read layout.
In the JetPlan system, the JetPlan standard format is the default output format for all flight
plans. You can arrange to have another format set as your default output. For information,
contact your Jeppesen account manager.
The following is an example of the standard JetPlan flight plan format.

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

JetPlan User Manual

Introduction
Getting Started

PLAN 0791
NONSTOP COMPUTED 2159Z

KSJC TO KABQ GLF5 M85/F IFR


FOR ETD 1700Z
PROGS 2012ADF

FUEL TIME DIST ARRIVE TAKEOFF LAND


POA KABQ 004696 01/48 0843 1848Z 057007 052311
ALT KELP 001408 00/31 0194 1919Z
HLD
000000 00/00
RES
001703 00/45
XTR
000000 00/00
TXI
000000
TOT
007807 03/04

06/20/07
G5
LBS

AV PLD
001200

OPNLWT
048000

KSJC SJC9 PXN..CZQ..OAL J58 ILC..BCE..GUP CURLY2 KABQ


WIND P027
MXSH 7/CZQ
FL 450/OAL
490
KSJC ELEV 00062FT
CPT
FLT T WIND S TAS GRS
FREQ
D303B
MOONY
PXN
112.6
TOC
CZQ
112.9
OAL
117.7
ILC
116.3
BCE
112.8
GUP
115.1
TOD
CURLY
ABQ
113.2
KABQ
ELEV

..
..
..

.. ....
.. ....
.. ....

FIRS

KZLC/0035

. ..
. ..
. ..

..
..
..

MCS

DST DSTR ETE

ETR

FU

302.4 003 0840 ./.. ./.. ..


120.9 028 0812 ./.. ./.. ..
108.4 046 0766 ./.. ./.. ..

FR

FF/E

.. . .. .
.. . .. .
.. . .. .

450 .. .... . .. .. 062.1 015 0751 0/14 1/34 014 0064 .. .


450 66 26050 7 479 529 062.1 033 0718 0/04 1/30 002 0063 1281
450 66 27050 7 479 522 039.6 118 0600 0/14 1/16 006 0057 1271
490 65 26028 4 480 508 068.2 160 0440 0/19 0/57 008 0049 1252
490 65 28022 3 480 501 093.2 105 0335 0/12 0/45 005 0044 1193
490 68 30017 3 477 494 114.2 212 0123 0/26 0/19 010 0034 1165
490 70 29015 2 475 489 080.3 007 0116 0/01 0/18 000 0034 1142
.. .. .... . .. .. 080.3 080 0036 ./.. ./.. .. .. . .. .
.. .. .... . .. .. 137.5 026 0010 ./.. ./.. .. .. . .. .
.. .. ....
05355FT

. ..

..

KZDV/0106

079.1 010 0000 0/18 0/00 003 0031 .. .

KZAB/0125

FP
GLF5/ 479 SJC 1700 450
SJC.SJC9.PXN..CZQ..OAL.J58.ILC..BCE..GUP.CURLY2.ABQ/0148
END OF JEPPESEN DATAPLAN
REQUEST NO. 0791

JetPlan User Manual

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2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

Introduction
Getting Started

Customer Support Files


The JetPlan system has two customer support files that are mentioned in this manual: the User
ID/Attribute File and the Customer Preferences database. User-specific settings in these files
support custom-tailoring of the flight planning system and the flight plan product. Jeppesen
maintains these files. To request any changes, contact Jeppesen Customer Service or your
Jeppesen account manager.
The following paragraphs briefly describe the User ID/Attribute File and the Customer
Preferences database. The description is general but gives an idea of how these files support
customization.

User ID/Attribute File


The User ID/Attribute File contains parameter settings, or attributes, which are activated when
you log on to the JetPlan system. The assigned attributes are specific to your user ID. Some of
the attributes are for Jeppesen accounting purposes. Others assign certain user characteristics
that apply to your flight planning operations. You can discuss your User ID/Attribute File
settings with your Jeppesen account manager at any time.
The following list describes some of the attributes that can be set to support your use of
JetPlan:
Database Access

Attribute settings define your level of access to your customer


databases (Customer Route Database, Customer Aircraft Database,
and so on).

Format Definitions

Attribute settings define the layout and design of your flight plan
output, the measurement units used in the flight plan output (metric or
English), and specific calculation methods.

Feature Options

Some attribute settings enable you use a feature that may not be
available without consent from Jeppesenfor example, Enroute
Charges or Optimal Scenario Analysis. Other settings support the
automatic application of certain features that would normally require
a manual input in the flight plan request, such as the Autoweight
option. (Any settings that are automatically applied can always be
overridden with manual inputs.)

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JetPlan User Manual

Introduction
Getting Started

Customer Preferences Database


The Customer Preferences database supports settings for numerous flight plan calculation
options, display options, and feature options such as:
Second alternate calculation method
Autoweight fuel reduction method versus the standard method, where
payload is typically reduced
Enroute Charges option (monetary exchange rate information sources)
Various biasing and fuel burn methods
Enroute alternate airport display
This list provides just a sample of what is available in the Customer Preferences database. For
more information, contact your Jeppesen account manager.

JetPlan User Manual

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

C HAPTER 1

JetPlan Command-Line
Interface

JetPlan Command-Line Interface


Overview

Overview
You can access the JetPlan flight planning functionality through the traditional Question and
Answer command-line interface and through the Jeppesen graphical user interface (GUI)
products that interface with JetPlan, such as JetPlanner, JetPlan.com, and Jeppesen Dispatch
Control. In addition, some JetPlan customers, such as large commercial airlines, have
developed in-house software applications that interface with JetPlan. Most customers now use
one of the GUI interfaces to use JetPlan, but some customers still use the command-line
interface.
This manual covers JetPlan flight-planning concepts relevant for users of any of the JetPlan
interfaces. Each product interfacing with JetPlan also has its own user documentation that
describes how to use that product to perform specific flight-planning tasks. The JetPlan User
Manual provides examples of using command-line prompts to perform flight-planning tasks.

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

JetPlan User Manual

11

JetPlan Command-Line Interface


Understanding the Command-Line Interface

Understanding the Command-Line


Interface
The JetPlan command-line interface presents a series of standard question and answer prompts
to which you provide specific responses that determine the resulting flight plan or
informational output. Some responses are mandatory, while others are optional. Some prompts
are not always displayed. For example, if JetPlan can use data stored in your Customer
Aircraft Database (CADB) record, the related question prompts do not appear. The following
sections provide an overview of the command-line prompts and how they are used.

Command-Line Prompts
The following table briefly describes each flight planning command-line prompt and provides
information about why some prompts might not appear in a given flight-planning session.

NOTE When using the system, press the ENTER key to confirm your input (or lack
of input) and move on to the next prompt.

Table 1-1
Command-Line Prompt

Description

ENTER ID

(Required) This entry is used to log on to JetPlan.


With certain access software, your customer ID is a
stored value and may be automatically inserted for
you.

ENTER PASSWORD

(Required) This entry is used to log on to JetPlan.


With certain access software, your password is a
stored value and may be automatically inserted for
you.

01 OPTIONS

(Required) For a flight plan, enter the flight plan


option codes at a minimum. For the various codes that
can be entered at this prompt, see Chapter 2, Option
Commands.

02 POD

(Required) Enter the point of departure (POD) airport,


using an ICAO or IATA identifier. Divert airports,
field coordinates, taxi fuel values, and takeoff
alternates can also be entered if necessary. For more
information, see Chapter 3, Point of Departure and
Point of Arrival Commands.

JetPlan User Manual

12

Command-Line Prompts

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

JetPlan Command-Line Interface


Understanding the Command-Line Interface

Table 1-1

Command-Line Prompts (continued)

Command-Line Prompt

Description

03 POA

(Required) Enter the point of arrival (POA) airport


using an ICAO or IATA identifier. For more
information, see Chapter 3, Point of Departure and
Point of Arrival Commands.

05 RESTRICTED AREA

(Optional) The system presents this prompt only when


RST has been entered on the 01 OPTIONS command
line. Enter a temporary restricted area or a Customer
Restricted Area Database (CRAD) record name. For
more information, see Chapter 37, Restricted Area
Database.

06 ROUTE

(Optional) Enter a route that follows the syntax rules


of the Route Selector you wish to employ, or use a
Customer Route Database (CRDB) record name. If no
route or record name is entered, JetPlan determines an
optimized route using the best combination of airways
and direct segments. For more information, see
Chapter 6, Route Commands.

07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST

(Optional) Enter a hold time and/or alternate airport


identifier in either ICAO or IATA format. You can
enter up to four destination alternates on this
command line. You can also override stored alternate
information by entering an alternate distance, a stored
route (CRDB record), or a great circle distance to use
for alternate calculations. For more information, see
Chapter 7, Hold-Alternate Commands.

08 ETD

(Required) Enter the estimated time of departure


(ETD) using a four-digit coordinated universal time
(UTC) input. For more information, see Chapter 8,
Estimated Time of Departure Commands.

09 PROFILE

(Required) Enter the altitude flight rule under which


you want to fly (I for IFR; V for VFR). You can also
enter specific flight-level constraints. For more
information, see Chapter 9, Profile Commands.

10 A/C TYPE/REGN

(Required) Enter either a generic aircraft type or a


CADB record name. When you enter a CADB record
name, some of the other command-line prompts are
not displayed. Instead, the system looks for that
information in the CADB record. For more
information, see Information Provided by the CADB
Record on page 15 and Chapter 10, Aircraft Type
Commands.

February 19, 2015


2003-2015 Jeppesen. All rights reserved.

JetPlan User Manual

13

JetPlan Command-Line Interface


Understanding the Command-Line Interface

Table 1-1
Command-Line Prompt

Description

11 CRZ MODE

(Required) Enter one or more primary cruise modes


and, if needed, an auxiliary cruise mode. You can
specify a secondary climb schedule as well as ad hoc
biases for climb, cruise, descent, and alternate. The
system does not display this prompt when you enter a
CADB record containing a default cruise mode on the
10 A/C TYPE/REGN command line. For more
information, see Information Provided by the CADB
Record on page 15 and Chapter 11, Cruise Mode
Commands.

12 PRFM INDEX

(Required) Enter the performance basis on which the


flight plan is calculated (save fuel, time, or money).
The system does not display this prompt when you
enter a CADB record containing a default
performance index value on the 10 A/C TYPE/REGN
line. For more information, see Information Provided
by the CADB Record on page 15 and Chapter 9,
Profile Commands.

13 OPERATIONAL WT

(Required) Enter the aircrafts basic operational


weight. The system does not display this prompt when
you enter a CADB record containing the information
on the 10 A/C TYPE/REGN command line. For more
information, see Information Provided by the CADB
Record on page 15 and Chapter 13, Operational
Weight Commands.

14 PAYLOAD

(Optional) Enter a payload amount or let JetPlan


calculate the maximum payload automatically. For
more information, see Chapter 14, Payload,
POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel Commands.

15 FUEL OFF/ON

(Optional) Enter a checkpoint and fuel off-load or onload amount. This option is for fuel off, fuel on, or
payload drop applications. For more information, see
Chapter 15, Fuel Off/On and Payload Off
Commands.

16 POD OR POA FUEL

(Required) Enter an arrival or departure fuel if a


known payload value or zero fuel (ZF) entry has been
entered on the 14 PAYLOAD command line. For more
information, see Chapter 14, Payload, POD/POA,
Weight, and Fuel Commands.

16 POD OR POA WT

(Required) Enter an arrival or departure weight if an


unknown payload value has been entered on the 14
PAYLOAD command line. For more information, see
Chapter 14, Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel
Commands.

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14

Command-Line Prompts (continued)

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JetPlan Command-Line Interface


Understanding the Command-Line Interface

Table 1-1

Command-Line Prompts (continued)

Command-Line Prompt

Description

17 RESERVE

(Optional) Enter extra reserve fuel if a departure


weight or fuel value is specified on line 16 or 17. The
system does not display this prompt when a CADB
record containing the information has been entered on
the 10 A/C TYPE/REGN command line. For more
information, see Information Provided by the CADB
Record on page 15 and Chapter 14, Payload,
POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel Commands.

17 MAX FUEL

(Required) Enter the maximum fuel available if an


arrival weight or arrival fuel is specified on line 16 or
17. The system does not display this prompt when a
CADB record containing the information has been
entered on the 10 A/C TYPE/REGN command line.
For more information, see Information Provided by
the CADB Record on page 15 and Chapter 14,
Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel Commands.

18 CLIMB FUEL,TIME,DIST BIAS

(Optional) Enter departure biases. The system does


not display this prompt when a CADB record
containing the information has been entered on the 10
A/C TYPE/REGN command line. For more
information, see Information Provided by the CADB
Record on page 15 and Chapter 16, Departure and
Arrival Bias Commands.

19 DESCENT FUEL,TIME,DIST BIAS

(Optional) Enter arrival biases. The system does not


display this prompt when a CADB record containing
the information has been entered on the 10 A/C
TYPE/REGN command line. For more information,
see Information Provided by the CADB Record on
page 15 and Chapter 16, Departure and Arrival Bias
Commands.

Information Provided by the CADB Record


On the 10 A/C TYPE/REGN command line, you can enter a generic aircraft type or a CADB
record name. When you enter a CADB record name, JetPlan does not prompt you for entries
on the following command lines because the information exists in the CADB record:
11 CRZ MODE
12 PRFM INDEX
13 OPERATIONAL WT
17 RESERVE or MAX FUEL

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15

JetPlan Command-Line Interface


Understanding the Command-Line Interface

18 CLIMB FUEL,TIME,DIST BIAS


19 DESCENT FUEL,TIME,DIST BIAS

Optional Responses
The following flight-planning command-line prompts do not require responses. In this case,
your entries provide additional information, beyond the basic information necessary to
calculate a flight plan.
05 RESTRICTED AREA
07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST
18 CLIMB FUEL,TIME,DIST
19 DESCENT FUEL,TIME,DIST

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JetPlan Command-Line Interface


Understanding the Batch Interface

Understanding the Batch Interface


The following paragraphs are for the benefit of anyone who uses the JetPlan batch interface.
Similarities and differences between the command-line interface and the batch interface are
discussed. A user accesses the batch interface with a dumb terminal and an older message
transmission network (SITA or ARINC). This difference in access method dictates the
difference in input procedures.

Command-Line and Batch Method: Differences


To create a JetPlan request for information, command-line users are prompted for required
inputs through a question and answer session (the command-line interface). In contrast, batch
users have no such session to guide them. Users must provide the batch interface with both the
type of input (keyword) and the input value itself.
For example, once you are connected to the command-line interface, the system prompts you
for the inputs that determine your request. The inputs are simple codes or data values that
define your request parameters. If you request a flight plan, the system prompts you for
specific information such as the departure airport, the arrival airport, or the aircraft. Once you
have satisfactorily answered all of the necessary questions, the system computes your request
and returns the results.
The batch interface, however, requires you to not only enter an input value but also to label the
input with a keyword that identifies it. JetPlan does not understand a batch input value without
the keyword label. To enter the departure airport, the arrival airport, and other values in a
flight plan request, first specify the keyword that defines the input type, and then follow the
keyword with your input value. For example, a departure airport input starts with the keyword
POD and continues with an ICAO or IATA code that defines the specific airport. The batch
interface is more challenging than the command-line interface because a greater intrinsic
knowledge of JetPlan is required to satisfy the request input syntax.

Command-Line and Batch Method: Similarities


Despite their differences, the command-line and batch method interfaces are functionally
similar. They use the same command options (prompts and keywords) to create an input set
that meets the requirements for a request for information. The codes and values you enter after
the command options are identical in most cases.

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JetPlan Command-Line Interface


Understanding the Batch Interface

The following table compares the command-line prompts and the batch method keywords.
Table 1-2
Command-Line Prompts

Batch Keywords

ENTER ID

//ID

ENTER PASSWORD

//PWD

01 OPTIONS

//OPT

02 POD

//POD

03 POA

//POA

05 RESTRICTED AREA

//RST

06 ROUTE

//RTD (//RTW & //RTA) or //RDB

Route Optimizer: If the route


enters more than one JetPlan area
of coverage, the keywords //RTW
and //RTA can be used. You can
use keyword //RDB to enter a
CRDB file as your route input.

07 HOLD, ALTERNATE/DIST

//HLD or //ALT

If you have a hold time set in the


ID/Attributes file, you can use the
//ALT keyword instead of //HLD.

08 ETD

//ETD

09 PROFILE

//FLV

10 A/C TYPE/REGN

//AC or //ADB

11 CRZ MODE

//CRZ

12 PRFM INDEX

//PRF

These command options are not


used when a CADB file is
specified at the A/C TYPE/REGN
prompt or the //ADB keyword.

13 OPERATIONAL WT

//OEW

These command options are not


used when a CADB file is
specified at the A/C TYPE/REGN
prompt or the //ADB keyword.

14 PAYLOAD

//PLD

15 FUEL OFF/ON

//RF

16 POD OR POA FUEL

//DFL or //AFL

16 POD OR POA WT

//DWT or //AWT

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JetPlan Interface Comparison


Notes

Specify the //AC keyword with


GO when loading a previous
request and changing the //FLV
keyword inputs.

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JetPlan Command-Line Interface


Understanding the Batch Interface

Table 1-2 JetPlan Interface Comparison (continued)


Command-Line Prompts

Batch Keywords

Notes

17 RESERVE or MAX FUEL

//RES or //MVR

These command options are not


used when a CADB file is
specified at the A/C TYPE/REGN
prompt or the //ADB keyword.

18 CLIMB FUEL,TIME,DIST
BIAS

//DBS

These command options are not


used when a CADB file is
specified at the A/C TYPE/REGN
prompt or the //ADB keyword.

19 DESCENT FUEL,TIME,DIST
BIAS

//ABS

These command options are not


used when a CADB file is
specified at the A/C TYPE/REGN
prompt or the //ADB keyword.

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JetPlan User Manual

19

C HAPTER 2

Option Commands

Option Commands
Overview

Overview
This chapter explains and defines the various command and option codes available for input
on the JetPlan Options command line. The Options command line refers to the 01 OPTIONS
prompt in line mode. On this line, you can enter commands and options for flight planning,
weather information, message and data transmission, reference material, and the customer
databases.

NOTE The total number of command and option inputs on the Options command
line must not exceed 240 characters.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Flight Plan Command


The Flight Plan (FP) command is a required input for original flight plan requests. Flight plan
options must follow the FP command on the Options command line (unless otherwise noted in
this manual). Flight plan options are described in Flight Plan Command Options on page 24.

NOTE You can retrieve and recompute previously computed flight plans with the
FPR, LD, or LDR commands, described in the following sections.

Table 2-1

Flight Plan Commands

Command

Explanation

FP

Flight Plan Request Command. The FP command is a mandatory


input for an original flight plan request.

SC,FLT

Schedule Database Flight Plan Request Command. The SC


command is associated with access to and management of the
Customer Schedule Database. However, when combined with the
FLT option and a Schedule Database record, this command
instructs JetPlan to produce a flight plan using the inputs in the
database record.
For example:
SC,FLT,TRIP101
NOTE Do not use the flight plan options listed in Flight Plan
Command Options on page 24 with the SC,FLT command. All
options must be added to the Schedule Database record before you
invoke this command.

For more information, see Chapter 41, Customer Schedule


Database.

Flight Plan Command Options


You can enter flight plan-related options (options that follow the FP command) in random
combinations on the Options command line, unless the options are conflicting or mutually
exclusive. For example, codes that derive similar information from different sourcessuch as
the route structure selection codes LA and MAcreate a conflict in JetPlan logic when
entered together on the Options command line. The result of such conflicts is an output error
or, worse, a flight plan with incorrect output data.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

In addition, command codes not listed in the following Flight Plan Options sections cannot be
used with the FP command. Examples of inputs not used with the FP command are: the
Weather Request Command (WX), Message Command (MG), reference codes, or any
database access code.
Flight plan options fall into various categories. The following sections contain examples of
these options. Some of the examples substitute placeholders for values a user would actually
enter when the input value is a user-specific variable, free text, or other variable.
Placeholders are used as follows:
Options that require text input values (any combination of alphanumeric
characters) include one or more of the lower-case x characters as the
dummy value, for example, xxx(xxx). If the number of characters the value
represents is not clearly stated in the Explanation column, you can assume
that the placeholder value includes the proper number of place holdersfor
example, xxx represents a text variable that is three characters in length.
Options that require an integer, such as a month number, wind velocity, or
temperature deviation, include one or more pound symbols (#) as the
placeholder value. If the number of digits the value represents is not clearly
stated in the Explanation column, you can assume that the placeholder value
includes the proper number of place holdersfor example, ### represents a
numeric component that is three digits in length.
The numbers, 1234, 2345, and so on, are used in examples that include a
computer transaction number. JetPlan assigns a unique four- or five-digit
number for each computer transaction (a flight plan or other information
request) and usually displays the number in the following places:
At the top and bottom of each flight plan and text weather output
At the top of each message (except for a no number message)

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25

Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Flight Plan OptionsOutput


The options in this section are related to flight plan output. They meet various needs by adding
specific information to the output or by changing the appearance or amount of information
presented
Table 2-2

Flight Plan OptionsOutput

Option

Explanation

FP,xxx

Output Format (Layout) Option. This option is generally a custom code


applied to identify and use a specific output layout. It determines what
information is presented in the calculated flight plan output, and its
appearance. Jeppesen provides various output formats and can customize
one or more to meet your needs.
NOTE A specific Output Format code may be preset in your ID/Attribute File
to be applied automatically to every flight plan. In this case, you would apply
this option only when you wish to use an Output Format other than your default
one. Contact your account manager for more information.

FP,AP

Abbreviated Plan Output Option. The Abbreviated Plan code provides a


summary that includes the following data: enroute burn/time, distance,
takeoff weight, alternate burn, reserve/hold/extra fuel, takeoff fuel, route
summary line, wind component, maximum shear, and altitude profile. It does
not list: arrival times, landing weight, payload, operational weight, or aircraft
database file. This option provides detail that the Short Plan option does not.

FP,LP

Long Plan Output Option. The Long Plan code provides the entire flight plan
output; nothing is omitted. This format is generally the default output format.
Typically, this option is used when the first plan is in the Short Plan format,
and the user wants to see the entire output of that plan.

FP,SP

Short Plan Output Option. The SP code delivers the top portion of the flight
plan output only. This output includes the fuel block totals and route
summary. The point-by-point body of the flight plan is omitted.

(Format Specific)
FP,RP

Route Proof Output Option. The RP code provides route summary and total
mileage output only. All other flight plan output is omitted. This option is
useful for checking distance and route information before you request the
more data-intensive short or long flight plan format outputs.
After reviewing the Route Proof information, you can choose to enter FP at
the next 01 OPTIONS prompt and then GO at the next prompt to compute a
flight plan in a more complete form.
NOTE For information on the GO command and changing flight plan inputs,
see Flight Plan Shortcuts on page 54.

FP,TP

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Turboprop Output Option. The TP option instructs JetPlan to provide


waypoint output every five degrees rather than the standard ten. This option
specifically applies to turboprop aircraft, but can be applied to any flight plan
if that type of waypoint output is desired. The estimated time enroute (ETE)
between the checkpoints must exceed the preset minimum value.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-2

Flight Plan OptionsOutput (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,.xxxxxxxxx.

Plan Header Output Option. You can insert a header (or title) at the top of a
flight plan by including this input string. A header is up to 12 characters in
length and must be entered between two periods. Use a comma to separate
this entry from the FP code and any additional inputs.
For example:
FP,.MYFLIGHTPLAN.

FP,CS/xxxxx...

Aircraft Call Sign Output Option. This option enables you to insert the call
sign of the aircraft into the flight plan filing program. Enter CS followed by a
slash and the call sign. A call sign entry includes up to 12 characters,
although most ARTCCs/ACCs accept only seven characters. The call sign is
included on the ICAO flight plan filing strip. Some customer formats include
the call sign in the flight plan body as well.
For example:
FP,CS/TANGO11

For more information, see Chapter 19, ATC Filing.


FP,FN/xxxxxx...

Flight Number Output Option. This option allows the flight number to be
included in the flight plan output and filing program. This option is different
from the Aircraft Call Sign Output Option (FP,CS) with regards to output
placement and filing behavior.
For more information, see Chapter 19, ATC Filing.

FP,TLK/xxxxx...
(Format Specific)

Talk (Free Form Text) Output Option. If your format is set up for this feature,
the Talk option includes your plain text message in the flight plan output. If
more than one line of text is required, end the current line with a space and a
slash (/), and then continue on the next line. A maximum of 80 characters per
line is permitted, with an overall maximum of 200 characters.
For example:
FP,TLK/ENTER YOUR MESSAGE HERE...

FP,TRAK

Track Summary Output Option. This option instructs JetPlan to provide a


latitude and longitude summary for every checkpoint on the route of flight at
the bottom of the flight plan.
NOTE The TRAK output is provided even without specifying the TRAK
option if either of the following is true:
A stored aircraft database record is used in question 10 A/C TYPE/REGN
- or A generic aircraft ID is used together with a registration number in question 10
A/C TYPE/REGN (entered in the form xxxx/nnnnnn, where xxxx is the generic
JetPlan aircraft ID, and nnnnnn is the registration number of the aircraft).

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-2

Flight Plan OptionsOutput (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,KILO

Measurement Output OptionKilograms. If the weight unit default in your


ID/Attribute File is set to pounds, but you want to use kilograms on a given
flight plan, use the KILO option. FP,KILO instructs JetPlan to provide the
flight plan output of weight values in kilograms, regardless of the default
setting in your ID/Attribute File.
NOTE The KILO FP option does not override the value of the Weight Unit
(WU) parameter in the Customer Aircraft Database (CADB) record when WU
has been set to anything other than Default. When WU has been set to a nondefault value, it overrides both FP,KILO and the default setting in the
ID/Attribute file.

FP,KM

Measurement Output OptionKilometers. The KM option switches flight


plan output distance/time values from nautical miles to kilometers. This
option is used in combination with the KILO option.
NOTE You can request two separate user passwords for your user ID: one
that displays distance/time values in kilometers, and one that displays them in
nautical miles. Contact your Jeppesen account manager for information.

FP,LBS

Measurement Output OptionPounds. If the weight unit default in your


ID/Attribute File is set to kilograms, but you want to use pounds on a given
flight plan, you can use the LBS option. FP,LBS instructs JetPlan to provide
the flight plan output of weight values in pounds, regardless of the default
setting in your ID/Attribute File.
NOTE The LBS option does not override the value of the Weight Unit (WU)
parameter in the Customer Aircraft Database (CADB) record when WU has
been set to anything other than Default. When WU has been set to a nondefault value, it overrides both FP,KILO and the default setting in the
ID/Attribute file.

FP,NM

Measurement Output OptionNautical Miles. The NM option switches flight


plan output distance/time values from kilometers to nautical miles. This
option is used in combination with the LBS option.
NOTE You can request two separate user passwords for your user ID: one
that displays distance/time values in kilometers, and one that displays them in
nautical miles. Contact your Jeppesen account manager for information.

FP,WXE

Enroute Weather Output Option. The WXE option provides enroute weather
information at the end of the calculated flight plan.
An enhanced version of this option is available upon request. Contact
Jeppesen Customer Service for more information.

FP,WXEL

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Enroute Weather Output List Option. The WXEL option is equivalent to the
WXE option but generates only a list of the enroute airports, not the
associated NOTAMs and weather.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-2

Flight Plan OptionsOutput (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,OPGF

Winds and Temperatures Aloft Output Option. The OPGF option instructs
JetPlan to attach forecast data for each enroute waypoint to the end of the
calculated flight plan. (This option only works with certain formats).

(Format Specific)

Another way to retrieve Winds and Temperatures aloft data is to reformat a


flight plan that has already been computed using the format code WX1. This
method enables any customer to access this type of forecast data. However,
reformatting only outputs the OPGF data, not the complete flight plan.
For example:
RFMT,1234,WX1

Where:
RFMT is the Reformat option.
1234 is the plan number of the flight plan.
WX1 is the format code that retrieves winds and temperature aloft data for the

flight plan number specified.


FP,CPT/xxxxx...
(Format Specific)

Captains Name Output Option. This option lets you insert the name of the
pilot in command into the flight plan filing program so that it appears in the
ICAO flight plan filing strip. Normally, the maximum number of letters
allowed is 20. However, you can request that the option be changed to allow
up to 40 characters.
As for the normal flight plan output, this option is format-specific, meaning
the format must be modified before the option can be applied in this manner.
Given format modifications, the captains name appears in the plan output.
You can request a change to allow two separate names. This option requires a
slash (/) between the names.
For example:
FP,CPT/SILVERFP,CPT/D SILVER/B JONES

FP,DSP/xxxxx...
(Format Specific)

Dispatchers Name Output Option. The dispatchers name option is only for
formats that have been modified to include this information. The option
enables you to insert the name of the flights dispatcher into the plan output.
The maximum number of characters is 40.
For example:
FP,DSP/C PARK

FP,FOF/xxxxx...
(Format Specific)

First Officers Name Output Option. The first officers name option is only
for formats that have been modified to include this information. The option
enables you to insert the name of the flights first officer into the flight plan.
The maximum number of characters is 40.
For example:
FP,FOF/G NGUYEN

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-2

Flight Plan OptionsOutput (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,FEN/xxxxx...

Flight Engineers Name Output Option. The flight engineers name option is
only for formats that have been modified to include this information. The
option enables you to insert the name of the flight engineer into the flight
plan. The maximum number of characters is 40.

(Format Specific)

For example:
FP,FEN/M ROBERTS

Flight Plan OptionsWeather Sources


The following flight plan options enable you to change the source database for wind and
temperature information used in the flight plan calculation.
For more information on these options, see Chapter 8, Estimated Time of Departure
Commands.

NOTE These options have nothing to do with text and graphic (map) weather
products available through the Weather Services portion of JetPlan.

Table 2-3
Option

Explanation

FP,WXADF

ADF Weather Option. The WXADF option instructs JetPlan to use the
National Weather Service Database in the flight plan computation rather than
your default weather database. The National Weather Service Database is
used in Aviation Digital Format, 2.5 calibration between 20 and 70 north
and 20 and 70 south latitudes. This database contains current winds and
temperature data, collected and compiled by the U.S. National Weather
Service within the previous 24 hours.

FP,WXNWS

NWS Weather Option. The WXNWS option instructs JetPlan to use the
National Weather Service Database (1.25 calibration) in the flight plan
computation rather than your default weather database. This database
contains current winds and temperature data, collected and compiled by the
U.S. National Weather Service within the previous 24 hours.

FP,WXRUC

Rapid Update Cycle Winds Option. The WXRUC option instructs JetPlan to
use the Rapid Update Cycle Database in the flight plan computation rather
than your default weather database. The RUC is a numerical analysis and
forecasting system designed to give accurate forecasts in the 012 hour time
frame.

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Flight Plan OptionsWeather Sources

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-3

Flight Plan OptionsWeather Sources (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,WXUK

UK Met Office (UKMO) Weather Option. This option instructs JetPlan to


use the UKMO Database (1.25 calibration) in the flight plan computation
rather than your default weather database. This database contains current
wind and temperature data, collected and compiled by the United Kingdom
Met Office within the previous 24 hours.

FP,W()###,()##

User-Specified Weather Option. Typically, JetPlan calculates flight plans


using current weather forecasts from data collected and compiled within the
previous 24 hours. This option is a planning tool, enabling you to review fuel
computations based on various fixed weather scenarios. You enter your own
wind component value (13 digits) and ISA deviation value (12 digits) into
the flight plan request. JetPlan uses the values to calculate the flight plan
results.
Use the letter P to represent a positive value (a tailwind component or a
greater-than-ISA condition). Use the letter M to represent a negative value (a
headwind component or a less-than-ISA condition).
The following example requests a headwind component of 50 knots and an
ISA deviation component of +10 degrees:
For example:
FP,WM50,P10

FP,WH##

UK Met Office Historical Weather Option. Typically, JetPlan calculates


flight plans using current weather forecasts from data collected and compiled
within the previous 24 hours. This option instructs JetPlan to use the UK Met
Office Historical Weather Database in the flight plan computation rather than
your default (current winds and temperatures) weather database.
Enter WH followed by a two-digit value defining the month of the year. The
following example shows how to access the historical data for the month of
November:
For example:
FP,WH11

FP,WS##(##),R##

Reliability Equivalent Winds Option. This option provides the capability of


applying a confidence level (a reliability factor) on weather data from a
historical database. Using a 40-year compilation of information, you can
specify a time of year and apply a confidence level to gain a greater feel for
the accuracy of the predicted winds and temperature data when planning
future flights. The time of year can be specified as a single month or a season
(range of months). The reliability factor is expressed in percentage terms
from 5098 percent.
In the example below, the reliability equivalence expressed by the inputs
shown is based on a range of months, from December (12) to March (03),
with a confidence level of 80 percent.
For example:
FP,WS1203,R80

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Flight Plan OptionsRouting Variables


The following options provide control over the route calculation process by either allowing or
limiting use of certain types of route structure.
Table 2-4

Flight Plan OptionsRouting Variables

Option

Explanation

FP,GC

Great Circle Option. The Great Circle option forces the Route Optimizer
(RO) to determine great circle routing, even when waypoints are submitted
on the Route command line. Avoid route options that contradict this option
(jet airways [J]). For more information on this option, see Chapter 6, Route
Commands.

FP,AX

Time-Restricted Routes Access Option. The AX option instructs JetPlan to


consider all time-restricted routes, regardless of the time frame. As a rule,
JetPlan automatically performs a time-check on all routes accessed via the
Route Optimizer or through a Customer Route Database (CRDB) record.
This option removes the time-check functionality. The following list
describes how the AX option affects the various types of JetPlan routes:
Route Optimizer routes: JetPlan considers all time-restricted airway
segments among all route possibilities when your route inputs dictate.
SRS routes: JetPlan ignores this option when using SRS routes.
Combination routes: JetPlan considers all time-restricted airway
segments among all route possibilities when your Route Optimizer
inputs dictate. This option does not affect SRS inputs.
CRDB routes: JetPlan considers all CRDB files that meet the
POD/POA limitation and that contain time-restricted airway segments.

FP,NX

Time-Restricted Routes No Access Option. The NX option instructs


JetPlan not to consider any time-restricted routes. As a rule, JetPlan
automatically performs a time-check on all routes accessed via the Route
Optimizer or through a Customer Route Database (CRDB) record. This
option removes all time-restricted airways from consideration, regardless of
the time you are looking at flying them. The following list describes how this
option affects JetPlan routes:
Route Optimizer routes: JetPlan does not consider any time-restricted
airway segments.
SRS routes: JetPlan ignores this option when using SRS routes.
Combination routes: JetPlan does not consider any time-restricted
airway segments for the Route Optimizer inputs. This option does not
affect SRS inputs.
CRDB routes: JetPlan does not consider any CRDB files that have timerestricted airway segments.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-4

Flight Plan OptionsRouting Variables (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,CRAM

Conditional Route Availability Message (CRAM) Processing Option. If the


CRAM preference is available and is inactive in the customer preference
database, this option turns on AUP/UUP (formerly CRAM) processing and
gives access to CDR1/CDR2 AUP/UUP routes as published by
EUROCONTROL.
NOTE CRAM is not compatible with the MA or LA options.The AX and NX
options override the CRAM option or preference.

FP,NOCRAM

No Conditional Route Availability Message (CRAM) Processing Option. If


the CRAM preference is available and is active in the customer preference
database, this option turns off AUP/UUP (formerly CRAM) processing.
NOTE When you are using the ERAD 2.0 FP option, the NOCRAM flight plan
option does not turn off processing of AUP/UUP (CRAM) files.

FP,ERAD

Electronic Route Availability Document Option. ERAD is a central


repository of European airspace traffic flow restrictions.
Second-generation ERAD (ERAD 2.0) achieves a high rate of acceptance of
optimized routes by IFPS by providing multi-dimensional optimized route
selection that is fully compliant with routing constraints published by
EUROCONTROL and member states. For information on ERAD, see
Chapter 6, Route Commands.

FP,LA

Low Altitude Navigational Database Option. The Low Altitude option


instructs JetPlan to access the low-altitude navigational database when
computing the flight plan. The low altitude database is available worldwide.
NOTE You can use the input LA by itself in place of FP,LA. The FP option is
implied.

FP,MA

Mid Altitude Navigational Database Option. The Mid Altitude option


instructs JetPlan to access the mid altitude navigational database (FL 195 to
FL 245) when computing the flight plan. The mid altitude database is only
applicable in portions of Area 2 (France, Switzerland, Belgium, Netherlands,
and Finland). Using this option, JetPlan accesses the low altitude database in
Area 2 when operating outside of the aforementioned countries.
NOTE You can use the input MA by itself in place of FP,MA. The FP option is
implied.

FP,RN

RNAV Routes Option. This option instructs JetPlan to consider RNAV


segments when calculating the flight plans route.
The RN option overrides the Customer Aircraft Database (CADB) setting for
RNAV and ignores any MEL degradations that have been applied to RNAV.
NOTE RNAV routes are not available with the low and mid-altitude (LA, MA)
navigational databases.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-4

Flight Plan OptionsRouting Variables (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,NOERA

No Automatic Enroute Alternate (ERA) Option. If the Automatic ERA


customer preference is set to Yes, the NOERA option enables you to disable
the automatic ERA search on a per-flight plan basis.
NOTE When set to Yes, the Automatic ERA customer preference instructs
JetPlan to perform an automatic search for an enroute alternate, assuming
that no enroute alternate has been manually entered in the flight plan request
using the ERA command on line 16. For information on the ERA command,
see Chapter 14, Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel Commands.
NOTE Use of the Automatic ERA preference depends on other preference,
database settings, and format settings. For more information, contact your
Jeppesen account manager.

FP,NORN

No RNAV Routes Option. This option directs the Route Optimizer to avoid
all RNAV segments. The NORN option overrides the Customer Aircraft
Database (CADB) setting for RNAV and ignores any MEL degradations that
have been applied to RNAV.

FP,NOSTAR

No STAR Option. This option overrides any user preferences for preferred
departure/arrival procedures. When this option is used, Standard Terminal
Arrival Route altitude constraints are ignored.

FP,NRP

National Route Program Option. The NRP option enables you to flight plan
in the conterminous U.S. using free flight rules (per AC 90-91).
For more information, see Chapter 6, Route Commands.

FP,NRR

Non-Restrictive Routing Option. The NRR option enables you to flight plan
above FL350 in the conterminous U.S. using free flight rules (per AC 9099).
For more information, see Chapter 6, Route Commands.

FP,PITCAH

NRR Pitch and Catch Option. The PITCAH option enables you to include
pitch and catch points in the route (per AC 90-99). This option must be used
with the NRR flight plan option.
For more information, see Chapter 6, Route Commands.

FP,RST

Restricted Area Option. The RST option enables you to define an area along
the intended or generally expected route of flight as restricted airspace that
the plans computed route avoids. The area can be defined using a delineated
boundary or a common route structure element. A delineated boundary
definition can even be stored as a Customer Restricted Area Database record.
For more information, see Chapter 4, Restricted Area Commands.

FP,NRTC

No Route Constraint Option. The NRTC option prevents the application of a


route constraint record from the Route Constraint Database, regardless of the
characteristics of the selected customer aircraft.
Prerequisite: The Override Flag parameter (OVR) in the Route Constraint
Database must be set to Yes (OVR=Y). If OVR is set to N, no explicit
override is possible with the NRTC option.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-4

Flight Plan OptionsRouting Variables (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,TR

TACAN Routes Option. This option instructs JetPlan to consider European


TACAN routes as viable choices in the route selection process of a flight
plan in that sphere of operation.

FP,OWATAN

Overwater Alert Option. This option instructs JetPlan to generate an alert


when the aircraft specified in the flight plan request does not have the
necessary level of overwater certification to fly the specified route. The
Overwater Capability (OA) parameter in the Customer Aircraft database
(CADB) defines the overwater certification, which can be Full, Limited, or
None. See Chapter 26, Customer Aircraft Database.
In addition, when the OWATAN or the OWATAA option (see below) is used,
JetPlan checks the Overwater (OWI) parameter in the City Pair database
(CPDB) to determine whether an aircraft flying this flight leg route must
have limited or full overwater capability. If OWI is set to No, JetPlan ignores
the OWATAN or OWATAA option for any flight plan computed for that city
pair. For more information on the OWI parameter, see Chapter 31, City Pair
Database.

FP,OWATAA

Overwater Avoid Option. This option instructs JetPlan to compute an


optimized route so that the aircraft specified in the flight plan request does
not (based on its overwater certification) violate overwater restrictions at any
point along the route. The Overwater Capability (OA) parameter in the
Customer Aircraft database (CADB) defines the overwater certification,
which can be Full, Limited, or None. See Chapter 26, Customer Aircraft
Database.
During route optimization, if the system cannot find a valid route around full
or limited overwater airspaces, it generates an error indicating that a valid
route cannot be found. If the user specifies a route (using SRS) through an
overwater airspace, and the aircraft does not have the necessary level of
overwater capability, JetPlan generates an alert.
When the OWATAN (see above) or the OWATAA option is used, JetPlan
checks the Overwater (OWI) parameter in the City Pair database (CPDB) to
determine whether an aircraft flying this flight-leg route must have limited or
full overwater capability. It OWI is set the No, JetPlan ignores the OWATAN
or OWATAA option for any flight plan computed for that city pair. For more
information on the OWI parameter, see Chapter 31, City Pair Database.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Flight Plan OptionsPerformance Variables


The following options directly affect the performance calculation process of the flight plan.
Table 2-5

Flight Plan OptionsPerformance Variables

Option

Explanation

FP,AW

Autoweight Option. The AW option instructs JetPlan to run an iterative


process whereby any plan calculation that exceeds a weight limit or fuel
capacity limit is automatically recalculated using a reduced weight value.
This option eliminates most of the Too Heavy errors that occur when limits
are unknowingly tested. The Autoweight option can be preset in your
ID/Attribute File to be invoked on every flight plan calculation. Contact your
Account Manager for information.
For more information, see Chapter 14, Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and
Fuel Commands.

FP,NOAW

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No Autoweight Option. This option turns off the Autoweight feature when it
is the default setting in your ID/Attribute File (see the AW option above).

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Flight Plan OptionsFeature Options


The following options provide special and unique capabilities to any flight operation. The
information provided here is for quick reference only. Review the individual chapters or
sections about these options for more complete information.
Table 2-6

Flight Plan OptionsFeature Options

Option

Explanation

FP,EUETS

EU ETS Option. This option supports ad hoc requests for CO2 calculations
that are then included in the flight plan output.
When the EU ETS emission computation is performed, JetPlan reports the
EU ETS distance as equal to the Great Circle Distance (GCD) in kilometers
from the POD to the POA plus 95 kilometers. The latitude/longitude
coordinates of the POD and POA and the GCD between them are computed
in compliance with the WGS-84 standard.
EU ETS emissions results are returned in metric units (metric tons and
kilometers), regardless of the units used for the rest of the flight plan. The
EU ETS outputs are available for archiving by utilizing the archiving options
with an XML (X09) format.
Prerequisite: The Fuel Type parameter must be set for the aircraft record in
the CADB before you can use the EU ETS option. Otherwise, JetPlan returns
an error.
You can also implement the EU ETS option by setting the EU-ETS
Emissions Flag in the Flight Brief Database. For more information, see
Chapter 34, Flight Brief Database.
NOTE Contact your Jeppesen account manager for information about
compatible flight plan formats or to arrange to have your format modified.

FP,RC or FP,RCC

Reclear Option. The RC option invokes the Reclear feature. This option lets
you enter the inputs necessary to perform a reserve fuel recalculation, which
can legally reduce the international reserve fuel carried.
The purpose of Reclear is to increase payload or extend mileage. It generally
includes output for the original flight plan with full international reserves, a
recleared plan to the original destination with reduced reserves, and a
recleared plan to a user-specified reclear airport with full international
reserves.
The RCC option is format-specific, meaning the output created by this
option depends on your format. It provides flight plan information for each
of the reclear plans mentioned above, but in a compressed layout.
Compression Print Command. Another way to compress previously
computed reclear flight plans into one informative output format is to use the
Reclear Compression Print Command. Depending on your output format,
you can compress two or three reclear flight plans by specifying the plan
numbers after the CM command.
For example:
CM1234,1235,1236

For more information, see Chapter 20, Reclear Commands.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-6

Flight Plan OptionsFeature Options (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,RC,DPP

Decision Point Procedure Option. An extension of the Reclear option, the


DPP option also enables you to reduce international reserve fuel legally. This
option is an EU-OPS compliant operation
NOTE Use of this option requires that the EU-OPS parameter is set in your
ID/Attribute File. Contact Jeppesen Customer Service.

For more information, see Chapter 20, Reclear Commands.


FP,ETOP or
FP,ETOPX (Format
Specific)

ETOPS Option. This option invokes the JetPlan ETOPS feature for extended
twin engine operations. Both options, ETOP and ETOPX, provide critical
fuel data based on Equal Time Point (ETP) information you provide.
ETOPX, which is format-specific, also provides extended information
through a detailed fuel analysis of the computed flight.
For more information, see Chapter 21, ETOPS.

FP,DRFT or
FP,DRFTX

Driftdown Option. This option invokes the JetPlan Driftdown feature, which
provides for the following driftdown scenarios: depressurization, one
engine-out, and two engines-out. Both DRFT and DRFTX provide critical
fuel data based on Equal Time Point (ETP) information you provide.
DRFTX also provides extended information through a detailed fuel analysis
of the computed flight.
For more information, see Chapter 22, Overwater Driftdown and Terrain
Analysis.

FP,TANK1 or
FP,TANK1X

Single-Leg Tankering Option (Fuel Index). This option instructs JetPlan to


determine whether tankering fuel is warranted or not. The TANK1/1X option
uses a fuel index method for making the determination. The fuel index
method is desirable if fuel price information is sensitive. The TANK1X
option provides extended information in the flight plan output.
For more information, see Chapter 14, Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and
Fuel Commands. This chapter also contains information on Multi-sector
Tankering, where fuel requirements for the initial leg of a two-legged flight
are determined in the second leg and carried over to the flight plan request
for the first leg.

FP,TANK2 or
FP,TANK2X

Single-Leg Tankering Option (Fuel Cost). Like the previous option, the
TANK2/2X option also instructs JetPlan to determine whether tankering fuel
is warranted or not. However, the TANK2/2X option uses actual fuel prices
to make the determination. The TANK2X option provides extended
information in the flight plan output.
For more information, see Chapter 14, Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and
Fuel Commands. This chapter also contains information on Multi-sector
Tankering, where fuel requirements for the initial leg of a two-legged flight
are determined in the second leg and carried over to the flight plan request
for the first leg.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-6

Flight Plan OptionsFeature Options (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,TANK3 or
FP,TANK3X

Single-Leg Tankering Option (Varying Percentages). This option displays


results for tankering different amounts of fuel (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and
100%). This option can be useful if you are deciding whether to tanker the
maximum amount of fuel or a lesser quantity.
For more information, see Chapter 14, Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and
Fuel Commands.

FP,4DF or 4DC

Optimal Scenario Analysis (OSA) Option. This option enables you to enter
multiple scenarios for a given flight plan request. Each scenario is comprised
of a unique combination of flight plan inputs. A given scenario is made
distinct from any of the other scenarios by the unique contents of at least one
of these inputs. Each scenario is subjected to a complete flight plan
computation, and the scenario that produces the overall optimum result
based on user-specified optimization criteria (fuel, time, or cost) is
determined. The flight plan computed for that scenario then serves as the
basis for the detailed formatted flight plan output presented to the user. At
the end of the detailed output, certain parameters taken from the flight plans
computed for the other scenarios are presented in summary form, ranked
based on optimization. When you enter 4DF or 4DC along with the RT/ALL
input, a scenario is defined for each customer route currently active for the
specified POD and POA airports.
For more information, see Chapter 23, Optimal Scenario Analysis.

FP,CCAA

4D Avoid and Alert Option. This option instructs JetPlan to avoid avoidlevel Special Use Airspaces (SUAs), user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen
turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR airspaces when determining an optimum
route and profile. JetPlan allows the optimum route and profile to traverse
notify-level SUAs, user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, or
FIR/UIR airspaces, but alerts must be posted for each such traversal.
NOTE

CCAA does not apply to Organized Track airspaces.

For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive


Airspaces.
FP,CCAAN

4D Alert Option. This option instructs JetPlan to allow transversal of avoid


and notify-level Special Use Airspaces (SUAs), user-defined airspaces,
Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR airspaces when determining an
optimum route and profile. Alerts must be posted for each such traversal.
Alerts for traversal of avoid-level SUAs, user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen
turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR airspaces must be distinguishable from
alerts for traversal of notify-level SUAs, user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen
turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR airspaces.
NOTE

CCAAN does not apply to Organized Track airspaces.

For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive


Airspaces.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-6

Flight Plan OptionsFeature Options (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,CCAAF

CCAA Fine Grid Option. This option invokes 4D Avoid and Alert
functionality (CCAA), using a finer latitude/longitude grid for avoidance of
avoid-level airspaces when D routing has been specified on the flight plan.
For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive
Airspaces.

FP,ORTRKA

4D Avoid Functionality for Organized Track Airspaces Option. When


ORTRKA is specified, JetPlan ensures that all avoid-level Organized Track
Airspaces are avoided when determining an optimum route and profile.
JetPlan allows the optimum route and profile to traverse notify-level
Organized Track Airspaces, but alerts must be posted for each such traversal.
For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive
Airspaces.

FP,ORTRKN

4D Alert Functionality for Organized Track Airspaces Option. When


ORTRKN is specified, JetPlan allows both avoid and notify-level organized
track airspaces to be traversed when determining an optimum route and
profile. Alerts must be posted for each such traversal.
For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive
Airspaces.

FP,GCAA

The GCAA option invokes 4D Avoid functionality for geopolitical country


airspaces. The GCAA option avoids a country with the avoidance level of
avoid in the CCAA DB when determining an optimal route and profile. The
GCAA option can be used with or without the CCAA or CCAAN option.
For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive
Airspaces.

FP,GCAN

The GCAN option invokes 4D Alert functionality for geopolitical country


airspaces. This option allows countries with an avoidance level of avoid or
notify when determining an optimal route and profile, but generates an alert
for each such traversal. The GCAN option can be used with or without the
CCAA or CCAAN option.
For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive
Airspaces.

FP,CCAA,AVDERR

CCAA Avoid Error Messaging Functionality Option. When the AVDERR


flight plan option is invoked together with the CCAA option, JetPlan alerts
the user when JetPlan cannot find a valid route due to incursions of avoidlevel SUAs, user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, or
FIR/UIR airspaces. The system also lists the specific route segment and
airspace name for each incursion.
NOTE AVDERR is also available as a customer preference. When the
preference is enabled, AVDERR functionality applies to all CCAA flight plans
automatically.

For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive


Airspaces.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-6

Flight Plan OptionsFeature Options (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,CCAA,CCAAQ

CCAA Qualify Option. When the CCAAQ flight plan option is invoked
together with the CCAA option, the system computes the route from the
POA to the POD, looking for any avoid-level SUA, user-defined, Jeppesen
turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR airspaces. If such an incursion occurs, the
system automatically reruns the flight plan as a CCAA plan.
NOTE CCAAQ is also available as a customer preference. When the
preference is set, CCAAQ functionality applies to all CCAA flight plans
automatically.

For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive


Airspaces.
FP,CCAA,EXSS
FP,CCAAN,EXSS

CCAA/CCAAN Except SIDS and STARS Option. When the EXSS option
is invoked together with the CCAA or CCAAN option, standard CCAA and
CCAAN functionality applies except that alerts for traversal of SUAs are
suppressed for any segment that is part of a SID or STAR.
For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive
Airspaces.

FP,CCAA,EXCD
FP,CCAAN,EXCD

CCAA/CCAAN Except Climb and Descent Option. When the EXCD


option is invoked together with the CCAA or CCAAN option, segments
starting before Top of Climb (TOC) or ending after Top of Descent (TOD) or
that are part of a SID or STAR are not checked for incursions of Generic
Restrictive Airspaces.
For more information, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive
Airspaces.

FP,PBNDC=Y/N

PBNDC=Y Compute Geopolitical Country Boundary Crossings


Option. The PBNDC=Y flight plan option directs the system to
generate a country border crossing report and output it on supporting
flight plan formats.
PBNDC=N Suppress Geopolitical Country Boundary Crossings
Option. The PBNDC=N flight plan option directs the system to
suppress a country border crossing report. If the Flight Brief Database
contains a matching record in which the Display Political Boundary
Report (PBNDC) parameter is set to Yes, you can suppress the
boundary crossing report on an individual flight plan by including the
PBNDC=N option in the request. For more information, see Chapter 34,
Flight Brief Database.
NOTE The political boundary report includes only boundary crossings for
countries for which records exist in the CCAA database with the avoid level set
to either Avoid or Alert. See the CCAA Database Help topic on JetPlan.com.
NOTE The boundary crossing report requires a specific format. You may
need to request a format change if you wish to use this report. Contact your
Jeppesen account manager for information.
NOTE The PBNDC=Y/N flight plan option overrides the value of the PBNDC
parameter in the Flight Brief Database.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-6
Option

Flight Plan OptionsFeature Options (continued)

Explanation

FP,FBNDC=Y/N

FBNDC=Y Compute FIR/UIR Boundary Crossings Option. The


FBNDC=Y flight plan option directs the system to generate a FIR/UIR
border crossing report and output it on supporting flight plan formats.
FBNDC=N Suppress FIR/UIR Boundary Crossings Option. The
FBNDC=N flight plan option directs the system to suppress a FIR/UIR
border crossing report. If the Flight Brief Database contains a matching
record in which the Display FIR/UIR Boundary Report (FBNDC)
parameter is set to Yes, you can suppress the boundary crossing report
on an individual flight plan by including the FBNDC=N option in the
request. For more information, see Chapter 34, Flight Brief Database.
NOTE The FIR/UIR boundary report includes only boundary crossings for
FIR/UIRs for which records exist in the CCAA database with the avoid level set
to either Avoid or Alert. See the CCAA Database Help topic on JetPlan.com.
NOTE The boundary crossing report requires a specific format. You may
need to request a format change if you wish to use this report. Contact your
Jeppesen account manager for information.
NOTE The FBNDC=Y/N flight plan option overrides the value of the FBNDC
parameter in the Flight Brief Database.

Flight Plan OptionsFlight Management Systems


This section provides both options and commands. Each option instructs JetPlan to store
internally the computed flight plan data in a format that is compatible with the selected Flight
Management System (FMS). The command associated with each option enables you to print
(to screen) the newly formatted FMS data.

NOTE If you use JetPlanner to run flight plans, the output generated by any of the
listed FMS reformat commands is automatically downloaded to a file on your
computer. The file can then be uploaded to the FMS on the aircraft if it has dataloading capabilities.

Table 2-7
Option/Command

Explanation

FP,SFS

Sperry FMS Option. The SFS option instructs JetPlan to store internally the
computed flight plan data in a format that is compatible with the Sperry
FMS. Externally, no change is visible in the output of your flight plan.
However, the data is prepared for the next command (see below).

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Flight Plan Options/CommandsFMS

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-7

Flight Plan Options/CommandsFMS (continued)

Option/Command

Explanation

FM1234

Sperry FMS Reformat Command. This command prints the data stored from
a flight plan that used the SFS option. The data is formatted for the Sperry
FMS. Enter FM and the appropriate computer transaction number from your
SFS plan.

FP,UNI

Universal FMS Option. The UNI option instructs JetPlan to store internally
the computed flight plan data in a format that is compatible with the
Universal FMS. Externally, no change is visible in the output of your flight
plan. However, the data is prepared for the next command (see below).

UN1234

Universal FMS Reformat Command. This command prints the data stored
from a flight plan that used the UNI option. The data is formatted for the
Universal FMS. Enter UN and the appropriate computer transaction number
from your UNI plan.

FP,AFIS

Global-Wulfsberg (Honeywell) AFIS Option. The AFIS option instructs


JetPlan to store internally the computed flight plan data in a format that is
compatible with the Global-Wulfsberg FMS. Externally, no change is visible
in the output of your flight plan. However, the data is prepared for the next
command (see below).

GW1234

Global-Wulfsberg (Honeywell) Reformat Command. This command prints


the data stored from a flight plan that used the AFIS option. The data is
formatted for the Global-Wulfsberg FMS. The data is sent to Allied Signal's
Global Data Center for upload to the aircraft via AFIS. Enter GW and the
appropriate computer transaction number from your AFIS plan.

FP,LTN

Litton FMS Option. The LTN option instructs JetPlan to store internally the
computed flight plan data in a format that is compatible with the Litton FMS.
Externally, no change is visible in the output of your flight plan. However,
the data is prepared for the next command (see below).

LT1234

Litton FMS Reformat Command. This command prints the data stored from
a flight plan that used the LTN option. The data is formatted for the Litton
FMS. Enter LT and the appropriate computer transaction number from your
LTN plan.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Flight Plan OptionsMiscellaneous


These options provide various capabilities. The CR and EC options are also commands that
can be used without running a flight plan at the same time (see Flight Plan Support Commands
below).
Table 2-8

Flight Plan OptionsMiscellaneous

Option

Explanation

FP,-E

Enroute Charges Option. Considers enroute navigational fees (see related


Output Option below). This option is typically only used when performing
4D cost-based analysis.

FP,-O

Enroute Charges Output Option. This option (a dash or minus sign


followed by the letter O) displays the calculated navigational fees at the
bottom of the flight plan.
NOTE This feature requires activation of specific settings in your ID/Attribute
File. Contact Jeppesen Customer Service for more information.

FP,CR

Cosmic Radiation Long-Term Archive Option. This option stores specific


information from the flight plan to track crew exposure to the possibly
harmful effects of cosmic radiation. The archive function provides long-term
storage of up to one year.
For more information, see Chapter 24, Enroute Charges and FIR Traversal.
NOTE Both this feature and the application that automatically performs this
function (Automatic Archive) require activation of specific settings in your
ID/Attribute File. Contact Jeppesen Customer Service for more information.

FP,EC

Enroute Charges Long Term Archive Option. This option stores specific
information from the flight plan to track navigational fees associated with
flight over other countries airspace. The archive function provides longterm storage of up to one year.
For more information, see Chapter 24, Enroute Charges and FIR Traversal.
NOTE Both this feature and the application that automatically performs this
function (Automatic Archive) require activation of specific settings in your
ID/Attribute File. Contact Jeppesen Customer Service for more information.

FP,HOLD

Hold Option. The Hold option instructs JetPlan to look for inputs not
otherwise required. For example, when you request a flight plan that
specifies a departure weight or fuel value, JetPlan does not typically prompt
a reserve fuel input. However, with HOLD specified on the Options
command line, the JetPlan Interactive system prompts you for a reserve fuel
input (Question 17).
The Hold option also enables you to change pre-stored option values for the
flight plan request at hand without permanently affecting the stored values.
For example, you can change the Performance Index on an immediate flight
plan request from fuel optimization (F) to time optimization (T), without
changing the stored value (in the Customer Aircraft Database) of fuel
optimization in future plan requests.

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Option Commands
Flight Plan Command

Table 2-8

Flight Plan OptionsMiscellaneous (continued)

Option

Explanation

FP,PMIN

Precision Minima Option. This option directs JetPlan to use precision


minima for checking suitability of alternate airports. Normally, the more
conservative non-precision minima are used. This option allows airports
with lower ceiling or visibility forecasts to be used as alternates.
NOTE The Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum (P3) and
Precision Approach Alternate Visibility Minimum (P4) parameters must be set
in the Customer Airport Fleet Database and/or the Customer Airport Database.

FP,RF

Fuel Off/On and Payload Off Option. The RF option is a request to include a
fuel on-load or off-load (or a payload off-load) as part of your flight
plan.When the RF option is invoked, JetPlan prompts for an on-load/off-load
input with the Refuel command line (Question 15).
For more information, see Chapter 15, Fuel Off/On and Payload Off
Commands.

FP,XFDB

Exception to Filing Database Option. This option directs JetPlan to ignore


the special addresses and/or filing parameters set in your Filing database (if
you have one). For this flight plan request, default addresses and/or
parameters are used.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Additional Command-Line Options


The following sections cover options that are entered on the 01 OPTIONS command line but
that are not used with the FP command.

Support Information and Action Commands


The following commands are entered on the Options command line. They provide separate
support information or perform specific action functionality for the JetPlan system (flight
planning, weather, and so on).

NOTE

These commands are not used with the FP command at all.

Table 2-9

Support Information and Action Commands

Command

Explanation

ATTRA,PRI

Print Attributes Command. This command displays the attributes that are
associated with your password (your ID/Attribute File).

BU

Bulletins Command. Entering BU displays the current on-line bulletins. This


includes the status of organized track structures (OTS) such as those in the
Pacific and North Atlantic, and other system pertinent information.

CM1234,1235
(Format Specific)

Reclear Compression Print Command. This command provides output of


reclear flight plans in a compressed format. Depending on your output
format, you can compress two or three reclear flight plans by specifying the
plan numbers after the CM command.
For example:
CM1234,1235,1236

For more information, see Chapter 20, Reclear Commands.


CR,1234

Cosmic Radiation Archive and Report Command. This command enables


you to track your crews increased exposure to the possibly harmful effects
of cosmic radiation. The archive function provides long-term storage of
specific flight data for up to one year. You can use this feature on a per plan
basis or set it to store information for every flight plan computed
automatically. For information on cosmic radiation archive and report
functionality, see Chapter 25, Archiving.
NOTE Both this feature and the application that automatically performs this
function (Automatic Archive) require activation of specific settings in your
ID/Attribute File. Contact Jeppesen Customer Service for more information.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-9

Support Information and Action Commands (continued)

Command

Explanation

CR,1234,CX

Cosmic Radiation Archive and Report Cancel Command. Marks flight


plans in the archive as canceled and prevents their display in future reports.
For information on the cosmic radiation archive and report functionality, see
Chapter 25, Archiving.

EC,1234

Enroute Charges Long-Term Archive Command. Provides long-term


storage (up to one year) of navigational fee records, including specific
information about the flight. You can use this feature on a per plan basis or
set it to store information for every flight plan computed automatically. For
information on the archive and report functionality, see Chapter 25,
Archiving.
NOTE Both this feature and the application that automatically performs this
function (Automatic Archive) require activation of specific settings in your
ID/Attribute File. Contact Jeppesen Customer Service for more information.

EC,1234,CX

Enroute Charges Long-Term Archive Cancel Command. Marks flight


plans in the archive as canceled, and prevents their display in future reports.
For information on the archive and report functionality, see Chapter 25,
Archiving.

ER,xxxxx...

Error Decode Command. This option provides plain language error


explanations if not already preset in your ID/Attribute File. Enter ER
immediately followed by the error code (or a comma and the error code).
For example:
ER,SEAGUL06

FI1234

Filing Command. Enables you to file the flight plan by the transaction
number.
For more information, see Chapter 19, ATC Filing. For information on
automatic archive functionality, see Chapter 25, Archiving.

FI1234,CHG,(various
entries)

Filing Change Command. Sends a change message based on the entries


included.

FI1234,CX

Filing Cancel Command. Enables you to cancel previously filed flight plans
(by transaction number).
For more information, see Chapter 19, ATC Filing. For information on
automatic archive functionality, see Chapter 25, Archiving.

FI1234,DLA=####

Filing Delay Command. Allows the ETD on a previously filed plan to be


delayed.
For example:
FI2615,DLA=1745

FI1234,HOLD

Filing Hold Command. Prompts enter question number or GO to allow


user to make changes before filing.

FI1234,NOW

File Now Command. Makes filing immediate, rather than holding in queue.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-9

Support Information and Action Commands (continued)

Command

Explanation

FIxxxx,STAT

Filing Status Command. Provides the status of a flight plan, whether filed,
queued, or canceled.
For example:
01 OPTIONS FI2615,STAT
ATC MESSAGES FOR PLAN 2615DATE/TIME (GMT)
STATUS
CENTER
REFNO SEQNO
SEND
BY04/12/2007-10:31:57 FILING ACCEPTED LFPYZMFP 25240

For example:
01 OPTIONS FI2615,STAT,ALL
ATC MESSAGES FOR PLAN 2615DATE/TIME (GMT)
STATUS
CENTER
REFNO
SEQNO
SEND
BY04/12/2007-10:31:04 FILING QUEUED ~~~~ 25238
04/12/2007-10:3104/12/2007-10:31:37 FILING SUBMITTED
~~~~
2523804/12/2007-10:31:57 FILING ACCEPTED
LFPYZMFP 25240

FPR

Flight Plan Reload Command. Reloads the inputs from the most recent
previously computed flight plan during an uninterrupted connection to the
JetPlan system, saving you from having to answer all of the flight plan
prompts again.

IATA,xxx

IATA Airport Decode Command. Displays an airport's IATA and ICAO


identifiers, coordinates, and full (proper) airport name. Either a comma or a
space can be entered between IATA and the identifier.
For example:
IATA,JFK

ICAO,xxxx

ICAO Airport Decode Command. Displays an airport's IATA and ICAO


identifiers, coordinates, and full (proper) airport name. Either a comma or a
space can be entered between ICAO and the identifier.
For example:
ICAO,KJFK

IFS,FLEX

Print PACOTS (eastbound flex tracks) Command. Displays the eastbound


Flex Track NOTAM (routes from Japan to Hawaii). These particular tracks
are on-line between 00-02Z, and are valid 10-21Z for aircraft crossing 160E
between 12-16Z.

IFS,FREEFLOW

Print PACOTS (westbound) Command. Displays the route inputs necessary


to access the westbound Pacific Organized Track Structure. These particular
tracks are on-line between 14-16Z, and are valid 19-08Z for aircraft crossing
160E between 02-06Z.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-9

Support Information and Action Commands (continued)

Command

Explanation

IFS,PAC-OTS

Print PACOTS (eastbound) Command. Displays the route inputs necessary


to access the eastbound Pacific Organized Track Structure. These particular
tracks are on-line between 21-23Z, and are valid 07-23Z for aircraft crossing
160E between 09-16Z.
NOTE The dash (minus sign) is required between PAC and OTS when you
input this support command.

IFS,WFTR

Print PACOTS (westbound flex tracks) Command. Displays the westbound


Flex Track NOTAM (routes from Hawaii to Japan). These particular tracks
are on-line between 11-13Z, and are valid 19-08Z for aircraft crossing 160E
between 23-06Z.

INFO,ABS

Arrival Bias Reference Command. Displays all arrival biases stored under
your ID/Password.

INFO,ACQREF

Aircraft Reference Command. Displays the names of all the manufacturers


with aircraft loaded in the JetPlan Aircraft Library. You can enter subset
commands by specifying an individual manufacturer or the ICAO code for
the aircraft. The first example is a request for all Boeing aircraft loaded in the
JetPlan library (by the ICAO code).
For example:
INFO,BOEING

The next example is a request for all aircraft in the JetPlan library with the
ICAO code B747
For example:
INFO,B747

INFO,ATC

ATC Reference Command. Displays Center Flight Data phone numbers and
addresses.

INFO,CHANGES

Customer Database Changes Command. Displays a summary of all changes


to your Customer Route Database. Changes occur periodically, and are
usually based on the AIRAC cycle.

INFO,DBS

Departure Bias Reference Command. Displays all departure biases stored


under your ID/Password.

INFO,FAX

FAX-Forwarding Reference Command. Displays all FAX-forwarding


features.

INFO,FAXCHRG

FAX Charges Reference Command. Lists the international communication


charges associated with the FAX-forwarding feature.

INFO,IDQREF

Aircraft ID Reference Command. Displays all of the JetPlan identifiers for


generic aircraft loaded in the JetPlan Aircraft Library. Each identifier is
cross-referenced to its counterpart ICAO identifier. Use the JetPlan aircraft
identifier as your A/C input if you wish to flight plan with a generic aircraft.

INFO,JPOPT

JetPlan Options Reference Command. Lists most JetPlan options.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-9

Support Information and Action Commands (continued)

Command

Explanation

INFO,MAPS

Map Codes Reference Command. Lists all of the codes used to obtain
weather maps on the JetPlan system. See the WX command.

INFO,METAR

METAR Decode Command. Displays a METAR weather report example


along with a decoding of the METAR hourly weather report format.

INFO,TAF

TAF Decode Command. Displays a TAF weather report example along with
a decoding of the TAF terminal forecast format.

JPIII

JetPlan 3 Reference Help Command. This command accesses various


database information that may help you research and create flight plans.
Information that can be accessed includes:
Airport Information
High/Low Altitude Airway Information
SID/STAR Information
SID/STAR Details
Waypoint Information
Currency Exchange Rates
FIR Traversal Information
Enroute Charges Information
Enter JPIII at the Options command line and simply follow the directions.

JPRA1234,1235

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JetPlan Route Analysis Command. This command enables you to condense


up to 14 long or short format flight plans into a comparative analysis onto
one page. The standard output format, STF, must be used with this option.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-9

Support Information and Action Commands (continued)

Command

Explanation

LD1234 and
LDR1234

Load Commands. The LD and LDR commands enable you to reuse inputs
from a previously computed flight plan. Simply enter the command (LD or
LDR), followed by the computer transaction number (flight plan number) of
the plan you wish to reuse. Transaction numbers must be from plans that
were run in the past 812 hours. Otherwise, the input data is lost.
Both LD and LDR enable you to change any of the previously entered
inputs. However, only LDR lets you insert additional codes on the Options
command line without affecting previous entries on that line. If LD is used,
and additional codes are intended, reenter the entire line of inputs (Options
command line only).
For example, to make a long plan (LP) from a previously computed short
plan, use the following entry:
LDR1234,LP

As for all other command-line inputs, entering LD or LDR enables you to


change any of these other entry lines. You can use the at symbol (@) to move
to the command line you want to edit or change, without affecting the inputs
on the other command lines. Enter @, followed by the command-line
number you want to change.
NOTE If question 10 A/C TYPE/REGN is changed, also re-answer question
11 CRZ MODE, question 14 PAYLOAD, and question 16 POD OR POA FUEL.

After all changes are made and your request is ready to be recomputed, type
GO at the next command line to start the computation. For example, the
following inputs illustrate creating a long plan (LP) from a previously
computed short plan (SP) and changing the route, payload and arrival fuel:
01
02
06
07
14
16
17

LL,()####,()##### or
LLX,xxxxx

OPTIONS LDR1234,LP
POD @6
ROUTE J,FIM
HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST @14
PAYLOAD 84250
POD OR POA FUEL A0,I
MVR GO

LAT/LONG Database Search Commands. This option provides the JetPlan


internal name of a waypoint. You can enter either the waypoints coordinates
after LL or the waypoint's charted (external) name after LLX.
When entering the waypoints coordinates, use four digits to express the
latitude and five digits to express the longitude. Also, when specifying South
or East coordinates, the letters S and E (or a minus sign) must precede the
coordinate entries. The letters N and W are optional (they are default) for
north and west coordinates.
See the following examples:
LL,-3356,-11510 (south 33 deg., 56 min.; east 115 deg., 10
min.)
LL,S3356,E11510
LLX,ALCOA
LLX,SPY

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-9

Support Information and Action Commands (continued)

Command

Explanation

PI1234

Print Inputs Command. This command followed by a specific flight plan or


message transaction number prints the inputs of that particular flight plan or
message.

PN1234

Print Plan (Transaction) Number Command. This command followed by a


specific flight plan or message transaction number prints the output of a
particular flight plan or message.

PA

Print ABC NATs Command. Displays the current westbound North Atlantic
Tracks (ABCs), including valid altitudes. These tracks are updated between
23-01Z, and valid between 1130-19Z.

PZ

Print XYZ NATs Command. Displays the current eastbound North Atlantic
Tracks (XYZs), including valid altitudes. These tracks are updated between
12-14Z, and valid between 01-08Z.

RFMT,1234,xxx

Reformat Plan Command. Enables you to reformat a previously computed


flight plan without actually computing it again. Enter the plan transaction
number from the flight plan you wish to reformat and a different output
format (layout) code to complete the input.
For example:
RFMT,1234,STF
NOTE The RFMT command may not always translate information from one
plan format to another plan format properly. Certain information may be lost
due to the differences in the formats.

VERSION

JetPlan Version Number Command. Displays the current JetPlan program


version.

WXE1234

Enroute Weather Command. Enter WXE, followed by the plan transaction


number, and JetPlan reproduces the plan, including the enroute weather. A
maximum of four flight plan numbers can be entered separated by commas.
For example:
WXE1234,2345,3456,4567
NOTE This command does not recalculate the flight plan. The enroute
weather briefing is based on the route from the flight plan with the transaction
number specified.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-9

Support Information and Action Commands (continued)

Command

Explanation

XAP,ALT,xxxx

Alternate Search Command. A search for alternate airports can be


accomplished using the following commands:
XAP,ALT,origin,rad,rwy,etd,ete,gsa,lst

where:
origin = an ICAO or IATA airport code, or lat/long coordinates entered as
[N|S|+|-]ddmm[W|E|+|-]dddmm (for example, N3356W11824)
rad = nnnn: search radius in NM (default is 100)
rwy = nnn: minimum length of longest runway in hundreds of feet (default is
80)
etd = hhmm or ddmmyyyy@hhmm: UTC departure time or date@time from
the POD, not the origin (used for TAF processing)
ete = hhmm: flight time to origin from the POD (used for TAF processing)
gsa = nnn: origin-to-alternate groundspeed in KT (default is 250)
lst = nnn: maximum number of alternates in response (default is 20)
NOTE

All parameters except origin are optional (default values are used).

NOTE TAF-processing is bypassed when both ETD and ETE inputs are
omitted.

For example:
Explanation: Search for airports within 150 nm of KLVK with runway
lengths of at least 7000 feet.
01 OPTIONS XAP,ALT,KLVK,RAD=150,RWY=70

or
01 OPTIONS XAP,ALT,KLVK,150,70D

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Flight Plan Shortcuts


The following inputs can be entered on the Options command line. They are time-saving
shortcuts that expedite the flight planning process.
Table 2-10

Flight Plan Shortcuts

Command

Explanation

FPR

Reloads the inputs from the most recent previous flight plan during an
uninterrupted interactive session. This command saves you time because you do
not need to answer all of the flight plan prompts again.

LD

Loads (or reloads) the inputs from a flight plan previously computed in the
preceding 812 hours. See above.

LDR

Same as LD except LDR allows for additional inputs to be added to the Options
command line. See above.

RFMT

Enables you to reformat a previously computed flight plan without actually


computing it again. Enter the transaction number from the flight plan you wish to
reformat and a different format code to complete the input (for example,
RFMT,1234,STF).

NOTE The RFMT command may not always translate information from one plan
format to another plan format properly. Certain information may be lost due to the
differences in the formats.

The following command inputs can be entered from any command line.
@The At command. When followed by an interactive line number, this
JetPlan shortcut jumps to the logical position of the line specified where the
desired change is needed. This command simplifies the flight planning
process immensely because you can move immediately to the line that needs
to be added, changed, or corrected without answering other command inputs
again.
GOThe GO command. Directs JetPlan to begin computing the flight plan
request immediately.
The following example demonstrates the application of JetPlan shortcuts. Assume a flight plan
has just been computed, and it was not correct. You want to change your route and cruise
mode information. In this case, you can apply the following shortcuts as shown in the
following example.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Example:
01
02
06
07
11
12

OPTIONS FPR
POD @6
ROUTE J,FIM
HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST @11
CRUISE MODE LRC
PRFM INDEX GO

Explanation:
Option Line User reloads the flight plan from the immediately previous
computation.
POD Line User jumps to the Route Line, bypassing all command lines in
between.
Hold Line User jumps to the Cruise Line, bypassing all command lines in
between.
Performance Index Line User directs JetPlan to begin the computation of
the edited plan, bypassing all other possible inputs.

Weather Services Command


The following command accesses text and graphical (maps) weather information from the
Jeppesen Weather Services portion of the JetPlan system.

NOTE

This command is not used with the FP command at all.

Table 2-11

Flight Plan CommandsWeather Information

Command

Explanation

WX

Weather Request Command. The WX command enables you to display


Jeppesen weather products, including text briefings and graphic weather
depictions (maps).
Upon input of this command, JetPlan prompts for your weather request input
on the Stations command line (02 STATIONS).
For more information, see Chapter 47, Graphic Weather. See also
Chapter 46, Text Weather.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Messages Command
You can compose and store text messages for transmission using the command shown below.
You can also include previously computed non-graphic JetPlan products (flight plans and
weather briefings) into one package using this feature.

NOTE

This command is not used with the FP command at all.

Table 2-12

Flight Plan CommandsMessages

Command

Explanation

MG

Message Command. Entering this command enables you to create a plain


text message. It also enables you to bundle other JetPlan products together
under one transaction number. The created message or message package may
be transmitted via one of the major data communication networks (AFTN,
ARINC, SITA) or faxed.
JetPlan provides for up to 55 lines of text and 68 characters per line.
For more information, see Chapter 17, Message Commands.

MGNN

Message No Number Option. This command is the same as the MG


command except that the No Number option, NN, suppresses the transaction
number when the message is printed or forwarded via a communication
network.

Data Transmission Commands


You can forward any recently computed, non-graphic JetPlan product via a specific data
network using the commands in the following table.
For more information on these commands, see Chapter 18, Forward Plans and Messages.

NOTE

These commands are not used with the FP command at all.

Table 2-13
Command

Explanation

AF

AFTN Command. This command enables you to transmit flight


plan/message/weather data via the AFTN network.

AR

ARINC Command. This command enables you to transmit flight


plan/message/weather data via the ARINC network.

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Data Transmission Commands

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-13

Data Transmission Commands (continued)

Command

Explanation

FX

FAX Command. This command enables you to transmit flight


plan/message/weather data via FACSIMILE.

SI

SITA Command. This command enables you to transmit flight


plan/message/weather data via the SITA network.

UL,1234

ACARS Uplink Command. This command enables you to upload flight


plans or text message information to the FMS system on the aircraft.
Presently, you can uplink to three types of systems: Universal, Smith
Industries, and Honeywell.
For example:
UL,AR,1234,UF,RG=N123ZZ

Database Commands
The following commands access specific customer databases. Using these access commands,
you can create and manage information used in your flight plan requests, customizing the
information that affects your flight plans while simplifying your inputs.

NOTE

These commands are not used with the FP command at all.

Table 2-14

Flight Plan CommandsCustomer Database Access

Command

Explanation

AC

Aircraft Database Access Command. Enables you to create and manage


custom records of the aircraft you use in the JetPlan system. An aircraft
records parameter settings are invoked in a flight plan when the record name
is specified in the flight plan request.
For more information, see Chapter 26, Customer Aircraft Database.

ACF

Aircraft Fleet Database Access Command. Enables you to create and


manage custom records of the aircraft fleet types you use in the JetPlan
system. A fleet type is the Jeppesen generic aircraft ID that defines a specific
airframe/engine combination. An aircraft fleet records parameter settings
are invoked in a flight plan when the record name is specified in the flight
plan request.
For more information, see Chapter 27, Aircraft Fleet Database.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-14

Flight Plan CommandsCustomer Database Access (continued)

Command

Explanation

ALT

Alternate Database Access Command. Enables you to create and manage


alternate airport records for any arrival station you choose. Also enables you
to define the route and/or distance information from a POA to an alternate if
desired. If your flight plan request contains a POA that is recognized as
having alternate information in the database, alternate airport records are
invoked automatically
For more information, Chapter 33, Customer Alternate Database.

AP

Airport Database Access Command. Enables you to create and manage


custom records for any airport you wish to store in the database. Records can
include obstacle information, special procedures, fuel prices, taxi times and
more. If your flight plan request contains a POD or POA that is recognized
as having information in the database, Airport Database records are invoked
automatically
For more information, see Chapter 29, Customer Airport Database.

APF

Airport Fleet Database Access Command. Enables you to create and manage
custom records that define an airports practical usefulness for the type of
aircraft (fleet type) being used in the flight plan. If your flight plan contains a
POD, POA, or implicit alternate with information stored in the database,
Airport Fleet Database records are automatically reviewed. Further, if the
specific fleet type in the flight plan request coincides with a particular airport
record, information in the record is then invoked.
For more information, see Chapter 30, Airport Fleet Database.

CDR

Coded Departure Routes Database Access Command. Coded Departure


Routes (CDRs) are predefined alternate routes for flying between city pairs
when a user-preferred route is not available due to weather or traffic
constraints. This database enables you to find, view, and mark as OK to
Use records of CDRs between specific airport pairs.
For more information, see Chapter 42, Coded Departure Routes Database.

CP

City Pair Database Access Command. Enables you to create and manage
records that contain values specific to specific airport pairs.
For more information, see Chapter 31, City Pair Database.

CPF

City Pair Fleet Database Access Command. Enables you to create and
manage records that contain values specific to certain aircraft types operating
between specific airport pairs.
For more information, see Chapter 32, City Pair Fleet Database.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-14

Flight Plan CommandsCustomer Database Access (continued)

Command

Explanation

FB

Flight Brief Database Access Command. Enables you to create and manage
records that identify remarks intended for ATC or the flight crew. Remarks
can include diplomatic clearance information, crew notes, or weather
information. An FB record is applied in a flight plan if certain conditions for
the flight (for example, departure FIR, arrival FIR, flight number, and fleet
type) match user-defined, key parameters in the database.
NOTE A quick help file is available to guide you through the various
management inputs for this database. Enter FB,HLP on the Options command
line.

For more information, see Chapter 34, Flight Brief Database.


MEL

MEL Database Access Command. Accesses the Minimum Equipment


List/Configuration Deviation List Database. Enables you to create and
manage records that address performance degradations and/or equipment
shortcomings for aircraft of a specific fleet type. Records are invoked when a
MEL Database record name is specified in a flight plan request.
NOTE You can have your output format customized to display MEL
information from the database in the flight plan.

For more information, see Chapter 35, Minimum Equipment List


Database.
MDB

Master (MEL) Database Access Command. Enables you to create and


manage records that address performance and/or equipment degradations for
individual aircraft. This database is keyed by the aircrafts Customer Aircraft
Database (CADB) record name rather than by its fleet type. A record is
invoked any time the CADB record name is used in a flight plan request as
long as it has not expired. This database depends on the MEL Database for
information.
For more information, see Chapter 36, Master Database (MDB).

RST

Restricted Area Database Access Command. Enables you to create and


manage records that identify restricted areas you define. A restricted area
from the database is invoked when a records file name is specified in a flight
plan request.
For more information, see Chapter 37, Restricted Area Database.

RT

Route Database Access Command. Enables you to create and manage as


many routes between specific airport pairs as you need. A record is invoked
when a route file name is specified in a flight plan request.
For more information, see Chapter 38, Customer Route Database.

RG

Route Group Access Command. Enables you to create and manage records
that categorize Customer Route Database records by group record names.
For more information, see Chapter 38, Customer Route Database.

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Option Commands
Additional Command-Line Options

Table 2-14

Flight Plan CommandsCustomer Database Access (continued)

Command

Explanation

RTC

Route Constraint Database Access Command. Enables you to create and


manage records that restrict routes based on aircraft capabilities, limitations,
or equipment.
For more information, see Chapter 39, Route Constraint Database.

SDB

Scenario Database Access Command. Enables you to create and manage


records of inputs that can be used automatically with the OSA (4D) feature.
For more information, see Chapter 40, Scenario Database.

SC

Schedule Database Access Command. Enables you to create and manage


flight plan request sets in a database of scheduled records. A schedule record
is invoked when specified in a flight plan request (SC,FLT,record name).
For more information, see Chapter 41, Customer Schedule Database.

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C HAPTER 3

Point of Departure and


Point of Arrival
Commands

Point of Departure and Point of Arrival Commands


Overview

Overview
This chapter contains information on entering a point of departure (POD) and a point of arrival
(POA) in a JetPlan flight plan request. This chapter also introduces optional features and other
capabilities related to the POD and POA command lines. These features include:
Equal Time Point (ETP) locations
Taxi-out and taxi-in fuel
POD and POA positions and elevations for user-defined airports and inflight start points
Takeoff alternate (POD command line only)

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Specifying Airports
The following sections describe options for entering airport information.

Airport Identification
JetPlan recognizes all airports stored in its Navigation Database, which contains information
on the location and elevation of each airport. The system uses the location and elevation of the
airport in the calculation that determines the flights route and performance information.
You can enter airports on the POD and POA command lines. Specify the four-character ICAO
or three-character IATA identifiers to confirm your departure and arrival airports.
Example:
02 POD KDEN or DEN
03 POA PHNL or HNL
NOTE For information on using airports that are not in the Navigation Database, see
User-Defined Airports on page 78.

Diversion Airports
You can include diversion airports in the flight plan calculation. JetPlan uses diversion airports
to determine ETP information.
You can specify a maximum of 12 diversion airports in your flight plan request. JetPlan has
two methods for specifying diversion airports: sequential entry or paired entry.

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Sequential Entry Method


The sequential entry method requires you to type the diversion airports one after the other
(sequentially) on the POD line only. These inputs follow the departure airport input and are
separated from the POD and from each other by a slash (/).
With the sequential method, the first divert airport (aft) is the POD. The POA is the last
forward divert airport. In the following example, JetPlan determines ETP information between
KLAX and KSFO, KSFO and PACD, PACD and RJCC, and, finally, between RJCC and
RJAA.
Example:
02 POD KLAX/KSFO/PACD/RJCC
03 POA RJAA

Paired-Entry Method
The paired-entry method requires you to specify the diversion airports in paired sets between
the POD and the POA lines. These inputs follow the departure and arrival airport inputs and
are separated from the POD, POA, and each other by a slash (/).
With the paired-entry method, the first divert airport (aft) is the first airport identified after the
departure airport. The last (forward) divert airport is the last airport identified on the POA line.
In the following example, JetPlan determines ETP information in two places: between KSFO
and PACD and between PACD and RJCC. (This input method is easier to follow if you view
the example from top to bottom rather than from left to right.)
Example:
02 POD KLAX/KSFO/PACD
03 POA RJAA/PACD/RJCC

ETP Calculations
When using diversion airports to calculate ETP information, JetPlan computes the basic flight
plan (POD to POA) first. Before JetPlan delivers the results, it runs the ETP subroutine that
applies your specified divert airports. This calculation is not based on a complex mathematical
formula, but rather on a simple iterative process.
This process requires JetPlan to determine both a route to the divert airport and a time factor
on which a comparison can be made. JetPlan determines the route using a great circle
projection from a point along the route of flight to the candidate divert airport. The system
determines the time factor by gathering information that defines a groundspeed. JetPlan uses

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wind averages based on forecast data at a selected altitude (or millibar level) for this
information. Once this information is set, the system performs a comparison process involving
the following two steps:
Step 1 Determination of the bounding points
Step 2 Interval halving between the bounding points
NOTE Several JetPlan applications use this approach, including Basic ETP
Calculator, ETOPS, and Overwater Driftdown. However, variations in this method
exist for certain formats or aircraft. These variations are discussed later in this
section.

The two-step approach analyzes the results of repetitive calls (iterations) to a trial ETP
calculation function. This technique is based on the existence of a forward and backward
divert airport. The trial ETP calculation determines the enroute time required from a trial point
on the flight plan route to either a forward or a backward divert airport. The airport closest to
the flight plan POD is the backward divert airport. The airport closest to the flight plan POA is
the forward divert airport.

Determination of Bounding Points


The objective of the first step is to determine the checkpoints that contain, or bound, the ETP
position. This process uses the ETP airspeed and flight level data stored in either the generic
aircraft data file or in a Customer Aircraft Database (CADB) record. The particular parameters
the system uses to calculate a specific set of ETP positions depend on the specific JetPlan
application. For example, the ETOPS program uses different parameters than the Basic ETP
calculation program. In any event, the algorithm that determines the bounding pair of
checkpoints begins.

NOTE For basic ETP calculations, JetPlan looks in the CADB for the NA/NF
parameters first. If no data exists for these parameters, the system uses the
EA/EM(F) parameters.

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Starting at the beginning of the primary route of flight (the route developed in the basic flight
plan) and proceeding incrementally with each checkpoint, JetPlan creates an ETP trial point.
When divert airports are entered sequentially, the POD is generally the first ETP trial point.
See Figure 3.1.
Dulles (KIAD) - Heathrow (EGLL)
Diverts CYQX / LPLA
EA=320kts EF=10,000ft
CYQX

EINN

Trial
ETP #1

EGLL

KIAD
ETP METHODOLOGY
Determine the trial ETP

Figure 3.1.

LPLA

Trial Equal Time Point

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To collect wind and temperature data, JetPlan runs a great circle route from the ETP trial point
to each divert airport. JetPlan uses this data to determine an overall wind component that can
then be used with the ETP airspeed to determine a time enroute to each divert airport. If the
time to the divert airports does not come within 30 seconds of being equal, JetPlan moves to
the ensuing checkpoint and makes it the next ETP trial point. See Figure 3.2 and Figure 3.3.
Dulles (KIAD) - Heathrow (EGLL)
Diverts CYQX / LPLA
EA=320kts EF=10,000ft
CYQX
Great Circle Route 1
+15 kt tailwind
2:00 hrs

EINN

Trial
ETP #1
Great C ircle Route 2
+30 kt tailwind
5:00 hrs

KIAD

ETP METHODO LOG Y


Test of Trial ETP #1

Figure 3.2.

LPLA

Test of Trial Equal Time Point #1

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Dulles (KIAD) - Heathrow (EGLL)


Diverts CYQX / LPLA
EA=320kts EF=10,000ft
Great Circle
Route 3
1:00 hr

CYQX

Trial
ETP #2

EINN

Great Circle R oute 4


3:55 hr

KIAD

ETP METHODOLOGY
Test of T rial ETP #2

Figure 3.3.

EGLL
LPLA

Test of Trial Equal Time Point #2

Initially, the time to the forward divert airport is greater than the time to the backward divert
airport. At the waypoint where the time to the forward airport becomes less than the time to the
backward airport, a time switch is detected. At this point, known as the switch point, JetPlan

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knows that the ETP must exist somewhere between the switch point and the checkpoint
analyzed immediately prior to the switch point. The bounding points are now known. See
Figure 3.4.
Dulles (KIAD) - Heathrow (EGLL)
Diverts CYQX / LPLA
EA=320kts EF=10,000ft
Great Circle Route 13
2:55 hr

CYQX

Bounding Point #1
Bounding Point #2 (Switch point)

EINN

Great Circle Route 14


1:45 hr

EGLL

KIAD
ETP METHODOLOGY
Test of Trial ETP #7,
Switch point is determined

Figure 3.4.

Determining the ETP Switch Point

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Interval Halving Between Bounding Points


The objective of the second step is to determine the ETP position precisely, using the interval
halving technique. JetPlan creates a new ETP trial point that is midway between the two
bounding points. The system can then recalculate the time to each of the two divert airports
and note the difference. If the time difference is less than 30 seconds, the iteration is satisfied,
and the trial ETP position is established as the actual ETP. See Figure 3.5.
Dulles (KIAD) - Heathrow (EGLL)
Diverts CYQX / LPLA
EA=320kts EF=10,000ft
Great Circle Route 15
2:35 hr

CYQX

Bounding Point # 1
New Trial ETP
Bounding Point #2 (Switch point)

EINN

Trial
ETP #1

Great Circle Route 16


2:05 hr

EGLL

KIAD
ETP METHODOLOGY
Post Interval Halving Test
of Ne w Trial ETP

Figure 3.5.

LPLA

Interval-Halving Test of New Trial ETP

If the time difference between the backward and forward airports and the trial ETP is greater
than 30 seconds, JetPlan determines a new pair of bounding points using the current ETP trial
point as one of the bounding points. A new trial ETP is computed midway between the current

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trial ETP and the other bounding point (interval halving is applied again). This process
continues over and over, until the less-than-30-seconds check is satisfied, and an actual ETP is
determined. See Figure 3.6.
Dulles (KIAD) - Heathrow (EGLL)
Diverts CYQX / LPLA
EA=320kts EF=10,000ft
Great Circle Route 17
2:20 hr

CYQX

Bounding Point #1
New Trial ETP (Ultimate ETP)
New Bounding Point & Switch Point
Bounding Point #2 (original switch point)

EINN

Trial
ETP #1

Great Circle Route 18


2:20 hr

KIAD

Figure 3.6.

ETP METHODOLOGY
Second Interval Halving
Test of New T rial ETP
Actual ETP Determined

LPLA

Determining the ETP

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CADB Considerations
The system determines both the trial and the final ETP points in one of the following ways:
By applying the default true airspeed (TAS) and wind extract level found in
the generic aircraft data file
- or By applying the customer-specified TAS and wind extract level stored in the
CADB.
NOTE In the CADB, the ETP TAS value is stored as the value of the EA parameter
(ETP airspeed), while the ETP wind extract level is stored as the value of the EM
parameter (ETP millibar). By default, a display of the CADB shows the wind extract
parameter as EM. If you use the EM parameter, you are required to apply one of the
following millibar values: 850, 700, 500, 400, 300, 250 or 200. However, you can
apply a flight level rather than a millibar value by specifying the EF parameter (ETP
flight level) and entering a flight level value in hundreds of feet (for example, EF310
for 31,000 feet). Using the EF parameter lets you specify any flight level, as long as it
is valid for the aircraft.

Normally, JetPlan uses the EA and EM/EF parameters for the basic ETP calculations. JetPlan
also makes ETP calculations when the ETOPS and Driftdown options are selected.
If the ETOPS option is selected, the EA parameter is used to specify the ETP TAS, and the
EM/EF parameter is used to specify both the ETP wind selection altitude and the low-level
cruise altitude.
If the Driftdown option is selected, the EA parameter is used to specify the low-level allengine cruise ETP TAS, and the EM/EF parameter is used to specify both the ETP wind
selection altitude and the low-level all-engine cruise altitude.
The Driftdown option also calculates ETPs for one and two-engine out scenarios (for three and
four engine aircraft). This process requires you to provide the following additional parameter
values:
EA1 is used to specify the one engine-out (1LE) ETP TAS
EM1/EF1 is used to specify the one engine-out ETP wind selection altitude
EA2 is used to specify the two engines-out (2LE) ETP TAS
EM2/EF2 is used to specify the two engines-out ETP wind selection altitude
The cruise altitude for one engine-out and two engines-out is determined by a table lookup that
considers aircraft weight and ambient temperature.

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Some users prefer to use a high-altitude ETP for JetPlans basic ETP calculations. JetPlan
refers to this scenario as a non-emergency ETP. In this case, the NA (non-emergency TAS)
parameter is used to specify the non-emergency ETP TAS, and the NF (non-emergency flight
level) parameter is used to specify the non-emergency ETP wind level. The NF parameter
recognizes a flight level only; no millibar levels are allowed (no NM parameter exists).

NOTE The term non-emergency refers to the operational integrity of the aircraft.
The non-emergency ETP may, in fact, be used in an emergency situation, such as a
passenger medical emergency on board. In this case, the aircraft is not compromised,
but a diversion is still required.

NOTE When you apply the Driftdown option to a flight plan with an aircraft that has
CADB values loaded for the NA and NF parameters, the ETP output at the top of the
flight plan is based on these parameters (the non-emergency scenario). However, the
ETP information in the Driftdown summary block is based on the other ETP
parameters, depending on the scenarios applied (all-engine, one engine-out, or two
engines-out calculations).

For more information, see the ETOPS Users Guide: 2 Engine Aircraft on JetPlan.com and
Chapter 22, Overwater Driftdown and Terrain Analysis.

Variations in ETP Calculation Methods


JetPlan has three variations in the methods used to calculate ETP data. Each is briefly
explained in the following paragraphs. The first method is the default and available to most
users, depending on the generic aircraft or CADB file applied. The second and third methods
are more format and aircraft-specific.

Default ETP Calculation Method


The default method calculates the ETP location using a TAS constant and a specific flight
level or millibar for weather data (winds and temps aloft). These constants are stored either in
the generic aircraft data file in use or in the CADB record (EA, EM/EF parameters). If using a
CADB file, both parameter values can be altered. However, if using a generic aircraft data file,
only the TAS constant can be changed.

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Most generic aircraft data files that have ETOPS or Driftdown table data available contain the
following information:
One of the following TAS constants:
All-engine, low-level cruise (usually LRC)
One engine-out cruise (usually 1LE)
A wind extract flight level of 700mb (approximately FL100). Some older
generic aircraft loads have a flight level of 300mb (approximately FL300).
By applying a wind component valuedetermined by running a great circle
flight at the ETP flight level from a trial ETP to the divert airportsto the
TAS constant at the midpoint between the ETP and the divert airports,
JetPlan can determine the groundspeed for the ETP formula.

Second ETP Calculation Method


The second ETP calculation method, applicable to specific formats and aircraft, determines
the ETP location in the same manner as the first method. In addition, this method determines
the fuel burn from the ETP to one or more diversion airports, based on user-supplied fuel flow
constants. Typically, these fuel flow constants represent all-engine, low-level cruise or one
engine-out cruise. The fuel burn calculations include:
Descent from cruise altitude to the specified wind data flight level (millibar)
loaded in the CADB. For example, if 700 mb is specified, the divert cruise
altitude is 10,000 feet.
Cruise to the divert airport at the specified wind data flight level.
Descent to the divert airport.
Hold over the divert airport for user-specified time and altitude.

Third ETP Calculation Method


The third ETP calculation method is an enhanced version of the second method. Instead of
using constants for the TAS and fuel flow, table data is used to determine slightly more
accurate TAS and fuel flow values.
For specific two-engine aircraft, JetPlan may use this method in ETOPS flight plans.
For specific two, three, and four-engine aircraft, JetPlan may use this method in Driftdown
flight plans.

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For more information, see the ETOPS Users Guide: 2 Engine Aircraft at JetPlan.com and
Chapter 22, Overwater Driftdown and Terrain Analysis.

ETP and Diversion Airport Output


The following output is typical for the default ETP calculation method.
ETP KSFO/PACD 03/05 1404NM
ETP PACD/RJAA 07/34 3490NM
--- --------- ----- -----1
2
3
4

P009/M028 BURN 0536 N42402W145348


P038/P000 BURN 1149 N41492E167180
--------- --------- ------------5/6
7
8

Explanation:
Column 1 ETP indicator.
Column 2 Airport pair.
Column 3 Estimated time enroute (ETE) from the POD to the ETP with all
engines operating.
Column 4 Distance from the POD to the ETP.
Column 5 Wind component from the ETP to the rearward ETP airport
(KSFO on the first line)in this case, plus nine knots (tailwind).
Column 6 Wind component from the ETP to the forward ETP airport
(PACD on the first line)in this case, minus 28 knots (headwind).
Column 7 Total fuel burn from the POD to the ETP. Most formats
generally round off this value to the nearest hundred pounds (for example,
0536 on the first line is 53,600+ pounds). Other available formats display
this value to the nearest pound.
Column 8 The ETP coordinates.
The following output is representative of the second or third ETP calculation method.
RJAA-PACD
DIST
2093
DIST
TIME
04.03
TIME
BURN
1274
BURN
LAT/LONG N36402 E168210
AVG W/C RJAA M012 TO PACD

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1620
02.54
0575
P080

-LINE
-LINE
-LINE
-LINE
-LINE

1
2
3
4
5

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Explanation:
Line 1 Distance in the left column is from the POD to the ETP. Distance in
the right column is from the ETP to the forward ETP airport (PACD).
Line 2 Time in the left column is from the POD to the ETP. Time in the
right column is from the ETP to the forward ETP airport (PACD).
Line 3 Burn in the left column is from the POD to the ETP. Burn in the
right column is from the ETP to the forward ETP airport (PACD).
Line 4 The ETP coordinates.
Line 5 Average wind components to the rearward ETP airport
(RJAAM012) and to the forward ETP airport (PACDP080).

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User-Defined Airports

User-Defined Airports
The following sections discuss options for entering information about user-defined airports.

Station Identification
For an airport not loaded in the Navigation Database, you can use an arbitrary, unique, fourcharacter alphanumeric dummy identifier in combination with the coordinates and elevation of
the airport to define a valid POD or POA input in the JetPlan system. The dummy identifier
must not match any identifiers in the Navigation Database. For flights in the U.S., the letter K
can be used as the first character in the dummy identifier (for example, KXXX). This assists
ATC in recognizing the filing strip as U.S. domestic information.
The coordinate values for this type of airport input must follow the convention of a four-digit
latitude and a five-digit longitude. A dash, or minus sign (-), must precede southern or eastern
hemisphere coordinate values.
The airports elevation is a three-digit value (in hundreds of feet) and must be preceded by the
letters FL. If an elevation value is not entered, JetPlan assumes that the airport is at sea level.
Example:
02 POD KXXX,4136,10409,FL055

This example illustrates how to enter a user-defined airport as a POD or POA. The coordinates
and elevation for this airport are: N4135.6 W10409.4 and 5,535'. Notice that rounding is
performed to comply with coordinate and elevation input rules.

In-Flight Start
The term In-Flight Start refers to beginning a flight plan at altitude, or in-flight. The In-Flight
Start feature is a useful planning tool for various situations. It may also be applied to an arrival
airport and, therefore, the name is a bit of a misnomer, but it works equally well.
The In-Flight Start feature is similar to the User-Defined Airport feature, in that the inputs are
similar. However, with In-Flight Start, you can use either an airport from the Navigation
Database or a user-defined airport as an in-flight start point. In addition, you can use
NAVAIDs as in-flight start points. Another difference between the two features is that instead
of using the FL option to specify an airport elevation, you are using it as an actual flight level
(altitude) at which to begin (or end, in the case of a POA) the flight.

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Example:
02 POD XXXX,4136,10409,FL350

Explanation: This example applies a user-defined airport followed by an in-flight start altitude
of 35,000 ft.
Example:
02 POD KPDT,FL390

Explanation: For airports stored in the JetPlan Navigation Database, enter the ICAO or IATA
identifier followed by the in-flight start altitude. Here, an in-flight start is applied at Pendleton
(KPDT) at 39,000 ft.
Example:
02 POD PDT,K1,FL370

Explanation: To specify a NAVAID that is collocated at an airport, use the ARINC 424
alphanumeric method of identification. Here, the in-flight start begins at the Pendleton VOR,
K1, using a flight level of 37,000 ft.
Example:
02 POD BILLO,P,FL360

Explanation: You can also specify a NAVAID that is located over some known route
structure, such as an OTS. Use the ARINC 424 alphanumeric method of identification for the
NAVAID. Here, an in-flight start is applied using the waypoint, BILLO, from the Hawaiian
Track structure R-464 at an altitude of 36,000 ft.

Running In-Flight-Start ETP Flight Plans


This section describes the in-flight start flight plan with an engine-out cruise mode. Two
different techniques exist to output one engine-out and two engine-out performance data. The
first technique invokes the Driftdown option. (For more information, see Chapter 22,
Overwater Driftdown and Terrain Analysis.) The second technique requires an in-flight start
flight plan.

NOTE JetPlan considers a one engine-out ferry flight plan as a normal plan, using
an aircraft data file with one engine-out climb and cruise data. JetPlan has many
corporate and transport generic aircraft data files with one engine-out data. In
addition, JetPlan has some transport generic aircraft data files with two engine-out
data.

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The following steps illustrate how to run optimized flight plans from the ETP to the rearward
and forward ETP airports.
1. Run a flight plan from the POD to the POA, specifying ETP airport pairs
that meet operational requirements (weather, NAVAID availability, runway
length, and so on). The following inputs are representative of a flight plan
from KJFK to EGLL using sequential ETP airports.
Example:
01 OPTIONS FP
02 POD KJFK/CYHZ/CYYR/BIKF/EINN,TX1200
03 POA EGLL
06 ROUTE P//P
07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST 30,EGSS
08 ETD 0200
09 PROFILE I
10 A/C TYPE/REGN D30M/N12345 or CADB entry $345/
11 CRUISE MODE M82,M82
12 PRFM INDEX F *
13 OPERATIONAL WT 270000 *
14 PAYLOAD 75000
16 POD OR POA FUEL A2000,I
17 MAX FUEL 243000 *
18 CLIMB FUEL,TIME,DIST *
19 DESCENT FUEL,TIME,DIST *
NOTE Items with an asterisk are not required if a CADB file is used (for example,
$345/).

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2. From this flight plan, determine the following items for the ETP in-flight
start flight plans:
The ETP coordinates constitute the POD (in-flight start point).
The POD elevation is the cruise altitude at the ETP.
The POA is one of the diversion airports.
Determine the in-flight start ETD by adding the enroute time to the
ETP to the original flight plan ETD.
Specify the appropriate cruise mode. The most common one engineout cruise mode is 1LE (one less engine). The most common two
engines-out cruise mode is 2LE (two less engines).
Determine the POD fuel by subtracting the fuel burn to the ETP
from the takeoff fuel.

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3. Run the first in-flight start flight plan:


Example:
01 OPTIONS FP
02 POD ETPX,5028,03807,FL330
03 POA BIKF
06 ROUTE D//D
07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST <ENTER>
08 ETD 0506 (original flight plan ETD plus ETE to the
ETP)
09 PROFILE I
10 A/C TYPE/REGN M1LE/N12345 or CADB entry $345/
11 CRUISE MODE 1LE (use the designated one or two
engine-out cruise mode)
12 PRFM INDEX F *
13 OPERATIONAL WT 270000 *
14 PAYLOAD 75000
16 POD OR POA FUEL D64500 (fuel remaining at ETP)
17 RESERVE 0 *
18 CLIMB FUEL,TIME,DIST BIAS *
19 DESCENT FUEL,TIME,DIST BIAS *
NOTE If a CADB file is used (for example, $345/), items with an asterisk are not
required.

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4. After receiving the first in-flight start flight plan, run the second in-flight
start flight plan, specifying the other diversion airport as the POA.
Example:
01 OPTIONS FPR
02 POD ETPX,5028,03807,FL330
03 POA CYYR
06 ROUTE D//D
07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST <ENTER>
08 ETD 0506
09 PROFILE I
10 A/C TYPE/REGN M1LE/N12345 or CADB entry $345/
11 CRUISE 1LE
12 PRFM INDEX F *
13 OPERATIONAL WT 270000 *
14 PAYLOAD 75000
16 POD OR POA FUEL D64500
17 RESERVE 0 *
18 CLIMB FUEL,TIME,DIST BIAS *
19 DESCENT FUEL,TIME,DIST BIAS *
NOTE If a CADB file is used (for example, $345/), items with an asterisk are not
required.

5. The generic aircraft data file, M1LE, is embedded in the D30M load,
supporting use of the Driftdown (DRFT/DRFTX) feature with the D30M
load. The M1LE generic load is selected since the D30M does not have a
1LE cruise mode. Customer Service can provide a list of corporate and
transport generic aircraft data files with one engine-out and two engines-out
cruise modes.
6. Flight plans can be run for each ETP airport pair in a similar manner.

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Taxi Fuel

Taxi Fuel
The following sections discuss options for entering information about taxi fuel.

Taxi Parameters in the Customer Databases


The CADB includes three parameters that affect the inclusion of taxi fuel:
TX Taxi fuel flow (lbs/hr)
DT POD taxi fuel weight
AT POA taxi fuel weight
When the CADB record is specified in the flight plan request, the DT and AT parameters
apply a specific amount of fuel (by weight) to your flight plan.
The CADB parameter TX affects flight planning only when a taxi time amount is specified.
Taxi time is specified through the parameters TO (AVE Taxi Out Minutes) and TI (AVE Taxi
In Minutes) in the Customer Airport Database. If the correct combination of aircraft and
airports is specified in your flight plan request, these parameters initiate a taxi fuel amount in
the flight plan output.
The amount of fuel derived from the TX parameter in the CADB (together with the TO and TI
parameters in the Airport Database) override the DT and AT parameter values.

NOTE The CADB TX parameter also works in coordination with the taxi-in and taxiout data sets in the City Pair Fleet Database and the Airport Fleet Database. For
information, see Chapter 27, Aircraft Fleet Database and Chapter 32, City Pair
Fleet Database.

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Taxi Fuel

Ad Hoc Taxi Fuel


You can use the POD and POA command lines to add taxi fuel to your flight plan requests.
You can enter the taxi fuel value in weight or time.

NOTE

Ad hoc taxi fuel overrides any parameter setting in your customer databases.

NOTE Many different output formats provide separate taxi fuel information in the
fuel block summaries of flight plans. Other formats embed taxi fuel in other totals. If
you want taxi fuel totals output on a separate fuel summary line, you can change your
output format to one that does show this information. You can also have a taxi fuel
line added to your output format. Contact your Jeppesen account manager for more
information.

To enter the taxi fuel value in weight, enter the TX option on either the POD or POA line or
both. Include the weight value immediately after the option. Depending on your weight
measure preferences, the value you enter is in pounds or kilograms.
Example:
02 POD KLAS/KLAX/KSFO,TX1200

Explanation: Include 1200 pounds taxi-out fuel.


Example:
03 POA PHNL/PHTO/PHTO,TX400

Explanation: Include 400 pounds taxi-in fuel.

NOTE As a rule, JetPlan subtracts taxi-out fuel from the total fuel before takeoff.
JetPlan considers taxi-in fuel as extra fuel carried to the POA.

To enter the taxi fuel value in minutes, enter the TXT option on either the POD or POA line or
both. Include the time in minutes immediately after the option.
Example:
02 POD KSFO,TXT12

Explanation: Include 12 minutes of taxi-out fuel

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Taxi Fuel

Example:
03 POA KMAN,TXT14

Explanation: Include 14 minutes of taxi-in fuel

Adding the Taxi-Out Value to the ETD


The TXA option enables you to add the taxi-out value to the ETD time specified in the flight
plan request. The ETD used in the flight plan calculation is then the taxi-out time + ETD.
If you do not enter a taxi-out value in the flight plan request, JetPlan looks in the customer
databases for a taxi-out value to use. See Taxi Parameters in the Customer Databases on
page 84.
When TXA is specified and taxi-out is a non-zero value, the following information is added to
the RMK/ field in the filing strip: TAXI#####, where ##### is the taxi time in minutes (for
example, 30) or, if needed, in hours and minutes (0130).
To add the taxi-out time to the ETD in the flight plan request, type TXA on the POD line.
Example:
02 POD KSFO,TXA
03 POA KMAN

Explanation: Instruct JetPlan to add the taxi-out time to the ETD to determine the actual ETD
used in the flight plan computation. The taxi-out time is then added to the value entered for the
ETD. Because no taxi-in or taxi-out time is specified in the flight plan request, JetPlan
determines the values based on what is stored in the customer databases.
Example:
02 POD KSFO,TXT16,TXA
03 POA KMAN,TXT11

Explanation: Instruct JetPlan to add the taxi-out time (16 minutes) to the ETD to determine the
actual ETD to be used in the flight plan computation. Request a taxi-in time of 11 minutes.
The taxi-out and taxi-in time values entered on the flight plan request override any taxi-in and
taxi-out values stored in the customer databases.
Example:
02 POD KSFO,TXA
03 POA KMAN,TXT8

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Taxi Fuel

Explanation: Instruct JetPlan to add the taxi-out time to the ETD to determine the actual ETD
to be used in the flight plan computation. Request a taxi-in time of eight minutes. Because no
taxi-out time is specified in the flight plan request, JetPlan determines the value based on what
is stored in the customer databases. The taxi-out time is then added to the value entered for the
ETD. The taxi-in time entered on the flight plan request overrides any taxi-in value stored in
the customer databases.

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Takeoff Alternate

Takeoff Alternate
The Takeoff Alternate is an EU-OPS compliant feature that enables you to specify one
alternate, in IATA or ICAO format, on the POD command line.
Example:
02 POD EGLL,ALT=LGW

- or 02 POD EGLL,ALT=EGKK

To validate whether the entered takeoff alternate meets EU-OPS requirements, JetPlan:
Determines the total distance from the POD to the takeoff alternate. JetPlan
does this using a sequential checklist that searches first in the Alternate
Database (which stores either the Route Database distance or the userspecified distance) and then by performing a great circle distance check.
Determines if the total distance from POD to takeoff alternate is less than
the maximum allowable distance based on the engine-out true airspeed
(EA1) specified in the ETP database (a subsection of the CADB).
Determines the setting of the ETOPS approval time parameter (ET in the
ETOPS database), which then implements a time factor of one or two hours,
depending on that parameter entry. A non-entry (blank or zero) provides for
a one-hour factor at engine-out cruise speed. A time parameter entry of 60
minutes to 180 minutes provides for a two-hour factor at engine-out cruise
speed.
Displays the takeoff alternate data (format-dependent).
Prints a warning message at the bottom of the flight plan if a takeoff
alternate is not specified or if it is not within the maximum allowable
distance.
Uses the engine-out flight level (EM1) set in the ETP database (a subsection
of the CADB).

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C HAPTER 4

Restricted Area
Commands

Restricted Area Commands


Overview

Overview
JetPlan allows you to define an area along the intended, or generally expected route of flight as
restricted airspace through the use of the RST option and Restricted Area command line.
Application of this feature forces JetPlan to generate a route that avoids the defined restriction.
A restricted area may be defined at the time of flight plan creation or predefined for future and
continued use.
There are two types of user-defined restricted areas: delineated boundary and common route
structure element. A delineated boundary is created by the demarcation of a region through the
use of coordinate values. Elements of common route structure that may be used to define
restricted areas include FIR/UIR boundaries, airways, and navaids.
In addition, delineated boundary restricted areas can be stored in the Restricted Area Database
for use at any time, as flight requirements dictate (see Chapter 37, Restricted Area
Database.).

NOTE The restricted area functionality invoked by the RST option command and
the 4D Avoid and Alert restrictive airspace functionality are two separate and distinct
features. For information on the 4D Avoid and Alert feature, see Chapter 5, 4D Avoid
and Alert Restrictive Airspaces.

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Using the RST Option

Using the RST Option


To apply a restricted area input to a flight plan, you must first invoke the RST option in the
flight plan request. The RST option is entered on the 01 OPTIONS command line anywhere
after the FP command (for example, FP,RST or FP,LP,AW,RST).
When entered without any further qualifying information on the Options command line, the
RST option tells JetPlan to prompt you for a restricted area input later (on the 05
RESTRICTED AREA line). At this prompt you may input either a delineated boundary, a
common route structure element, or a record from the Restricted Area Database. If needed,
you may even enter multiple inputs (excluding the delineated boundary type).
Example:
01
02
03
05
06

OPTIONS FP,LP,RST
POD EDDF
POA LIRA
RESTRICTED AREA (Single Input or Multiple Inputs)
ROUTE J

You may also enter a restricted area input on the Options command line immediately after the
RST option. However, this input must be of the predefined variety (database file name or
common route structure element), and only one input is allowed here. You may not enter a
delineated boundary type of input on the Options command line. To add a restricted area input
on the Options command line, enter RST, followed by a slash (/) and the file or element input.
The slash after RST is required (RST/XAVD1).
Example:
01 OPTIONS FP,LP,RST/XAVD01

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Using the RST Option

Delineated Boundaries
There are two techniques for defining delineated boundary restricted areas. The first is to
demarcate a polygonal area using coordinates as corner points. The other is to define a circular
region by providing a coordinate and a radius distance. In either case, each coordinate must be
expressed as a number set with latitudinal and longitudinal values.
User-de lineated Restricted Are as

Polygonal Areas

Circu lar Area

The following rules apply to restricted area inputs of the delineated boundary type:
A delineated boundary may be either a polygonal or circular area.
A polygonal area is composed of three to five sets of coordinates.
Coordinates must be input in a manner similar to connecting points
on a piece of paper, with no lines crossing and the area enclosed.
A circular area is composed of a single coordinate followed by a
radius distance. The radius must be specified in nautical miles and
have the letter, R, appended.
All coordinate sets must be expressed as four-digit latitude and fivedigit longitude values. South latitude and East longitude entries
must be prefixed with a minus sign (-), or the letters S and E
respectively. A prefix may be omitted for the North latitude and
West longitude entries (these hemispheres are accepted as default).
However, you may prefix these coordinates with a plus sign (+), or
the letters N and W respectively.
Example:
Explanation: The restricted area is the four-sided polygon created by the coordinate sets
identified.
01
02
03
05

OPTIONS FP,CS/JD123,CPT/J SMITH,DSP/D JONES,RST


POD MMUN
POA LFPG
RESTRICTED AREA 5700,05000,5700,01000,4800,02000,4800,05000

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Using the RST Option

Example:
Explanation: The restricted area is a one hundred mile radius around the coordinate point
identified.
01
02
03
05

OPTIONS FP,CS/JD123,CPT/J SMITH,DSP/D JONES,RST


POD MMUN
POA LFPG
RESTRICTED AREA N5700,W01000,100R

Restrictions By Route Structure Element


There are three elements of route structure which may be used to define a restricted area:
FIR/UIR boundaries, airway segments, and navaids. Using a FIR or UIR as a restricted area
input allows you to avoid an entire airspace region, while specifying an airway segment or a
NAVAID as a restricted area allows you to avoid the identified route structure element.
When using a route structure element as a restricted area input you must explicitly identify the
element by prefixing the input with a code that identifies the type of element you are entering.
The following table shows each element type, its required prefix, and a description of the input
value.
Table 4-1

Route Structure Elements

Element

Prefix

Input Description

FIR/UIR

XIR=

Charted FIR/UIR
identifier
Ex. XIR=LIMM

Airway Segment

AW=

Nav1 AirwayID Nav2


Ex. AW=DQO J75 GVE

Navaid

CP=

Charted NAVAID
identifier
Ex. CP=KOKSY or
CP=CTL

Route structure elements as restricted area inputs are typically entered on the Options
command line, immediately after the RST option (RST/prefix=element input). While this
method saves time, it does limit the input to only one restricted area entry.
You may enter route structure elements as inputs on the Restricted Area command line. This
method allows you to enter multiple restricted area inputs if needed.

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Using the RST Option

FIR/UIR Examples
The examples below demonstrate the use of airspace regions as restricted area inputs. Two
examples are given; one shows a restricted area input on the Options command line, the other
shows a restricted area input on the Restricted Area command line.

NOTE Extraneous command line inputs are omitted for brevity (for example, POD,
POA, and so on).

Example:
Explanation: (Options command line) This example defines the Switzerland UIR boundary as
the area to be avoided.
01 OPTIONS FP,RCC,CS/JD123,CPT/S SMITH,DSP/R JONES,RST/XIR=LSAS

Example:
Explanation: (Restricted Area command line) This example defines the Milan, Italy UIR
boundary as the area to be avoided.
01
02
03
05
06

OPTIONS FP,CS/JD123,CPT/J SMITH,DSP/D JONES,RST


POD EDDF
POA HECA
RESTRICTED AREA XIR=LIMM
ROUTE J

Airway Examples
When defining an airway restriction, you must define an airway segment. This is done by
entering a begin and an end point on the airway you wish to avoid using charted NAVAID
identifiers. Enter the option, AW=, followed by the NAVAID that marks the start of the
airway segment, the airway identifier/name, and finally the NAVAID that marks the end of the
airway segment. Separate each identifier with a blank space. Do not enter a comma between
these entries.

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Using the RST Option

The examples below demonstrate the use of airways as restricted area inputs. Two examples
are given; one shows a restricted area input on the Options command line, the other shows a
restricted area input on the Restricted Area command line.

NOTE Extraneous command line inputs are omitted for brevity (for example, POD,
POA, and so on).

Example:
Explanation: (Options command line) This example defines the airway segment between
Konan and Nattenheim on UL607 as restricted. Notice that a blank space separates the
NAVAID and airway identifiers, not a comma.
01 OPTIONS FP,RST/AW=KONAN UL607 NTM
06 ROUTE J

Example:
Explanation: (Restricted Area command line) This example defines the airway, UB4, between
Rolampont and Chatillon, as restricted.
01 OPTIONS FP,RST
05 RESTRICTED AREA AW=RLP UB4 CTL
06 ROUTE J

Airway Altitude Restrictions


You may restrict certain altitudes on a particular airway by including the altitude restriction
option on your airway restriction input. This type of restriction instructs JetPlan to test two
routes (generate two flight plans). The first flight plan uses the route that includes the defined
airway segment, but at an altitude above or below the altitude restriction. The second plan uses
the route that avoids the defined airway segment altogether. JetPlan prints the plan that
provides the optimum results (based on your preferred performance index: fuel, time, or
money).
To add an altitude restriction to the airway restriction option, enter a slash (/) at the end of the
defined airway restriction, followed by the prefix, FL=, and the altitude range you wish to
avoid. The altitude range input follows standard flight level syntax, except that a dash ( - )
separates the two flight level inputs rather than a comma.

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Using the RST Option

Example:
Explanation: This example defines an airway restriction on UB4 (same as previous example),
but with a specific altitude restriction (330 to 370). The possible outcome of this input is a plan
that includes the airway, UB4, with a flight level above or below the specified avoid range; or
a plan that avoids UB4 between the points, RLP and CTL.
01 OPTIONS FP,RST
05 RESTRICTED AREA AW=RLP UB4 CTL/FL=330-370
06 ROUTE J

Checkpoint Examples
The examples below demonstrate the use of checkpoints as restricted area inputs. Two
examples are given; one shows a restricted area input on the Options command line, the other
show a restricted area input on the Restricted Area command line.

NOTE Extraneous command line inputs are omitted for brevity (for example, POD,
POA, and so on).

Example:
Explanation: (Options command line) This example defines the Frankfurt NAVAID, FFM, as
a restricted overfly point.
01 OPTIONS FP,RST/CP=FFM
06 ROUTE J

Example:
Explanation: (Restricted Area command line) This example defines the Honiley NAVAID,
HON, as a restricted overfly point.
01 OPTIONS FP,RST
05 RESTRICTED AREA CP=HON
06 ROUTE J

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Using the RST Option

Customer Route Database Considerations


When using a Customer Route Database (CRDB) file as your route input, be careful not to
specify a restricted area input that conflicts with the stored route.
If you are going to create a flight plan request in which a CRDB file and a restricted area are
both applied as the route input and the route restriction input respectively, there is a possible
conflict to consider. A problem arises when a route structure element within the CRDB file (a
NAVAID or airway) matches a route structure element named as a restricted area input.
The conflict is the opposing logic between the two inputs you are supplying JetPlan. On the
one hand, you are saying, give me the route stored in this CRDB file. On the other, you are
saying be sure to avoid this route structure, even if it is part of the stored route data. If the
element you wish to avoid is part of the route you are supplying JetPlan, an error occurs.
For example, consider the following inputs.
Example:
01 OPTIONS FP,RST/CP=FFM
06 ROUTE RT/RTE1

If the CRDB input, RTE1, includes the checkpoint you wish to avoid, FFM, an error message
is generated.
This is due to the fact that there is no dynamic route selection when using a CRDB file as your
route input. JetPlan, in this case, can only deliver a route based on the information stored in the
CRDB file. If the stored information includes the NAVAID or airway you wish to avoid, then
an obvious conflict exists.
The same can be said for FIR/UIR restricted area inputs too. If the submitted route file is
designed to traverse the FIR/UIR named as a restricted area, an error occurs.
To alleviate this type of conflict, you must remove the restricted area input or select another
CRDB file; one that does not contain the named restriction.

NOTE When using a restricted area input and the Route command line input,
RT/ALL, the same conflict is possible. However, if the file selected as the optimum
route contains the defined restriction (the route element you wish to avoid), only a
warning banner is produced (no error message is generated).

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Restricted Area Commands


Using the RST Option

Applying Restricted Area Database Files


Restricted Area Database files may be applied to a flight plan request (standard or scheduled)
on either the Options command line or the Restricted Area command line.

NOTE This section does not consider the creation or maintenance of Restricted
Area Database files. To create or manage such files, see the Customer Restricted
Area Database chapter.

If you wish to enter a Restricted Area Database file name after RST on the Options command
line, you may enter only one. Be sure to separate the option from the input value with a slash
(/).
Example:
Explanation: A single Restricted Area Database file name is entered after the RST option on a
standard flight plan request.
01 OPTIONS FP,RCC,CS/JD123,CPT/S SMITH,DSP/R JONES,RST/XNAT1

Example:
Explanation: A single Restricted Area Database file name is entered after the RST option on a
schedule flight plan request.
01 OPTIONS SC,FLT,JFK-LHR,DRFT,RST/XNAT1

You may enter one or more database file names on the Restricted Area command line.

NOTE

For multiple inputs, see the next section below.

Example:
Explanation: A single Restricted Area Database file name is entered on the Restricted Area
command line.
01
02
03
05

OPTIONS FP,RCC,CS/JD123,CPT/S SMITH,DSP/R JONES,RST


POD MMUN
POA LFPG
RESTRICTED AREA XNAT1

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Using the RST Option

Applying Multiple Restricted Areas


If you wish to enter more than one restricted area input in a flight plan request, you must use
the Restricted Area command line only. Multiple inputs may not be entered on the Options
command line.
Multiple restricted area entries can include any combination of database file names and route
structure elements. Each entry in a multiple input must be separated by a comma.

NOTE You may not enter more than one delineated boundary input (the type that is
defined by coordinate sets).

Example:
Explanation: Multiple database file names are entered on the Restricted Area command line.
01
02
03
05

OPTIONS FP,RST
POD MMUN
POA LFPG
RESTRICTED AREA XAVD1,XAVD2

Example:
Explanation: Multiple inputs, including a FIR/UIR boundary, are entered on the Restricted
Area command line.
01
02
03
05

OPTIONS FP,RST
POD MMUN
POA LFPG
RESTRICTED AREA XIR=LECM,XAVD1,XAVD2
NOTE

You may enter up to five FIR entries.

Example:
Explanation: Multiple airway/altitude restrictions are entered on the Restricted Area command
line.
01 OPTIONS FP,RST
05 RESTRICTED AREA AW=ONL J114 SNY/FL=200-370,AW=AVE J6 HEC/FL=310370
06 ROUTE J

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Restricted Area Commands


Omitting a Restricted Area Input

Omitting a Restricted Area Input


When working with stored or previously computed flight plans that contain restricted area
inputs, you may enter the option, NORST, on the Options command line to prevent or cancel
the application of that input. In other words, when computing or recomputing a plan that
includes a restricted area input database file name, route structure element, or delineated
boundary you may supersede that input by adding the NORST option.
This may be entered on the Options command line after the FP, FPR, LD or LDR commands.
With the NORST option, the 05 RESTRICTED AREA prompt is suppressed. If for some
reason this does not suppress the 05 RESTRICTED AREA prompt, or if you forget to enter
this option, you may enter NONE as your input at the prompt and continue to the next
question.
Example:
01 OPTIONS FPR,NORST

or
01
02
03
05

OPTIONS FP
POD MMUN
POA LFPG
RESTRICTED AREA NONE

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C HAPTER 5

4D Avoid and Alert


Restrictive Airspaces

4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive Airspaces


Overview

Overview
NOTE The 4D Avoid and Alert restrictive airspace functionality and the restricted
area functionality are two separate and distinct features. The restricted area
functionality is invoked by the RST option. For information on the RST option
command, see the Restricted Area Commands chapter in the Jetplan User Manual.

This chapter provides information on the JetPlan 4D Avoid and Alert feature. This feature
governs JetPlans behavior when it is:
Determining an optimized route and vertical profile
Providing airspace incursion alerts for a user-entered route and its computed
vertical profile
Providing airspace incursion alerts for a user-entered customer route and its
computed vertical profile
The aspects of a restrictive airspace that most impact route optimization and route validation
are its vertical and lateral boundaries, operational times, and avoidance level. Three avoidance
levels are possible: Ignore, Notify, and Avoid. These are discussed in detail in the following
sections.

Prerequisites
The following prerequisites exist for the 4D Avoid and Alert feature:
Restrictive
Airspace Alerts

A restrictive airspace alert is provided for each segment of the route


of a completed flight plan that is determined to incur at least one
restrictive airspace with an avoidance level of Avoid or Notify. To
display such alerts, you need either a flight plan format that supports
alerts or an interface that automatically displays them. For more
information on these requirements, contact your Jeppesen account
manager.

Customer
Controlled Avoid
and Alert (CCAA)
Database

As mentioned above, the JetPlan 4D Avoid and Alert feature requires


the existence of customer recordsboth in the CCAA Database and
in source restrictive airspace databases. These databases are discussed
in detail in the following sections.

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Overview

The remainder of this chapter covers the following topics:


The Customer
Controlled Avoid
and Alert (CCAA)
Database and the
source restrictive
airspace
databases

These database records contain information relative to the avoidance


levels of restrictive airspaces. The CCAA Database is a prerequisite
for the 4D Avoid and Alert feature. See Understanding the CCAA
Database on page 107.

The JetPlan 4D
Avoid and Alert
flight plan options

These options invoke the restrictive airspace avoid and alert


functionality. See Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan
Options on page 118.

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4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive Airspaces


Understanding the CCAA Database

Understanding the CCAA Database


NOTE This section presents an overview of the CCAA Database and how it
supports the Avoid and Alert flight plan options. For complete information on creating
and maintaining CCAA Database records, see the JetPlan.com Help file for the CCAA
Database.

The CCAA Database allows users to create and manage records that reference pre-defined
restrictive airspace records residing in several different source restrictive airspace databases.
The pre-defined restrictive airspace records contain data originating in sources such as an
ARINC 424 extract, customer-provided source, or an online electronic service (for example,
organized track updates or customer or vendor-provided turbulence forecasts). For this reason,
these databases are referred to as source restrictive airspace databases. Records in the source
restrictive airspace databases are referred to as referenced records, and records in the CCAA
Database are referred to as referencing records.
While the CCAA Database does not allow you to alter restrictive airspace records stored in
source restrictive airspace databases, you can set and modify the following two important
parameters in the referencing CCAA Database records:
Avoidance Level

JetPlan uses the avoidance level to determine how to treat the


referenced restrictive airspace when computing a flight planas an
Avoid or Notify airspace or as an airspace that can be ignored.

Special Customer
Airspace Type
(SCA Type)

The SCA Type is a unique, user-defined value. You can use the SCA
Type to invoke an ad hoc override of a restrictive airspaces
avoidance level.

Application of the avoidance level and SCA Type by the JetPlan 4D Avoid and Alert feature is
discussed in more detail in the following paragraphs. For detailed descriptions of these two
parameters, see the JetPlan.com Help file for the CCAA and User-Defined Restrictive
Airspace Databases.

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4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive Airspaces


Understanding the CCAA Database

Creation of the Initial CCAA Database


NOTE For step-by-step procedures on creating and maintaining the CCAA
Database, see the JetPlan.com Help file.

A customer-appointed authorized user is required to invoke a special procedure to initially


create/reconcile the customers CCAA Database. This procedure both creates the CCAA
Database and reconciles it to each of the source restrictive airspace databases.
The CCAA Database create/reconcile procedure must be performed before the JetPlan 4D
Avoid and Alert options can be used. The create/reconcile procedure only needs to be invoked
once. Afterwards, the CCAA Database is automatically updated and reconciled each time one
of the source restrictive airspace databases is updated. However, in the event of loss or
corruption of either the CCAA Database or one or more of the source restrictive airspace
databases, the authorized user can always perform the create/reconcile procedure to ensure
that the CCAA Database is properly constituted.
JetPlan.com provides a convenient way to perform the CCAA Database create/reconcile
procedure. For instructions, see the JetPlan.com Help file. For users of the JetPlan commandline interface, the command for invoking the CCAA create/reconcile procedure is as follows:
01 OPTIONS CAA,GEN

Understanding the Source Restrictive Airspace


Databases
As discussed in the previous section, the CCAA Database is initially populated and
subsequently updated through automatic reconciliation with the source restrictive airspace
databases. The following paragraphs provide more information about these databases.

Restrictive Airspace Terminology


The following terms are used throughout this chapter to describe types of restrictive airspace:
Special Use
Airspace (SUA)

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A government-managed airspace stored in the Generic Restrictive


Airspace Database.

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User-Defined
Airspace

A user-defined airspace stored in the User-Defined Restrictive


Airspace Database.

Organized Track
Airspace

An airspace formed around an organized track and stored in the


Organized Track Restrictive Airspace Database.

Jeppesen
Turbulence
Airspace

An airspace for which there is forecasted turbulence.

Flight Information
Region/Upper
Information
Region Airspace
(FIR/UIR)

An airspace formed by the boundaries of a FIR or UIR.

Geopolitical
Country Boundary

An airspace formed by the boundaries of a country.

Avoid-Level
Airspace

An airspace for which the referencing CCAA Database record has an


avoidance level of Avoid.

Notify-Level
Airspace

An airspace for which the referencing CCAA Database record has an


avoidance level of Notify.

Ignore-Level
Airspace

An airspace for which the referencing CCAA Database record has an


avoidance level of Ignore.

Source Restrictive Airspace Databases


The following source restrictive airspace databases are referenced by records in the CCAA
Database.

NOTE Only the User-Defined Restrictive Airspace Database can be modified. The
other databases are read-only.

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Understanding the CCAA Database

Generic Restrictive Airspace Database


The Generic Restrictive Airspace Database is included in the suite of JetPlan navigational
databases provided to you by Jeppesen. This database contains a standard, customerindependent set of restrictive airspaces, each of which is constructed based on a specific
government-defined Special Use Airspace (SUA). All SUAs are extracted from the ARINC
424 file that is provided by Jeppesens NavData service every 28 days. These extracts are
processed to produce and store airspaces in the Generic Restrictive Airspace Database.
Updates
The Generic Restrictive Airspace Database is updated by Jeppesen every 28 days per the
ARINC 424 28-day cycle. For flight planning purposes, you have access to the current version
of this database and all subsequent updates to it as soon as creation of the initial CCAA
Database has been completed. From that point on, each update to the Generic Restrictive
Airspace Database is immediately followed by an automatic reconciliation of the CCAA
Database.

Organized Tracks Restrictive Airspace Database


The Organized Tracks Restrictive Airspace Database is included in the suite of JetPlan
navigational databases provided to you by Jeppesen. This database contains Organized Tracks
restrictive airspaces built around the following organized track structures:
North Atlantic tracks (NATS)
Pacific tracks (PACOTS) includes the Northern Pacific tracks as well as
the Flex tracks for Hawaii to and from Japan
Australian tracks (AUSOTS)
Updates
Jeppesen updates the Organized Tracks Restrictive Airspace Database periodically over a 24hour period each day as it receives and processes track updates from the appropriate
government agencies. For flight planning purposes, you have access to the current version of
this database and all subsequent updates as soon as creation of the initial CCAA Database has
been completed. From that point on, each update to the Organized Tracks Restrictive Airspace
Database is immediately followed by an automatic reconciliation of the CCAA Database.

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Turbulence Restrictive Airspace Database


This customer-specific database contains restrictive airspaces based on forecasted turbulence.
Data such as lateral and vertical boundaries and intensity levels that define any given
forecasted turbulence restrictive airspace must be provided by a system operated by the
customer or by a vendor on behalf of the customer.
Updates
Customer forecasted turbulence data is received by an offline Jeppesen process that initially
populates the Turbulence Restrictive Airspace Database and then maintains it 24 hours a day,
seven days a week. For flight planning purposes, you have access to the current version of this
database and all subsequent updates as soon as creation of the initial CCAA Database has been
completed. From that point on, each update to the Turbulence Restrictive Airspace Database is
immediately followed by an automatic reconciliation of the CCAA Database.

NOTE Only customers that provide their own data defining forecasted turbulence
airspaces have access to the Turbulence Restrictive Airspace Database. Contact
your Jeppesen account manager for more information.

FIR/UIR Restrictive Airspace Database


The FIR/UIR Restrictive Airspace Database is included in the suite of JetPlan navigational
databases provided to you by Jeppesen. This database contains FIR/UIR restrictive airspaces
built around FIR/UIR boundaries.
Updates
FIR/UIR data is extracted from the ARINC 424 file that is provided by Jeppesens NavData
service every 28 days. The data is normally not modified during mid-cycle (non 28-day)
updates, but can be if needed. For flight planning purposes, you have access to the current
version of this database and all subsequent updates as soon as creation of the initial CCAA
Database has been completed. From that point on, each update to the FIR/UIR Restrictive
Airspace Database is immediately followed by an automatic reconciliation of the CCAA
Database.

Geopolitical Country Restrictive Airspace Database


The Geopolitical Country Restrictive Airspace Database is included in the suite of JetPlan
navigational databases provided to you by Jeppesen. This database contains airspaces defined
by geopolitical country boundaries.

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Updates
Geopolitical country boundary data is derived from Jeppesens NavData. For flight planning
purposes, you have access to the current version of this database and all subsequent updates as
soon as creation of the initial CCAA Database has been completed. From that point on, any
update to the Geopolitical Country Restrictive Airspace Database is immediately followed by
an automatic reconciliation of the CCAA Database.

User-Defined Restrictive Airspace Database


This database contains restrictive airspaces that are specific to a customer. A customerauthorized user can create and change airspaces in the User-Defined Restrictive Airspace
Database by using the User-Defined Restricted Areas options on the CCAA Database page in
JetPlan.com.
For information on creating User-Defined Restrictive Airspace Database records, see the
JetPlan.com Help file.

Understanding the Contents of CCAA Database


Records
This section covers the following elements of CCAA Database records:
The RSA Tag
The SCA Type
Default avoidance levels

The RSA Tag


A given CCAA Database record is uniquely defined by its Restrictive Airspace (RSA) Tag.
The RSA Tag is made up of (from left to right):
The ICAO code (two characters)
The restrictive type (one character)
The restrictive airspace designation (up to ten characters)
The multiple code (optional one character)
For example, WXUHURIRENE_1 is an RSA Tag, where WX is the ICAO code, U is the
restrictive type, HURIRENE is the restrictive airspace designation, and 1 is the multiple code.

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Understanding the CCAA Database

The RSA Tag in a CCAA Database record acts as a reference to an airspace that has the same
tag and that is stored in one of the source restrictive airspace databases. Interfaces such as
JetPlan.com take advantage of this relationship by enabling you to view a particular CCAA
Database record and also the source restrictive airspace record that it references. You can view
any of the parameters stored for the referenced airspace, such as vertical and lateral
boundaries, operational times, start and end effectivity, and so on.

The ICAO Code in the RSA Tag


For a CCAA Database record that references an SUA record in the Generic Restrictive
Airspace Database, the ICAO code portion of the RSA tag is the actual ICAO code that
defines the region within which that SUA resides. However, for a CCAA Database record that
references a record in one of the other source restrictive airspace databases, the ICAO code in
the RSA Tag is an arbitrary 2-letter code that represents the airspace type.
To identify the airspace type for records in the Organized Track, Turbulence, FIR/UIR, and
Geopolitical Country Restrictive Airspace Databases and for their corresponding records in
the CCAA Database, Jeppesen inserts the following codes into the ICAO portion of the RSA
tag:
OT For records in the Organized Track Restrictive Airspace Database and
their corresponding CCAA Database referencing records
JT For records in the Turbulence Restrictive Airspace Database and their
corresponding CCAA Database referencing records
JF For records in the FIR/UIR Restrictive Airspace Database and their
corresponding CCAA Database referencing records
CB For records in the Geopolitical Country Restrictive Airspace Database
and the corresponding CCAA Database referencing records.
For user-defined airspaces, the user decides how to define the ICAO code portion of the RSA
tag. For instance, in the user-defined record with the RSA tag WXUHURIRENE_1, the
airspace type is WX, which the user has chosen to convey the fact that the referenced airspace
is based on weather activity.

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Understanding the CCAA Database

About the Default SCA Type and Default Avoidance Level


As discussed above, each CCAA Database record also contains an SCA Type and an
avoidance level. Three avoidance levels are possible: Ignore, Notify (Alert), and Avoid.
When the CCAA Database is first established, each of its records is assigned an initial, sourcedependent default SCA Type and also a default avoidance level. The methods used to
determine these default values vary, depending on which source restrictive airspace database a
CCAA Database record is referencing. The following table shows how the default SCA Types
and avoidance levels are determined.
Table 5-1

Default SCA Types and Avoidance Levels in CCAA DB Records

Referenced Source
Database Records
Generic Restrictive Airspace
Database records (SUAs)

Default SCA Types

Default Avoidance Levels

CCAA Database records that


reference SUA records in the
Generic Restrictive Airspace
Database have a blank default
SCA Type value.

CCAA Database records that


reference SUA records in the
Generic Restrictive Airspace
Database have a default avoidance
level value determined by an
automatic mapping between the
restrictive airspace type and
avoidance level. This mapping is
controlled by preferences stored in
the JetPlan Customer Preference
Database.
For example, for a given customer,
a part of the mapping may be that
all SUAs for which the restrictive
type is R are mapped to the Avoid
avoidance level. For more
information on the mapping of
restrictive type to avoidance level
in your Customer Preference
Database, contact your Jeppesen
account manager.

Organized Tracks Restrictive


Airspace Database records

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CCAA Database records that


reference records in the Organized
Tracks Restrictive Airspace
Database have a default SCA Type
value of NAT for NATs, PAC for
PACOTS, and AUS for AUSOTS.

The default avoidance level for


CCAA Database references to
NAT and PACOTS restrictive
airspaces is Avoid.
The default avoidance level for
CCAA Database references to
AUSOTS restrictive airspaces is
Notify.

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Table 5-1

Default SCA Types and Avoidance Levels in CCAA DB Records (continued)

Referenced Source
Database Records
Turbulence Restrictive Airspace
Database Records

Default SCA Types

Default Avoidance Levels

CCAA Database records that


reference records in the
Turbulence Restrictive Airspace
Database have a default SCA Type
value of JTA.

CCAA Database records that


reference records in the
Turbulence Restrictive Airspace
Database have a default avoidance
level value determined by the
automatic mapping between the
restrictive airspace type and
avoidance level.
For Turbulence Restrictive
Airspace Database records, the
restrictive airspace type is always
set to the turbulence intensity
level, which is a number between 0
and 9.For information on the
mapping of airspace-type to
avoidance-level in your Customer
Preference Database, contact your
Jeppesen account manager.

FIR/UIR Restrictive Airspace


Database Records

Each CCAA Database record that


references records in the FIR/UIR
Restrictive Airspace Database has
a default SCA Type value of one of
the following:
FIR Flight information
region (lower level)
UIR Upper information
region

The default avoidance level for


CCAA Database references to
FIR/UIR restrictive airspaces is
Ignore. To use these restrictive
airspaces in CCAA, CCAAN,
CCAAQ, and CCAAF flight plans,
change the default avoidance level
in the appropriate CCAA Database
record to Avoid or Notify.

F/U Both upper and lower


information region
Geopolitical Country Restrictive
Airspace Database Records

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Each CCAA Database record that


references records in the
Geopolitical Country Restrictive
Airspace Database has a default
SCA Type that corresponds to the
ISO code for the countryfor
example, GB for the United
Kingdom, BE for Belgium, BD for
Bangladesh, and so on.

The default avoidance level for


CCAA Database references to
Geopolitical Country restrictive
airspaces is Ignore. To use these
restrictive airspaces in GCAN and
GCAA flight plans, change the
default avoidance level in the
appropriate CCAA Database
record to Avoid or Notify.

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Table 5-1

Default SCA Types and Avoidance Levels in CCAA DB Records (continued)

Referenced Source
Database Records
User-Defined Restrictive Airspace
Database Records

Default SCA Types

Default Avoidance Levels

CCAA Database records that


reference records in the UserDefined Restrictive Airspace
Database have a blank default
SCA Type value.

CCAA Database records that


reference records in the UserDefined Restrictive Airspace
Database have a default avoidance
level value determined by an
automatic mapping between the
restrictive airspace type and
avoidance level. This mapping is
controlled by preferences stored in
the JetPlan Customer Preference
Database.
For example, for a given customer,
a part of the mapping may be that
all user-defined restrictive
airspaces for which the restrictive
type is U are mapped to the Ignore
avoidance level. For more
information on the mapping of
airspace type to avoidance level in
your Customer Preference
Database, contact your Jeppesen
account manager.

Modifying the SCA Type and the Avoidance Level


NOTE For step-by-step procedures on modifying CCAA Database records, see the
JetPlan.com Help file.

An authorized user can, at any time, set or change the value for the SCA Type in a CCAA
Database record using JetPlan.com. This is significant because the SCA Type can be used to
override the avoidance level of certain airspaces on a specific flight plan request.
In addition, an authorized user can change the avoidance level in a CCAA Database record
using JetPlan.com. The avoidance level determines how JetPlan treats a restrictive airspace
with regard to optimizing and validating routes and vertical profiles and issuing alerts.
Once you change an avoidance level in a CCAA Database record, that avoidance level remains
unchanged when the associated airspace record in the source restrictive airspace database is
subsequently updated. The same concept applies to the SCA Type. For example, assume that
you have a CCAA Database record that has the RSA Tag K2R2601A and an avoidance level
of Avoid. This CCAA Database record references a source record with the same RSA Tag in

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the Generic Restrictive Airspace Database. If you change the CCAA Database records
avoidance level to Notify and its SCA Type to MI, the avoidance level and the SCA Type in
the CCAA Database record stays the same, even if the referenced source restrictive airspace
record is changed by a 28-day cycle update of the Generic Restrictive Airspace Database.

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Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert


Flight Plan Options
This section describes the 4D Avoid and Alert flight plan options and how they are used in
flight planning.

NOTE The CCAA Database must contain records before you can use the 4D Avoid
and Alert flight plan options. See Creation of the Initial CCAA Database on
page 108. See also the CCAA Database and User-Defined Restrictive Area Database
Help files in JetPlan.com.

Understanding the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan


Options
The JetPlan 4D Avoid and Alert Functionality is activated and influenced by the following
flight plan options:
CCAA

This option invokes the 4D Avoid and Alert functionality. When


CCAA is specified, JetPlan ensures that avoid-level SUAs, userdefined airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR
airspaces are avoided when determining an optimum route and
profile. JetPlan allows notify-level SUAs, user-defined airspaces,
Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR airspaces to be traversed
by the optimum route and profile, but alerts must be posted for each
such traversal. For more information, see Using the CCAA,
CCAAN, and CCAAF Options on page 120.

CCAAN

This option invokes the 4D Alert functionality. When CCAAN is


specified, JetPlan allows both avoid and notify-level SUAs, userdefined airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR
airspaces to be traversed when determining an optimum route and
profile. Alerts must be posted for each such traversal. Alerts for

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traversal of avoid-level airspaces must be distinguishable from alerts


for traversal of notify-level airspaces. For more information, see
Using the CCAA, CCAAN, and CCAAF Options on page 120.

NOTE CCAA and CCAAN apply to SUAs, user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen


turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR airspaces but not to organized track or geopolitical
country airspaces. See Using the ORTRKA and ORTRKN Options on page 124 and
Using the GCAA and GCAN Options on page 125.

CCAAF

This option invokes 4D Avoid and Alert functionality, using a finer


latitude/longitude (lat/long) grid for avoidance of avoid-level
airspaces when direct (D) routing has been specified on the flight
plan. For more information, see Using the CCAA, CCAAN, and
CCAAF Options on page 120.

ORTRKA

This option invokes 4D Avoid functionality for organized track


airspaces. When ORTRKA is specified, JetPlan ensures that all
avoid-level organized track airspaces are avoided when determining
an optimum route and profile. JetPlan allows notify-level organized
track airspaces to be traversed by the optimum route and profile, but
alerts must be posted for each such traversal. For more information,
see Using the ORTRKA and ORTRKN Options on page 124.

ORTRKN

This option invokes 4D Alert functionality for organized track


airspaces. When ORTRKN is specified, JetPlan allows both avoid
and notify-level organized track airspaces to be traversed when
determining an optimum route and profile. Alerts must be posted for
each such traversal. For more information, see Using the ORTRKA
and ORTRKN Options on page 124.

GCAA

The GCAA option invokes 4D Avoid functionality for geopolitical


country airspaces. The GCAA option avoids a country with the
avoidance level of Avoid in the CCAA DB when determining an
optimal route and profile. The GCAA option can be used with or
without the CCAA or CCAAN option.

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The GCAN option invokes 4D Alert functionality for geopolitical


country airspaces. This option allows countries with an avoidance
level of Avoid or Notify when determining an optimal route and
profile, but generates an alert for each such traversal. The GCAN
option can be used with or without the CCAA or CCAAN option.

GCAN

Options that may be used in combination with CCAA or CCAAN:


AVDERR

This option invokes Avoid Error messaging functionality, which


includes specific information about avoid-level airspace incursions in
error messages when applicable. For details, see Using the
AVDERR Option on page 126.

EXSS

This option invokes Except SIDS/STARS functionality, which allows


certain exceptions for SIDS and STARS traversing SUAs. For details,
see Using the EXSS Option on page 126.

EXCD

This option invokes Except Climb and Descent functionality, which


allows certain exceptions for segments starting before Top of Climb
(TOC) or ending after Top of Descent (TOD) or that are part of a SID
or STAR. For details, see Using the EXCD Option on page 127.

CCAAQ

This option invokes CCAA Qualify functionality, which directs the


system to qualify the route as needing 4D avoidance before
computing an optimized route with 4D in effect. For details, see
Using the CCAAQ Option on page 127.

NOTE AVDERR and CCAAQ are also customer preferences. See Understanding
4D Avoid and Alert Customer Preferences on page 132.

All of the options summarized above are described in more detail in the following sections.

Using the CCAA, CCAAN, and CCAAF Options


The CCAA, CCAAN, and CCAAF options apply to all SUAs, user-defined airspaces,
Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR airspaces but not to organized tracks or
geopolitical country airspaces.

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Using the CCAA Option


The CCAA option invokes the 4D Avoid and Alert functionality, with full avoidance of avoidlevel SUAs, user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR airspaces. In
addition, alerts are generated for incursions of notify-level SUAs, user-defined airspaces,
Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR airspaces. Organized track restrictive airspaces
are not considered.
In the JetPlan command-line interface, the input for the CCAA option is as follows:
01 OPTIONS FP,CCAA

When the CCAA flight plan option is invoked, any SUAs, user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen
turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR airspaces can impact (1) JetPlans determination of an
optimum route and vertical profile, (2) JetPlans provision of alerts based on a user-defined
route and its computed vertical profile, and (3) JetPlans provision of alerts based on a userselected customer route and its computed vertical profile. The manner of the impact depends
on whether the airspace is an ignore, alert, or avoid-level airspace, as described below:
Ignore-Level
Airspace

The airspace has no impact on the flight plan computation or flight


plan output. JetPlan ignores the restrictive airspace.

Notify-Level
Airspace

The airspace has no impact on the flight plan computation. JetPlan


generates an alert for each segment of the flight plan that incurs the
airspace.

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Avoid-Level
Airspace

JetPlan responds as follows to restrictive airspaces with an avoidance


level of Avoid:
When determining an optimum route. JetPlan avoids the
airspace in the most optimal manner (laterally by route or
vertically by profile), depending on the capacity of the aircraft
and on the restrictive airspaces operational time, its effective
status, and its lateral, upper, and lower boundaries.

NOTE If, for a given flight plan computation, it is not possible to determine a route
and profile that successfully avoid all of the relevant avoid-level SUAs, user-defined
airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, or FIR/UIR airspaces, JetPlan returns an
error.

When the user defines the route using the Specific Route
Selector (SRS), that route is subjected to vertical profile
optimization. If one or more route segments of that route are
then determined to incur the restrictive airspace, an alert is
issued for each combination of segment and airspace.
When the user requests customer route optimization, then each
customer route is subjected to vertical profile optimization. If,
for a given customer route, one or more route segments of that
route are determined to incur the restrictive airspace, the entire
route is eliminated from consideration as the optimum route. If
for a given flight plan computation, all customer routes are
eliminated because each incurs at least one airspace with the
avoidance level of Avoid, JetPlan returns an error.
When the user requests a specific customer route, that route is
subjected to vertical profile optimization. If one or more route
segments of that route are then determined to incur the
restrictive airspace, an alert is issued for each combination of
segment and incurred airspace.

Using the CCAAN Option


The CCAAN flight plan option differs from the CCAA option in the treatment of avoid-level
airspaces. While the CCAA option invokes full avoidance of avoid-level SUAs, user-defined
airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR airspaces, the CCAAN option invokes
alerting for route segment incursions of these airspaces. No attempt is made to avoid avoidlevel restrictive airspaces.

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Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options

In the JetPlan command-line interface, the input for CCAAN is as follows:


01 OPTIONS FP,CCAAN

This command invokes the 4D Alert functionality, alerting on all incursions of avoid-level and
notify-level SUAs, user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR
airspaces. Avoid-level restrictive airspaces are not avoided. Organized track restrictive
airspaces are not considered.

NOTE The CCAAN option overrides the CCAA option if both are entered on the
same flight plan request.

NOTE The CCAA/CCAAN options can be used with the ORTRKA/ORTRKN and
GCAA/GCAN options. See Using the ORTRKA and ORTRKN Options on page 124
and Using the GCAA and GCAN Options on page 125.

Using the CCAAF Option


The CCAAF option is intended for use when CCAA does not produce a reasonable flight plan
because of excessive avoid-level SUA or user-defined, Jeppesen turbulence, or FIR/UIR
airspace congestion anywhere along the route. When the CCAAF option is invoked, and direct
(D) routing has been specified on the flight plan, the route optimizer uses a finer lat/long grid
than is used when the standard CCAA or CCAAN option has been invoked.
The spacing of the fine lat/long grid is one half the size of the standard grid used with CCAA
flight plans. For example the standard grid is 1 degree latitude by 10 degrees longitude for an
east/west non-polar region. The fine grid for the same route would be degree latitude by 5
degrees longitude.
A good indication that CCAAF may be preferable to the CCAA option is when a large
deviation from the great circle route results with D routing and the CCAA flight plan option.
For example, because of the density of SUAs in Mexico, Arizona, and Southern California on

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the route from KDFW to KLAX, the CCAA option can result in the flight deviating north well
into Colorado and Utah or south into Mexico, depending on the weather. When the CCAAF
option is invoked, the route goes through New Mexico and Arizona.

NOTE Because the use of the fine grid generates so many possible segments for
evaluation, additional compute time is required. Very long flights may exceed the
capabilities of the system and produce a WETRAD error.

NOTE If you enter both the CCAA and the CCAAF commands on the same flight
plan request, the system uses the first command entered and ignores the second
command. Also, the CCAAN option always overrides both the CCAA and the CCAAF
option.

Using the ORTRKA and ORTRKN Options


The ORTRKA and ORTRKN options apply only to organized tracks airspaces. The impact of
the ORTRKA option on JetPlans treatment of organized track airspaces is the same as the
impact of the CCAA option on JetPlans treatment of avoid-level SUAs and user-defined,
Jeppesen turbulence, and FIR/UIR airspaces. Similarly, the ORTRKN option has the same
impact as the CCAAN option but applies only to organized tracks restrictive airspaces.
When required to avoid one or more organized track airspaces, JetPlan attempts to avoid them
either laterally or vertically, taking into account the effective times of the restriction. It is the
nature of such airspaces that lateral avoidance keeps the aircraft at least 60 nm from the
associated track.
In the JetPlan command-line interface, the input for ORTRKA is as follows:
01 OPTIONS FP,ORTRKA

This command invokes the 4D Avoid and Alert functionality, with full avoidance of organized
tracks airspaces. Other types of restrictive airspaces (SUAs, user-defined, Jeppesen turbulence
airspaces, and FIR/UIR airspaces) are not considered.
In the JetPlan command-line interface, the input for ORTRKAN is as follows:
01 OPTIONS FP,ORTRKAN

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Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options

This command invokes the 4D Alert functionality, alerting on all incursions of organized
tracks airspaces. No organized tracks airspaces are avoided. Other types of restrictive
airspaces (SUAs, user-defined, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, FIR/UIR, and geopolitical
country airspaces) are not considered.

NOTE The ORTRKA/ORTRKN options can be used with or without the


CCAA/CCAAN options. See Using the CCAA, CCAAN, and CCAAF Options on
page 120).

Using the GCAA and GCAN Options


The GCAA and GCAN options apply only to geopolitical country airspaces. The GCAA
option avoids a country with the avoidance level of Avoid in the CCAA DB when determining
an optimal route and profile. The GCAN option invokes 4D Alert functionality for geopolitical
country airspaces. This option allows countries with an avoidance level of Avoid or Notify
when determining an optimal route and profile, but generates an alert for each such traversal.
The default avoidance level for geopolitical country airspaces is Ignore.

NOTE The GCAA/GCAN options can be used with or without the CCAA/CCAAN
options. See Using the CCAA, CCAAN, and CCAAF Options on page 120).

The impact of the GCAA option on JetPlans treatment of geopolitical country airspaces is the
same as the impact of the CCAA option on JetPlans treatment of avoid-level SUA, userdefined, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR airspaces. Similarly, the GCAN option
has the same impact as the CCAAN option but applies only to geopolitical country airspaces.
In the JetPlan command-line interface, the input for GCAA is as follows:
01 OPTIONS FP,GCAA

This command invokes the 4D Avoid and Alert functionality, with full avoidance of
geopolitical country airspaces. Other types of restrictive airspaces (SUAs, user-defined,
Jeppesen turbulence, FIR/UIRs, and organized tracks) are not considered.
In the JetPlan command-line interface, the input for GCAN is as follows:
01 OPTIONS FP,GCAN

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Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options

This command invokes the 4D Alert functionality, alerting on all incursions of geopolitical
country airspaces. No geopolitical country airspaces are avoided. Other types of restrictive
airspaces (SUAs, user-defined, Jeppesen turbulence, FIR/UIRs, and organized tracks) are not
considered

Using the AVDERR Option


NOTE AVDERR is also available as a customer preference. When the preference is
enabled, AVDERR functionality applies to all CCAA flight plans automatically. See
Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert Customer Preferences on page 132.

As explained in Using the CCAA Option on page 121, if it is not possible to determine a
route that successfully avoids all restrictive airspaces that have an avoidance level of Avoid,
JetPlan returns an error. In this case, the general PUZZLE01 error message indicates only that
a valid route could not be found, given the flight plan inputs. No information about avoid-level
airspace incursions is provided. The AVDERR flight plan option is designed to provide such
information.
When the AVDERR flight plan option is invoked along with the CCAA option, JetPlan alerts
the user when JetPlan cannot find a valid route due to incursions of avoid-level SUAs, userdefined airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR airspaces. The system also lists
the specific route segment and airspace name for each incursion.
In the JetPlan command-line interface, the inputs are as follows:
01 OPTIONS FP,CCAA,AVDERR

NOTE When the EXSS flight plan option is invoked, SIDs and STARs are not
checked for incursions of SUAs, and thus, these incursions by SIDs and STARs do
not generate errors or alerts. See Using the EXSS Option on page 126.

Using the EXSS Option


It is not uncommon for a SID or STAR to traverse avoid-level SUAs or notify-level SUAs.
When the EXSS option is invoked with the CCAA or CCAAN option, standard CCAA and
CCAAN functionality applies except that JetPlan considers it acceptable for SIDS and STARS
to traverse SUAs. Therefore, alerts for traversal of SUAs are suppressed for any segment that
is part of a SID or STAR.

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Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options

In the JetPlan command-line interface, the inputs are as follows:


01 OPTIONS FP,CCAA,EXSS

- or 01 OPTIONS FP,CCAAN,EXSS

Using the EXCD Option


When the EXCD option is invoked with the CCAA or CCAAN option, standard CCAA and
CCAAN functionality applies except that segments starting before Top of Climb (TOC) or
ending after Top of Descent (TOD) or that are part of a SID or STAR are not checked for SUA
incursions. Airspace incursion alerts are suppressed for any segments that meet one or more of
the following conditions:
The segment coincides with a SID or STAR (same functionality as for the
EXSS option; see Using the EXSS Option on page 126).
The segments initial fix occurs prior to but not at TOC.
The segments ending fix occurs after but not at TOD.
In the JetPlan command-line interface, the inputs are as follows:
01 OPTIONS FP,CCAA,EXCD

- or 01 OPTIONS FP,CCAAN,EXCD

Using the CCAAQ Option


NOTE CCAAQ is also available as a customer preference. When the preference is
set, CCAAQ functionality applies to all CCAA flight plans automatically. See
Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert Customer Preferences on page 132.

When the CCAAQ flight plan option is invoked together with the CCAA option, the system
computes the route from the POA to the POD, looking for any avoid-level SUA, user-defined,
Jeppesen turbulence, or FIR/UIR airspace incursions. If even one such incursion occurs, the
system automatically reruns the flight plan as a CCAA plan.

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Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options

For city pairs for which the probability of one or more avoid-level SUA, user-defined airspace,
Jeppesen turbulence, or FIR/UIR airspace incursions by the optimum route/profile is less than
50% on a long-term basis for any given departure time/date, use of the CCAAQ option along
with the CCAA option can save significant computation time compared to use of the CCAA
alone. For the majority of flight plans, it saves the route selector from having to perform
unnecessary time consuming airspace avoidance computations for each candidate radial
within the optimization ellipse.
On the other hand, for city pairs for which the probability of one or more avoid-level SUA,
user-defined, Jeppesen turbulence, or FIR/UIR airspace incursions is greater than 50%, use of
the CCAAQ option along with the CCAA is not advised as it adds to the computation time for
the majority of flight plan computations compared to use of the CCAA option by itself.
In summary, the CCAAQ option is preferable as an add-on to the CCAA option for any given
city pair if it is determined that there is less than a 50% probability of one or more avoid-level
SUA, user-defined, Jeppesen turbulence, or FIR/UIR airspace incursions by the optimum
route for that city pair on a long-term basis.
CCAAQ is functional only when entered along with the CCAA flight plan option. It has no
impact when entered alone or with the CCAAN option.

Understanding the City Pair and City Pair Fleet Database


CCAAQ Parameters
The City Pair Fleet and City Pair Databases each contain a CCAAQ parameter. The value of
each parameter has the potential to influence the application of the CCAAQ option on flight
plan requests that include the CCAA option and the applicable city pair or city pair fleet
combination.
In both the City Pair Fleet and the City Pair Databases, the choices for the CCAAQ parameter
are:
Yes Ensures that the CCAAQ option is imposed whenever the CCAA
option and the city pair or city pair fleet combination are present in the flight
plan request.
No Ensures that the CCAAQ option is not imposed whenever the CCAA
option is in effect for the city pair or city pair fleet combination, unless the
CCAAQ option is explicitly invoked by the user on the flight plan request.
Unset (Default) The CCAAQ parameter has no influence.

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Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options

The City Pair Fleet Database has precedence over the City Pair Database. In other words, if the
CCAAQ parameter in the City Pair Fleet Database is set to No and the parameter in the City
Pair Database is set to Yes, then the effective value is No.
The CCAAQ City Pair and City Pair Fleet Database parameters are applied together with the
CCAAQ User Preference setting as follows:
If the CCAAQ flight plan option is specified in conjunction with CCAA (for
example, 01 OPTIONS FP,CCAA,CCAAQ, in command-line mode), then
the CCAAQ option is in effect, no matter what the settings are for the
CCAAQ parameters in the City Pair Fleet and/or City Pair Database records
and regardless of whether or not the CCAAQ preference is turned on.
If the CCAAQ flight plan option is not specified, but the CCAA option is
(for example, 01 OPTIONS FP,CCAA, in command-line mode), then the
CCAAQ option is in effect if one of the following conditions is met:
The CCAAQ parameter in the applicable City Pair Fleet Database
record is set to Yes.
- or The CCAAQ parameter in the applicable City Pair Database record
is set to Yes, and the CCAAQ parameter in the applicable City Pair
Fleet Database record is set to Yes or Unset.
- or The CCAAQ parameters in the City Pair and City Pair Fleet
Database records are not set, but the CCAAQ User Preference is
turned on.

Overriding an Avoidance Level on a Flight Plan


As described above, an airspaces avoidance level is determined by the avoidance level set in
its referencing CCAA Database record. If you are using a front-end GUI application such as
JetPlan.com or Jeppesen Dispatch Control, you can override this avoidance level for a given
flight plan request. JetPlan applies the ad hoc avoidance level during route optimization or
validation, regardless of the airspaces default avoidance level in its referencing CCAA
Database record.

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Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options

This ad hoc avoidance level override can be accomplished by any of the following means:
You can specify the restrictive airspaces by name (called Restrictive
Airspace Designation or AD in JetPlan.com).
You can specify SCA Types as defined and stored in CCAA Database
records. For each SCA Type specified, all referencing restrictive airspace
records in the CCAA Database with that SCA Type are impacted by the ad
hoc avoidance-level override.
You can specify a combination of restrictive airspaces by name and SCA
Type.
JetPlan applies the following precedence rules when ad hoc avoidance-level overrides are
specified in a flight plan request:
For a given airspace, an ad hoc avoidance-level override always takes
precedence over the avoidance level in the airspaces referencing CCAA
Database record.
Avoidance levels for restrictive airspaces that are specified by name
(Restrictive Airspace Designation) in an ad hoc avoidance-level override
have higher priority than avoidance levels for the same airspaces specified
by SCA Type.
For example, a flight plan request may include an ad hoc avoidance-level
override for an airspace specified by name. The same flight plan request
may also include another avoidance-level override for an SCA Type that
happens to apply to the same airspace specified by name. In this case, the ad
hoc avoidance level applied to the airspace by name takes precedence over
the avoidance level applied by SCA Type.
If, on a given flight plan, there are two or more ad hoc avoidance-level
overrides applied to the same airspace name or to the same SCA Type, the
specification of Avoid takes precedence over any other avoidance-level
specified.

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Working with the 4D Avoid and Alert Flight Plan Options

As an example, the following graphic shows the Customer Controlled Avoid and Alert area
in the New Flight Planner in JetPlan.com. You can use this area to invoke 4D Avoid and Alert
options and enter ad hod avoidance levels. (Note that in this view, the SCA Type is
abbreviated as SCAT.)

Figure 5.1.

Customer Controlled Avoid and Alert Options in JetPlan.com

NOTE For more information, see the documentation for your front-end GUI
application or contact your Jeppesen account manager.

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Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert Customer Preferences

Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert


Customer Preferences
Settings for the following customer preferences can be used to customize the application of the
CCAA and CCAAN flight plan options. When the customer preference is enabled, the
specified functionality is applied automatically rather than having to be invoked on a flight
plan-by-flight plan basis.

NOTE Customer preferences are set by Jeppesen. For more information on these
preferences, contact your Jeppesen account manager.

NOTE As discussed in Overriding an Avoidance Level on a Flight Plan on


page 129, Customer Preference settings determine the default avoidance level for
each record in the CCAA Database. For more information, contact your Jeppesen
account manager.

4D Altitudes (4DALTS) Preference


The 4DALTS preference allows you to define the lowest cruise altitude used for eliminating
avoid restrictive airspaces. This speeds up CCAA computations by reducing the number of
avoid restrictive airspaces considered for a given flight plan. For example, when
4DALTS=290, the minimum cruise altitude to be considered by the 4D Avoid and Alert
function is FL290. You also have the option to specify minimum flight levels that apply within
the range of up to four separate, defined great circles. For example, you can set 4DALTS to
use FL050 within a great circle distance of 0 nm to 300 nm, FL150 within a great circle
distance of 301 nm to 1000 nm, and so on, up to four great circles.

AVDERR Preference
When the AVDERR preference is set, and the CCAA flight plan option has been invoked, the
system automatically behaves as if the AVDERR flight plan option has been submitted along
with the CCAA option.
For information on how AVDERR works, see Using the AVDERR Option on page 126.

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Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert Customer Preferences

CCAAQ Preference
When the CCAAQ preference is set, and the CCAA flight plan option has been invoked, the
system automatically behaves as if the CCAAQ flight plan option has been submitted along
with the CCAA option.
For information on how CCAAQ works, see Using the CCAAQ Option on page 127.

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Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert Error Messages

Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert Error


Messages
When a user specifies a route on a CCAA flight plan (for example, an SRS or company route),
alert messages provide information about any incursions of avoid or notify-level SUAs, userdefined airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR airspaces. Similarly, for a
CCAAN flight plan, alert messages provide information about any incursions of avoid or
notify-level SUAs, user-defined airspaces, Jeppesen turbulence airspaces, and FIR/UIR
airspaces. Each alert message contains the following information:
The avoidance level of the airspace that has been incurred.
The start and end point of the route segment that has incurred the airspace.
Information on the airspace, including a one-character code for the source
restrictive airspace database (G for Generic, U for User-Defined, J for
Turbulence, F for FIR/UIR, P for Geopolitical Country).
The RSA Tag for the airspace.
Repetition of the restrictive airspace designation and the multiplier code
from the RSA Tag to make it easier to find in case the user wants to use it
for an ad hoc override of the airspaces default avoidance level. See
Overriding an Avoidance Level on a Flight Plan on page 129.
For example, the following is an example of an alert message for an incursion of a notify-level
airspace by a customer-entered route:
Segment MEDOG ABAPO incurs alert airspace GEGD203_____B:203_____B
SENNYBRIDGE

In the alert message above:


G signifies that the source database is the Generic Restrictive Airspace
Database (the airspace is an SUA).
EGD203_____B is the RSA Tag.
The ICAO code is EG.
The restrictive type is D, the restrictive airspace designation is 203_____,
and the multiple code is B.
Note that the restrictive airspace designation and multiple code (203_____B) are repeated
after the colon.

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Understanding 4D Avoid and Alert Error Messages

The following is an example of an alert message for an incursion of an avoid-level restrictive


airspace by a customer-entered route. The User-Defined Restrictive Airspace Database is the
source database, and, again, the airspace designation is repeated after the colon.
Route incurs avoid-level restrictive airspace:
Segment SLANY MALOT incurs avoid airspace UJKPTEST0:TEST0 TEST

For a description of the RSA Tag, see Understanding the Contents of CCAA Database
Records on page 112.

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C HAPTER 6

Route Commands

Route Commands
About Route Commands

About Route Commands


JetPlan provides the following methods for selecting a route. Each route-selection method
supports the ultimate goal of producing a flight plan. The methods vary to some degree in
approach and application. This chapter focuses on how each method is used.
Route Optimizer

This is JetPlans traditional route selection method. Your inputs (or


lack thereof) are the tools that control the route selection process. The
Route Optimizer works with both dynamic and non-dynamic
inputs. A dynamic route input is one that entrusts the system to
determine and deliver the missing pieces of the routing puzzle. A
non-dynamic route input is one that dictates the route each step of the
way. Routes are generated using the JetPlan Navigation Database as
the source of airway and waypoint information. The Route Optimizer
can be used alone or combined with the Specific Route Selector to
produce the precise routing that meets your needs.

Specific Route
Selector (SRS)

The SRS allows complete control of the route. Unlike the Route
Optimizer, the SRS requires input of the full route. Using Jeppesen
syntax, you can specify a customer route from POD to POA. The SRS
can also be used in conjunction with the Route Optimizer to produce
combination routes. The source of navigational information for the
SRS is the Jeppesen Aviation Database (JAD), which uses the
ARINC 424 standard.

Customer Route
Database (CRDB)

This is another non-dynamic route input method because you enter a


user-defined CRDB record name to use a pre-stored route when the
flight plan is computed. Before you can use a CRDB record, you must
first create the desired route using one of the route selection tools
mentioned above. When satisfied with the route, you can save it to the
CRDB for subsequent recall and application in your flight plan
requests.

Coded Departure
Route (CDR)
Database

Coded Departure Routes are predefined alternate routes for flying


between city pairs when a user-preferred route is not available due to
weather or traffic constraints. Coded departure routes are complete
routes from departure to arrival, including terminal procedures. The
FAA maintains coded departure routes and publishes an updated list
of the effective coded departure routes every 56 days. Each record in
the Customer Coded Departure Route Database is a duplicate of a
coded departure route stored in the generic NavData Coded Departure

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Route Commands
About Route Commands

Route Database, which is replaced every 56 days. You can enter the
coded departure route record name to use the pre-stored route when
the flight plan is computed.
The following sections cover each of the above route selection tools in detail.

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Route Optimizer

Route Optimizer
The Route Optimizer is both the simplest and the most complicated means of entering a route
input on the JetPlan system. The simplicity shines in its dynamic ability to provide a route
with a minimum of inputs. The complexity comes with the routing concepts and syntax rules
you must apply to make the inputs you do enter valid and effective. You can let the Route
Optimizer do the work for you, or limit its dynamic abilities by providing more inputs. This
section explains how to use this flight planning tool.
The Route Optimizer enables you to apply complete route optimization, partial route
optimization, or no route optimization to your flight plans. Each is defined below.
Complete Route
Optimization

Defined as a route created without user input. This no-input method


allows the Route Optimizer to dynamically determine the route based
solely on the POD and POA entries.

Partial Route
Optimization

Defined as a route that is controlled to some degree by the users


inputs. This method still allows the Route Optimizer to dynamically
determine the route, but the user has provided constraints that must be
followed. For example, you could choose to limit the route to airways
only, overflight of a particular waypoint, ATC preferred routing, or
something more complicated.

No Route
Optimization

Defined as a route that is controlled every step of the way by the user.
Though the Route Optimizer is designed to dynamically determine a
route based on a minimum of inputs, you can instruct it to use the
course you determine by specifying each waypoint along the way.

The Navigation Database and Route Areas


How you achieve the route optimization level of your choice depends on your inputs and the
sphere of operation in which a flight is to be flown. The Route Optimizers source of
navigational information is the JetPlan Navigation Database. This database, which is
originally derived from the Jeppesen Aviation Database (JAD), separates the world into
logical route areas for flight planning purposes. There are five different land mass areas
(labeled as Areas 1 through 5) and one overwater area (Area 0) within this database.
The following list is a breakdown of the major countries or land masses defined as route areas
in the JetPlan Navigation Database:

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Route Optimizer

Area 1

Alaska, Canada, Greenland, United States, Mexico, Central America,


Caribbean, and northern South America.

Area 2

Europe (up to and including Western Russia), Africa, and most of the
Middle East.

Area 3

South America (with the exception of that portion of South America


covered by Area 1).

Area 4

Part of the Middle East, China, South East Asia, Japan, Philippines,
Indonesia, Malaysia, Australia, New Zealand, Guam, South Pacific
Islands, Eastern Russia.

Area 5

Hawaiian Islands, Iceland, and Azores.

Area 0

All areas not covered under areas 1 through 5, including overwater


areas. Further, all airports defined by latitude/longitude coordinates
are considered to be in Area 0. (For more information, see Chapter 3,
Point of Departure and Point of Arrival Commands.)

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

The map below provides a rough overview of the defined route areas in the JetPlan Navigation
Database.

Figure 6.1.

Navigation Database Route Areas

The JetPlan Navigation Database uses three altitude route structures:


High Altitude

The high-altitude route structure is used the default information for


all flight plans. However, two subset options are available for various
altitude restrictions.

Low Altitude (LA)

The low-altitude (LA) option provides worldwide low-altitude route


structure. For regions of the world that do not have separate low and
high-altitude structures, the low-altitude option uses the same route
structure as the high-altitude option.

Mid Altitude (MA)

The mid-altitude (MA) option provides a hybrid high/low-altitude


route structure over Europe (Area 2) for flight planning between
FL200 and FL245. This structure is needed to handle the different
altitudes that countries in Europe use to separate low and high altitude
airspace.

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Route Optimizer

You can use only one of the three (high, mid, or low) options per flight plan request. For
information on the application of the LA and MA subset options, see the following sections in
this chapter and Chapter 2, Option Commands.

NOTE You can use SRS inputs or the CRDB to accommodate unique flight planning
situations not covered by standard Route Optimizer inputs. These options are
discussed later in this chapter.

JetPlan Defined Route Types


There are a variety of route types you can use when applying Route Optimizer concepts. They
include the following:
Optimized Routes

Optimized routes are dynamically calculated routes that use wind


direction and speed to come up with the best path. Depending on the
aircrafts general course of flight, the Route Optimizer attempts to
either maximize a tailwind or minimize a headwind. Optimized routes
are based on the following:
The best combination of airways or direct segments between
NAVAIDS. This type of optimizing (within navigational route
structure) is referred to as Nav Optimized routing.
The best available airways (high, mid, or low altitude
navigational route structure). This type of optimizing (airway
structure only) is referred to as Airway Optimized routing or
simply as Airways.
The navigational route structure used in either of these route
optimization types may vary, depending on the altitude option
used (high, mid, or low).

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

The best latitude/longitude direct route. This type of optimizing


ignores the JetPlan Navigation Database, meaning that
NAVAID and airway structure is irrelevant. It is often referred
to as random routing, but this manual refers to it as Direct
routing.
NOTE Do not be confused or misled by this manuals use of the term Direct. With
regard to the Route Optimizer, the term Direct is used in two contexts:
- A route segment of sufficient length to allow the route optimization algorithms to
determine the optimal route (winds and temperatures are factored into the equation).
- A route segment too short to be thought of as anything other than a direct route. The
segment is sufficiently short so as not to be changed by any optimization algorithms.

Published
Organized Track
Structures

Organized track structures (OTS) include: the dynamic (changing


daily) North Atlantic (NATS) routes, Pacific (PACOTSincludes
Northern Pacific Tracks as well as the Flex Tracks for Hawaii to and
from Japan) routes, and Australian (AUSOTS) routes.

CRDB Records

CRDB route records apply to the Route Optimizer only, in the sense
that they can be created using the Route Optimizer.

Time-Restricted
Airway

JetPlan considers the availability of a time-restricted (daily or


weekly) airway, based on the Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) over a
window waypoint. In addition, JetPlan has two options that override
this capability: AX and NX. Either option is applied on the Options
command line after the FP entry, as follows:
AX allows the Route Optimizer to consider routes normally not
available due to time restrictions associated with one or more
segments.
NX prevents JetPlan from considering any time-restricted
airway that would normally be available for flight planning
based on an ETA over a window fix.

National Route
Program (NRP)

NRP refers to the FAA National Route Program, which allows flights
operating at or above FL290 within the conterminous U.S. to
participate in minimum time/cost routes without restrictions (free
flight). Although NRP plans do not require route inputs for the typical

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Route Optimizer

U.S. domestic flight, some coordination may be necessary if using


NRP for the U.S. portion of an international flight plan. For more
information, see National Route Program (NRP) Option on
page 199.
Non-Restrictive
Routing (NRR)
Routes

NRR refers to the FAA Non-Restrictive Routing program, which


applies to flights operating at or above FL350 (configurable) within
the conterminous U.S. NRR allows the flexibility and increased
efficiency of point-to-point navigation, rather than requiring flights to
traverse existing airway structures such as Jet airways. Two levels of
NRR service are available: High Altitude Redesign (HAR) and Pointto-Point (PTP). For additional information on these two NRR service
levels, including setup requirements, see Non-Restrictive Routing
on page 202.

Applying Route Inputs General


NOTE For information about route input limits, see Route Input Limits on
page 182.

The Route Optimizer provides three route segments for your inputs: the Departure Area
Routing (RTD) segment, Overwater Area Routing (RTW) segment, and the Arrival Area
Routing (RTA) segment. This design was created to meet the needs of intercontinental flight
while complying with the design of a navigational database that separates data into specific
route areas.
For example, if you are flying from Area 1 to Area 2 (see the picture above) and you want to
apply some sort of control over the route, the RTD segment allows you to enter navigational
fixes within the area of your departure airport, the RTW segment allows you to enter some sort
of transition routing over the Atlantic Ocean (for example, a North Atlantic Track), and the
RTA segment allows you to enter navigational fixes within the area of your arrival airport.
The three segments combined provide the input fields necessary to develop a route between
two airports for almost any flight plan. In many cases, only one route input segment (RTD) is
necessary because many flights never leave the departure airport route area.
The following paragraphs describe the RTD, RTW, and RTA segments in more detail:

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

RTD

Departure Area Routing The RTD segment is used to navigate route


structure within the same route area as the Point-of-Departure. It is
the only route segment necessary if the flight stays within the same
route area (the POD and POA are in the same area-of-coverage). It
can also be used to enter specific route constraints for departure area
routing on intercontinental flights (from one route area to another).

RTW

Overwater Area Routing The purpose of the RTW segment is to


control the route transiting between non-zero route areas (1 through
5), or any other Area 0 routing (for example, Organized Track
Structures, latitude-longitude coordinates, and so on).

RTA

Arrival Area Routing The RTA segment is used to navigate route


structure within the same route area as the Point-of-Arrival. This
route segment is required any time the arrival airport is in a route area
that differs from the departure airport route area. It also applies any
time inputs are made to the RTW segment.

NOTE JetPlan accepts all three segments of inputs on one Route command line (06
ROUTE). Each segment is separated by forward slashes for example, 06 ROUTE
RTD input/RTW input/RTA input. If it is necessary to continue a route input to the next
computer screen line, a comma is entered before the entry does a line wrap.

JetPlan-Defined Flight Plan Types and the Route Segment


Inputs
The following paragraphs describe the JetPlan flight plan types and how they relate to the
RTD, RTW, and RTA route segments.
Domestic Flight
Plans

As it applies to the Route Optimizer, JetPlan defines a domestic flight


plan as one in which the POD and POA are in the same route area (for
example, Area 1 to Area 1), not the same country. Even if the POD
and the POA are both in Area 0 (overwater area), the flight plan is
still defined as domestic because the origination and termination
occur within the same JetPlan logical area. In either case, an RTD
route input is generally necessary (unless nav optimization is desired,
in which case no inputs are made). The RTW and RTA segments do
not need to be entered at all, unless the flight plan is transitioning

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from one area to another (international flights) or using preferred


routes or canned tracks (see Domestic Flight Plans with Three Route
Segment Inputs below).
Domestic Flight
Plans with Three
Route Segment
Inputs

There are times when a domestic flight plan uses the three route
segments (RTD/RTW/RTA) rather than the single segment normally
used, despite having a POD and POA in the same route area. You
specify RTD, RTW, and RTA inputs when you want to use one of the
following RTW input types:
A published preferred route
A JetPlan canned route
An Area 0 waypoint or a latitude-longitude coordinate set

International Flight
Plans

International flight plans are defined as those plans that originate in


one JetPlan route area and terminate in another JetPlan route area (for
example, flights from North America to Europe). When a flight plan
transits the Atlantic, Pacific, or any other Area 0 region, JetPlan
clearly regards this as transiting three areas: the POD route area, the
overwater route area, and the POA route area. In this case, you
generally have to specify route inputs for the RTD and RTA. If one or
more Area 0 waypoints or latitude-longitude coordinate sets are to be
included in the route input, then an RTW segment must also be
specified.
If coordinates are used to define either the POD or the POA, then
JetPlan recognizes this point to be in Area 0. Specific rules must be
followed to define the route correctly for the computer.

Route Input Segments Basic Structure


If you want to let the Route Optimizer determine the entire route without constraints (complete
route optimization), then no route segment inputs are necessary. The Route Optimizer either
determines the route dynamically or provides an error message suggesting further user
intervention in the form of route inputs.
Assuming that some sort of user control (input) is to be applied to the route, it may not be
necessary to apply inputs to all three route segments, as in the case of flights within a single
route area.

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

Example:
06 ROUTE (RTD inputs)

If a flight is to transit two route areas (for example, Area 1 to Area 2), specify route inputs for
at least the RTD and RTA segments. Note that the slash must be entered to separate the route
segments, and in the case of no RTW input, two consecutive slashes are necessary to signify
the separation of route areas and the lack of an RTW input. See example below.
Example:
06 ROUTE (RTD inputs)//(RTA inputs)

If an overwater (Area 0) input is needed, specify information for the RTD, the RTW, and the
RTA segments. Note that a slash separates each segment.
Example:
06 ROUTE (RTD inputs)/(RTW inputs)/(RTA inputs)

RTD and RTA Segments Input Types


The RTD and RTA route segments allow the same types of input and require the same syntax.
The following route entry types and syntax rules apply to the RTD and RTA segments.
Jet Airways (J)

You must enter the J option if you want to ensure that the Route
Optimizer looks for airway routing throughout the flight. The J option
must be entered only once, and it must be the first entry on the RTD
or RTA segment. If the J option is applied anywhere but in the first
position, you can expect a flight plan error at best or an invalid route
at worst. When using both the RTD and RTA input segments, there is
no requirement to use the J option on both segments unless you
expressly want airways in both route areas. When the J option is used,
the Route Optimizer discriminates against improper use of one-way
airways.

Victor Airways (V)

You can use the V option in place of the J option to designate a low
altitude airway request. The rules for the V option are the same as for
the J option.

NOTE You must specify the low altitude navigation database (LA option) on the
Options command line to use Victor airways properly.

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Direct Segments
(D)

The D option instructs the Route Optimizer to ignore navigational


route structure and fly an optimized direct route between the points
specified (whether that be enroute waypoints or airport pair). This
option can be placed in any position on the RTD or RTA segment,
except in front of the J option. When used together with the J option,
the D option always overrides the airway requirement to perform the
direct routing for that portion of the flight specified, before reverting
back to airway routing. For example, if a direct segment is required
from a departure airport to a nearby NAVAID, and airways are
otherwise desired for the majority of the flight, then the opening input
on the RTD segment is J,D followed by any other valid entry.
The following syntax rule apply: the D option is entered as the last
entry on the RTD segment and the first entry on the RTA segment
when waypoints are specified on the RTW segment. This type of
input solidifies the transition into and out of Area 0. There are some
instances where this input method is not necessary, but it is generally
a good idea to follow this procedure, as it ensures a smooth transition.
If airways are required after the RTW segment, then you must begin
your RTA input with J followed by any other valid entry.
The only exception to the practice of ending an RTD input (or
beginning an RTA input) with D or J,D is when an international track
code is used on the RTW segment. In this case, the D only interferes
with the track selection process. International track codes are JetPlan
inputs that access the best airway from a set of Organized Track
Structures (A or Z for the NATs, OW or OE for the PACOTS, and so
on).

Preferred Routes
(P)

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In conjunction with the North Atlantic Tracks, ATC preferred routes


are available to and from selected airports in North America. The P
option can be used on the RTD or RTA segment to access these
preferred routes. Entering P alone, or with specific preferred route
waypoint connections, picks up the preferred North American Routes
(NARs) in Area 1. Used in the same manner as the J option, the P
option is generally the first input on the segment, although there are
cases where it can be entered as the second entrybut only after a J
input (J,P). Entering J,P instructs the Route Optimizer to ignore the
non-common portion of the NAR and instead fly airways. Using the P
option as an input on flights in other parts of the world (not related to
the NATs), generates an error at best or produces an invalid route at
worst. Also, do not use the D option with the P option.

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

Waypoints can be entered on the RTD and RTA input segments in


two different ways. You can enter the charted ID of the waypoint
(usually a two- to five-character input) or enter the JetPlan threecharacter ID (an internal code). Normally, internal IDs are only used
to clarify confusion between two similarly identified points (see
Waypoint Ambiguity (RTD/RTA) on page 152).

Waypoints

NOTE

When entering the above input types, apply the following rules:

- All route entries for the RTD and RTA segments must be separated by commas with
no spaces in between (for example, J,D,OVR,HVQ,ALB or P/Z/J,LND,KOK).
- A comma must never be the last item for an RTD or RTA input.

Waypoint Identification (RTD/RTA)


The Route Optimizer is designed to perform all flight planning computations using the JetPlan
Navigation Database. Since this database contains waypoints available around the world, it is
very important that each waypoint has a unique identifier. For example, the NAVAIDS for
Manchester, England and Muscat, Oman have the same identifier (MCT). Thus, a unique
identifier for each is assigned (MCT for Manchester and M2B for Muscat).
Since the Route Optimizer performs all computations using the JetPlan internal identifier for
each waypoint, it would seem practical to use these internal IDs when entering your route
inputs. However, trying to determine what internal ID to use for each waypoint can be
cumbersome. For this reason, the Route Optimizer accepts waypoint entries by both the
charted and the internal identifiers. In fact, using charted identifiers for waypoint input is both
acceptable and recommended. This practice saves you time in the long run, because JetPlan
can scan your input, determine the identifiers location, and convert it to the internal ID faster
than you can.
The following rules apply to the input of charted and internal waypoint identifiers. These rules
apply only to entries on the RTD or RTA input segments (route Areas 1 through 5).
Charted Identifiers

These are generally two to five-character inputs. What you find on the
navigational chart is what you enter. Navaids are typically two or
three-character inputs (for example, CH, DVR, and HVQ), while
compulsory (CRP) and non-compulsory reporting points (NCRP) are
typically five-character inputs (for example, BRADD, KANNI, and
WHALE).

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Internal Identifiers

These are three or four-character inputs.These identifiers are typically


composed of the elements listed in the following table.
Table 6-1 Internal Identifiers

Identifier Composition

Examples

Alphanumeric characters

FQF,TNP,AVE,T90, F41

Period

PU.

Hyphen (often referred to as a dash)

HL-

Waypoint External Output (RTD/RTA)


JetPlan prints out the charted name of a waypoint in the flight plan output. For example, the
four-character internal identifier ADSM prints out as ADSAM, which is a waypoint on the
Arctic track NCA ALFA. The three-character internal identifier C1R prints out as the twocharacter identifier CH.

Waypoint Ambiguity (RTD/RTA)


As mentioned above, one of the aspects of using charted identifiers for your waypoint inputs is
the fact that, occasionally, some waypoints within the same route area have the same
identifiers. For example, CH is the identifier for both the Cheung Chau VOR in China and the
Christchurch VOR in New Zealand. Both are in the same JetPlan route area (Area 4).
Knowledge of the JetPlan internal identifiers for these waypoints would be helpful because
each internal ID is unique. However, this is not always practical. Sometimes you only know
what you have in front of you, which are the names on the charts. Entering the charted name in
this situation could cause problems because the Route Optimizer cannot determine which
identifier you want. This is referred to as waypoint ambiguity.
If faced with waypoint ambiguity, JetPlan attempts to automatically resolve the problem by
selecting the waypoint closest to the route of flight.If automatic waypoint resolution fails, you
can try the following:
Lat/Long
Approximation

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Specify a latitude/longitude coordinate in parentheses, approximate to


your waypoint, next to the waypoint input. Use the Route Optimizer
rules for latitude-longitude input. This technique forces JetPlan to use
the charted waypoint identifier closest to the specified coordinates.

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

Nearby Waypoint

Specify another waypoint near the waypoint causing the ambiguity.


This additional waypoint needs to be on your intended route of flight.

Internal Identifier

Specify the internal identifier of the waypoint. Because JetPlan


assumes that all waypoint identifiers entered in a flight plan request
are charted names, you must enter a left parenthesis before the
internal waypoint name. This facilitates the waypoint file search.
Example:
06 ROUTE J,(CH-

RTW Segment Input Types


The RTW route segment allows you to navigate in Area 0. There are several types of RTW
inputs and all are specific to the RTW segment only. None of the input types listed for the
RTD or RTA segments are allowed on the RTW segment. The following input types and rules
apply to the RTW route input segment.
Latitude/Longitude
Coordinates

The Route Optimizer recognizes user-defined latitude/longitude


coordinates on the RTW segment only. Coordinates can be entered in
a different ways. The standard Route Optimizer method is given
below:
Latitude is entered as a four-digit input; two digits define
degrees, and two digits define minutes (ddmm).
Longitude is entered as a five-digit input; three digits define
degrees, and two digits define minutes (dddmm).
South and East coordinates must be prefixed with a minus sign
(-) to differentiate these coordinates from North and West
coordinates.
A comma must separate the latitude from the longitude and a
coordinate set from any other RTW entry.
Example:
D/3800,17000,3900,18000,4000,-17000,4000,-16000/D

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Other latitude-longitude entry methods are taken from the Specific


Route Selector tool. However, these methods do work with the Route
Optimizer. The following paragraphs describe these methods:
Latitude can be entered as a two-digit (dd) or a four-digit
(ddmm) input, depending on whether you want to express a
minutes value. If the minutes value is a non-zero value, enter a
four-digit input. If not, then simply enter the two-digit degree
value.
Longitude can be entered as a three-digit (ddd) or a five-digit
(dddmm) input, depending on whether you want to express a
minutes value. If the minutes value is a non-zero value, enter a
five-digit input. If not, then simply enter the three-digit degree
value.
All coordinates must be prefixed with the single letter
designating the hemispherical location of the coordinates (N, S,
E, or W).
Commas between latitude and longitude are not necessary.
However, you must separate one coordinate set (latitudelongitude combination) from another with either a comma or a
space.
Example:
D/N38W170 N39W180 N40E170 N40E160/D or
D/N3830W17000,N39W180,N4015E17000,N3950E16000/D

International Track
Codes

You can invoke access to certain Organized Track Structures (OTS)


by entering JetPlan international track code. The code you enter
instructs the Route Optimizer to determine the optimal track from the
set of tracks available for the given POD/POA combination. For more
information about international track codes and the associated
Organized Track Structures, see International Planning Organized
Track Structures on page 164.

The Route Optimizer and SID/STAR Application


The Route Optimizer selects a SID or STAR provided the following conditions are met:
A SID/STAR transition is part of the optimized route.
The SID/STAR identifier is loaded in the navigation database.

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

If an optimized route does not print out a SID or a STAR, then you may have to specify a
transition waypoint to pick up the SID or STAR. If a SID or a STAR is not loaded in the
navigation database, contact Jeppesen Customer Service to have it loaded.

NOTE The Route Optimizer considers a SID or a STAR identifierthe label given to
the route structure that makes up the SID or STARan airway name. If the Optimizer
constructs a route overflying a NAVAID that has a SID or a STAR connected to it,
then the SID or STAR identifier may print out in the flight plan just like any other
airway. This does not occur often, and it can be avoided, given assistance from
Jeppesen Customer Service.

Using Route Proof


You can use the Route Proof (RP) command as a planning tool to determine the following:
Operational validity of the route
Necessary route input changes
Where to make user-specified altitude (profile) changes
Where to make user-specified cruise mode changes
To use Route Proof, enter FP,RP on the Options command line, and then enter the rest of the
flight plan request inputs (for example, POD, POA, RTD/RTW/RTA, and so on). Route Proof
prints out the route of flight and ground distances based on your route inputs.

NOTE Using the JetPlan shortcuts simplifies the Route Proof process. See Flight
Plan Shortcuts on page 54 in Chapter 2, Option Commands.

Once the route is proven satisfactory, you can build the desired flight plan request, using the
information gathered from the Route Proof. Start by typing all of the necessary command
inputs after FP on the Options command line, and then make changes to the other inputs, if
necessary. Type GO at any point if the plan is ready to be calculated.
The following example illustrates a Route Proof request, a follow-up Route Proof request that
modifies the route entry, and a final plan (long version) with all of the desired commands and
options, including a profile change.

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Example:
Explanation: The following is the original route proof request.
01
02
03
06
07
08
09
10
11
14
16

OPTIONS FP,RP
POD WIII/WBSB/RPMM/RCTP/RJFK,TX800
POA RKSI
ROUTE J
HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST 30,RKSM
ETD 0100
PROFILE I
A/C TYPE/REGN $N123
CRUISE MODE LRC
PAYLOAD 50000
POD OR POA FUEL A0,I

Example:
Explanation: The following is the follow-up route proof request with route modification (FPR
is the Flight Plan Reload command).
01
02
06
07

OPTIONS FPR
POD @6 or @06
ROUTE J,LBG
HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST GO

Example:
Explanation: The following is the final, complete flight plan request.
01 OPTIONS FPR,ETOP,DRFT,CS/JD123,CPT/S RAWLUK,DSP/T MURPHY
02 POD @909 PROFILE I,330,35010 A/C TYPE/REGN GO

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

Applying Route Inputs Domestic Planning


As stated above, domestic flight plans originate and terminate within the same JetPlan route
area. Even if the POD and the POA are both in Area 0 (the overwater area), the flight plan is
still in one area. In either case, an RTD input is generally necessary, except in the case of pure
nav optimization (no inputs). RTW and RTA inputs are not necessary unless overflying one or
more Area 0 waypoints or using preferred routes or canned tracks.

NOTE This section applies the general route input concepts described previously by
including more concrete examples. To keep the examples as realistic and
understandable as possible, actual inputs are used, including departure, arrival, and
waypoint identifiers. In addition, route areas are noted to help clarify the reason
certain entries are made.

Optimized Direct Routing


If you want to request the best direct route without regard for NAVAID or airway structure,
then enter the D input type. This provides the best latitude/longitude direct route. For
predominantly east/west routes, it is based on calculations at every 1 degree of latitude and 10
degrees of longitude. In other words, a computer-generated waypoint, in latitude-longitude
format, prints every 10 degrees of longitude. For predominantly north/south routes, it is based
on calculations at every 5 degrees of latitude and 1 degree of longitude.
You can specify direct routes between an airport pair or between enroute waypoints. As more
overfly waypoints are specified, the Route Optimizer capability is diminished.

NOTE In a zero wind scenario, direct routing is roughly equivalent to great circle
routing.

Example:
Route explanation: Optimum direct (D) route from KLAX to KJFK.
02 POD KLAX
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE D

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Example:
Route explanation: Nav optimize to DAG, fly direct from DAG to LVZ, and then nav optimize
to POA. JetPlan prints out the SID or STAR, if either are loaded in the database.
02 POD KLAX
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE DAG,D,LVZ

NAV Optimized Routing


Any route input, or lack of route input, that does not specifically select a direct segment (D) or
airways (J) automatically produces nav optimization. A nav-optimized route is one that looks
at the navigational structure to produce the best combination of airways or direct segments
between NAVAIDS. To nav optimize, withhold all route inputs as shown in the example
below.
Example:
Route explanation: Nav optimize from POD to POA (no route input).
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE <ENTER>

Airway Optimized Routing


If you want to request the best airway route, then enter the J input type. This selects the
optimal route based on the best combination of jet airway routes available. To consider RNAV
routes, specify RN on the Options command line (you can also use an aircraft from the
Aircraft Database that has the RNAV parameter turned on). To avoid RNAV routes, specify
NORN on the Options command line.
Example:
Route explanation: Fly jet routes from POD to POA.
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE J

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

Nav Optimized Routing Between Specific Waypoints


You can request a nav optimized route while overflying specific waypoints. Enter one or more
waypoints as part of the route input. JetPlan nav optimizes between the waypoints as long as
the J input is not specified, and the D input is not placed between waypoints. As the number of
overfly waypoints increases, Route Optimizer capability decreases.
Example:
Route explanation: Nav optimize the entire flight, but overfly LIN and LVZ.
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE LIN,LVZ

Airway Optimized Routing Between Specific Waypoints


You can request airway routing while overflying specific waypoints. Enter the J input and one
or more waypoints as part of the route input. JetPlan airway optimizes between waypoints as
long as airway structure exists between them and as long as the D input is not entered to
disrupt this type of request. As the number of overfly waypoints increases, Route Optimizer
capability decreases.
Example:
Route explanation: Fly airways from POD to POA, but overfly TIGRA, KRK, TRL, and SIT.
If jet routes do not connect all of these points, then an error occurs.
02 POD EDDM
03 POA HECA
06 ROUTE J,TIGRA,KRK,TRL,SIT

Domestic Planning All 3 Route Segments


There are times when a domestic flight plan uses all three route input segments
(RTD/RTW/RTA) rather than the single segment (RTD) normally used, despite being in the
same JetPlan route area. This is effectively the same as entering international route inputs.You
specify three route segments when an Area 0 input (RTW input) is necessary.

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Example:
Route explanation: Fly optimized routing to DVV VOR, then fly direct to N42/W110, then
direct to MLD VOR, then fly optimized to POA.
02 POD KMCI
03 POA KSFO
06 ROUTE DVV,D/N42w110/D,MLD

Applying Route Inputs International Planning


As stated, international flight plans originate in one JetPlan route area and terminate in another
(for example, flight plans from North America to Europe or Asia to North America). When a
flight plan transits the Atlantic, Pacific, or any Area 0 region, JetPlan deems this a three area
transition: the POD area, the overwater area, and the POA area.

NOTE This section applies the general route input concepts described previously by
including more concrete examples. To keep the examples as realistic and
understandable as possible, actual inputs are used, including departure, arrival, and
waypoint identifiers. In addition, route areas are noted to help clarify the reason
certain entries are made.
Because general syntax rules for the Route Optimizer apply equally to both the
domestic and the international route entries, detailed review of the different types
of route entries would be redundant here. Therefore, only specific differences from
domestic inputs and examples are explained below.

Optimized Direct Routing


You can request the best direct route between the POD route area and the POA route area,
without regard for navigational structure. The following paragraphs cover specifying direct
routes when planning international flights.

POD and POA


Example:
Route explanation: In this example, a direct route is entered on a flight from Honolulu (Area 5)
to Calgary (Area 1). All published route structure is ignored. Note that a non-entry on the
RTW segment (blank RTW) is the same as a D on the RTD or RTA.

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Route Commands
Route Optimizer

02 POD PHNL
03 POA CYYC
06 ROUTE D//D

Enroute Waypoints
Example:
Route explanation: In this example, direct segments are entered between waypoints in Area
1on a flight from New York (Area 1) to London (Area 2). With the exception of the entered
waypoints, all published route structure is ignored. Note that a non-entry on the RTW segment
(blank RTW) is the same as a D on the RTD or RTA.
02 POD KJFK
03 POA EGLL
06 ROUTE D,ACK,D,YHZ//D

Overwater Waypoints
Example:
Route explanation: The inputs instruct the Route Optimizer to calculate direct segments from
PHNL to ZIGIE, from ZIGIE into the overwater area, direct (no input) for the overwater area
to TOU in Area 1, and direct from TOU to CYYC. Note that no input on the RTW segment is
the same as a D on the RTD or RTA.
02 POD PHNL
03 POA CYYC
06 ROUTE D,ZIGIE,D//D,TOU,D

Directs between overwater waypoints (Area 0 fixes) are implied, as the following example
illustrates.
Example:
Route explanation: The inputs instruct the Route Optimizer to calculate direct segments from
EINN to 52N015W, from 52N015W to 54N030W, from 54N030W to SCROD, and from
SCROD to CYYR. The additional route examples portray variations of the same RTW input.
Note that an implied direct (D) exists between every entry on the RTW segment.
02 POD EINN
03 POA CYYR

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06 ROUTE D/5200,01500,5400,03000,SCROD/D
or
06 ROUTE D/N52W015 N54W030 SCROD/D
or
06 ROUTE D/N52W015,N54W030,SCROD/D

Nav Optimized Routing


You can request the optimal routing based on the best combination of jet airways or direct
segments between NAVAIDS. A non-input on the RTD and RTA segments instructs the
Route Optimizer to nav optimize in both route areas (the POD route area and the POA route
area). If the route crosses an overwater area (Area 0) between the POD and the POA route
areas (more than just the transition between the two route area land masses), JetPlan selects an
optimized direct route across the overwater area. Note that no input on the RTW segment is
the same as a D on the RTD or RTA.
Example:
Route explanation: Route nav optimizes from POD through Area 1, optimizes direct across the
North Atlantic, and then nav optimizes through Area 2 to the POA.
02 POD KJFK
03 POA EDDF
06 ROUTE <ENTER> (no entry made)

In addition, when planning an international flight, a nav-optimized route can be selected for
one route area, POD or POA, while the other route area has various route inputs.
For example, if jet airway or direct routing is desired for the POA route area only, then omit
any RTD or RTW inputs.
Example:
Route explanation: Same as the previous example, except that the Route Optimizer now uses
jet airways to the POA (through Area 2 only).
02 POD KJFK
03 POA EDDF
06 ROUTE //J

Airway Optimized Routing


You can select the optimal route based on the best combination of jet airway routes available.

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Example:
Route explanation: This example specifies airways through Area 2, optimized direct routing
over the North Atlantic (Area 0), and then airways through Area 1 to POA.
02 POD EDDF
03 POA KLAX
06 ROUTE J//J

Like nav optimization, airway optimization can be applied to one route area if desired. Simply
remove the J input from the route area that you want to free from airway requirements. See the
example given for nav optimization in one route area (above).

Nav Optimized Routing Between Specific Waypoints


You can specify one or more waypoints as part of the route in the POD or POA route area.
JetPlan nav optimizes between waypoints as long as the route elements, J or D, have not been
specified. As the number of overfly waypoints increases, Route Optimizer capability
decreases.
Example:
Route explanation: Fly nav optimized routing through Area 1, optimize direct across the North
Atlantic (Area 0), and then fly nav optimized routing through Area 2 to POA via SUM and
AAL.
02 POD KSEA
03 POA EKCH
06 ROUTE //SUM,AAL

Example:
Route explanation: Fly nav optimized routing through Area 1, optimize direct across the North
Atlantic (Area 0) via N61E000, and then, after going direct to ZOL, nav optimize in Area 2 to
POA via VES.
02 POD KSEA
03 POA EKCH
06 ROUTE /N61E000/D,ZOL,VES

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Airway Optimized Routing Between Specific Waypoints


You can specify a J input and one or more waypoints as part of the route in the POD or POA
area. JetPlan airway optimizes between the waypoints as long as airways exist between the
waypoints and a D input has not been requested. As the number of overfly waypoints
increases, Route Optimizer capability decreases.
Example:
Route explanation: Fly airways through Area 1, optimize direct across the North Atlantic
(Area 0), and then fly airways through Area 2 to the POA via SUM.
02 POD KSEA
03 POA EKCH
06 ROUTE J//J,SUM

Example:
Route explanation: Fly airways through Area 2 via TIGRA, KRK, TRL, SIT, and DBA, and
then transition to airways through Area 4 to POA.
02 POD EDDM
03 POA VABB
06 ROUTE J,TIGRA,KRK,TRL,SIT,DBA//J

JetPlan Designated Preferred Routes


You can invoke preferred routes between specific airport pairs located in different route areas.
To do so, enter the D input on the RTD and RTA segments and PR on the RTW segment. For
a list of airport pairs with preferred routes loaded between them, contact Jeppesen Customer
Service.

International Planning Organized Track Structures


Organized Track Structures (OTS) are sets of ATC-approved tracks designed to facilitate
traffic flow across large bodies of water. There are two kinds of organized track structures:
static and dynamic. Static structures are, more or less, permanent airways that do not change
over time. They can be found on navigation charts. Occasionally, waypoints on these airways
may be repositioned, but charts are generally updated and changes are minimal. Static
structures provide a set of valid flight levels that can be used for the direction flown. Some of
these airways may be available for two-way traffic, while others are only available in one
direction.

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Dynamic structures are airways that can change from day to day. A controlling agency
disseminates NOTAMS that define the structure for a given time period, including valid flight
levels. Dynamic structures are not on navigation charts.
JetPlan provides international track codes for several OTS systems. These codes, which are
entered on the RTW route input segment, allow you to access the optimal track, from the given
set of airways available, for the given POD/POA combination. The following table shows the
JetPlan code (input) that is used on the RTW segment and the corresponding track structure
being referenced. All of the track structures in this table are dynamic.

Table 6-2

International Track Codes

Code (Input)

Organized Track Structure Name (Direction)

North Atlantic Tracks (NATs westbound)

North Atlantic Tracks (NATs eastbound)

OE

Pacific Organized Track Structures (PACOTS eastbound)

OW

Pacific Organized Track Structures (PACOTS westbound)

North Atlantic Tracks


The North Atlantic Tracks (NATs) are a set of airways designed to alleviate traffic flow
between Europe and North America. They are a dynamic track structure in that they are
updated on a daily basis. The eastbound set, referred to as the XYZ tracks, is published by
Gander OAC. The westbound set, referred to as the ABC tracks, is published by Shanwick
OAC. Each set of tracks is available on the JetPlan system immediately upon receipt from the
aforementioned agencies. To obtain a print of the latest NAT update, specify one of the
following inputs on the Options command line:
PZ Prints a current copy of the eastbound North Atlantic Tracks
PA Prints a current copy of the westbound North Atlantic Tracks
When planning to use the NATs, consider the following restrictions:
Daytime (westbound) NATs constrain traffic at the 30 West parallel from
1130 to 1800 UTC for flight levels 310 through 390. This means that for you
to consider using the westbound NATs, your flight needs to be at or past the
30 West parallel within the time frame specified.

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Nighttime (eastbound) NATs constrain traffic at the 30 West parallel from


0100 to 0800 UTC for flight levels 310 through 390. This means that for you
to consider using the eastbound NATs, your flight needs to be at or past the
30 West parallel within the time specified.
The CAA and FAA recommend that random route (non-NAT) flights that
cross the 30 West parallel within the hour preceding the onset of a new NAT
set flight plan on the new NAT set or maintain vertical or lateral separation
from the new NAT set.
To request routing over the NATs, enter one of the following international track codes on the
RTW route input segment.
Table 6-3

International Track Codes

Track Code

Tracks

Times

A, B, C, and so on

Valid 1130Z1900Z

U, V, W, and so on

Valid 0100Z0800Z

When a NAT is requested on a submitted flight plan, the Route Optimizer automatically
determines the optimum track. Flight levels are constrained to valid NAT altitudes during the
NAT portion of the flight.

North Atlantic Tracks Basic Route Inputs


The examples below demonstrate the various basic inputs that access the North Atlantic
Tracks. Subsequent sections provide more concrete input examples. Keep in mind that all
input rules previously established in this chapter apply.
The following input examples request the optimum eastbound track. Enter a Z on the RTW
input segment. You can request nav optimization, jet airways, or preferred routing for your
Area 1 and Area 2 inputs (the RTD and RTA input segments).

NOTE Not every possible combination of NAT route inputs is shown in the tables
below.

Table 6-4
Input

Route Explanation

/Z/

Nav optimize through Area 1, optimum eastbound


track, nav optimize through Area 2.

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Table 6-4

North Atlantic Tracks (Eastbound Examples) (continued)

Input

Route Explanation

J/Z/J

Jet airways through Area 1, optimum eastbound track,


jet airways through Area 2.

/Z/J

Nav optimize through Area 1, optimum eastbound


track, jet airways through Area 2.

P/Z/J

ATC preferred routing through Area 1 (a.k.a., NARs),


optimum eastbound track, nav optimize through Area
2.

The following input examples request the optimum westbound track. Enter an A on the
RTW input segment. RTD and RTA inputs can be used in similar fashion to those shown
above.
Table 6-5

North Atlantic Tracks (Westbound Examples)

Input

Route Explanation

/A/

Nav optimize through Area 2, optimum westbound


track, nav optimize through Area 1.

J/A/J

Jet airways through Area 2, optimum westbound


track, jet airways through Area 1.

J/A/P

Jet airways through Area 2, optimum westbound


track, ATC preferred routing through Area 1 (NARs).

J/A/

Jet airways through Area 2, optimum westbound


track, nav optimize through Area 1.

/A/P

NAV optimize through Area 2, optimum westbound


track, ATC preferred routing through Area 1 (NARs).

Overfly points can be added to your Area 1 or Area 2 route input. One type of overfly point
that you may want to use is the coastal fix. Coastal fixes are waypoints that enter or exit a
particular track, and they are part of the track messages that come from the controlling ATC
agencies. By entering a coastal fix, you imply to the Route Optimizer that you want to use a
specific track. For example, if you specify the coastal waypoint COLOR, and COLOR is
connected to track Charlie (NAT C) on todays westbound tracks (ABCs), then the likelihood
of track Charlie being used in the computed flight plan is increased significantly. This
implication need only be specified in one route area for it to work this way. See the following
examples for application of overfly points within a NAT request (specifically coastal
waypoints).
Example:
J/A/P,COLOR

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- or J,BURAK/A/J,P,SSM,LIT

North Atlantic Tracks Preferred Route Considerations


A NAT-associated preferred route can be requested in Area 1 by entering the P option on your
RTD or RTA input segment.

NOTE The P option used on the RTD and RTA is only available in relation to North
Atlantic travel. It does not access any other preferred routing except as defined here.

Area 1 Preferred Routing


In Area 1, the preferred routes associated with the NATs are called North American Routes
(NARs). Every NAR consists of two segments, the common portion and the non-common
portion. The common portion exists between a coastal waypoint (where the NAT is either
entered or exited) and an inland navigational fix. The non-common segment is the connection
between the inland navigational fix and the departure (or arrival) airport, depending on the
direction of the flight.
The table below shows the North American (Area 1) airports connected to the North Atlantic
Tracks by common and non-common NAR segments.
Table 6-6
East

West

West

West

KADW

CYMX

KDTW

KORL

KBOS

CYYZ

KEWR

KPHL

KBWI

CYUL

KFLL

KPIT

KCHS

KADW

KHPN

KRDU

KDOV

KATL

KIAD

KSFB

KEWR

KBOS

KIAH

KSTL

KHPN

KBWI

KJFK

KTEB

KIAD

KCHS

KLAS

KTPA

KJFK

KCLT

KLAX

KWRI

KPHL

KCVG

KMCO

KSFB

KDEN

KMIA

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Table 6-6

North American Airports

East

West

West

KTEB

KDFW

KMSP

KWRI

KDOV

KORD

West

If you want to use the preferred route option as your Area 1 input, it is typically used alone.
However, because of the segmented nature of NARs, you can apply additional route inputs to
your Area 1 routing.
When applying additional inputs to your Area 1 preferred route request, the direction
determines where to place the P option. If departing Area 1 (eastbound), the P option can be
placed in the last position of the input segment. If arriving Area 1 (westbound), the P option is
placed in the first or second position of the input segment (this is dependent on whether you
want to specify jet airways, the J option, at all).
Area 1 preferred route inputs: When departing Area 1, the P may be the last input on the RTD.
Example:
02 POD KDFW
03 POA EDDF
06 ROUTE J,JAROM,P/Z/J

Area 1 preferred route inputs: When arriving Area 1, it is the first or second input on the RTA.
Example:
02 POD EDDF
03 POA KDFW
06 ROUTE J/A/J,P

For westbound flights, you can override the non-common portion of a NAR by specifying the
inland navigational fix (the endpoint for a westbound common segment) after the P option and
then entering additional waypoints that deviate from the non-common segment.
Example:
Route explanation: Preferred route from EHAM to the optimum westbound NAT. After the
NAT, pick up the common portion of the NAR to SSM (inland navigational fix), and then fly
jet airways from SSM to KDFW via LIT.
02 POD EHAM
03 POA KDFW
06 ROUTE J/A/J,P,SSM,LIT

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For North American airports not connected to the NARs, the P option accesses a common
NAR segment. However, the route output to or from the common NAR depends on your input.
If the P option is used alone (no other input option is specified), the route nav optimizes as
follows:
Eastbound: the route optimizes from the POD to the start of the common
NAR. Overfly waypoints can be specified with this input. However, the P is
the last input on the RTD.
Westbound: the route nav optimizes from the end of the common NAR to
the POA. Overfly waypoints can be specified with this input.
If the J option is included with the P option (such as J,P), the route airway optimizes as
follows:
Eastbound: the route selects optimal jet airways to the start of the common
NAR. Overfly waypoints can be specified with this input. However, the P is
the last input on the RTD.
Westbound: the route selects optimal jet airways from the end of the
common NAR. Overfly waypoints can be specified with this input.
Preferred Routes Without the NATs
The preferred route option can be used even when the NATs are not specified. For example, if
you are planning to cross the Atlantic but prefer to use latitude-longitude coordinates rather
than specify a North Atlantic Track, you can enter the coordinates on the RTW input segment
while specifying preferred routes on the RTD or RTA.
Example:
02 POD EGLL
03 POA KBOS
06 ROUTE J/5500,02000,5000,05000/P

Preferred Route Restrictions


The following restrictions apply to the P option for Area 1.
When departing Area 1, do not use a D to direct the route from a waypoint on a common NAR
segment to a waypoint input specified on the RTW route segment. The following example
demonstrates an incorrect route input.

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Example:
Error Message outputs: Cannot direct route from a NAR way-pointYYTto 4800,05000.
02 POD KJFK
03 POA EGLL
06 ROUTE YYT,P,D/4800,05000/J,DOLIP

When arriving Area 1, do not use a D to direct the route from a waypoint on the RTW route
segment to a waypoint on a common NAR segment. The following example demonstrates an
incorrect route input.
Example:
Error Message outputs: cannot direct route from 5000,05000 to the beginning waypoint on a
common NARYYT.
02 POD EGLL
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE J/5000,05000/P,D,YYT

North Atlantic Tracks Flight Level Considerations


When using the North Atlantic OTS, a Profile command input of I (for IFR) or C (for IFR and
no step-climbs) is acceptable. In addition, waypoints can be specified as altitude constraint
parameters.
Without the C profile option, JetPlan step climbs into, through, or above the valid NAT flight
levels if the change results in a better profile. If step climbs are not desired, you can constrain
the NAT portion by adding the C option to your Profile command line.
In the example below, the C option is specified. JetPlan selects IFR altitudes until the NAT
track, where it selects a valid flight level and holds it (no step-climbs) for the duration of the
track. After the track, JetPlan reverts back to IFR altitude rules.
Example:
02
03
06
09

POD EDDF
POA KPHL
ROUTE J/A/J,P,BRIGS
PROFILE C

In the next example, waypoints are specified as altitude constraint parameters. These inputs
approximate typical ATC arrival restrictions in Area 1.

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Example:
02
03
06
09

POD EDDF
POA KPHL
ROUTE J/A/J,P,BRIGS
PROFILE C,PVD,240,HOFFI,200

North Atlantic Data Link Mandate (NAT DLM)


Phase 2A of the ICAO North Atlantic Data Link Mandate (NAT DLM) went into effect on
February 5, 2015. Phase 2A requires aircraft operating between FL350 and FL390 (inclusive)
on all east and westbound NATs to have specific Controller-Pilot Data Link Communications
(CPDLC) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) equipment.
In keeping with the NAT DLM, JetPlan automatically restricts FL350FL390 on east and
westbound NATs to aircraft with the required CPDLC and ADS-C equipment in Item10a/b on
the ICAO filed flight plan (FPL). The system applies this restriction if the Profile command
input is I or C for the NAT portion of the flight plan.
Table 6-7 lists the equipment codes that are required to satisfy the NAT DLM. (As long as the
required codes are present, other equipment codes may also be present in Item10a/b)
Table 6-7

NAT DLM Phase 2A Required Item 10a/b Equipment

ICAO FPL Item

Equipment Type

Equipment Codes

EQUIPMENT 10a

CPDLC

One or more of the following CPDLC codes:


J2 CPDLC FANS 1/A HFDL
J5 CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM (INM)
J7 CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM (IRID)

EQUIPMENT 10b

ADS

D1 ADS-C with FANS 1/A Capabilities

The CPDLC and ADS equipment in Table 6-7 is stored in the NC2 parameter in the ICAO
2012 Certification and Equipment section of the Customer Aircraft Database record. When
the NC2 parameter is configured with this data, JetPlan automatically inserts the 10a
equipment codes before the / indicator and the 10b codes after the / indicator in Item 10a/b
EQUIPMENT on the filing strip. For more information, see Chapter 26, Customer Aircraft
Database.
You can override the NAT DLM flight-level restriction with an altitude constraint Profile
command inputfor example, I,330,400 or C,330,400.
When flight levels 350 to 390 are restricted, supporting flight plan formats display an alert that
the aircraft is not properly equipped, even if you override the altitude restriction. The alert is
similar to the following example:

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NUMBER OF ALERTS 1
ALERT TAG NATEQUI
ALERT MSG No ADS or CPDLC equipment detected.
Flight levels 350 to 390 prohibited.

North Atlantic Track Input Examples


This section provides concrete examples that depict inputs that select the optimum track from
those available, and specific tracks.
Selecting the Optimal Track
The following examples are representative of a users request for the optimum NAT.
Example:
Route explanation: Non-common and common NAR for Area 1, optimal eastbound NAT, then
airways through Area 2 to destination.
02 POD KJFK
03 POA OEJN
06 ROUTE P/Z/J

Example:
Route explanation: Jet airways for Area 2, optimal westbound NAT, and then the NAR
through Area 1 to destination.
02 POD EDDF
03 POA CYMX
06 ROUTE J/A/P

Example:
Route explanation: Nav optimize through Area 1, optimal eastbound NAT, and then airway
optimized through Area 2 to destination.
02 POD KTEB
03 POA EGLL
06 ROUTE /Z/J

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Example:
Route explanation: Airways via LIT to the inland navigational fix, SSM, and then the NAR,
the optimal NAT, and finally, airway optimized through Area 2 to destination.
02 POD KDFW
03 POA EDDF
06 ROUTE J,P,LIT,SSM/Z/J

Selecting a Specific Track


Selecting a particular NAT track for your flight plan requires you to include one or more
coastal waypoints in your input. The number and location of points specified determines
whether the input is a demonstrative command to fly a particular NAT track or merely a mild
suggestion for which track to aim. There are many variations to this technique, and
representative examples are illustrated below.
Westbound Flight Plans
Example:
Route explanation: Jet airway optimized through Area 2 to the NAT that connects with the
Area 1 coastal fix, HO. Pick up common and non-common NAR through Area 1 to
destination.

NOTE

A valid track must exist with the coastal fix, HO, included.

02 POD EDDF
03 POA KORD
06 ROUTE J/A/P,HO

Example:
Route explanation: Same as previous example except that only the common portion of the
NAR is requested. Once the inland navigational fix (the endpoint for the common segment) is
reached, jet airways prevail to the destination.

NOTE A valid NAT track with the coastal fix, HO, must exist. Also, the inclusion of
the J option overrides the non-common NAR segment.

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02 POD EDDF
03 POA KORD
06 ROUTE J/A/J,P,HO

Example:
Route explanation: Same as previous example except that the jet airways after the common
segment of the NAR must overfly the waypoint, TUL.
02 POD EGLL
03 POA KDFW
06 ROUTE J/A/J,P,HO,TUL

Example:
Route explanation: Jet optimized through Area 2 to the NAT that connects with the inland
navigational fix, STEAM. Pick up the common and non-common NAR segments in Area 1 to
destination.

NOTE

A valid track with the coastal fix, STEAM, must exist.

02 POD EHAM
03 POA KDFW
06 ROUTE J/A/P,STEAM

Eastbound Flight Plans


Example:
Route explanation: Preferred route (NARs) through Area 1 to the coastal fix, VIXUN, pick up
NAT that is connected to VIXUN, and then fly jet optimized through Area 2 to destination.
02 POD KATL
03 POA EGLL
06 ROUTE P,VIXUN/Z/J

Example:
Route explanation: Jet airways through Area 1 to the inland navigational fix (the start point for
the common segment of the NAR), pick up the NAR to the coastal fix, COLOR, and then the
NAT connected to COLOR. Jet optimized through Area 2 to destination.

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02 POD KDFW
03 POA EDDF
06 ROUTE J,COLOR,P/Z/J

North Atlantic Tracks Crossing Without The NATS


The same types of RTD and RTA inputs used on a NAT flight plan can be used for a random
route flight plan across the North Atlantic. If an organized track across the North Atlantic is
not desired, omit the international track code (A or Z) and the Route Optimizer develops an
optimized direct route for the overwater portion of the flight.
Example:
Route explanation: Preferred NAR through Area 1, optimize direct across the North Atlantic
(with waypoints defined every ten degrees of longitude), and then jet airways through Area 5
to destination.
02 POD KTEB
03 POA BIKF
06 ROUTE P//J

Example:
Route explanation: Jet optimized through Area 2, optimize direct across the North Atlantic,
and then preferred NAR through Area 1 to destination.
02 POD EGLL
03 POA CYUL
06 ROUTE J//P

Pacific Organized Track Structures (PACOTS)


PACOTS refers to the multiple, dynamic airway structures that exist in the North and MidPacific. PACOTS are dynamic because they are updated daily for flight planning purposes
during specific time-frames.
PACOTS includes Northern Pacific Tracks as well as the Flex Tracks for Hawaii to and from
Japan. The tracks in the North Pacific lie between the west coast of North America (Area 1)
and the Asian Far East (Area 4generally landing or overflying Japan). The Mid-Pacific
tracks, historically referred to as the Flex Tracks, lie between Hawaii (Area 5) and Japan
(Area 4).

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Flex Tracks
The Flex Tracks exist between Hawaii and Japan. They are updated on a daily basis and are
available only at specific times of the day. The eastbound Flex Tracks are valid on JetPlan
from 1000 to 2100 UTC (for flights crossing the 160 East parallel between 1200 and 1600
UTC). The westbound tracks are valid from 1900 to 0800 UTC (for flights crossing the 160
East parallel between 2300 and 0600 UTC). To view the latest update of these tracks, enter the
following on the Options command line:
01 IFS,FLEX Prints the eastbound Flex Track NOTAM.
01 IFS,WFTR Prints the westbound Flex Track NOTAM.

NOTE The outputs resulting from these two inputs differ significantly. The
eastbound tracks (FLEX) printout provides the route of flight to follow. You must
enter your inputs based on this information. The westbound tracks (WFTR) printout
provides the user inputs that you enter to access any one of the tracks. The reason
for this output difference involves how each structure is stored on the JetPlan system.

Flex Tracks Route Inputs


Routing in both directions (east and west) requires similar basic inputs to use the track
structure. By entering the international track code, OE, on the RTW segment, you access the
Flex track systemgiven the POD and POA are in Area 5 and Area 4 respectively.
Entering J on the RTD or RTA generally provides the optimal Flex Track. For more control,
you can enter some or all of the overfly points specified in the track NOTAM.
Example inputs for each direction are shown below.
Example:
Route explanation: Jet airways through Area 4, the optimum Flex Track, jet airways through
Area 5 to destination. The route input used in this example is valid for either direction.
02 POD RJAA (Area 4)
03 POA PHNL (Area 5)
06 ROUTE J/OE/J

Example:
Route explanation: Jet airways through Area 4 via MILVA, pick up the Flex track connected
to MILVA, jet airways through Area 5 to destination.

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02 POD RJAA
03 POA PHNL
06 ROUTE J,MILVA/OE/J

Example:
Route explanation: Jet airways in Area 5 to SOK, and then direct to DANNO; pick up the Flex
Track connected to the specified waypoints, and then jet airways through Area 4 via MILVA,
SMOLT, SUNNS and LIBRA to destination.
02 POD PHNL
03 POA RJAA
06 ROUTE J,SOK,D,DANNO/OW/J,MILVA,SMOLT,SUNNS,LIBRA

PACOTS Far East To/From North America


The PACOTS between the Far East (Area 4landing or overflying Japan) and the west coast
of North America (Area 1) are updated on a daily basis. They are available only at specific
times of the day. The eastbound tracks are valid on JetPlan from 0900 to 1600 UTC (for flights
crossing the 160 East parallel). The westbound tracks are valid from 1900 to 0800 UTC (for
flights crossing the 160 East parallel). To view the latest update of these tracks, enter the
following on the Options command line:
IFS,PAC-OTS Prints the eastbound PACOTS Tracks NOTAM.
IFS,FREEFLOW Prints the westbound PACOTS Tracks NOTAM.

NOTE The output resulting from this input is in a user-input format. The output is
prepared by the Jeppesen Customer Service staff.

PACOTS Route Inputs


Routing in both directions requires similar basic inputs to use the track structure. The twoletter designator OE is entered on the RTW input segment to access the optimum eastbound
PACOTS track. The two-letter designator OW is entered on the RTW input segment to access
the optimum westbound PACOTS track.
You can use the J option or nav optimize on the RTD or RTA route segments when accessing
the optimal track. For more control, you can enter some or all of the overfly waypoints
provided in the track printout message.

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Example inputs for each direction are shown below.


Example:
Route explanation: Jet airways through Area 4, the optimum eastbound track, jet airways
through Area 1 to destination. The route input used in this example is valid for either direction.
02 POD RJAA
03 POA CYVR
06 ROUTE J/OE/J

Example:
Route explanation: Jet airways through Area 1 via ALCOA, pick up the westbound track
connected to the specified waypoints, and then jet airways through Area 4 via GARRY,
SCORE, VIRGO and LIBRA to destination.
02 POD KSFO
03 POA RJAA
06 ROUTE J,ALCOA/OW/J,GARRY,SCORE,VIRGO,LIBRA

If you are planning for flights between North America and Taipei, Hong Kong, Manila, or
some other similar arrival, you can enter a special Customer Route Database entry,
RT/ALL/TOS, to invoke the optimum track from the two tracks, K and L. This input searches
a public CRDB record, allowing you to use these specific routes that are maintained by
Jeppesen. To invoke Track K specifically, enter RT/PACK/TOS. To invoke Track L
specifically, enter RT/PACL/TOS.
Example:
Route explanation: Entering the CRDB input shown selects the more advantageous of the two
tracks, K or L.
02 POD KLAX
03 POA VHHH
06 ROUTE RT/ALL/TOS

Example:
Route explanation: The following CRDB input selects track K.
02 POD KLAX
03 POA VHHH
06 ROUTE RT/PACK/TOS

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Example:
Route explanation: The following CRDB input selects track L.
02 POD KLAX
03 POA VHHH
06 ROUTE RT/PACL/TOS

AUSOTS Tracks
The AUSOTS tracks are flexible tracks published daily across Australia to and from the three
main airports in eastern/southern Australia (YMML, YSSY and YBBN). There are three
different AUSOTS groups currently ingested daily into JetPlan:
GROUP A South/East Australia to/from Southeast Asia
GROUP B South/East Australia to/from Middle East
GROUP E Perth (YPPH) to/from Brisbane (YBBN)
For each group, both Eastbound and Westbound tracks are published. Each track has a specific
valid time that varies in begin time, but most (if not all) end at 2200Z daily.
To use the AUSOTS tracks in JetPlan, the following inputs are used (independent of direction
of flight):
J/AA/J GROUP A
J/AB/J GROUP B
J/AE/J GROUP E

A copy of the current AUSOTS tracks can be retrieved in JetPlan by using the following input
on the Options command line:
IFS,AUSOTS

A sample track message follows:


01 OPTIONS ifs,ausots
20 COMPUTING 0626
(TDM TRK XB13 091111060001

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0911110900 0911112200
ELATI MUTMI 07S097E TATOD NODAB METAB BRISO BIGUP CESCI GEKKO
ANZAC LATOM TAVEV TAM
RTS/TAM V327 HAWKE Y491 SMOKA Y177 BN YBBN
RMK/AUSOTS GROUP B
(TDM TRK XM13 091111060001
0911120900 0911122200
DADAR 07S085E 11S090E 14S095E 17S100E 20S105E SWAGY TINDA NALAR
HITCH CLAMY RUFLE BUNGY MTG
RTS/MTG Y53 WENDY V279 ML YMML
RMK/AUSOTS GROUP B
(TDM TRK XS13 091111060001
0911110900 0911112200
DADAR 07S085E 11S090E 14S095E 17S100E 20S105E WONSA 25S118E
BUNNY LEC SAPED NEWMO EKKEY
RTS/EKKEY J141 PKS H319 TARAL Y59 SY YSSY
RMK/AUSOTS GROUP B
(TDM TRK BY1A 091111120001
0911111100 0911112200
MORRO ROM TAVEV VINAX PARTY MONIC 14S130E KIKEM
RTS/YBBN BN G326 MORRO
RMK/AUSOTS GROUP A
(TDM TRK MX13 091111110001
0911111100 0911112200
ROBET WHA RUSAD 26S127E NONAX MELBO SAPDA
RTS/YMML ML H164 KEPPA Q168 ROBET
RMK/AUSOTS GROUP B
(TDM TRK MY1A 091111120001
0911111100 0911112200
ROBET OJJAY PUGUT ROOKS DUBIS JUGGL PONTI ATMAP
RTS/YMML ML H164 KEPPA Q168 ROBET
RMK/AUSOTS GROUP A
(TDM TRK SY1A 091111120001
0911111100 0911112200
NYN POLEV AS TIMMI 17S125E ITCHY ATMAP
RTS/YSSY SY H202 RIC UH226 NYN
RMK/AUSOTS GROUP A
(TDM TRK YB1A 091111120001
0911111300 0911112200
ONOXA TOBIE MONIC TASHA EML
RTS/EML UY409 EAGLE Y177 BN YBBN

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RMK/AUSOTS GROUP A
(TDM TRK YM1A 091111120001
0911111300 0911112200
SAPDA MELBO NONAX 28S130E RUSAD WHA HINDY
RTS/HINDY Y12 ARBEY H119 ML YMML
RMK/AUSOTS GROUP A

END OF JEPPESEN DATAPLAN


REQUEST NO. 0626

Route Input Limits


The Route Optimizer has a finite limit to the number of input elements that can be entered on
each flight plan request. The maximum number of input elements is 18. This is true whether
entering elements on the RTD segment only, or on all three route segments (RTD, RTW and
RTA). In addition, there is a total limit of 408 characters, including spaces, for any kind of
route inputroute optimizer, SRS, or combination.

POD and POA in the Same Route Area


When both the POD and the POA are in the same route area, and all of the waypoints entered
on the RTD are in the same area, the following rules apply:
The entry D counts as a route element against your 18 possible inputs
when it is the first input, the second input (for example, J,D), or the last
input on the RTD segment.
For waypoints only: you can specify 10 waypoints in succession.
For waypoints and one or more D entries: you can specify 11 waypoints in
succession, if the string of 11 waypoints is preceded or followed by a D.
The airway entry J does not count as a route element against your 18
possible inputs.
Example:
Limit explanation: 10 waypoints.
02 POD KSEA
03 POA KBGR
06 ROUTE BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

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Example:
Limit explanation: 11 waypoints, D, 7 waypoints.
02 POD KSEA
03 POA KBGR
06 ROUTE BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK,
EMG,D,LIT,PXV,ROD,DJB,JHW,SYR,PLB

Example:
Limit explanation: 11 waypoints, D.
02 POD KSEA
03 POA KBGR
06 ROUTE BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,BLH,GBN,SSO,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,D

Example:
Limit explanation: D, 11 waypoints, D, 5 waypoints, D = 18 elements.
02 POD KSEA
03 POA KBGR
06 ROUTE D,BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK,
EMG,D,LIT,PXV,ROD,DJB,JHW,D

POD and POA in Different Route Areas


When the POD and the POA are in different route areas, the rules stated above apply with the
following exceptions:
The route input D does not count when it is the last route element on the
RTD segment. It does count as an element on the RTD when it is the first or
the second entry (when preceded immediately by a J).
The entry D does not count when it is the first route element on the RTA
segment, or when it is preceded immediately by a J. (It does count as an
element when it is the last entry on the RTA.)
And the following inclusion:
Each overwater waypoint and latitude-longitude fix (RTW segment entries)
counts as one route element.

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Example:
Limit explanation: Airways through Area 5 = 0 elements (the J does not count); Area 0 = 0
elements; Area 1 = 11 waypoints, D, 7 waypoints; total = 18 elements.
02 POD PHNL
03 POA KBGR
06 ROUTE J//OAK,SNS,RZS,LAX,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,
LFK,EMG,D,LIT,PXV,ROD,DJB,JHW,SYR,PLB

Example:
Limit explanation: Area 5 = 1 waypoint; Area 0 = 0 elements; Area 1 = 10 waypoints, D, 7
waypoints; total = 18 elements.
02 POD PHNL
03 POA KBGR
06 ROUTE J,CKH,D//J,OAK,RZS,LAX,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,
IAH,LFK,EMG,D,LIT,PXV,ROD,DJB,JHW,SYR,PLB

Example:
Limit explanation: Area 1 = 2 waypoints; Area 0 = 11 waypoints; Area 4 = 4 waypoints, D;
total = 18 elements.
02 POD KLAX
03 POA RJAA
06 ROUTE J,SNS,D,OSI,D/
ALCOA,3800,13000,3900,14000,4100,15000,4200,16000,4100,17000,
4100,18000,4000,-17000,4000,-16500,4000,-16000,CALMA/
J,D,COMFE,D,VACKY,PETAL,CVC,D

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Route Commands
Electronic Route Availability Document Option

Electronic Route Availability Document


Option
This section describes the Electronic Route Availability Document (ERAD) flight plan option,
which instructs JetPlan to create a route that is both optimized and fully compliant with
EUROCONTROL traffic flow restrictions. The ERAD option employs a route selector that is
designed only for flights using European airspace.

Overview
In early 2013, a new version of the ERAD route selector became available in JetPlan. This
second-generation ERAD (version 1.1) included new capabilities that determine optimum
RAD-compliant routes by considering additional route restrictions, weather, and enroute
charges. ERAD 1.1 significantly improved the percentage of flight plan filings accepted by
EUROCONTROL over the legacy ERAD route selector. In February 2015, the ERAD route
selector (version 2.0) was enhanced further with an improved optimization algorithm that
achieves an even higher rate of acceptance by EUROCONTROL.
ERAD 2.0 provides multi-dimensional optimized route selection that is fully compliant with
routing constraints published by EUROCONTROL and member states. These constraints
include the RAD and other efficiency schemes such as the Airspace Use Plan/Updated
Airspace Use Plan (AUP/UUP) (formerly known as CRAM). Additional regional route
restrictions will be supported in future enhancements of ERAD.
ERAD 2.0 also supports lowest fuel, time, or cost-based route optimization, depending on the
criteria specified by the user. For cost-based optimization, JetPlan accounts for cost as the sum
of fuel, enroute charges, and time and considers altitude restrictions enforced by RAD and
other ATC restrictions as part of the route selection process.
In addition, ERAD 2.0 includes new flight plan options that are currently supported only in the
JetPlan command-line interface and the Basic Flight Planner in JetPlan.com. For information
on the new flight plan options available with ERAD 2.0, see ERAD 2.0 Flight Plan Options
Supported Only in the Command-Line Interface on page 198.

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Possible Error Messages with ERAD


Some customers may experience the following errors when using the ERAD flight plan
option:
NRADNULL error If you consistently receive an NRADNULL response
for flight plan requests containing the ERAD flight plan option, the most
likely cause is that the ERAD 2.0 route selector does not yet support your
aircraft type. In that case, ERAD is not currently a viable option in flight
plan requests for that aircraft type. If you experience this situation, Jeppesen
recommends letting your customer service representative know. Jeppesen is
working to add support to ERAD 2.0 for all aircraft types in the near future.
2HEAVY error Under certain combinations of weather conditions and
RAD rules, you might receive a 2HEAVY error in response to a flight plan
request containing the ERAD flight plan option. If this happens, try
incrementally lowering the payload or zero fuel weight until a flight plan is
produced. If that approach is not acceptable, and it is a cost-index plan, try
reducing the cost index. If it is not a cost-index plan, try reducing the Mach
speed. If these approaches fail to prevent the 2HEAVY error (or if they are
unacceptable), the only choice is to not use the ERAD flight plan option and
to try other means to achieve a EUROCONTROL-compliant flight plan.

Upper-Level Winds and Temperature Forecasts


The weather source for ERAD 2.0 is the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS). Fixed winds
are supported; historical and statistical winds are not supported.

Accessing ERAD 2.0


JetPlan automatically uses the enhanced ERAD 2.0 route selector when you use the ERAD
flight plan option in any of the following flight planning products: JetPlan.com (Basic Flight
Planner or New Flight Planner), Jeppesen Dispatch Control, JetPlanner, Legacy OpsControl,
FlightPlan Online, and the JetPlan interactive (Q and A) command-line interface.
ERAD 2.0 also includes new flight plan options, currently supported only in the JetPlan
command-line interface and the Basic Flight Planner in JetPlan.com. However, future
enhancements will make these options available in other client interfaces, such as that
provided by JetPlanner. For information on the new flight plan options available with ERAD
2.0, see ERAD 2.0 Flight Plan Options Supported Only in the Command-Line Interface on
page 198.

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Electronic Route Availability Document Option

ERAD 2.0 Options and Inputs


With a few exceptions, use of flight plan options and inputs with ERAD has not changed as a
result of the improvements to the route selector. However, some new and some changed
capabilities do exist. The following sections describe supported options and explain when
options are not supported.

ERAD Point of Departure (POD) and Point of Arrival (POA)


Inputs
The route selector employed by the ERAD flight plan option is designed only for flights using
European airspace. The POD or the POA in the planned route is usually in Europe, although
some flights merely overflying European airspace also benefit from the ERAD option.

ERAD Route Inputs


With a few exceptions, route inputs do not change with ERAD 2.0. The following three tables
list supported, planned, and unsupported route inputs.

NOTE When requesting a specific SID (with transition), STAR (with transition),
airway (with entry and exit waypoints), or waypoint, enter each name separated by a
blank.

Table 6-8
Route Input

Route Inputs Supported with ERAD 2.0


Type

No route input

Description
Optimum RAD-compliant route
via best combination of directs and
airways

BANTO
BANTO UMBAG

Waypoint(s)

Optimum RAD-compliant route


via specified waypoints

BANTO UP155 UMBAG

Waypoint(s) plus airway(s)

Optimum RAD-compliant route


via specified waypoint and airway

Waypoint DCT waypoint

Optimum RAD-compliant route


constrained to fly FOO Direct to
BAA

NOTE If the ERAD FP option is


not specified, these inputs cannot
be used in the route optimizer.
BANTO DCT UMBAG

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Table 6-8

Route Inputs Supported with ERAD 2.0 (continued)

Route Input

Type

Description

TNT3E TNT HON HON2A

SID followed by transition

NOTE If the ERAD FP option is


not specified, these inputs cannot
be used in the route optimizer.

Transition followed by STAR

Optimum RAD-compliant route


constrained to fly the SID TNT3E
to TNT and the STAR HON2A
from HON

Table 6-9 lists route inputs that will be supported in a future version of ERAD.
Table 6-9

Route Inputs Planned for a Future Version of ERAD

Input Type

Notes

Westbound and eastbound North Atlantic Organized


Tracks (NATs)

Not currently supported. Using these route inputs


results in an error.
For detailed information, see ERAD and the NATS
on page 189.

/A/
/Z/

Preferred routing to or from NATs


Pacific Organized Track System (PACOTS),
including Flex Tracks

Not currently supported. Using these route inputs


results in an error.
Not currently supported. Using these route inputs
results in an error.

Australian Organized Track Structure


(AUS OTS)

The following table lists route inputs that are either not supported or not recommended with
ERAD 2.0.
Table 6-10
Input Type

Notes

SRS inputs and combination of optimizer and SRS


inputs

Do not use with ERAD 2.0.

JetAirways (J)
Direct (D)

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Route Inputs Not Supported or Not Recommended for Use with ERAD

These inputs are acceptable but not recommended.


ERAD 2.0 applies rules to ensures that airways are
included as necessary and direct optimization is
always exploited whenever possible.

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Electronic Route Availability Document Option

ERAD and the NATS


In ERAD 2.0 flight plan computations, the following logic applies to the NATs:
ERAD 2.0 only includes the optimum NAT in the route computation when
doing so results in the most optimum ATC-acceptable trajectory.
Including the westbound (/A/) or eastbound (/Z/) NAT in your route inputs
results in an error.

ERAD Flight-Level Input Options


ERAD 2.0 does not support VFR (V) or C flight-level (profile) input options (C is used to
prevent a step climb when flight planning on the organized tracks). Otherwise, ERAD 2.0
supports all user-entered flight-level instructions supported by JetPlan. The system applies
your flight- level constraints while determining an optimum route that is also compliant with
both RAD and Conditional Route rules.
For details on user-entered flight level constraints, see Chapter 9, Profile Commands.

ERAD Conditional Route Options


NOTE The acronym CDR in the context of this section refers to conditional routes in
Europe used by ERAD and not to FAA Coded Departure Routes (CDRs). For
information on FAA CDRs, see Using Coded Departure Route (CDR) Records on
page 247.

In Europe, conditional routes are Air Traffic Service (ATS) routes or portions thereof that are
designated by the controlling ANSPs as non-permanent. Such routes or portions thereof are
often referred to as airways. They can be planned and used under specified conditions that are
time-based and altitude-based. These conditional routes are divided into three categories:
Category 1 (CDR1): Normally available for planning in the same way as
permanent ATS routes but subject to short-notice closure by the daily
AUP/UUP (formerly CRAM) update document.
Category 2 (CDR2): Normally unavailable for planning except when made
available by the daily AUP/UUP update document.
Category 3 (CDR3): Never available for planning; usable on ATC
instruction only.

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ERAD 2.0 uses the Conditional Route (CDR) Route-Segment Database. The records in this
database contain airway segment/time frame/flight level data derived from the combination of
data from the latest conditional route publications put forth by the ANSPs and data from the
daily AUP/UUP document. The AUP/UUP document applies to the 24-hour period starting at
0600Z the day after it is published. The CDR Route-Segment Database is updated every 24
hours upon receipt of the daily AUP or whenever a UUP is released.
An understanding of how the relevant data is maintained on a daily basis is critical to
understanding how ERAD 2.0 treats airways subject to conditional route designation. Each
day, upon receipt of the latest AUP/UUP document in electronic form, the ERAD 2.0 CDR
Restrictions file is updated. For each airway segment or sequence of segments that is subject to
conditional route designation, a set of records can be found in this file. The set of records
defines a complete schedule for the availability of the airway segments and flight levels and,
therefore, can be thought of as a schedule block. The contents of the schedule block are
determined through a compositing of the AUP/UUP and the standard conditional route
designations. Each schedule block covers a two-week period starting at 0000Z on the current
day.
Any given AUP/UUP document covers a 48-hour period, starting at 0600Z on its effective
date. Thus, the contents of the first 24 hours of a schedule block for any given airway
segment/flight level reflects the combination of the AUP/UUP and the standard conditional
route designation. After the first 48 hours, the contents reflect only the standard conditional
route designation.
When computing a flight plan, ERAD 2.0 reads and processes the data from the CDR
Restrictions File to determine if a given combination of candidate airway segment and flight
level is open at the estimated time of entry. If the estimated time of entry is within the 48-hour
coverage window of the latest AUP/UUP, the impact of the AUP/UUP is accounted as
composited with the standard conditional route designations. If the estimated time of entry is
beyond the 48-hour coverage window of the latest AUP/UUP, the latest AUP/UUP has no
impact, and only the standard conditional route designators have an impact.

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As an example, consider the airway A333 between AGUNI and LUTEL. For FL300 to FL530,
this section of A333 is designated CDR2 on weekdays and CDR1 on weekends. Assume that a
flight plan is run on a particular Wednesday, and for that day, the AUP/UUP caused this
section of A333 to be open for the 48-hour period extending from 0600Z on that day. ERAD
2.0 behaves as follows when computing this flight plan:
If the flight plans ETD, aircraft performance, forecast winds and
temperatures, and so on, are such that the estimated time of entry to the
section of A333 between AGUNI and LUTEL is prior to 0600Z on Friday
of that week (and thus within the 48-hour coverage of the latest AUP/UUP),
that section is considered to be open.
If the flight plans EDT, aircraft performance, forecast winds and
temperatures, and so on are such that the estimated time of entry to the
section of A333 between AGUNI and LUTEL is after 0600Z on Friday of
that week (and thus beyond the 48-hour coverage of the latest AUP/UPP),
that section is considered to be closed.
ERAD 2.0 applies the following Flight Planning-relevant CDR (FP_CDR) classifications
dynamically when determining whether a particular combination of airway segment and flight
level is available for consideration in the optimum route/profile computation. Note that for
certain airway segment flight level combinations, the FP_CDR classification can depend on a
flight plan computations estimated time of entry.
FP_NOCDR The combination of airway segment and flight level is not
subject to conditional route designation.
FP_CDR0 The estimated time of entry for the airway segment/flight level
is within the period of the latest AUP/UUP, and the combination of the latest
AUP/UUP and the standard conditional route designations is such that the
airway segment/flight level is considered open.
FP_CDR1 The estimated time of entry for the airway segment/flight level
is beyond the period of the latest AUP/UUP and is at a point in time that the
airway segment/flight level is designated a CDR1.
FP_CDR2 The estimated time of entry for the airway segment/flight level
is beyond the period of the latest AUP/UUP and is at a point in time that the
airway segment/flight level is designated a CDR2.
FP_CDR3 The combination of airway segment and flight level is
designated a CDR3.
NOTE When you are using ERAD 2.0, the NOCRAM flight plan option does not turn
off processing of AUP/UUP (CRAM) files.

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The following table summarizes how ERAD 2.0 uses the FP_CDR classifications.
Table 6-11

FP_CDR Classifications

Command-Line Input

Description

Notes

FP,ERAD

Consider airway flight level


combinations that are determined
to be FP_NOCDR, FP_CDR0 or
FP_CDR1.

Consider only those airway


segments that are explicitly known
to be open at the estimated point of
time of entry or are considered
probably open at the estimated
time of entry.

FP,ERAD,AX

Consider airway flight level


combinations that are determined
to be FP_NOCDR, FP_CDR0,
FP_CDR1 or FP_CDR2.

Consider any airway segment


flight level combination that has
the possibility to be open at given
time of entry in the future within or
beyond the coverage of the current
AUP/UUP.

FP,ERAD,NX

Consider only those airway flight


level combinations that are
determined to be FP_NOCDR.

Consider only those airway


segments that have no CDR
designation.

ERAD and the Restricted Areas Option and Inputs


The following sections describe how the Restricted Area (RST) flight plan option and inputs
work with ERAD 2.0.

NOTE For detailed information on restricted area options, see Chapter 4,


Restricted Area Commands.

Avoiding Checkpoints and Airways with ERAD


ERAD 2.0 supports JetPlan checkpoint and airway-avoid inputs entered with the RST flight
plan option. The syntax and rules for checkpoint avoid and airway avoid inputs using the
command-line interface are the same as for the JetPlan route selector. (Examples can be found
in Chapter 4, Restricted Area Commands.)
The way the ERAD 2.0 route selector processes a checkpoint avoid input is similar to the way
the JetPlan route selector processes the input. The system computes the route so that it avoids
any checkpoint entered as an avoid checkpoint. However, currently, the ERAD 2.0 route
selector processes an airway avoid input differently than the JetPlan route selector does. The
JetPlan route selector accepts input of a checkpoint, followed by an airway name, followed by

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a checkpoint, and then ensures avoidance of the named airway only between the two
checkpoints. ERAD 2.0 does not consider the checkpoints in such an input. Instead it avoids
the entire airway.
For example, the following command-line inputs request ERAD to compute a route that
avoids airway UL607. The ERAD route selector computes a route that avoids UL607
completely, not just between KONAN and NTM.
01 OPTIONS FP,ERAD,RST/AW=KONAN UL607 NTM

The following command-line inputs request the ERAD route selector to compute the route so
that it avoids the airway UB4. Again, ERAD computes a route that avoids UB4 completely,
not just between RLP and CTL.
01 OPTIONS FP,ERAD,RST
....
05 RESTRICTED AREA AW=RLP UB4 CTL

A future enhancement to ERAD 2.0 will enable it to avoid an airway only between the userentered checkpoints.

Avoiding Countries by ICAO Code with ERAD


You can specify complete or partial ARINC 424 ICAO codes for countries to avoid during
route selection. For example, the following command-line inputs request the ERAD 2.0 route
selector to compute a route from EGLL to VTBD that excludes the following:
All waypoints within Ukraine (UK)
All waypoints within the Peoples Republic of China (Z)
All waypoints within IRAN (OI)
01
02
03
05

OPTIONS FP,RST,ERAD,
POD EGLL
POA VTBD
RESTRICTED AREA ICAO/UK Z OI

You can also specify a country to avoid on the 01 OPTIONS command line, as in the
following example:
01 FP,ERAD,RST/ICAO/OI

Note, however, that you cannot enter more than one ICAO country code on the 01 OPTIONS
command line.

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Ignoring RAD Rules with ERAD


ERAD 2.0 supports the ability to ignore individual RAD rules. In the command-line interface,
the input for specifying RAD rules ignore is supported with the RST option and adheres to the
following syntax:
05 RESTRICTED AREA IR/<rule rule rule,>

where <rule> is the identifier of an individual RAD rulefor example, EG2345A. You can
enter as many RAD rules as can fit on the input line.
For example, the following command-line entries request that the ERAD route selector
compute the route so that it ignores the RAD rules EHEG1002B, EH2027B, and LF2471B:
01 OPTIONS FP,ERAD,RST
....
05 RESTRICTED AREA IR/EHEG1002A EH2027B LF2471B

You can also combine checkpoint or airway avoid inputs with RAD rule ignore inputs. For
example, the following command-line inputs request the ERAD 2.0 route selector to compute
the route so that it avoids the checkpoint tulip and ignores the RAD rules EHEG1002 and
EH2027.
01 OPTIONS FP,ERAD,RST
....
05 RESTRICTED AREA CP=tulip,IR/EHEG1002 EH2027

Avoiding Two-Dimensional Restricted Areas and FIRs with


ERAD
ERAD 2.0 does not currently support the JetPlan inputs for avoiding two-dimensional
(delineated boundary) restricted areas with the RST option. These restricted areas are
polygons or circles defined with coordinates.
For example, the following command-line inputs are not supported and result in an error:
01 OPTIONS FP,LP,RST,ERAD
....
05 RESTRICTED AREA 5700,05000,5700,01000,4800,02000,4800,05000

In addition, ERAD 2.0 does not currently support input of a FIR/UIR with the RST option.
The following command-line inputs result in an error:
01 OPTIONS FP,LP,RST,ERAD

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....
05 RESTRICTED AREA XIR=LIMM

However, the ERAD 2.0 route selectors adherence to complex RAD rules and other ATC
restrictions to a certain extent reduces the need to avoid user-defined restricted areas or
specific route elements. For example, the need to account for a FIR/UIR entered as a restricted
area is somewhat lessened because ERAD 2.0 applies FIR/UIR-based filtering to the
calculation of direct segments. ERAD works to ensure that route optimization gets the most
benefit possible from direct optimization without violating distance restrictions imposed on
direct segments within any encountered FIR/UIR.

ERAD and the Four-Dimensional Avoid and Alert Restrictive


Airspaces Options
The Customer Controlled Avoid and Alert options (CCAA/CCAAN) are allowed with ERAD
2.0, meaning an error does not occur if CCAA or CCAAN is used with the ERAD flight plan
option. However, ERAD 2.0 does not consider the CCAA or CCAAN inputs. Thus, ERAD
used with CCAA could possibly produce a route that traverses one or more avoid-level
restrictive airspaces. In such cases, flight plan formats that support alerting for such traversals
include the appropriate alerts.
When used with ERAD, both the CCAA option and the CCAAN option cause alerts for each
traversal of active avoid-level and alert-level restrictive airspaces. The alerts are included in
the output of flight plan formats that support all JetPlan alerts.
For example, the system accepts the following command-line entries, and ERAD 2.0 attempts
to produce a route but does not consider the CCAA entry:
01 OPTIONS FP,CCAA,ERAD,AA6

In this case, if the route traverses one or more active avoid-level restrictive airspaces, an alert
is included in the output for each traversal as well as for each traversal of an alert-level
restrictive airspace, since the AA6 format presents all JetPlan alerts.

NOTE For detailed information on the CCAA and CCAAN options, see Chapter 5,
4D Avoid and Alert Restrictive Airspaces.

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ERAD and the Time, Fuel, and Cost Optimization Options


ERAD 2.0 considers forecast winds and temperatures and altitude variations as part of its
overall methodology to determine one of the following:
A shortest-time route
A lowest-fuel route
A lowest-cost route
The choice of determining a shortest-time route, lowest-fuel route, or lowest-cost route is
controlled by the users entries on the Performance Index command line (line 12). However, if
the user enters a cost index on the Cruise Mode line (line 11), ERAD 2.0 determines a lowestcost route, regardless of the Performance Index entry on line 12.
For lowest-cost path determination, ERAD 2.0 considers by default the cost of time and the
cost of fuel. These costs are determined from direct user entry, or extraction from the CADB,
or implicitly from the user-entered cost index.
Unlike the JetPlan route selector, ERAD 2.0 lets the user request consideration of enroute
charges along with the costs of time and fuel in the lowest-cost path determination. In this
case, the user must ensure that the cost of time and the cost of fuel are entered directly as part
of the Performance Index entry (for example, M,067,6000) or are available via extraction from
the CADB. Determining the cost of time and the cost of fuel implicitly from cost index is not
compatible with including consideration of enroute charges in the lowest-cost path
determination.
The route of flight determined by the route selector is the only ERAD 2.0-specific result that is
displayed in the final flight plan output.
In summary, ERAD 2.0s multi-dimensional approach enables it to provide superior
constrained optimization relative to the JetPlan route selector in the face of multi-dimensional
rules imposed by agencies such as EUROCONTROL through its electronic RAD.

NOTE For detailed information on the Performance Index commands and time, fuel,
and cost optimization, see Chapter 9, Profile Commands.

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Electronic Route Availability Document Option

ERAD Special Remarks in the Filing Strip


In ERAD 2.0 flight plans, the system appends ERAD special remarks to JetPlan Engine
special remarks in the filing strip by default. The following example shows the ERAD special
remarks appended to the filing strip.
(FPL-JBTFS2-IS
-B738/M-SDE2E3FGIJ1RWXY/LB1
-EDDV0500
-N0449F380 OSN8S OSN UM170 BAM UZ158 LNO/N0449F390 UZ707 RESMI
UN857 DISAK UQ237 LMG UN10 ENSAC UP181 NEA UL14 ADINO/N0448F380
DCT ELVAR DCT GENRO
-LPFR0301 LEJR
-PBN/B1D1O1S2 DOF/140913 REG/DAHFW
EET/EBUR0028 LFFF0036 EBUR0037 LFFF0038 LECM0143 LPPC0230 OPR/TUI
PER/C
RMK/TAXI:10 DAL:D55PTOSN DAL:D121PTBAM DAL:D193PTLNO
DAL:D376PTRESMI DAL:D403PTDISAK DAL:D550PTLMG DAL:D671PTENSAC
DAL:D872PTNEA DAL:D1030PTADINO DAL:D1092PTELVAR DAL:D1215PTGENRO
DAL:D1242ADLPFR TOC:D114F360T0019 BOC:D121F360T0020
TOC:D140F380T0023 BOC:D193F380T0030 TOC:D205F390T0031
TOD:D1030F390T0222 BOD:D1033F380T0222 TOD:D1114F380T0233 TCAS
EQUIPPED PLAN 9703 ID JBTFS2 RVR/200)

Note that the system only includes the DAL/TOC/BOC portion of the ERAD special remarks
when both the POD and the POA are in regions where EUROCONTROL has sole control over
filings. In the command-line interface and the JetPlan.com Basic Flight Plan interface, you can
use the Include DAL/TOC/BOC flight plan option (DOTB) to include the DAL/TOC/BOC
portion of the ERAD special remarks in the filing strip, regardless of the location of the POD
and POA. For more information, see Include DAL/TOC/BOC Option on page 198.

Suppressing ERAD Special Remarks


In ERAD flight plans, the system appends ERAD special remarks to JetPlan Engine special
remarks in the filing strip (with the DAL/TOC/BOC exception described in ERAD Special
Remarks in the Filing Strip on page 197.) A customer preference setting enables you to
override this default behavior. When this customer preference setting is in place, the system
does not append ERAD special remarks to the filing strip. Contact your Jeppesen account
manager for more information.

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ERAD 2.0 Flight Plan Options Supported Only in the


Command-Line Interface
NOTE At present, the following flight plan options are supported only in the JetPlan
command-line interface and in the Basic Flight Planner in JetPlan.com. Future
enhancements will make these options available in other client interfaces, such as
that provided by JetPlanner.

Include DAL/TOC/BOC Option


When you use the ERAD flight plan option, the system includes ERAD special remarks in the
filing strip with the following exception: the DAL/TOC/BOC portion of the ERAD special
remarks is included only when both the POD and the POA are in regions where
EUROCONTROL has sole control over filings. The ERAD DAL/TOC/BOC flight plan option
(DOTB) lets you override this behavior on an ad hoc basis. Entering DOTB on the 01 Options
command line in an ERAD flight plan request instructs JetPlan to append the DAL/TOC/BOC
portion of the ERAD special remarks to the JetPlan filing strip, regardless of the POD and
POA.

Runway to Runway Flight Planning


When used with the ERAD flight plan option, the Runway to Runway option (S2R2R)
instructs JetPlan to select the best runway automatically, based on the most recent TAF and
runway preference information for airports stored in the Jeppesen Navigation Database. To
use the Runway to Runway option, enter ERAD followed by S2R2R on the 01 Options
command line.

Dynamic SID/STAR Calculation


When used with the ERAD flight plan option, the Dynamic SID/STAR Calculation (S2PTHT)
option instructs JetPlan to compute SID and STAR routings dynamically instead of using the
pre-calculated SID and STAR routings stored in the JetPlan Navigation Database. The
dynamic calculation performed with this option takes into account the aircraft used in the
flight plan request as well as the ARINC 424 data, resulting in a more accurate computation of
SIDs, STARs, and total distance.
To use the Dynamic SID/STAR Calculation option, enter ERAD followed by S2PTHT on the
01 Options command line.

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Route Commands
National Route Program (NRP) Option

National Route Program (NRP) Option


NRP refers to the FAA National Route Program, which allows flights operating at or above
FL290, within the conterminous U.S., and regardless of city pairs, to participate in minimum
time/cost routes, without route limiting restrictions (Free Flight).
The NRP option in JetPlan conforms to all FAA rules, up to and including the latest Advisory
Circulars. The option provides the following features:
The NRP transition points are either: (a) NRP approved transition points
from the list of SIDs and STARs provided by the FAA (see AC 90-91B,
Appendices 1 and 2), or (b) the closest checkpoints, at least 200 nautical
miles (nm) from the POD and POA, on the optimal NAVAID route.
Checkpoints on the NRP portion of the flight are in Fix-Radial-Distance
format.
Checkpoints are inserted for ARTCC reporting requirements as follows: (a)
each ARTCC contains at least one checkpoint; if an ARTCC is entered and
exited multiple times, each segment within the ARTCC contains at least one
checkpoint; (b) each ARTCC has a checkpoint within 200nm of the flights
entry point into the ARTCC.
The NRP flight plan avoids active restricted areas, including 3D Avoid
regions. In respect to 3D Avoid regions, the flight plan either avoids the area
completely or transitions from NRP to NAVAID structure and flies valid 3D
Avoid deviation radials, avoiding the blocked altitudes for the area. A flight
plan may transition from NRP to NAVAID structure to traverse an active
3D Avoid area and then transition back to NRP after clearing the area.
NRP is entered on all domestic flight plan filing strips.
In the event that the optimal route transits Canadian airspace (for example,
on a Boston to Seattle flight), the NRP flight plan can make the transition
from NRP routing to Canadian RNAV routing and back again.

NRP Usage
NRP is activated by entering NRP on the Options command line. For a domestic flight plan,
route inputs are not necessary unless specifying a published preferred IFR route for that
portion of the flight that is within the 200nm boundary of the POD (egress) or POA (ingress).
Flights can be filed and flown on the complete transition of SIDs or STARs for the airport
areas listed by the FAA, in lieu of the 200nm ingress/egress filing requirements.

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National Route Program (NRP) Option

For an international flight plan, route inputs are not necessary for that portion of flight within
the conterminous U.S. However, routing on the overwater and the international portions are
input as normal.
Example:
NRP routing in Area 1no inputs, optimum eastbound NAT track, European preferred
routing in Area 2.
02 POD KLAX
03 POA EGLL
06 ROUTE /Z/P

NRP Output
An NRP flight plan has output that includes a route summary line that clearly indicates the
NRP route, and a filing strip (if requested) that clearly indicates that the flight is an NRP
plan. See the NRP plan on the next page.

Route Summary Line


Note that the route summary line (below) shows the NRP portion in fix-radial-distance format.
The portions immediately preceding and then following the NRP portion is the preferred
NAVAID structure routing. The points CFB and PGS are the required transitions, positioned
at least 200nm from the POD and POA.
Immediately below the route summary line, in parentheses, is the indication of inserted
waypoints. In the event the flight plan passes through one or more (ARTCC) traffic centers
without the normal JetPlan calculation of an optimized direct waypoint, then one or more
are inserted so that NRP rules are followed. In the example below, one waypoint was inserted
between CFB and DKK278032 (BUF200033), and one was inserted between CRL295073 and
BDF340053 (IOW292060).
KBOS VECTOR..BAF..HNK..CFB..BUF200033..DKK278032..CRL295073..
IOW292060..BDF340053..DSM253062..HYS324076..PUB303038..PGS J128
CIVET CIVET4 KLAX
(DIR RTE CRB-DKK278032)
(DIR RTE CRL295073-BDF340053)

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Filing Strip
Highlighted at the bottom of the NRP plan output, and shown separately below, is the ATC
filing strip. On the NRP domestic flight plan, the designation NRP is clearly displayed. No
such designation occurs on an NRP international flight plan at this time.
FP
H/B74B/ 502 BOS
0000 350
BOS..BAF..HNK..CFB..DKK278032..CRL295073..BDF340053..DSM253062..
HYS324076..PUB303038..PGS.J128.CIVET.CIVET4.LAX/0457 :NRP

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Non-Restrictive Routing

Non-Restrictive Routing
JetPlan supports the use of Non-Restrictive Routing (NRR). NRR supports point-to-point
navigation, rather than requiring flights to traverse existing airway structures such as Jet
airways. Flights with adequately equipped aircraft operating at or above FL350 (configurable)
in U.S. airspace can maximize efficiency, choosing points along their path to report in a flight
plan.

High-Altitude Redesign
NRR allows aircraft to fly optimal routes in High-Altitude Redesign (HAR) airspace, which
takes its name from the FAA program that has implemented fundamental changes in
navigation structure and operating methods away from using ground-based NAVAIDs to
leveraging the flexibility of point-to-point navigation. In HAR airspace, operators can opt to
fly outside of structured routing using the NRR options.

HAR Phases
The first two phases of the FAA HAR program have been implemented. The program has the
following characteristics:
Applies to aircraft with equipment accompanying transponder suffixes E, F,
G, and R
Enables point-to-point navigation
Is restricted to altitudes of FL350 and above (in JetPlan, this is configurable)
Supports waypoint navigation around Special Use Airspace (SUA)
Uses high-altitude RNAV routes (Q Routes)
Implements a reference grid of waypoints for flight navigation planning
called Navigation Reference System (NRS)
Supports user-defined NRR, including entering/exiting HAR airspace via pitch and catch
points. If no pitch and catch points are available, appropriate SID/STAR endpoints can be
used. Figure 6.2 shows HAR airspace as of 2007 and which centers are part of the airspace.

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Figure 6.2.

HAR Airspace in 2007

NRS Waypoints
NRR is characterized in a flight plan through the identification of one waypoint per Air Route
Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) in HAR airspace. To support NRR, the FAA developed the
NRS, a grid of waypoints and waypoint naming conventions to serve as the navigation
structure for HAR. See Figure 6.3 for an illustration of the waypoint naming convention.
KD54W is a waypoint, where:
K represents the FIR (USA)
D represents the center or sub-FIR (Denver)
54 represents the latitude (lat 39 00)
W represents the longitude (104 degrees west longitude)

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Figure 6.3.

NRS Waypoints and Naming Convention

High-Altitude RNAV Routes (Q Routes)


As part of the HAR program, the FAA introduced high altitude RNAV routes. The FAA also
refers to these routes as preferred IFR routes. The use of RNAV facilitates less restrictive
routing than is commonly available with navigation via radar vectors. This allows for more
efficient routing through high-density corridors. Q is the International ICAO-assigned
designator for a published RNAV route in Canada or the U.S. Q routes are spaced more
closely than standard airways, allowing additional routes in the same airspace, and fewer
conflicts between routes. Q-routes can have direction, flight level, equipment, and time
constraints associated with them.

Pitch and Catch Points


The FAA has defined points, called pitch and catch points, for getting into and out of HAR
airspace. The pitch points indicate an end of a departure procedure, a preferred IFR routing, or
other established routing program where a flight can begin a segment of NRR. The catch point
indicates where a flight ends a segment of NRR and joins published arrival procedures,

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preferred IFR routings, or other established routing programs. For the portion of the route in
between the pitch and catch points, NRR is permitted. If no pitch and catch points are
available, appropriate SID/STAR endpoints can be used.
The FAA has defined a Vertical Pitch Line (VPL) to indicate the boundary for flights to begin
NRR in HAR from the East coast of the U.S. Because of the density and traffic, there are few
pitch points defined for airports east of the VPL. Flights originating outside of HAR airspace
and flying westbound cannot pitch into HAR until they fly to the VPL. However, flights
originating west of the VPL and flying eastbound can catch out of HAR through catch points
located throughout the area east of the VPL. North/south routes outside of HAR airspace are
not permitted for HAR. The FAA has chosen to keep existing airway structures in place when
flying in the densely populated eastern Air Traffic Control Centers.

NOTE You can find the pitch and catch points and VPL in the airport/facility
directory.

NRR Levels of Service


The two levels of NRR service are as follows:
HAR When the aircraft has all NRS waypoints in its flight management
systems (FMS) and is RNAV-equipped, the flight plan can be filed as fullservice capability HAR. Depending on the configuration of the NRRPRC
customer preference (see Customer Preferences Database on page 207),
HAR appears in the filing remarks of these flight plans.
Point-to-Point When the aircraft has the traditional waypoints (not the
NRS waypoints) in its FMS and is RNAV-equipped, the flight plan can be
filed as limited-service capability PTP. You can also choose to request a
PTP flight plan for an aircraft that is NRS-capable. Depending on the

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configuration of the NRRPRC customer preference (see Customer


Preferences Database on page 207), PTP appears in the filing remarks of
these flight plans.
NOTE The flight plan can be filed as a National Route Program (NRP) plan when
the following are true: The aircraft is RNAV equipped, the FMS does or does not
recognize NRS waypoints, the initial cruise is a flight level above 29,000 feet and
below 35,000 feet, and the route of flight contains at least one published waypoint per
each ATC center. In this case, NRP appears in the ATC filing remarks, depending
on the configuration of the NRRPRC customer preference. For more information
about NRP, see National Route Program (NRP) Option on page 199

For additional information on NRR and the HAR redesign program, refer to FAA Advisory
Circular AC 90-99.

NRR Flight Planning Guidelines


The following guidelines apply to NRR flight planning with JetPlan:
(Required) The aircraft must be RNAV-equipped. JetPlan checks the
aircrafts RNAV value in the Customer Aircraft Database (CADB). If the
RNAV parameter is set to No, the system alerts you that the aircraft is
unable to create an NRR flight plan.
The aircraft has the NRS waypoints (required for HAR plans) or traditional
waypoints in its FMS. If you request an NRR flight plan with HAR, JetPlan
checks the value of the NRS-Capable parameter in the CADB. If NRS
Capable is set to No, JetPlan generates a HARSET01 error.
(Required) The route of flight contains at least one NRS waypoint or
NAVAID per each Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC). You can
allow JetPlan to generate the route, or you can input an SRS route.
(Required) An initial cruise of FL350 and above. This is a configuration
item in the Customer Preference Database (see Customer Preferences
Database on page 207).
NOTE JetPlan currently checks for RVSM for aircraft to fly between FL290 and
FL410.

(Optional) The use of pitch and catch points. You can use pitch and catch
points by entering PITCAH on the Options command line or through the
front-end flight planning software. If you do not enter the pitch and catch

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command directly on the flight plan request, JetPlan checks the Pitch-Catch
parameter for the indicated city pair in the City Pair Fleet Database
(CPFDB). If the Pitch-Catch parameter is set to Yes, the system generates a
flight plan request for an NRR-optimized flight plan using pitch and catch
points.

NRR Setup Guidelines


This section describes how your JetPlan preferences and customer databases are configured to
support NRR flight planning.

Customer Preferences Database


The Customer Preferences Database, which is not customer-controlled, contains the following
options that apply to NRR:
Non-Restrictive Routing Flight Level Floor (NRRFLF) Specifies a flight
level floor for non-restrictive routing. This is the initial cruise an aircraft
must reach to file an NRR flight plan as HAR or PTP. The default value is
FL350.
Non-Restrictive Routing Preferential Route Check (NRRPRC) Specifies
an FAA preferential route check for NRR. Determines whether the system
bases the NRR ATC filing remarks off of the existence of an FAA
Preferential Route. The default value is Yes.
This configuration item allows operators the flexibility to file NRR routes,
whether or not FAA preferential routes exist. If the configuration is set to
Yes, and an FAA preferential route exists, then the system files an NRRappropriate remark in the ATC filing remarks field (HAR, PTP, or
NRP). However, if the configuration is set to Yes, and an FAA
preferential route does not exist, then the system does not file an NRRappropriate remark in the ATC filing remarks field. If the NRRPRC
configuration is set to No, it does not matter if an FAA preferential route
exists; NRR remarks are always in the ATC filing remarks field.
NAVALERT Aircraft flying NRR routes must be RNAV-equipped, as
indicated by the setting of the RNAV parameter in the Customer Aircraft
Database (CADB). The functionality associated with the RNAV setting
requires the NAVALERT customer preference to be set. When the
NAVALERT preference is set, and the RNAV parameter is set to a value
other than Terminal and Enroute, the system optimizes to avoid RNAV
segments beyond the navigational capabilities of the aircraft. If the system

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looks for and cannot find such a route, it fails the flight plan calculation and
returns an error. If you specify a route that includes RNAV segments that
exceed the RNAV capability of the aircraft, an alert is returned with the
flight plan.

Customer Aircraft Database (CADB) Equipment Section


NRS Capable (NR) When set to Yes, the aircrafts navigational database
contains the NRS points for the HAR program. This parameter must be set
to Yes for an aircraft to be used in a HAR flight plan that uses the NRS
points. If NRS Capable is set to No, JetPlan generates a HARSET01 error
when you request the HAR flight plan.
RNAV (RE) This parameter indicates whether or not the aircraft has
RNAV equipment onboard. This parameter must be set to Terminal and
Enroute (T or Y in JetPlan command-line mode) or Enroute (E in JetPlan
command-line mode) to access RNAV routing. If the RNAV parameter is
set to No, the system alerts you that the aircraft is unable to create an NRR
flight plan.
NOTE The functionality associated with the RNAV setting requires the NAVALERT
customer preference to be set. For information about the NAVALERT preference, see
Customer Preferences Database on page 207.

City Pair Fleet Database


Pitch-Catch (PC) This parameter determines whether JetPlan uses available pitch and catch
points when creating a NRR flight plan for a given city pair and fleet type. When you request
an NRR-optimized flight plan but do not indicate the use of pitch and catch points on the
JetPlan Options command line or through a front-end flight planning system, JetPlan looks for
the value of the Pitch-Catch flag in the CPFDB for the indicated city pair and fleet type. If the
Pitch-Catch flag is set to Yes, the system generates a flight plan request for an NRR-optimized
flight plan using pitch and catch points.

NRR Usage
NRR is activated by entering NRR on the Options command line. Other inputs, along with the
values in the customer and preference databases, determine whether the flight plan is filed as
HAR, PTP, or NRP.

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NRR with HAR


In this example, either an FAA preferential route exists for the city pair and the NRRPRC
preference is set to Yes, or the preference is set to No and the existence of a preferential route
is irrelevant in either case, HAR appears in the flight plan. The flight level is at or above
the value set by the NRRFLF customer preference.
Example:
Explanation: NRR on the Options command line requests NRR remarks and H on the Route
Command (06 ROUTE) line requests an NRS Optimized route (using the NRS waypoints).
01
02
03
06

FP,NRR
POD KSFO
POA KORD
ROUTE H

Output
The resulting HAR flight plan has a route summary line containing the NRS waypoints.
KSFO..SAC..HAROL..KU66K..KU69M..KU72O..KU75Q..KD78U..KD81Y..KP81A..KP81C..KP81E..K
P81G..KP81I..KG81K..DLL..MSN..JVL JVL5 KORD

The HAR remark in the filing strip indicates the crew is willing and the aircraft is capable of
accepting a re-route including NRS points.
(FPL-N901AN-IS
-B738/M-SXDIRGHW/S
-KSFO0100
-N0455F390 DCT SAC DCT HAROL DCT KU66K DCT KU69M DCT KU72O DCT
KU75Q DCT KD78U DCT KD81Y DCT KP81A DCT KP81C DCT KP81E DCT KP81G
DCT KP81I DCT KG81K DCT DLL DCT MSN DCT JVL JVL5
-KORD0342
-EET/KZLC0042 KZDV0145 KZMP0219 KZAU0311
REG/N901AN SEL/ACBJ DAT/V
RMK/HAR)

If the NRRPRC preference is set to Yes, and an FAA preferential route does not exist, the
following alert appears, and HAR does not appear in the remarks:
ALERT TAG NRR01
ALERT MSG No NRR Remarks are used because a FAA Pref Route does not
exist.

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Using Pitch and Catch Points in an NRS-Optimized Route


Example:
Explanation: PITCAH on the Options command line requests use of catch and pitch points in
the NRS-optimized route. The route contains a catch point for Denver.
01
02
03
06

OPTIONS FP,NRR,PITCAH
POD KLAX
POA KDEN
ROUTE H

Note that JetPlan observes the Vertical Pitch Line.


Example:
Explanation: The route uses NRS points beyond the Vertical Pitch Line only.
01
02
03
06

OPTIONS FP,NRR,PITCAH
POD KMIA
POA KLAX
ROUTE H

NRR with PTP


In this example, either an FAA preferential route exists for the city pair and the NRRPRC
preference is set to Yes, or the preference is set to No and the existence of a preferential route
is irrelevant in either case, PTP appears in the flight plan. The flight level is at or above
the value set by the NRRFLF customer preference.
Example:
Explanation: NRR on the Options command line requests NRR remarks and nothing on the
ROUTE 06 requests a NAVAID optimized flight plan that does not use the NRS points.
01 FP,NRR
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KORD
06

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Non-Restrictive Routing

Output
The resulting PTP flight plan has a route summary line containing the waypoints and the
PTP remark in the filing strip.
If the NRRPRC preference is set to Yes, and an FAA preferential route does not exist, PTP
does not appear in the filing strip and the following alert displays.
ALERT TAG NRR01
ALERT MSG No NRR Remarks are used because a FAA Pref Route does not
exist.

NRR with SRS Routing


Example:
Explanation: The specified route may or may not use NRS waypoints.
01
02
03
06

OPTIONS FP,TST,WH06,NRR
POD KSFO
POA KORD
ROUTE -SAC HAROL KU66K KU69M KU72O KU75Q KD78U KD81Y KP81A KP81C
KP81E KP81G KP81I KG81K DLL MSN JVL JVL5

.
(FPL-N901AN-IS
-B738/M-SXDIRGHW/S
-KSFO0100
-N0455F390 DCT SAC DCT HAROL DCT KU66K DCT KU69M DCT KU72O DCT
KU75Q DCT KD78U DCT KD81Y DCT KP81A DCT KP81C DCT KP81E DCT KP81G
DCT KP81I DCT KG81K DCT DLL DCT MSN DCT JVL JVL5
-KORD0342
-EET/KZLC0042 KZDV0145 KZMP0219 KZAU0311
REG/N901AN SEL/ACBJ DAT/V
RMK/PTP)

NRR and NRP


NRP appears as a remark in the filing strip when the following are true:
The NRR remarks are requested.

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Non-Restrictive Routing

The route is computed either as NRS optimized (HAR) or as NAVAID


optimized (PTP).
Either an FAA preferential route exists for the city pair and the NRRPRC
preference is set to Yes, or the preference is set to No and the existence of a
preferential route is irrelevant.
The flight level is below the NRR flight level set by the NRRFLF customer
preference, but at or above the flight level set for NRP.
For more information on NRP, see National Route Program (NRP) Option on page 199.

MEL RNAV Degradation and NRR


It is possible that an MEL item may override the setting of the RNAV parameter in the CADB
for an aircraft used in an NRR flight plan. The RNAV Degradation parameter in the MEL
Database record determines the level, if any, of RNAV degradation that may apply to the
RNAV setting in the CADB. When the RNAV Degradation parameter is set to Terminal, the
flight plan is calculated with no terminal RNAV capability. When the parameter is set to All,
the flight plan is calculated with no RNAV capability at all. For more information, see
Chapter 35, Minimum Equipment List Database..
The RN and NORN flight plan options override the Customer Aircraft Database (CADB)
setting for RNAV and ignore any MEL degradations that have been applied to RNAV. If an
MEL item exists that degrades the RNAV capability, JetPlan returns an alert on the NRR flight
plan. For more information, see Chapter 2, Option Commands.

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Route Commands
Specific Route Selector

Specific Route Selector


The input methodologies of the Route Optimizer are substantially different from those of the
Specific Route Selector (SRS). SRS requires no keywords (for example, RTD, RTW, RTA),
no knowledge of route areas (for example, Area 1 and Area 2), and no input type options to
remember (for example, J,D,ABC,P/Z/J). It is separate and independent of the Route
Optimizer. Nevertheless, SRS does have its own syntax rules and guidelines to follow. This
section describes that information.
SRS provides a very useful method for entering a route between any two points (airports or
waypoints). You define the route of flight with your explicit inputs. Enter each NAVAID and
airway element sequentially, as you would file a flight plan with ATC. Simply specify the
route, start to finish, and you get an output that matches your input.
In addition, low and high altitude airway segments may be combined in one route request. By
specifying an entry waypoint, the published high (or low) altitude airway, and an exit
waypoint, you define the desired route of flight on the airway structure of your choice. If
desired, you can also specify as many enroute waypoints as necessary. SRS builds great circle
segments using your specified inputs.

NOTE If necessary, there is a method for combining SRS and Route Optimizer
inputs, which is discussed in Combination (SRS Route Optimizer) Routing in this
chapter.

SRS provides the following features:


Independence from Route Optimizer conventions if desired.
SRS inputs can be used to create Customer Route Database (CRDB) files.
Ability to specify waypoints that are considered terminal waypoints (an
ARINC 424 standard.)
Ability to delineate SID/STAR route information in the flight plan output,
including each fix and track to a fix. The fix data is obtained from the
Jeppesen Aviation Database (ARINC 424 standard).
Ability to work in conjunction with the Route Optimizer if necessary. This
provides flexibility in that portions of the route may be dynamically
constructed using the Route Optimizer, while other portions are explicitly
defined using SRS.
Ability to accept and interpret both IATA and ICAO identifiers from your
POD, POA, Hold, Alternate, and Reclear inputs.

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The Navigation Database


SRS navigational data originates in the Jeppesen Aviation Database (JAD). Specific data is
extracted from JAD and placed in a file formatted to ARINC 424 standards, where it may be
used for flight planning purposes. The converted database file contains worldwide airport,
airway, and waypoint information.
SRS has no route area concept to consider. All airports, airways, and waypoints are defined
in the same data source, meaning that there are no subsections (route areas) to worry about.

SRS Facts and Guidelines


When requesting an SRS route, be aware of the following input guidelines:
Route inputs are limited to a total of 408 characters, including spaces.
SRS route inputs are entered as they would be filed with ATC. The route is
defined by entering both the airway and the waypoint names in the order of
flight. The names entered on the Route command line need to be loaded in
the navigation database.
Lat/long coordinates not associated with airway structures can be entered as
part of your route input.
NAVAID radial/distance fixes (RNAV waypoints) not associated with
airway structures can also be entered as part of your route input.
All waypoint name inputs must be entered according to their charted
(external) name. If the charted name exists more than once in the navigation
database, SRS selects the waypoint closest in proximity to the previously
entered waypoint.
Waypoints can be entered using latitude-longitude coordinates. You can
also include a name to be associated with the entered coordinate.
A route can be created, all or in part, based on the entry and exit waypoints
to one or more published airways.
Both high and low altitude waypoint names may be included in the same
SRS route input.

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If needed, you can clarify a waypoint external name entry by further


defining the entry using modifiers. There are two basic types of modifiers:
NAVAID type and coordinate approximation. NAVAID type modifiers
are used to differentiate between two waypoints that are different NAVAID
types, but are located in close proximity to each other.
There are three NAVAID type modifiers that can be appended to your
waypoint entry: VOR, NDB, or FIX. Coordinate approximation modifiers
are latitude-longitude inputs appended to your waypoint name entry to help
the Specific Route Selector locate the waypoint.
When applying a coordinate approximation modifier, SRS uses your
modifier to determine the waypoint. It then uses the coordinates from the
navigation database, rather than your approximation, to complete the route
calculation.
Static track structures can be used with SRS.
You can specify an airway name between two waypoints stored in the
navigation database, or between two waypoints defined by you.
You can specify a coded departure route.

SRS Syntax Rules


The following syntax rules are applied during the input of an SRS route. Please contact
Jeppesen Customer Service to resolve any questions regarding route input.

The Dash Delimiter


The most important syntax rule to remember is to always begin an SRS input with a dash (for
example, -OSI V25 PYE). If the dash is omitted, JetPlan does not recognize the route entry as
an SRS input, but rather as a Route Optimizer input, leaving you with invalid inputs for the
route selection tool in use.
Example:
Explanation: The dash delimiter (-) is always the first entry in an SRS route input. It designates
that the SRS tool is being implemented.
06 ROUTE -OSI V25 PYE

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Specific Route Selector

Input Styles
Two different route input styles may be employed when entering an SRS route. The first style
resembles the route syntax found in an ICAO flight plan filing request, where each route
element (airway name, NAVAID or waypoint name) is separated from the next by a space.
The second style resembles the route syntax found in a U.S. domestic flight plan filing request,
where each route element is separated from the next by a period.
Example:
Explanation: ICAO stylea blank space separates each route element.
06 ROUTE -J16 BIL J151 ONL J94 OBK

Example:
Explanation: U.S. Domestic stylea single period separates each route element.
06 ROUTE -J16.BIL.J151.ONL.J94.OBK
NOTE When using the U.S. Domestic input style, one period is entered between
dissimilar route elements (for example, airway.navaid.airway.way-point). However,
similar route elements are separated by two periods (for example,
airway..airway.navaid.airway..airway.navaid).

Example:
Explanation: U.S. domestic styletwo periods separate similar route elements, while a single
period separates dissimilar elements.
06 ROUTE -J16..J52.DBS.J82..J107.DPR.J34.BAE

Starting/Ending Route With a Waypoint


If a NAVAID or waypoint is entered immediately after the dash, SRS creates a direct segment
from the POD to that point. Similarly, if a NAVAID or waypoint is included as the last
element in the route input, SRS creates a direct segment to the POA.
Example:
Explanation: SRS creates a direct to the NAVAID DAG, and a direct from the NAVAID DVV
to the POA.

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Specific Route Selector

02 POD KLAX
03 POA KDEN
06 ROUTE -DAG J146 HBU J10 DVV

Starting/Ending Route With an Airway


If an airway identifier (or SID) is entered immediately after the dash, then SRS uses that
airway (or SID) to begin the route. Similarly, if an airway identifier (or STAR) is included as
the last element in the route input, SRS uses that airway (or STAR) to the POA.
Example:
Explanation: SRS uses the LOOP9 SID to DAG.
06 ROUTE -LOOP9 DAG J146 HBU J10 DVV

Jeppesen defines a circle around each NAVAID during the JetPlan route database build
process. The circumference of the circle is in nautical miles and is determined by Jeppesen. If
the POD (or POA) is not located within the NAVAID circle of a NAVAID on the specified
airway, an error occurs.
Example:
Explanation: In this case, the POD does not reside within a nearby NAVAID circle on J16, so
a route error occurs.
02 POD KPDX
03 POA KORD
06 ROUTE -J16 MCW J90 BRIBE

To alleviate this problem, a NAVAID must be entered before the airway on the departure.
Example:
Explanation: By adding the NAVAID BTG to the start of the SRS route input, a direct
segment is created and the subsequent route becomes acceptable.
06 ROUTE -BTG J16 MCW J90 BRIBE

Using similar logic, a NAVAID must be entered after the airway on the arrival if the POA is
not within the NAVAID circle.

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Example:
Explanation: In this case, the POA does not reside within a nearby NAVAID circle on J16, so
a route error occurs.
02 POD KORD
03 POA KPDX
06 ROUTE -BRIBE J90 MCW J16

Explanation: By adding the NAVAID BTG to the end of the SRS route input, a direct segment
is created and the subsequent route becomes acceptable.
06 ROUTE -BRIBE J90 MCW J16 BTG

SRS Input Types


This section discusses all of the types of inputs that can be entered using the SRS
methodology. Typical examples are given as well as subtle variations.

LAT/LONG Inputs
The following sections describe latitude and longitude inputs.

Unnamed LAT/LONG Inputs


To specify latitude, you may prefix or suffix any of the following coordinate entries with the
letter N for North, or S for South:
One or two digits, assumed to be degrees.
Optionally, three or four digits, the last two digits assumed to be minutes.
Optionally, enter a period and a single digit for tenths of a minute.
The latitude coordinate, 3712.4N can be entered using any of the following formats:
N37

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N3712

N3712.4

3712N

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Specific Route Selector

To specify longitude, you can prefix or suffix any of the following coordinate entries with the
letter W for West, or E for East:
One to three digits assumed to be degrees.
Optionally, four or five digits, the last two digits assumed to be minutes.
Optionally, input a period and a single digit for tenths of a minute.
The longitude coordinate 09823.6W can be entered using any of the following formats:
W98

W098

W9823

W09823

W9823.6

W09823.6

98W

09823.6W

To specify a complete coordinate, use the guidelines mentioned above. You can include a
slash, space, or comma between the latitude entry and the longitude entry. However, these
separators are not required. To specify the coordinate 3712.4N / 09823.6W, enter any of the
following:
N37W98

N37W098

N3712W9823

N3712W09823

N3712.4W9823.6

N3712.4W09823.6

N3712.4 W09823.6

User-Named LAT/LONG Inputs


For user-named latitude-longitude inputs, apply the rules mentioned previously. In addition,
prefix the coordinate input with a one-to-six character name within parentheses. The name is
of your choosing and can consist of alphanumeric or special characters. For example, to attach
a name to the coordinate 3712.4N / 09823.6W, you can enter:
(MY-CHKPT1)N3712W9823

(MY-CHKPT1)N3712.4W09823.6

Charted (External) Name Inputs


There are a few ways to specify the charted (external) name of a waypoint. One way is to
simply enter the name as it exists on the chart. Another way is to attach modifiers to the
external name. Modifiers can describe the fix by its typeVOR, NDB, or FIXor as an
approximation of the latitude and longitude coordinates of the waypoint.

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Charted Names (No Modifier)


To specify the charted (external) name of a waypoint without modifiers, enter the one to five
(1-5) alphanumeric/special character name from the chart. Your entry must match the
waypoint name stored in the navigation database.
ALCOA

APPLE

RIPKI

MAARI

ACKIL

Charted Names Using NAVAID Type Modifiers


To specify the charted name of a waypoint by NAVAID type, follow the procedure established
for charted names (above), and append the NAVAID type within parentheses. A database
search is made for the waypoint whose charted name is closest to the last known position and
whose NAVAID type corresponds to the type specified (VOR, NDB, or FIX). Once found,
JetPlan uses the coordinates associated with the waypoint in the flight plan.
BNA(VOR)

BNA(NDB)

Some countries have VORs and NDBs that are either collocated or located in close proximity
to each other, where airway structure is defined on the NDB in one quadrant, but defined on
the VOR in another quadrant. In this case, the only way to get airway continuity is to specify
the input in the following manner:
1. Inbound airway name
2. Inbound NAVAID identifier
3. Outbound NAVAID identifier
4. Outbound airway name
If the VOR and NDB have the same identifier, then the NAVAID type modifier must be
attached. Since this can be confusing, it may be more practical to specify the inbound airway
name, inbound NAVAID name, and then a direct segment to the first waypoint or NAVAID
on the outbound airway. In the example below, J111 is defined on the Nome VOR, whereas
G212 is defined on the Ft. Davis NDB. Both are in close proximity to each other.
Example:
Route explanation: For the points in questionInbound on airway J111 to the Nome VOR
(OME), direct to the Ft. Davis NDB (FDV), and then outbound on airway G212 to TA.
02 POD PANC
03 POA UHMM
06 ROUTE -ANC J111 OME FDV G212 TA G212G UHMM

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Charted Names Using Coordinate Approximation


To specify the charted name of a waypoint by coordinate approximation, follow the procedure
established for charted names (above), followed by the latitude and longitude (using the syntax
rules established earlier) within parentheses. A database check is made for the waypoint whose
charted name is closest to the latitude-longitude coordinate. Once the closest waypoint is
found, JetPlan uses the waypoint coordinates found in the navigation database rather than the
approximated coordinates. If you also apply a user-specified name and it does not match
anything in the database, an error message is generated. See the examples below.
GILRO(N37W121)

AMERT(N4439.7W07743.1)

RNAV Waypoint Inputs


To enter an RNAV waypoint, specify the point in Fix-Radial-Distance format. Enter the
two- or three-character charted name of the NAVAID, followed by the radial in magnetic
degrees (001360), and the distance from the NAVAID (in nautical miles). SRS performs a
database search for the NAVAID with the name that matches your input and that is in closest
proximity to the previously entered user waypoint.
OAK216160

RZS133024

UPP066164

Airway Name Inputs


There are two ways to specify an airway name: 1) by the charted name, 2) by a user-specified
convention. The latter is used for specific airways not recognized in the SRS navigation
database. For example, the SRS navigation database does not recognize ATS and D
airway names.

Charted Airway Names


Most airways on the charts are available for input. The method for entering these airways is to
simply specify the name in your route input as it is found on the chart. This means entering the
airway using the one to six alphanumeric characters that identify the airway. The first
character must be an alpha character. Do not insert any spaces in the airway name.
A586

W41

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NCA15

PTSQ

ACAO

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User-Specified Airway Names


To specify an airway name that is user-created or not in the SRS navigation database, you
must demarcate the begin and endpoints of the airway and make a unique entry in between. Do
this by specifying the waypoint that marks your entry to the airway in question, the airway
name prefixed with a special input, and the waypoint that marks the end of the airway
segment. The prefix to the airway name is AW/ or AW=. This airway input must be
within parentheses.
The following route input illustrates the user-specified designation of an airway not
recognized in the SRS navigation database.
Example:
Route explanation: Pick up the ATS airway between KCC and CU, and between CU and
OKC.
06 ROUTE -GO W18 KC (AW/ATS) CU (AW/ATS) OKC V23 IWC ...

The next route input illustrates the designation of a fictitious airway name, TRK34, between
the waypoints ALPHA and BRAVO.
Example:
06 ROUTE -(ALPHA)N40W110 (AW/TRK34) (BRAVO)N40W100

SID/STAR Name Inputs


SRS lets you enter an ARINC-424 compliant SID or STAR name (maximum of six
alphanumeric characters) in your route input. In addition, you can enter a transition waypoint
name. The inclusion of a transition waypoint forces JetPlan to consider the POD or POA
information and search the database for intermediate waypoint data.
To specify a published SID or STAR and include intermediate waypoint data, enter the SID or
STAR name (maximum of six alphanumeric characters) and the charted name of the SID or
STAR transition waypoint.
Example:
Route explanation: Pick up the LOOP2 departure to DAG, fly route, then pick up the MOD2
arrival from CZQ. By entering the transition waypoints (DAG and CZQ), intermediate
waypoint data for both the SID and STAR are included in the flight plan output.
02 POD KLAX
03 POA KSFO

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06 ROUTE LOOP2 DAG...<continuing input>...CZQ MOD2

Runway Name Inputs


To specify a departure or arrival runway within a SID or STAR input, append the runway
name to the SID (or STAR) name. Use the dollar symbol ($) to separate the runway number
from the SID/STAR name and the transition name. A space (or period) separates the transition
waypoint entry from the SID/STAR/Runway input. For example:
-PORTE9$28$ AVE -GMN1$24$ AVE

The following rules apply to entering runway names:


The runway number must always be two digits.
Use L to designate left runway, R to designate right runway, and B to
designate a procedure common to both parallel runways. For example:
-GMN1$07L$ AVE -GMN1$24B$ AVE
If there is no common procedure stored for two parallel runways,
SRS defaults to the left runway procedure, and then the right
runway procedure. If only the runway number is specified for
parallel runways, SRS defaults first to common procedure, and then
to the left procedure, and then to the right procedure.
If no procedures are stored for the specified SID/STAR and runway,
or you do not specify a runway, SRS defaults to the procedure for
the lowest numbered runway for the specified SID/STAR.
If SRS cannot find a SID/STAR input in the SRS database, but it
does find the specified SID/STAR in the Route Optimizer database,
JetPlan prints out the SID/STAR identified in the route summary
line. However, no intermediate waypoints are printed.
It is possible to instruct SRS to go direct to all of the stored
intermediate waypoints of a published SID/STAR. JetPlan prints
out the appropriate SID/STAR name after the route is established on
either the SID or STAR. ARTCC and ACC centers may not accept
this type of routing when the automatic filing feature is used.

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NAVAID/Radial Inputs
The combination of a NAVAID and a radial can be used as an SRS route input for the purpose
of furthering the route when the published airway structure does not meet your needs. A
NAVAID/radial input is a six-character entry, combining the three-letter NAVAID identifier
with a three-digit radial value. There are several ways to use a NAVAID and radial
combination as a route entry. Each is described in this section.

NAVAID/Radial Intersecting a NAVAID/Radial


To designate the point where a NAVAID/radial intersects another NAVAID/radial, enter the
intersection in the following manner:
First enter the initial enroute NAVAID from which the first radial exists. Next, enter the sixcharacter NAVAID/radial combination based on the initial NAVAID. Then enter the sixcharacter NAVAID/radial combination based on the subsequent enroute NAVAID. Lastly,
enter the subsequent NAVAID from which the other radial exists. See the examples below.
Example:
Route explanation: Beginning at the initial NAVAID, OOD, fly the 198 radial (OOD198) until
it intersects with the SBY014, and then fly the 014 radial to SBY.
06 ROUTE -OOD OOD198 SBY014 SBY

Example:
Route explanation: Same as previous example, except using U.S. domestic input style. Note
that two periods separate the similar input elements (in this case, the NAVAID/radial
combinations OOD198 and SBY014).
06 ROUTE -OOD.OOD198..SBY014.SBY

NAVAID/Radial Intersecting an Airway


To designate a route input where a NAVAID/radial intersects an airway, enter the initial
enroute NAVAID, the NAVAID/radial input, and the airway name (using the rules
established). See the example below.

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Specific Route Selector

Example:
Route explanation: Beginning at the initial NAVAID, DQO, fly the 306 radial (DQO306) until
it intersects with airway J110. Fly airway J110 via VINSE to the IHD310 radial, and then fly
the 310 radial to DJB.
06 ROUTE -DQO DQO306 J110 VINSE J110 IHD310 DJB

NAVAID/Radial to a Waypoint
To designate a NAVAID radial routing to or from a waypoint, specify the NAVAID/radial
entry followed (or preceded) by the waypoint. See example.
Example:
Route explanation: Overfly the PTW vortac, and then proceed via the PTW320 radial to the
RAV vortac.
06 ROUTE -PTW PTW320 RAV
06 ROUTE -PTW.PTW320.RAV

NAVAID/Radial/Distance Waypoint
To designate a NAVAID radial/distance waypoint, enter the combination of the charted twoor three-character name of the NAVAID, the radial in magnetic degrees (001360), and the
distance in nautical miles. This is the same rule as stated for designating RNAV waypoints.
See the examples below.
OAK216160 RZS133024 UPP066164

Great Circle Route Inputs


Great Circle routing is available using SRS. In contrast to the Route Optimizers optimized
direct routing, which approximates a great circle route on direct segments when the GC
option is specified on the Options command line, the SRS great circle capability generates a
true great circle route.
Using the Route Optimizer, a predominantly east/west great circle route is generated with
longitudinal crossings printed in multiples of ten degrees and latitudinal crossings printed in
multiples of one degree (see Optimized Direct Routing in this chapter). The deviation
(round-off) of the latitudinal crossings from the exact great circle position is for appearance
sake.

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SRS on the other hand, generates a predominantly east/west great circle route with
longitudinal crossings printed in segments of user-defined degrees, and the exact latitudinal
crossings are printed (not rounded to whole degree values).
For example, if you request SRS to compute a flight plan from KJFK to PHNL in 10 degree
segments of longitude, SRS may cross W100 at N3858.6. If the Route Optimizer calculated a
similar route, it would deviate from an exact great circle route to cross W100 at N3900.0.
Likewise, a predominantly north/south route generated by the Route Optimizer has latitudinal
crossings printed in multiples of five degrees and longitudinal crossings printed in multiples of
one degree.
SRS on the other hand, generates a north/south route with latitudinal crossings printed in
segments of user-defined degrees, and exact longitudinal crossings printed. Again, no roundoff is done. For example, if you request SRS to compute a flight plan from FHAW to BIKF, in
5 degree segments of latitude, SRS may cross N10 at W01534.6. If the Route Optimizer
calculated a similar route, it would deviate from an exact great circle route to cross N10 at
W01600.0.

Single Segment Great Circle Route


To specify a single segment SRS great circle route (POD to POA), enter a dash (for SRS
routing) as the only route element input. With no route elements entered, JetPlan samples wind
and temperature data at only one point along the route.
Example:
06 ROUTE

Multi-Segment Great Circle Route: Latitudinal or Longitudinal Crossings


To specify a multi-segment SRS great circle route with latitudinal or longitudinal crossings at
whole degree intervals, enter the following inputs without any spaces between them: a dash
(for SRS routing), followed by the command GR8C, followed by a crossing interval value.
The crossing interval value must be a four-digit number. The first two digits represent a
latitude entry, while the last two digits represent a longitude entry. The entry has a nonzero
input for one directional value or the other (latitude or longitude), not both. Zeroes are entered
for the direction not taken.
For a predominantly north/south route, only the first two digits (designated latitude parameter)
are used. For a predominantly east/west route, only the last two digits (designated longitude
parameter) are used. The examples below are typical of inputs necessary for predominantly
north/south routes.

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Specific Route Selector

Example:
Explanation: The first route input shows an entry that produces a plan with latitude crossings
every 5 degrees. The second route input shows the entry that produces a plan with latitude
crossings every 10 degrees.
06 ROUTE -GR8C0500
06 ROUTE -GR8C1000

The next set of examples are typical of inputs necessary for predominantly east/west routes.
Example:
Explanation: The first route input shows an entry that produces a plan with longitude crossings
every 10 degrees. The second route input shows the entry that produces a plan with longitude
crossings every 20 degrees.
06 ROUTE -GR8C0010
06 ROUTE -GR8C0020

Multi-Segment Great Circle Route: Latitudinal and Longitudinal


Crossings
To specify a multi-segment SRS great circle route with latitudinal and longitudinal crossings
at whole degree intervals, make the following entries without any spaces between them: a dash
(for SRS routing), followed by GR8C, followed by a crossing interval value. The crossing
interval value is a four-digit number specified by you. The first two digits represent a latitude
entry, while the last two digits represent a longitude entry. Each two-digit value is entered as
something greater than zero in this type of input.
Predominantly East/West Routes
For predominantly east/west routes, only the last two digits (longitude parameter) are typically
given a value greater than zero. However, to include additional waypoints, you can also enter a
value greater than zero for the first two digits (latitude parameter), thereby creating waypoints
at the specified intervals of latitude. At the additional waypoints, the longitude coordinate
values prints out in degrees, minutes, and tenths of minutes without any rounding.

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Specific Route Selector

Example:
Explanation: Print 10-degree intervals of longitude when flight planning predominantly
east/west, such as KJFK to PHNL. Also print additional way-points at 10-degree intervals of
latitude.
06 ROUTE -GR8C1010

Example:
Explanation: Print 20-degree intervals of longitude when flight planning predominantly
east/west. Also print additional waypoints at 5-degree intervals of latitude.
06 ROUTE -GR8C0520

Predominantly North/South Routes


For predominantly north/south routes, only the first two digits (designated latitude parameter)
are typically given a value greater than zero. However, to include additional waypoints, you
can also enter a value greater than zero for the last two digits (designated longitude parameter),
thereby creating waypoints at the specified intervals of longitude. At the additional waypoints,
the latitude coordinate values print out in degrees, minutes, and tenths of minutes without any
rounding.
Example:
Explanation: Print 5-degree intervals of latitude when flight planning predominantly
north/south, such as FHAW to BIKF. Also print additional waypoints at 3-degree intervals of
longitude.
06 ROUTE -GR8C0503

Example:
Explanation: Print 10-degree intervals of latitude when flight planning predominantly
north/south. Also print additional waypoints at 5-degree intervals of longitude.
06 ROUTE -GR8C1005

Great Circle Route Segment(s) Between Any Two SRS Waypoints


To specify one great circle route segment between any two SRS waypoints, enter either a
space (ICAO style) or two periods (domestic style) between the two waypoints. SRS builds
one great circle direct segment between the two waypoints, regardless of distance. To specify

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Route Commands
Specific Route Selector

multi-segment great circle routing between any two SRS waypoints, enter GR8Cnnnn between
the two waypoints. Specify the desired segments of latitude/longitude (nnnn) using the syntax
rules explained in the previous sections.
In the following example, the first input generates a single segment great circle route between
two points. The second input also generates a great circle route between two points, but with
multiple segments.
Example:
Explanation: Generate a single great circle route segment between SYA and PABBA.
02 POD KSJC
03 POA RJAA
06 ROUTE -OSI PYE J143 ENI C1486 DAANN G215 SYA PABBA OTR6
KETAR OTR10 CVC

Example:
Explanation: Generate a great circle route between SYA and PABBA, but with multiple
segments. Since this is a predominantly east/west flight, the input prints 10-degree intervals of
longitude, and prints additional waypoints at every 10-degree intervals of latitude.
02 POD KSJC
03 POA RJAA
06 ROUTE -OSI PYE J143 ENI C1486 DAANN G215 SYA GR8C1010
PABBA OTR6 KETAR OTR10 CVC

JetPlan SRS Distance Override/Bias Specification


You can enter an absolute distance or specify a distance bias between checkpoints in the SRS
route input.
Examples:
06 ROUTE -ABC (DIST=260) XYZ

Explanation: You have specified a distance of 260 nm between ABC and XYZ. The 260 nm
distance overrides the direct point-to-point distance that JetPlan would have otherwise
calculated between ABC and XYZ.
06 ROUTE -ABC (DIST=+33) XYZ

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Specific Route Selector

Explanation: You have specified an incremental distance of 33 nm between ABC and XYZ. A
33 nm distance bias is added to the point-to-point distance that JetPlan calculated between
ABC and XYZ.
06 ROUTE -(DIST=15) HOLTZ7 TRM IRK LVZ LENDY5

Explanation: You have specified a distance of 15 nm between the departure airport and the
first checkpoint of the HOLTZ7 departure procedure (DLREY). The 15 nm distance overrides
the direct point-to-point distance that JetPlan would have otherwise calculated between the
POD and DLREY (first leg on the SID procedure).
06 ROUTE -HOLTZ7 TRM IRK LVZ LENDY5 (DST=+22)

Explanation: You have specified an arrival procedure distance bias of 22 nm. This bias is
reflected between the last checkpoint of the LENDY5 arrival procedure (LGA) and the arrival
airport. The 22 nm distance bias is added to the point-to-point distance that JetPlan calculated
between LGA and the POA. (The added distance is reflected on the last leg of the STAR
procedure).
If the requested distance override is less than the great circle distance between the checkpoints,
one of the following error messages appears:
SID DIST If the requested distance of a segment (from POD to the first
SID checkpoint) is less than the great circle distance for that segment.
STARDIST If the requested distance of a segment (from last checkpoint of
STAR to POA) is less than the great circle distance for that segment.
RTE DIST If the requested distance of a segment (between two successive
enroute checkpoints) is less than the great circle distance for that segment.

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Route Commands
Specific Route Selector

SRS Routing for User-Defined Airports


To specify SRS routing when flight planning to or from user-defined airports (see the POD
and POA Commands chapter), the typical inputs can be one of the following:
A great circle route for part or all of the route.
Example:
02 POD AAAA,3900,12000
03 POA XXXX,3900,07000
06 ROUTE -

Example:
02 POD AAAA,3900,12000
03 POA XXXX,3900,07000
06 ROUTE -GR8C0010

A combination of great circle and airway routes.


Example:
02 POD AAAA,3900,12000
03 POA XXXX,3900,07000
06 ROUTE -LAX J78 J161 FMN DVV GR8C0010

A direct segment to a waypoint, and then airway structureif the POD is


defined by coordinates.
Airway structure to a waypoint, and then a direct segment to the POAif
the POA is defined by coordinates.

SRS Naming Conventions


SRS follows the ARINC 424 standard for data naming conventions. Common naming
conventions are shown in the following sections.

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Specific Route Selector

VOR, VORDME, VORTAC, TACAN and NDB


Waypoints located at any of the above types of facilities take on the official one-, two-, three-,
or four-character identifier of the facility.

Named RNAV Waypoints, Intersections, and Reporting Points


In many countries, these waypoints are assigned unique five-character names. The identifier is
the same as the name. For waypoints not so named, an identifier is developed using five or
fewer character names, according to the following rules.

One-Word Names
Use the full name if five or less characters are involved.
ACRA LOGAN PIKE DOT
Eliminate double letters.
KIMMEL becomes KIMEL, COTTON becomes COTON, and RABBITT
becomes RABIT.
Keep the first letter, first vowel, and last letter. Drop other vowels starting
from right to left.
ADOLPH becomes ADLPH, BAILEY becomes BAILY, and BURWELL
becomes BURWL.
Drop consonants, starting from right to left.
ANDREWS becomes ANDRS, BRIDGEPORT becomes BRIDT, and
KHABAROVSK becomes KHABK.

Multi-Word Names
Use the first letter of the first word and abbreviate the last word using the above rules for
single word names to reduce the last word to four characters.
CLEAR LAKE becomes CLAKE, and ROUGH AND READY becomes RREDY.

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Route Commands
Combination (SRS Route Optimizer) Routing

Combination (SRS Route Optimizer)


Routing
You can alternate between SRS and Route Optimizer types of inputs to create a combination
route request. This capability allows you to take advantage of the unique benefits of both
methods. There is no restriction on the number of times you alternate between SRS and Route
Optimizer within your route input.

Input Rules
Combination routing requires you to adhere to some guidelines when entering your route
request. First, all current SRS and Route Optimizer syntax rules and guidelines must be
followed when applying the particular methodology. Next, you must follow the unique and
specific guidelines listed below to ensure the proper parsing of input information.
When alternating between SRS and Route Optimizer inputs, separate each
selection tool segment with two dashes. You can include spacing around the
two dashes, or have no spacing at all.
Example:
Explanation: The first line demonstrates the no spacing style that can be
applied. It also shows the request starting with an SRS entry (thus the single
dash begins the input). The second line demonstrates the spacing style,
where spaces separate the inputs from the two dashes. It also shows the
request starting with a Route Optimizer entry (thus, there is no single dash
as the first input). Route Optimizer
06 ROUTE -SRS--RO--SRS--RO

- or 06 ROUTE RO -- SRS -- RO -- SRS

Do not duplicate waypoint names when switching from one selection tool
style to the other (SRS to Route Optimizer or Route Optimizer to SRS).
Example:
Explanation: Incorrect entry. The waypoint GAS is duplicated between the
two methods.
06 ROUTE -DHA A1 SIBLI--J,D,SIBLI,GAS,D--GAS V22 MAD

Explanation: Correct entry. Duplication is avoided.


06 ROUTE -DHA A1 SIBLI -- J,BOPAN,GAS -- V22 MAD

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Combination (SRS Route Optimizer) Routing

When switching from SRS to Route Optimizer, the last SRS waypoint must
exist in one of the recognizable land mass route areas of the navigation
database that the Route Optimizer uses (Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5). It cannot be a
latitude-longitude coordinate or a waypoint located in Area 0 of the Route
Optimizer navigation database.
Example:
Explanation: Incorrect entry. The last SRS waypoint, N3730E133, is in Area
0 according to Route Optimizer rules.
06 ROUTE -SEL G597 KAE N3730E133 -- J,GTC//J

Explanation: Correct entry. The last SRS waypoint, GTC, can be found in
Area 4.
06 ROUTE -SEL G597 KAE N3730E133 GTC -- J//J

JetPlan automatically constructs a direct segment from the last Route


Optimizer waypoint to a subsequent SRS waypoint unless the first SRS
input is an airway name, in which case an airway segment is used. Do not
use a D input to direct the route from a Route Optimizer waypoint to an
SRS waypoint.
Example:
Explanation: Direct segment from MLD to MVA.
06 ROUTE J,MLD -- MVA MOD2

Explanation: Airway segment from MLD to MVA.


06 ROUTE J,MLD -- J158 MVA MOD2

Explanation: Incorrect use of D input.


06 ROUTE J,MLD,D -- MVA MOD2

Combination Routing Examples


The following examples illustrate how you can alternate between SRS and Route Optimizer
inputs in one combination route request.
If more than one line of route entries is required, a comma (,) or a backslash (\) can be used at
the end of the current line of input to establish a continuation.

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Route Commands
Combination (SRS Route Optimizer) Routing

Use a comma only if it is part of the route input, extending Route Optimizer inputs to the next
line. SRS inputs can only be ended with a comma and the next line started with a space.

NOTE Examples with next line inputs show more space than is realistic just to
emphasize the point.

Route Optimizer to SRS


Example:
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE J,DVV -- J60 JOT J146 GIJ J554 JHW J70 AVP LENDY3

Example:
02 POD EHAM
03 POA RKSI
06 ROUTE J//J,GTC -- N3735E13559 N3710E13232 KAE G597 SEL MADOO

SRS to Route Optimizer


Example:
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE -SHOR9 LIN J84 MVA -- J,DVV,LVZ

Example:
02 POD RKSI
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE -GOLF$32$ SEL G597 JEC -- J/P/J,IGN

Example:
02 POD RKSI
03 POA EHAM
06 ROUTE -GOLF$32$ SEL G597 JEC N3730E13300 N3749E13557 GTC -- J//J

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Combination (SRS Route Optimizer) Routing

SRS to Route Optimizer to SRS


Example:
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE -SHOR9 LIN J84 MVA -- J,DVV -- J60 JOT J146 GIJ J554 JHW ,
J70 LVZ LENDY4

Example:
02 POD RKSI
03 POA EDDF
06 ROUTE -GOLF$32$ SEL G597 JEC -- J,GTC//J,SR,HEL -- UR1 SVD , UA905
HAM UG5 FUL

Route Optimizer to SRS to Route Optimizer


Example:
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE J,EKR -- J116 DVV J60 JOT -- J,GIJ,JHW,LVZ

Example:
02 POD WIII
03 POA RKSI
06 ROUTE J,DKI,MAARI -- R471 HCN B591 APU -- J,CJU

Multiple Switch Examples


Example:
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KSFO
06 ROUTE J//J,BDO,PVO//J,GTC,CVC//J,ANC

(Route Optimizer example, for comparison only)


- or 06 ROUTE J//J,BDO -- UP854 VAS UG44 HEL -- J,SPB//J,GTC,CVC//J,ANC

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Route Commands
Combination (SRS Route Optimizer) Routing

- or 06 ROUTE J,6860N -- N68W050 N69W040 N69W020 N68W010 N66W000 N64E010


BDO -- J,PVO,SPB -- R30 METAT R30G UHT R30 ARELI B152 IVADA A333
UHHH R211 GTC -- J,CVC//J,ANC -- J804R MDO B453 KYLLE FOT GOLDN4

SRS Static Preferred Routes


There are several types of static Preferred Routes in JetPlan that are stored as SRS route
strings. These routings can be used through the use of special SRS/Combo route inputs.
Currently the following Preferred Route types are available in JetPlan:
U.S./Canada High Altitude Preferred Routes
U.S./Canada High Altitude RNAV Preferred Routes
U.S. Coded Departure Routes (FAA CDRs)
Australian Domestic Preferred Routes

Published Preferred Routing (High Altitude)


To invoke a U.S./Canadian/Australian preferred routes in SRS specify PR*. To invoke a
U.S./Canadian RNAV preferred route, specify RN*. If JetPlan generates a RTDVRPRR
error, a preferred route is not loaded in SRS between the POD and the POA.
Example
02 POD KSFO
03 POA KJFK
06 ROUTE PR*

- or 02 POD KDFW
03 POA KORD
06 ROUTE RN*

Limited Navigational Capability Tracks


For aircraft that have limited navigational capability, canned track entries can be used to keep
the flight plan on published routes between Goose Bay, Newfoundland via Keflavik, Iceland,
and Stornoway, Scotland. Four SRS preferred route tracks are stored in JetPlantwo
eastbound and two westbound. You can enter these routes in the SRS portion of a combination
SRS-optimizer route input.

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Route Commands
Combination (SRS Route Optimizer) Routing

The four preferred route tracks are as follows:


Track Name

Route

CHK (Eastbound)

HOIST 5850N OZN 6140N 6330N EMBLA (AW/ATS) KEF R1


VM (AW/ATS) ALDAN 57STN ATSIX

CK1 (Westbound)

ATSIX 57STN ALDAN (AW/ATS) VM R1 KEF (AW/ATS)


EMBLA 6330N 6140N OZN 5850N HOIST

CK2 (Eastbound)

HOIST 5850N OZN 6140N 6330N EMBLA

CK3 (Westbound)

EMBLA 6330N 6140N OZN 5850N HOIST

Using the following input, you can use the track name as an SRS element:
CT*<track name>

Example
02 POD CYYR
03 POA BIKF
06 ROUTE HOIST -- CT*CK2 EMBLA

- or 02 POD CYUL
03 POA EGLL
06 ROUTE J,HOIST - CT*CHK ATSIX -- J

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Route Commands
Route Line Editing for Route Optimizer and SRS

Route Line Editing for Route Optimizer


and SRS
Route line edit gives the ability to edit a typing mistake or some other error without having to
retype the complete route input.

Route Line Editing Commands


Edit a route input by entering @6C after any JetPlan prompt. The route must have been
successfully entered after 06 ROUTE. If the previous route input failed syntax checks, it is not
saved and needs to be reentered.
Example:
08 ETD @6C (same flight planning session/request)
01 OPTIONS LD1234
02 POD @6C (flight plan request previously computed)

JetPlan displays the route input with field numbers over each changeable field. Except for the
last field, the minimum field length is four charactersthe three-character waypoint identifier
plus the comma after it. Unless it is the last route element, a D is the first element in a field.
Fields are ended by one of four delimiters: a space, a comma, a period, or a forward slash. To
terminate a field edit, press the ENTER key with no input. JetPlan prompts 07
HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST. Type GO, and JetPlan processes the revised route input.

Changing a Field Entry


To change a field entry, specify the field number, a space, and the new input. One or several
fields can be changed in a single request.
Example:
Original Flight Plan Request:
02 POD KSEA
03 POA KBGR
06 ROUTE J,BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

To overfly ABQ instead of ELP, enter @6C on any line.

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Route Line Editing for Route Optimizer and SRS

JetPlan responds with:


1 2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

Enter 6 ABQ.
JetPlan responds with:
1 2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,BLH,ABQ,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

Press <ENTER>.
JetPlan displays the 07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST prompt.
Example:
Original Flight Plan Request:
02 POD KDFW
03 POA EGLL
06 ROUTE J/Z/J

To change the Area 1 route from a jet route to a preferred (NAR) route, enter @6C.
Then press <ENTER>.
JetPlan responds with:
1
2
J/Z/J

Enter 1 P/Z/.
JetPlan responds with:
1
2
P/Z/J

To change the Area 2 input to a P, enter 2 P.

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Route Commands
Route Line Editing for Route Optimizer and SRS

JetPlan responds with:


1
2
P/Z/P

Press: <ENTER>
JetPlan prompts the 07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST question.

Deleting a Field Entry


To delete a field entry, specify the field number alone. Delete only one field at a time;
however, more than one deletion can be made for each @6C input.
Example:
Original flight plan request:
02 POD KSEA
03 POA KBGR
06 ROUTE J,BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

To delete BLH and SAT, enter @6C.


JetPlan responds with:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

Enter 5.
JetPlan responds with:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

Enter 7.

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Route Commands
Route Line Editing for Route Optimizer and SRS

JetPlan responds with:


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,PMD,ELP,INK,IAH,LFK

Press <ENTER>.
JetPlan displays the 07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST prompt.

Inserting a Field Entry


To insert a new route input between two consecutive fields, specify the following:
The preceding field number, followed by a decimal point and the number 5
(X.5, where X is the preceding field number), and then a space and the new
route input. Using a comma after the new route input is optional.
To add a new route input after the last field number, specify the following:
The last field number, followed by a decimal point and the number 5 (X.5),
two spaces, and the new route input.
NOTE The change technique can be used to add a new route input after the last
field number. Specify the last field number, retype the existing route input for that
field, and then add the new route input.

Example:
Original flight plan request:
02 POD KSEA
03 POA KBGR
06 ROUTE J,BTG,LMT,EHF,LAX,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

To insert the SLI VOR between LAX and BLH, enter @6C on any line.
JetPlan displays the following prompts:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,LAX,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

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Route Commands
Route Line Editing for Route Optimizer and SRS

Enter 4.5 SLI, (or 4.5 SLI with no comma).


JetPlan responds with:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,LAX,SLI,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

Press <ENTER>.
If the flight plan is computed using this route input, JetPlan responds with KSEA NG, because
the Route Optimizer is limited to 10 consecutive waypoints. At this point, insert D between
one of the NAVAIDS, or delete one of the NAVAIDS. To insert D between field 8 and 9, for
example, enter: @6C
JetPlan responds with:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,LAX,SLI,BLH,ABQ,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

Enter 8.5 D, (or 8.5 D with no comma) JetPlan responds with:


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,LAX,SLI,BLH,ABQ,INK,D,SAT,IAH,LFK

Press <ENTER>.
JetPlan displays the 07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST prompt.
Example:
Original flight plan request:
02 POD KSJC
03 POA RJAA
06 ROUTE -OSI V25 PYE V27 ENI C1486 GUTTS GENCO GAVEL DUT G215 PLADO
A590 \ PABBA OTR6 KETAR OTR10 CVC

In this case, the requirement is to replace the route segment between the inputs, GAVEL and
OTR10, with the route segment CDB A342 OLCOT NIPPI R220 NANAC. This requires
both the insertion process and the deletion process.

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Route Commands
Route Line Editing for Route Optimizer and SRS

Enter @6C. JetPlan responds with:


1
2
3
4
-OSI V25 PYE V27
14
15
16
PABBA OTR6 KETAR

5
6
7
8
9
10 11
12
13
ENI C1486 GUTTS GENCO GAVEL DUT G215 PLADO A590
17
18
OTR10 CVC

Enter 10 CDB A342 OLCOT NIPPI R220 NANAC.


JetPlan responds with:
1
2
3
4
-OSI V25 PYE V27
15
16
17
NANAC G215 PLADO

5
6
7
ENI C1486 GUTTS
18
19
20
A590 PABBA OTR6

8
GENCO
21
KETAR

9
GAVEL
22
OTR10

10 11
12
13
14
CBD A342 OLCOT NIPPI R220
23
CVC

Delete fields 16 through 21 using the procedure specified above.

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Route Commands
Using Customer Route Database Records

Using Customer Route Database Records


NOTE This section covers applying customer-defined routes that are stored in the
Customer Route Database (CRDB). For detailed information on creating and
managing customer route records, see Chapter 38, Customer Route Database.

The CRDB allows you to create and manage one or multiple route records for a given airport
pair. A CRDB record is created using standard JetPlan route inputs for the Route Optimizer,
SRS, or combination routing (SRS-Route Optimizer).
When you define a route, you assign it a unique record name that identifies it in the CRDB.
You can then enter the record name as the route input on a flight plan request. The airport pair
in the record you choose must match the airport pair in the flight plan request.
If you are unsure of which CRDB record to choose, you can direct JetPlan to select a record
from those available for the airport pair in the database. This method selects the optimal route
from the available choices. You can also add delimiting factors that narrow the search process.
The following examples provide inputs that allow JetPlan to find the optimal route:
Find the optimal route stored between the POD and the POA.
Example:
Explanation: This input selects the optimum from all routes available
between the specified POD and POA.
06 ROUTE RT/ALL

Find the optimal route stored between the POD and the POA from those
files stored under the specified group names.
Example:
Explanation: This input selects the optimum from only those groups
specified (groups ALPHA and BRAVO).
06 ROUTE RT/ALL,GP=ALPHA,BRAVO

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Route Commands
Using Customer Route Database Records

Find the optimal route stored between the POD and the POA that does not
come from the excluded groups.
Example:
Explanation: This input selects the optimum from all files except those
specified (groups ALPHA and XRAY).
06 ROUTE RT/ALL,GP=-ALPHA,-XRAY

Find the specific route stored under the database record name given for the
specified POD and POA.
Example:
Explanation: This input selects route record P001. If the record exists, and if
the airport pair matches the pair in the flight plan request, the record is used.
06 ROUTE RT/P001

Route Line Editing of a CRDB Record


The route line edit feature described in Route Line Editing Commands on page 239 can be
applied to CRDB records when making a change to the route entries in the record. See the
example below.
Example:
01 OPTIONS RT,CHG,KSEA,KBGR/RT01
06 ROUTE @6C

JetPlan displays the following prompts:


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
J,BTG,LMT,EHF,LAX,BLH,ELP,INK,SAT,IAH,LFK

Make changes as necessary using the techniques demonstrated in Route Line Editing
Commands on page 239.

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Route Commands
Using Coded Departure Route (CDR) Records

Using Coded Departure Route (CDR)


Records
NOTE CDR in the context of this section refers to FAA Coded Departure Routes,
not the European Conditional Routes (CDRs) used with the ERAD flight plan option.
For information on ERAD, see Electronic Route Availability Document Option on
page 185.

NOTE This section covers applying routes that are stored in the Customer Coded
Departure Route (CDR) Database. For detailed information on generating and
managing CDR records, see Chapter 42, Coded Departure Routes Database.

About Coded Departure Routes (CDRs)


Coded departure routes are predefined city-pair routes, complete from departure to arrival,
including terminal procedures. The FAA maintains coded departure routes and publishes a list
of the effective coded departure routes every 56 days.
To facilitate orderly routing around weather and other adverse conditions, Air Traffic Control
(ATC) may issue an advisory indicating that coded departure routes are in effect for flights
departing from specified airports or from any airport within an indicated FIR and flying to
specified airports or centers. ATC advisories indicate that the crew of an affected flight may be
asked to fly a coded departure route when requesting clearance to depart. However, advisories
do not indicate the particular coded departure routes to fly or state that the crew will definitely
be asked to fly a coded departure route, only that coded departure routes need to be taken into
account in planning.
An airline must respond operationally to a coded departure route advisory to prepare a crew
for a request to fly an unknown coded departure route. Prior to flight planning, the airline must
determine if it flies the indicated city pairs and if it has operational agreements to fly a coded
departure route with the centers involved. In addition, during flight planning, the airline must
determine which coded departure routes are flyable, given the aircrafts navigational
capabilities and the planned amount of onboard fuel. The Customer Coded Departure Route
Database helps airlines meet these operational needs.

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Route Commands
Using Coded Departure Route (CDR) Records

About the Customer Coded Departure Route Database


The Customer Coded Departure Route Database allows airlines to make the necessary
decisions about coded departure routes prior to and during flight planning. An updated list of
effective coded departure routes is downloaded from the FAA Route Management Tool every
56 days. The JetPlan Navigation Data (NavData) team processes the downloaded coded
departure routes, validating that (1) they are compliant with JetPlans version of the latest
ARINC 424 navigation data and (2) that they are flyable routes according to JetPlan routing
routines. The coded departure routes downloaded from the FAA are stored in the generic
NavData Coded Departure Route Database, which is replaced every 56 days.
Using JetPlan.com, you can populate your initial Customer Coded Departure Route Database
with duplicates of coded departure route records in the current generic NavData Coded
Departure Route Database. The FAA code for the coded departure route becomes the record
name in your Customer Coded Departure Route Database. All coded departure routes in the
Customer Coded Departure Route Database are initially marked as OK to Use, meaning
JetPlan considers them as acceptable choices for flight planning, indicating you have the
operational prerequisites in place. You can change the OK to Use setting to No for selected
coded departure routes that you do not want JetPlan to use.

NOTE After you have created your initial Customer Coded Departure Route
Database, you need to manually reconcile it with the generic NavData Coded
Departure Route Database when needed. Your OK to Use settings are retained
during reconciliation.

For more information on working with Coded Departure Route Database records, see
Chapter 42, Coded Departure Routes Database.

Using a Coded Departure Route Database Record As a


Flight Plan Input
The name of the coded departure route record in the Customer Coded Departure Route
Database is the same as the FAA code for the route. The FAA coded departure route naming
convention is PODPOAxx, where POD and POA are the 3-character IATA airport identifiers
and xx are two alphanumeric characters that act as a secondary identifier. For example, a
coded departure route for the directional city pair KJFK/KORD is JFKORD60. The syntax for
the route input on the Route command line is: -CD*xx.

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Route Commands
Using Coded Departure Route (CDR) Records

The following are examples of coded departure route records and the corresponding route
input syntax.
Airport Pair

Coded Departure
Route Record Name Route Input

KMSP, KORD

MSPORDE2

-CD*E2

KMSP, KORD

MSPORDS1

-CD*S1

KLAX, KJFK

LAXJFKB1

-CD*B1

Example:
Explanation: The following input selects coded departure route record MSPORDE3. The
record is used if the record exists, is active, is marked OK to Use and if the airport pair
matches the pair in the flight plan request.
02 POD KMSP
03 POA KORD
06 ROUTE -CD*E3
NOTE When used with certain flight plan formats, Jeppesen Dispatch Control can
provide a summary report that allows you to compare multiple coded departure route
scenarios. For more information, consult the Jeppesen Dispatch Control Users Guide
or contact your Jeppesen account manager.

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249

C HAPTER 7

Hold-Alternate
Commands

Hold-Alternate Commands
Hold-Alternate Command Line

Hold-Alternate Command Line


The Hold-Alternate command line (07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST) is a multifunctional
prompt, allowing you to specify several inputs at one time. It is also an optional prompt on the
JetPlan system, meaning no input is absolutely necessary in the course of creating a flight
plan. However, it does provide a way to ensure that fuel is laded for the contingency of delay
or diversion.
You may use this line to specify a hold time, which in turn provides an extra fuel amount to
the total fuel carried. You may also use this line to specify up to four destination alternate
airports and a distance, route, or altitude (specific or range) to each.
Specifically, this command line allows the following information to be entered:
Hold time at the Point-of-Arrival (POA). When entered without a
destination alternate airport, this input is applied to the POA.
Hold time at a destination alternate airport. If a hold time and an alternate
are both entered, then the time is applied to the alternate rather than the
POA, and the amount of hold fuel is based on the aircrafts weight at the
alternate (not the POA).
Hold time at a primary alternate and one to three (1-3) secondary alternates.
The display of secondary alternate information in the flight plan output is
format-dependent.
NOTE A second destination alternate (if submitted) is included on the ATC filing
strip by default. A customer preference can be set to limit the number of destination
alternates in the filing strip to one, regardless of how many destination alternates exist
in the flight plan request. Please contact your Jeppesen account manager for more
information.

Hold time that overrides default hold time information stored in your
ID/Password attribute file, Customer Aircraft Database (CADB), or
Customer Airport Database (CAPDB). If you have a default setting for hold
time in a database file, entering a hold time on the Hold command line
overrides that setting.
Destination alternate airport(s) only no hold time. One primary alternate
airport and up to three secondary alternates may be specified.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Hold-Alternate Command Line

User-specified alternate distances. You can apply distance values to any or


all specified destination alternates.
The value you enter is used in the alternate calculation rather than the
standard great circle method for determining the alternate distance, unless a
route is stored in the Customer Alternate (CALT) database.
User-specified alternate flight levels. You can apply a single flight level or a
range of flight levels to any or all specified destination alternates. When
applying a flight-level override, the minimum and maximum flight level
must be specified for a single flight level as well as for a range of flight
levels. See the examples in Table 7-1, Hold-Alternate Command Line
Sample Inputs, on page 261.
A Customer Route Database (CRDB) file. You may use a pre-stored route
database file as information for the route and performance to a destination
alternate if the file contains the correct airport pair (the departure and arrival
airports in the file match the specified arrival and alternate airports in the
flight plan request). If the airports in the file do not match those specified in
the plan, JetPlan defaults to either the great circle or the CALT Database
distance and route information.
EU-OPS-compliant destination alternate fuel uplift policy.
The following paragraphs discuss the Hold-Alternate commands in more detail. For additional
examples, see Table 7-1, Hold-Alternate Command Line Sample Inputs, on page 261.

Hold-Alternate Fuel Considerations


The following section provides some of the factors used in the determination of Hold and
Alternate fuel. You have the option of further control over these factors through certain
parameter settings in your customer databases.

Hold Fuel
The Hold fuel calculation is generally based on the long-range cruise mode fuel flow and the
aircraft weight at the POA. Some factors that can provide more control over how this fuel is
calculated can be found in the CADB. Specifically, this database allows you to set parameters
that control the holding fuel flow, the hold altitude, the minimum amount of hold fuel, and
whether landing weight or max zero fuel weight (MZFW) is used to calculate hold fuel.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Hold-Alternate Command Line

Alternate Fuel
Alternate fuel is the fuel required to fly from the point of intended landing (the POA) to the
alternate airport.
Depending on the output format, this can be determined by either a calculated mini flight
plan between the POA and the alternate, or a simple table look-up based on the great-circle or
user-specified distance to the alternate. These scenarios are described below.
In any case, the alternate fuel calculation is based on the aircraft weight at the POA. The
altitude profile and distance to the alternate airport is determined by the configuration of a
particular format setting (ALTPFM), and the existence of a stored route.

NOTE Contact your Jeppesen account manager to request a changes to format


settings.

Primary case 1:
Stored route,
optimized altitude

If a customer route from the POA to the alternate is stored in the


CALT Database, JetPlan ignores the ALTPFM format setting and the
customer route is used. Altitude optimization calculations are
performed just as if JetPlan were computing a normal flight plan.
Long Range Cruise (LRC) data is used.

Primary case 2:
Great-circle
distance,
optimized altitude

If there is no stored route between the POA and the alternate, and
ALTPFM is set to 2, then the great-circle distance to the alternate is
used along with JetPlans normal altitude optimization calculations.
LRC data is used.

Standard case:
Great-circle or
user-specified
distance, altitude
selected from
table

If there is no stored route and ALTPFM is set to 0 or 1, then the greatcircle distance to the alternate airport is used. The optimum altitude is
not calculated, but rather selected based on altitude/distance tables
hard-coded into the aircraft performance data. LRC data is used for
aircraft speed and fuel flow information. This generally applies to
older output formats that do not enumerate the checkpoints and flight
levels of an alternate route.
If you do not want to use great-circle distance, you can control the
distance factor in the standard case through a user-specified distance
input.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Hold-Alternate Command Line

For example, assuming that no stored route exists from the POA to
KSCK, the following input uses a distance of 110 nm instead of the
great circle distance:
07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST KSCK/110

Secondary
Alternate Case

This method applies to secondary alternates, and only when the


output format is designed to include this information. When a
particular secondary alternate has a route from the POA stored in the
CALT Database, the distance determined by that route file is used to
make performance calculations, including an optimum profile
calculation. For computation purposes, the route to this secondary
alternate is considered to be a single segment.

Uplift Option (EU-OPS)


If flying under EU-OPS regulations, two destination alternates are required. The fuel uplift
option (ALTF=n), which addresses the destination alternate policy, calculates departure fuel
based on whichever alternate needs the greater amount of fuel (from POA to alternate). The
ALTF parameter has a valid range of 04. The range value always matches the number of
alternates entered (for example, two alternates = uplift value of 2).

NOTE Application of this and any option related to EU-OPS requires that a special
parameter in your ID/Password attribute file be set. Contact your Jeppesen account
manager for more information.

Alternate Flight Level Restriction


You may request a maximum altitude value (MAv) setting in the Customer Preferences
database to limit the flight level of the alternate route.

NOTE The Customer Preferences database is an extension of your ID/Attribute File.


It allows you to specify certain preference settings that are unique to your operational
requirements. For example, customer preference settings can be defined for flight
level restrictions, reserve fuel calculations, and format, among other factors. Contact
your Jeppesen account manager to discuss your options regarding the Customer
Preferences database.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Hold-Alternate Command Line

The maximum altitude value is used in the following formula to determine a maximum
alternate flight level.
MAv x route distance = maximum flight level
The maximum altitude value is a percentage figure that provides a certain altitude (in
thousands of feet) when multiplied by the route distance to the alternate.
To elaborate, if the maximum altitude value is set to 150 in the Customer Preferences
database, the maximum altitude for any alternate calculation is 150% of the distance to the
alternate.
For example, assume that for a given flight plan the distance to the alternate is 120 nautical
miles. Using a maximum altitude value of 150 produces a maximum flight level of 18,000
feet.
150 x 120nm = 18,000 or FL180

NOTE The Customer Preferences database setting does not override the limits set
for the aircraft in its generic data or in the CADB (FL parameter), nor does it override
user-specified flight levels entered on the Hold-Alternate command line.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Customer Alternate Database

Customer Alternate Database


The Customer Alternate (CALT) database allows you to store information for user-specified
destination alternate airports. You can define distances between POA airports and their
alternates or reference specific route records stored in the CRDB.
Once your CALT Database is developed, you do not need to do anything to invoke its use
other than include a POA airport and a destination alternate in your flight plan request. Upon
submission of your flight plan request, the JetPlan system automatically scans the CALT
Database for matching records. If your flight plan request contains a POA/alternate
combination that matches a record in the CALT Database, the stored data (distance value or
CRDB record) is applied to the calculation process.
This section reviews the type of records stored in the CALT and the methods available to
override these stored records. For information on managing the CALT, see Chapter 33,
Customer Alternate Database.

Distance Records
The CALT Database allows you to store a distance record for any POA/alternate combination.
JetPlan uses the stored distance value to calculate performance data (flight level, fuel burn) to
the alternate. This feature eliminates the need for repetitive inputs of alternate distances.

NOTE
on.

The following example omits extraneous inputs, such as POD, Route, and so

Example:
Explanation: Assuming a distance value is stored in the CALT Database for the airport
combination (KJFK - KEWR), JetPlan automatically applies the distance to its alternate fuel
calculation.
03 POA KJFK
07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST 30,KEWR

For more examples, see Table 7-1 on page 261.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Customer Alternate Database

Route Records
The CALT Database allows you to store a route record from the CRDB that defines the
routing between any two airports, specifically, a POA/alternate combination. JetPlan
automatically applies the stored route if the airport matches the POA/alternate combination in
the flight plan. The distance determined by the route file is used to calculate performance data
(flight level and fuel burn) to the alternate.

NOTE The display of a stored alternate route in the flight plan output is
format-dependent. Certain formats allow JetPlan to print out both an alternate route
summary and alternate waypoints. The route summary includes the airspeed and
altitude in an ICAO style output.

The following rules apply when using alternate route files:


To view alternate route data in the flight plan, the output format must be
programmed to display this information. Otherwise, application is internal
and not displayed fully.
Low-altitude performance data must be stored in the generic aircraft data
file, the basis for CADB records.
A route record from the POA airport to the alternate must exist in the
CRDB.
Each record name stored in the CRDB that is intended for use as an
alternate route must be added to the CALT Database. The route
record name in the CALT Database is the key to finding the actual
route string in the CRDB. Hence, for every route record name in the
CALT Database, there must be a matching record with the correct
airport pair combination in the route database.
JetPlan uses the standard case for determining the alternate burn calculation
if:
The POA/alternate airport combination in the flight plan has no
corresponding record in the CALT Database, or if it does, has no
corresponding record in the CRDB.
A performance error is generated during the calculation of the
alternate route.
An ad hoc alternate distance is entered after the alternate airport,
thereby nullifying the stored route.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Customer Alternate Database

Route Output
The following is an example of an output format that displays alternate route information. In
this case, a route from KLAX (POA) to KONT (alternate) is displayed. Alternate route output
is generally designed to display toward the end of a flight plan, right after the main body of the
plan and before any ATC filing information.

. ..flight plan body...


ALTERNATE DATA
-N0277F070 V23 SLI V8N PDZ DCT
CPT
HERMO
SLI
AHEIM
OLLIE
PDZ
KONT

LAT
N33516
N33468
N33492
N33504
N33552
N34036

LONG
W118 210
W118 030
W117 552
W117 486
W117 318
W117 360

MCS
134
094
056
064
057
313

DIST
0006
0016
0007
0006
0015
0009

...ATC filing inform ation...


END OF JEPPESEN DATAPLAN
REQUEST NO. 1234

CALT Database Overrides


You may override a CALT Database record (distance or route) in one of three ways:
Enter a slash after the alternate airport identifier. This nullifies the stored
record and forces JetPlan to determine the distance based on great circle
routing to the alternate.
Example:
30,KEWR/

Enter a slash and a new distance value after the alternate airport identifier.
This nullifies the stored record and force JetPlan to use the new distance
value.
Example:
30,KEWR/250

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Customer Alternate Database

Enter a slash and a CRDB record name after the alternate airport identifier.
This nullifies the stored record and force JetPlan to use the route defined in
the specified database file.
Example:
30,KEWR/A001

For more examples, see Table 7-1.

Hold-Alternate Command-Line Inputs


The following examples illustrate representative inputs on the Hold-Alternate command line
(07 HOLD,ALTERNATE/DIST).
Table 7-1

Hold-Alternate Command Line Sample Inputs

Sample Input

Explanation

30

30 minutes of hold time at the POA.

30,4500

30 minutes of hold time at the POA, at 4,500 feet


above field elevation. The default holding altitude is
1,500 feet above field elevation. This value may be
changed in the CADB.

45

45 minutes of hold time at the POA; also, assuming a


default value of 30 minutes in your ID/Password
attribute file, this example is an override of that
default value.

30,EGLL

30 minutes of hold time at the alternate, EGLL.

30,KSJC,POAH,25

30 minutes of hold time at the alternate, KSJC, plus 25


minutes of hold time at the original POA.
(POAH=Point of Arrival Hold.)

30,KSJC,POAH,25,3500

30 minutes of hold time at the alternate, KSJC, plus 25


minutes of hold time at the original POA at an altitude
of 3,500 feet above field elevation (1,500 feet is the
default altitude).

30,POAHF=1000

30 minutes of hold time at the POA plus additional


POA hold fuel (POAHF) (weight value). Assuming
pounds is in effect for this example, the additional fuel
value is 1000 lbs.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Customer Alternate Database

Table 7-1
Sample Input

Explanation

30,POAHF=1000,POAH=15

30 minutes of hold time at the POA plus 15 minutes of


hold time at the POA (POAH), plus additional POA
hold fuel (POAHF). Additional POA hold fuel can be
entered as both a time value (POAH) and a fuel value
(POAHF). In such cases, JetPlan adds the fuel and
time values.

30,KSEA,POAH=15,POAHF=1800

30 minutes of hold time at the alternate, KSEA, plus


15 minutes of hold time at the original POA, plus
1800 pounds of hold fuel at the original POA. JetPlan
adds the POA fuel and time values.

KABQ

Alternate airport with no hold time. If the


ID/Password attribute file has a default hold time of
something other than zero, then this example would
also override the default hold time value.

30,EGLL/120

30 minutes of hold time at the alternate, EGLL;


distance from POA to EGLL is a user-specified value
of 120 nm.

30,EGLL,EGKK,EGCC,EGPK

30 minutes of hold time at the primary alternate,


EGLL; secondary alternates are defined as EGKK,
EGCC, and EGPK.

KAUS/100,KELP/200,KDAL/333,KDEN/1111

One primary alternate, KAUS, and three secondary


alternates; the distance from the POA to each alternate
is a user-specified value in nautical miles.

30,RCTP/A001

30 minutes of hold time at the primary alternate,


RCTP; use the route database file, A001, to provide
the route and performance information to the
alternate. This input overrides any information stored
in the CALT Database for the given airport pair, as
long as the airport pair in A001 matches the pair in the
flight plan (the POA and alternate).

KSFO/RT01/100/200

Use the CRDB record RT01, and fly between 10000ft


(FL100) and FL200 inclusive. The RT01 record
provides the route and performance information to the
alternate, overriding any information stored in the
CALT Database for the given airport pair (the POA
and alternate). Note the slashes around the minimum
and maximum flight levels after the route record
entry.

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Hold-Alternate Command Line Sample Inputs (continued)

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Customer Alternate Database

Table 7-1

Hold-Alternate Command Line Sample Inputs (continued)

Sample Input

Explanation

KSFO/50/180/240

Primary alternate airport (KSFO) with no hold time;


the distance from POA to KSFO is a user-specified
value of 50 nautical miles (or 50 am), and the flight
level is between FL180 and FL240 inclusive. Note the
slashes around the minimum and maximum flight
levels after the distance entry.

KSFO/50/200/200

Primary alternate airport (KSFO) with no hold time;


the distance from POA to KSFO is a user-specified
value of 50 nautical miles (or 50 km), and a single
flight level of FL200 is specified. You must specify
the minimum and maximum flight level whenever you
apply an altitude override, even for a single flight
level.

KSFO//200/200

Primary alternate airport with no hold time and no


user-specified distance and with a user-specified
altitude of FL200.

KSFO//060/120

Use the default distance value, which is the distance


value specified in the CALT Database. If there is no
distance value in the CALT Database, use the great
circle distance. Fly between 6000ft and 12000ft
inclusive.

KSFO//060/120/

Use the great circle distance, even if there is a distance


value in the CALT Database, and fly between 6000ft
and 12000ft inclusive. Note the trailing slash after
120.

30,EDDM,EDDF,ALTF=2

30 minutes of hold time at the primary alternate,


EDDM. The secondary alternate is defined as EDDF.
Alternate fuel (ALTF) is determined by an uplift
policy of 2, meaning fuel calculations for both
alternates are evaluated to determine the greater
amount, which is then applied to the departure fuel
total (EU-OPS requirement).

EXEMPT

Some customers may need to state on a flight release


that a special exemption has allowed them not to
specify a destination alternate. The information to be
displayed on the release is format-specific and may
vary by operator. If not legally required, it may be
operationally required to avoid confusion by flight
crew when no alternate is specified.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Automatic Alternate Selection

Automatic Alternate Selection


In addition to the CALT Database, where alternate distance or route information is stored for
retrieval and application when the correct POA/ALT combination is submitted in your flight
plan request, JetPlan can also automatically select alternates based on other preset preferences
and conditions. In this case, no alternate airport needs to be submitted in the flight plan
request.

NOTE If you specify an alternate airport in your flight plan request, the Automatic
Alternate functionality is deactivated for that type of alternate airport.

Automatic selection may be used with destination, departure, and enroute alternates. The
criteria that JetPlan uses to select an alternate automatically is defined by you in your
Customer Airport Fleet Database (CAPFDB) and CAPDB. In these databases, you can set
parameters that help the system to determine a candidate alternate airports availability and
suitability. (For information on setting up the CAPFDB and the CAPDB for automatic
alternate selection, see Setting Up the Customer Databases on page 274.)
Availability refers to factors that make an airport appropriate for the aircraft type being used,
such as runway length, refueling facilities, passenger exchange, and so on. These factors must
be determined by you for the aircraft in question because simply including them in your
databases defines the airports as available.
Suitability refers to factors that limit airport operation, such as weather minima and hours of
operation. These factors are determined in a more dynamic fashion, though you are required to
provide guidelines that assist in the determination process.

NOTE The CALT Database also comes into play when an automatically selected
alternate creates a situation where the POA/ALT combination matches a record in the
CALT Database. In this case, the stored route or distance information found in the
CALT Database is applied to the flight plan calculation.

The following sections describe the automatic alternate selection feature in more detail.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Automatic Alternate Selection

Automatic Selection Criteria and Tests


Although the automatic selection criteria differs somewhat between takeoff, destination, and
enroute alternates, automatic selection is generally a function of the following considerations:
The estimated time of operation (arrival) into the candidate alternate airport.
This time estimate is part of the calculation process, and it is used to secure
an accurate weather forecast as well for comparison to the candidate
airports hours of operation. It also supports ETOPS calculations, where
adjustable earliest/latest arrival time deltas (variations) factor into the divert
calculation.
The candidate alternate airports hours of operation, as defined by the
following parameters in the CAPDB:
Hours Operation - Open
Hours Operation - Close
Week Days
UTC/Local Flag
For more information on these parameters, see Table 7-5, CAPDB
Alternate Airport Application, on page 281.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Automatic Alternate Selection

The candidate alternate airports terminal weather forecast (TAF). This


forecast is compared to the candidates minimum ceiling and visibility
settings stored in the CAPFDB or CAPDB in the following parameters:
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Visibility Minimum
These parameters are in both the CAPFDB and the CAPDB. JetPlan first
checks the CAPFDB for the Non-Precision Approach Alternate
Ceiling/Visibility minimum values. If the values in the CAPFDB are zero,
JetPlan checks the CAPDB.
If you use the optional Precision Minima (PMIN) flight plan option, the
system uses the Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling and Visibility
Minimum values in the CAPFDB or the CAPDB, rather than the NonPrecision Approach values, to check suitability of alternate airports.
NOTE A customer preference setting allows you to change the database (CAPFDB
or CAPDB) used as the default source of the Alternate Ceiling Minimum and Alternate
Visibility Minimum values. Contact your Jeppesen Account Representative for
information.

For more information on all the ceiling/visibility minima parameters, see


Table 7-4, CAPFDB Alternate Airport Application, on page 277 and
Table 7-5, CAPDB Alternate Airport Application, on page 281.
The candidate alternate airports proximity to the departure or arrival
airport.
Airline preference and operating practices. This consideration supports
airline specified combinations of acceptable divert airports along with the
allowable aircraft fleet types.

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Criteria Tests at Compute Time


Airports that are considered candidates as alternates must pass criteria tests at plan compute
time. Failure to meet one of the three basic criteria listed below eliminates the airport as an
alternate candidate.
Weather information for the airport (TAF). Failure occurs when TAF for a
candidate alternate is unavailable or incomplete.
NOTE The TAF Time Window customer preference extends the effectivity of TAFs.
For information, see About the TAF Time Window (TAFWINDW) Customer
Preference on page 267.

Airport operational hours. Failure occurs when the flights estimated time of
arrival into the candidates alternate airport is outside the facilitys
scheduled hours of operation.
Weather minima (ceiling and visibility). Failure occurs when the reported
minima are below the prescribed minima in the candidate alternates
CAPDB record.
NOTE JetPlan can provide a briefing of the alternates reviewed at the end of the
flight plan output. The briefing includes those alternates selected as well as those
eliminated due to some criteria failure. This briefing feature is format dependant.
Contact your Jeppesen account manager for more information.

About the TAF Time Window (TAFWINDW) Customer


Preference
NOTE For information about setting the TAF Time Window customer preference,
contact your Jeppesen account manager.

The optional TAF Time Window customer preference defines a time windowbefore or after
the effectivity of a given TAFduring which the TAF is applied to the automatic alternate
selection process, thus extending the effectivity of the TAF by the specified number of
minutes. The window value can be defined as anything from zero minutes to 720 minutes (12
hours). A value of zero provides for strict enforcement of TAF effective times.
When the TAF Time Window preference is set, the system applies the following functionality
during the automatic alternate selection process:

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An approximate time to arrive at the alternate is calculated, based on the


planned time to arrive at the POA and then a call to the alternate
performance calculation with the estimated arrival weight.
The value of the TAF Time Window (TAFWINDW) customer preference is
used to establish start and end times (estimated arrival time - TAFWINDW
value) and (estimated arrival time + TAFWINDW value).
TAF is checked all the way from the start time to the end time. If ceiling or
visibility fall below minimum anywhere in that time range, the airport is
eliminated from consideration.

Alternate Selection Process


As discussed above, the Automatic Alternate selection process requires the setup of specific
database parameters and the deliberate omission of an alternate airport entry in your flight plan
request. When you specify an alternate airport in your flight plan request, the Automatic
Alternate functionality is deactivated for that type of alternate airport. For example, if you
include a destination alternate in your flight plan request, the system does not apply the
automatic selection process to destination alternates. However, departure alternates could still
be automatically selected, given the proper database setup and plan scenario. (For information
on setting up the customer databases for automatic alternate selection, see Setting Up the
Customer Databases on page 274.)
The following sections describe the automatic alternate selection process for each type of
alternate.

NOTE In all cases mentioned below, the use of a record from the CAPFDB implies a
match in aircraft fleet type between the record and the flight plan request.

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Departure (Takeoff) Alternates


If the POD has a preferred Takeoff Alternate Airport (TA) identified in its CAPFDB record
(for example, TA=KXXX), the process explained below is applied to the preferred takeoff
alternate. However, if the preferred airport does not meet the operational requirements based
on the hours of operation or weather minima, then the proximity search of possible departure
alternates begins.
Possible departure alternates come from a pool of airports stored in the CAPFDB. These
airports are identified as available for use as takeoff alternates by the following parameter
settings:
Departure Alternate (DA)=Yes
Type of Operations (TO)=Regular, Alternate, Refueling, or Provisional
From this candidate pool, JetPlan can perform a preliminary ranking of candidate departure
alternates based on proximity to the POD. This is performed using the departure airports
record in the CAPFDB, where the Max Distance to Takeoff Alternate (MA) parameter is
defined (for example, MA=50).
JetPlan filters out all candidate departure alternate airports that do not meet the operational
requirement established in the plan calculation. If a candidates hours of operation parameters
in the CAPDB do not support the possible divert time calculated in the flight plan, the
candidate is eliminated.
Then, JetPlan filters out those candidate departure alternates whose forecast weather is not
available or is below the minima established by the candidates ceiling and visibility minimum
values in the CAPFDB or the CAPDB. Using the remaining airports (those that survive the
criteria tests), JetPlan determines which airport provides the best results relative to the
optimization process.
See Automatic Selection Criteria and Tests on page 265 for more information about the
hours of operations and minimum ceiling/visibility parameters and the criteria tests.

Destination Alternates
Selection of a destination alternate is primarily based on airline preference. JetPlan checks the
POA record in the CAPFDB for Preferred Destination Alternate Airports (A1-A8). For each
preferred destination alternate, the system examines the criteria of the TAF, operating hours in
the CAPDB, and ceiling/visibility minima in the CAPFDB or the CAPDB. From the list of
preferred airports that meet the criteria, JetPlan selects the airport that provides the best results
relative to the optimization process.

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If the POA does not have any preferred alternates stored in the CAPFDB, or if all the defined
preferred airports fail the criteria tests, JetPlan performs a proximity search based on the Max
Distance to Destination Alternate (MD) parameter in the CAPFDB. The proximity search is
for those airports identified as being available destination alternates by the following
parameters in the CAPFDB:
Arrival Alternate (AA)=Yes
Type of Operations (TO)=Regular, Alternate, Refueling, or Provisional
The system then selects the alternate that meets the operating hours, weather forecast, and
ceiling/visibility minima criteria and that delivers the best numbers in terms of optimization.
See Automatic Selection Criteria and Tests on page 265 for more information about the
hours of operations and minimum ceiling/visibility parameters and the criteria tests.

ETOPS/Overwater Driftdown Enroute Alternates (Diversion


Airports)
NOTE ETOPS and Overwater Driftdown flight plan calculations requires extensive
setup, beyond the scope of this section. For complete information on Overwater
Driftdown setup, see Chapter 22, Overwater Driftdown and Terrain Analysis. For
complete information on ETOPS, see the ETOPS Users Guide: 2 Engine Aircraft on
the User Manuals page on JetPlan.com. For information on the Equal Time Point
(ETP) calculation, see Chapter 3, Point of Departure and Point of Arrival
Commands.

When creating an ETOPS or Overwater Driftdown flight plan, you can enter the diversion
airports manually on the POD and POA command lines. However, they may also be
automatically selected from a pool of airports stored in the CAPFDB and identified as
available for use in the automatic selection process by the Enroute Alternate in
ETOPS/Overwater Driftdown Operations parameter in the CAPFDB (ET=Yes).
Taking into account additional Overwater Driftdown, ETP, and/or ETOPS parameters
(depending on the type of flight plan), JetPlan can select airports from the pool of candidate
alternates and perform equal time point (ETP) calculations to determine appropriate enroute
alternates. JetPlan filters out potential enroute alternate airports that do not meet the
requirements for hours of operation or weather minimums. See Automatic Selection Criteria
and Tests on page 265 for more information.

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EU-OPS Enroute Alternates


You can enter an EU-OPS enroute alternate (ERA) manually on line 16. The ERA input is
compliant with EU-OPS 1.255, which allows operators to reduce contingency fuel from 5
percent to 3 percent if they have a qualified enroute alternate. (For more information on the
manual ERA input, see Chapter 14, Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel Commands.)
JetPlan can also select ERAs automatically from a pool of airports identified in the CAPFDB
as available ERAs (EU=Y). A candidate ERA must pass the operating hours, TAF, and
weather/ceiling minima criteria tests. If the candidate also meets route distance and qualifying
circle requirements as specified in EU-OPS 1.255, the system qualifies the selected ERA as
meeting European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) regulations and automatically reduces the
contingency fuel for the entire flight to 3 percent.
For more information on EU-OPS 1.255, see the Chapter 20, Reclear Commands.

Prerequisites
Before you can use this feature, the Automatic ERA customer preference must be set to Yes
and the EU (JAR)-OPS, International Reserve Fuel Policy, and Special Fuel attributes must be
set in your ID/Attribute file, in addition to other customer preference and format settings. For
complete information, contact your Jeppesen account manager.

NOTE You can override any International Reserve Fuel Policy setting in your
ID/Attribute file by entering the appropriate policy code in the flight plan request (on
line 16) or through the City Pair Fleet DB IR parameter. Successful ERA autoselection depends on a correct fuel policy entry. For information on International
Reserve Policies, see Chapter 14, Payload, POD/POA, Weight, and Fuel
Commands.

The following customer database settings are also required:


The CAPDB and the CAPFDB must each contain a record for any airport
you want considered as an EU-OPS ERA.
In the CAPFDB, the EU-OPS Enroute Alternate (EU) parameter must be set
to Yes for any airport you want considered as an EU-OPS ERA.
For more information on customer database setup, see Setting Up the Customer Databases
on page 274.

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The Automatic EU-OPS ERA Process


When the Automatic ERA customer preference is set to Yes, JetPlan performs an automatic
search for an EU-OPS ERA in matching flight plans. JetPlan filters out potential airports that
do not meet the requirements of EU-OPS 1.255 or pass the TAF, operating hours, and weather
minima criteria (see Criteria Tests at Compute Time on page 267). Using the remaining
airports, JetPlan determines which ERA provides the optimum results.
When using the Automatic EU-OPS ERA feature, be aware of the following:
If the Automatic ERA customer preference is present and set to Yes,
entering an ERA airport manually on the flight plan request switches off the
automatic ERA selection process.
You can use the No Automatic Enroute Alternate (NOERA) flight plan
option to disable the automatic ERA search on a per-flight plan basis. For
more information on the NOERA option, see See Chapter 2, Option
Commands.

EU-OPS Qualification Output


When JetPlan identifies a qualified EU-OPS ERA, it automatically reduces the contingency
fuel to 3 percent. The following paragraphs illustrate this process.
Assume that the CAPFDB record for the Pulkovo airport (ULLI) is set up as follows:
The Non-Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum parameter (N3) is
set to 1200 feet.
The Non-Precision Approach Alternate Visibility Minimum parameter (N4)
is set to 1000 meters.
NOTE For more information on the approach parameters in the CAPDB and
CAPFDB and how they are used in automatic alternate selection, see Setting Up the
Customer Databases on page 274.

For purposes of illustration, assume the TAF check for ULLI is as follows:

TAF ULLI 031340Z 0315/0415 16005G10MPS 3000 SN BR BKN006


OVC010 TEMPO 0315/0324 0800 +SNRA FZRA BKN003 640000
BECMG 0400/0402 22005G10MPS TEMPO 0400/0415 1600 SHSN
BKN006 BKN010CB=

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In this example, the EU-OPS Qualification output indicates that the automatic selection
process did not discover a qualifying ERA. Because no ERA was found, contingency fuel
remains at 5 percent, as shown in the Fuel Plan section in the following graphic.
EU OPS QUALIFICATION
ERA NO ALTERNATES FOUND
Fuel plan:
CONT

FUEL TIME
00350 00.06

However, if the Ceiling and Visibility Minimum values for ULLI are set to 200 feet and 600
meters respectively, ULLI passes the ceiling/visibility minima check. If it also passes the other
criteria for an ERA, including the EU-OPS 1.255 requirements, ULLI qualifies as an ERA
when the plan is recomputed. As the following output shows, contingency fuel is also reduced
to 3 percent.
EU OPS QUALIFICATION
ERA
ULLI

DIVERT PT CUMD MSA


N6048.4 0488 022
E02916.8
Fuel plan:
FUEL TIME
CONT 00210 00.03

TTK
154

DIST
0067

FL TIME
220 0.10

ETA
1816

NOTE The system respects the value of the Min. Contingency/RES Fuel (MC) and
the Min. Contingency/RES Time (MT) parameters in the CADB, even when an airport
qualifies for reduced 3 percent.

Automatic Alternate Setup


Use of the Automatic Alternate feature requires that customer database records be created for
the candidate alternate airports. The following list summarizes what is needed.
POD Requires a record in the CAPFDB for every departure airport that
you want considered as a takeoff alternate.
POA Requires a record in the CAPFDB for every arrival airport that you
want considered as a destination alternate.
Candidate takeoff alternate Requires a record in both the CAPFDB and the
CAPDB for every airport you want considered as a takeoff alternate.

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Candidate destination alternate Requires a record in both the CAPFDB


and the CAPDB for every airport you want considered as a destination
alternate.
Candidate ETOPS/Overwater Driftdown enroute alternate Requires a
record in both the CAPFDB and the CAPDB for every airport you want
considered as an enroute alternate.
Candidate EU-OPS ERA Requires a record in both the CAPFDB and the
CAPDB for every airport you want considered as a an ERA.
NOTE An airport may be defined as a candidate for more than one alternate
scenario in the CAPFDB.

Setting Up the Customer Databases


The two main databases required for application of the Automatic Alternate selection
functionality are the CAPFDB and the CAPDB.

Customer Airport Fleet Database


The CAPFDB contains parameters that allow you to control the alternate information and
operating procedures for specific sets of aircraft when non-standard or emergency situations
(diverts) occur. Stored records are referenced by both the airport and the fleet type
(airframe/engine combination) in your flight plan request. For more information, see
Chapter 30, Airport Fleet Database.
As noted previously, records must be created in this database to support the Automatic
Alternate selection process. This includes records for airports used as departure airports and
arrival airports, as well as those airports you wish to include as possible alternates. The
following tables explain the necessary relationships to this database for each type of airport
application.

NOTE Because the CAPFDB is indexed by airport and fleet type, your flight plan
request must contain a POD (or POA) and aircraft that match a record in the
database for this application to work properly. Furthermore, only those airports
denoted as candidate alternates, with the correct aircraft fleet type, are considered in
the selection process.

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Departure Airport (POD)


Any airport used as a POD must be stored in the CAPFDB if you want to apply the automatic
takeoff alternate selection process. If you have more than one type of aircraft in your fleet,
then multiple records may be required for a particular airport.
Table 7-2

CAPFDB POD Application

Parameter

Application/Reason

Airport ID

(Required). The ICAO or IATA identifier of the


airport being stored. This entry is one of the two keys
that initiate the use of the CAPFDB. Ex. KLAX or
LAX

Fleet Type ID

(Required). Typically the Jeppesen identifier of the


aircraft fleet type. This entry is the other key that
initiates the use of the CAPFDB. Ex. B747

Takeoff Alternate (TA)

(Optional). You can specify a takeoff alternate airfield


as the preferred alternate for a specific POD. When
the Automatic Alternate selection process begins, this
is the first airport checked for suitability. If the criteria
check fails (TAF is incomplete or missing, ETA is
outside airport operating hours, or weather is below
minimums), a proximity check is performed for
possible alternates by using the Maximum Allowable
Distance to Takeoff Alternate (MA) parameter.

Maximum Allowable Distance to Takeoff Alternate


(MA)

(Optional). You can specify a distance limit to the


proximity search for a takeoff alternate airfield (up to
4 digits, in NM or Km). This parameter is considered
only when the Takeoff Alternate (TA) parameter is
left blank or when the TA airport is disqualified due to
weather or curfew. The Automatic Alternate selection
process tests candidate airports within the distance
specified.
NOTE This proximity limit does not typically apply to
your TA parameter input. However, if you invoke the
Terrain Driftdown Approved parameter (TD=Y), the
proximity limit applies to the TA input.

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Arrival Airport (POA)


Any airport used as a POA must be stored in the CAPFDB if you want to apply the automatic
destination alternate selection process. If you have more than one type of aircraft in your fleet,
then multiple records may be required for a particular airport.
Table 7-3

CAPFDB POA Application

Parameter

Application/Reason

Airport ID

(Required). The ICAO or IATA identifier of the


airport being stored. This entry is one of the two keys
that initiate the use of the CAPFDB. Ex. KLAX or
LAX

Fleet Type ID

(Required). Typically the Jeppesen identifier of the


aircraft fleet type. This entry is the other key that
initiates the use of the CAPFDB. Ex. B747

Maximum Allowable Distance to Destination


Alternate (MD)

(Optional). You can specify a distance limit to the


proximity search for a destination alternate airfield
(up to 4 digits, in NM or Km). This parameter is
considered only when parameters A1 through A8 are
left blank or when these airports are disqualified due
to weather or curfew (unlikely if all 8 are employed in
the database). The Automatic Alternate selection
functionality tests candidate airports within the
distance specified.
NOTE This proximity limit does not apply to your
preferred destination alternate entries (parameters A1 A8). However, if you invoke the Terrain Driftdown
Approved parameter (TD=Y), the proximity limit applies
to the destination alternate entries.

Preferred Alternate Airports (A1...A8)

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(Optional). You can specify up to 8 preferred


destination alternate airfields for a specific POA. The
order of preference is numeric, with A1 being the first
preference and A8 being the last. When the Automatic
Alternate selection process begins, these airports are
the first checked for suitability. The entire list must be
exhausted before a proximity search for alternates is
begun. If the criteria check eliminates all of the
preferred alternates, a proximity check is performed
for possible alternates by using the MD parameter.

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Alternate Airport (ALT)


Any airport you wish to have considered as a candidate alternate in the Automatic Alternate
selection process must be stored in the CAPFDB. If you have more than one type of aircraft in
your fleet, then multiple records may be required for these airports.
Table 7-4 CAPFDB Alternate Airport Application
Parameter

Application/Reason

Airport ID

(Required). The ICAO or IATA identifier of the


airport being stored. This entry is one of the two keys
that initiate the use of the CAPFDB. Ex. KLAX or
LAX

Fleet Type ID

(Required). Typically the Jeppesen identifier of the


aircraft fleet type. This entry is the other key that
initiates the use of the CAPFDB. Ex. B747

Departure Alternate (DA)

(Optional). By invoking this parameter (DA=Y) you


designate the airport as a suitable takeoff alternate
for the aircraft fleet type identified. Thus, when
departing another airport with an aircraft of the fleet
type identified in this record, the Automatic Alternate
selection process considers this airport as a possible
takeoff alternate. Of course, this airport must be
available based on the criteria mentioned
previously.
NOTE Any airport designated as a departure
alternate may be eliminated from consideration for a
variety of reasons, most notably when the POD has a
preferred takeoff alternate assigned (TA parameter for
the POD airport), or when the POD has a maximum
allowable distance parameter (MA) that is less than the
distance between the POD and this departure alternate
airport.

Arrival Alternate (AA)

(Optional). By invoking this parameter (AA=Y) you


designate the airport as a suitable destination
alternate for the aircraft fleet type identified. Thus,
when arriving at another airport with an aircraft of the
fleet type identified in this record, the Automatic
Alternate selection process considers this airport as a
possible alternate. Of course, this airport must be
available based on the criteria mentioned
previously.
NOTE Any airport designated as a arrival alternate
may be eliminated from consideration for a variety of
reasons, most notably when the POA has some
preferred alternates assigned (parameters A1-A8 for
the POA airport), or when the POA has a maximum
allowable distance parameter (MA) that is less than the
distance between the POA and this destination
alternate airport.

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Table 7-4

CAPFDB Alternate Airport Application (continued)

Parameter

Application/Reason

Enroute Alternate in ETOPS/Overwater Driftdown


Operations

(Optional). This parameter activates the key airport as


a possible enroute alternate in the automatic alternate
selection process when either the ETOPS or the Basic
(Overwater) Driftdown feature is employed in the
flight plan.

ET

EU-OPS Enroute Alternate


(EU/JAR Operations Alternate)
EU
ETOPS Approach
ETOPS Ceiling Minimum
ECM

(Optional). Defines the key airport as available for


use as an enroute alternate for automatic enroute
alternate selection. Applies to EU(JAR)-OPS only.

NOTE This parameter is used only with ETOPS 2


flight plan options. Contact your Jeppesen account
manager for more information.

(Optional). This parameter defines the ceiling


minimum for the airport in feet or meters. It is used to
determine if an ETOPS alternate is suitable based on
the TAF weather between the Early Arrival Time and
later arrival time.
This parameter works in conjunction with the ETOPS
Ceiling Minimum parameter in the CAPDB. If there
is not a minimum value in the CAPFDB, JetPlan
checks for the minimum in the CAPDB. If there is no
minimum value in the CAPDB, JetPlan uses zero
ceiling.

ETOPS Approach
ETOPS Visibility Minimum
EVM

NOTE This parameter is used only with ETOPS 2


flight plan options. Contact your Jeppesen account
manager for more information.

(Optional). This parameter defines the visibility


minimum for the airport in feet or meters. This
parameter is used to determine if an ETOPS alternate
is suitable based on the TAF weather between the
Early Arrival Time and later arrival time.
This parameter works in conjunction with the ETOPS
Visibility Minimum parameter in the CAPDB. If there
is not a minimum value in the CAPFDB, JetPlan
checks for the minimum in the CAPDB. If there is no
minimum value in the CAPDB, JetPlan uses zero
visibility.

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Table 7-4

CAPFDB Alternate Airport Application (continued)

Parameter

Application/Reason

Non-Precision Approach

NOTE The Precision Minima (PMIN) flight plan option


uses the Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling and
Visibility Minimum values to check suitability of
alternate airports. See definitions of those parameters
below.

Alternate Ceiling Minimum


N3

Defines the ceiling minimum for the airport in feet or


meters. This parameter is a weather criteria check in
the automatic alternate selection process. When
JetPlan checks the suitability of an airport as an
alternate (departure, enroute, or arrival alternate) it
may perform a TAF check on that airport. That is, it
compares the TAF forecast with the landing minima
values for the candidate alternate airport.
By default, JetPlan first checks the CAPFDB for the
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum
value. If the value in the CAPFDB is zero, JetPlan
gets the value from the CAPDB.
NOTE A customer preference setting allows you to
change the database used as the default source of the
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum
and Non-Precision Approach Alternate Visibility
Minimum values. Contact your Jeppesen Account
Representative for information.

Non-Precision Approach
Alternate Visibility Minimum
N4

NOTE The Precision Minima (PMIN) flight plan option


uses the Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling and
Visibility Minimum values to check suitability of
alternate airports. See definitions of those parameters
below.

Defines the visibility minimum for the airport in feet


or meters. This parameter is a weather criteria check
in the automatic alternate selection process. When
JetPlan checks the suitability of an airport as an
alternate (departure, enroute, or arrival alternate) it
may perform a TAF check on that airport. That is, it
compares the TAF forecast with the landing minima
values for the candidate alternate airport.
By default, JetPlan first checks the CAPFDB for the
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Visibility
Minimum value. If the value in the CAPFDB is zero,
JetPlan gets the value from the CAPDB.
NOTE A customer preference setting allows you to
change the database used as the default source of the
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum
and Non-Precision Approach Alternate Visibility
Minimum values. Contact your Jeppesen Account
Representative for information.

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Table 7-4

CAPFDB Alternate Airport Application (continued)

Parameter

Application/Reason

Precision Approach

Defines the ceiling minimum for the airport in feet or


meters.

Alternate Ceiling Minimum


P3

When the PMIN flight plan option is used, JetPlan


uses the Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling
Minimum and the Precision Approach Alternate
Visibility Minimum values to check the suitability of
alternate airports. (When the PMIN option is not used,
JetPlan uses the more conservative Non-Precision
Approach Alternate Ceiling and Visibility Minimum
values to check suitability of alternates.)
By default, JetPlan first checks the CAPFDB for the
Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum
value. If the value in the CAPFDB is zero, JetPlan
gets the value from the CAPDB.
NOTE A customer preference setting allows you to
change the database used as the default source of the
Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum and
Precision Approach Alternate Visibility Minimum
values. Contact your Jeppesen Account
Representative for information.

Precision Approach
Alternate Visibility Minimum
P4

Defines the visibility minimum for the airport in feet


or meters.
When the PMIN flight plan option is used, JetPlan
uses the Precision Approach Alternate Visibility
Minimum and the Precision Approach Alternate
Ceiling Minimum values to check the suitability of
alternate airports. (When the PMIN option is not used,
JetPlan uses the more conservative Non-Precision
Approach Alternate Ceiling and Visibility Minimum
values to check suitability of alternates.)
By default, JetPlan first checks the CAPFDB for the
Precision Approach Alternate Visibility Minimum
value. If the value in the CAPFDB is zero, JetPlan
gets the value from the CAPDB.
NOTE A customer preference setting allows you to
change the database used as the default source of the
Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum and
Precision Approach Alternate Visibility Minimum
values. Contact your Jeppesen Account
Representative for information.

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NOTE Even though each airport application (POD, POA, and ALT) is addressed
separately, and as if unique, a record for a particular airport could address all three
applications in the CAPFDB. In other words, you can create a record for a particular
airport/AC fleet type that sets all of the parameters necessary to make the airport
applicable in all situations of the automatic alternate selection process (as a POD, as
a POA, and as a candidate alternate).

Customer Airport Database


Along with numerous other parameters for other purposes, the Customer Airport Database
(CAPDB) contains parameters that allow you to control the factors that determine the
suitability of an airport in the Automatic Alternate selection process. Specifically, the CAPDB
is where you define the weather minima and operating hours criteria for individual airports.
For more information about all of the available parameter settings, see Chapter 29, Customer
Airport Database.
Any airport to be considered as a possible alternate in the Automatic Alternate selection
process must have a record in this database. The following table defines the parameters needed
to support the Automatic Alternate application.

NOTE The CAPDB may be used for several applications, not the least of which is
the Automatic Alternate selection process; and an airport record may include
information that applies to the facility as a POD, a POA, or alternate. However, the
information presented in the table below specifically applies to the Automatic
Alternate selection process.

Table 7-5

CAPDB Alternate Airport Application

Parameter

Application/Reason

Airport ID

(Required). The ICAO or IATA identifier of the


airport being stored. This entry is the key that initiates
the use of the CAPDB. Ex. KLAX

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Table 7-5 CAPDB Alternate Airport Application (continued)


Parameter

Application/Reason

Non-Precision Approach

NOTE The Precision Minima (PMIN) flight plan option


uses the Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling and
Visibility Minimum values to check suitability of
alternate airports. See definitions of those parameters
below.

Alternate Ceiling Minimum


N3

Defines the ceiling minimum for the airport in feet or


meters. This parameter is a weather criteria check in
the automatic alternate selection process. When
JetPlan checks the suitability of an airport as an
alternate (departure, enroute, or arrival alternate) it
may perform a TAF check on that airport. That is, it
compares the TAF forecast with the landing minima
values for the candidate alternate airport.
By default, JetPlan first checks the CAPFDB for the
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum
value. If the value in the CAPFDB is zero, JetPlan
gets the value from the CAPDB.
NOTE A customer preference setting allows you to
change the database used as the default source of the
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum
and Non-Precision Approach Alternate Visibility
Minimum values. Contact your Jeppesen Account
Representative for information.

Non-Precision Approach
Alternate Visibility Minimum
N4

NOTE The Precision Minima (PMIN) flight plan option


uses the Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling and
Visibility Minimum values to check suitability of
alternate airports. See definitions of those parameters
below.

Defines the visibility minimum for the airport in feet


or meters. This parameter is a weather criteria check
in the automatic alternate selection process. When
JetPlan checks the suitability of an airport as an
alternate (departure, enroute, or arrival alternate) it
may perform a TAF check on that airport. That is, it
compares the TAF forecast with the landing minima
values for the candidate alternate airport.
By default, JetPlan first checks the CAPFDB for the
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Visibility
Minimum value. If the value in the CAPFDB is zero,
JetPlan gets the value from the CAPDB.
NOTE A customer preference setting allows you to
change the database used as the default source of the
Non-Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum
and Non-Precision Approach Alternate Visibility
Minimum values. Contact your Jeppesen Account
Representative for information.

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Hold-Alternate Commands
Automatic Alternate Selection

Table 7-5 CAPDB Alternate Airport Application (continued)


Parameter

Application/Reason

Precision Approach

Defines the ceiling minimum for the airport in feet or


meters.

Alternate Ceiling Minimum


P3

When the PMIN flight plan option is used, JetPlan


uses the Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling
Minimum and the Precision Approach Alternate
Visibility Minimum values to check the suitability of
alternate airports. (When the PMIN option is not used,
JetPlan uses the more conservative Non-Precision
Approach Alternate Ceiling and Visibility Minimum
values to check suitability of alternates.)
By default, JetPlan first checks the CAPFDB for the
Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum
value. If the value in the CAPFDB is zero, JetPlan
gets the value from the CAPDB.
NOTE A customer preference setting allows you to
change the database used as the default source of the
Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum and
Precision Approach Alternate Visibility Minimum
values. Contact your Jeppesen Account
Representative for information.

Precision Approach
Alternate Visibility Minimum
P4

Defines the visibility minimum for the airport in feet


or meters.
When the PMIN flight plan option is used, JetPlan
uses the Precision Approach Alternate Visibility
Minimum and the Precision Approach Alternate
Ceiling Minimum values to check the suitability of
alternate airports. (When the PMIN option is not used,
JetPlan uses the more conservative Non-Precision
Approach Alternate Ceiling and Visibility Minimum
values to check suitability of alternates.)
By default, JetPlan first checks the CAPFDB for the
Precision Approach Alternate Visibility Minimum
value. If the value in the CAPFDB is zero, JetPlan
gets the value from the CAPDB.
NOTE A customer preference setting allows you to
change the database used as the default source of the
Precision Approach Alternate Ceiling Minimum and
Precision Approach Alternate Visibility Minimum
values. Contact your Jeppesen Account
Representative for information.

Opening Hour of Operation (O1)

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(Optional). The O1 parameter allows you to define the


hour at which the airport opens (for example,
O1=0600). If no input is entered, 0000Z is assumed
by default.

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Table 7-5 CAPDB Alternate Airport Application (continued)


Parameter

Application/Reason

Closing Hour of Operation (C1)

(Optional). The C1 parameter allows you to define the


hour at which the airport closes (for example,
C1=1800). If no input is entered, 2400Z is assumed by
default.

Days of Week Open (W1)

(Optional). The W1 parameter allows you to define


the days of the week the airport operates using the
hours defined by the O1 and C1 parameters (for
example, W1=23456). The default setting is 1234567,
or all seven days.
NOTE Monday is considered the start of the
operational week. Hence, 1=M, 2=T, 3=W, etc.

UTC/Local Flag (T1)

(Optional). This parameter allows you to designate the


airports hours of operation as coordinated universal
time (UTC) or local time. The default setting is UTC.

Other Parameters (O2..O4, C2..C4, W2..W4, T2..T4)

(Optional). These parameters allow you to define the


airports hours/days of operation if multiple settings
are necessary. For example, an airport may have
different operating hours on different days, or may
have midday closings.

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C HAPTER 8

Estimated Time of
Departure Commands

Estimated Time of Departure Commands


ETD Command Line

ETD Command Line


The ETD command line is used for entering a flights Estimated Time of Departure (ETD),
which is a mandatory input.
The ETD input affects the performance calculation immensely. The ETD input directly
correlates to the forecast wind and temperature data that is applied in the computation of the
flight plan. For this reason, a large portion of this chapter is devoted to the various weather
databases that provide online winds to JetPlan.
In addition to ETD, the ETD command line supports the input of these options:
Required Arrival
Time option (RAT)

You can set a time for arriving at a specific point in the flight (enroute
fix or POA) and JetPlan adjusts the ETD to meet the required arrival
time. JetPlan uses your specified cruise mode. In this case, the cruise
mode input is a more or less fixed airspeed, forcing the change in the
ETD.

Required Arrival
Time Cost Index
option (RATCI)

Using a cost index value as your cruise mode input, you can set a time
for arriving at a specific point in the flight (enroute fix or POA)
without affecting the defined ETD. In this case, the cruise speed
varies (increases or decreases) to meet the required arrival time while
the ETD remains fixed.

Orbit (ORB)

You can orbit (hold at) a selected enroute point at a specified altitude
for a specific amount of time.

NOTE The RATCI and RAT options are mutually exclusive features. They may not
be used together in the same flight plan. The ORB option, however, may be used in
conjunction with the RAT option, if needed.

The following sections describe all of the ETD command line options in detail.

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The Standard ETD Input

The Standard ETD Input


An ETD input is a four digit, UTC value.
Example:
ETD 2230

The following considerations apply to the standard ETD input:


23 hours and 59 minutes from the current time is as far into the future that a
flight plan can be computed. For example, if the current time is 1000 UTC,
the latest the ETD input is 0959 for the next day.
The ETD determines the forecast data (enroute winds and temperatures) on
which the flight plan is calculated.
If the flight plan passes into a new forecast period (the length of the flight
exceeds the time range of the forecast data used to start the computation),
the remainder of the flight plan is computed using data from the next
forecast period.
NOTE JetPlan has the capability to accept an estimated date of departure (EDD).
However, by default, this feature is not active.
Example:

08 ETD 1700/EDD,19APR07
Using EDD does not automatically activate the forecast data feature when the flight
plan is computed. Contact your account manager if your operations require the input
of EDD.

NOTE Some front-end flight planning applications, such as JetPlanner, allow you to
enter a Scheduled Date of Departure (SDD) in your flight plan request. The SDD is
not factored into flight plan calculations. It is informational only and is output on
supporting flight plans.

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Understanding the Wind and Temperature Database

Understanding the Wind and Temperature


Database
The ETD input correlates to the forecast wind and temperature data that is applied in the
computation of the flight plan. The following sections describe the forecast weather data used
in flight plan calculations.

PROGS Time Output on Flight Plans


Every flight plan computed on the JetPlan system includes the valid time of the weather
forecast data used in the calculation of that flight plan. Forecast data refers to the wind and
temperature aloft information stored in and accessed from a special database. The valid time is
a day/time stamp typically displayed on the second line of the header information in the flight
plan output. It is always identified by the label PROGS.
The PROGS day/time stamp indicates the collection date and time of the forecast data. For
example, the day/time stamp, 2212ADF, indicates that the weather data was collected on the
22nd day of the month and is the 1200Z update of the ADF file. Database updates are
expressed in Zulu [UTC] time.
The Aviation Digital Format (ADF) database updates twice in a 24-hour period: at 0000Z and
1200Z The high-resolution National Weather Service (NWS) and United Kingdom
Meteorological Office (UKMO) forecast weather databases update four times in a 24 hour
period: at 0000Z, 0600Z, 1200Z, and 1800Z. The PROGS day/time stamp defines the relative
recentness of the forecast information used in the flight plan calculation.

Online Winds Sources and Formats


Forecast weather data is collected, compiled, and sent from a major meteorologic gathering
agency to Jeppesen four to seven hours after the noted collection time. Jeppesen validates the
integrity of the data transmission and updates JetPlan generally within one hour of receiving
the information.
Each update creates a new weather database file that is valid for the period extending until the
next update. The information within an update spans approximately 30 hours of flight
planning capability, depending on which database you use. This means that you can plan
flights that extend 30 hours into the future on any of the forecasted databases.

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Understanding the Wind and Temperature Database

JetPlan has two sources for recently gathered forecast wind and temperature aloft data: the
UKMO (also known as the UK Met Office Weather Service) in England and the NWS in the
U.S. From these two sources Jeppesen provides three different forecast models for the
application of weather to the flight plan computation: ADF, NWS, and UK. Typically, the
ADF weather model is the default format. However, you may select any one of these three as
your default format by requesting the setting of one in your ID/Attribute File. The default
format may be overridden on any individual flight plan by entering the option that selects
another weather database on the Options command line.

NOTE For information on changing your default forecast weather model, contact
your Jeppesen account manager.

ADF Format (Default)


The ADF database file is the default forecast weather model if no other choice is made on the
Options command line and if no other format is set as the default in your ID/Attribute File.
The ADF file is usually updated twice a day (0000Z and 1200Z) and is generally composed of
reformatted NWS GRIB (gridded binary) data, although it may also be taken from UKMO
GRIB data if necessary. In either case, the data originates from a high-resolution forecast
weather file and is converted to this older, lower resolution format to create a separate file.
Information in the ADF file is compiled into a grid with points every 2.5 degrees of latitude
and longitude between 20N to 70N and between 20S to 70S. Between 20N and 20S, and on the
extreme poles, the grid points are placed every 5 degrees of latitude and longitude.
Information about wind direction, wind velocity, and temperature for a given set of mandatory
altitudes is collected for each grid point.
ADF provides faster processing times than either of the other two formats, though the
difference is minimal. The data within the ADF file extends approximately 30 hours into the
future. Any plan that goes beyond that window receives data that is reexamined and applied
from earlier in the update. While this ensures the completion of the flight plan (no error is
promulgated due to a lack of data), it does affect the quality of the information within it.
Whether it is the default format or user-defined at the time of plan creation, ADF generally
appears after the day/time stamp on the flight plan output (for example, 0500ADF). To select
the ADF format, enter WXADF on the Options command line anywhere after the FP
command.
Example:
FP,WXADF

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Understanding the Wind and Temperature Database

NWS Format
The NWS GRIB format provides a high-resolution database file. It uses advanced numerical
models for wind and temperature aloft forecasting. The data for this format is compiled into a
grid with points every 1.25 degrees of latitude and longitude (more than doubling the lateral
amount of data available compared to ADF). In addition to the greater number of lateral grid
points, NWS GRIB collects extra intermediate readings in the vertical direction too. This
provides more precise information about the wind direction, velocity, and temperature at a
given altitude, especially compared to the standard atmosphere levels of data collected for
ADF.
The NWS format is updated four times a day (0000Z, 0600Z, 1200Z, and 1800Z) and provides
a weather window that extends approximately 48 hours into the future (preferable for long
flights being planned a day in advance).
Whether it is the default format or user-defined at the time of plan creation, the letters NWS
generally appears after the day/time stamp on the flight plan output (for example, 1018NWS).
To select this format, enter WXNWS on the Options command line anywhere after the FP
command.
Example:
FP,WXNWS

UKMO Format
The UKMO GRIB format is a high-resolution model that is similar in data compilation to that
of the NWS format. Like the NWS format, it is updated four times a day (0000Z, 0600Z,
1200Z, and 1800Z). However, this file only provides a 30-hour weather window.
Whether it is the default format or user-defined, the letters UK generally appear after the
day/time stamp on the flight plan output (for example, 0500UK). To select this format, enter
WXUK on the Options command line anywhere after the FP command.
Example:
FP,WXUK

Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) Format


The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) is a numerical forecast model offering high-frequency
updates (every hour) of weather information. This weather data is valid for approximately 12
hours.

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Whether it is the default format or user-defined, the code R4S generally appears after the
day/time stamp on the flight plan output (for example, 1918R4S). R4S indicates the RUC
40km model, Short form (19 mb levels instead of 25 mb levels). To select this format, enter
WXRUC on the Options command line anywhere after the FP command.
Example:
FP,WXRUC
NOTE The weather database labels, ADF, NWS, UK, and R4S may or may not
appear in the header section of your flight plan, depending on your output format
design.

UK MET Office Historical Winds


The UK Met Office Historical Winds Database is a weather model that provides historically
likely wind and temperature aloft figures for any given month of the year. The historical winds
are a statistical average from the period 19601980 whereby each grid point uses the average
wind direction and wind speed from each day in the month to come up with a monthly average
grid point value at each standard altitude for that month. This database is a helpful What if?
option for planning possible flights in the future.
To select this database, enter WHXX, where XX is a number value for the desired month of
the year (0112), on the Options command line anywhere after the FP command. For example,
to specify UK Met Office historical data for the month of December, enter:
Example:
FP,WH12

JetPlan displays the three-letter abbreviation for the selected month in the header of the flight
plan output, right after PROGS (see output sample below).
PLAN 7027
EGKK TO LIRF MD11 LRC/F IFR
NONSTOP COMPUTED 1659Z FOR ETD 0000Z
PROGS DEC

08/17/06
LBS

*** JEPPESEN HISTORICAL AVERAGE WINDS HAVE BEEN USED. ***

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Understanding the Wind and Temperature Database

Reliability Equivalent Winds


Reliability Equivalent Winds refers to a JetPlan method whereby you specify a confidence
level in the data from a historical weather database. This is another analysis tool, like the UK
Met Office Historical Winds Database. However, with this database you have the ability to
estimate the likeliness of the information gathered for a particular month. For example, if
August winds are historically light for a given region, but this year you expect stronger than
usual winds, you can increase expected wind speed by expressing a lower confidence in its
accuracy. By providing a reliability factor, in percentage terms, you can gather information
about the aircrafts performance and economy through various scenarios.

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Database


The weather database used with the Reliability Equivalent Winds option is a 41 year (1958
1999) upper level wind/temperature compilation. The information was gathered and
maintained by the NCAR. It is based on the daily computerized analyses provided by the U.S.
National Meteorological Center. With this option, you are able to focus in on an individual
month, a season, or an annual time frame for your flight planning research data.

Confidence Level
The confidence level value is a percentage number that represents the reliability of the
occurrence of the gathered historical wind speeds. For example, looking at a specific month
like November, we know the database contains 40 monthly average readings for this month
(19581997). If express an 80% confidence level in the data, we are saying that our flight plan
headwind component values will not exceed those values gathered in 32 out of 40 Novembers.

Reliability Equivalent Wind Features


The features of this function include:
The ability to enter any confidence level value between 50% and 98%
NOTE JetPlan accesses historic mean values when the confidence level is 50%. A
reliability wind of 98% indicates the likelihood of occurrence of an equivalent wind
smaller than the historic mean plus two times standard deviation. Thus, for a specific
month like April, 98% reliability equivalent wind indicates an equivalent headwind
component value that will not be exceeded in 39 Aprils for the historical time frame of
40 years.

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The ability to enter any time period input from one month to a year (12
months)
Availability for any airport or lat/long around the world
Higher resolution historical wind and temperature data than current UK Met
Office Historical Winds

Application
The Reliability Equivalent Winds option is entered on the Options command line (anywhere
after the FP command) using the following format:
Example:
FP,WS##(##),R##

Specify a time frame after the letters, WS, by entering a two-digit month value (for example,
11 = November), or a four-digit range of months value (for example, 0103 = January through
March). The numbers 0112 correspond to January through December.
Specify a confidence level value using a percentage number after the letter R. This input must
not be less than 50% and not more than 98%.
The following examples illustrate different time period and confidence level inputs:
For November with 70% confidence: WS11,R70
For Summer (June to August) with 80% confidence: WS0608,R80
For Winter (January to March) with 50% confidence: WS0103,R50
For annual data with a 90% confidence: FP,WS0112,R90

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Required Arrival Time

Required Arrival Time


NOTE The Required Arrival Time (RAT) option and the Required Arrival Time
Cost Index (RATCI) option are mutually exclusive.

The ETD command line may be used to specify a RAT or a RATCI input. This allows you to
define a fixed arrival time at just about any point enroute or at the destination. The two options
cannot be used together because of the opposite effect each option has on the ETD. The main
determination of which option to use depends on whether or not the ETD can be changed. The
two methods are:
Fixed ETD (RATCI
option)

JetPlan varies the airspeed by adjusting a cost index (CI) cruise mode
until the required arrival time input is met, while maintaining the
original ETD. In most cases, the ability to specify a cost index value
as your cruise mode input is mandatory.

Variable ETD (RAT


option)

JetPlan adjusts the ETD to make the required arrival time while
applying a cruise mode that is relatively constant. In this case, a cost
index cruise mode cannot be used. However, cruise modes such as
ECO, CMC, and LRC are acceptable.

(For more information on cruise modes, see Chapter 11, Cruise Mode Commands.)

Required Arrival Time Cost Index (Fixed ETD)


The Required Arrival Time Cost Index (RATCI) feature generates a flight plan based on a
set arrival time at either the POA or an enroute fix. JetPlan varies the aircraft speed to make
the required arrival time while maintaining the original ETD.

NOTE You must include a cost index cruise mode input on the Cruise Mode
command line or set certain parameters in the Customer Aircraft Database for this
option to work (see below).

To invoke the RATCI option, enter your estimated time of departure value on the ETD
command line. Follow that with a slash (/), the option (RATCI), an enroute fix or the POA,
and finally a required arrival time.

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Required Arrival Time

Example:
08 ETD deptime/option,ckpt,arrtime

RATCI Considerations
The following considerations apply to the RATCI option:
The time constraint input must be achievable, considering the aircrafts
minimum and maximum speeds.
If a waypoint is designated as the required arrival time point, it must be
located after Top of Climb (TOC) and before Top of Descent (TOD).
The required arrival time point (POA or enroute waypoint) must be entered
in ICAO format only.
This option may be used with JetPlans Reclear feature, but only for an
enroute waypoint that is located at or before the reclear fix. The Reclear
POA cannot be specified as the RATCI point.
The display of the cost index value used in a flight plan can usually be found
on the top line of the flight plan output (the header section), before the
forward slash that separates the cruise mode stamp from the performance
index stamp. The required arrival time is displayed under the ARRIVE
column of the flight plan output. However, the display of this information
may depend on your output format design.
Example:
Explanation: The estimated time of departure is 0100Z, the required arrival time point is
RKSI, and the required arrival time is 1207Z.
08 ETD 0100/RATCI,RKSI,1207
NOTE
line.

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You also must enter a cost index cruise mode on the Cruise Mode command

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Required Arrival Time

RATCI and the Customer Aircraft Database


The Customer Aircraft Database contains five parameters that may be used to control the
RATCI process. They are:
Min RAT Cost
Index (CI1)

Minimum RATCI value

Max RAT Cost


Index (CI2)

Maximum RATCI value

Default Cost Index


(CI3)

First CI value tried in the RATCI process

Lowest Cost Index


Mach (LM)

Lowest Mach number to use in cost index (not just RATCI) flight
plans

Highest Cost Index


Mach (HM)

Highest Mach number to use in cost index (not just RATCI) flight
plans

If these parameters are set, and the RATCI option is invoked, JetPlan performs an iterative
process that determines the CI cruise mode necessary to attain the required arrival time. The
iterative process is as follows:
JetPlan first computes the flight plan using the cruise mode specified in the
flight plan request on the Cruise Mode command line. If this calculation
satisfies the requested arrival time (the RAT point is reached on time), the
iterative process is stopped, and the plan is output.
If the cruise mode from the flight plan produces a flight that arrives at the
RAT point early, JetPlan reviews the cruise mode input to determine if it is a
constant mach value.
If it is a constant mach value, JetPlan reviews the LM parameter
setting in the aircraft database. If the input value and the LM
parameter setting are equal, JetPlan uses this value, stops the
iterative process and produces the plan output. In this case, JetPlan
can do no more because the LM setting prevents any attempt at a
slower airspeed.
If it is not a constant mach value, JetPlan determines a cost index
value.

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Required Arrival Time

If the cruise mode from the flight plan is not a cost index value and not a
constant mach value, JetPlan determines the cost index by starting with the
default value in the CADB (CI3). In this case, test CI values are tried until
one works and a plan is produced or until one of the CI limits (CI1 or CI2) is
reached and the time is determined to be unattainable.
Otherwise, the cruise mode from the flight plan is a cost index value, in
which case, JetPlan starts searching for the right cost index value by
applying one of the four methods listed below:
If the user-specified cost index value is higher than the default value
in the CADB (CI3) and the plan is early, JetPlan starts the search by
applying CI3.
If the user-specified cost index value is higher than the default value
in the CADB (CI3) and the plan is late, JetPlan starts the search by
applying the maximum CI value from the CADB (CI2).
If the user-specified cost index value is lower than the default value
in the CADB (CI3) and the plan is early, JetPlan starts the search by
applying the minimum CI value from the CADB (CI1).
If the user-specified cost index value is lower than the default value
in the CADB (CI3) and the plan is late, JetPlan starts the search by
applying CI3.
Continue search until the iterations converge (when the arrival time is within
three minutes from the RATearly or late).
Since these iterations may be time consuming, there are many checks to stop them early. For
example, if the maximum allowable CI is used, and the arrival time is still late, then the search
is terminated because there is no speed greater, based on your own CADB inputs.

Required Arrival Time (Variable ETD)


The Required Arrival Time (RAT) option allows you to generate a flight plan based on a set
arrival time at either the POA or an enroute fix. JetPlan determines the departure time based on
the fixed airspeed.

NOTE You must enter an estimated time of departure value on the ETD command
line. This value needs to be a reasonable estimate of the departure time so that
JetPlan can access the correct blocks of forecast data (winds and temperatures) for
the flight computation.

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Required Arrival Time

To invoke the Required Arrival Time option, enter your estimated time of departure value on
the ETD command line. Follow that with a slash (/), the option (RAT), an enroute fix or the
POA, and finally a required arrival time.
Example:
08 ETD departure time/RAT,checkpoint,arrival time

RAT Considerations
The following considerations apply to the RAT option:
If the required arrival time input results in a departure time that is past the
days current time, a processing error result.
If a waypoint is designated as the required arrival time point, it must be
located after TOC and before TOD.
The required arrival time point (POA or enroute waypoint) must be entered
in ICAO format only.
This option may be used with JetPlans Reclear feature, but only for an
enroute waypoint that is located at or before the reclear fix. The Reclear
POA cannot be specified as the RAT point.
The RAT option and the Orbit (ORB) option may be used together.
JetPlan displays the following statement on the third line of the flight plan:
REQUIRED ARRIVAL TIME AT XXXX HHMM. The XXXX is the
RAT point identifier, and HHMM is the coordinated universal time of the
arrival.
Example:
Explanation: The estimated time of departure is 1200Z (this estimate is for accessing the
correct forecast weather data). The required arrival time point is RKSI, and the required arrival
time is 1825Z.
08 ETD 1200/RAT,RKSI,1825

The following examples further demonstrate the RAT option. Sample flight plan outputs show
what to expect based on the example input.

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Required Arrival Time

Example:
Explanation: The estimated time of departure is 1900Z (to access forecast weather data). The
RAT point is the POA, LIRF, and the arrival time is set to 2130Z. The sample output reveals
the results of this input.
02 POD EGKK
03 POA LIRF
08 ETD 1900/RAT,LIRF,2130

Sample output:
PLAN 7061
EGKK TO LIRF MD11
M85/F IFR
NONSTOP COMPUTED 1740Z FOR ETD 1953Z
PROGS 1700ADF
REQUIRED ARRIVAL TIME AT LIRF 2130Z

08/17/06
LBS

Example:
Explanation: The estimated time of departure is 1900Z (to access forecast weather data). The
RAT point is the enroute waypoint, LASBA, and the arrival time is set to 2030Z. Sample
output reveals the results of this input.
02 POD EGKK
03 POA LIRF
08 ETD 1900/RAT,LASBA,2030

Sample output:
PLAN 7099
EGKK TO LIRF MD11
M85/F IFR
NONSTOP COMPUTED 1709Z FOR ETD 1935Z
PROGS 1700ADF
REQUIRED ARRIVAL TIME AT LASBA 2030Z

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08/17/06
LBS

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Estimated Time of Departure Commands


ORBIT

ORBIT
The Orbit (ORB) option allows you hold at a waypoint for a specific length of time, airspeed,
and flight level. This may be used to burn excess fuel (or time), to rendezvous with another
aircraft, or to meet any requirement you deem necessary.
To invoke the ORB option, enter your estimated time of departure value on the ETD command
line. Follow that with a slash (/), the orbit option (ORB), the orbit point, the hold time, the
orbit airspeed (cruise mode), and the orbit altitude.
Example:
08 ETD departure time/ORB,checkpoint,time,speed,flight level

ORB Considerations
The following considerations apply to the ORB option:
JetPlan does not make climb/descent performance calculations between the
enroute cruise altitude and the orbit altitude.
This option may be used with JetPlans Reclear feature, but only for an
enroute waypoint that is located at or before the reclear fix.
This option may be used with the RAT option (but not RATCI).
JetPlan inserts the checkpoint, ORB01, (and the associated performance
data) in the flight plan body prior to the user-defined orbit fix. ORB01 is
deemed collocated with the orbit fix.
JetPlan displays the performance data (distance, time, and burn) from the
immediately previous enroute waypoint to the orbit fix on the ORB01 line.
Since ORB01 and the orbit fix are collocated, JetPlan generates zero
distance from ORB01 to the orbit fix. JetPlan displays the orbit time and
fuel burn on the same line as the orbit fix.
Example:
Explanation: Depart at 1900Z. Orbit the enroute waypoint, LASBA, for 45 minutes at long
range cruise, at an altitude of 37,000 feet.
02 POD EGKK
03 POA LIRF
08 ETD 1900/ORB,LASBA,45,LRC,370

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ORBIT

Example:
Explanation: Multiple orbit points may be entered as shown. Depart at 1900Z. Orbit SFO for
20 minutes at long range cruise, at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Orbit XIDIL for 20 minutes at
long range cruise, at an altitude of 21,000 feet. Orbit TOP for 10 minutes at long range cruise,
at an altitude of 23,000 feet.
08 ETD 1900/ORB,SFO,20,LRC,250,XIDIL,20,LRC,210,TOP,10,LRC,230

The following sample flight plan output illustrates the expected results when the ORB option
is invoked. Three points are shown for clarification: 1) the fix prior to ORB01; 2) the ORB01
point; and 3) the orbit fix. Column headers are included at the top of the sample for ease of
interpretation.
CPT

COORDINATES / FIR
F/L TMP WIND T/C T/H
FIR
N46084 E006024 / LFFF
370 M03 31053 133 133
ORB01 N45447 E006387
370 M03 31053 133 133
LASBA N45447 E006387
370 M03 31056 133 133

TRP
AW/MH TAS
FIR
42
UG32 457
42
UG32 457
42
UG32 484

SR
G/S
2
510
2
510
2
540

DIST
ZD CD

TIME
ZT
CT

FUEL
ZF CF

002 0411 0/00 0/45 000 0121


035 0446 0/04 0/49 007 0128
000 0446 0/45 1/34 078 0206

ORB and RAT Options


The ORB and RAT options may both be entered on the ETD command line if needed. The use
of both does not necessarily tie the two together in a joint purpose, but the two can be applied
to coordinate a specific mission. For example, the RAT option could be applied to one enroute
point as a rendezvous, where timing is critical, while the ORB option could be applied to the
next enroute point for the purpose of completing some requirement.
The order in which these options are added to the ETD command line is irrelevant. The
following examples illustrate this point.
Example:
Explanation: Estimated time of departure is 1900Z. The required arrival point is the POA
station, LIRF, and the arrival time is set for 2230Z. An orbit is set for the enroute point,
LASBA, for 45 minutes using long range cruise at an altitude of 33,000 feet.
02 POD EGKK
03 POA LIRF
08 ETD 1900/RAT,LIRF,2230/ORB,LASBA,45,LRC,330

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Estimated Time of Departure Commands


ORBIT

Example:
Explanation: Same as above.
02 POD EGKK
03 POA LIRF
08 ETD 1900/ORB,LASBA,45,LRC,330/RAT,LIRF,2230

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C HAPTER 9

Profile Commands

Profile Commands
Overview

Overview
JetPlan is designed to automatically attain the best flight profile for a given aircraft within a
given airspace for any situation. The Profile command line provides user control over this
designed optimization. With it, you can manage the:
Altitude Flight Rule Selection
Altitude Control Options
You must enter at least one Flight Rule option on the Profile command line to complete a
flight plan request. Altitude Control options are optional; they may be included with your
flight rule input if necessary.

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Profile Commands
Altitude Flight Rule Selection

Altitude Flight Rule Selection


An altitude flight rule is applied using the following Profile command line options.
Table 9-1

Flight Rules Options

Option

Explanation

Selects the optimal IFR altitudes based on your performance index


setting.
NOTE The performance index setting is entered in the flight plan
request on the Performance Index command line (line 12) or stored
as the default setting in your Aircraft Database file (see the
Performance Index (Fuel, Time, and Cost) Optimization on
page 318 for more information).

If the flight plan request includes routing via one of the organized
track structures, the I option allows step climbs/descents between
designated track altitudes, provided the aircraft weight and
ambient temperature are conducive to such a maneuver. The I
option considers all MEA airway restrictions. For information on
organized tracks, see Chapter 6, Route Commands.
I, M

Selects the optimal IFR altitudes (as explained above) and also
considers MAA airway restrictions. This option prompts a check
of the altitude profile against MEAs and constrains the profile to
MAAs. If JetPlan cannot find a valid altitude, or if you specify an
altitude below the MEA or above the MAA, an MEAMAA01 error
is generated.

I, T

Selects the optimal IFR altitudes (as explained above) and uses
GRID MORA data to ensure that flight levels clear all obstacles
along a given route area (grid region). If a selected flight level is
below the recommended clearance level, JetPlan generates a
MORALT01 error.
Output formats designed for this information prints the GRID
MORA data in the flight plan body.
NOTE GRID MORA is the Minimum Off Route Altitude within a
sectionoutlined by the latitude and longitude lines (the grid)that
clears the tallest obstacle within that section. Jeppesen values clear
all terrain and man-made structures by 1,000 in areas where the
highest elevations are 5,000 MSL or lower, and by 2,000 in areas
where the highest elevations are 5,001 MSL or higher.

I, M, T

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Selects the optimal IFR altitude (as explained above) and considers
MEAs, MAAs, and GRID MORA data. If a route segment is on an
airway, JetPlan checks for stored MEA/MAA information first. If
no MEA or MAA value is found, then a check is done against the
GRID MORA data. If a route segment is not on an airway (an
optimized direct segment), the only check is against the GRID
MORA data.

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Profile Commands
Altitude Flight Rule Selection

Table 9-1 Flight Rules Options (continued)


Option

Explanation

Same as the I option except that it restricts step climbs/descents


while on the following organized track structures: North Atlantic
and PACOTS. If the PACOTS include one or more segments on
the NOPAC, this does not apply.

Selects the optimal VFR altitudes.


NOTE Must be used in conjunction with the low or mid altitude
databases to be applicable.

I,xxxxx/V

This is used for flight plans that begin as IFR and transition to VFR
(described as Y type flight plans in ICAO 4444 Air Traffic
Management, 14th Ed. 2001). The transition fix is entered
followed by /V to indicate a transition to VFR altitudes.
EXAMPLE:
Explanation: IFR to VFR transition at MALOT.
09 PROFILE I,MALOT/V
NOTE This functionality is not applicable in the United States with
FAA flight plans. It is applicable only to ICAO flight plans.

V,xxxxx/I

This is used for flight plans that begin as VFR and transition to IFR
(described as Z type flight plans in ICAO 4444 Air Traffic
Management, 14th Ed. 2001). The transition fix is entered
followed by /I to indicate a transition to IFR altitudes.
EXAMPLE:
Explanation: VFR to IFR transition at MALOT.
09 PROFILE V,MALOT/I
NOTE This functionality is not applicable in the United States with
FAA flight plans. It is applicable only to ICAO flight plans.

Other Considerations
The following considerations apply to the selection of optimal altitudes:
Up to twenty-nine different altitudes may be output on each flight plan. The
altitude changes may occur to minimize fuel, time, or cost, and to conform
to the appropriate cruising altitude for the direction of flight.
All non-hemispherical altitudes are loaded in the airway information of the
navigation database. Flight plans step climb/descend between hemispherical
and non-hemispherical altitudes provided there is at least a 60 nm segment
distance for which the new altitude is effective.
The appropriate metric equivalent flight level(s) are output in the FIR/UIR
boundaries where applicable.

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Profile Commands
Altitude Flight Rule Selection

If a flight plan cruise altitude is above the highest altitude of an organized


track structure prior to the transition onto the track structure, the profile does
not descend to a designated track altitude when the flight rule option C is
entered on the Profile command line.
Hawaiian Tracks R-463, R-465, and R-577 have a non-published track
altitude of FL420 loaded into the route database, which is 2,000' above the
highest published track altitude for these tracks. Additionally, R-465 and R577 have FL440 loaded in the database. Within the constraints of aircraft
performance, this allows the system to consider additional altitude(s) which
may be assigned by ATC.

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Profile Commands
Altitude Control

Altitude Control
Altitude control refers to the flight planner's option to constrain the profile one or more times,
or to invoke 2,000' step climbs while enroute. You may change the flights profile using up to
ten sets of altitude restrictions. A restriction may be entered as either a single altitude value or
a range of altitudes. Where the restriction takes effect in the flight depends on the constraint
points (waypoints) specified by the planner. Restrictions can be specified to occur after the
crossing of an enroute waypoint or by the time the waypoint is reached.

Auto Step Climb


The unique command to invoke 2,000' step climbs is the input, 920. This option may be
applied to the entire flight or to a specific route segment.

NOTE For those organized track structures (OTS) that allow it (the North Atlantic
tracks), JetPlan automatically applies 2,000' step climbs, if applicable.

To invoke 2000 step climbs, enter 920 on the Profile command line.
Example:
Explanation: Apply IFR rules and 2,000 step climbs for the entire flight.
09 PROFILE I,920

Example:
Explanation: Apply IFR rules to the flight. Step climb, in 2,000 increments, between BAE
and ENM.
09 PROFILE I,BAE,920,ENM

Changing Flight Levels


Up to ten sets of flight level restrictions and associated altitude constraint points may be
specified on a Profile command line.

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Profile Commands
Altitude Control

To enter flight level changes, you must specify waypoints from the route of flight as constraint
points for each change event. The examples below illustrate the correct way to enter profile
changes, including the constraint points.
Example:
Explanation: Apply IFR rules. Fly at flight level 260 to DBQ, 280 to ONL, 310 to CYS, and
350 the rest of the way (until Top of Descent).
09 PROFILE I,260,DBQ,280,ONL,310,CYS,350

Example:
Explanation: Apply IFR rules. Fly at flight level 260 to DBQ, 280 to ONL, 310 to CYS, 350 to
OAL, and optimize the flight level the rest of the way (no input after OAL).
09 PROFILE I,260,DBQ,280,ONL,310,CYS,350,OAL

Unlike the examples above, it is a good practice to provide a flight level range as your
restriction rather than a single hard altitude. This allows JetPlan to consider climbs/descents
when non-hemispherical airways are encountered. It also generally provides better
optimization and avoids 2 Heavy errors which increase in likeliness when a single flight
level is specified. Consider the following example.
Example:
Explanation: Apply IFR rules. Fly anywhere between the flight levels 290 and 350 (inclusive)
until the waypoint, BAE. Select optimal altitudes the rest of the flight.
09 PROFILE I,290,350,BAE

Waypoints As Constraint Parameters


As stated earlier, where the change in profile occurs can be controlled. A descent or climb can
be specified to occur after crossing a waypoint or by the time the waypoint is reached.

Altitude Change Aft