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Market watch
March 31, 2015

w Jones
dustrials

Nasdaq
mposite

ndard &
ors 500

Russell
2000

-200.19
17,776.12
-46.55
4,900.89
-18.35
2,067.89
-5.03
1,252.77

onds

By The Associated Press


barometers in the Treasury market late
day, compared with late Monday. Price
es in the 10-year note and 30-year bond
er $100 invested:
Prices
Today Pvs Session
ar note
+21.9 cents +12.5 cents
ar bond
+21.9 cents 15.6 cents
Yields
th bill
0.04
0.01
th bill
0.02
0.03
th bill
0.13
0.12
note
0.56
0.58
note
1.37
1.40
ar note
1.93
1.95
ar bond
2.54
2.55
n note
0.16
0.21
al Funds
0.12
0.12
pal Bonds (1)
4.22
4.22

uels

W YORK (AP) Futures trading on the New


Mercantile Exchange Tue.:
weet crude ($ per bbl) May 47.60 1.08
g oil ($ per gallon)
Apr 1.7179 .0133
ne ($ per gallon)
Apr 1.7800 .0206
al gas ($ per 1,000 btu) May 2.640 .004

Metals
NEW YORK (AP) Spot nonferrous metal
prices T.
Aluminum -$0.8057 per lb., London Metal Exch.
Copper -$2.7713 Cathode full plate, LME.
Copper -$2.7470 N.Y. Merc spot Tue.
Lead - $1816.00 metric ton, London Metal
Exch.
Zinc - $0.9427 per lb., London Metal Exch.
Gold - $1187.00 Handy & Harman (only daily
quote).
Gold - $1183.10 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue.
Silver - $16.715 Handy & Harman (only daily
quote).
Silver - $16.581 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.
Platinum -$1129.00 troy oz., Handy &
Harman.
Platinum -$1142.60 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot
Tue.

Futures
CHICAGO (AP) Wheat futures trading on
the Chicago Board of Trade Tue.:
5,000 bu minimum; cents per bushel
Open High Low
Settle Chg.
May
531 531 509
51118
Jul
534 534 512 514 19
Sep
542 542 521 52219
Dec
557
557
535
537 18
Mar
568 568 549
551 16
May
566
575 558
558 17
Jul
570 572 552 557 15
Sep
580 580 564 564 16
Dec
591 591 576 57615
Mar
598 598 582 58215
May
605 605 586 58619
Jul
586 586 566 56619
KANSAS CITY (AP) Wheat futures on the
Kansas City Board of Trade Tue:
5,000 bu minimum; cents per bushel
Open High Low
Settle Chg.
May
576 578 558
559 17
Jul
581
582
562 563 17
Sep
591
591 572
573
18
Dec
604 605 585
58618
Mar
610
615 597 59717
May
620 621
602 60218
Jul
605 618 600 60017
Sep
625 625 608 60816
Dec
636 636 621 62114
Mar
641
641
626 62614
May
641
641
626 62614
Jul
611
611
596 59614

rains

ahoma grain elevator cash bids as of 2:00


uesday.
. No 1 HARD RED WINTER WHEAT: .12
lower. 5.19-5.53. Frederick 5.19, Hobart,
s, Lawton, Temple 5.24, Hooker 5.27,
er, Clinton, El Reno, Geary, Okarche,
ne, Shattuck, Watonga, Weatherford
Alva, Buffalo 5.34, Manchester 5.36,
5.39, Cherokee, Ponca City 5.43,
ord, Perry, Stillwater 5.44, Eldorado 5.53,
.34.
O: .32 to .34 lower. 6.54-7.61. Eldorado
Manchester 7.16, Keyes 7.25, Shattuck,
herford 7.34, Alva, Buffalo 7.43, Hooker
Medford, Ponca City 7.61.

SOYBEANS: .05 to .06 higher. 8.82-9.05.


Hooker 8.82, Shattuck 8.98, Manchester 9.01,
Alva, Buffalo, Medford, Ponca City,
Weatherford 9.03, Stillwater 9.05, Gulf 10.45
3/4.
CORN: .19 lower. 3.66-4.01. Manchester
3.66, Ponca City 3.70, Medford 3.71, Keyes
3.91, Hooker, Shattuck, Weatherford 4.01, Gulf
4.32 1/4.
CANOLA (CWT): .06 higher. Oklahoma City
11.46.
Grade 41, Leaf 4, Staple 34 Cotton in
Southwestern Oklahoma averaged 59.25 cents
per pound.

vestock

OKLAHOMA CITY
der Cattle Narrative Report for
/2015
ual Receipts: 9,501 Last Monday: 6,206
Ago Monday: 8,316
mpared to last week: Feeder steers and
s mostly steady. Steer and heifer calves
o 3.00 higher on comparable sales. Rain
evere storms came through last week,
ng some much needed rain to the Central
Eastern portions of the state. However,
little rain was recorded in Western
oma where the US Drought Monitor
s the entire region in the Severe to
ptional drought categories. Receipts
y higher than expected this week, howsome cattle may have been slated for
week but shipped today instead because
e Easter holiday next weekend. The
ty of the heavy weight yearling cattle

lbs 203.50-213.50, fleshy 200.50; 800-850 lbs


200.00-207.75; 850-900 lbs 194.50-200.00;
900-1000 lbs 181.50-194.00.
Medium and Large 2: 475-500 lbs 269.00270.00, thin fleshed 280.00; 525-600 lbs
244.00-285.00, thin fleshed 272.00-294.00;
625-700 lbs 218.00-227.00, thin fleshed
254.00; 700-800 lbs 201.00-216.00; 825-900
lbs 190.00-199.50; 950-1000 lbs 185.00186.00; lot 1015 lbs 174.50.
Feeder Holstein Steers Large 3: lot 390 lbs
234.00; few 975 lbs 149.00.
Feeder Bulls Medium and Large 1: lot 375
lbs 320.00; 415-475 lbs 296.0-315.00, fleshy
279.00; 515-550 lbs 268.00-283.00; 575-600
lbs 241.00-250.00; 625-630 lbs 244.00246.00, fleshy 625 lbs 228.00.
Feeder Heifers: Medium and Large 1:
Calves: 300-375 lbs 315.00-339.00, thin
fleshed 350.00; 400-450 lbs 289.00-296.00,

could go into effect, lawyers


for the doctors, dentists and
pharmacists sued, contending that the reduced rates
violated the Medicaid Act.
The legislation says the pay-

Scalia, writing for the majority.


He said that Medicaid authorizes the secretary of
Health and Human Services
to ensure that the states are

icaid Act, he said.


In dissent, Justice So
Sotomayor faulted the
jority for ruling that fed
judges may not enforce
part of federal law.

AT&T invests Survey started for young fa


2014, young farmers
in networks B V S
swering the same sur
Y

IC CHOONOVER

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

AT&T invested more than


$1 billion in its Oklahoma
wireless and wireline networks from 2011-2014, driving a wide range of upgrades to reliability, coverage, speed and performance
for residents and business
customers.
As part of its Project Velocity IP (VIP), an investment plan focused on network enhancement and expansion, AT&T in 2014 made
325 network upgrades in Oklahoma, including 52 new
cell sites, addition of wireless and wired network capacity, and new broadband
network connections.
There is a direct connection between economic
growth and success in todays economy and the availability of leading-edge technologies, said AT&T Oklahoma President Steve Hahn.
AT&T is proud of our continuing technology investments, which help enhance
the quality of life and spur
economic opportunities for
Oklahoma consumers and
businesses. Announcements
like this are a tribute to the
efforts of our local and state
elected officials who work
so hard to ensure that public
policies encourage companies like AT&T to invest in
Oklahoma.

Finding and securing


enough land to grow crops and
animals is a major concern for
young people who want to
farm, according to a survey
conducted by members of the
American Farm Bureau Federation young farmers and
ranchers program.
Almost a third of the people surveyed, 29 percent,
stated finding enough land to
farm was their major obstacle.
For young people who
want to begin farming or
ranching or expand an established operation, securing
adequate land remains their
top challenge, said Jon Henderson, of the Farm Bureau.
Another major challenge is
coping with burdensome
government regulations.
Other issues ranked as top
concerns by young farmers
and ranchers included the
willingness of parents to
turn over control of the
farm, 10 percent; overall
profitability, 10 percent; taxes and the availability of water, both 7 percent; and urbanization and the availability of ag financing, each at 5
percent.
The 23rd survey revealed
84 percent of those surveyed
are more optimistic about
the future of farming than
they were five years ago. In

stated 91 percent of th
were more optimistic ab
the future of farming t
their predecessors of
years before.

Wild hogs tested fo


pseudorabies

More than half of 117 w


hogs seized by Oklaho
Department of Agricult
Food and Forestry age
recently at Broken B
tested
positive
pseudorabies, a highly-c
tagious
swine
dise
thought to be eradica
from domestic swine,
still occurring in wild
feral, hogs.
Tom Buchanan, A
farmer and president of
Oklahoma Farm Bure
says the agriculture dep
ment should enact em
gency rules to stop
transportation of feral h
in the state.
People involved as gu
and landowners host
paid hunts for wild hog
the state have been illeg
hauling the wild pigs fr
out of state and within
state to provide more h
for people to hunt. The m
problem with that is t
none of the wild hogs
ceive adequate health c
to control the disease

BUSINESS
BUSINESS/IN BRIEF
CU students paper
accepted at event
A position paper by three
Cameron University students has been accepted at
the 2015 Marketing Educators Association (MEA) annual conference.
Felipe Anzarut, Juan
Haayen and Andrew Koracin will present Educating Students in Sustainable
Marketing: Evaluating and
Framing Messages to Influence Consumer Behavior.
Anzarut, from Cancun,
Mexico; and Koracin, from
Lawton, are specializing in

Science Quiz Bowl at Ross


Hall. At 5 p.m., delegates
will be welcomed during an
opening assembly in the
McCasland Ballroom of the
McMahon Centennial Complex. At 6 p.m., participants
will meet in the Shepler
Ballrom for parliamentary
procedure instructions prior to dispersing to classrooms in South Shepler.
Contestants will present
speeches in the areas of
Agribusiness, Agriculture
Policy, Agriscience, Animal Sciences, 8th Grade
April 6, 2015
2:48 pm /
Agricultural
Exploration,
8-9-10th Grade Believe in

ual awards will be pres


ed for each of the speak
ing topics.
On April 8, participan
will assemble at 8 a.m.
Cameron Stadium for a
welcome assembly followed by individual com
petitions. Competitors w
demonstrate their know
edge in a variety of top
including meat judging
field
crops/agronomy/seeds I
farm business management, floriculture, livestock judging, food science/technology, dairy
foods, land and