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Zinc is a mineral that you need in small amounts in your food every day

for good health. Ninety percent of the bodys zinc is found in bones and
muscles. It is found in variety of foods, so meeting the daily
recommended value of zinc is not much of a problem, especially if you
eat meat and its products.

Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for Zinc For infants up to 6 months of age - 2mg /day
For children of 7 months up to 3 years of age - 3mg /day
For children 4 to 8 years of age - 5mg /day
For children 9 to 13 years of age - 8mg /day
Boys /men above 13 years need 11mg /day of zinc
Girls /women above 13 years need 9mg /day of zinc
Pregnant women require 11mg (12mg for those below 19) and nursing
mothers require 12mg (13mg for those below 19) per day of zinc.
Health Benefits of Zinc
Zinc has many health benefits Zinc is very important for proper functioning of the immune system.
Zinc treatment has shown to enhance the healing process of gastric
ulcers.
Zinc may help manage diabetes.

Zinc may help manage or reduce symptoms of sickle cell anemia.


Zinc treatment may be effective in the management of Wilson's
disease, an inherited disorder of copper metabolism where liver fails to
excrete copper, resulting in chronic degenerative changes.
Although not very well researched, zinc can be a safe and effective
alternative treatment for herpes types 1 and 2.
Topical or oral use of zinc seems to be a safe and effective treatment
for acne vulgaris.

Zinc may prove to be useful in treating ADHD in older children with


higher BMI. Studies found that zinc supplements reduced hyperactive,
impulsive, and impaired socialization symptoms but did not reduce
attention-deficiency symptoms in other children.
Cancer patients (head and neck cancers) who received zinc
supplementation along with radiotherapy had a better clinical outcome,
according to some studies.
Shampoo containing 1 percent of zinc pyrithione helps

reduce dandruf in some people.

Zinc has been shown to improve blood cholesterol levels in


hemodialysis patients. Zinc may also improve the ratio of HDL (good
cholesterol) to LDL (bad cholesterol).
Zinc Deficiency
Zinc deficiency mostly occurs in vegetarians. This is because zinc is
found mostly in non-vegetarian foods.
Symptoms and Signs of Zinc deficiency include Growth retardation
Impaired immune function
Loss of appetite
Diarrhea
Hair loss in severe cases

Delayed sexual maturation, impotence, and hypogonadism in males


Eye and skin lesions

Weight loss (sometimes)


Delayed healing of wounds
Mental lethargy
Many of these symptoms, however, are non-specific and are associated
with number of health conditions. Unfortunately, there are no tests that
can accurately assess the zinc status, and that is because zinc is
distributed throughout the body. Zinc Taste Test (ZTT), a taste acuity
test, is often resorted to but its validity has not yet been firmly
established. Plasma and serum tests are also used to determine zinc
deficiency in most countries.
Foods High in Zinc
Zinc is abundant in red meats, certain seafood, and whole grains.
Because zinc is mainly located in the germ and bran portions of grains,
as much as 80 percent of the total zinc is lost during milling, according
to the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary
Reference Intakes.
Here are Some Foods Considered Rich in Zinc:
Milligrams (mg) per
Serving

Percent DV*

Oysters, cooked, breaded and fried, 3 ounces

74.0

493

Beef chuck roast, braised, 3 ounces

7.0

47

Crab, Alaska king, cooked, 3 ounces

6.5

43

Beef patty, broiled, 3 ounces

5.3

35

Breakfast cereal, fortified with 25% of the DV for zinc, cup serving

3.8

25

Lobster, cooked, 3 ounces

3.4

23

Pork chop, loin, cooked, 3 ounces

2.9

19

Baked beans, canned, plain or vegetarian, cup

2.9

19

Chicken, dark meat, cooked, 3 ounces

2.4

16

Yogurt, fruit, low fat, 8 ounces

1.7

11

Cashews, dry roasted, 1 ounce

1.6

11

Chickpeas, cooked, cup

1.3

Cheese, Swiss, 1 ounce

1.2

Oatmeal, instant, plain, prepared with water, 1 packet

1.1

Milk, low-fat or non fat, 1 cup

1.0

Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce

0.9

Kidney beans, cooked, cup

0.9

Chicken breast, roasted, skin removed, breast

0.9

Cheese, cheddar or mozzarella, 1 ounce

0.9

Peas, green, frozen, cooked, cup

0.5

Food

Flounder or sole, cooked, 3 ounces

0.3

*DV = Daily Value. DVs were developed by the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration to help consumers compare the nutrient contents of
products within the context of a total diet. The DV for zinc is 15 mg for
adults and children age 4 and older. Foods providing 20% or more of the
DV are considered to be high sources of a nutrient.
Zinc Rich Foods for Men
Men need to have foods that are rich in zinc to maintain the
testosterone (male hormone) levels. In men, zinc protects the prostate
gland from infection and from prostate inflammation. Zinc helps
maintain sperm count and mobility and normal levels of serum
testosterone. Studies suggest that zinc supplements taken with
antibiotics may be more effective than antibiotics alone in reducing
pain, urinary symptoms, quality of life, and maximum urethra closure
pressure for patients with chronic prostate inflammation.

Zinc Rich Foods For Women


Zinc may help prevent osteoporosis in women, especially those who
have gone through menopause. Studies have shown that low levels of
zinc in women are associated with lower bone density, so, eating zinc
rich foods may help decrease bone loss in postmenopausal women.
Also, zinc helps boost skin health, prevents dandruff and curbs hair
loss.

Zinc Rich Foods during Pregnancy


Zinc is vital for cell division and growth, so it is extremely important to
consume zinc rich foods during pregnancy to ensure adequate level of
zinc. Zinc also helps to avoid congenital abnormalities and pre-term
delivery and plays an important role in activating height, weight and
bone development in infants and children.

Zinc Rich Foods For Hair


It is important to consume zinc rich foods for healthy hair. Studies have
shown that low zinc levels can result in hair loss, as well as thin, dull and
graying hair. Studies have however reported conflicting results
regarding efficacy of zinc in treating alopecia.

Zinc Rich Foods for Vegetarians


Since zinc mostly occurs in white and red meats and its products, zinc
levels may not be adequate in vegetarians. Phytates, which are
commonly found in plant foods, can reduce zinc absorption, and some
researchers have suggested that this increases the zinc needs of
vegetarians by up to 50 percent. However, vegetarians dont have to feel
lost. Zinc levels can be easily maintained by consuming spinach and a
number of seeds like sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds and flax seeds. As
an example, an ounce of pumpkin seeds, watermelon seeds, or squash
seeds contains 2.9mg or 19 percent DV. Again half a cup of garbanzo
beans or lentils will give you 1.3mg of zinc. So, it is important that you
consume sufficient quantities of these foods.

Read more: Foods High in Zinc | Zinc Rich


Foods http://www.medindia.net/patients/lifestyleandwellness/foods-high-inzinc.htm#ixzz3VmMX51nw

Top 10 Foods Highest in Zinc


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Zinc is an essential mineral required by the body for maintaining a


sense of smell, keeping a healthy immune system, building proteins,
triggering enzymes, and creating DNA. Zinc also helps the cells in
your body communicate by functioning as a neurotransmitter. A
deficiency in zinc can lead to stunted growth, diarrhea, impotence,
hair loss, eye and skin lesions, impaired appetite, and depressed
immunity. Conversely, consuming too much zinc can lead to nausea,
vomiting, loss of appetite, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and
headaches in the short term, and can disrupt absorption of copper
and iron in the long term. If you have a zinc deficiency, then animal
foods are better sources of zinc than plant foods. The current
daily value (DV) for Zinc is 15mg. Below is a list of the top ten
foods highest in Zinc by common serving size, for more, see
the list of high zinc foods by nutrient density, and the extended
list of zinc rich foods.

#1: Seafood (Cooked Oysters)

78

Other Seafood High in Zinc (%DV per 3oz cooked): Crab (43%),
and Lobster (41%).

#2: Beef and Lamb (Cooked Lean Beef


Shortribs)
Zinc in 100g
12.3mg (82% DV)

Lamb is also a good source of Zinc (%DV per 3oz cooked): Lean
Foreshank (49%), Lean Shoulder (46%) and Lean Cubed Lamb for
Stewing (37%).

#3: Wheat Germ (Toasted)

Crude or Untoasted Wheat Germ is also a good source of Zinc


providing 94% DV per cup:. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

Advertisement (Bad ad? How to mute ads)

#4: Spinach

Other Green Leafy Vegetables High in Zinc (%DV per


cup):Amaranth Leaves, cooked (8%), and Endive and Radiccio, raw
(2%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Pumpkin and Squash Seeds

Other Seeds High in Zinc (%DV per ounce): Sunflower (10%), Chia
(9%), and Flaxseeds (8%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#6: Nuts (Cashews)

Other Nuts High in Zinc (%DV per ounce): Pine nuts (12%),
Pecans (9%), Almonds (6%), Walnuts (6%), Peanuts (6%), and
Hazelnuts (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

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#7: Cocoa and Chocolate (Cocoa Powder)

Zinc in

6.8mg (4

Dark baking Chocolate is also high in Zinc providing 85% DV per


cup grated and 19% DV per 29g square. Click to see complete nutrition
facts.

#8: Pork & Chicken (Cooked Lean Pork


Shoulder)

Chicken is also High in Zinc providing 15% DV per cooked


drumstick. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#9: Beans (Cooked Mung Beans)

Zi

0.5

Other Beans High in Zinc (%DV per cup cooked): Baked Beans
(39%), Adzuki (27%), Chickpeas (17%) and Kidney Beans
(12%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#10: Mushrooms (Cooked White Mushrooms)


Zinc in 100g
0.9mg (6% DV)

Other Mushrooms High in Zinc (%DV per Cup Pieces): Morel, raw
(9%), Brown, raw and Portabella, grilled (5%), Oyster, raw (4%), and

White, raw (2%). Four Dried Shitake mushrooms contain 8% DV and


4 raw shitake contain 4% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

Top 13 Zinc Rich Foods You Should


Include In Your Diet
By Vineetha in Rich Foods September 21, 2014

0 Comment

Image: Shutterstock

Is your diet lacking in zinc? Time to think about it! Vitamins and minerals
are indispensable for the maintenance of overall health. One mineral that
often misses our attention is zinc. Though needed by the body in small
amounts, this mineral is vital for maintaining the sense of smell, building a

healthy immune system, triggering enzymes and for the formation of DNA.
It also contributes to other aspects of health like vision, taste, hair and skin.
It is believed to improve testosterone production in men and lessen PMS
symptoms in women as well as boost the health of prenatal babies.
Deficiency of zinc can lead to diarrhoea, impotency, stunted growth, loss of
appetite, hair loss, eye and skin lesions, and impaired immunity. The best
way to improve your zinc intake and prevent zinc deficiency is to
incorporate foods rich in zinc in your daily diet.

Table 1: Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for Zinc

Age

Male

Female

Pregnancy

Lactation

06 months

2 mg*

2 mg*

712 months

3 mg

3 mg

13 years

3 mg

3 mg

48 years

5 mg

5 mg

913 years

8 mg

8 mg

1418 years

11 mg

9 mg

12 mg

13 mg

19+ years

11 mg

8 mg

11 mg

12 mg

* Adequate Intake (AI)


Nearly 90% of the zinc in our body is found in the bones and muscles. The
recommended daily amount of this mineral is 15 milligrams which is quite
easy to obtain as zinc is present in a variety of foods. Given below is the list
of foods which are the best sources of zinc.

Top 13 Zinc Rich Foods:

1. Cereals:

Fortified cereals like bran, whole grain and multigrain


cereals contain high amounts of zinc. It should be kept in mind that such
cereals also contain phytates which bind with the zinc in them and prevent
proper absorption. Cereals with high sugar levels should also be avoided as
the high sugar content is enough to neutralize the health benefits of zinc.
Per 100 gram serving 52mg

2. Wheat germ:

Wheat germ is also an excellent source of zinc with a


100 gram serving providing 17 mg of zinc, equivalent to about 111% of the
recommended daily allowance of this mineral. You can make it a part of
your diet by sprinkling some toasted wheat germ on your salad.
Per 100 grams serving 17mg

3. Pumpkin Seeds:

Besides being extremely high in zinc, pumpkin seeds


help prevent prostate cancer and support a healthy immune system. A 100
gram serving of pumpkin seeds contains about 10.3 mg of zinc, contributing
69% daily value (DV) of this mineral. To obtain maximum zinc, it is
advisable to eat them raw as roasting them can deplete the zinc content.
Per 100 grams serving 10.3mg

4. Sesame seeds:

Sesame seeds are rich in many minerals, zinc being one


of them. Whether eaten raw, roasted or ground into tahini butter, a 100 gram
serving of sesame seeds provides about 10 mg of zinc. Sesame seeds can be
incorporated in your diet by using more hummus (a Middle Eastern dip
made from tahini butter) or using sesame seed flour instead of wheat flour in
baked goods or breads.
Per 100 grams serving 10.2mg

5. Meats:

If you are a meat eater, you are less likely to suffer from
zinc deficiency as meats are one of the best foods rich in zinc. The meats
that have the highest concentration of zinc include beef, lamb, pork, chicken

and turkey. A 100 gram serving of cooked lean beef contains 12.3 mg or
82% DV of zinc. Similarly, 100 grams of cooked lean pork provides 5 mg or
33% DV of zinc. Chicken is also a good source with one cooked drumstick
providing 15% DV of this mineral. Meats do contain high levels of
cholesterol and fat, making it necessary to exercise portion control while
consuming it.

6. Shellfish:

Shellfish like crabs, clams, lobsters and mussels are


powerful sources of zinc that are prior included in the zinc rich foods list. A
serving of 6 oysters contains 76 mg of zinc which is nearly seven times the
recommended daily allowance of this mineral. Shellfish is not easily
available. Since it is exceptionally high in zinc, it is advisable to eat it
occasionally. Excess intake of zinc can lead to impaired immunity and
difficulties in metabolizing other minerals.
Per 100 grams serving 76mg

7. Squash Seeds:

These popular Middle Eastern seeds are a good source


of zinc, providing 10 mg of this mineral in a 100 grams serving. These seeds
can be removed from the squash and eaten in raw, dried and roasted forms.
Per 100 grams serving 10.3mg

8. Fruits:

Fruits generally do not contain abundant amounts of


zinc but there are certain fruits that are the richest sources of this mineral.
Pomegranates top the list with one fresh pomegranate providing 1 mg of
zinc. Avocados are also high in zinc providing 1.3 mg in one medium fruit.
Berries are good sources of zinc too. A cup of blackberries contain about 0.8
mg while raspberries and loganberries each contain 0.5 mg of zinc. A cup
serving of dates provides 0.4 mg of zinc.

9. Vegetables:

Certain vegetables are also good sources of zinc. These


include soybeans, lima beans and peas. A cup serving of soybeans contains
about 9 mg while the same amount of peas and lima beans contain 2 mg of
zinc each. Other vegetables that contain zinc include green beans (1 mg) and
Brussels sprouts or asparagus (0.5 mg) in a cup serving. A cup of corn
provides 0.7 mg while potatoes and pumpkin provide 0.6 mg of zinc. Among
the leafy green vegetables, Swiss chard is a good source of zinc, providing
about 0.2 mg in a cup serving.

10. Dark Chocolate:

A square of dark chocolate can greatly boost your zinc


level. A 100 gram serving of unsweetened dark chocolate provides 9.6 mg of
zinc. 100 grams of cocoa powder provides 6.8 mg or 45% DV of zinc.
Occasional indulgence in a square of dark chocolate is a great way to
improve your zinc intake!
Per 100 grams serving 6.8mg

11. Spinach:

Spinach is a super food which is rich in every nutrient


and zinc is no exception. A cup of cooked spinach provides 1.4 mg of zinc,
contributing 9% DV of this mineral. This gives you more reason to
incorporate this leafy veggie in your diet!
Per 100 grams serving 0.8mg

12. Mushroom:

Among the vegetables, mushroom also deserves special


mention because of its high content of zinc. They are another wonder foods

rich in zinc. A cup serving of cooked white mushrooms provides 1.4 mg or


9% DV of zinc. This is similar to spinach. If you dont like spinach, you can
replace it with mushroom to get the same amount of zinc.
Per 100 grams serving 0.9mg

13. Nuts:

Nuts can also be considered as good sources of zinc.


Cashews, in particular, are rich in this mineral with 100 grams serving
providing 5.6 mg or 37% DV of zinc. Other nuts containing zinc include
pine nuts (12% DV), pecans, (9% DV), almonds, peanuts and walnuts (6%
DV each) and hazelnuts (5% DV).

If zinc deficiency is the cause of your concern, make haste in incorporating


these zinc rich foods in your dietary routine. Do ensure not to consume
excess amounts of zinc as this can also cause adverse effects.

SL NO

Top 10 High Zinc Foods by Nutrient Density

Per 100 Grams

#1.

Oysters (Cooked)

78.6mg (524% DV)

#2.

Wheat Germ (Toasted)

16.7mg (111% DV)

#3.

Beef (Lean, Cooked)

12.3mg (82% DV)

#4.

Veal Liver (Cooked)

11.9mg (79% DV)

#5.

Pumpkin & Squash Seeds (Roasted)

10.3mg (69% DV)

#6.

Sesame Seeds

10.2mg (68% DV)

#7.

Dark Chocolate

3.3mg (22% DV)

#8.

Dried Herbs & Spices (Chervil)

8.8mg (59% DV)

#9.

Lamb (Lean, Cooked)

8.7mg (58% DV)

#10.

Peanuts (Roasted)

3.3mg (22% DV)

Other Zinc Rich Foods


#11.

Fortified Cereals

52mg (345% DV)

#12.

Low Fat Yogurt with Fruit

0.7mg (4% DV)

#13.

Milk

0.4mg (3% DV)

#14.

Chicken Breast

1mg (7% DV)

#15.

Cheddar Cheese

3.1mg (21% DV)

#16.

Mozzarella

2.9mg (19% DV)

#17.

Watermelon Seeds

10.2mg (68% DV)

#18.

Venison (Cooked)

8.6mg (58% DV)

#19.

Veal

7.4mg (49% DV)

#20.

Fortified Peanut Butter

15.1mg (101% DV)

#21.

Alfalfa Sprouts

0.9mg (6% DV)

#22.

Asparagus (Cooked)

0.6mg (4% DV)

#23.

Rice Bran

6.0mg (40% DV)

#24.

Hearts of Palm

3.7mg (25% DV)

#25.

Seaweed (Kelp)

1.2mg (8% DV)

#26.

Napa Cabbage (Cooked)

0.1mg (1% DV)

#27.

Green Peas

1.2mg (8% DV)

#28.

Sesame Seeds (Tahini)

10.5mg (70% DV)

#29.

Flat Fish (Flounder or Sole)

0.6mg (4% DV)

Source : healthaliciousness

Selected Food Sources of Zinc


Food

Milligrams (mg)
per serving

Percent DV*

Oysters, cooked, breaded and fried, 3 ounces

74.0

493

Beef chuck roast, braised, 3 ounces

7.0

47

Crab, Alaska king, cooked, 3 ounces

6.5

43

Beef patty, broiled, 3 ounces

5.3

35

Breakfast cereal, fortified with 25% of the DV for zinc, cup serving

3.8

25

Lobster, cooked, 3 ounces

3.4

23

Pork chop, loin, cooked, 3 ounces

2.9

19

Food

Milligrams (mg)

Baked beans, canned, plain or vegetarian, cup

2.9

19

Chicken, dark meat, cooked, 3 ounces

2.4

16

Yogurt, fruit, low fat, 8 ounces

1.7

11

Cashews, dry roasted, 1 ounce

1.6

11

Chickpeas, cooked, cup

1.3

Cheese, Swiss, 1 ounce

1.2

Oatmeal, instant, plain, prepared with water, 1 packet

1.1

Milk, low-fat or non fat, 1 cup

1.0

Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce

0.9

Kidney beans, cooked, cup

0.9

Chicken breast, roasted, skin removed, breast

0.9

Cheese, cheddar or mozzarella, 1 ounce

0.9

Peas, green, frozen, cooked, cup

0.5

Flounder or sole, cooked, 3 ounces

0.3

Also you can check out the list of high potassium, iron, magnesium and
protein rich foods list