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THE

The professional

Diploma

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EL&M

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

& M A N A G E M E N T

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PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA IN

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

MANAGEMENT

&&

HANDBOOK

VISIONARY LEADERS & COMPETENT MANAGERS

The professional

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EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

& M A N A G E M E N T

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THE PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP & MANGEMENT HANDBOOK

Overview
Overview

This Program is designed to help school-level administrators be both visionary leaders and competent managers. It addresses the needs of aspiring & practicing principals by providing the tools to build e ective & e cient schools.

The Diploma in Educational Leadership and Management program endeavours to prepare its graduates for the many challenges facing school administrators. It aims at providing hands-on opportunities for students to demonstrate pro ciency and to practice leadership skills in their schools.

Student Profile The diploma enables you to a examine all a spheres education and training
Student Profile
The
diploma
enables
you
to
a examine
all
a spheres
education
and
training
and
ensures
you
are
well
positioned
to
select
suitable
opportunities
from
broad
array
of
options.
Graduates
often
work
within
a as school
setting,
or
in
community
or senior
college
setting.
They
may
also
administrate
government
programs,
or
work
curriculum
coordinators
for of
schools
or
community
programs.
Extra Reading
Book Author Theories of Educational Leadership and Management Tony Bush The Principles of Educational Leadership
Book
Author
Theories of Educational
Leadership and Management
Tony Bush
The Principles of Educational
Leadership and Management
David Middlewood, Tony
Bush, & Lee Bell
Leading learning Process,
Themes and Issues in
International Contexts
Tom O'Donoghue, Simon
Clarke
Applied critical leadership in
education: Choosing Change
Lorri J. Santamaría, Andrés P.
Santamaría

1

Publisher Sage Publications Ltd Sage Publications Ltd Routledge Routledge
Publisher
Sage Publications Ltd
Sage Publications Ltd
Routledge
Routledge

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Learning and Teaching Strategy
Learning and
Teaching Strategy

This course will be delivered using a variety of innovative learning and teaching strategies that will support the students in the development of their role as educational leaders & managers. One of the major learning strategies employed will be the guidance and support given by the Notting Hill College and practice based tutors. These tutors will help the students to negotiate educational experiences relevant to their workplace role and meet learning outcomes and educational standards. The tutors will play a key role in facilitating Occupational Health and Safety educational leadership & management participant learning. However, students will have overall responsibility for organising and managing their educational experiences. As well as the support from Notting Hill College tutors, independent learning will be used. The learning and teaching strategies have been chosen to encourage students to collect evidence from their practice settings and to take a critical stance towards the analysis of educational tasks and their development as educational leaders.

OBJECTIVES
OBJECTIVES

Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by:

1. Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation & stewardship of learning.

2. Promoting a positive school culture, providing an e ective instruction program, applying the best practices to student learning & designing comprehensive professional growth plans for sta .

3. Managing the organisation, operations & resources in a way that promotes a safe, e cient & e ective learning environment.

4. Collaborating with families & other community members, responding to diverse community interests & needs, and mobilising community resources.

5. Acting fairly, with integrity and in an ethical manner.

6. Understanding, responding to and in uencing the larger political, social, economic, legal & cultural context.

The Diploma is Aligned with the Educational Leadership Consortium Council (ELCC) Standards

Student Workload
Student Workload

Lectures – 30 hours Independent learning – 140 hours •Materials Reading: 40hours •Class preparation: 40 Hours •Research: 60 Formative assessment – 40 hours Summative assessment – 20hours Industrial/work experience learning – 2 years

60 Formative assessment – 40 hours Summative assessment – 20hours Industrial/work experience learning – 2 years

2

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THE PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP & MANGEMENT HANDBOOK

COURSEWORK
COURSEWORK

THE PROGRAM CONSISTS OF FOUR MODULES

Module 1 Module 2
Module
1
Module
2

Schools & Principals: It focuses on the complex nature of schools, the principal

roles & responsibilities, e ective schools for all students…etc

Leadership Expectations: It focuses on principal behaviour & instructional leadership, organising & evaluating instructional programs, building & maintaining relationships…etc

Module 1
Module 1
Module 2
Module 2
Module 3 Module 4
Module
3
Module
4

Managerial Responsibilities: It focuses on managing material resources, managinghuman resources, managing pupil services, providing a safe school environment…etc

Vital Aspects of practice: It focuses on problem solving & decision making,

collaborative e ort for school improvement, career planning…etc.

Module 3
Module 3
Module 4
Module 4
 

Principal Roles

Instructional Programs

Managing Material

Safe School Environment

E

ective Schools

Instructional Leadership

Managing H.R

Problem Solving

Principal Behaviour

Building Relationships

Managing Pupil services

School Improvement

Managing H.R Problem Solving Principal Behaviour Building Relationships Managing Pupil services School Improvement 3

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Educational Leadership & Management:

Learning Objectives & Outcomes

Chapter 1:
Chapter 1:

Complex Nature of Schools

Learning Objectives:

• To understand the complexity of the institutions in which contemporary principals practice.

• To understand the three perspectives a school can be viewed from:

o

Legitimate

o

Social-Political

o

Moral-Ethical

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Identify the federal, state and local government responsibilities for public education.

• Explain the relationships among laws, district policies and school rules.

• Identify society’s interests in having e cient and e ective schools.

• Explain the importance of schools as moral institutions.

• Express an understanding of the persistent tensions between societal and individual rights.

• Di erentiate the characteristics of adequate, e cient, e ective and good schools.

Chapter 2:
Chapter 2:

Principal Roles & Responsibilities

Learning Objectives:

• To examine school administration by comparing past and present roles.

• To compare the public expectations of school administra tion with reality.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Correctly di erentiate among three key terms: management, leadership & administration.

• Distinguish between ideal and real roles.

• Distinguish between formal and informal roles.

• Identify traditional role expectations for principals

• Explain why some principals did not meet traditional role expectations.

• Identify contemporary role expectations for principals

• Explain why some principals do not meet contemporary role expectations.

4

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THE PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP & MANGEMENT HANDBOOK

Chapter 3:
Chapter 3:

Effective Schools for All Students

Learning Objectives:

• To examine emerging perspectives on school improvement.

• To examine emerging perspectives on the principal’s roles as change leader.

• To examine school climate, the framework for successful schools and the idea of success for all students.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Articulate why evolving world and societal conditions have changed the social and personal consequences for student failure.

• De ne a school’s mission, philosophy, vision & plan.

• Describe the concept of organisational climate and identify its components.

• Explain how school climate, and especially school culture, a ect student learning.

• Detail the di culty associated with changing each element of school climate.

associated with changing each element of school climate. Chapter 4: Principal Behaviour and Instructional Leadership
Chapter 4:
Chapter 4:

Principal Behaviour and Instructional Leadership

Learning Objectives:

• To examine principal behaviour in relation to formal role expectations, personal dynamics & work environment.

• To discuss contemporary perspectives of instructional leadership.

• To demonstrate how behaviour determinants in uence principal performance.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Explain why principal behaviour a ects school performance.

• Identify the primary determinants of

principal behaviour.

• Di erentiate between the traditional conceptualisation of the principal as an instructional leader and the principal’s role in shared instructional leadership.

• Di erentiate between administrative strategies and administrative style.

• Di erentiate between autocratic, democratic and delegating leadership styles.

• Di erentiate between transactional and transformational leadership styles.

• Di erentiate between ine ective and

e ective assumptions and behaviours

related to instructional leadership.

• Identify basic characteristics of principals

who are e ective instructional leaders.

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Chapter 5:
Chapter 5:

Organising & Evaluating Instructional Programs

Learning Objectives:

• To describe why the organisation of instructional delivery is important.

• To identify possible choices and procedures for organising the school day.

• To consider options for organising the school year.

• To apply the concept of learning organisation to schools.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Explain why organisational decisions for instructional delivery are important.

• Identify options for organising subsystems in elementary and secondary schools.

• Identify options for daily school schedules.

• Identify options for annual school calendars.

• Explain the nature of a learning organisation.

• Explain the nature of a learning organisation. Chapter 6: Building & Maintaining Relationships Learning
Chapter 6:
Chapter 6:

Building & Maintaining Relationships

Learning Objectives:

• To explain why relationships are relevant to school improvement, with regards to philosophy, education and politics.

• To describe the intricate connections among school public relations (PR), principal communication and relationship building.

• To explore relationships with employees and students inside the school.

• To explore relationships with parents and the media outside the school.

• To suggest opening lines of communications with all stakeholders.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Explain the philosophical, educational and political reasons for having positive relationships.

• De ne school PR as a broad administrative process advantageous to school improvement.

• De ne the concept of relational communication and di erentiate it from traditional communicative behaviour.

• Explain how relationships with stakeholders improve the probability of school improvement.

• Identify positive and negative behaviours that in uence principal relations with the media.

• De ne parental engagement and explain how it leads to positive relationships.

• Identify guidelines for establishing school web pages, preparing print materials, collecting public opinions and conducting public forums.

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Chapter 7:
Chapter 7:

Managing Material Resources

Learning Objectives:

• To address managerial responsibilities.

• To examine scal and facility management.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• De ne the three basic elements of scal management: budgeting, accounting and auditing.

• Identify a principal’s responsibilities for managing school-based funds (e.g, extracurricular accounts).

• Describe a principal’s role in facility utilisation, planning and evaluation.

• Explain the advantages and disadvantages of principals being actively involved in facility planning and construction projects.

• Describe a principal’s managerial responsibilities for facility maintenance.

7
7
Chapter 8:
Chapter 8:

Managing Human Resources

Learning Objectives:

• To address human resources administration (HRA) in sta ng schools.

• To address HRA sta development.

• To address HRA in evaluating employee performance.

• To address HRA diagnosing and managing con ict.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Identify e ective measures for recruiting and selecting school employees.

• Outline an orientation program for new employees.

• Identify principles of e ective sta development.

• Di erentiate between assessment and evaluation.

• Di erentiate between summative and formative evaluation.

• Identify guidelines for involuntary employee dismissals.

• Identify types of con ict occurring in schools.

• Identify con ict management techniques as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

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Chapter 9:
Chapter 9:

Managing Pupil Services

Learning Objectives:

• To describe the legal and educational dimensions of maintaining student records and using data.

• To identify the nature of a student activities program and to detail pertinent issues related to shaping, managing and evaluating it.

• To describe principal responsibility for ensuring proper supervision outside of classrooms with focused attention given to outdoor aspects of a school campus and student transportation.

• To identify the fundamental aspects of managing a school food service program.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Articulate basic legal requirements for maintaining student records.

• Discuss how legal requirements pertaining to student records and the use of data to improve decision making are linked.

• Identify the purposes of a student activities program and a principal’s responsibility for managing it.

• Develop an outline for evaluating a school activities program including criteria for evaluating individual activities.

• Identify e ective measures a principal can take to ensure student safety outside of classrooms.

• Detail a principal’s responsibilities for managing a food service program.

Chapter 10:
Chapter 10:

Providing a Safe School Environment

Learning Objectives:

• To address student discipline from both a philosophical and managerial perspective.

• To address school crisis planning and management.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Understand di ering philosophical dispositions toward student discipline, especially dissimilarities between control and cooperation approaches.

• Identify positive and negative actions in relation to structuring a school discipline program.

• Identify the concept of manifest determination and explain how it must be applied in schools.

• Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of zero-tolerance policy and rules.

• Describe a school safety audit and its value to crisis planning.

• Detail the essential aspects of a school crisis plan.

• Identify positive actions to ensure that the plan is understood and applied properly.

• Detail how communication should be managed during and after a crisis situation.

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Chapter 11:
Chapter 11:

Problem Solving and Decision Making

Learning Objectives:

• To address problem solving and decision making from the principal’s perspective.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Identify and describe the common stages of problem solving.

• Engage in de ning (or framing) problems that occur in schools.

• Identify factors that can deter problem solving.

• Explain the relationship between problem solving and decision making.

• Describe rational approaches to decision making and their underlying assumptions.

• Di erentiate between ideal and satisfactory decisions.

• Describe the advantages and disadvantages of group decision making in schools.

and disadvantages of group decision making in schools. 9 Chapter 12: Collaborative Efforts for School Improvement

9

Chapter 12:
Chapter 12:

Collaborative Efforts for School Improvement

Learning Objectives:

• To examine strategies principals can apply to achieve school improvement.

• To examine these strategies in relation to both rational and coercive tactics that have been used in an attempt to change schools.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

• Explain why change has been resisted in schools.

• Identify the consequences of student failure in contemporary society.

• Explain why continuous improvement is bene cial to all schools.

• Di erentiate among rational, coercive and reconstructive strategies of improving schools.

• Identify the advantages of pursuing collaborative approaches to school improvement.

• Identify di erent approaches to civic engagement and their advantages and disadvantages.

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Chapter 13:
Chapter 13:

Commitment to Being a School Administrator

Learning Objectives:

• To address the personal commitment to becoming a principal.

• To describe the authentic practice in relation to moral-ethical behaviour.

• To describe the authentic practice in relation to serving others.

• To explain the importance of career planning.

• To provide a model for career planning.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this chapter, you should be

able to do the following:

• Identify the nature of ethics within professions and ethical standards for administrators.

• Discuss the concept of servant leadership and apply it to the principality.

• Explain why many educators do not engage in career planning and identify possible negative

e ects of not doing so.

• Develop an outline for a personal career plan.

• Develop examples of measurable career goals.

plan. • Develop examples of measurable career goals. Assessment of the Educational Leadership & Management
Assessment of the Educational Leadership & Management Diploma
Assessment of the Educational
Leadership & Management Diploma

The Educational Leadership & Management Diploma is a course-book programme. The book used for the course in “The School Principle” by Theodore J. Kowalski. The book consists of 4 parts & has a total of 13 chapters. Students are asked to thoroughly read each chapter & answer one question only from each chapter.

Graduation Requirement
Graduation Requirement

The course book has two types of questions: Knowledge-Based Questions & Skill-Based activities. To complete this course, students are asked to answer 13 Knowledge-Based Questions, one question only in each chapter. They are also required to select two topics from the Skill-Based activities and prepare two 20-minute presentations.

About Knowledge-Based Questions:
About Knowledge-Based Questions:

These are usually lists of questions related to the theories tackled in the chapter. Students are free to select from the list and write a 500 word essay. The assignments of each part are scored and grades are usually emailed to the student within 5 working days.There is usually a 48 hour grace period to send assignments in case you face internet problems.

About Skill-Based Activities:
About Skill-Based Activities:

These activities aim to help students re ect on the theories of the course & practically apply them in their educational settings. Students select only two topics from the thirteen chapters to prepare their presentations. Trainers can help students in their selections. After presentations, trainers give feedback on the student performance.

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Assessment & Grading System

GRADING SYSTEM
GRADING SYSTEM

The Educational Leadership & Management Diploma is achieved by completing 13 assignments and at least 2 presentations. Programme graduates are awarded one of the following grades:

Grade C
Grade
C

Pass, have completed the course to a satisfactory standard.

Grade A
Grade
A

Pass with Credit, have shown that they are able to relate the theoretical issues studied.

Pass with Distinction, have demonstrated an ability to express original thinking.

GRADING SCALE A+ Distinction A A- B+ Excellent with Honour Excellent Very Good B Good
GRADING SCALE
A+
Distinction
A
A-
B+
Excellent with Honour
Excellent
Very Good
B
Good with Merit
B-
C+
Good
Promising
C
C-
Satisfactory
Pass
Scoring Rubric
Scoring Rubric
MARKING CRITERIA
MARKING CRITERIA

Marking Criteria for the Final Grades of The Education Leadershio & Management for the nal grades clarify the assessor expectations to the candidates.

A Distinction: Grade A: demonstrates

• Clear Rationale supported by appropriate and substantial activities

• Extensive knowledge, understanding and evaluation

of relevant theories

• Coherent writing backed by substantial evidence and experience

• Practical activities, experimentation with the language

• Professional presentation of ideas combined application of knowledge

• Practical application of theory with in-depth focus on communication

B Merit: Grade B: demonstrates:

• Clear Rationale supported by adequate activities.

• Knowledge, understanding and evaluation of relevant theories.

• Coherent writing backed by adequate evidence and experience.

• Practical application of knowledge with re ection of results

C Pass: Grade C: demonstrates:

• Clear rationale with limited activities

• Some knowledge, understanding and evaluation of relevant literature

• Practical application of knowledge with some re ection of results

The pass mark for the Diploma in Educational Leadership

& Management is to gaingrading of at least 50 %.

The following criteria outline the standards that will need to be met:

Comprehension Explains and summarises relevant literature, demonstrating an understanding of key issues. Application Relevance and application to own practice and context is addressed. Analysis

A clear argument or case is made and is supported by

evidence. Synthesise a range of ideas which are drawn together in a coherent presentation.T Evaluation Evidence and ideas are examined critically. For example,

strengths, weaknesses and implications may be identi ed. Presentation Satisfactory use of language with appropriate use of referencing and quotation.

D Referral Grade D: demonstrates:

• Rationale not clearly explained or supported.

• Limited knowledge, understanding and evaluation of relevant literature.

• Arguments not developed or sustained.

• Practical application not linked to theoretical knowledge.

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Comprehension and Application Exceptional level of knowledge, accuracy and detail showing evidence of wide reading,
Comprehension
and Application
Exceptional level of
knowledge, accuracy
and detail showing
evidence of wide
reading, very well
supported by relevant
examples.
Thorough knowledge
and understanding
demonstrated. High
level of accuracy and
detail showing
evidence of wide
reading, well supported
by relevant examples.
Sound knowledge base.
Evidence of highly
relevant understanding
of principles.
Up-to-date literature.
Well supported by
relevant examples.
Good knowledge base.
Adequate explanations
and summary. Some
aspects of question
answered. Limited use
of literature.
Basic knowledge and
understanding of
subject shown.
Question only partially
answered.
Some elements of
knowledge apparent
but the question is
inadequately
addressed. Content
often irrelevant
Unable to grasp
concepts or to present
facts. Nothing of
relevance.
Analysis and Synthesis Sophisticated skill shown in formation of relevant argument and analytical reasoning.
Analysis and
Synthesis
Sophisticated skill
shown in formation of
relevant argument and
analytical reasoning.
Original use of theory,
Innovative thought.
Shows ability to
contextualise
knowledge. Very well
developed, logical
argument. Generates
new perspectives of
topic area.
Clearly developed
logical argument.
Evidence of insight.
Ability to apply ELM
principles to problems
encountered in practice
Over reliance on
description rather than
analysis.
Mainly descriptive
rather than analytical.
Structure not entirely
clear. Little evidence of
debate.
Weak structure and
some confusion in
presenting argument.
Very little or no analysis
of issues.
Poor or no apparent
structure. Totally
confused. No logical
ow, no analysis.

12

Evaluation Exceptionally high level of critical evaluation. Fully deals with all relevant issues. No irrelevancies
Evaluation
Exceptionally high level
of critical evaluation.
Fully deals with all
relevant issues. No
irrelevancies
Fluent and focused.
Excellent evaluation
demonstrated.
Identi es major and
minor issues of
relevance.
Identi es strengths and
weaknesses of material.
Identi es major and
minor issues of
relevance.
Some evidence of
unstructured argument
or illogical reasoning.
Identify major issues.
Limited critical
appraisal of major
strengths and
weaknesses.
Identi es some major
issues. Limited
evaluation of major
strengths and
weaknesses.
Very descriptive with
little or no critical
appraisal. Few issues
identi ed.
Appraisal and
evaluation totally
absent. No major issues
identi ed.
Presentation Articulate and excellent use of language with no errors of grammar, spelling or syntax.
Presentation
Articulate and excellent
use of language with no
errors of grammar,
spelling or syntax.
Arguments
exceptionally well
structured.
Articulate and careful
use of language with no
errors of grammar,
spelling or syntax.
Arguments very well
structured.
Clear use of language.
No or few grammatical
errors. Some minor
referencing errors
Satisfactory use of
language. Very few
grammatical errors.
Adequate use of
language. Some
grammatical errors.
Inadequate use of
language. Grammatical
errors.
Poor standard of
grammar and spelling.
Numerous errors.

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Adequate (C) Demonstrates minimally acceptable writing skills (grammar and spelling) Some di culty in organisation
Adequate (C)
Demonstrates minimally
acceptable writing skills
(grammar and spelling)
Some di culty in organisation
Response to prompt in this
section shows acceptable
analysis of required
components.
Paragraphs contain some
details that addresses the
prompts
Response demonstrates some
insights into the material
covered.
Shows adequate
understanding of concepts
Displaying acceptable
knowledge of Educational
Leadership & Management
pedagogical theory
Meets Standards (B) Demonstrates competent use of standard writing skills (grammar and spelling). Organised Response
Meets Standards (B)
Demonstrates competent use
of standard writing skills
(grammar and spelling).
Organised
Response to prompt in this
section shows some analysis of
the required components.
Paragraphs contain adequate
detail that addresses the
prompts
Response demonstrates
signi cant insight into the
material covered.
Shows understanding of
concepts.
Displaying adequate
knowledge of Educational
Leadership & Management
pedagogical theory
Exemplary (A)
Exemplary (A)

Demonstrates e ective use of writing skills (grammar and spelling)

Well organised

Response to prompt in this section is clear, with extensive analysis of the required components.

Paragraphs contain detail that addresses the prompts and is supported with evidence.

Response demonstrates signi cant insight into the material covered.

Shows sophisticated understanding of concepts.

Displaying detailed or extensive knowledge of Educational Leadership & Management pedagogical theory

Noti cation of Results The nal results will be announced within four weeks from the
Noti cation of Results
The nal results will be announced within four weeks from the date of submission.

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CREDENTIALS
CREDENTIALS

Notting Hill College's UK campus is accredited by Accreditation Service for International Colleges (ASIC), Accreditation Number:

AS38071/0914 which is an independent body providing accreditation services for independent, further and higher education colleges. ASIC accreditation helps students and parents make a more informed choice and will also help a school, college, university, training provider or distance education provider, demonstrate to the international student body that they are a high quality institution. Notting Hill College is an institutional member of:

• The International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language, Member number 19296 .

• The College of Teachers, Member number 313608 .

• The London Chamber of Commerce & Industry (LCCI), Membership Number: C518283.

Notting Hill College is a UK Registered Learning Provider: UKRLP (NHC is a UK Registered Learning Provider (UK-RLP; No. 10028428) & is registered with the Information Commissioner's O ce under registration reference: ZA047052

O ce under registration reference: ZA047052 and Policies discrimination disability and promoting

and

Policies
Policies

discrimination

disability and promoting equality of opportunity between disabled people and other people.

In order to meet the general duties of the Disability Discrimination Act 2005, we must;

• Promote equality of opportunity between disabled people and other people;

• Eliminate direct or indirect discrimination;

• Eliminate harassment of disabled people that that is related to their disabilities;

• Promote positive attitudes towards disabled people;

• Encourage participation by disabled persons in public life; and

• Take steps to take account of disabled persons' disabilities, even where that involves treating disabled people more favourably than other people.

of

harassment

on

grounds

• Equal Opportunities

• Policy Statement on Promoting Disability Equality

• Implementation and Monitoring

• Complaints and Appeals

• Refund policy

• Health and Safety for Notting Hill College Students

• Ethical Norms and Values for Marketers

• Privacy Policy Statement

Our Policies Equal Opportunities

Equal Opportunities Policy Statement:

Notting Hill College believes that equal

opportunities are important in order to:-

• Encourage the development of individuals’ abilities, talents and potential to the full

• Attract potential students from the widest possible pool of talent.

• Meet its moral and legal obligations.

• Provide a working environment free from unlawful discrimination, harassment or victimisation.

Implementation and Monitoring

Notting Hill College (NHC) will take measures, including sta development and training to combat inequality, discrimination or prejudice based on any of the personal characteristics mentioned above, and to eliminate barriers which may prevent people joining as employees or as students. It is the responsibility of the A liate Center’s Manager to monitor e ectiveness, and to review and develop the policy where necessary. Monitoring and review will take place annually. Students or employees who feel they have been discriminated against should raise the matter with the Center’s Manager.

Policy Statement on Promoting Disability Equality

We recognise that many disabled people face barriers to access and achievement in vocational training and we are committed to eliminating

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Notting Hill College (NHC) has adopted the following Equal Opportunities Policy Statement:

Notting Hill College will seek to ensure that all students & sta are treated equally in all aspects of course provision, regardless of age, race, colour, nationality, ethnic or national origin, disability, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, political belief, religion, or irrelevant criminal conviction or other irrelevant characteristics. This policy will be widely promoted, and copies will be freely available and displayed in the A liate Centre’s o ces.

Initially the student/employee and Center’s Manager should aim to resolve the matter informally. It may be that discriminatory action is unwitting and easily resolved once the problem is clear. If students or employees are dissatis ed with the outcome, the complaint is very serious, or the Centres Manager(s) is/are the cause of the complaint, the student/employee should raise the matter, in writing.

Complaints and Appeals

If for any reason you are not satis ed with the service provided by Notting Hill College, then please email us:complaints@nottinghillcollege.co.uk Please outline the nature of your grievance and we promise to take measures & acknowledge your complaint within 24 hours. The Quality Assurance Manager will try to reach a satisfactory conclusion for all sides within 4 working days. If you are not satis ed with your distance learning grade, please contact your online tutor for detailed feedback. If you are still not satis ed then please contact the The Quality Assurance Manager at the above address. If you have to drop-out please contact The Quality Assurance Manager to state your reasons. Once accepted, you will be charged £50 for re-enrolment fees. If you have do not pass your course, you have the right appeal. You will be noti ed of your grade and the reasons behind the attained grade, to appeal against such a decision please contact the Quality Assurance Manager at the above address outlining the justi cation for your appeal.

Reassessment

1. Our reassessment procedure will be initiated should a student be unhappy with their nal grade, or should they want further clari cation on why they were awarded their nal grade. Once the student has agreed to the terms & conditions outlined in this document, the reassessment procedure can begin. This will involve an assessor (di erent from the assessor who originally graded their work) reading through the student’s assignments/quizzes/ nal exam.

2. The next step will be for the assessor to create a report for each piece of work using the Grading Rubric which all students will have received (as it is detailed in each Programme Handbook). Once the reports are complete, relevant grades will be awarded. Once all pieces of work are graded, a nal grade will be awarded.

Once the procedures have been completed, there will be one of three outcomes. These are as follows:

Increase in Grade If once the procedure has been completed, the student is awarded a higher grade than they originally received, the student will be sent their reports and a new grade book via email. They will be sent a new certi cate which displays their higher grade by post, as well as a new veri cation number to con rm the certi cate’s authenticity. Once this new certi cate has been issued, the original certi cate and veri cation number will become invalid.

Grade is Maintained If once the procedure has been completed, the student is awarded the same grade as they originally received, the student will be sent their reports and a new grade book via email. The student will keep their original certi cate and veri cation number.

Decrease in Grade If once the procedure has been completed, the student is awarded a lower grade than they originally received, the student will be sent their reports and a new grade book via email. They will be sent a new certi cate which displays their lower grade by post, as well as a new veri cation number to con rm the certi cate’s authenticity. Once this new certi cate has been issued, the original certi cate and veri cation number will become invalid.

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Refund policy

*Distance Learning Courses Distance learning enrollment becomes e ective

instantaneously. As soon as a student has paid for a course, the student has access to the programme. As such, Notting Hill College does not refund tuition for distance learning courses once a student is enrolled. Course fees are non-refundable once a student’s account is activated and download is permitted. *Classroom-based Courses No refund is given after registration is received. Cancellations are not permitted (with the exception of severe illness or injury to the attending student). Rescheduling within the rst seven days will incur a £100 penalty.

• Course fees are totally refundable 15 working days before the start of the course.

• If a refund is requested a week or less before the course start date, we will deduct 15% to cover administrative fees.

• Course fees are non-refundable once the course starts.

• Course fees cannot be transferred to another course or system.

• Course fees cannot be transferred to another student.

Health and Safety for Notting Hill College Students

The health and safety of students during the course is one of

our highest priorities. The School of Teacher Training at Notting Hill College works hard to carry out straight forward measures for health & safety at our premises. The School of Teacher Training at Notting Hill College provides the necessary tools and resource including strong communication with sta to make sure there is e ective management of health and safety. While attending classes at The School of Teacher Training at Notting Hill College you must be aware of health and safety issues for yourself & others. At all times, please follow the following.

• Take steps to ensure your own health and safety, and the health and safety of others.

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• Cooperate with both the sta & venue management with regards to re exits and evacuation.

• Report any accident so to the nearest sta member.

• Behave sensibly to ensure the health and safety of yourself and others.

Ethical Norms and Values for Marketers

Purpose

Notting Hill College commits itself to promoting the highest marketing standard for students, potential students & partners. Norms are established standards of conduct that are expected and maintained by society and/or professional organisations. Values represent the collective conception of what communities nd desirable, important and morally proper. Values also serve as the criteria for evaluating our own personal actions andthe actions of others. As marketers, we recognise that we not only serve our organisation but also act as stewards of society in creating, facilitating and executing the transactions that are part of the greater economy. In this role, marketers are expected to embrace the highest professional ethical norms and the ethical values implied by our responsibility toward multiple stakeholders (e.g., customers, employees, investors,peers,channel members, regulators and the host community).

Ethical Norms

1- As Marketers, we:

Do no harm. This meansconsciously avoiding harmful actions or omissions by embodying high ethical standards and adhering to all applicable laws and regulations in the choices we make. 2- Foster trust in the marketing system. This means striving for good faith and fair dealing so as to contribute toward the e cacy of the exchange process as well as avoiding deception in product design, pricing, communication, and delivery of distribution. vbuilding relationships and enhancing consumer con dence in the integrity of marketing by a rming these core values: honesty, responsibility, fairness, respect, transparency and citizenship.

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Ethical Values

Honesty – to be forthright in dealings with customers and stakeholders. To this end, we will:

• Strive to be truthful in all situations and at all times.

• O er products of value that do what we claim in our communications.

• Stand behind our products if they fail to deliver their claimed bene ts.

• Honor our explicit and implicit commitments and promises.

Responsibility – to accept the consequences of our marketing decisions and strategies. To this end, we will:

Strive to serve the needs of customers. Avoid using coercion with all stakeholders. Acknowledge the social obligations to stakeholders that come with increased marketing and economic power. Recognise our special commitments to vulnerable market segments such as children, seniors, the economically impoverished, market illiterates and others who may be substantially disadvantaged. Consider environmental stewardship in our decision-making.

Fairness – to balance justly the needs of the buyer

with the interests of the seller. To this end, we will:

• Represent products in a clear way in selling, advertising and other forms of communication; this includes the avoidance of false, misleading and deceptive promotion.

• Reject manipulations and sales tactics that harm customer trust. Refuse to engage in price xing, predatory pricing, price gouging or “bait-and-switch” tactics.

• Avoid knowing participation in con icts of interest. Seek to protect the private information of customers, employees and partners.

Fairness – to balance justly the needs of the buyer with the interests of the seller. To this end, we will:

• Represent products in a clear way in selling, advertising and other forms of communication; this includes the avoidance of false, misleading and deceptive promotion.

• Reject manipulations and sales tactics that harm customer trust.

Refuse to engage in price xing, predatory pricing, price gouging or “bait-and-switch” tactics.

• Avoid knowing participation in con icts of interest. Seek to protect the private information of customers, employees and partners.

Respect – to acknowledge the basic human dignity of all stakeholders. To this end, we will:

• Value individual di erences and avoid stereotyping customers or depicting demographic groups (e.g., gender, race, sexual orientation) in a negative or dehumanising way.

• Listen to the needs of customers and make all reasonable e orts to monitor and improve their satisfaction on an ongoing basis.

• Make every e ort to understand and respectfully treat buyers, suppliers, intermediaries and distributors from all cultures.

• Acknowledge the contributions of others, such as consultants, employees and coworkers, to marketing endeavours.

• Treat everyone, including our competitors, as we would wish to be treated.

Transparency – to create a spirit of openness in marketing operations. To this end, we will:

• Strive to communicate clearly with all constituencies.

• Accept constructive criticism from customers and other stakeholders.

• Explain and take appropriate action regarding signi cant product or service risks, component substitutions or other foreseeable eventualities that could a ect customers or their perception of the purchase decision.

• Disclose list prices and terms of nancing as well as available price deals and adjustments.

Citizenship – to ful l the economic, legal, philanthropic and societal responsibilities that serve stakeholders. To this end, we will:

• Strive to protect the ecological environment in the execution of marketing campaigns. Give back to the community through volunteerism and charitable donations.

• Contribute to the overall betterment of marketing and its reputation.

• Urge supply chain members to ensure that trade is fair for all participants, including producers in developing countries.

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Privacy Policy Statement The type of personal information we may collect could include, for example, your name and postal address,

Notting Hill College Limited (hereafter referred to as "Notting Hill College", "us", "we" or "our") is committed to respecting your privacy and to complying with applicable data protection and privacy laws. You can visit our website without disclosing any personally identi able information about yourself. If you do submit personal information by ordering products or services, for example, you can be assured that we will use your personal information only to support your continuing relationship with Notting Hill College.

date of birth, gender, telephone and fax numbers, email address, credit/debit card information, as well as other information collected on registration or through surveys. If you choose to provide us with personal information, it will be used in support of the intended purposes stated at the time at which it was collected, and subject to any preferences indicated by you.

How will we use your information?

We have provided this Privacy Policy Statement to help you understand how we collect, use and protect your information when you visit our website and when you generally use our products and services. We wish to help you make informed decisions, soplease take a few moments to read the sections below and learn how we may use your personal information.

We use third-party advertising companies to serve ads when you visit our website. These companies may use information (not including your name, address, email address, or telephone number) about your visits to this and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. Google, as a third party vendor, uses cookies to serve ads on your site. Google's use of the DART cookie enables it to serve ads to your users based on their visit to your sites and other sites on the Internet. Users may opt out of the use of the DART cookie by visiting the Google ad and content network privacy policy.

Personal Information Collection

We endeavour to collect and use your personal information only with your knowledge and consent and typically when you order and subsequently use services, make customer enquiries, register for information or other services, request product information, submit a job application, or when you respond to communications from us (such as questionnaires or surveys). We collect information about you for 2 reasons: rstly, to process your order, and secondly, to provide you with the best possible service.

We may use your information for a number of purposes which include: processing your orders; managing, administering and delivering any services or information requested by you; responding to complaints or enquiries.

Terms & Conditions
Terms & Conditions

We highly recommend that you carefully read and understand our Terms and Conditions. Kindly email manchester@nottinghillcollege.co.uk if you have any questions relating to these terms.

Deposits and Balance Payments

1. To book a particular o er, you would need to pay a deposit of £50, which is non-refundable. We accept most debit and credit cards and also payment by Skrill (Money Bookers). Once you have decided to start your course, you would need to pay the full amount at the time of booking. If a full or partial refund has to be made a fee of £20 will be added to cover each bank transaction charge.

Prices

2. Notting Hill College reserves the right to change any of the prices, courses, services or other particulars contained on the website at any time.

Online Course & Customer Satisfaction

3. If for any reason you are not satis ed with the course you have purchased you are entitled to a full refund within seven days from the date you made the purchase of the course ”Grace Period”. After 7 days you are not entitled to a refund if you wish to cancel. You cannot get a refund on online courses if you have already started the course, even if you are still in your grace period.

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Extensions

4. The design of the courses o ers a great deal of exibility. An extension can also be arranged free of charge for the rst time (it grants you 4 extra weeks) after, you would pay £25 for every extra 4 weeks. After 12 months of inactivity, your course will be deleted and you will not be able to access your grades or course work. Please contact manchester@nottinghillcollege.co.uk to extend your course.

Failing the course

5. In most cases, students pass the course. However, if the assessor feels you have not assimilated the content of the course su ciently then you may be asked to resubmit your tasks. The rst resubmission will be free of charge. For every other resubmission, you will be charged £25. If you have dropped-out, please contact the Course O cer to state your reasons. Once accepted, you will be charged £50 as re-enrolment fees.

6. If you do not have the essential pro ciency of English to accomplish the course, we reserve the right to fail you without expectation of a refund. As a guide we recommend that non-native speakers have a minimum IELTS 6.0 score. If you are unsure, we could arrange access to our placement test free of charge.

Plagiarism

7. Copying word for word from any source including your course book is considered plagiarism. Nonetheless, we recognize that researching and sharing ideas play a vital role in the academic endeavour. With this in mind, we request our students to present genuine work. Their answers must be tailored to their particular teaching environment & their activities must be modi ed to re ect their students’ needs.

To avoid plagiarism, you must use your own words, paraphrase ideas & alter activities. If any student is found responsible for any violation of this rule, he/she will receive a written warning. If violation is repeated, students will be subject to course failure. No refund will be made.

Trainer

8. Online courses: You can contact your trainer at any time by email. For general questions your trainer will reply within 48 hours (Monday to Friday). For feedback on assignments your trainer will respond within 5 days (Monday to Friday).

Certi cates

9. Every endeavour is made to ensure that certi cates reach the graduates within 15 working days upon exam results. Notting Hill College, however, cannot be

responsible for certi cates that are not received due to postal issues (wrong recipient and/or postal address).

If you have not received your certi cate within 15

working days of passing your course, please contact us for assistance. Certi cate issuance is free of charge for the rst attempt. If the package bounced back, graduate will PAY £40 for resending.

10. All graduates can request a new certi cate to replace

a lost certi cate for the administrative fee of £50 within the United Kingdom and £75 worldwide. This fee includes standard postage and packaging. If the graduate requires alternative postal arrangements, this will solely be at the cost of the graduates.

Data Protection Act 1988

15. In order to register and receive or use the services on our website, you will be required to submit some personal information, such as your name, your postcode and email address. We have a legal duty to ensure that we keep your personal data safe and secure, in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. We will not share your personal information with anybody else without your knowledge, unless we are required by law to do so.

not share your personal information with anybody else without your knowledge, unless we are required by

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Liability

11. Notting Hill College does not accept liability for any

loss or additional expense caused by delay or interruption to travel services, weather conditions, civil disturbance, industrial action, strikes, wars, oods, sickness or force majeure. Such losses or additional expenses are your responsibility. Force majeure represents unusual and unforeseeable circumstances such as war or the threat of war, riots, terrorist activity, civil strife, industrial disputes, natural or nuclear disaster, re, ood or adverse weather conditions.

12. Notting Hill College does not accept responsibility or

liability for death, bodily injury or illness caused to the student or any other person included on the application form. Any claims shall be subject to English law in respect of any question of liability or quantum and all proceedings shall be within the sole domain of the English courts.

13. Under no circumstances does Notting Hill College

accept responsibility or liability for loss of personal possessions while attending the course.

14. Notting Hill College does not accept responsibility or liability for any other event which may a ect you or your course.

Reassessment

16. Our reassessment procedure will be initiated should a

student be unhappy with their nal grade, or should they want further clari cation on why they were awarded their nal grade. Once the student has agreed to the terms & conditions outlined in this document, the reassessment procedure can begin. This will involve an assessor (di erent from the assessor who originally graded their work) reading through the student’s assignments/quizzes/ nal exam.

17. The next step will be for the assessor to create a

report for each piece of work using the Grading Rubric which all students will have received (as it is detailed in each Programme Handbook). Once the reports are complete, relevant grades will be awarded. Once all pieces of work are graded, a nal grade will be awarded.

Once the procedures have been completed, there will be one of three outcomes. These are as follows:

Increase in Grade If once the procedure has been completed, the student is awarded a higher grade than they originally received, the student will be sent their reports and a new grade book via email. They will be sent a new certi cate which displays their higher grade by post, as well as a new veri cation number to con rm the certi cate’s authenticity. Once this new certi cate has been issued, the original certi cate and veri cation number will become invalid.

Grade is Maintained If once the procedure has been completed, the student is awarded the same grade as they originally received, the student will be sent their reports and a new grade book via email. The student will keep their original certi cate and veri cation number.

Decrease in Grade If once the procedure has been completed, the student is awarded a lower grade than they originally received, the student will be sent their reports and a new grade book via email. They will be sent a new certi cate which displays their lower grade by post, as well as a new veri cation number to con rm the certi cate’s authenticity. Once this new certi cate has been issued, the original certi cate and veri cation number will become invalid.

Acceptance of Terms and Conditions

18. By signing the application form, verbally agreeing on the telephone or ticking the relevant box on the website you are agreeing to accept all these conditions. The person, who signs the application form, does so on behalf of all the registered individuals included. Hence, all are bound by the booking conditions.

form, does so on behalf of all the registered individuals included. Hence, all are bound by

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PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA IN

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HANDBOOK

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E N T Powerd by: NOTTING H I L L C O L L E G

Notting Hill College Manchester

Peter House, 9 th Floor, Oxford Street, Manchester, Greater Manchester, M1 5AN, United Kingdom Tel: 0044 1612987003 Mobile: 0044 7404115914 Fax: 0044 1613327725 E-mail: manchester@nottinghillcollege.co.uk Or Visit www.nottinghillcollege.co.uk

Or Visit www.nottinghillcollege.co.uk Notting Hill College London Suite B, 29 Harley Street,

Notting Hill College London

Suite B, 29 Harley Street, London, W1G 9QR, United Kingdom Tel: 0044 2081 33 2793 Fax: 0044 2071826931 E-mail: info@nottinghillcollege.co.uk

NHC is a UK Registered Learning Provider (UK-RLP; No. 10028428)