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University of Huddersfield

School of Education and Professional Development

Certificate in Education
Professional Graduate Certificate in Education
Postgraduate Certificate in Education

(Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

In-Service Course
Handbook 2009-10
University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

CONTENTS

1. WELCOME TO THE COURSE..........................................................................8

2. PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT.........................................................................10

University Attendance Monitoring Policy ...........................................................12

Annual Study Requirements.............................................................................12

3. COURSE AIMS AND OUTCOMES .................................................................14

3.1 Course Aims.............................................................................................14

3.2 Course Outcomes......................................................................................16

4. THE UNIVERSITY COURSE TEAM................................................................20

5. THE COURSE CALENDAR 2009-10...............................................................23

University Term Dates 2009-10 .......................................................................23

6. STRUCTURE OF THE COURSE.....................................................................24

7. TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT...............................................27

7.1 Teaching and Learning...............................................................................27

7.2 Module Learning Outcomes........................................................................27

7.3 Learning Contracts and Assignments...........................................................28

7.4 Deadlines and Extensions...........................................................................29

7.5 Pass, Refer and Fail...................................................................................29

7.6 Course Assessment Criteria for Different Academic Levels..............................30

7.7 The Minimum Core for Language, Literacy, Numeracy and ICT........................34

7.8 Confidentiality in Assessed Work.................................................................36

7.9 Further Guidance on Assessment and Academic Conduct...............................36

8. ACADEMIC READING AND THE HARVARD REFERENCING SYSTEM.....37

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

9. SVUK ENDORSEMENT AND HE ACADEMY ACCREDITATION ................40

9.1 Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills...........................................................40

9.2 Accreditation by the Higher Education Academy ...........................................42

10. TEACHING OBSERVATIONS AND MENTOR ARRANGEMENTS.............43

10.1 Frequency of Observations and Specialist Observations................................43

10.2 Preparing for and Reflecting on Teaching Observations................................43

10.3 Additional Observations, Trainee Presentations and Microteaching.................45

10.4 Mentor Arrangements..............................................................................45

10.5 Video and the Observation of Practice........................................................46

11. THE PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN....................................................47

11.1 Introduction...........................................................................................47

11.2 Timescales.............................................................................................50

11.3 Initial Assessment & Planning (PDP1 & PDP3).............................................50

11.4 Completing the Record of Development (PDP4)...........................................51

11.5 Tutorials................................................................................................52

11.6 Some Questions and Answers about the Personal Development Plan..............52

12. ACCREDITATION OF PRIOR LEARNING (APL).........................................55

13. REFLECTION.................................................................................................57

13.1 Definitions of Reflective Learning and Teaching...........................................57

13.2 Reflection in the In-Service Course............................................................59

13.3 Levels of Reflection..................................................................................60

13.4 Some Examples of Reflection....................................................................62

14. E-LEARNING SERVICES AND SUPPORT...................................................66

15. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS...........................................................67

16. REFERENCES...............................................................................................76

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

1. Welcome to the Course

The course team is delighted to welcome you to the University of Huddersfield


Certificate, Professional Graduate Certificate and Postgraduate1 Certificate in
Education (Post-Compulsory Education and Training). These courses have a
major role in the professional training of teachers and trainers within post-
compulsory education and training and by joining the course we feel that you are
contributing to the overall professional development of the sector.

The Partnership Statement overleaf sets out the University’s commitment to you
as a learner, and also our expectations of your commitment to your studies.
Please take time to read this statement as you enter the course.

The in-service version of the course is available through a network of colleges


that are approved by the University to offer this provision and are located
throughout the North of England. This network is known as the Consortium for
Post-Compulsory Education and Training (CPCET). In this handbook, it will
usually be referred to simply as the Consortium. Although, with the exception of
the Specialist Module, you will study at a single centre, you will be part of a
community of around two thousand in-service trainees, following the same
curriculum and being assessed according to the same criteria. The tutors and
trainees throughout the network of centres are a unique resource consisting of
professionals working in post-16 education and training; a rich source of ideas
and experiences.

In 2007, the University of Huddersfield and its partners in the FE and Skills sector
were designated as a Centre for Excellence in Teacher Training (CETT). The
role of the University of Huddersfield CETT is to lead (at regional and national
levels) the development of teacher training for the Lifelong Learning sector, in
particular those aspects that relate to teaching a specialist subject.

The course handbook is a source of reference as you undertake the studies


leading to your target award. Your tutors have copies of all course documents
and University regulations and will help you with any remaining questions that
you may have about the course. This handbook is also available in electronic
form on Blackboard (the University’s virtual learning environment) at
http://virtual.hud.ac.uk . Further general information about University procedures
is contained in the School of Education and Professional Development Virtual
Guide, available at http://www2.hud.ac.uk/edu/brochures.php.

The University of Huddersfield awards are endorsed and accredited by


professional bodies in further and higher education. These bodies are Standards
1
Please note that the Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PCET) is only available at the University
Centre and at the University Campuses at Barnsley and Oldham. See Section 6 for more details.
University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

Verification UK (SVUK) and The Higher Education Academy. If you work in either
sector, then you will need to meet certain specific requirements as well as the
general requirements of the course. These requirements are outlined in Section
9.

A word about terminology will be useful at this point. To make it clear who we are
talking about at any time in this handbook, we will normally refer to you (the
trainee teacher) as the trainee, to your own students as students or learners,
and to your teachers on the course as your tutors. This and other language used
in the handbook is not meant to be exclusive in any way. Terms such as
‘college’, ‘teaching’, ‘lesson’, ‘class’ and so on, that might be taken as implying a
traditional and formal setting for learning are used as a convenient shorthand for
the great diversity of learning situations to be found in post-compulsory education
and training. Your centre is the college within which you are studying the course
and is a member of CPCET. The tutor in overall charge of the course within your
centre is known as the Centre Manager.

If you already have a basic teaching qualification such as Part One of a Diploma
in Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector (DTLLS), the City and Guilds 7407 or
7306/7, or if you have very substantial previous teaching experience, it may be
possible for you to progress more quickly through the course by making use of
this prior learning or professional experience. If you hold a Certificate in Teaching
in the Lifelong Learning Sector (CTLLS) or Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong
Learning Sector (PTLLS), it is possible to take this into account in your work for
this course. Please consult your Centre Manager to decide if these possibilities
might suit your needs and situation.

We look forward to working with you and hope that you enjoy your learning as a
member of the course.

Ron Thompson
In-service Course Leader
School of Education and Professional Development
University of Huddersfield
July 2009

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

2. Partnership Statement
This statement sets out the University’s commitments to its students and its expectations from you in return.

We aim to provide you with full, accurate and timely information We ask you to make yourself aware of relevant details of our
on our courses, facilities and services, and our policies, courses, facilities and services, and observe our policies,
regulations and procedures in areas such as equal regulations and procedures in areas such as equal
opportunities and diversity, assessment and examination opportunities and diversity, assessment and examination
arrangements, complaints, health and safety, and the standard arrangements, complaints, health and safety, and the
of behaviour we expect from you. standard of behaviour we expect from you.

We will: We ask you to:


• help you to gather sufficient information to select your • satisfy yourself that your selected programme meets your
course needs and aspirations
• reply to all queries patiently, politely and efficiently • provide us with accurate information about yourself and,
• operate a fair and timely selection procedure for all if you have a disability, any special facilities you need to
applicants support your studies
• send you clear and unambiguous letters setting out the • keep appointments for interviews and reply to letters
conditions for admission promptly
• invite you, if you have a disability, to visit us to discuss • make the most of the learning opportunities offered to
any special facilities that you may need you by:
• try to provide an effective and flexible learning  studying diligently and organising yourself effectively
experience for all our students  always producing your best work
• deliver courses that are well designed, relevant and  attending classes punctually and regularly
quality-assured  taking part in additional activities as required
• provide appropriate course materials and learning  meeting commitments and deadlines
resources  contributing actively to tutorials, seminars, practicals
• carry out fair assessment that is quality-assured and fieldwork
• provide timely feedback on all coursework and inform  submitting assignments (which must be your own
you of your progress towards your award work) on time
• use external examiners to satisfy ourselves of the  entering for and attending the relevant examinations
quality of our awards and the fairness and rigour of our  informing tutors immediately if you are experiencing

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

assessment difficulties
• offer you information on the range of student services  acting on feedback given by tutors
intended to support your learning experience, such as • make the most of the opportunities that exist for you:
welfare, counselling, careers advice, recreational  to become involved in the University decision-
facilities, health care, and spiritual and pastoral support making processes
services  to take an interest in the affairs of the Students’
• seek and listen to your comments to improve the Union
courses we deliver  to offer feedback on your learning experience
• deal with complaints and appeals against results  to make use of the range of support services and
fairly and efficiently, in confidence and without bias staff available to you, should you encounter
• provide opportunities for you to participate or be problems or difficulties
represented in our decision-making processes. • treat all your fellow students and members of staff with
mutual respect
• be an ambassador for the University.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

University Attendance Monitoring Policy

Trainees are expected to attend scheduled classes and attendance is monitored


systematically.

Where a trainee has failed to attend satisfactorily, he or she will be contacted to discover
the reasons. If the trainee then fails to respond to this approach, the centre manager will
send a standard letter, stating that unless the trainee responds within seven working days
he/she will be deemed to have withdrawn from the course on the grounds of non-
attendance.

In exceptional cases, a trainee who responds to this letter by offering extenuating


circumstances for the period of absence may attend a meeting, with the opportunity of
being accompanied by a friend, to present his/her explanation. If the explanation is
accepted then a formal restart interview can re-establish the trainee on the programme of
study.

Annual Study Requirements

As a member of an in-service initial teacher-training course, you need to do a great deal


more than simply attend classes. Practical teaching, directed or independent private study
and preparing work for assessment need to be allocated a substantial amount of time in
your working week. The following paragraphs show in detail what is expected of you. Full-
time equivalents are indicated as this will help you in applying for a maintenance grant.

The course is normally of two years duration. In each year of the course, students
complete 60 credits; the requirement for the equivalent one year full-time course is 120
credits, so that part-time students study at an intensity of 50% of the equivalent full-time
students.

University regulations require 100 study hours per 10 credits, so the total annual
commitment to study for a part-time student on this course is 600 hours, or the equivalent
of 100 days of full-time study at 6 hours per day. A large part of this must be done during
the working day because it is based on your professional practice as an in-service teacher.

The total requirement is made up as follows:

Attendance at taught classes and tutorials: 18 days (full-time equivalent)


Attendance for teaching practice* 30 days (full-time equivalent)
Attendance for directed study at University or
local study centre** 18 days (full-time equivalent)
Attendance for University Specialist Module
(in Year Two) 4 days (full-time study)
Private study (Year 1) 34 days (full-time equivalent)

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

Private study (Year 2) 30 days (full-time equivalent)

*Full-time equivalent for teaching practice is based on a typical teaching load of 10 hours
per week for a full-time pre-service student plus 20 hours of associated preparation,
marking and structured reflection.

**A considerable amount of reading and other tasks (including preparing assignments)
needs to be done, and you need to spend time in your centre library or learning resource
centre. Your tutors will give you reading lists and assignment briefs connected with the
course modules.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

3. Course Aims and Outcomes

The course has a number of aims and outcomes. A course aim is an aspiration of the
course to provide you with certain learning or professional opportunities. A course
outcome is something you will be expected to know, to understand or to do by the end of
the course, and will guide the judgement of tutors when making decisions on the award of
credit or of the complete qualification.

It is very important that you refer to the course outcomes when preparing work for
assessment, particularly in the second year modules. This is so that you can ensure that
your work meets appropriate course outcomes as well as the specific outcomes stated in
the module.

3.1 Course Aims

The course aims to provide trainees with opportunities to:

For the Certificate in Education:

3.1.1 Become professional practitioners in post-compulsory education and training


(PCET).
3.1.2 Develop knowledge of the PCET sector.
3.1.3 Understand learning, teaching and training in their social, political, and
philosophical contexts.
3.1.4 Develop the knowledge and understanding required to plan, implement, assess
and evaluate learning in own specialist area.
3.1.5 Develop practical skills in teaching and/or training and in supporting learning.
3.1.6 Analyse interpersonal relationships and develop interpersonal skills associated
with their intended or actual work role.
3.1.7 Develop knowledge and understanding of pedagogical issues relating to
language, literacy and numeracy in PCET, and the personal skills required to
use them effectively in learning situations.
3.1.8 Develop knowledge and understanding of pedagogical issues arising from the
use of communication and information technologies (ICT) in PCET, and the
ability to use ICT effectively in learning situations.
3.1.9 Develop inclusive approaches to teaching and learning, addressing issues of
disability, age, race, ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, gender and class.
3.1.10 Develop a commitment to, and critical awareness of, professional values,
knowledge and skills.
3.1.11 Develop the ability to apply models of reflective practice to their professional and
learning activities.
3.1.12 Develop critical abilities in the field of education and training.
3.1.13 Provide a foundation for further study in the field of education and training.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

For the Professional Graduate Certificate in Education

3.1.1 Become professional practitioners in post-compulsory education and training


(PCET).
3.1.2 Develop knowledge of the PCET sector.
3.1.3 Achieve a critical understanding of learning, teaching and training in their social,
political and philosophical contexts.
3.1.4 Develop the knowledge and understanding required to plan, implement, assess
and evaluate learning in own specialist area.
3.1.5 Develop practical skills in teaching and/or training and in supporting learning.
3.1.6 Analyse interpersonal relationships and develop interpersonal skills associated
with their intended or actual work role.
3.1.7 Develop knowledge and understanding of pedagogical issues relating to
language, literacy and numeracy in PCET, and the personal skills required to
use them effectively in learning situations.
3.1.8 Develop knowledge and understanding of pedagogical issues arising from the
use of communication and information technologies (ICT) in PCET, and the
ability to use ICT effectively in learning situations.
3.1.9 Develop inclusive approaches to teaching and learning, addressing issues of
disability, age, race, ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, gender and class.
3.1.10 Develop a commitment to, and critical understanding of, professional values,
knowledge and skills.
3.1.11 Develop a critical understanding of models of reflective practice and the ability to
apply this understanding to their professional and learning activities.
3.1.12 Develop and apply critical abilities in the field of education and training.
3.1.13 Provide a foundation for postgraduate study in the field of education and
training.

For the Postgraduate Certificate in Education

3.1.1 Become professional practitioners in post-compulsory education and training


(PCET).
3.1.2 Achieve a comprehensive, critical understanding of developments in the PCET
sector.
3.1.3 Achieve a critical understanding of learning, teaching and training in their social,
political, psychological and philosophical contexts.
3.1.4 Develop the knowledge and understanding required to plan, implement, assess
and evaluate learning in own specialist area.
3.1.5 Develop practical skills in teaching and/or training and in supporting learning.
3.1.6 Analyse interpersonal relationships and develop interpersonal skills associated
with their intended or actual work role.
3.1.7 Develop knowledge and understanding of pedagogical issues relating to
language, literacy and numeracy in PCET, and the personal skills required to
use them effectively in learning situations.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

3.1.8 Develop knowledge and understanding of pedagogical issues arising from the
use of communication and information technologies (ICT) in PCET, and the
ability to use ICT effectively in learning situations.
3.1.9 Develop inclusive approaches to teaching and learning, addressing issues of
disability, age, race, ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, gender and class.
3.1.10 Develop a commitment to, and critical understanding of, professional values,
knowledge and skills.
3.1.11 Critically evaluate models of reflective practice and their application to the
professional activities of the teacher.
3.1.12 Develop and apply critical abilities in the field of education and training.
3.1.13 Provide a foundation for further postgraduate study in the field of education and
training.

3.2 Course Outcomes

By the end of their programme, trainees will have the capabilities outlined in the following
tables:

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Certificate Professional Graduate Certificate Postgraduate Certificate
KNOWLEDGE & UNDERSTANDING OUTCOMES
Understand the role of PCET in relation Critically analyse current policies and Critically evaluate current policies and
to current policies and developments. developments in PCET. developments in PCET.
Understand curriculum influences and Critically analyse curriculum influences and Critically analyse curriculum influences and
structures in PCET. structures in PCET. structures in PCET.
Understand the nature of professionalism Critically analyse the nature of Critically analyse the nature of
in education. professionalism in education. professionalism in education.
Have an appropriate level of subject Have an appropriate level of subject Have an appropriate level of subject
knowledge. knowledge. knowledge.
Understand pedagogical issues and Critically analyse pedagogical issues and Critically analyse pedagogical issues and
principles in own specialist area. principles in own specialist area. principles in own specialist area.
Understand issues of inclusivity, diversity Critically analyse issues of inclusivity, Critically analyse issues of inclusivity,
and equality in PCET. diversity and equality in PCET. diversity and equality in PCET.
Understand principles underlying the Understand principles underlying the planning Understand principles underlying the
planning and implementation of teaching and implementation of teaching and learning. planning and implementation of teaching and
and learning. learning.
Understand the nature and role of Understand the nature and role of Understand the nature and role of
assessment. assessment. assessment.
Understand principles of evaluation of Understand principles of evaluation of Understand principles of evaluation of
educational programmes. educational programmes. educational programmes.
Understand pedagogical issues relating Understand pedagogical issues relating to the Understand pedagogical issues relating to
to the use of language, literacy and use of language, literacy and numeracy in the use of language, literacy and numeracy in
numeracy in PCET. PCET. PCET.
Understand pedagogical issues relating Understand pedagogical issues relating to the Understand pedagogical issues relating to
to the use of ICT in PCET. use of ICT in PCET. the use of ICT in PCET.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Certificate Professional Graduate Certificate Postgraduate Certificate
INTELLECTUAL & COGNITIVE OUTCOMES
Integrate theory and practice by relating Integrate theory and practice by critically Integrate theory and practice by critically
appropriate literature to own experience reviewing appropriate literature and relating it reviewing and evaluating a range of
and development. to own experience and development. appropriate literature and relating it to own
experience and development.

Apply models of reflective practice .to Critically analyse models of reflective practice Critically evaluate models of reflective practice
professional and learning activities. and apply them to professional and learning and apply them to professional and learning
activities. activities.

Reflect on own learning in relation to the Reflect on own learning in relation to the Reflect on own learning in relation to the
professional teaching role in PCET. professional teaching role in PCET. professional teaching role in PCET.

Engage in Personal Development Engage in Personal Development Planning Engage in Personal Development Planning
Planning related to the professional related to the professional teaching role in related to the professional teaching role in
teaching role in PCET. PCET. PCET.

Undertake and report on a creative Undertake and report on a creative project Undertake and critically review a creative
project focusing on specialist teaching focusing on specialist teaching and learning. project focusing on specialist teaching and
and learning. learning.

Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the
the context of PCET. context of PCET. context of PCET.

Demonstrate appropriate critical abilities Critically analyse important issues in the field Critically analyse significant current issues in
in the field of education and training. of education and training. the field of education and training.

PROFESSIONAL & PRACTICAL OUTCOMES


Work effectively in a full professional role Work effectively in a full professional role in Work effectively in a full professional role in
in PCET. PCET. PCET.

Exhibit appropriate standards of Exhibit appropriate standards of professional Exhibit appropriate standards of professional
professional conduct. conduct. conduct.

Design, plan, implement and evaluate Design, plan, implement and evaluate Design, plan, implement and evaluate
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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

appropriate learning programmes. appropriate learning programmes. appropriate learning programmes.

Demonstrate competence in facilitating Demonstrate competence in facilitating and Demonstrate competence in facilitating and
and supporting learning, monitoring supporting learning, monitoring progress and supporting learning, monitoring progress and
progress and providing guidance. providing guidance. providing guidance.

Demonstrate an appropriate range of Demonstrate an appropriate range of Demonstrate an appropriate range of


assessment skills. assessment skills. assessment skills.

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


Certificate Professional Graduate Certificate Postgraduate Certificate
KEY/TRANSFERABLE OUTCOMES
Exhibit inclusive beliefs and values in all Exhibit inclusive beliefs and values in all Exhibit inclusive beliefs and values in all
written work, work-based experience and written work, work-based experience and written work, work-based experience and
day to day involvement in the course. day to day involvement in the Course. day to day involvement in the Course.

Demonstrate an appropriate level of Demonstrate an appropriate level of Demonstrate an appropriate level of


personal skills and understanding in personal skills and understanding in personal skills and understanding in
language, literacy and numeracy. language, literacy and numeracy. language, literacy and numeracy.

Demonstrate skills and understanding in Demonstrate skills and understanding in Demonstrate skills and understanding in
the use and application of ICT. the use and application of ICT. the use and application of C & IT.

Demonstrate appropriate skills in Demonstrate appropriate skills in Demonstrate appropriate skills in


analysing information and numerical data analysing information and numerical data analysing information and numerical data
gathered from a variety of sources. gathered from a variety of sources. gathered from a variety of sources.

Evaluate own teaching effectiveness and Evaluate own teaching effectiveness and Critically evaluate own teaching
establish own development targets. establish own development targets. effectiveness and establish own
development targets.

Communicate effectively using a range Communicate effectively using a range of Communicate effectively using a range of
of media. media. media.

Work effectively with other people. Work effectively with other people. Work effectively with other people.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

4. The University Course Team

Each Centre in the Consortium has its own Course Team consisting of the
Centre Manager and module tutors. You will be given contact details relating to
your own centre by your Centre Manager. In addition, matters concerning the
course as a whole (for example, curriculum development, curriculum support and
quality assurance) are managed by the University Course Team. The electronic
mail addresses of key colleagues are given below should you need to contact
any of us directly.

Dean of School Dr Christine Jarvis

Head of Department Martyn Walker


(Post-Compulsory Ed & Training) m.a.walker@hud.ac.uk

Network Manager:
Dr Roy Fisher r.fisher@hud.ac.uk
In-Service Course Leader:
Ron Thompson r.thompson@hud.ac.uk

Course Administrators:
Julie Gledhill j.a.gledhill@hud.ac.uk
Carolyn Newton c.a.newton@hud.ac.uk
Sarah Hudson s.e.hudson@hud.ac.uk

Course Examinations Tutors:


Dr Ros Ollin r.e.ollin@hud.ac.uk
Kevin Orr k.orr@hud.ac.uk
Ian Rushton i.rushton@hud.ac.uk

Course Admissions Tutor:


Dr Roy Fisher r.fisher@hud.ac.uk

Specialist Conference Co-ordinators:


Cheryl Reynolds c.reynolds@hud.ac.uk
David Powell d.powell@hud.ac.uk

Network Mentor Co-ordinator:


Judith Schoch j.h.schoch@hud.ac.uk

Other Tutors: Wayne Bailey w.bailey@hud.ac.uk


Steve Burton s.j.burton@hud.ac.uk
Jennie Coates j.b.coates@hud.ac.uk
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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

Noel Cullinane n.cullinane@hud.ac.uk


Liz Dixon l.dixon@hud.ac.uk
Ian Findlay i.findlay@hud.ac.uk
Alison Iredale a.iredale@hud.ac.uk
Judith Kidder j.a.kidder@hud.ac.uk
Dr David Lord d.lord@hud.ac.uk
John McNichol j.mcnichol@hud.ac.uk
Bernard McNicholas b.mcnicholas@hud.ac.uk
Denise Robinson d.robinson3@hud.ac.uk
Robin Simmons r.a.simmons@hud.ac.uk
Dr Martin Suter m.suter@hud.ac.uk
Sarah Williamson s.m.williamson@hud.ac.uk

Designated Academic Liaison Tutors

Each centre within the Consortium has a Designated Academic Liaison Tutor
(DALO), a member of the University staff whose role is to act as a link between
the centre and the University. You will meet your DALO at Centre Student Panel
meetings, Specialist Conference briefings and at other times as arranged
between your centre and the University. In the case of problems arising from the
course which cannot be resolved by your own tutors or by your Centre Manager,
you may wish to contact your DALO. A list of Designated Academic Liaison
Tutors and their contact details is given below.

Designated Academic Liaison Tutors and Centre Managers 2009-10


(subject to amendment)

Centre
Centre/College Liaison Tutor
Manager
Accrington & Rossendale Julie Garrigan Dr Martin Suter
College
Askham Bryan College Ade Brownlow John McNichol
Bishop Burton College Dr Andrew John McNichol
Henworth
Boston College Steven Duffy Robin Simmons
Calderdale College Deborah Phillip Liz Dixon
Craven College, Skipton Linda Burgin Ian Findlay
Darlington College Ursula Quick Dr David Lord
Dearne Valley College Ellen Schofield Robin Simmons
East Riding College John Aston John McNichol
Grimsby Institute of F & Andrew Tofts Kevin Orr
HE
Harrogate College Lizann Lowson Dr Ros Ollin

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

Hull College William Hawkridge Dr Ros Ollin


Joseph Priestley, Leeds Heather Hartman Judith Kidder
Kirklees College Kim Harrison Dr David Lord
Leeds City College: Gaynor Mount John McNichol
Thomas Danby
Manchester College Batya Howard Alison Iredale
Nelson & Colne College Emma Richardson Ian Rushton
Northern College Louise Mycroft Dr Ros Ollin
North Lindsey College Adrian Murrell Judith Schoch
Redcar & Cleveland Sheila Rooth Sarah Williamson
College
Rotherham CAT Lucretia Packham Ian Findlay
Selby College Heather Lister Cheryl Reynolds
South Tyneside College George Abbott David Powell
Stockton Riverside Jackie Bunt Denise Robinson
College
Tameside College Beryl Clarke Liz Dixon
University Centre Robin Simmons
Off-site Provision at Dr Ros Ollin
Sheffield
University Centre, Judith Schoch
Barnsley
University Centre, Oldham Alison Iredale
Wakefield College Linda Hallwood John McNichol
York College Dr Helen Dr David Lord
Kenwright
Yorkshire Coast College Lyn Paxton John McNichol

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

5. The Course Calendar 2009-10

The course as a whole follows the academic year determined by the University
Senate. However, local variations may apply in Centres as determined by local
needs and constraints. In particular, the deadlines for submission of work given
below are advisory; the University Centre will work to these deadlines but other
Centres may need to make alterations. Your Centre will provide you with detailed
programmes of study, timetables and assignment deadlines.

University Term Dates 2009-10

Autumn Term 2009

Monday 21 September University academic year begins.


Induction week.

Monday 28 September - Friday 18 December Teaching (12 weeks)

Friday 27 November Advisory Deadline for


Completion of Initial Teaching
Assignment

Spring Term 2010

Monday 11 January - Friday 26 March Teaching (11 weeks)

Friday 26 February Advisory Deadline for


Completion of DFA7130
Teaching, Learning &
Assessment

Summer Term 2010

Monday 19 April - Friday 21 May Teaching and Assessment (5


weeks)

Monday 24 May – Friday 2 July Assessment and moderation (6


weeks)

Friday 18 June Deadline for Submission of


Work to Module Tutor

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

6. Structure of the Course

The course leads to one of the following three awards:

Certificate in Education

This 120 credit award is the ‘standard’ university level award for those teachers in
the post-compulsory sector who are not graduates; following a period of
professional formation (see Section 9), it will lead to the newly instituted status of
Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills (QTLS). It contains 60 credits of study at
intermediate level (HE level 2). The Certificate is equivalent to the new level 5
Diploma in Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector (DTLLS).

Professional Graduate Certificate in Education: PGCE (H)

This 120 credit award is the ‘standard’ university level award for graduate
teachers in the post-compulsory sector; following professional formation it will
lead to the newly instituted status of Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills
(QTLS). It contains 60 credits of study at honours level (HE level 3). It is at a
higher academic level than the new level 5 Diploma in Teaching in the Lifelong
Learning Sector (DTLLS) but contains equivalent practical content.

The title of this award may be unfamiliar to many people. It was introduced
nationally to clarify the distinction between initial teacher training for graduates,
which was normally postgraduate in time but not in level, and postgraduate study
in education as an academic discipline (such as an MA in Education). Thus, the
Professional Graduate Certificate in Education is the direct successor to the initial
teacher training award commonly known as a ‘PGCE’ and has the same
abbreviation. For more information, see the QAA website at
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/academicinfrastructure/FHEQ/PGCEstatement.asp.

Postgraduate Certificate in Education: PGCE (M)

This 120 credit award is intended for graduate teachers in the post-compulsory
sector who wish to undertake a programme at Masters level, and will also lead
(following professional formation) to the newly instituted status of Qualified
Teacher Learning and Skills (QTLS). Although it has the traditional title
commonly associated with the abbreviation ‘PGCE’, it is essentially a new award,
containing 60 credits of study at postgraduate (M) level. Entry to this
programme is limited at present to the University Centre and the University
Campuses at Barnsley and Oldham, and is subject to a selection process.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

Whichever award is taken, the course has a modular structure consisting of four
core modules (the two second year modules are offered at three levels,
depending on your intended award). Each module carries a credit rating of 30
credits and a total of 120 credits is required in order to gain the award. The level
of each module is significant; achievement at intermediate level is sufficient to
gain the Certificate in Education but 60 credits at honours level are essential for
the Professional Graduate Certificate and 60 credits at postgraduate level are
required for the Postgraduate Certificate.

The overall course structure is shown below:

Year One (All Awards)

Module Title Credit Level Module Code


Teaching, Learning and 30 F DFA7130
Assessment
Personal and Professional 30 F DFD7130
Development

Year Two (Certificate in Education)

Module Title Credit Level Module Code


Understanding Curriculum and 30 I DIK7230
Professional Issues
Teaching a Specialist Subject 30 I DID7230

Year Two (Professional Graduate Certificate in Education)

Module Title Credit Level Module Code


Studies in Curriculum and 30 H DHK7230
Professional Issues
Studies in Teaching a Specialist 30 H DHD7230
Subject

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

Year Two (Postgraduate Certificate in Education)

Module Title Credit Level Module Code


Advanced Studies in Curriculum 30 M DMK7230
and Professional Issues
Advanced Studies in Teaching a 30 M DMD7230
Specialist Subject

Detailed specifications of the modules will be found in separate module


handbooks, available from your Centre Manager.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

7. Teaching, Learning and Assessment

7.1 Teaching and Learning

One of the distinctive features of a course of professional training in education is


that the teaching and learning strategies used by tutors are actually part of the
content of the course as well as its delivery. Your tutors will often encourage
discussion of the methods they use and their effectiveness. This helps you to
make judgements about what will work with your own trainees. You are required
to reflect critically on the processes that help you to learn, or that provide barriers
to learning. These considerations are the philosophy underlying the prominence
of ‘reflection’ in the course and the requirement in your Personal Development
Plan to set down your thoughts on the process of your own learning.

You should expect to encounter a wide range of teaching and learning activities
as you work through the course. You will work in small groups and on your own,
attend lectures and seminars as well as presenting your own seminars. Work-
based learning will be an important feature of your studies, not just in relation to
practical teaching but also to develop your wider professional role. A similar
variety of assessment strategies will also be encountered, ranging from essays
and projects to teaching observations and peer assessment.

How much work you do on a module, and how it is divided between tutorial time
and private study, will depend on the nature of the module. For a 30-credit
module, it is normally expected that you devote a total of 300 hours study
time to the module. Typically, this might involve 45-60 hours group time with the
remainder being supervised teaching practice, reflection, tutorials, meetings with
your mentor, directed study tasks and individual private study.

Underlying the selection of teaching and learning strategies by your tutors is the
basic assumption that the course will operate as an adult learning environment.
You will be expected to develop autonomy as a learner, to ‘take responsibility for
your own learning’, and to co-operate in supporting the learning of your peers.
The idea of an adult learning model is also part of the content of the course, and
you will learn more about its assumptions and approaches in your work on the
modules.

7.2 Module Learning Outcomes

Every module within the course has a module specification, which sets out the
learning outcomes and the assessment strategies to be used in determining
whether or not they have been achieved. A module specification also gives
details of the content normally covered in the module and of recommended

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

reading. Module specifications are given in separate module handbooks.

Learning outcomes fall into two categories:

• knowledge and understanding outcomes, which relate to knowledge of the


module content and to understanding of relevant theoretical principles,
concepts and issues; and
• ability outcomes, which relate to specific skills and abilities, work-based
competence and key transferable skills.

The assessment strategy for a module will typically provide the opportunity for
you to demonstrate achievement of both categories of outcome, by asking you to
reflect, to analyse, to criticise and to synthesise and also to actually do or
produce something. You will also be asked to show that you can relate together
the two types of outcome, in other words to show that you can integrate theory
with practice. You will frequently be asked to show how the theoretical knowledge
you have gained in the module can be applied to your practical teaching and
training or to your other professional duties, or alternatively to show how your
practice can illustrate or suggest general principles and theories.

7.3 Learning Contracts and Assignments

The assessment strategy for a module will make use of an assignment, a


learning contract or possibly both.

• The assignment for a module should meet the needs of the majority of people
studying the module. However, due to the diversity of working contexts
experienced by our trainees, it is possible that you may feel that a particular
assignment is not entirely appropriate for you.

• In this case, you should discuss with your module tutor how to amend the
assignment to make it suitable, and record your amendments in a learning
contract form. You may then work to the amended assignment brief.

• You may also negotiate a learning contract in the case that you feel that
alternative work significantly different to the standard assignment would be
more appropriate to your professional development needs.

• When negotiating a learning contract, you must take care to ensure that the
evidence you propose is of at least the same quality as the work required by
the assignments. This will ensure that standards are maintained throughout
the course.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

7.4 Deadlines and Extensions

The course calendar indicates the general guidelines for submission of work that
apply across the course. Your own centre will also publish deadlines for specific
modules, and it is important that you try to meet these deadlines if at all possible,
even if you feel that your work could still be improved. However, if you feel that
you might be unable to meet a module deadline please consult your tutor at the
first available opportunity.

Your tutor will explain to you the options and how they will apply in your situation.
Briefly, these options are

• An extension of one week may be given by the module tutor at his/her


discretion.
• An extension of up to four weeks may be given on application to the
University; there must be strong reasons to support this application
otherwise it may be refused.
• Your assessment may be deferred if there are exceptional extenuating
circumstances, for example serious illness. This may be for quite a long
period, subject to confirmation by the Course Assessment Board.
• If you cannot foresee when work might be completed, then as well as
applying for a deferral you should consider suspending your studies for an
appropriate period. This means that your remaining local authority award
(payment of fees) is protected.

7.5 Pass, Refer and Fail

When you have completed your work and submitted it by the deadline set by your
Centre, your module tutor will assess the work, taking into account the module
outcomes, the assignment briefs or learning contract, and the course assessment
criteria for the level of the module (foundation or honours).

• If your work is of a sufficiently high standard the tutor will recommend a ‘Pass’
to the Course Assessment Board.

• If the work is not of Pass standard, the tutor will normally recommend a
‘Refer’ and the work will be internally and externally moderated to ensure that
this judgement is fair.

• In the case of a ‘Refer’ you may be entitled to one tutor re-assessment


before the referral is confirmed by the Course Assessment Board. This means
that you will be allowed to resubmit your work in line with the feedback
received from your tutor. If you do this by the date given in the feedback and it
is of a satisfactory standard, the final result entered will be a ‘Pass’. However,
if you do not do this or the work is still not satisfactory, the ‘Refer’ will be

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

confirmed.

• Once a referral has been confirmed, you must present your work for one
further reassessment and will be awarded a Pass if the work then reaches the
required standard. Please note that the deadline for re-submission of
referred work is very shortly after the Course Assessment Board (see
the Course Calendar).

• If work is particularly weak at the first assessment point, the tutor may
recommend a ‘Fail’. Under University regulations, this is entered as a ‘Refer’
so that the trainee may have the opportunity to make good the work for the
resit Course Assessment Board (unless the trainee is following the
Postgraduate Certificate programme, in which case they will fail the module).
However, a tutor recommendation of Fail is a clear signal that substantial
work is required to bring the submission up to Pass standard.

• In the case of referred work, if a Pass standard is not achieved for the resit
Course Assessment Board then unfortunately you will fail the module and will
need to retake it the next time it is offered by the Centre. There is normally a
fee for retaking failed modules.

• If you submit no work for a module at the first assessment point for that
module, the Course Assessment Board will record a ‘Refer’ grade (unless you
are following the Postgraduate Certificate programme, in which case you will
fail the module). Tutor re-assessment is not available in such circumstances.
If you do not submit work for a subsequent assessment following a referral or
deferral, you will fail the module unless there are extenuating circumstances.
It is very important, therefore, that you either submit work on time or ask for
extenuating circumstances to be taken into account. The procedure for this is
explained in section 7.4 above.

• Extenuating circumstances are approved for one assessment point only.


Should extenuating circumstances need consideration by more than one
Assessment Board, a fresh application must be submitted each time.

7.6 Course Assessment Criteria for Different Academic Levels

For all three awards, you must achieve credit in Year One at foundation level,
also known as ‘HE level 1’. In Year Two, you will need to achieve credit at the
level appropriate to your award. For the award of the Certificate in Education, this
is intermediate level (HE level 2). For the Professional Graduate Certificate and
Postgraduate Certificate, you must achieve at least 60 credits at honours level
(HE level 3) or postgraduate level respectively.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

• Foundation level is the standard required by the end of one year of full-time
undergraduate study. It is ‘foundation’ in the sense that it serves as a basis for
more advanced study within the discipline of education, not in the sense of
being elementary or introductory.

• Intermediate level is the standard required at the end of a second year of full-
time undergraduate study.

• Honours level study refers to work at the standard normally expected in a


third year of full-time undergraduate study. It provides a significant challenge
to PGCE trainees whose main field of expertise is likely to be in a field other
than education.

• Postgraduate level is, as its name implies, the standard required in


postgraduate programmes such as Masters degrees. This level provides a
further challenge to PGCE trainees, particularly if their original degree is in a
field other than education.

The course outcomes given earlier are applied to all modules where appropriate,
whatever their content and specific learning outcomes. In addition, assessing
tutors will apply a set of general criteria that depend on the level of the module
and also criteria that are specific to the module. The level-based criteria are given
below; specific module assessment criteria will be found in the module
handbooks.

FOUNDATION LEVEL CRITERIA

Trainees presenting modules at foundation level will be expected to:

• Demonstrate knowledge of the underlying concepts and principles


associated with their area of study;
• Interpret this knowledge and understanding within the context of the area
of study;
• Present and interpret qualitative and quantitative data;
• Develop lines of argument;
• Make sound judgements in accordance with basic theories and concepts
of their area of study;
• Evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems
related to their area of study and/or work;
• Communicate the results of their study/work accurately and reliably, with
structured and coherent arguments.

In initial teacher training, learning at this level concerns the transition from being
an experienced practitioner in a subject, perhaps with some ability as an

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

instructor, to becoming a professional teacher or trainer. It is important to note


that trainees will also be required to operate within their own discipline at a level
appropriate to their teaching duties; in many cases, this may be well above
foundation level.

INTERMEDIATE LEVEL CRITERIA

Trainees presenting modules at intermediate level will be expected to:

• Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the well-established


principles of their area(s) of study, and of the way in which those principles
have developed;
• Apply underlying concepts and principles outside the context in which they
were first studied, including, where appropriate, the application of those
principles in an employment context;
• Demonstrate knowledge of the main methods of enquiry in their subject(s);
• Evaluate critically the appropriateness of different approaches to solving
problems in the field of study;
• Understand the limits of their knowledge, and how this influences analyses
and interpretations based on that knowledge.
• Use a range of established techniques to initiate and undertake critical
analysis of information, and to propose solutions to problems arising from
that analysis;
• Effectively communicate information, arguments, and analysis, in a variety
of forms, to specialist and non-specialist audiences, and deploy key
techniques of the discipline effectively;

HONOURS LEVEL CRITERIA

Honours level implies a more critical appreciation of the teacher’s role. In


particular, trainees at honours level should:

• Have a systematic understanding of key aspects of the field of


education and training, including acquisition of coherent and detailed
knowledge, at least some of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of
defined aspects of the discipline;
• Appreciate the uncertainty, ambiguity and limits of knowledge.
• Deploy accurately established techniques of analysis and enquiry
within the discipline;
• Devise and sustain arguments, and/or solve problems, using ideas
and techniques, some of which are at the forefront of the discipline;
• Describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research,
or equivalent advanced scholarship, in the discipline;

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

• Make use of scholarly reviews and primary sources (e.g. refereed


research articles and/or original materials appropriate to the discipline);
• Apply the methods and techniques that they have learned to
review, consolidate, extend and apply their knowledge and understanding;
and to initiate and carry out projects;
• Critically evaluate arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts and
data, formulate judgements, and frame appropriate questions to achieve a
solution – or identify a range of solutions – to a problem;
• Communicate information, ideas, problems, and solutions to both
specialist and non-specialist audiences.

At this level, trainees will be expected to analyse educational issues in greater


depth and evaluate the insights which theoretical perspectives may offer.
Honours level studies will require evidence of sustained, independent and high
quality work. Trainees will be expected to be able to engage in effective literature
research and/or empirical or action research related to their intended
professional role. At honours level the trainee will be able to demonstrate the
ability to analyse, synthesise and creatively apply what has been learned on the
course.

POSTGRADUATE LEVEL CRITERIA

Postgraduate level requires a fully developed critical appreciation of the teacher’s


role and the context in which this role takes place. In particular, trainees at
postgraduate level should:

• Demonstrate a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical


awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at,
or informed by, the forefront of their academic discipline, field of study, or
area of professional practice;
• Have a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their
own research or advanced scholarship;
• Demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a
practical understanding of how established techniques of research and
enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline;
• Evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the
discipline;
• Evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where
appropriate, to propose new hypotheses.
• Deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound
judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their
conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences;
• Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems,
and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a
professional or equivalent level.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

7.7 The Minimum Core for Language, Literacy, Numeracy and ICT

As a professional teacher or trainer, you will be expected to display an


appropriate level of ability in language, literacy and numeracy and in other key
transferable skills such as information technology. These skills will be assessed
during the application process and through your coursework. Because it is
appropriate skill levels, rather than formal qualifications, that are required, it is not
compulsory to achieve specific literacy, numeracy or ICT qualifications during the
course. However, you will need evidence of achievement in literacy and
numeracy in order to be awarded QTLS (see Section 9). We therefore strongly
recommend that, if you do not already hold a level 2 qualification in literacy and
numeracy (for example, GCSE Maths and English at grades A*-C) you aim to
achieve this by the end of the course.

A national minimum core has been introduced for all trainees in relation to
language, literacy, numeracy and ICT (LLUK 2007a, b). This requires that you
achieve a level of knowledge, understanding and personal skills in the three
areas sufficient to:

• Support the learning needs of your own students in applying language,


literacy and numeracy skills (up to level 2) within the context of your teaching
subject;

• Support your own understanding of professional issues in education and


training.

You will be assessed on these skills in two different ways:

• Through the general assessment criteria set out earlier.

• Through the application of language, literacy and numeracy within your own
subject area as required in the modules you undertake.

You will also need to demonstrate an appropriate level of achievement in other


key transferable skills. Again, the general assessment criteria set out our
expectations in these skills.

If you think that you may need support in order to achieve an appropriate level in
the minimum core or in any other key skill, please discuss this with your tutors as
soon as possible. You should certainly expect to receive feedback on your
performance in this area if there are any problems, and may find that your tutor
has indicated specific points relating to key skills in your marked work.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

As well as any specific support you may require, there are many opportunities for
key skill development within the modules you will study. The table below shows
how you will demonstrate achievement in key skills through your work in these
modules.

Key Transferable This may include:


Skill
Oral and Written Academic referencing Portfolio building
Communications (Harvard) Avoiding plagiarism
Reading academic papers Presenting numerical data
Essay writing Oral
Critical writing presentations/discussions
Reflective writing Seminars/tutorials
Note taking Interviews and appraisal
Report writing Using images and
Written applications (jobs, illustrations
courses) Presentation skills
Information Handling and presenting Researching, analysing
Management data and using information
Critical analysis of data from a wide variety of
Solving problems sources such as libraries,
Analysing numerical data the Internet, Intranets,
Interpretation of graphical World Wide Web, CD-
information ROMs, newspapers,
Identifying sources journals and educational
Avoiding plagiarism texts
Inter-personal and Giving and receiving Leadership of teams and
intra-personal feedback groups
Domains and Taking part in meetings Evaluation of own
Improving own Team building effectiveness
Learning Solving problems Organisational skills
Group work Planning and time
management
Information and Basic confidence in ICT Virtual Learning
Communication Basic ICT skills Environments
Technology Word processing (Blackboard)
Producing tables Electronic
Layout and style Communications
Spreadsheets Power Point/data
File Management projection
Using multimedia
packages
Video conferencing
Data base graphics

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

7.8 Confidentiality in Assessed Work

In the work you submit for modules, you will quite often include examples of work
from your students, information relating to your organisation and so on. When
you do this, please ensure that you do not identify individuals. A section of the
module cover sheet reminds you of this and asks you to confirm that you have
taken the necessary measures.

If you work in the National Health Service, you need to take great care if you
carry out primary research for any of your modules. A wide-ranging Research
Governance Framework (2001) applies in the NHS, and it is possible that some
forms of module work (anything involving primary research with NHS patients or
employees, beyond what you would normally do as part of your teaching post)
may be affected by the framework. If you feel that the framework might apply to
some research you plan to do for the course, speak to your line manager well in
advance and keep your centre manager informed.

7.9 Further Guidance on Assessment and Academic Conduct

Further guidance on assessment, including formative assessment and tutor re-


assessment, is contained in the School of Education and Professional
Development Virtual Guide, available at http://www2.hud.ac.uk/edu/brochures.php.

As a member of a professional and academic course community, it is of the


utmost importance that your academic conduct (including the way you approach
assessed work and also your relationships with others) is of a high standard. In
particular, academic misconduct such as plagiarism is viewed extremely
seriously by the University. For information on academic conduct, please see
http://www2.hud.ac.uk/registry/academic_misconduct/.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

8. Academic Reading and the Harvard Referencing System

As well as being a programme of professional training, the course is a higher


education course and as such you are expected to engage in scholarship related
to the discipline of education. This means that you are required to read widely
and systematically, and to make use of your reading in the work you produce for
assessment. Some of the ways in which the course supports this requirement are
set out below:

• All modules have reading lists associated with them. You should make
yourself familiar with their contents and make use of a range of these texts in
your work.

• An extremely comprehensive guide to reading in post-compulsory education


and training is produced by the University, along with a course reader. The
guide will be helpful in exploring topics in more depth, or from a different
perspective. The reader provides a number of recent key articles relevant to
your work on the course.

• The catalogue of the University library is available online at the University


website http://www.hud.ac.uk. You will also be able to gain electronic access
to online journals and e-books through this website, using Metalib, the ‘one-
stop’ password system. A booklet describing the electronic resources of the
University library is available from your tutor.

It is important to understand that the course assessment criteria require you to


make use of appropriate literature in your assessed work. You cannot pass a
module without doing this. You also need to be aware of the distinction between
primary and secondary sources:

• A primary source is an article in a refereed journal, a book by an original


author, a government report or piece of legislation etc. Thus Schön (1983) is
a primary source.

• A secondary source is a publication (usually a book, but it may be a review


article, website etc.) containing summaries of primary sources. Thus Hillier
(2002) describing and analysing Schön’s work is a secondary source.

In foundation level modules, secondary sources are perfectly acceptable but you
should also make use of at least some primary sources. The course reader will
be helpful here.

In honours level modules, it is a requirement that you make use of a range of


primary as well as secondary sources (see the course assessment criteria for
honours level). The course reader and module reading lists will provide starting

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

points, but you should also carry out your own literature searches to find further
relevant reading.

Remember that you should not only read, but also refer to your reading in
reflections, assignments and other coursework. Use the ideas you have found in
your reading to support and enrich your arguments, giving quotations where
appropriate.

When referring to published work, you should use the Harvard referencing
system (other correctly applied systems of academic referencing will not be
penalised, but tutor feedback will recommend that you learn the Harvard system).
Persistently incorrect or inadequate referencing will be penalised and you should
expect to have work returned to you for correction in such cases.

Some examples of the Harvard system are given below:

(a) A book

Avis, J., Fisher, R. and Thompson, R. (2009) (Eds.) Teaching in Lifelong


Learning: A guide to theory and practice. Maidenhead: Open University
Press.

Note that the title is given in italics.

A book would be referred to in your text in different ways depending on your


point. For example, you might say:

Reece and Walker (2003) explain different models of concept formation …

A cultural approach to learning provides an important perspective on FE


(James and Biesta, 2007) …

If you are referencing a specific point or quotation, it is important to give a page


reference, as in Reece and Walker (2003, p.189) or (James and Biesta, 2007,
p.53).

(b) A journal article

Ollin, R. (2008) Silent pedagogy and rethinking classroom practice:


structuring teaching through silence rather than talk. Cambridge Journal of
Education, 38 (2), pp. 265-280.

Refer to this as you would to a book, thus: Ollin (2008). Note that the title of the
article is in normal sentence case; it is the title of the journal that is given italic
title case. In this example, ‘38 (2)’ means ‘Volume 38, Issue 2’; this may also be
written as ‘Vol. 38, no. 2’.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

(c) A report produced by an organisation

DfEE (1997a) Requirements for Courses of Initial Teacher Training.


London: DfEE.
DfEE (1997b) Minister acts to strengthen vocational qualifications (press
release, 5 August). London: DfEE.

This example also shows what to do if you are referring to more than one
publication by a given author in a single year.

(d) A web-site

DirectGov (2009) Financial help for disabled students,


http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/DisabledPeople/EducationAndTraining/HigherEd
ucation/DG_10035904 (Accessed July 9, 2009).

These examples show how you should deal with the references most often
required in this course. Some cases may not fall neatly into any of these
categories, however. If you are unsure, ask your module tutor or apply the
common-sense test: could the reader find my reference in order to check what I
am saying?

Specific references in the text of your work must always be accompanied by a list
of references. You may also be asked to provide a bibliography, which is a list of
publications referred to in preparing your work, but not necessarily cited as a
specific reference.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

9. SVUK Endorsement and HE Academy Accreditation

The University of Huddersfield awards of Certificate in Education and PGCE


(PCET) are endorsed by Standards Verification UK (SVUK) as meeting the
requirements of the Secretary of State for initial teacher training in the FE and
skills sector. SVUK is the ‘verification arm’ of Lifelong Learning UK (LLUK), the
body charged by Government with regulating teacher training for the sector. In
addition, the courses are accredited by the HE Academy for trainees working in
higher education. If you work in either of these sectors, then you will need to
meet certain specific requirements as well as the general requirements of the
course.

9.1 Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills

In September 2007, the Government introduced a large-scale reform of initial


teacher training for the post-compulsory sector (often described as Lifelong
Learning). These reforms are claimed to constitute a ‘step-change’ in the quality
of training and have involved a new set of standards for teachers in the sector
and a new qualifications framework.

A key element of this framework is the status of Qualified Teacher Learning


and Skills (QTLS), which is intended to be analogous to Qualified Teacher
Status (QTS) in school teaching. Please note, however, that possession of QTLS
will not provide QTS. The reforms are set out in detail in the Government
document Equipping Our Teachers for the Future (DfES, 2004). For more detail
on these reforms and their history, see Chapter 3 of Avis, Fisher and Thompson
(2009).

It is important to note that QTLS is awarded by the Institute for Learning (IfL) and
not by the University. The IfL is the professional body for teachers and trainers in
further education and skills, and you should register with them whilst you are
undertaking this course. On successful completion of the course, you will need to
engage successfully in a period of professional formation before you can be
awarded QTLS. An important element of the evidence you need to provide to IfL
is that you have achieved level 2 skills in literacy and numeracy. For more
information on the process of achieving QTLS, see the IfL website on
www.ifl.ac.uk.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

The new qualifications structure is as follows:

Preparing to Teach in This is a basic qualification which operates as


the Lifelong Learning 6 credits a minimum requirement for teaching in the
Sector (PTLLS) at level 3 sector. It is contained in our module
or 4 DFA7130, within the first assignment you will
complete: the Initial Teaching Assignment.

Certificate in 24 This qualification is for those with a very


Teaching in the credits at limited teaching role. It is contained broadly
Lifelong Learning level 4 within the module DFA7130, although there is
Sector (CTLLS) overlap with DFD7130.

Diploma in Teaching 120 This is the full teaching qualification. Our Cert
in the Lifelong credits at Ed is at least equivalent to this and the PGCE
Learning Sector level 5 awards exceed its academic level.
(DTLLS)

The Further Education Teachers’ (England) Regulations 2007 set out the
statutory requirements for qualifications; for a critical review of the qualifications
structure and its implementation, see Thompson & Robinson (2008).

The University of Huddersfield awards of the Certificate, Professional Graduate


Certificate and Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PCET) are endorsed by
Standards Verification UK (SVUK) against the teaching standards for the sector
(LLUK, 2007c). If you work in further education, then you will need to meet
certain specific requirements as well as the general requirements of the course.
These requirements are set out briefly below; for more details please consult
your tutors.

• Satisfactory completion of the work for the Cert. Ed. or PGCE within the
context of your activities as a teacher in further education.

• Awareness of how this work relates to the LLUK standards for teaching and
supporting learning; this awareness should be demonstrated within your
assignment work and your reflections.

• At least 150 of your logged teaching hours should be in further education (see
the PDP for the relevant forms). Note that, if you teach higher education
courses in the context of a further education college, you may also count your
HE teaching hours towards HE Academy accreditation.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

If you do not work in the FE and skills sector, you may not be required to obtain
an approved teaching qualification. However, it is possible for you to obtain QTLS
provided your teaching is in certain areas, including:

• Training delivered in the workplace to groups of learners


• Adult and community education
• Further education in higher education settings

In all these cases, you need to be able to cover the LLUK standards through your
teaching work. Please make your tutors aware that you are aiming for this
endorsement.

9.2 Accreditation by the Higher Education Academy

The Higher Education Academy (HEA) is the recognised professional body for
teaching in higher education; this course is accredited by HEA.

If a substantial part of your teaching is in higher education (whether in an HE


institution, higher education in an FE college, a school of nursing or some other
organisation delivering HE), you are in principle eligible for membership of the HE
Academy once you have successfully completed this course. However,
Certificate in Education trainees seeking this accreditation must, in the second
year, take the honours level modules DHD7230 and DHK7230 instead of the
corresponding intermediate level modules.

Should you wish to seek HEA fellowship or associateship, you will need to
complete additional sections as part of your PDP. The documentation for this,
including comprehensive guidance, is contained in the HEA-PDP and is available
from your Centre Manager.

The HE Academy has recently decided that candidates for accreditation by this
route must apply within ONE YEAR of completing their teacher training course.

Further information about the HE Academy is available online at


http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

10. Teaching Observations and Mentor Arrangements

Teaching observations are a vital part of any teacher training course. Naturally,
they can be quite stressful as teaching is a very personal activity and we often
feel uncomfortable at the thought of an ‘outsider’ watching us with our trainees.
However, education and training is increasingly open to public scrutiny and you
may well need to get used to frequent observation and inspection as part of the
normal activity associated with your role.

10.1 Frequency of Observations and Specialist Observations

You will normally be formally observed teaching on four occasions in Year One
and Year Two (a total of eight observations for a two-year course). Ideally, the
four observations in each year will be spaced fairly evenly (perhaps one or two
per term). The great majority of observations are always conducted through an
in-person visit from a tutor, but it is also possible to be assessed on occasion
through video evidence of your teaching.

For in-person visits, please be prompt in supplying your tutors with details of your
teaching timetable so that together you can identify suitable times for
observations. Remember that it is your responsibility to ensure that observations
are arranged at appropriate times and that you do not run out of teaching with
observations still to take place. If you have not been observed teaching, you
cannot pass the practice-based modules.

Video-based observations also need to be agreed and arranged in good time and
they involve particular requirements. Two DVDs, “A Trainee Guide to Using
Video in Observations of Practice” and “A Practical Guide to Using Video in
Observations of Practice”, are available from your tutor to guide you through this
process. They contain advice, procedural and practical guidance and illustrative
video clips. See also the section Video and the Observation of Practice below.

Whenever possible, one of the three formal observations will be a specialist


observation made by a tutor whose teaching subject is the same as (or close to)
your own; this will normally be your mentor. Alternatively, a member of your
centre team who has an appropriate specialism might carry out this specialist
observation. The feedback you receive will be focused on specialist teaching
issues. Your centre will brief you on arrangements for your specialist observation.

10.2 Preparing for and Reflecting on Teaching Observations

The following points are intended to help you in preparing for formal teaching
observations.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

• You will normally be observed by someone you know. This will often be your
module tutor, but in some circumstances it is necessary for other tutors to
undertake the observation. Nevertheless, you should be given an opportunity
to meet your observer before the visit and to find out about their expectations.

• You will need to be well-prepared before the session. Make sure you have
spare copies of lesson plans and teaching materials to give to your
observing tutor when they arrive, and that the room has somewhere for the
tutor to sit.

• You must complete the preparation form TP1 before the session and give it
to your tutor on arrival.

• You may also need to show your ongoing teaching practitioner file to the tutor
and discuss other aspects of the module. Check on this in advance.

• You should normally expect feedback immediately following the session, and
a written version of the feedback (on form TP2 for a generic observation or
TP4 for a specialist observation) either there and then or as soon as
possible thereafter. If pressing commitments mean that there is no opportunity
for feedback at this time, make an appointment with the tutor for feedback as
soon as possible.

• You do not pass (or fail!) the module on the basis of a single session; instead,
the feedback and your own materials and reflections form part of the overall
evidence you need to collect to show that you have achieved the outcomes.
Keep them in your teaching file.

• Don’t forget to complete the reflection form TP3 in which you give your own
reflections on the feedback and the way you plan to address the development
points raised by the observing tutor.

• Your teaching file for Year One will form the basis for planning for
improvement in Year Two.

Following the observation, you will need to keep copies of your lesson
materials, and of the relevant forms, in your teaching practitioner file.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

10.3 Additional Observations, Trainee Presentations and Microteaching

As well as the formal observations, you should try to obtain as many additional
teaching observations as is practicable. Negotiate observations with your mentor,
with close colleagues and with fellow trainees. As part of your work on the Initial
Teaching Assignment and elsewhere in the course, you will take part in
presentations to other trainees and in microteaching sessions. All of these
activities will give you ‘food for reflection’ and you should make use of them in the
work you submit for modules.

10.4 Mentor Arrangements

As part of the course, you are required to arrange for a suitable person to act as
your mentor. Ideally, your mentor will be a person who teaches the same subject
area as you (or a closely related one), has a teaching qualification and is a more
experienced teacher than you are. Your mentor would also need to be willing to
spend time talking to you about teaching issues and your progress on the course
(about an hour each month), and to observe your teaching at least once each
year.

When arranging a mentor, you need to be confident that they will meet the
following criteria or have equivalent qualifications and experience:

1. Have a recognised teaching qualification.


2. Be employed as a teacher and/or have substantial experience of
teaching in PCET.
3. Have the same or a related specialism to your own.
4. Be sympathetic to the developmental ethos of the course and not
act as an ‘inspector’.

If you are unsure about whether a possible mentor would be appropriate, or if


you have any other questions about arranging a mentor, please consult your
Centre Manager as early as possible in the course.

Your mentor will not normally take part in the formal tuition and assessment of
your work on the course, but should provide support and guidance as you
progress, particularly in relation to teaching and learning issues related to your
specialist area. You should find that the process of reflecting on your learning
and practice, and the development of your Personal Development Plan, are both
greatly enhanced by having a mentor with whom you can talk things over.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

10.5 Video and the Observation of Practice

Video can provide a number of benefits in the observation process, particularly


as a basis for trainees to reflect on their practice. Further, digital technology now
makes the recording of teaching increasingly practicable. For any one of several
reasons, and not necessarily for formal assessment purposes, you or your tutor
may wish to make a video recording of a session that you take.

Note that a number of special considerations apply to the use of video in


educational settings (for example, permission is required from each person who
is to appear on it or, if they are under 18, from their parent or guardian) – but
those who have used it report that it can also provides unique opportunities to
learn and gain insights into the processes of teaching and learning.

For trainees who want, or need, to use this medium for observations, we have
produced two multi-media self-help guides that are designed to assist you in
using digital video easily and effectively. These DVD guides can be supplied on
request either by your tutor or by the PCET office at the University. They include
a set of written protocols that have to be observed if video is to be used as the
basis for an assessment of practice.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

11. The Personal Development Plan

11.1 Introduction

In each of the following modules, trainees are required to maintain a Teaching


Practitioner File, which records their development as a practitioner in teaching or
training through each year of the course:

• DFD7130 Personal and Professional Development


• DID7230 Teaching a Specialist Subject
• DHD7230 Studies in Teaching a Specialist Subject
• DMD7230 Advanced Studies in Teaching a Specialist Subject

An important component of the Teaching Practitioner File is a Personal


Development Plan (PDP). The purpose of the PDP is to enable you to plan,
record and reflect on your learning and achievement as you progress through the
course. Personal Development Planning is now a standard requirement in UK
higher education, and is defined by the Quality Assurance Agency (2004) as:

a process undertaken by an individual to reflect upon their own


learning, performance and/or achievement and to plan for their
personal, educational and career development. The primary
objective for PDP is to improve the capacity of individuals to
understand what and how they are learning, and to review, plan and
take responsibility for their own learning.

As well as this general context for PDPs in higher education, the DfES reform
agenda for teacher education, begun in Success for All (DfES, 2002) and
continued in Equipping our Teachers for the Future (DfES, 2004) and the Further
Education White Paper of 2006, makes an individual planning process a specific
requirement of initial teacher training and continuing professional development.
From 2007, it is a statutory requirement for teachers having the status of
Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills (QTLS) to keep a Professional
Development Record in order to maintain their licence to practise. The PDP is
intended to help you gain experience of this process and to transfer smoothly into
the new system in due course.

The following notes provide detailed guidance on the use of the PDP.

The PDP contains the following elements:

• A short introduction to your current teaching or training role (PDP1)


• Your CV
• A log of your teaching or training hours (PDP2)

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

• Initial Assessment Record (PDP3)


• Your Record of Development (PDP4)
• Your Teaching Observation Record (form PDP5)
• Records of discussions with your mentor (form PDP6)

The Introduction to your teaching role form (PDP1) asks you to provide some
brief contact details for you and your mentor and also an overview of the nature
of the teaching or training you are engaged in. You should also note any previous
teacher training that you have experienced. Please ask your mentor to sign this
form, confirming that they agree to be contacted by the University in connection
with the course. You can assure them that their details will not be passed on to
any other organisation.

Your CV will be helpful to tutors in giving feedback on the appropriateness of


your subject knowledge, industrial experience and background in teaching or
training.

The Log of Teaching Hours (PDP2) is intended to establish the number of


teaching hours you have completed as part of the course (a minimum of 150
hours is required over the two years of the course). It also records the sectors
within which you teach, an important factor in determining whether you are
eligible for accreditation by FENTO or the HE Academy through completion of the
course.

The Initial Assessment Record (PDP3) should be completed within the first 10
weeks of the course. It should draw on the information you and your tutors have
collected regarding your readiness to undertake the course, the support you
might require and what initial direction your development should take. The level
of your skills in language, literacy, numeracy and ICT is an important part of
PDP3. Depending on the programme of work in your particular centre, it may also
be possible to include feedback from the Initial Teaching Assignment in module
DFA7130; this will be helpful in assessing your initial needs in relation to teaching
skills.

The Record of Development (PDP4) is the means by which you will plan, reflect
on and record your general academic progress through the course. Although the
comments you include will be quite brief, they should summarise real
engagement with your development as a teacher, any difficulties experienced,
and the action you need to undertake. For certain development activities, you are
required to write up reflections in a Reflective Journal and you should refer to
your Reflective Journal in PDP4.

The Teaching Observation Record (PDP5) tracks your progress in the


development of practical teaching skills and ensures that you complete the
required number of observations of your teaching. It should summarise the
dialogue with your tutors about your teaching skills and should identify action

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

points for you to work on. You may also wish to refer to your Reflective Journal to
show how you have acted on this feedback. The key purpose of PDP5 is to allow
you and your module tutor to show how your teaching skills have developed over
the year, to highlight the development points that have been raised and your
success in dealing with them. You may find it useful to take your PDP5 to mentor
meetings.

The Record of Discussion with Mentor (PDP6) allows you to set down the
outcomes of regular meetings with your mentor. Again, you are asked to identify
action points. An important feature of the mentor meetings should be a focus on
specialist issues relating to the teaching of your subject, and this should be
evident in the records you make in PDP6. You should normally include one form
for each meeting, but if your meetings with your mentor are very frequent you
may wish to include the outcomes of several meetings in a single form.

As well as these formal sections of the PDP, you may also include other
supporting material such as tutorial record sheets and work on initial assessment
of your learning skills.

The PDP is your document and you have the responsibility for maintaining it, and
for making it available to your tutors when necessary. Although some aspects of
the PDP process require you to work on a one-to-one basis with a tutor or
mentor, you are expected to take the main responsibility for identifying your own
learning needs and proposing action to meet these needs. This will involve work
on your own or in small groups with other trainees, for example during the initial
assessment and planning process, or in preparing for periodic review meetings.

An up-to-date copy of your PDP must be available to tutors during tutorials.

The completed PDP will be assessed as part of your work towards the
professional practice modules (DFD7130, DID7230, DHD7230 and DMD7230) as
noted at the beginning of this section.

The PDP documents may be obtained from your tutors in paper and electronic
form. Electronic copies (in Microsoft Word format) are also available within the
‘Course Documentation’ section of Blackboard, and at the Consortium website
http://consortium.hud.ac.uk/ . In case of difficulty, ask your tutor for a copy.

You are strongly recommended to complete and update the PDP as an


electronic document. However, please ensure that you print hard copies for use
in review sessions and when you submit work.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

11.2 Timescales

The initial assessment and planning process should be completed in the first 10
weeks of the course, and you should ensure that you have completed PDP1 and
PDP3 by the end of November at the latest.

Thereafter, you should aim to update PDP4 regularly (at least twice per term) as
you identify developmental issues and action points, or complete earlier action
points. The log of teaching hours (PDP2) should also be regularly updated.

You should complete the Teaching Observation Record (PDP5) immediately after
each observation.

You should aim to meet with your mentor about once per month, and you should
complete a PDP6 for each meeting.

11.3 Initial Assessment & Planning (PDP1 & PDP3)

As soon as possible after the start of your work on the course, you will complete
the Introduction to your Teaching Role (PDP1) and the initial assessment and
planning form (PDP3). Your tutor will explain this process to you, but particular
points to note are:

• It is a course requirement that you arrange for a suitable person to act as


your mentor during the course. Ideally, your mentor will be a person who
teaches the same subject as you (or a closely related one), has a teaching
qualification and is a more experienced teacher than you are. Your mentor
would also need to be willing to spend time talking to you about teaching
issues and your progress on the course (about an hour each month), and
to observe your teaching at least once each year. See Section 10.4 for
further information on mentors.

• The normal entry requirement for the course is a degree in a subject


related to the one you teach (for PGCE trainees) or at least an NVQ level
3 (or equivalent) in the subject you teach (for Cert Ed trainees). PGCE
trainees whose degree is not related to their teaching subject must have at
least an NVQ level 3 (or equivalent) in the teaching subject. Record your
highest subject qualification on form PDP1. If you were granted non-
standard entry without the above qualifications, please ensure that you
record the qualifications and experience on which your entry was based.

• You may wish to record additional learning support requirements that you
might have. These could arise from, for example, health or disability
issues that might affect your learning. This will enable you and your tutor

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

to identify any support that might be required and, where applicable, to


investigate sources of funding such as the Disabled Students Allowance.

• At an early stage in the course, you will complete initial assessments of


your learning needs in literacy, numeracy and ICT, and may also complete
a learning style analysis. The results of these assessments should be
recorded in PDP3. Teaching in lifelong learning requires an appropriate
standard of literacy, numeracy and ICT skills. If you do not already have
level 2 qualifications in literacy and numeracy (e.g. GCSE English and
Maths at grade C or above), you should aim to achieve this by the end of
the course.

• If you have already completed a Stage 2 teaching qualification, or if you


have very substantial prior knowledge and experience of teaching, you
may wish to claim advanced standing on the basis of accreditation of prior
learning. Give brief details in PDP1 and ask your tutor to explain the
process of APL submission.

11.4 Completing the Record of Development (PDP4)

As the course proceeds, you need to regularly update PDP3 to plan, reflect on
and record your own development. As well as working on this individually, it is
also useful to work in small groups and to share experiences and ideas in Cert
Ed/PGCE class meetings.

A number of suggestions for development areas and action points are given in
the guidance sheets below, and again it will be useful to talk about these in class
and to suggest additional ideas for developing your knowledge and skills.

Some of the suggestions are there not just because of their own value, but
because they may soon become statutory elements of initial teacher training
courses. These include:

• Peer observation of teaching (that is, you observe another colleague or


course member, they observe you, and you discuss and share your ideas
and skills). When you teach in very different ways and/or in different
subject areas this can be particularly valuable.

• Observation/experience of different phases and contexts of education.


You can significantly broaden and deepen your viewpoints by observing or
helping in a different organisation to your own, particularly where the
learners are a different age or level to your own.

Note that these two suggestions may involve protection issues for children or
vulnerable adults; always talk to your tutor before following them up.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

The final sheet on this form asks you to review, in a fairly open-ended way, your
progress and development over a complete year of the course. Once again,
suggestions are provided in the guidance sheets.

11.5 Tutorials

From time to time during the course you will have individual or small-group
tutorials with your tutors. These might be to address specific issues (for example
progress with assignments) or to discuss progress in general. In either case,
please ensure that you take along your PDP as you or your tutor may wish to
refer to it or to suggest development/action points.

11.6 Some Questions and Answers about the Personal Development Plan

Who completes the PDP – me or my tutor?

It is entirely your own responsibility to fill in each section of the PDP, and to
reflect on your progress and possible action points in preparation for this.

Will we spend time in class on discussing and completing the PDP?

You can expect to spend some time in class near the beginning of the course
being introduced to the PDP process and engaging in/recording initial
assessment activities. You can also expect to spend further class time discussing
approaches to its completion and considering the guidance sheets and other
ideas for good practice in working with the PDP. You may wish to work in
learning sets to share approaches to the PDP. However, you would normally
expect to undertake the actual writing of the PDP as an individual activity.

How often should I meet with my mentor? Who fills in the mentor record sheets?

If possible, you should meet once a month with your mentor (more often if you
both agree that this would be useful). Your mentor should be involved in deciding
what to record in PDP6, but ultimately you are responsible for filling it in.

Can I fail the PDP?

No. The PDP is not a module, so you can’t pass or fail it. However, it forms part
of the assessment strategy for the practical teaching modules and links to the
assignment for the Curriculum and Professionalism modules in Year 2. This

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

means that it must be completed to a satisfactory standard in order for you to


succeed in those modules.

OK, so what is a ‘satisfactory standard’?

Your PDP needs to show reflection on your learning needs across the course
and the ability to identify and work on meaningful action points for improving
knowledge and skills in teaching and learning. It needs to consider and promote
your development (where relevant) in personal skills of language, literacy and
numeracy and also in ICT. Your PDP also needs to show that you have reflected
on, and responded to, issues raised in teaching observations and meetings with
your mentor. Obviously, all the relevant sections need to be completed to achieve
this.

I can’t see any learning outcomes about the PDP, so why do I have to complete
it?

Although there are no specific learning outcomes saying that you must produce a
PDP, it contributes to the achievement of a number of outcomes in the modules
mentioned above.

More generally, as explained above, teachers working towards or holding QTLS


are expected to engage in a PDP process. It is therefore important for
professionally qualified teachers to become familiar with this type of process in
their initial training.

Is it OK to handwrite the PDP?

The PDP forms are designed to be completed using Microsoft Word or similar
software. If you genuinely do not have access to a computer, or have other
genuine reasons that would prevent you completing the PDP electronically, it
would be acceptable to handwrite it. However, some of the PDP forms would
probably be too small to complete in this way (in particular, PDP3). You should
therefore use separate sheets of paper to supplement what you write on the
forms themselves.

Should I include the results of initial assessment of literacy and numeracy skills
in the PDP?

Yes. All trainees need to undertake an initial assessment and the information
gained by this process is recorded in PDP3.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

Should I record things to be studied in modules as development points in the


PDP?

Not normally. Where it is obvious that a particular issue will be dealt with in the
natural course of a module, you would not include it as a development or action
point. For example, you would not record as an action point in Year 1: ‘I need to
learn about lesson planning’, because it is clear that this will be covered in the
module DFA7130.

What you might record, though, is ‘I need to investigate ways of planning to meet
individual needs in the drop-in workshop where I teach ICT skills’ as this
individualises more general module work and relates it to your own needs for
working in a particular context.

You might also record development points relating to better or deeper


understanding of points covered in modules where this is relevant to your needs.

Should I keep a learning diary as part of the PDP?

This is not a requirement, but it can be very useful and many trainees have done
this in the past. It is then possible to reflect at greater length on your experiences,
and later to draw on and summarise your reflections for use in completing the
PDP.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

12. Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

There are three mechanisms for accrediting your prior learning as part of the
requirements for the Certificate, Professional Graduate Certificate or
Postgraduate Certificate in Education:

• Negotiating a learning contract to include evidence of your prior learning in


one or more learning outcomes. This will be particularly appropriate if you
already hold one of the new teaching qualifications (PTLLS or CTLLS) – in
this case ‘standard’ learning contracts to help you with the process are
available from your Centre Manager. Evidence for the remaining module
outcomes should then be produced in the normal way, either via the
assignments or by negotiation, documented in the learning contract. Please
ensure that you distinguish clearly between evidence of prior learning and
evidence of learning in the module.

• Making a claim for Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) against


a complete module (specific credit). You may do this if you believe that you
have already achieved all of the learning outcomes for a particular module,
and can produce evidence to support this.

• Making a claim for Accreditation of Prior Learning Achievement (APLA)


against one or more modules. This would be appropriate if you have already
successfully completed a City & Guilds 7407 Stages One and Two, or another
Cert. Ed./PGCE course elsewhere. It may then be possible to award credit to
you on the basis of this prior achievement. Consult your Centre Tutor if you
think that you may have a claim for APLA (it is not possible to consider claims
for APLA based on the City and Guilds 7306/7).

• PTLLS and CTLLS awards consist of 6 credits and up to 24 credits


respectively. They cannot therefore be used to make APLA claims against
complete modules.

Please note that any APL claims for specific credit must be submitted for
assessment by 31 October of your first year of study.

If you are expecting to achieve credit through the APL procedures adopted by the
course you should use the APL document (obtainable from your Centre
Tutor) to identify your evidence and write up the reflective summaries which you
will need to support your claim. Each claim must be matched against the
outcomes contained in the modules for which you are seeking accreditation.

It is important to note that the principle on which an APL claim for a complete
module is made is that you have already achieved the learning outcomes, and

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

therefore do not need to study the module. If you find that you need a
significant amount of tutor support to put together your claim (for example, if you
need detailed explanations of what the module outcomes mean or what might be
appropriate evidence), it is likely that an APL claim is not appropriate in your
case and you should study the module in the normal way.

The course regulations do not permit the award of credit by APL against
the second year modules.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

13. Reflection

You will already have read that the course, in common with other courses in the
School of Education and Professional Development, requires you to engage in
reflective learning. As noted earlier, the fact that you are learning as a teacher or
trainer means that the processes by which you and your peers learn are an
important resource for your own practice.

In addition, professional standards for teachers require you to engage in


reflection. The purpose of this section is to help you to develop an understanding
of what we mean by reflective learning or practice and to be more effective in
your own reflection.

Avis, Fisher and Thompson (2009) contains a chapter on Reflection. A study


pack on reflective practice (Reynolds, 2003) has been developed by Barbara
Reynolds of Harrogate College. It is available on Blackboard or from your tutor.

13.1 Definitions of Reflective Learning and Teaching

[Reflection is the] active, persistent and careful consideration of any


belief or … knowledge in the light of the grounds that support it and
the further conclusion to which it tends.
Dewey (1933, p.9)

Reflection in the context of learning is a generic term for those


intellectual and affective activities in which individuals engage to
explore their experiences in order to lead to new understandings and
appreciations.
Boud & Walker (1985, p.19)

Reflection involves the critique of assumptions about the content or


process of problem solving … The critique of premises or
presuppositions pertains to problem posing as distinct from problem
solving. Problem posing involves making a taken-for-granted
situation problematic, raising questions regarding its validity.
Mezirow (1991, p. 105)

The term reflective practice is particularly associated with the work of Schön
(1983) and has proved to be immensely influential in professional education and
training. Practitioners are encouraged to develop problem-solving skills relating
to situations at work beyond just selecting from a pre-determined formula or
procedure. This is done by reflecting on their experience of similar situations and
the effectiveness of the solutions they have tried. The process of reflection

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involves generalising and making educated guesses about what will work in the
future. These generalisations are then tested and their effectiveness as guides to
practice is evaluated.

The reflective practice model goes beyond merely ‘thinking about one’s
teaching’. By restricting reflection to practice, practitioners may not regard their
own values, beliefs and assumptions, or those of the system within which they
work as open to question. Schön describes reflection which is simply concerned
with finding a better means to an unquestioned end as ‘single-loop’ learning. He
encourages practitioners to engage in reflection that questions the ends
themselves, what he calls ‘double-loop’ learning.

This second strand of reflection, in which we explicitly question underlying


assumptions and aims, is known as critical reflection (Mezirow, 1991). It
encourages learners to reflect on contradictions and dilemmas inspired by
clashes between their own world-view and the value-system of the situation
within which they work. This can lead to a fundamental re-making of the
reflector’s value-system and is a direct product of the process of critical reflection.
Mezirow calls this transformative learning and contends that it is more important
than the solution of the problem that originally prompted the critical reflection

A third strand within the area of reflective learning is the idea of critical
consciousness associated with Paulo Freire (1970) and his ideas of
emancipatory learning. It emphasises group, rather than individual, discussion of
issues and takes its themes from the collective concerns of group members. Its
aim is largely political: to identify structural factors which constrain the lives,
practice and understandings of specific groups and to recognise the political
interests operating through such constraints.

When you wish to reflect on a particular issue, you may have good reason for
operating entirely within one of these strands; at different times any one of them
may be the most appropriate. Alternatively, when confronting a complex issue
you may find it useful to bear in mind all three strands. For example, you might
reflect on how to achieve a given objective in your work, such as implementing a
quality assurance procedure (reflective practice). Going further, you might also
consider the basis of your own judgements about what constitutes a desirable
outcome in this situation (critical reflection, possibly leading to transformative
learning) and to ask whose interests are served by the establishment of such a
system (critical consciousness).

It will be clear that the idea of ‘reflection’ is a complex one and can be interpreted
in different ways. In this course, we take the following working definitions:

• Reflective Learning is the systematic analysis and evaluation of what, how


and why you are learning. The reflective learner actively considers the

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content of their studies but also questions and seeks to improve their learning
process, by thinking about the various factors contributing to their learning:
themselves, the tutor, other trainees, experience as a teacher and so on. It
will include elements of transformative learning and critical reflection (see
above). Reflective learning is particularly important in a programme of teacher
training because it provides you with a direct insight into the experiences of a
learner; you should use this insight to help inform your own teaching or
training. The main places for you to demonstrate reflective learning are the
Personal Development Plan and the Curriculum and Professional Issues
modules.

• Reflective Practice is the systematic analysis and evaluation of what, how


and why you are teaching or training. It questions and seeks to improve your
professional practice by means of the approach outlined above; however, this
course requires you to go beyond constructing ‘personal theories’ and relate
your analysis of practice to the knowledge and understanding you are gaining
through the modules you study. Reflective practice will always include critical
reflection and may lead to elements of transformative learning. The
assignments and your written evaluations in the Professional Practice
modules will be the main ways in which you demonstrate reflective practice.

• Reflection is used to indicate reflective learning or reflective practice when


either or both is intended.

13.2 Reflection in the In-Service Course

Reflection will occur in the course in different ways:

• Your own informal reflection which you undertake simply because you are
interested in the issues raised by your teaching or training and by your study
on the course.
• The reflection taking place in your group as you work on the modules,
perhaps initiated by the tutor or perhaps by group members.
• Many of the assignments require you to reflect on particular issues raised in
the module (for example, ‘lesson reflections’ in the Professional Practice
modules).
• The Personal Development Plan provides several opportunities for you to
reflect on your own learning and teaching.

The following table summarises the different ways in which you need to reflect in
your assessed work.

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Focus of How demonstrated Where and when


reflection
Your own Personal Development Before and during tutorials
learning & Plan and meetings with your
development mentor.
Module assignment Some modules have
learning outcomes asking
you to reflect on your
learning within the module.
Your own Reflections on teaching Before and after each
teaching observations. observation, using TP1 &
TP3.
Lesson reflections in In modules DFD7130,
teaching file. DID7230, DHD7230,
DMD7230 (see module
assignments).
Module assignments. All modules.
Processes, Module assignments. All modules.
policies and
theories of
education and
training

You may find it helpful to maintain a ‘learning diary’ in which you set down on a
regular basis your reflections on teaching and learning. When writing up work for
the course, you then draw on your journal as a resource. The process of fairly
continuous written reflection helps ‘break the ice’ and takes a lot of the pressure
off when you come to the more formal requirements of the course.

13.3 Levels of Reflection

Thinking about the influential strands in reflection described earlier can provide a
starting point for your own reflective activity. Confronting a particular issue, you
might ask: Is this about practice, for the moment not questioning the values or
assumptions behind it? Is it a situation which challenges my value-system, so
that I want to think about how and why I feel in relation to it? Is it a situation which
makes me want to question the political or economic forces lying behind it?

To improve your reflective abilities you should work with the Reflective Practice
study pack, either on your own or preferably within a group. You should also
consider reflective writing produced by yourself and by others, analysing them to

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understand the way in which they approach their concerns.

Examples of reflection can be very diverse in terms of the depth at which they
tackle an issue. The following scheme (due largely to Mike Allen, a former tutor at
the University of Huddersfield) shows a hierarchy of levels of reflection which will
prove useful in analysing your own writing.

Description
This is simply a non-evaluative account of your unsupported memory of an event:
“we had a visiting speaker on counselling who talked about some of her own
experiences”.

Evaluation
Personal evaluation. This includes the writer’s immediate impression of the
event: “we had a most interesting input from a practising counsellor. I found this
to be very helpful”.

Supported evaluation. This relates the event to other involvement including


discussion, mapping on to personal experience and reading. “I discussed the
input from the counsellor with my group. We agreed that the personal experience
of the counsellor gave us a deeper insight into the ethical considerations than we
had beforehand” or “what the speaker claimed is contrary to my own extensive
experience in student support” or “I note from my reading that both directive and
non-directive counselling are described. The speaker made no use of the latter. I
can see that this is because she is not involved in career counselling where this
may have a role”.

Analysis
This may include the use of a theoretical perspective: “the non-critical
relationship between the counsellor and the client indicated that she was
establishing the sort of unconditional positive regard described by Carl Rogers”
or “her use of specific instances from her experience to demonstrate general
principles was a good example of inductive teaching”.

Application & Technical Reflection


This is the transfer of reflection to your current practice: “the most interesting
aspect of the input was the use of personal anecdotes. I will experiment with this
in my law class” or “the room was much too large. I could neither see nor hear
properly. When faced with this problem I think I will try a team approach. I could
have a lead lecture using the PA system and the large screen Powerpoint
projector, with a follow-up in small tutorial groups”.

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Critical Reflection
This is the questioning of the assumptions and values underlying practice: “I was
concerned that many of the counselling examples were concerned with retaining
students on course, rather than identifying the best action for that student –
which may involve leaving the course” or “having seen and heard the excellent
practice of the counsellor, aimed at supporting students rather than achieving
organisational targets, I am much more positive than before about the role of
student counselling in my organisation”.

Brookfield’s Critical Lenses


An additional perspective on the depth of your reflection is Brookfield’s (1995)
idea of the four ‘critical lenses’. To fully reflect on a teaching/learning situation, he
suggests, you need to look at it through your own eyes but also the eyes of your
colleagues, your students and of theoretical literature.

In Conclusion
You may find it helpful to look at your own reflections and see whether they
represent a reasonable spread over the above. If much of your reflection is at the
first or second level, try to use this hierarchy to increase the use you make of
reflecting. Use Barbara Reynolds’ resource pack to explore in more detail the
available models and strategies relating to reflection.

13.4 Some Examples of Reflection

The following boxes give some examples of how trainees in the early stages of
their course have reflected on issues concerning them. You might like to discuss
them with colleagues and identify which of the three strands of reflection are
being used. You should also think about the degree to which the examples
analyse and criticise events, rather than simply describing them. Also think about
how the extracts should continue from where they leave off and how the levels of
reflection they display could be raised.

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1 “I should have watched the video first”


Technical
I am beginning to understand the importance of meeting the
Reflection
individual needs of each student in my groups. Both X and Y
are far more motivated and ask really demanding questions
at times. My planning needs to take into account that some
students need to be motivated before they will learn but
others already want to learn and make progress more
quickly.

However, today the whole group failed to grasp what I was


Technical
trying to get across and on reflection I expect I will need to re-
Reflection
visit this lesson and change the way I approached it. In
particular the videotape was too long and contained material
which was irrelevant to the outcomes of the lesson. I was
advised to preview the tape and how right that advice now
seems. Next time I will!

2 “My Tutor Observed Today”

I have dreaded this event all weekend and was very Personal
nervous about X coming to see me teach. The lesson evaluation
went really well as far as I was concerned and I managed
to get the students in the right mood to ‘take part’ in my
discussions. They appeared to be attentive and interested
in the subject of accident prevention and gave some really
good examples of their own experiences at work.

My Q&A during the session and the exercises done by the


group suggested that several of the learning outcomes Technical
were being achieved, but X pointed out that one of the Reflection
outcomes was not assessed in this session and some
follow-up would be needed. X suggested that I make a
seating plan for the class to enable me to use the names
of the students much earlier (I have only been with them
two weeks and there are 15 in the group).

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3 “I need to learn more about IT”

The Internet may be a resource with which we must Technical


interact (and in fairness I have found some good sites Reflection
which have been relevant to this module). I do need to
learn how to use search engines more effectively. I
am spending far too much time scrolling and locating
stuff which is not relevant. I am going to see if there
is any guidance material in the college on using
search engines. I really do need to spend less time
Beginning of
searching through this huge mountain of material.
critical
reflection
I have always thought that there is more to education
Reflection
than accumulating information and using the latest
technology, but I worry when I see course documents
stressing that my students must learn to use IT in
subject sessions and see my colleagues using the
Internet in virtually every session …

4 “First Meeting of the Professional Module”

Description On Wednesday we met for the Curriculum and


Professional Issues modules for the first time. The
morning was largely spent reviewing the outcomes and
considering the various ways in which we could tackle the
outcomes. We were provided with the schedule of
meetings and the assignment.
Personal
evaluation
In the afternoon the College Quality Manager and the
head of QA at a local training organisation ran a
workshop on Quality systems in education. There were
some interesting ideas in this workshop, including the
definition of quality as meeting a specification and the
possibility of applying this to a training situation.

Beginning to However, I felt that this was driven by the assumption that
critically we had to have a business model of quality come what
reflect
may, however inappropriate it was to training or education
and began to question what was behind this. Is it a
question of finding ways to save money, to equate
education with industry, to increase central government
control over education or whatever? …

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Reflection is a matter of continuous practice. You will find that sharing your
reflections with other members of your group(s) will help, although you must
remember that reflection is a personal process too. What is important to you,
may not be important to others. You will have different circumstances to your
peers and therefore your learning environment will be different, as indeed will
your learning needs and desires. Show your reflections to your module tutor too,
s/he will be able to advise you on the style and content of your writing.

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14. E-Learning Services and Support

There is an increasing range of facilities and services available to you “on-line”.


Up-to-date information is available either from the separate “Consortium E-
Learning Handbook”, or from http://consortium.hud.ac.uk and then “Learning
Resources” in the Student Area. You can directly access the sites below by
clicking on the links under ‘services’ on the consortium home page

TITLE & ADDRESS DESCRIPTION


The main web site of the University with details of
The University of
all the services it provides for its students, including
Huddersfield
those who study off-campus – and a direct link to
http://www.hud.ac.uk
Blackboard with guidance on accessing it.
For a range of information on learning resources
and on-line services – from ordering books and
The University Library downloading e-journals, to using self-study packs
http://www.hud.ac.uk/cls on study skills and remote and/or specialised
databases. It also has a wide selection of advice,
FAQs, guides etc in its “Help” section.
A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) with notice-
Blackboard boards, resources and selected course documents.
(The University’s VLE) Blackboard is accessible once you are registered
http://virtual.hud.ac.uk as a student of the University on the in-service
course for Cert. Ed or PGCE.
Consortium A “gateway” to many other relevant web sites (see
(The on-line presence of “Links”); this site provides information and a wide
CPCET) variety of services and “tools” for enhancing your
http://consortium.hud.ac.uk learning and teaching.

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15. Frequently Asked Questions

In this section we will attempt to address some common questions about the
PGCE and Cert. Ed. courses. If the answers to your questions are not included
here please ask your Centre Manager or Module Tutor. Often other trainees can
help to solve problems too.

What is the difference between the Certificate, Professional Graduate


Certificate and Postgraduate Certificate in Education?

Any trainee enrolled on the course is entitled to work for a Certificate in


Education. In order to gain a Professional Graduate or Postgraduate Certificate2
in Education (PGCE) you need to be a graduate or equivalent of a recognised
university (at the beginning of the course or, exceptionally, at the beginning of
year two) and you need to gain 60 credit points at honours level or postgraduate
level respectively. See Section 6.1 for more details.

As teaching qualifications, the three certificates are equivalent. As you will see
from the course outcomes, we have set the practical and professional outcomes
to be identical for all three awards. The difference is in the level of academic work
required, which is dependent on the expected previous academic experience of
the trainee.

How long will it take?

In-service trainees will normally take two years to complete the course. Suitably
qualified and experienced trainees may be able to complete the course in less
than two years by means of accreditation of prior learning (APL). However, not all
centres offer such accelerated programmes.

What is QTLS and how do I get it?

QTLS stands for Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills and is the professional
status for the sector introduced in the 2007 reforms (see Chapter 3 of Avis,
Fisher and Thompson, 2009). In order to achieve QTLS, you must first register
with the Institute for Learning (IfL). On successful completion of our course, you
will then begin a period of professional formation monitored by the IfL; QTLS is
awarded subsequent to completing this process. Once you have achieved QTLS,
to maintain this status you must provide evidence to IfL that you are engaging in
at least 30 hours per year of Continuing Professional Development (CPD). For
more information, see the IfL website on www.ifl.ac.uk.

2
The Postgraduate Certificate in Education is available only at the University and the University Campuses
at Barnsley and Oldham, and is subject to a selection process.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

Does the Course confer Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) for work in
Schools?

No. The awards are specifically for the post-compulsory sector and do not lead to
QTS. Should you wish to teach in schools, you should consult the TTA website at
http://www.teach-tta.gov.uk/. The site contains useful information on the
Graduate and Registered teacher scheme, an employment-based route which
may be attractive to a teacher experienced in the post-16 sector.

How much does it cost?

The tuition fees for the course are £840 per year in 2009-10. In year two, you will
also need to budget for travel and accommodation costs involved in attending
conference events at the University as part of the specialist modules. These
additional costs are likely to be around £100.

What Financial Support is available?

Student loans are available for tuition fees. You may also be eligible for a non
means-tested grant of £553, which will be assessed by Student Finance
England. Your eligibility for this grant depends in part upon the full-time
equivalent length of the course. The University’s position is that the course is
equivalent to 18 weeks full-time study per year and your Centre Manager can
provide you with documentation to explain this position. However, the
responsibility for making the assessment lies with Student Finance England. For
further information on funding, see the Funding Guide on the University website
at http://www2.hud.ac.uk/edu/funding/pt_pcet_funding.php.

What do I do if I change personal details (such as my address)?

You should inform your centre and also send the change of personal details form
(at the end of this handbook) to the course Administrator, Julie Gledhill (School of
Education and Professional Development, University of Huddersfield, Lockside,
Queensgate, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, HD1 3DH). Julie can also be
contacted on email at j.a.gledhill@hud.ac.uk.

How do I claim Accreditation of Prior Learning?

You can use a Stage 2 teaching qualification such as the C & G 7407 to obtain
accreditation of prior learning achievement (APLA). Alternatively, you could use
extensive teaching experience and knowledge of education (possibly gained from
good performance in a C & G 7306/7 programme) to support a claim for
accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL). The maximum amount of
credit you would normally expect to achieve through APL is 60 points. Claims for
APEL need to be completed by 31 October in your first year of study (31 March

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

for January starters).

Please read carefully the section on Accrediting Prior Learning before making a
claim for APL.

I already hold PTLLS. Do I have to take it again as part of the course?

We have a standard learning contract for holders of PTLLS awards, which may
be used to exempt you from one of the course assignments.

I hold a CTLLS award. Can I enter Year 2 of the course directly?

Year 1 of the course consists of 60 credits, whereas CTLLS consists of up to 24


credits. For this reason, it is not possible to enter Year 2 directly with CTLLS
alone. However, it may be that you have evidence of additional prior learning
which would help you to construct an APEL claim and this may form the basis of
direct entry to Year 2.

If you enter Year 1, there is a standard learning contract which can be used to
exempt holders of CTLLS from appropriate parts of the course requirements.

What times do I need to attend?

Local arrangements will differ and Centre Managers will make these known to
you in the early weeks of your course. However, most in-service trainees attend
for one session (day, evening or twilight depending on local arrangements) per
week. Sessions last typically 3 to 4 hours plus private study time.

What do I do if I am ill and unable to attend?

Keep your tutors informed at all times when you are unable to attend through ill
health or personal difficulty. It is vital that you do keep tutors informed especially
where your progress and rate of achieving credit is hampered by illness or
personal difficulty. Please note that if you do not attend for three weeks without
contacting your Centre Manager you may be withdrawn from the course.

What work do I have to do to pass a module and gain the credit points?

Each module specification tells you exactly what learning outcomes you must
achieve. Standard assignments are available for use by In-Service trainees.
However, in some cases it may be desirable for you to negotiate the ways in
which you personally achieve the outcomes. In this instance you would be
expected to enter into a learning contract with the tutor running the module. This
possibility allows you to integrate your learning fully with your practical teaching
or training. Discuss this with your module tutors where you wish to negotiate the
ways in which you tackle the module outcomes.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

How much time will I need to devote to studies?

All modules are based on the assumption that trainees will spend around 100
hours on their studies, for each 10 credits studied. Thus a 30 credit module will
require around 300 hours of study time. These average study times include the
tutor inputs and group meetings, which you will attend during the course. When
your tutor assesses your work s/he will be making a judgement on whether or not
you have spent an appropriate amount of time on each module submission. It is
expected that a majority of your learning will stem from your efforts and activities,
such as reading, research and work based experience. Sharing with other
learners is also a valuable learning activity; do not spend too much time learning
alone!!

How much reading do I need to do?

Reading is an essential part of the learning process and therefore you will be
expected to read widely in the discipline of education and training. Although
much of this reading could be in the form of books and journal articles, remember
that the educational newspapers, such as the Times Educational Supplement, or
Higher Education Supplement (published on Fridays) and the Guardian
(published on Tuesday) are a rich source of articles and features, particularly in
relation to national policy.

Is there a set book for the course?

A key text for both years of the course is Avis, J., Fisher, R. and Thompson, R.
(Eds.) (2009) Teaching in Lifelong Learning: A guide to theory and practice.
Maidenhead: Open University Press. In addition to dealing with course content,
this book contains an extensive bibliography.

Is there a reading list?

There are two sources for reading lists in addition to the text mentioned above.
Each module specification includes a reading list for that module. There is also
an indicative reading list for post-compulsory education and training, which is
circulated to all tutors and centres operating the course. The reading list is
combined with a course reader, which contains a number of significant recent
articles dealing with post-compulsory education and training. Copies are
available through your Centre at a nominal charge to cover printing and binding.

How do I reference my reading?

The course uses the Harvard system of referencing. For more information, see
the section on Harvard referencing.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

Must I use a computer in my work for the course?

Teachers in all sectors of education and training need to utilise Information &
Communications Technology (ICT) to enhance learning as well as in preparation
and administration. For this reason, ICT is a key transferable skill within the
course. You will be expected to use ICT (where appropriate) in your teaching
and also in your own learning on the course. Your assessed written work should
always be word-processed unless there is good reason for it to be presented in
some other form. If you are not confident, or lack ICT skills, there will be provision
in your centre to undertake development activities.

May I use email?

You will have access to the University email system once you are registered and
enrolled at the University (see the section on E-learning). If you prefer to use your
own email address, you should arrange for email to be forwarded from your
University account as the University may send important communications by
email. You will find that email is an effective way of contacting tutors at the
University and is becoming more reliable than the telephone as tutors spend a
large amount of time away from their desks. Ask locally to find out the
preferences of your centre with respect to email.

How will I be assessed?

You and your module tutor must agree in advance, through a learning contract or
assignment, the material you will produce to support your claim for credit. The
evidence provides proof that you have achieved the learning outcomes specified
for the module. When you submit this work, it will be assessed by the module
tutor, who will give feedback on the quality of your work and points for further
development. The module tutor is then responsible for recommending the award
of credit, applying the assessment criteria contained in each of the module and
also the course assessment criteria.

What do I do if things go wrong?

Discuss any problems you may encounter with your Centre Manager or module
tutor at the earliest opportunity (confidentiality will, of course, be maintained). We
want you to pass modules and achieve your award and the University has
systems for dealing with difficulties encountered by trainees.

What happens if I cannot meet the assessment deadlines?

Deadlines for the submission of assessed work will normally be adhered to


rigorously. Requests for extensions will normally be granted only in cases of
absence through illness, accident or through serious domestic or personal

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difficulties. Requests must be in writing to the Centre Manager using the


appropriate forms or systems operating locally. All requests must be received
before the relevant assessment deadline. If any of these situations apply to you
please make sure you keep your tutor informed, collect any necessary forms,
complete the form and get it signed by your Centre Manager who can permit an
extension to deadlines. Extensions will normally be granted for one or two weeks
only. Late submissions without approved extension will not normally be accepted.

What happens if I do not met the FINAL assessment deadline?

If there are genuine reasons for this – known in the University as ‘Extenuating
Circumstances’, you must share these problems with your Centre Manager at the
earliest possible moment. The University regulations permit you to claim for
more time to complete your assessed work, if you encounter health problems,
family bereavement or serious domestic problems, for example. Claims for
extenuating circumstances must be made on the appropriate form (copies are
available from your centre). Your claim will be assessed by a panel at the
University and a recommendation made to the Course Assessment Board.

Will my work be graded?

Assessed work on the PGCE and Cert Ed courses is graded Pass or Fail.

What happens if I don’t gain enough credit at the end of the Course?

If you have less than 120 credit points by the time of the September meeting of
the Course Assessment Board, you will not be awarded a Certificate. You will
receive your Certificate in Education (or PGCE) once 120 credit points have been
achieved. An LEA does not make payments for extension study unless they
have been informed earlier of a deferral or temporary suspension from the
course. In cases of considerable under-achievement, the LEA may seek a
reimbursement of fees already paid. Study beyond the end of two years may
incur extra charges and enrolment fees, which are not supported by an LEA.
Make sure you keep to the submission dates or claim extenuating circumstances
- in all cases these claims must be supported by medical notes or other similar
documentation.

How do I pay for credit when I am not receiving Financial Support?

If you do not achieve 120 credit points by the time your funding runs out, you
may be asked to pay charges to enable you to receive further tutorial support and
also to be registered with the University in order to be awarded credit. You
should contact your Centre Manager and/or the Registry of the University for the
details of the charges to be made under such circumstances.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

What if I withdraw from the course or don’t attend for some time?

The important thing is for you to ensure that your tutors know your position and
that, in turn, they keep the University informed. The University Registry must be
notified of withdrawals on the appropriate form. If you should withdraw part of the
way through the year, your funding provider needs to be informed so that it can
stop any remaining payments and seek a partial refund, if appropriate. In cases
of temporary withdrawal (“suspension of study”), you are advised to negotiate
with your funding provider for the award to be resumed at a later date.

University regulations state that a trainee who has not attended for more than 3
weeks, and who fails to make contact, may be treated as withdrawn.

Whatever credit you have gained, you keep. You can take it away with you and
come back later or transfer your credit into another course. You have up to 5
years from your initial enrolment during which you can be assessed for your
Certificate.

What do I do if my teaching hours are insufficient?

The University offered you a place on the in-service course on the understanding
that you will teach a minimum of 75 hours in any one year of the course, totalling
150 hours in the two years. If your teaching contract is changed or terminated
and you cannot fulfil this requirement, contact your Centre Manager immediately.

What contact will I have with other people on the course?

You will be allocated a personal tutor/counsellor and you will meet module tutors
who also act as your assessor (external assessors are appointed by the
University). You may have a mentor on placement and other work colleagues
may well be involved in giving you advice and support. Then there are other
trainees in your group with whom you will work, share and learn. Elsewhere,
there are about 2000 other trainees working towards the Certificate and
Postgraduate Certificate in Education in a network of 30 centres spread
throughout the North of England or based at the University.

Can I change centres?

In certain circumstances, you may need to change your centre during the in-
service course. For example, you might change jobs from one institution to
another and would benefit by moving to another centre closer to your work.
Please discuss this with your current Centre Manager in the first instance.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

How am I assessed on my teaching?

There are two modules (totalling 60 credit points) dealing with the practice of
teaching, which will be assessed in part by your tutors in teaching observations.
A tutor will visit you during each module and you will also maintain a teaching
practitioner file for each of these modules. You should encourage others to visit
your classroom to observe you and provide you with feedback about your
teaching - your mentor, colleagues, or other trainees on the course. You can
observe yourself using audio and/or video recording.

What is "reflection"?

We believe that professionals should consistently and regularly review and


evaluate their practice. In addition, they should do this from a secure knowledge
and understanding of theory and issues in post-compulsory education and
training. The reflective learning process enables you to demonstrate that you are
able to do this, by analysing your teaching and learning experiences and relating
them to the knowledge and understanding you gain from the course. Reflection
also involves you in questioning your own educational values and those of
society. More detailed definitions and examples of reflective learning and
reflective practice are included in Section 15.

Can I use my work from one module as evidence for other modules?

No. Work used to claim credit in one module may not be used to gain credit in
another module. Dual counting is not permitted. However you may find that
separate pieces of work could be used in different ways and in such cases you
should always ask the module tutor for guidance and assistance in determining
what is permitted.

Can one piece of evidence cover more than one module outcome?

Yes, and you will probably find this happens quite often. For example a lesson
plan will contain learning outcomes (and demonstrate your skill in preparing
these) together with an indication of your organisation and planning skills. It will
also provide an indication of your ability to satisfy the learning needs of your
students. In this way it would be possible to see that you had begun to meet
several outcome from the one document.

What is the Teaching Log for?

In the Personal Development Plan, you will be required to maintain a Teaching


Log in which you should record your teaching over the two Practitioner Modules.
You should undertake at least 150 hours of paid teaching over the two years of
the course, with a minimum of normally 75 hours in any one year of a two-year
course. The purpose of the teaching log is to show to your tutors that you have

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

achieved this minimum, and to indicate the breadth of experience you have
obtained. It also allows you to demonstrate that you have worked in a particular
sector of education, such as FE or HE. This is important if you are aiming for
accreditation by LLUK or the HE Academy.

When do I get my Certificate?

Once you have achieved 120 credits of the right level, the Course Assessment
Board, which meets in September in Huddersfield, will award your Certificate.
You are warmly invited to receive your Certificate at the annual Awards
Ceremony in Huddersfield during November. If you are not able to attend, your
Certificate will be posted to you, or your centre may arrange a local awards
ceremony.

And, finally, what could I do after my Certificate?

We would like to think that you would like to continue studying. The University of
Huddersfield offers a BA (Hons) in Education and Training in which the 120 credit
points of your certificate are accredited. Graduates may wish to consider the MA
or EdD programmes offered by the School of Education and Professional
Development or alternatively the MSc in E-Learning. Please see the University
website for details.

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University of Huddersfield Certificate in Education and PGCE (Post-Compulsory Education and Training)

16. References

Avis, J., Fisher, R. and Thompson, R. (2009) Teaching in Lifelong Learning: A


guide to theory and practice. Maidenhead: Open University Press.
Boud, D. & Walker, D. (1985) Barriers to reflection on experience, in Boud, D.,
Keogh, R. and Walker, D. Reflection: Turning Experience into Learning. London:
Kogan Page.
Brookfield, S. (1995) Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher. San Francisco:
Jossey Bass Wiley.
Dewey, J. (1933) How we Think: A Restatement of the Relation of Reflective
Thinking to the Educative Process. Boston: D. C. Heath.
DfES (Department for Education and Skills) (2002) Success for All. London:
DfES Publications.
DfES (2004) Equipping our Teachers for the Future: Reforming Initial Teacher
Training for the Learning and Skills Sector. London: DfES Publications.
Freire, P. (1970) Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Harmondsworth: Penguin.
Further Education White Paper (2006) Raising Skills, Improving Life Chances.
Nottingham: DfES Publications.
Hillier, Y. (2002) Reflective Teaching in Further and Adult Education. London:
Continuum International Publishing Group.
LLUK (Lifelong Learning UK) (2007a) Addressing Literacy, Language, Numeracy
and ICT Needs in Education and Training: Defining the Minimum Core of
Teachers’ Knowledge, Understanding and Personal Skills. London: LLUK.
LLUK (2007b) Inclusive Learning Approaches for Literacy, Language, Numeracy
and ICT. London: LLUK.
LLUK (2007c) New Overarching Professional Standards for Teachers, Tutors
and Trainers in the Lifelong Learning Sector. London: LLUK.
Mezirow, J. (1991) Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning. San Francisco:
Jossey Bass.
Quality Assurance Agency (2004) Policy statement on a progress file for Higher
Education [online]. Available at www.qaa.ac.uk. Accessed 21 July 2006.
Schön, D. (1983; reprinted 2004) The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals
Think in Action. New York: Basic Books.
Smith, M (1999) Reflection. http://www.infed.org/biblio/b-reflect.htm, (Accessed 1
July 2004).
Thompson, R. & Robinson, D. (2008) Changing step or marking time? Teacher
education reforms for the learning and skills sector, Journal of Further and
Higher Education, 32 (2), pp. 161-173.

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