Sie sind auf Seite 1von 14

Help Me Pay for

College

With or without My Parents'
Checkbook

Compiled by:
Table of Contents
Interview a Financial Aid Advisor about Financial Aid Requirements

Ace the FAFSA

Find Free College Money on the Web

Choose the Right Student Loans for College

Save Money on Your Student Loans for College

Money­saving College Prep Advice for Teenagers

Community Service Ideas That Help Students Pay College Expenses

Do I Know How to Pay for College?

Help Me Pay for College
With or without My Parents' Checkbook

Do I need this EduGuide?
Yes, if you’re a high school student who wants to go to college, but you’re not sure you can afford it, this EduGuide is for you. Learn 
about financial aid for students, scholarships, grants, and loans, as well as other steps you can take to make college affordable. 

2 How does it work?
ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org
Do I Know How to Pay for College?

Help Me Pay for College
With or without My Parents' Checkbook

Do I need this EduGuide?
Yes, if you’re a high school student who wants to go to college, but you’re not sure you can afford it, this EduGuide is for you. Learn 
about financial aid for students, scholarships, grants, and loans, as well as other steps you can take to make college affordable. 

How does it work?
l Quizzes help you know where you stand. 
l Articles give you the background information you need to make a decision. 
l ShortCuts help you take immediate action. Choose one or go through them all. 

What will I learn from this EduGuide?
l What questions to ask a college financial aid officer 
l How the classes you take in high school can save you money in college 
l Where to sign up for free scholarship information 
l What types of student loans are available and how they differ 
l How community service can help you pay off your student loans 

Quick Solutions
l What can I do in 15 minutes? Find out how much you know about financial aid by taking the quiz, “Do I know How to Pay for 
College?” Sign up and complete a personal profile on a free scholarship search web site. Make an appointment with your high 
school guidance counselor to review your class schedule to make sure you are taking classes that will help save you money in
college. 
l What can I do in one hour? Talk with your parents about how you and they can pay for your college education, reviewing your 
options for loans, scholarships, and other opportunities. 

Interview a Financial Aid Advisor about Financial Aid Requirements
A Dozen Questions You Need to Ask

EduGuide Staff
3 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org
Take the time to meet with your college’s financial aid adviser to ask questions about financial aid requirements and student loan 
 

Interview a Financial Aid Advisor about Financial Aid Requirements
A Dozen Questions You Need to Ask

EduGuide Staff

Take the time to meet with your college’s financial aid adviser to ask questions about financial aid requirements and student loan 
information. Don’t be embarrassed: it’s their job to explain this complex topic and to help you (not prevent you) from attending their 
college.

1. What is the total annual cost to attend this college? 
2. Are there any extra costs that I need to plan for? 
3. What employment opportunities (including work­study) are available for students? 
4. What scholarships might I be eligible for? 
5. What reduced cost, sponsored student loans am I eligible for? 
6. What loans have the lowest interest rates and fees? 
7. When would I have to start paying back the loans, and how flexible is the repayment plan? 
8. Will the school reduce my financial aid or loans if I also get a private scholarship? 
9. What would cause me to lose my financial aid? 
10. Depending on what degree I earn, what kind of loan forgiveness programs are available? Would the loans I’m considering be 
eligible for loan forgiveness? 
11. Based on the amount I’m borrowing, what will I owe at the time I graduate? What will my monthly payments be?  
12. How much does the average student owe when at graduation? 

Source: Christine MacDonald, The Detroit News.

Ace the FAFSA
Tips and Lifesavers for Maximizing College Student Financial Aid

EduGuide Staff

Making mistakes on or leaving information out of your FAFSA could delay your application and possibly make you lose out on some 
financial aid for school. The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NAFSAA) has compiled a list of the most 
common errors people make on the FAFA.

As you and your child complete the FAFSA, try to avoid these mistakes:

4 l Leaving blank fields–enter a "0 or "not applicable" instead of leaving a blank. Too many blanks may cause miscalculations and
ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org
an application rejection. 
l Using commas or decimal points in numeric fields; always round to the nearest dollar. 
Source: Christine MacDonald, The Detroit News.

Ace the FAFSA
Tips and Lifesavers for Maximizing College Student Financial Aid

EduGuide Staff

Making mistakes on or leaving information out of your FAFSA could delay your application and possibly make you lose out on some 
financial aid for school. The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NAFSAA) has compiled a list of the most 
common errors people make on the FAFA.

As you and your child complete the FAFSA, try to avoid these mistakes:

l Leaving blank fields–enter a "0 or "not applicable" instead of leaving a blank. Too many blanks may cause miscalculations and
an application rejection. 
l Using commas or decimal points in numeric fields; always round to the nearest dollar. 
l Listing incorrect social security number or driver's license number; check these entries and have someone else check them 
too. Triple check to be sure. 
l Entering the wrong federal income tax paid amount; obtain your federal income paid amount from your income tax return forms 
not your W­2 form(s). 
l Listing adjusted gross income as equal to total income; these are not the same figure. In most cases, the AGI is larger than 
the total income. This mistake is particularly common. 
l Listing marital status incorrectly; only write yes if you're currently married. If you're separated, you're considered married. Enter 
your marital status on the day you sign the FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA. 
l Listing parent marital status incorrectly; the custodial parent's marital status is needed; if they've remarried, you'll need the 
stepparent's information too. 
l Leaving the question about drug­related offenses blank; If you're unsure about something, find out before you submit your 
FAFSA instead of leaving a blank. A conviction doesn't necessarily disqualify you from getting aid. 
l Forgetting to list the college; obtain the federal school code for the college you plan on attending and list it, along with any other
schools to which you've applied. 
l Forgetting to sign and date; if you're filling out the paper FAFSA, be sure to sign it. If you're filing electronically, be sure to obtain 
your PIN from www.pin.ed.gov. Your PIN is your electronic signature and will always be assigned to you only. 
l Entering the wrong address; this is the student’s permanent address, not a campus or summer address.  

Here is a list of materials that will help you and your child complete the FAFSA:

l Your child’s and your social security numbers (can be found on social security card)  
l Your child’s and your driver's license (if any)  
l Your child’s W­2 forms for the previous year and other records of money earned  
l Your child’s most recent federal income tax return—IRS Form 1040, 1040A, 1040EZ, 1040Telefile, foreign tax return, or tax 
return for Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of 
Micronesia 
l Your (the parents’) federal income tax return for the previous year (if your student is a dependent student as defined by federal 
criteria) 
l Your child’s untaxed income records for the previous year —Social Security, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), 
welfare, or veterans benefits records 
l Your child’s current bank statements  
l Your child’s current business and investment mortgage information, business and farm records, stock, bond, and other 
investment records 
l Documentation that your child is a U.S. permanent resident or other eligible noncitizen. 

Bonus tip: If you apply online, your application will be processed faster and will likely be more accurate because your application will 
be processed on the FAFSA Web site to catch errors. The online application also provides worksheets that will calculate amounts and 
enter them into the field for you. You can save and continue the FAFSA at any time online and then sign your application electronically 
5 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org
using a personal identification number (PIN) which you can get from the Federal Student Aid PIN Web site.
l Documentation that your child is a U.S. permanent resident or other eligible noncitizen. 

Bonus tip: If you apply online, your application will be processed faster and will likely be more accurate because your application will 
be processed on the FAFSA Web site to catch errors. The online application also provides worksheets that will calculate amounts and 
enter them into the field for you. You can save and continue the FAFSA at any time online and then sign your application electronically 
using a personal identification number (PIN) which you can get from the Federal Student Aid PIN Web site.

There are resources available if you decide you need assistance filling out the FAFSA. Check the FAQ section on the FAFSA Web site, 
or call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1­800­4­FED AID (1­800­433­3243). You can also participate in College Goal
Sunday in your state for personal assistance completing the FAFSA. College Goal is held every February at a college campus near 
you.
 

Find Free College Money on the Web
The Top Ten Sites
Scholarships provide millions of dollars of free college money to students that they don’t have to pay back. The Web makes searching 
for the right scholarship easy—but it helps to know where to look: 

1. www.fafsa.ed.gov
In addition to being the place to fill out the FAFSA online, this site provides worksheets, information on financial aid 
requirements and scholarships, a college savings calculator, and more. 
2.  www.fastweb.com
This is a thorough database featuring thousands of scholarships affiliated with Monster, an online career finder. Match your 
profile to scholarships to save time. 
3. www.scholarshipexperts.com
Want to search 2.4 million scholarships worth $14 billion? This is the place. 
4. http://apps.collegeboard.com/cbsearch_ss/welcome.jsp
The College Board (the folks who run the SATs) provides a search for $3 billion worth of scholarships. 
5.  www.collegetoolkit.com
This site features a searchable scholarship database as well as cool features such as “Can I Get In?” Type in your dream 
college and qualifications and this feature will calculate your chances of getting accepted. 
6. www.collegenet.com/mach25/app
This allows you to search scholarships by keyword. Try using keywords that describe your interests and background. 
7. www.mappingyourfuture.org
Run by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA), this site lists loans, grants, scholarships, 
and work­study programs with helpful links to other resources. 
8. www.finaid.org
With information on financial aid and search tips, the site is a complement to www.fastweb.com 
9. www.scholarshiphelp.org
If you're looking for a breakdown of the process—from writing scholarship application essays to rating scholarship search 
sites—look no further.  
10. www.collegegoalsundayusa.org
Another site by NAFSAA where you can find links to College Goal Sunday sites by state. Go to College Goal Sunday and let the 
pros help you get it done, for free, on time. 

Content by Susan J. Demas, a 2006 Knight Foundation Fellow in Nonprofits Journalism.

6 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org


 

Find Free College Money on the Web
The Top Ten Sites
Scholarships provide millions of dollars of free college money to students that they don’t have to pay back. The Web makes searching 
for the right scholarship easy—but it helps to know where to look: 

1. www.fafsa.ed.gov
In addition to being the place to fill out the FAFSA online, this site provides worksheets, information on financial aid 
requirements and scholarships, a college savings calculator, and more. 
2.  www.fastweb.com
This is a thorough database featuring thousands of scholarships affiliated with Monster, an online career finder. Match your 
profile to scholarships to save time. 
3. www.scholarshipexperts.com
Want to search 2.4 million scholarships worth $14 billion? This is the place. 
4. http://apps.collegeboard.com/cbsearch_ss/welcome.jsp
The College Board (the folks who run the SATs) provides a search for $3 billion worth of scholarships. 
5.  www.collegetoolkit.com
This site features a searchable scholarship database as well as cool features such as “Can I Get In?” Type in your dream 
college and qualifications and this feature will calculate your chances of getting accepted. 
6. www.collegenet.com/mach25/app
This allows you to search scholarships by keyword. Try using keywords that describe your interests and background. 
7. www.mappingyourfuture.org
Run by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA), this site lists loans, grants, scholarships, 
and work­study programs with helpful links to other resources. 
8. www.finaid.org
With information on financial aid and search tips, the site is a complement to www.fastweb.com 
9. www.scholarshiphelp.org
If you're looking for a breakdown of the process—from writing scholarship application essays to rating scholarship search 
sites—look no further.  
10. www.collegegoalsundayusa.org
Another site by NAFSAA where you can find links to College Goal Sunday sites by state. Go to College Goal Sunday and let the 
pros help you get it done, for free, on time. 

Content by Susan J. Demas, a 2006 Knight Foundation Fellow in Nonprofits Journalism.

Choose the Right Student Loans for College
The Pros and Cons of Five Popular Options
7 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org
EduGuide Staff
Content by Susan J. Demas, a 2006 Knight Foundation Fellow in Nonprofits Journalism.

Choose the Right Student Loans for College
The Pros and Cons of Five Popular Options

EduGuide Staff

Student loan information can seem overwhelming. Here is a quick review of the five types of student loans for college and the pros 
and cons of each.

Perkins
Best federal government need­based loan for students.
Pro: Lower fixed interest rate. No fees. Credit history not a factor unless you are in default on prior student loans. Subsidized, so 
interest doesn’t start until after graduation.  
Con: Funding limited to those with greatest need.

Stafford
Most common federal student loan.

Pro: Fixed interest rate better than PLUS loan. Can be subsidized depending on need. Repayment is more flexible for disability or job 
loss than most private loans. 
Con: Limit on how much can be borrowed using this loan.

PLUS (Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students)
Most common federal parent loan. Also used by grad students.
Pro: Fixed interest rate. Can cover full cost of attendance minus other aid. 
Con: Subject to credit approval. Not as good a deal as Perkins or Stafford.

Sponsored
Provided by some colleges, states, employers, and scholarship groups.
Pro: Can be a better deal than some federal loans. 
Con: Harder to find. Ask around and use scholarship directories. 

Private
Provided by banks and credit unions independent of the federal system. 
Pro: May cover expenses beyond aid award. 
Con: Subject to credit approval. Read the fine print—some private loans may compete with PLUS loans, but some are way more 
expensive than federal loans. 

8 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org


expensive than federal loans. 

Save Money on Your Student Loans for College
Six Tips That Help Keep Costs Down
Finding your way through the maze of loan choices can be intimidating but it will pay off in the long run: the difference between the best
loans and the worst can be thousands of dollars. 
Use the following seven tips from the experts offer important student loan information to keep you out of trouble and on the path to 
saving money:

1. File the FAFSA federal aid form as soon as possible in February after you get your tax forms. The ShortCut “Ace the FAFSA: 
Tips and Lifesavers for Maximizing College Student Financial Aid” will show you how. For background on the benefits of filing 
the FAFSA, read “FAFSA Helps Families Access Four Types of Financial Aid for School.”  
2. Don’t borrow more than you really need. Your financial aid award letter will tell you how much loan aid you qualify for. Some 
students borrow less than the maximum to save themselves future payments; some borrow more. Before doing either, ask for 
advice from a financial aid counselor at your college. Note: Borrowing more than the standard maximum without the approval of
your school’s financial aid office can put your other aid at risk.  
3. Investigate sponsored loans. Some colleges, states, employers, and scholarship groups provide special private loans at 
rates that are even better than some federal loans. But you’ll have to check scholarship directories to find them. A good place to
start looking is the ShortCut “Find Free College Money on the Web: The Top Ten Sites.”  
4. Apply for loans accurately and on time, or you might not get the money before your first college payment is due. Also, if you’re 
applying for private loans or the federal PLUS loan, make sure there are no errors on your credit report that can affect the rates 
you’re eligible for. You can get your report free at Annual Credit Report.com.  
5. Consider career choices in your loan plan. Some careers will pay better than others and make it easier to make your monthly 
payments. And some service opportunities such as the Peace Corps, Teach for America, and the military may provide loan 
forgiveness programs for special public service. 
6. Compare loans. Knowing how much money you can borrow may seem like the most important piece of student loan 
information you need, but consider all these factors to save the most money in interest and fees over time: 

l Interest rate. The lower the better, but also consider whether the rate is fixed (stays the same throughout the life of the loan) or 
variable (can increase or decrease based on federal interest rates and other factors) 
l Interest accrual. Subsidized loans don’t begin to accrue interest until graduation, which saves a lot of money. Subsidized 
loans are awarded based on need, however. 
l Fees. Some lenders charge processing fees that you either pay up front or that are taken out of the amount that you’ve 
borrowed. So make sure you know the exact dollar amount of your fees. 
l Repayment options. For some loans, repayment starts sixty days after the first loan check is sent, but others can be delayed 
until months after graduation—or longer if the borrower encounters an economic hardship. Flexibility is good, but it comes at a 
price: find out how much this option adds to the loan amount. When comparing  repayment options, be sure to ask the 
following questions: When does repayment start? Is the date flexible? How long will I have to pay off the loan? Are there any 
penalties for paying off the loan early? And are there any incentives for on­time payment? 

 
 

Source: Christine MacDonald, The Detroit News.

9 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org


Source: Christine MacDonald, The Detroit News.

Money­saving College Prep Advice for Teenagers
The Classes You Take in High School Can Save You Money on College Tuition

Christine MacDonald

While you can’t control the cost of college tuition, there are smart ways of saving money for college that can start as early as your 
freshman year of high school. Read on to see how your high school academics can affect your college bottom line.

High School Academics Counts
Emily Sole of Traverse City, Michigan, handed over more than six hundred dollars to Wayne State University for a remedial math class 
that won’t even count toward graduation. She blames herself for not taking her high school math seriously. “I took Algebra II with a 
bunch of my friends and I just goofed off,” she admits. She took geometry her junior year but passed on math her senior year because 
she wanted to take more classes that matched her interests, primarily business classes. Now as a college freshman studying 
business administration, she regrets that decision. She spends five hours a week in a computer lab going over math basics she 
should have mastered already.

Unprepared College Freshmen
Colleges routinely test incoming freshmen to gauge how prepared they are for college work. According to a report published by the 
American Diploma Project and Achieve, Inc., almost seventy percent of college instructors reported spending time reviewing material 
with their students that students should have learned in high school. The same professors estimate that half of the incoming 
freshman class is unprepared for college­level math and writing. Why? Many college freshmen who feel unprepared for college admit 
that they didn’t work hard in high school. 

How Difficult Courses Can Pay Off
Jim Levasseur from Mount Carmel, Illinois, took six Advanced Placement classes in high school and entered Bowling Green 
University with thirty­three credits. Since thirty­three credits is the equivalent of a whole year of college credit, he entered school not as 
a freshman but as a sophomore and saved himself an estimated $21,700 in out­of­state tuition and room and board at the school. 
Since tackling these challenging courses also helped Levasseur improve his scores on the PSAT, he earned a full ride National Merit 
Scholarship that will pay the rest of his way through school. Having the required courses behind him lets Levasseur take classes he 
is more interested in sooner, including classes in his major of computer animation. He can also register for courses as a sophomore
honors student, practically guaranteeing he won’t get shut out of any classes. This calmed his nerves about making the transition to 
college. “It’s sort of like a big head start,” Levasseur explains. “I was confident in my ability to do work at the college level.”  

Christine MacDonald covers education for The Detroit News.

10ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org


Community Service Ideas That Help Students Pay College Expenses
Christine MacDonald covers education for The Detroit News.

Community Service Ideas That Help Students Pay College Expenses
Elizabeth Johnson

Many students who take out student loans for college hope to land high­paying jobs after graduation to help make their loan 
payments. However, several organizations offer repayment or forgiveness of federal student loans (such as Perkins, Stafford, Direct 
Loans, and FFEL loans) in exchange for a commitment to work in areas that need professional skills and services. Here are six 
community service ideas that help pay for college. 

Community Service Project Ideas
l Who has a program? Working in the Peace Corps or AmeriCorps VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America) allows you to use 
your knowledge and skills to help needy people in the United States and internationally. 
l What will I do? AmeriCorps VISTA programs provide opportunities for people to serve through a network of partnerships with 
local and national nonprofit organizations. During a year of AmeriCorps service, you might:  
¡ Tutor disadvantaged youth 
¡ Fight illiteracy 
¡ Provide health services 
¡ Build affordable housing 
¡ Teach computer skillsClean parks and waterways 
¡ Operate after­school programs Respond to disasters 

In the Peace Corps, you’ll do similar jobs in one of seventy­six developing countries throughout the world. The Peace Corps 
asks members to make a two­year commitment, but you can work longer if you desire. 

l How much can I earn toward college? If you have not yet gone to college, AmeriCorps VISTA will award you $1,200 that can be
applied to your college expenses. Peace Corps members can receive scholarships, reduced tuition, and academic credit 
toward advanced degrees at many universities. 
l How much of my student loans will be forgiven? When you serve full time with AmeriCorps VISTA after college, you’ll receive 
$4,725 toward payment of your federal student loans. Part­time workers get a partial award. In the Peace Corps, after a year of 
service, you can apply for deferment of Stafford, Perkins, and consolidation loans, as well as partial cancellation of Perkins 
Loans—fifteen percent for each year of service, up to seventy percent total.  
l Where do I find out more? Visit www.americorps.gov or www.peacecorps.gov for complete details on applying for a service 
position. 

Teaching
l Who has a program? The federal government created the Stafford Loan Forgiveness Program for teachers to encourage 
teachers to work in low income schools or schools in areas with teacher shortages. 
l What will I do? Teachers who serve in certain low income elementary or secondary schools for five years and who have an 
outstanding Direct Loan or FFEL loan balance can apply for loan repayment after completing their fifth year of teaching. 
l How much can I earn toward college? This program is only for repayment of loans after college. 
l How much of my student loans will be forgiven? Teachers who qualify may be eligible for up to $5,000 repayment of their 
remaining student loan balances. Certain highly qualified math and science teachers working in eligible secondary schools or 
highly qualified special education teachers may qualify for forgiveness of up to $17,500. People with a bachelor’s degree in 
early childhood education working in eligible nonprofit child care facilities could have up to one hundred percent of their student
loans repaid. 
l Where do I find out more? The federal student aid Web site has a page with extensive information about the Stafford Loan
Forgiveness Program for Teachers, including a list of eligible low income schools and the application for loan forgiveness. 

Medicine
11 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org
l Who has a program? The National Health Service Corps and the Nursing Education Loan Repayment Program both offer loan
l Where do I find out more? The federal student aid Web site has a page with extensive information about the Stafford Loan
Forgiveness Program for Teachers, including a list of eligible low income schools and the application for loan forgiveness. 

Medicine
l Who has a program? The National Health Service Corps and the Nursing Education Loan Repayment Program both offer loan
repayment programs for medical professionals who work in areas that need medical help, which are called Health 
Professional Shortage Areas. Some hospitals and health care facilities have loan forgiveness programs for occupational and 
physical therapists. 
l What will I do? Medical professionals can either apply to work at eligible medical sites or check the national database to see if 
their current employer is on the list. These people commit to working at the site for at least two years in order to qualify for loan 
reimbursement. Current or prospective medical students can apply for scholarships in exchange for service commitments. 
l How much can I earn toward college? The National Health Service Corps Scholarship provides several scholarships for 
students in training to become primary care physicians, dentists, nurse practitioners, certified nurse­midwives, and physician 
assistants who agree to provide two to four years of service in an NHSC approved site in a Health Professional Shortage Area 
of greatest need. The scholarship covers tuition, fees, and a living stipend. 
l How much of my student loans will be forgiven? Medical professionals who work for two or more years in areas with critical 
medical shortages can have as much as sixty percent of their student loan balances forgiven. Doctors, nurse practitioners, 
dentists, dental hygienists, mental health professionals, and physician assistants who agree to work in areas that lack 
adequate medical care as identified by the National Health Service Corps could have up to $50,000 in student loan 
repayments in exchange for two years of service. 
l Where do I find out more? Check out the Nursing Education Loan Repayment Program and the National Health Service
Corps. The American Physical Therapy Association and the American Occupational Therapy Association have information on 
loan forgiveness programs, and the American Association of Medical Colleges has a database of state and other non­federal 
repayment programs for medical school students. 

Law
l Who has a program? Many states, law schools, and employers have loan repayment and forgiveness programs for law 
school graduates who work in public interest or nonprofit positions. 
l What will I do? People working as state or local prosecutors, public defenders, civil legal aid, or legal advocates in low income
communities at nonprofit organizations may qualify for loan repayment assistance. Criteria vary by program. 
l How much can I earn toward college? These programs assist law school graduates who are working in lower­paying public 
interest law positions. The Equal Justice Works Web site (see below) has a list of law schools that offer grants and 
scholarships to those studying public interest law. 
l How much of my student loans will be forgiven? Loan repayment amounts vary from program to program. Proposed national 
repayment programs may pay an average of $2,000 to $10,000 per year for qualified service in public interest law. 
l Where do I find out more? Equal Justice Works, formerly the National Association for Public Interest Law, has information 
about law school loan repayment assistance programs, including a list of participating schools. It also has information about 
employer­based and state­based loan repayment assistance programs and the Higher Education Reauthorization Act loan 
repayment assistance programs. 

Military
l Who offers a program? Each of the five branches of the military (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) offers 
tuition assistance, scholarships, and student loan forgiveness plans of various types. 
l What will I do? Serve your country for a specified number of years through a branch of the military, the reserves, or the National 
Guard either before or after college to receive tuition assistance and loan repayment benefits. 
l How much can I earn toward college? If you want to go to college first and serve in the military later, the Reserve Officer 
Training Corps (ROTC) has merit­based scholarships in return for a three­ or four­year military commitment upon graduation. If
you want to serve in the military first, you can earn or save up to $50,000 toward college expenses. Students who serve part 
time in the Reserves can receive up to $24,000 toward college in exchange for a commitment of one weekend Reserve service
each month, plus two training weeks a year. 
l How much of my student loans will be forgiven? If you enroll in the military after graduation, the military will make payments 
directly to your student loan lender to help you pay for college. Each branch has its own criteria for loan repayment, so it’s 
important to ask a recruiter for information. For instance, soldiers can qualify to have one­third of their loan repaid for each year 
of full­time service, up to a maximum of $65,000. The Air Force’s College Loan Repayment Program has a maximum payment 
of $10,000. 
l Where do I find out more? The tuition support page of the Web site Today’s Military explains many ways the military can help 
you pay for college or repay your loans. 

Public Service
l Who offers a program? The federal government’s new Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program helps employees in public 
12 services jobs pay their student loans. 
ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org
l What will I do? You may be eligible for this program if you work full time in a public service job such as a federal, state, local, or
tribal government organization, agency, or entity; public child or family service agency; tribal college or university; organization 
you pay for college or repay your loans. 

Public Service
l Who offers a program? The federal government’s new Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program helps employees in public 
services jobs pay their student loans. 
l What will I do? You may be eligible for this program if you work full time in a public service job such as a federal, state, local, or
tribal government organization, agency, or entity; public child or family service agency; tribal college or university; organization 
that provides emergency management, military service, public safety, law enforcement, public interest law services, early 
childhood education, services for individuals with disabilities and the elderly, public health, public education, public library 
service, or school library services. 
l How much can I earn toward college? This program is available only to college graduates. 
l How much of my student loans will be forgiven? The amount will vary. The program forgives remaining student debt after ten 
years of eligible employment and qualifying loan payments, as long as you are still working full time in an eligible job and have 
debt remaining after one hundred twenty qualifying payments. 
l Where do I find out more? Visit Public Service Loan Forgiveness or The SmartStudent Guide to Financial Aid for additional 
details. 

Bonus tip: Many states have loan forgiveness programs for teachers, medical and legal professionals, and other workers. Check with 
your employer to see if you qualify for any state loan forgiveness programs. 

Elizabeth Johnson is a freelance writer in Lansing, Michigan, who is navigating the world of student loans for college with her teenage son.  
 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our 
website.

Do I Know How to Pay for College?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/31/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

13 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org


Elizabeth Johnson is a freelance writer in Lansing, Michigan, who is navigating the world of student loans for college with her teenage son.  
 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our 
website.

Do I Know How to Pay for College?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/31/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

14 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org