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COMUNICARE IN LIMBA ENGLEZA INCEPATORI

FORMATOR: SIMONA RUSU

UNIT 1 AT THE AIRPORT


1.1 DIALOGUES
Checking In
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.

Good morning. Can I have your ticket, please?


Here you are.
Thank you. Would you like smoking or non-smoking?
Non-smoking, please.
Would you like a window or an aisle seat?
An aisle seat, please.
Do you have any baggage?
Yes, this suitcase and this carry-on bag.
Here's your boarding pass. Have a nice flight.
Thank you.

Passport Control
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.

Good morning. Can I see your passport?


Here you are.
Thank you very much. Are you a tourist or on business?
I'm a tourist.
That's fine. Have a pleasant stay.
Thank you.

Key Vocabulary1
Can I have your ticket?
smoking, non-smoking
window, aisle seat
baggage, suitcase, carry-on bag
boarding pass
flight
Can I see your passport?
tourist, business

http://esl.about.com/od/beginnerpronunciation/a/bd_airport.htm

EXTRA ACTIVITY: VIDEO http://www.engvid.com/travel-vocabulary/

COMUNICARE IN LIMBA ENGLEZA INCEPATORI

FORMATOR: SIMONA RUSU

1.2 NATIONALITIES2
The word 'Nationality' is not often used in spoken English. It is a formal and official word
and it appears more frequently in written English. You will find the word 'Nationality'
is used a lot in the travel industry and for immigration.
We almost never say: What is your nationality?
We usually say: Where are you from? OR Where do you come from?
To tell someone your nationality you DON'T say: My nationality is Romanian.
You say: I'm Romanian.
Remember
I am from Chile.
To Be + from + country
I am Chilean.
To Be + Nationality
Singular

Plural

Country

Countries

Nationality Nationalities
List of Countries, Nationalities and their Languages
Below is a list of countries with the appropriate nationality. The Language that appears is the
main language that is spoken in the country. We have not included all the languages
that they may speak in that country.
Country

Nationality

Language

Afghanistan

Afghan

Persian - Pashto

Argentina

Argentine

Spanish

Australia

Australian

English

Belgium

Belgian

French / Flemish

Bolivia

Bolivian

Spanish

Brazil

Brazilian

Portuguese

Cambodia

Cambodian

Cambodian

Cameroon

Cameroonian

French / English

Canada

Canadian

English / French

Chile

Chilean

Spanish

China

Chinese

Chinese

Colombia

Colombian

Spanish

http://www.vocabulary.cl/Basic/Nationalities.htm

COMUNICARE IN LIMBA ENGLEZA INCEPATORI

FORMATOR: SIMONA RUSU

Costa Rica

Costa Rican

Spanish

Cuba

Cuban

Spanish

Denmark

Danish (Dane) Danish

Dominican Republic Dominican

Spanish

Ecuador

Ecuadorian

Spanish

Egypt

Egyptian

Arabic

El Salvador

Salvadorian

Spanish

England

English

English

Estonia

Estonian

Estonian

Ethiopia

Ethiopian

Amharic

Finland

Finnish

Finnish

France

French

French

Germany

German

German

Ghana

Ghanaian

English

Greece

Greek

Greek

Guatemala

Guatemalan

Spanish

Haiti

Haitian

French / Creole

Honduras

Honduran

Spanish

Indonesia

Indonesian

Indonesian

Iran

Iranian

Persian

Ireland

Irish

Irish / English

Israel

Israeli

Hebrew

Italy

Italian

Italian

Japan

Japanese

Japanese

Jordan

Jordanian

Arabic

Kenya

Kenyan

Swahili

Korea

Korean

Korean

Laos

Laotian

Laotian

Latvia

Latvian

Latvian

Lithuania

Lithuanian

Lithuanian

Malaysia

Malaysian

Malay / Malaysian

Mexico

Mexican

Spanish

Morocco

Moroccan

Arabic / French

Netherlands

Dutch

Dutch

New Zealand

New Zealander English / Maori

Nicaragua

Nicaraguan

Spanish

COMUNICARE IN LIMBA ENGLEZA INCEPATORI

FORMATOR: SIMONA RUSU

Norway

Norwegian

Norwegian

Panama

Panamanian

Spanish

Paraguay

Paraguayan

Spanish

Peru

Peruvian

Spanish

Philippines

Filipino

Tagalog / Filipino

Poland

Polish

Polish

Portugal

Portuguese

Portuguese

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rican

Spanish

Romania

Romanian

Romanian

Russia

Russian

Russian

Saudi Arabia

Saudi

Arabic

Spain

Spanish

Spanish

Sweden

Swedish

Swedish

Switzerland

Swiss

Swiss

Taiwan

Taiwanese

Chinese

Tajikistan

Tajik

Tajik (Persian)

Thailand

Thai

Thai

Turkey

Turkish

Turkish

Ukraine

Ukrainian

Ukrainian

United States

American *

English

Uruguay

Uruguayan

Spanish

Venezuela

Venezuelan

Spanish

Vietnam

Vietnamese

Vietnamese

Wales
Welsh
Welsh / English
*You will notice that people from United States have the nationality 'American'. Some
people from other parts of the American continent (especially Central and South
America) tend not to like the word American for people from the United States. You
will find that they will call them North American.

COMUNICARE IN LIMBA ENGLEZA INCEPATORI

FORMATOR: SIMONA RUSU

1.3 THE PRESENT INDICATIVE OF THE VERB TO BE


Affirmative
I am
You are
He is
She is
It is
We are
You are
They are
Short
Im, youre,
forms
hes, shes, its,
were, youre,
theyre

Negative

Interrogative( Negative)
I am not
Am I ( not) ?
You are not
Are you (not) ?
He is not
Is he ( not) ?
She is not
Is she ( not) ?
It is not
Is it ( not) ?
We are not
Are we ( not) ?
You are not
Are you ( not) ?
They are not
Are they ( not) ?
Im not , youre not ( you
Arent you ? isnt he? Isnt
arent ), hes not ( he isnt),
she? Isnt it? Arent we?
shes not ( she isnt), its not ( Arent you? Arent they?
it isnt), were not (we arent)
youre not( you arent) ,
theyre not ( they arent)

1.4 THE PLURAL OF COUNTABLE NOUNS3


Nouns that you can count as separate items are called countable nouns. Take for example the
word coin: you can have one coin, two coins, three coins, four coins and so on.
The plural of most nouns is formed by adding an s to the end of the noun:
one coin
two coins
one ticket
two tickets
one tourist
three tourists
one cat
two cats
one book
three books
one plane
two planes
one train
two trains
one car
two cars
There are some exceptions, however.
There are nouns that end with the sound /d/ or /t/ as in sandwich, witch, the sound /s/ as
in class, glass, the sound /z/ as in blouse or the sound /ks/ as inbox, fox. You can hear the
sound endings when you say the words out loud.
To form the plural for these words, add es to the end of the noun:
one sandwich
two sandwiches
one match
two matches
one class
two classes
one box
two boxes

http://www.learning-english-online.net/areas/grammar/parts-of-speech-and-sentence-structure/nouns/theplural-of-nouns/

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COMUNICARE IN LIMBA ENGLEZA INCEPATORI

FORMATOR: SIMONA RUSU

f(e)->ves
wife=> wives
wolf=> wolves
IRREGULARITIES AND CHANGES IN SPELLING
Some nouns have special plural forms: for example one mouse
man
two men, one woman
two women.
Here is a list of the most important nouns that have an irregular plural:

two mice, one

Singular Plural
child

children

man

men

woman

women

penny

pence

mouse

mice

tooth

teeth

foot

feet

If a noun ends with "y" after a consonant, it becomes "ie" when you form the
two parties, a family
plural (but dont forget the plural "s" at the end!): a party
two families.

1.5 ARTICLES
1. The Definite Article
Before it is possible to choose the right article to place before a noun, it is first necessary to determine the
nature or category of the noun that is being used.
As in other languages, nouns in English can be divided into two distinct categories, called: count
nouns and non-count nouns.
Count nouns are nouns referring to items that can be counted, for example:
One car, two pencils, three people, four guitarists, five hotels etc.
These nouns can be used in the singular or the plural
In the singular, count nouns must be preceded by a determiner:
The dog is happy. (or This dog is happy, etc: but not: Dog is happy )
I'm reading my book or I'm reading the book ; but not: I'm reading book
In the plural, they may require a determiner, depending on context.

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COMUNICARE IN LIMBA ENGLEZA INCEPATORI

FORMATOR: SIMONA RUSU

Non-count nouns are nouns referring to abstractions, substances or generalizations, or example:


Oxygen, health, money, heat, astronomy
In the singular, non-count nouns do not require a determiner.
The plural is even easier: non-count nouns can NOT usually be used in the plural.

Generalisation or not?
Sometimes it is not easy to decide if a plural noun is being used as a generalization, or in a restrictive
context : often the speaker or writer can choose. Look at these two sentences:
a) Tomatoes are red
b) The tomatoes are red.
In example (a), the writer is clearly implying a generalisation on the noun group
"Tomatoes": i.e. All tomatoes .
In example (b), he is referring to a restricted or defined category of the noun:
"tomatoes", i.e. the tomatoes here in front of us are red; but some other tomatoes may be green or yellow
.

In cases like these, one therefore has a choice; but the choice is not always completely free,
as it often depends on context. Is it more important or more logical to imply a generalization,
or a limitation?
2. The Indefinite Article
English has two indefinite articles, a and an
a is used before nouns starting with a consonant or a semivowel
an is used before nouns starting with a phonetic vowel
Examples: a dog, a cat, an apple, an orange, an uncle, but a university (because the
word university starts with phonetic [ju:], which is not a vowel).
Indefinite articles can only be used with count nouns. They are used when a count noun in the singular
refers to a non-specified or non defined entity.
Examples:
a) There's a train (= unspecified) coming in 5 minutes. It's the train (= specified)for London.
b) Look! I can see a hotel over there ! (= a non-identified hotel) It's the hotel (= specified) we're looking
for !.
There is no indefinite article in the plural. The word "some" is occasionally said to be a plural
indefinite
article,
but
really
it
is
a quantifier (like many,
few, etc.).
By definition, plural nouns referring to non-specified entities are generalisations, therefore
need no article4.

http://linguapress.com/grammar/article-in-english.htm

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COMUNICARE IN LIMBA ENGLEZA INCEPATORI

FORMATOR: SIMONA RUSU

1.6 NUMBERS
1. The cardinal Numeral
1 one
2 two
3 three
4 four
5 five
6 six
7 seven
8 eight
9 nine
10 ten

3.
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
10th

11 eleven
21 twenty-one
12 twelve
22 twenty- two
13 thirteen
23 twenty- three
14 fourteen
30 thirty
15 fifteen
40 forty
16 sixteen
50 fifty
17 seventeen
60 sixty
18 eighteen
70 seventy
19 nineteen
80 eighty
20 twenty
90 ninety
100 a (one) hundred
106 a (one) hundred and six
621 six hundred and twenty-one
1,000 a (one) thousand
3,749 three thound seven hundred and forty -nine
1,000,000 a (one) million

The ordinal Numeral


the first
11th the eleventh
21st
the twenty-first
th
nd
the second
12
the twelth
22
the twenty-second
th
rd
the third
13
the thirteenth
23
the twenty-third
th
th
the fourth
14
the fourteenth
30
the thirteth
th
th
the fifth
15
the fifteenth
40
the fortieth
th
th
the sixth
16
the sixteenth
50
the fiftieth
th
th
the seventh 17
the seventeenth
60
the sixtieth
th
th
the eighth
18
the eighteenth
70
the seventieth
th
th
the ninth
19
the nineteenth
80
the eightieth
th
th
the tenth
20
the twentieth
90
the ninetieth
th
100
the (one) hundredth
th
106 the (one) hundred and sixth
621st the six hundred and twenty-first
1,000th the(one) thounsandth
1,000,000th the(one)millionth

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