Sie sind auf Seite 1von 418

A BOOK OF

~D~D

ENGLISH

Being

A VAOE' MEGUM C::~NTAINING ENGLISH IDIOMATIC


EXPRESSIONS & V/OROS \VITH EXAMPLES

Edited a11d Revised l?J

PROF. S. K. BAGCHI, j\/l.A.


V1C'l'OP.I.~

COLLEGE, GWAL10R

Author of New College C.c-r:nposifion Etc.

'

AGRA

GAYA PRASAD & SONS

.... ......

1~

.. ' ....

Ed11catio11a/.
Pt1blishers

:
... .
.
.

, .. \I
.. , , ' ' '
. \ , .,
.,
t
/\.,~.t.,

-.\: . .

'

. Rs. 4J

'

PREFACE
In the first edition this book appeared as the handiwork of Mr. S. L. 1'Iaitra, late I-lead Master, Baptist
Mission High Scl1ool, J}9fa,.,.. ,_ ~?-. ~~"<?t the first compilation.
was his. But as it contained~-- ~ore of slang and unfamil~ar phrases picked up from the cheap . . fiction of the i9tl1,
. 1.
. .. .
century, than those "which are accepted on' all liarids' as:
qrrent co.ins of the Engli~h l~p..gagf_,:,it._ was felt necessary.
1
to suppleme~t the ~ork. Thougil it was our origitl.al '
intention to cut qut all kinds of vulgarism in spe~ch i~
VfaS not .fqund possible
.tlle
.. . for. t\fO r~~SQn~ .;. fir;S_tlf:;~
..
pruning
knife
could.
not
be
used
ruthlessly
without
mang. .
lin~ the bp.qk qut of ~~~shape ; s~~.ndly, in the pr.e~e.ntage
..
common speech and literary expressions are getting so
ittdissolu~.lY, mixed 4P. that the. t.en,d~~;: ~ 0 , the si..tnpli. fication of language is running for giving th.e imprimatur
tb.i. all that.. was considered unchaste
in the.
.. V:ictor.ian
..
period. Hence allcqrnings of language, good or bad,
had to be ac<:omtnodated in the compilation as that is the
vog.ue :Of ~the current .sp~ech. No. doubt, the purists cry,
but the .. caravin marci1es on~
1

'

'

EDITOR.

...

'

A Boo.k of Englisl1 Idioms .

INTRODUCTION..
. IJanguage is the expression of the mind. Thoughts,
ideas and concepts apprehended by the rriind are ex~
pressed througl1 \Vords. If we a1e"to u11derstand the
speech of our fello\v beings and to enter into tbei1
tninds it is essential that words and tl1eir con1binati.on:s
s11ould be l\:nown tho1oughly. 1'1:en's mind:; are not
always logioal, for in addition to reason a man pos. sesses also a fac11lty of f anoy. He has, the1efore,
al~o a fanciful way of tl1inlcing poetic, peaulia.1
. and strange ; and 11is fanciful tho11ghts he expresses.
thr611gh Idjonis. I<lion1s, therefore, 11ave meaning whioh
ate different from the grammatical or logical sense
of the words. Eve1y language has idio'tns and no language can be krio\vn fully without the111.
The word Idio1n is derived f10111 French, Latin
and Greek idior1ia, peculiarity idios, one's own.
E~noe ''a peculiar va1iation of any language'' js called
Idiom. Further it is not a language, but is the
Peculiar construction and turn of a la11g11age, whioh
dis~inguishes it altogether from others; it is that
wh1ch enters into the composition of the language,
and can.not be sepaTated from it. ldion1 _a1so denotes
special use of a wo1d 01 words peculiar to any
anguage.
.
.

lny

P~raseology is mol'e closely connected with the


~tudy of ldiom 1ather. than \Vit11 Gram1nar, and that
1 ~ true of Idio1n of any language.
l<lion1s are ~peoial

'

forms of Rpeeoh that for some reason, o.ften- 1nscru.. table; have p1oved congenial to tbe instinct of. a particular language. U sages of this so:rt can not _be

INTRODUCTION

acquired from dictionaries and grammars ; good


reading with the idiomatic eye open is very essential .

Metapho1 plays a very important part in idio1natic phraseology and very often ldio1n consists in the
use of a word or words in a metaphorical seni:;e. For
example, when a per::;on is asked to l1old l1is to11gue
it does not mean that he should actually hold his
tongue \\ ith his fingers; it is figuratively used and
means that he is required 11ot to t.alli: but to .JJe sile11t.
There a1e a good many exan1ples of this character
not only in the English language hr.it in e\-ery
language.
7

Tl1e Cl1a1acler of Idiom is fixed. The exact


\Vo1ds of an Idion1 sl1ould always be very carefully
noted. for, generally the \vord or words of an Idiom
.can not lJe substituted by another without spoiling
the idion1~tio character. For instance, How dt1 !/Ou.
.do ? P1tlled to pieces ; J(illing two birds tt1ith one st<1ne.
These and other-:i lil~e these can never be substitt1ted
by othe1 ex:p1 e9stonE. If it is done, the idiom~tic
character disappea1s. Certain wo1ds and expressions
ha\Te con1e to be rest.rioted in their \lse, so that they
can be t1sed idioma'cioally only in certain connection
or with ce1tai11 meanings, For example-Fast f1ier1ds,
addicted to cirinlcing. These "rords used here are fixed
and can11ot be used in any other sense. Fu1tber
])evotc,d is always ttsed in a good sense; Defalcation
and Defaulter are chiefly applied to rr.oney n1atters;
.. mo.n:;f augliler, 1nissio11ary, boolc-lceepe1, under-I<zker,
parole, co11done, co1n1nute, have become specialised as
to IJe ain1ost \vholly technical.

l<liomatir Expressions i'iave often preserved


obsolete \Vords or nearly obsolete, wo1ds with ob..:oJete
mean111gs or obsolete uses of words. These words are
never taken out of their settings and brought into
ge11eral use, since they are restricted to the expressions in \v-hioh they occur. Thus they word ?zill (ne\vill, not will) survives only in tbe expression '\.,jll

--

'

---~ ~

3
---------- ---------------------------------INTRODUCTION

he, nil{ he' (\vhetbe1 he will. or i1ot),. and therefore


may not be introdt1ced elsewhere.
Each and eve1y language gives its O'VITn special and
.peculiar n1eaning to aerti:tin words and phrases.
Thii;: peculiarity of the meanin~ of idio1natic expressions should' he oa1efully studied by 'every student.
As an idio1n is not the expression of logical thought
it takes a fo'reig11 stt1dent some tin1e to pick up the
fancy that coined it.; but it is onlJ1 th1ough this lang..
uage of fanoy that we con1e to l\:now the n1ind of the
Englishman.

Al~ove

CHAPTER I

A
A--Al :first cla~s. ve1y good. Originally it applied'
to a vessel oi Lloyd's (ship) of the best construction.
and in the best condition to sail. W. D. Howells.
They say tl1e snow's all pacl;;:ed do~vn already,.
and the going is Al.
.
.
AJJack l'AKEN ABA0K (fig) taken by surprise .
.Aback is originally a nautical word said of sails
pressed backward against the mast by the wind.
He is q11ite ta/cen abacl' at my refusal.
ABC THE ABC OF ANY SUBJECT its rudin1ents; its
ele1nentary principles.
Father and mother Jived in I(ing Street, Soho.
!'
He was a fiddle-maker, and taught me the ABC
of that science at aid times. Reade.
Aili<le To ABIDE BY to fulfil ; to refuse to depart
from ; to carry out.
The rules we-re fixed, and I int1st abide by
the:n. Tyndall.
,
Abide the storm, the issue 01 his anger to
sustain, face. e. g. I am abidi1ig the issue of n1yventure.
AlJo,c ABOVE-BO.A.RD openly ; "'ithout triol;;:ery ;honourable. This phl"ase came into use from cheating at cards. The man \Vho cheats at cards keeps
bis hands under the table.
Now u.11 is open and above-board witn you.
A. Trollope.
AB0"\1 E GROUND-unburied

or alive. A man
\vhen he dies is buried under the. ground. Hence
{fig.)
alive.

I a111 sure to catch hi1n if he is abuve g 1fJzt11d


-Ro,,e and \Vebb.
ABO\TE ONESELF-carried away by high spirits,,
self estee111 etc. e.g. He \vas abo'Ge liimself in his-

tnll~s.

Accottnt

-- ---

.. ...
-----"'----------~4.1lrOa<l ALL ABROAD (a) in a'. s~ate of. mental perplexity. ..4broad is from the Anglo-Saxon a (on)
and biad, broad, i11eans i.1. the whole breadh of the

----

- ----~----- - --- -

---

_,

land. It 1neans. out in the open. Hence (fig.) the


phrase n1eans when one's mind is in confusion.

...

"

He is such a . p,oor, orao~e~,; _cr~az-y;. qreature,


V.Ttth his mind all abroad. A. Trollope.
.
,,,
L

(b) Having the senses confused ; v.-r:ithout complete control of one's 01ganism..
.: .
At the t\velfth round the latter champion was
all abruad, as the saying is, and had lost all presence of mind and. power of attack or defence.Thackeray.

good eduoa.iio11 is spreading everywhere.


..
. '.'-'
Let the soldier be abroad if he will, he oan do
nothing in this age. fhere is another personage less imposi11g : -in\ the eyes of some, perhaps,
insignifioant. !J.'he school maste1 is abroad, and
. I trust.to hin1, a1med with his _primer; against
the soldier in- full military array. Lord Brougham.
.
'
Accord OF ONES O\VN . ACCORD voluntarily, spontaneously. e.g. He did it of liis own accord. . .
.
WI'l'H ONE_ ACCORD With_ one
g~, All
with 011e accord iefused. to work. . . . .

DO NOT ACCORD '\VITH . is not consist"ent ~ith;


e. g. His. depasition. does not accord with 'the
evidence.


rA.ccount ON ACCOUNT OR, TO ACCOUNT in instal. n1ent or part payment. -It i_s a business phl-ase,
used when two persons have dealings with; each
, . other, and the account betw~entb.em is only partly
ettled by
any
payment.
:

. .
. . .
.
.
.
''Give the driver this half sovereign,'~ whis .
. pered Captain Ablewhite, ''Tell him .it is on
. aceo1int, ,and that .he has a good fare.,, B. L.
. Fatjeon.
THE SCHOOL MASTER IS ABROAD

uansent. e:

'

'

'

Act
6
Account
- - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - ----- ----------To GIVE A GOOD ACCOUNT OF to be suocessful
with.
The terrier gave a good account of the rats (was
successful in killing many of them). J. Mr
Dixon.
To LAY ONE'S ACCOUNT WITH to expeot; to look
forward -to.
The Jurors must have laid thei1 accou11t with
appearing (expected to appear) before t.he Star
Chamber. Hallan1.
-

To TAKE INTO ACCOUNT to make allo\vance for ~


to take into consideration.
As to its adventurous beginning and all theselittle circumstances \vhioh gave it a distinctive
oharaoter and relish, he took the1n i1zto accou'Pt.Diokens.
To MAKE NO ACCOUNT OF-tu overlook.
The father made no account of his sons neglect
of duty towards the poor man.
THE GREAT ACCOUNT the day of judgment e. gr
Sinners tremble at tlie g1eat ar,count.
GoNX l'O HIS ACCOUNT dead; e.g. The poor
fellow is go1ze to his accou11f.
_ ON NO ACCOUNTS Certainly not ; e. g. On no
accounts will you be successful in this case.
TURN A THING INTO ACCOUNT make it profitable~
e. g. You should try to tu11z i'liis occasio1i into
account.

LAY ONES ACCOUNT WITH be prepa1ed for; e. g,


You must lay your account with this possibility
of loss.

To ACT A PART to behave hypoc1itically; to


conceal one's real feelings ; to act a part is either
really or fictitiously to a<Jf. in any part.
\Vas the Youngman acting a part or was he
really ignorant of the rumour : Wn1. Bla~k.
-

Act

Addle
- - -- - ------ -- - - -- - - - - -- -- ----- -----ACT OF GOD-an event whicl1 ca11no~ be p1evented by hurrian "foresight, but is the tesult of uncoilt1ollable 11atural forces; fo1 example when, the
.ship is struck by lightening and destroyed.
The act of L-tod~ fire,. and all the dangers and.
accidents-of tbe sea, are not accepted as ordinary
risks. J.M. Dixon.
ACT OF GRACE a favour, especially a pardon
. granted by a so:verejgn.

.
The sentence of death passed
the prisoner
was oommtlted to one of transportation for life
tl1-rough an act of grace of _King Georage V.
ACT UP TO to come. up in praQtice to some
expected standard; to behave in a suitab1e way;
to fu1fil what one professes to regard as duty.
It isn't among sailors and :fishermen that one
finds genuine -blackgua1cli!'<m. They have their
code, such a8 .it is, and upon the whole I think
they act up to it. W. E. Norris, in Good Words,
' 1887. ,
'
.
Adam -ADAM'S ALE OR ADAM'S WINE pure \vater.
Some~ take. a glass of porter to their <!inner,
hut I slake my 'thirst with Adam's wine. J. M.
Dixon.
-

ADAM'S APPLE:._the projection in th~ neok, un:de-r


the chi.n, so called , from
i.dea that part of th"e
farbidlen fruit stuck in Adam's throat.

. .
.
.
Having the noose adjuf->ted and secured_ by
tightening above his Ada~'s - apple, Daily 11elegraph, 1865.
.

Act

-~-

'

'

on

ro.

an.

'

,''~'

'

'

. ~OT TO KNOW A~iAN FROM

',

'

'

to. be' quite


unacquainted with him.

..
. '~ T.o my kno\vledge," again interp-osed - Mr.
Lethbr.idge, '~.I have never .seen his _face. I
Rbol.11dn't l'now him from Adam if he stood before
. . me now.'' B. L. Farjeon. .
. Adule AN ADDLE pATE-a a~n~e ; e., g. What an.
adcllc pate you a~e.

'

ADAM

'

"

'

Air
8
Addreses
- - - ------ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ----'
Addresses To p .A.y ONE'S ADDRESSES TO to court;
to approach a lady as a suitor for her hand in

marriage.
.
He was said to be paying addresses to Lady
Jane Sheepshanks, Lord Sot1thdo\vn's third daughter. Thackeray.
_.\.do MAKE ADO Make a fuss ; e.g. Why do y_ou
niake much ado about nothing?
Advantage TO ADVANTAGE-favourably.
To see the lower portion of this glacier to
advantage. Tyndall.
TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF to a'rail one's self of
any opportl1nity, often implying an unfair sense~
Here was material enough for the craft of
William to take advantage of. Freeman.
After AFTER ALL nevertheless; when all things
consirlered, as a result of, and so, inspite of,
Generally used to introduce some circumstance of
a more favourable nature.
Yet after all he was a mortal. W. Irving.
AFTER A MAN'S OWN HEART to one's 0\\ n
liking; exactly what he li1ces or admires.
.
It ~as indeed, a representative gath,ering, after
the TaTbe1ts' ownliearts. Hugh Oon\vay.
Agog-ALL AGOG. Eager, on the look out; e.g. He
is all agog for mischief.
Agree. AGREE TO DIF'F'ER abandon atte.npt to convince each other ; e. g. On this matter '\\Te agree to
differ.

Air T.AKE THE AIR to go out; e. g. Let . us take


the air.
TAKE AIR to become known; e.g. Tnese matters
have t alcen air.

IN THE AIR.- prevalent or vague ; e. g. Opinion


against child marriage is i1z the air ; the plan is
quite i11 the air.

DOlNG THINGS WITH AN AIR. with confident
bearing.

.
.
GIVE ONESELF AIRS of affected ma1iners. e. g.

'

HA rrivAs himsAlf hifr sii,.i:i_

Alpl1a

All

------------

~.\ll

existence;. the
whole time.
.
This in1po1t \Vas o.ll alO"Ttg felt to be a gt'eat
burden. Freeman.
.
To BE ALL THINGS TO ANOTHER to aooommodate oneself in eV""ery way to his wants, moods, or
ALL .A.LONG

caprices.

'

during its who1e

She had sworn that more than ever she would


be all f:hings to her husband. Marion Crawford.
ALL TN ALL (a) supreme ; of the first importanoe.
The then Prime Minister was all in all at
Oxford. -A. Trollope.
(b) tb.e dearest object of affection.
Mamma and I are all in all together, at1d we
shall remain together. A Trollope.
This.child i.s all in all to me.
(c) Altogether; completely ; entirely.
Trust me not at or all in all. Tennyson.
To BE ALL ONE-to make no di.fferenoe.
Mr, Ca;rker presently tried a oanter Rob was
still in attendanoe then a smart gallop. It was
all oue to the boy. Diokens.
.
ALL THE SAME neverthelesi;; notwithstanding .
. The Captain made us trim the boat, and we
got heT to lie a little mo-re evenly. All the sa~n~.
\Ve \Vere afraid to breathe. R. L. Stevenson.
ALL BUT everything short of; almost.
The boy stood on the burning deck.
Whenoe all but he had fled. Mr!!. Hemans.
ALL 0"\7ER-thOTOl1.ghly j entirely. ALL ..pvER
7
'\"\ 1TH (also. colloqually All:up with) finished, done

.
He is atl ove1: mud.
It is all over with hi1n.

w~.


:
ALL AND SUNDRY . every one without distinction.
Einally, he. i_nvited all .and sun.dry. to :Partake,
freely of the oatet1 cake and ale that he had
l1imself brought from Ballymena. 1:1all Caine.
Alplt<l . ALPHA AND OMEGE-:-the. beginning
the
end. e. g. Building
up
character
is
the
alpha
and
..
:
.
__ .
...
.

and.

--------"~.l!_"ll_"li

Api:oin\

10

Amends

Amends MAKE AMENDS FOR to compensate;. e.g._must 1nalce arnends fu1 this los8.
.
Appea1ance To KEEP UP AP-PEARANCE to keep an
outward show with intent to conceal the absen~e of
the inward reality; to .behave in a see1nly way
before other~.
Even poor people lilce to lceep 1ip appea1ar1ces.Rowe and Webb.
Apple APPLE OF ONE'S EYE a 211t1ch prided treasure; something especially dear. The ''apple of the
eye'' is the eye ball, so called fro1n its round shape ;
something very delicate and tende1.

Keep me as the apple of tlie r~?JP., l1ide me under


the shadow of thy wings. 'Bible.
He kept him as the apple of his e"e. Bible.
APPLE OF SODOM. any fair bt1t disappointing
. thing. It is described by Josephus as fair to 1001~
upon, but turning, when touched, jnto ashes. .
Like to the apples on the Dead Sea shoret. All ashes to the taste. Byron.
APPLE OF DISCORD. any ca1se of envy and contention, something which causes E-trife. Eris, the'
goddess of discord, threw a. golden apple among the
goddesses, with the insc1iption ''For tl1e most beautiful.'' Three godd asses claimed the prize Aphrodite (Venus), Pallas (Minerva) and Hera (Jt1no) and
quarrelled over its possession. Paris, son of
Priam, of Troy was appointed arbiter, and decided
jn favour of Aph1od1te (V ent1s);.

This great. and \vealthy church, constantly
. . formed an apple of discord (a subject
quarrel).
-Freeman.

APPLE PIE ORDER extreme neatnesR ; cpmplete


order.
.

Susan replied that her aunt wanted to put the .


hot1se in apple-pie order. . Reade.
ApJlOint .APPOlN'IED LOT. 'priscrited or o"dained
fate; e.g. No man cari change his appointed lot.
\VELL APP()INTED . Nicely equipped; e.g. We.
ha\e .a icell appointed fleet in the sea.
::

We

of

.,-

'

!
'

Arm

11

------------------------------~

April APRIL-FOOL 011e sent on a bootless errand


on the 1st of April a day reserved for such pracft
tioal joking.

.
We retired to the parlour, where she repeated
to n1e the strongest assuranoes of her love. I
thought I was a mad man. Alas! I was ,only
an .April fool Thackeray.
.
.
Apron--TIED TO APRONSTRINGS ruled by the mother
o't' wife ; e.. g. He is still tied to his mother's apron...
strings.

.
Arab A STREET ARAB A neglected or hon1eless boy
or gi1l; one of the unoared-for children of a large
oity.

This hero a11d heroine began life as street Arabs


of Glasgow. Pall Mall Gazette, 1883.
A11n ARM IN ARM walking in friendly fashion with
the arms li.nked .. .

It was an :agreeable surp't'i.se to her, therefore,


to perceive them walking upto the house together
with arm i11 arm. Mrs. Oliphant.
.
IN ARMS oarried about. 'Generally used with
the word cliild or infant..
.
...
One of these passengers being a ohild, still
young enough to be passed as a oh}ld in arms.
-Hugh Cot;iway. .
.
.
.

AT ARM'S LENGTH--ata oertain distance; away
from any friendliness or familiarity.
.
But no, she never alludes to it ; she keeps me
at arm's length. Murray's .JJfagazine, 1887. .
\VITH OPEN AR'1'1S warmly; affeotionately; with
hearty welcome. . .

. .
The Stan hopes \Vere all known. by 'nan1e in
. Barohester, and . Barobef,te1 . was prepared to
reoeive them witli open arms. A .. Trollope. .
RIGH'r .\RM the main suppo1t; one's ::,taunohest
friend.
.
.
.
Sir L!Lunoelot,. my 1iglit a71n; the n1ightiest 9f
n1y Kn1ghts Tennyson. . .

..
UNDER ARMS bearing arms ; in ma1tial array..
In a moment troops were itrzdor.. arms {in battle
a-rray) .. Robertson.
,

'

'

'

.'

.:\xe

12 .'

Arm
'

UP IN ARMS

roused to anger; ready: to figlit,


''I'll knook, I s\1\real', till I have your neighbou1s
up ir1 airns,'' said Ralph. Dickens.
ARiY.lED AT ALL POINTS fully prepared; e. g.
In the trial for murder the witnesses were a111ied nt
a(l points.
ARMED CAP-A-PIE so .from head to. foot.; e.g.
The robbers were a.1med cap-a-pie.
.
ARMED TO THE TEETH The sameas above.
ARMED NEUTRALITY .A nation outwardly neutral but inwardly prepared to rt- sist by arms any
aggression made against itself.
.
,Ass TO MAKE AN ASS OF ONE'S SELF to behave
foolishly. The ass is taken as the type of folly.
Do not mal'e such an ass of you1self as to sup~
pose that. A Trollope.

THE ASSES' BRIDGE a humourous nan1e for the


fifth proposition of the First Book of Euolid, because of the difficulties it pre5ented to beginners.
He never crossed the asses' Bridge. .All the
l'~ear Round, 1860..
Assurance To MAKE ASSURANCE DOUBLY SURE to
take .every p-eoaution.
' I'll nial'e assurance double su1e.
And take a bonrl. of fate. Shal{espeare .
j\.t AT THAT n10-reover ;. in additio11 .. .d. favourite
American phrase.
It comes nearest (the Irish car). to riding on
horse bacl\:, and on a side saddle at tliat, of any
vehicle travelling I ever saw. J. Burroughs.
AT MOST Taking highest estimate ; e. g. At
11iost you oan oall him literate.
.
.
AT ONE-inharmoney \vith; e. g. -;\1ot1r plan is
af one with mine.
AT ALL EVENTS In any oase ; . e. g. At all
events he will go today.
.
Ax:e-AXE TO GRIND a p1ivate pu1pose to ser\re,
\Vhen I see a merchant over-poJite to his
custon1ers, begging them to take a little brandy,
and thl'owing half his goods on the .oounter,
thinks I, that man has an axe to grind. Charles
Miner.
'

:Back

13
-

--

-~----

B
THE BABES IN 'IRE WOOD sjmple. t1"\.1stful
children. It .11as . come into use from an old ballad
whjch describes the sad fate of t\vo orphan children,cruel1y treated by a bad uncle. (Slang)
Yet those babes i12 the wood, uncle San1 and
Aunt Fanny, trusted six months of our existence
to his judgment. Harp(1r's Monthly, Septembe1
1887.
B~'\.BES .AND SUCR.LlNGs-utterly inexperienced ;
e.g. They .. are mere babes and Buclclings so far as
this matter is ooncerried.

'Bal>el To RAISE .A B.Ai3EL to . stark a confused


noise of talk ; e. g. Every evening the radio r<J.ises
:a babel on the table.
1
Back '1 0 PU'i' uNE'S B.ACK UP to become ioused,angry and obstinate. A oat when irritated and
ready to spit and sc1atch arches its back, the hair
. beoo1ning erect.
To SET ONE'S BACK Up to i1ritate or l'OllSe him.
I've been to see my mother, and you've S,1; lie1'
baclc up Besant.
To BREAK '!'HE B.AOK OF to finish the hardest
part of a task.
"
I always t1y to b1ealc tlie baclc of day's worl-:
l?efore breakfast. J. M. Dixon.
.
TO GO BACK ON A PERSON ( An1erican ) to
betray one.
I '11 not go bac7c on y0it. in any case. J. 11 ..
Dixon.

.
TO BACK THE FIELD ('in the Janguage of bet..:
ting) bet in favour of the other' horses in the field
against si11gle one
in
particular.
(Slang)
.

To BACK UP to give sUppo1t to.


:
He prolonged Cesar's con1n1arid, and l1aclcec{
hi11i itp 111
:everything.
F1ot1de.

".
'
To B.\CK OUT .to retreat .cautiously from a dif..
fictt1t positio11 ; to refuEe or recede after con~'enting.
.

Balle

'

'

'

'

Back

Bad

14

He was determined that Morris should not


back out. of the scrape so easily. Soott.
ON ONE'S BACK prostrate; helpless.
But here he was, on his bnck.- Wm. BJaclc.
To GI\7E THE BACK. to leave or quit.
Had even Obstinate himself but felt \\Tath I
have felt of the powers and ter1ors of what is
yet unseen, be \\Tould not thus rightly have given
us tlie baclc. Bunyan.
To TURN ONE'S BACK UPON to desert ; to
forsake.
''Uncle." Faid Mrs. Kenwigs, '' to think that
you should have turned yo11,r back upon me and
my children.'' Dickens.
ON, UPON THE BACK OF weighing do\\Tn as a
burden.

BACK AND BELLY clothing and food ; e.g. They


have to go almost withot1t baclc and belly.
BacklJ,111e TO THE BACKBONE-tboroughly : staunchly.
.
Ballacls and Pqe11zs of Trag!c L1fe is Mr. GeorgE
}.1:eredith 1:0 the baclcbone. Rontledge's Alniaiiac
1888.
Backstair BACK-STAIR INFLUENCE-Secret influenoE
exerted in a 111anner not legitin1ate.
Bacon--TO SELL ONE'S BACON to sell one's body.
To the Kaiser, therefore, I sold niy bacoii, And
by hi1n good cha1ge of the vvhole is taken.Schiller.
To S.o\\TE ONE'S BACON to escape from personal
injury, generally jn an undignified manner.
But as he ran to save Jiis bacon .
By hat and wig he was forsal{en. Co111be .

Bad TO GO TO THE BAD to go to ruin ; sink into


poverty and disgra11e.
He went, a::; the oomn1on saying expressively
phrases it, f.o tlie bad. Pall },fall Gazette.
rro THE BAD in debt ; in deficit.
I

15

Bad

Bag

He \vas betV1Teen 70 and 80 to the bad Pall


.Wall Gazette.
Tl) GO BAD to decay ; to spoil.
It goes bad more readily than cool\:ed butcher's
ineat. Daily News,1884.

BAD BLOOD-.angry and vindi.otive feelings.


At the battle of Poona he ragai.ned his autho1"ity, a11d whatever bad blood had flowed between
them \Vas oheol\:ed by tl1e prospect of approaching
dange'l'. J.M. Dixon.
BAD DEBTS-debts that cannot be recovered;
debts of \vhioh there is no hope that they will ever
be paid.
.
Among his assets be had jncluded a number
of bad deb1's. J. M. Dixon.
BADLY OFF i11 unfortunate oondition; e.g. After
losi.ng bis job he has been badly off.
BAD FORl\1.-want of breeding ; e. g. Personal
attack i.s in bad form.
BAD RAT a. person of bad ohara.cter.
Bag BAG AND BAGGAGE co.npletely; leaving no~
prope1ty behind. The phrase was originally used of
the co1nplete evaouatio:q. by aa army of an
enemy's territo,.y. and is now employed generally
to signify the \Vi~hed for depaTtt11e of an Ull\,Telcome
g'1est.

The Tl1rks ...... their Zaptieks and muncliss ..... .


tl1ei1 Kal111alzams and thei1 Pashas, one and all,
b1.1g and bciggag~~ shall, r hope, clear out from
the Province ttiey have ciesolated and profaned. -

Gladstone.
_an en1aciated Jiving being.
IN TH'E BOTTOM OF THE BAG :remaining as a
BAG OJi' B_1NES

lastresou1oe.
.
THE WHOLE BAG OF TRIORS . every expedient.
TO GivE ONE THE BAG TO HOLD. to e11gage any

one and mean\vhile disappear.


To LET THE OAT OUT OF TaE BAG to disclose the.,
secret.

16

Bag

Sunning to be sure, very nearly let f lie C(lf.


out of the bag one afternoon. W. E. Norris.
B.~GMAN a familiar name 01 a commercial traveller.
.
Eait TO BAIT A TRAP to put a bait in a .t1ap ; P. g.
The pron1ise of high interest is only baiting the
tTap for the unwary.
Baker A BAKERS DOZEN thirteen.
Ball Tu OPEN TH'E BALL to be ~in.

\Valtz and the battle of Austerlitz are said to


have opened the ball together (commenced tl1e
. ope1ations of the yea1 together). Byron ..
To LEAD UP THE BALL to 01Jen a dance. . Said
of the most distinguished couple \vho occupy the
leading place.
.
1\1r. Thornhill and my eldest dat1ghter led up
the ball.
Goldsmith.
Td HAVE THE BALL AT ONE'S FOOT . to have a
thing in one's power ; to be in n, position to 9ommand suooess. ,

The crisis in George Dallas's life had. arrived


-tlie ball was at 1Ais feet. E. Yates.
'
' TO KEEP 'fRE BALL ROLLING To 1\:eep fron1 flaggtng ; tQ keep a conversation going.
If .the 8paniards had not lost two armies lately,
\Ve should lceep up the ball for another year (cont.i.nt1e the entel'prise for another year.)-We11ingtort.

TO TAKE DP T!1E .BALL To tal\:e one's tt1rn jn


anytl1ing. To take one's turn in spealcing or in
any i::ocial matter.
Rosencrantz took up the ball. George Eliot.
I~an UNDER A BAN Prohibited by public opinion ; .
e.g.
Sucl1 conduct is u11dcr a llan in.sccie'cy.
.
.
Bn11<l) TO .BANDY ..WORDS In a . d: spute. flinging
\'.-01ds buck and forwaTd at .eacl1 other recklessly ;
e.g. \Vl1y waste your ti111e ba11dying words with

that im1)l1dent fellow ?

'

'

'

'

Bal". ..

Bargain."'

17

Bar THE BAR SINISTER A. well ..known heraldio indication of illegitimacy ; The real word is Batonsiniste1. Bar sinisfer.--is a dimintive of a bend ..
sinister ; the sign of illegitimate birth .
That was Paston Carew, the Clinton with the
bar-sinister across the shield. Mrs. E.~ Lynn
Lynton.

. :
TO APPEAR AT THE BAR. To. be formally referred '
for trial.

Warren Hastings b!l..d _to nppear before tlie bar 'of


House of Lords after relinquishing .his office of
Governor-General of India_.
To BAR.' OUT. To shut out~ .
Revolts, rep11blics, r.evol utions, most
No graver than a sohool boys' baning out.

Tennyson.
To EA'.1' FOR THE BAR,--To prepare oneself tobe a.
bal'rister. Those study~ng for entrance to. the bar
are required to be present at a certain numbe.r of
dinners in the Temple or Gray's Inn.
.
If you bind him with leading-strings at Col~
lege, he will break loose while eating for the bar.
in the London A. Trollope.
.
To BE CALLED TO.THE BAR. To be admitted as
a barrigter. e r;. He was r.alled to the ba1 in 1940.
TQ BE C,A.LL'ED WITHEN THE BAR. Te
appointed K .. C.; e. g. Only last yea-r he was calle<f,
'

be

withit1 the bar.

Bargain .INTO . THE BARGAIN. Beyond . what has


. been stipulated ; over and above ; besides.

If he studies the writings, say, of Mr~ Herbert


Spencer into f.he bargairz, ha will be. perfe.ct.M. Amo1d.

..

To 11AKE THE BEST OF BAD A' BARG.A.IN. '1.1 0
make the best of diffioult circumstances ; to bear
adverse ciraun1sta.nces in the best possible:\vay.
Men 11ad nlade up their minds to. submit: to
wha~ they could not help, _~nd to make tlie. best
of a bad. bargain
Freeman.
.

'

..

18

Bargai11

'l.'o STRIKE A BARG.A.IN. To come to terms about


a purchase. rhe Striking Of hands \"\TaS a _sign Of a
bargain being concluded.
Mr. Miles answered by offering to bet he
should make the best servant in the street; and
strange to say, 'the ba1gai1i was st1ucli:, and he
did turn out a model servant. C. Reade.
Bark 1-fIS BARK IS WORSE THAN HIS BITE his angry
. expressions are wor:Se than his actual deeds ; he
uses strong language, but acts with mildness.
However, I dare say you have learned by this
time that my father's ba1lc is worse thart liis bite.
-Sal' ah Tytler .
Barn. A BARNDOOR a target too large to be missed;
e,_g. That post is almost a ba1ndoor for you.
Basket To BE LEFT IN THE -BASKET to be neglected
. or thrown over.
Whatever he wants, 'he has only to ask it;
And all. other suitors are left in the Basket.
-Barham.

Bat ON HIS OWN.~.AT. on his own. account. Taken from the game of oriokt.

-Titmouse has. left Tanker and Co. and. is now


on his
l>a:. J. M. Dixon.
.

Bato1~. BATON. SINIS_TER the badge of _bastady. e. g.


1n this coat of arms there is a bato11 sinister.
.
'
Beans . FULL OF BEA~S in high spirits ; e. g. The
- boys were full of. beans when they were let off early
from - the school.

.
.
....GIVE PERSON BEANS punish or -scold him ; '!-. g.
The teacher gare the bo'l}S beans for their inischief.
Bear TO BEAR HARD ON' to be unfriendly to.

Ceasi:Jr doth bear ha1d on n1e. .


_
TO BEAR OUT A MAN to lend him support; to corroborate .
Every one :will bear me out iri saying that the
mark by which you know them.- is their genial

own

'

~Beard

19

and hea'rty fresh11ess and youtp_fulness;.~f :~h~raoter.


' H uglies. :

. .
Td BEAR .A HAND to give assistance ; 'to join
.otbel'R in work: .

' "
: '
We we1"e so short of mert' tliat every one on
boa-rd had to bear a lia:nd. R: L. Stevenson.- .:
To BEAR DO"TN 'UPON ' to swo'op upon. ' '
As . soon as. they got on the quarter, deok
A.rthu:r perceived a tall, well-preserved man with
:an eye glass,. whom. he seemed to know,bea1ing
d1wn upon them. ' H. R~ Haggard.
' .
To BEAR IN 111ND to remember ; to reoolleot.
,
It.will. be 001ne i1i mi1id that ;M:r. Aub1ey had
''
given bail to a ve1y ]arge amount. S. Warren.
A BEAR LE.ADER one who. acts as. 'a, companion
to. a per::;on of distinction ;. the. tutor or governor of
. .a youtl1 at the university. or on.travel ... : .-..: .. :
It
was
somewhat
.beneathi
the
..
dignity
~f a
'
gentleman. cavalier to_, aot as -bea1 leader to the
j'oskias and , simpering .city .. madams that . came
to see the curiosities. G. A. Sali>.,.
..
. To PI..AY. '.rHE BE.AR WITH ' to injqre ; to damage.
1 Slan )

'\
g
.
.
,
. . '
.
. . . The last storm has played the' .b:ia1' '.toitii the
" 'orops of se'veral 'districts.;
! .
.
.
..
.
A BEAR GARDEN a scene of tun1ult. :.
.
. l\fr. Trollope visited 'the :Chamber .. \vhilst at
Paris, and heard Soult and Dupin. . He- :thought
, . it a bear gai:den. Temple Ba1; -1887.
. .
BE.AR THE BRUNT OF
endure the. ii1ain shook
. of ; e. g. The centre of. the
has . "to btia1 tlze
bril.nt.
of the battle ... .. .. . - ''.
..
.
~EAR 'SWAY to .exercise aut.b_ority e: g.'. South
'Afric'a \vjll never be settled till 'England bea1s
over the whole region.
-' - -'
Be~lt'<l To BE.ARD THE LION IN 'HIS D'.EN. To. attack a
" dangerous or much.feared. person" boldly : in. his
o\vn quarters.
. . , " . _'.
. And da-rest thou then . .. . .
..:. ,
To beard the 'lion irz'.his den," : -. . .: : (

'

to

'

army

'

'

{'

sway

\.

'

.~

'

'

-Beat

20

:Beard

'

- . -- The Douglas in the hall ? 11farmio12, Soo_tt.


To BEARD A i\iAN To oontradiot or oppose a
man to his face ; e. g. . I have been bea1ded by boys.
Beat TO BEAT .ABOUT THE BUSH. . To approach a
subject in an indirect way; to avoid a direot statement of what must be said.
No ; give me a ohap that bits out straight
from the shou]del', can~t you see this_ is wortli..
a hundred J onses beati11g aboztt tl1.e bztsh and droning us all to sleep. C. Reade.
.
To BEAT -powN. To t~y to reduoe the .price of
goods.
.. :
.
.
. Perhaps his patient would try to beat liim down
and Dr. Benjamin made up his mind to hav&
the whole
nothing.. 0. \V. Holmes. . .
To BEAT A RETREAT. to retreat or. to retire. It
is a militar-y phrase and refers to the beating of
the drums as a -sign for making a ietreat.

She introduced Percy io him. The Colonel


-was cut but grumpy, and Percy soon beat .a
retreat. Reade.
TO BEAT THE Alli To fight to no purpose-. or
against an imaginary enemy.; to struggle in vain.
So fight I not as -one that beateth i:lie air .B~e;
.
.

or

To BEAT UP THE QUARTERS OF 11 0 visit witl1out


ceremony.
,
Sunday coming round, he set off thereforeafte:r
breakfast,
once
more
to
beat
iLp Captain

Cuttle's quarte1s. Dickens


..
. . To BEAT BLACK _,AND BLUE. To thrash; e~ g,
~-. 1n th.e party fight we beat our opponents blaclc and
blue.

Is extremely -exhilar~~
tmg ; e. g. Some of the Indian games beat cockfi'
gMin~
.
BEATEN TRACK Routine method; e. g. Tn offi
oial work don't leave the beaten t1aclc.
--

- . B_EATS COCKFIGHTING
1
'

Be di

21

Beat

-- ----------------------To BEAT OUT to forge, to mal\:e gold or silver

leaf out of metal.


"
To 13EAT THE BOUNDS. to trace out the boun.
daries of a parish in a periodic survey, certain
natural objects 'in the 1ine of journey bei:ilg for ..
. mally struclc with a rod,

:
To BEA'l' THE BRAINS to try hard. to remember
.or devi.se something.
.
TH.AT BEATS THE DUTCH -that is astonishing .

It beats the Dutcli (it is wonderful). how the


-thief can. have got thro11gh so small : a hole.-J. M. Dixon.

'.

. -

'

Bed.

22

Beg

in . childbirth ;- e. g. She has


..
been lJroziglit to bed today.
Bee IN A BEE-LINE the most direot 1oad from one
point to another, like the honey-Laden bee's way
home to the hive.

I'm going to get home as soon as I oanstrilce a bee line--W. D. Howells.

A BEE IN ONE'S BONNET a whim sical ororazy


fa11oy or some point; to be crazy in a certain
direction.


What new bee will you put 1tndP1'- 11our 'bo1znet
next, sir? G. A. Sala.
Been Y6U~YE
BEEN AND DONE IT you have commit.
'
t~d an action that may have very serious conseque-
nces. A re1nark general_ly made half. in wonder,.
half as warning.
I say,_ young f_E.llow, you've been and done -itDiokens.
Beer '' your pianist does not i:liinlc sniall 7Jeer.. 0-f
himself~'' George Elliot.
Beg_, TO GO BEQ-GING O_R A-B_EGGING to find _no oneto claim ; to be -so plentiful as to. be thought not
worth accepting. Generally said of things that
" have been highly prized at' qther times.

.
.Plac_es ~i}\:e Annerley. Hall don't go begging ._. _
, Florence Marryat.
To BEG THE QtJESTION to a~sume that which..
requires to be proved ; to take for granted the very
point at issue.
__ .
._ '' Faosirpiles l'' exclaimed the old n1an angrily ~
'' why not frankly . say that they al"e by the
same: hand at once ?''

'' But that is .begging tlie whole. que.<>tion ,'~ argued.


honest Dennis, . his. good and implastio nature
leading him into the self-san1e error into which
, . be had fallen at Charlecote Park._ James Payn.
To BEG 'OFF to obtain another's release .tarough
.ei;i.tFe~ty, -to ,s~e.k that one's self. may -be relieved of
some
penalty
or
.liability.

.
,,
'
- . -BROUGHT TO BED

'

Best

23

'

'

Beggars BEGGARS ST:3:0ULD NOT BE CHOOSERS those


wbo ask for favours sl1ould submit to. the terms imposed. upon them.
TO BEGGAR DESCRIPTION something beyond the
power of description ; e. g. The sunset glow on the
hills is so glo-ri.ous as to beggar desc1iption.
Bell EIGHT BELLS Half nours of \Vatch on a ship.
The unwelcome cry of '' All starbowlines
ahoy ! eig11:~ br.ll.s, there below l do you hear
the news ?'' (the \1sual formula of calling tbe
watoh). roused us. R. H. Dana, Jun.
TO BEA.R OR CARRY O]'F THE BELL to name OT
gain the firFt plaoe ; to be viotor. in a iaoe or other
context. (provinoialism).
The Italians have ca11ied awt.1y if~e l1ell from all
otl1er nations. as may appear both by their b'ooks
and works. Hakewell.
To BELL THE CA.T to take the leading part in
any hazardous mov.etnent, from the ancient fable
. of the mice wl10 proposed to hang a bell round
the oat's neck~
And fro~ a loophole whil.e I seep. . .
Old BP-ll-f:lie-Gat
keep. Scott.
. came from the
.
Belt To HlT BELOW THE BELT to stTike another
unfairly.

.
, To refer to his private distl;esses in a public
discussion was hitting belotv tlie belt J. M.
Dixon.
,

Bencl1 To BE ON . THE BENCH to be a judge ; e. g.


He has been taised to .the renob ..
,
THE BENCH AND THE BA.R The j\\dges and tl1e
barristers.
- .. .- . _,
'Bertl1 To GIVE A WIDE BERTH to keep well away
from ;_ generally to avoid a person.I
.
I have had letters wa:rnilig rrie that -I bad better
give Balli1iascro6n .a wid~- bertli if I. happen to be
in that pan of Ireland. Wm. Black.
Best A.T TH'E.BEST OR ..A.T BEST In the best possible,.:
wa.y~ taking the most favourable view
possible.

.
'

.,_

'

'

'

'

',

,,

:Be~t

-----------

--------------------I advise yot1 not to accept the situation~ _4.t


the besl you will be a mere favourite. ren1:lvable,
on the slightest whim of a capricious won1a11.-

J. M. Djxon.
To HAVE THE BEST OF IT. to gain the advantage
in a contest.

''In your argument yesterday, Charles, the


strange gen tlen1an had t.]ie. best of it,'' said his
wife. J. M. Dixon.

FOR THE BEST with the best intentions.


To .PUT .ONE'S BEST FOOT FOREMOST to do the
best, or to make the best show one can.
.
To 1\1:AK'E THE BEST OF ONE'S w AY to go by the
best possible road; to go as well as oan be don~ in
the circumstanoes.
With these awful remarlts, Mr. Kenwigs sat
down in a chair, and defied the nurse, wl10 made
the be.st flf her wa.1/ into "the adjoining roon1.-
Dickens.
TO MAKE THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS to manage
so as to get the good things of earth and be sure of

a good place in heaven.
There have b.een. great Captains, great Statesman, ay, great so-oalled Christians, f'eeking to
nialce the besf. of both ioo1lds~ Sarab T1ollope.

'

Bet

You

BET

:My
.Jun.

I assure you. (Slang)

father~s

rich, you 1Jet.

Henry

'

James,

Better. FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE-indissolubly. in

bond.

'

'

Eaoh b!:il1eved, . and indeed pretty plainly as-

serted, . ttiat they . could live . more handsomely


. asunder'; l ut, alas J they were united for . bette1 or
for iv1>rse. Maria Edgeworth.
. . ,
To GET THE: BETTER OJ!'. :to .overcome ; to . gain
the advantage over; to be stronger than:

'

25

1Better

-------

-~------

-- -- - - - - -----------------.....;

. 1 got tlie bette1 of m:y disease, "however, but I


.
was so weak that I spat blood whenever I attem
pted to write. H. MaoKenzie.
To BE BETTER THAN ONE'S WORD--to do n1ore
than Olle promised; e.g. You may depend on him
for he wilt be better than his ivord.

THINK BETTER OF lT Change one's mind; e. g.


I an1 sure he wi11 think bette1 of 'it.
'KNOWS BETTER THAN TO DO SO is not stlOh a
fool as to do so.
I KNOW BETTER I do not believe it.
Better 11alf a man's wife, a ooni.plimentary te1m for

a woman. It once applied seriously to either wife


or husband, and even the soul as opposed to the
body.

''Polly heard it,'' said. Toodle, jerking his


hat over his shoulder in the diratioli of the door,
. 'with an .air of perfeot. oon'fidenoe in his better
half.

Dickens.

.. ONE'S. BETTER SELF the . '1lgher pa1't of one's


nature, including conscience and good judgment.

'

.. ONE'S BETT~RS SUPERIOR .IN: RANK


ONE'S '.BETTE.Ii 'FEELINGS . the hi.gher nature.
,
i
'

'To l1e l1etter oft'-7'"to be in superior circumstances.


'

'

'

'

'
..
Since
joining
hi~. work he is bette1 off.
.. .
Bet,v.een BETWE'EN YOU .AND ME .AND THE POST OF
THE , DOOR POST a phrase u.sed .when anything is
spol\:en confidentially.
. .
'
But understand tbat: the: name of Dangerous
. iH to ren1ain a.secret between you and 1ne and
. . -tlic po~t. G. A. Sala.
. ..
.' . .
Bct,\een )'Oll an(l me and tl1e bed post don't reveal
. a \'Tord of what I say. It has oome into use because
. -generally talkR in the bedroom is bet\veen husband
and wife and is al\vays oonfidentia.1; _:

Bet,veen Oltrselves. in .. confidence.. ,


.
. '

Steyen has a touqh of the, gout, and so, bf.f.ween


1)urselvcs has your brother ... .:. .Thackeray .
'

'

'

'

Bid

26
------------- --

--- ---

--- --

---------

---

-----

Bet,veen Sc)'lla and Cbaryl)clis - bet-.yeen t\vo menaoing dangers. Avoiding one, you fa.II into the
other. Scylla was a iook and Ctiar11bd1.s a \Vhirl
pool on the coast of Sicily, ar.d the narrow passage
between was very much feared by mariners bevause
of its double danger. Now they are looked on
as harmless.
You have ?JOiir Scylla a12cl yozi1 Gliarybcli.!, as
pastor of the congregation. If you preach the
old theology, you \vill lose the-youngm~n ; and
if you p1eaoh the ne"', you ,ill alienate the
old men. J. M. Dixon.
Bet,vee11 t'vo fires subject to a (louble attaok, a posi-tion of peouliar danger in war. If any pe1son gets
between two parties who aie firing at eaoh othe1,
the .position is dange-rous to hin1, hence Lt means
to be assailed on different sidei; by contending dif~
fioulties of a very disagreeable or dangerous nature.
Poor Dawson is betrveen ;'zvo fire.; ; if he whips
the child, its mothe1 scolds him, and if he, lets
it off, its grandm'other comes down upon him.- J. M. Dixon.

.
'
To fall be_t,veen t'vo stools to lose both of two things.
between the choice o'f \Vhioh one was hesita1_ing,.
to adopt two plans
action, and to fail.
.
What on earth she should do ? l!~all' to the
- - ground between two stools ? No, that was - a
man's trick; and she '''as a woman, every inch.
'

of

-0. Reade.
Between 'vind and 'vater that part of a ship's side
which is now in, now out of, the \Vater owing to.the fluctuation of waves: ariy vulnerable point.
'l'he phra~e is used figurat_ively. _
.
- That shot _was: a settler ; it struck -poor Sale
- right bettveen .wind a?zd tVai:er '(in the most susceptible place}. ' Haliburton.

.
Bid To BID FAIR TO to seem likely.

In the eastern -countries the old race of small.

Black

''

30

Bla11kct \

She now hated iny sight, and made . hon1e so


disagreeable to ine that .,V-ha t is called by school
'
boys Blaclc l.fvndrzJJ was to me t_he wh~test _in the
. . .
.
\vhole yea i. Fielding.
Blac/1- Mail hush money. extorted under th1eat
of expositre, esp. of a ba.seless charge. . .
Blaclcnza1z, I suppose, is an honest inan paying
tl1rough his nose for the . sins of his yo\1th . J. M. Dixon.

.
Blackdraugh.t_ a dose. fo1merly given by physicians to ielieve st6n1ach ail1nents.
.
.
Go,, eiij.oy your - blacli d1auglits of ~eta physics. Thackeray. . .
. .
. . To beat or pincl1 another black and blue to
pinch or beat hi1n until.the1e is a bruise with.a vivid
'

polot1r.

: . .

. :

'' Will go .down arn1 in arm.''


.
'' B11t you pincli blaclc and blire.'' Dickens.
BLACK AND WHITE-\vritten definitely on paper
in inl\:.
:
.. .
''I have found: it a.11 out. Here is his name
in blacl<- and white ; '' and she touched the volume
she had fi1st placed pn the table with . impressive
reverence.-Ja111es Payn. _.

To BE IN ANY ONE'S BLACK BOOKS to have in.


curred
any one's displeasu1e.
To BLACK OUT to oblite1ate with black. .
Blank-BLANK SHEET ~ri u:O:written. scroll; meta--.
phoricaily, an absolutely free hand, e. g. Igave
hin1 a b'lanlc s}ieet iri this matter.

. LOOK BLAN~ ..to. appear nonplussed ; : e._ g~ At


this crisis he loolced blanlc.

'

BLANK FlRE-sham fight.


.
BLANK CHEQUE-Same
as
blank
sheet..
.
.
.
.
.
Blanket . .A WET BLANKET' one . \\,.ho discou1agesr
'

.\vbo cat1ses. others to becibnie .- disheartened ; a)so,


discouragement.

'
.
I.don't want to .be a wet blanlcet. W~ E. Norris .

31

Blood

Bless -To BLESS ONESELF to be astonished.


Could Sir: Thomas look in upon us just now,
. ' he would bless. lii?1iself, for we a.re rehea1sing
all .over the house. Jane Austin .
. . To BLESS ONE SELF W1TH in one's possession.
It is generally u.sed of coin, especially siJve1 coin.
-- \vhich people' ciossed thei1 paln1s with for good
luck.
.

What! Yoti trun1pery, to come and take


up an honest house without cross or coin to
. bless yourself with. -Goldsn1ith~

.
BLESS YOU an exclmation of \l'arying signifi..
cance. It is apiotl.s wish or benediction common
. in Ireland;
and
con1n1only
used
after
sneezing,
to

avert evil' oonseciueri.ces.


.
.''. Ble.<Js you ! .'' n1urn1tirs Miss Sey1nour under
her breath- the benediction being called forth
. by :the sneeze, not the demand for mustard.: ... Rhoda 13roughtori..

. .. - BLESS . MY SOUL ; . . GOD BLESS ME terms . of


surprise.
.
.BLESS ONES ST~IBS-thank ones fate for good
luck.

..
..
.
:BLESSING
rN
DISGUISE
unwelco1ne'
salutary
ex
.
'
.
. . . . ...
. Per1ence.
Bi.ind To GO IT BL1ND~to act \vitho11t due consi
. :
. der'ati.o. (Slang) _
A BLIJ.ll"'D ALLEY a narro\\ pass out . of \Vhich
there is no exit.
, ..
BE BLIND To not to be able-to app1eciate; e.g.
He is blind to n1ay goodpoirits.

- BLIND FORCES not iuled by 1)u~pose ; e.. g. Tl1ere
.. are so .many blind fo1ctJ.s in the affairs of then.

'

'

BLIND DRUNK-verydrunk:.

..

BI.JND SIDE-'-direction in-- \vhioh one is . ltn-

. guarded.
.. _
...
Bloo~ BLOOD AND 1RON-:-111ilitary compulsion; the
force of a.rn1ies. A phrase us11ally associated \\Yith
Prince Bisn1ark of:Ge'r111an:y:
-. .

Blood

Bloocl.

32

Mr: Ca1lyJe bas been hearc1 to say that Rha:,. da111anthus wot1ld certainly' give Macat1lay fo11r
dozen lashes \vhen he went to the shades for his
treat111ent of Marlborough. This is quite charac
ter for the Scotch apostle of blood at1d iron.J. Cotter Mti.rrison.
. HIS BLOOD w .AS UP- he \Vas excited or in a

passion.
_
_
That is the way of doing buDiness a . ct1t and
thrust style, without any flottrish ; Scott's style
when blood was up.-Christopher Warren. .
. . A PRINCE OF TH~ BLOOD- a noblen1an -\vho is a
near ielation of the Royal family.
.
. He had a calm, exhausted smile_ which-as
though he had been
p1nre of
blood .\vho
ha.s passed his life in acknowledging the plaudits
of the . populace sugg'ilsted tl1e ravages of
affabi1ity.-James Payn.
BLOOD IS THICKER TH.AN "\V ATER Kinship will
cati.se a man to befriend his relatives ; it is .bette1
to tr11st a kind kinsman than a stranger.
''I am a\vare there is a family tie, or I shoti.ld
nat have ventured to trou.ble you.'' ''Blood is
thi'clcer t?ian water, isn't it? ''-A. Trollope~
IN COLD BLOOD-free from pa.ssicin; deliberately.
Tb.e Stlggestions of such a contigency whi<?h
-0f cot1rse, meant failure- a colcl blood filled up the
cup of the antiquary's indignation.~ James
Payn.
BLUE BLOOD-aristoc1atic descent.
.
The blood of the Bankers .has,in yourself assll
' .
med the more azure liitle. -Besant.
. .
To MA.KE YOUR BLOOD CREEP to fill YOll . with
awe or terror.
,

Jinny Oates, the cobbler's daughter, being


more imaginative, stated not o,nly that she had
seen the earrings too, bttt they had made . he1
l>lood creep.. George Eliot.
...
,
'
.
.
A BLOOD HORSE-A:. English race horse of Arab
breed with great powers of endt1ranc_e.
.

the

'

'

'

Bioocl

Bll.1e

--------------------------FLESH AND BLOOD. -the anin1al. natti.1e ; e. g.


lt-rlesli and blood 'can npt bea~ this.
BAD BLOOD ill feeling; e. g. There is bad blood
bet\vee rl the two brothers.
.
.- . . BLOOD OUT OF A STONE - pity fro1n the ,pitiless ;
e. g". The su:fferiri.gs of the people . are severe
. enol1gh to force blood oiit of a stone.
Blow .-To BLOW QVER to pass away as a da.nger 01
scandal ; to be heard of no n1ore.
,. '' G1aciot1s
l an exect1tion .,,, said Lady
Olonbrony ; ''but I heard you talk of an
execl1tion tnonths ago, my lord, before n1y
son \\Tent to Ireland, and it blew over ; I heard
no niore of \t.'' -Maria Edgeworth.
'J~o BLOW UP to scold. ''
. If I hadn't been p1otl.dof the house I .shot1ldn't
- le bloivir1g 11ou up. Hughe:3.
To
BLO"\V:OFF to escape foroibly.
.
To BI...OW HOT AND COLD to be favourable and
.: unfavou:rable by turns ; to be irresolute.
.

.
.TO BLOW ONE'S OWN TRUMPET to sound one's

O\VD praises.
.

.
BLOWN UPON having a bad. reputation; unsotl.nd ; damaged. . _
. .
, . My :credit \Vas. so blowti upon that I oould not
. . 11ope to raise
a
shilling.
T
haolceray.
.
'
Bll?e THE BLUE RIBBON::..:_ (a) . the., Order of the
Garter. . .
. .
.


I therefore make no vain boast. of a blue
rbbo1i ' being seen there; :thus denoting the .
presence of the Knight of the. most noble orde:r
.. of the Garter. G. A; 8ala.

(b) The phrase is 'alsou~edt~ signify~' a distinction of th~ highest kind.''

li1 1840 he ''"as eleoted to a fello\vship at


Oriel, then the l1lue rfbbon of the university.
-At 1ic'l:eu.?1i, 1887.

--- ---------

'

'

me

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

Blue

34

:Blue

- - - - - - - - - - - - --------------------(c) A badge worn in England and Ame-rjca by


those who do not d1ink intoxicating-liquors.
T11i.s Society was founded in America in

1178.

Of course, Mr. S111ith didnt smoke, and supported a blile 1ibbo11 as proudly as if it bad been
the Orde-r of the Ga:rter.-Besant.
.
,..
A BLUE FUNK it is a Slang idiom and means a
great terror; a condition of f~ightened su~-se.
Altogether I was in the pitiable state known
by s :hool-boys as a blue fun le. H. R. Haggard.
A BLUE MOON a phenomenon whioh happens
very rarely.

BLUE BOOK British official parliamentary Reports, so called because . they are bound in blue
covers.
.
THE BLUE COAT SCHOOL Chl"ist's HospitaJ in
London ; a great public sohool socalled because
the boys attending 'it 'weal" a uniform' with a blue
coat.
..
BLUE J AOKwrs~-.Sailqr of the British Navy, \vho
wear jackets of blue .serge.
_
: ONCE lN A BLUE MOON-very seldom indeed.
BLUE MOONSH1NE fantastic nonsense. It is the
subject of a short poem of three stanzas in Havveis's
Comic Poets of ilig Ni11eteentli (.'e11f'ury.
IN THE BlltJES melancholy; low-spirited.
If we had been allowed to sit idle, we should
all have fallen in tlie blue.J .. R. L. Steven~on
.
.
.
.
THE BLUE AND YELLOW the Edinburgh Review,
so called from the ooloar
of its
cover.
.
.
.
.
Shortly afterwards, and - very little before
-. : . -the appearance. of tlie Blue and Yellou1,- Jeffrey
made another innoration. George Saint.slJt1ry
in Mac1nillans
Magazine, 1887.
. .. . .
'
.
.
THE 1iAN IN BLU~tlie polioeman .
Those kinds of sin which bring upon us the
1
.
nia11 i?l blue are such as wethin { \Ve shall never
<~on1mi.t.
Besan-!;.
..
'

"

l
!

Blt1e

.. .)., 5

Bl'under

To LOOK BL-CJE-to seem disoonoerted ; to be


do\V n.- s1)irited.
Squire Brown looJ, . ~ rather blue at having to
pay t\-x.ro pounds ten Rhillings for the posting expenses from 0 xford. Hughes. .
. ,
Bl11e De,,il~ an evil demon ; in plural, the meaning
is deep despondency, the apparition seen in deli1iu11i t1eme1zs,
.
Tile d1-unken old landlord had a fit of the
bl11.e-de.vils last night aad\vas making a dreadful
noise. J. M. Dixon.
Blue Sto~king a name given to learned ladies who
displayei their .acquirements in a pedantic manner,
to the negleot of \vornanly graoes about 1750.
Mrs. Montagile and others began to substitute literal"y conversa(;ion for oards; and the name was suggeste:i by tl1e b.i"e stockings of Benjamin Stilling~
fleet-the Fienoh bn3 blue is a translation. Hence
it means a ,,,.oma11 \Vho prides herself on , her
learning.

Lucy (Hutchinson) was evidently a very superior yot1ng lady, and looked upon as the bluest
of blitP-. stockings. Gentleman's Magazine,. 1886.
To fly tl1e blue-peter. to bo ready to .sail. It is a
small blue flag \Vith white rectangular centre; hoisted \Vhen a ship is about to sail \yithin twenty four
hours.
.
The ensign was at her peak, and at the fore
floated tlie blue~peter. W. Clark Russel.
BLUE-BEARD-one who is unfortunate. with his
\Vives after Henry VIL[.: It is from the famous
story of Perrault's Conte where as a monster he mu.
rders a series of \Vives before he is himself out off.
Blttnder BLUNDER UPON to find by fluke ; e; g. He
is so luolcy: as to l1ave l>ltLndered upon the right
thing.

BL"uNDER A\VAY O::NE'S CHANCES-to \Vaste one's-,,:


opportunities; e.g. He had n1any chanoes in ..,~- :'.'.-~
Career b:it he 1Jltindered tliem atoay.
:
~.'; :,..
- . ..
I

..

I.
-''

,r ,.

-_..,

'
-'J
'

'

.-

'

; -

',I

'

'"l1
,

Bohen1i~

36

Blunt'

Blunt-:-TO BL.lJN'l' THE EDGE OF .;o ma'.<.e tool less


effective for doing. its wo1k ; e. g. Time bliints tlz.e

edge of grief.

To par ro

Blt1sh

TI-IE BLUSH

to

shu\V
shame or confusion by grc)\ving I"d in the fa.ue.
Ridicule, in~tead of putting gt1ilt and e1ror ta
thE' blush turned her fo1m1dable shafts against
t<)

0<.1U8e

Macaulay.
AT THE FIRST BLUSH- at the first g1anoe.
All purely identical proposition!:l, obviously or
at first blusli, appear to contain no certain instruc..- ,
tion in the1n.-J. M. Dixon.
Boards ON THE BOARDS -following the profession
of an actor.
~
. Lily wa8 on flze board, but Katie tlould get
nothing to do. Besant.
.
To GO BY THE BOARD-to be lo~t 01 de~troyed.
It comes from by the board which means over the
boa1d or side of the ship.

To SWEEP THE BOARD - to tu.lee all the ca1ds.


There vvas keen contl-'st in the game of
bridge, but John and l1is partner swept the bot1rd.
ABOVE BOARD - openly ; e. g. He does things
above boa1d.

GROANING BOARD-abt1ndant n1eal ; e. g. In'


his house the servants get a groariing board. . .
Bob To LEARN A BOB-to join in chorus. (Slang)
To GIVE THE .bOB-to cheat; t9 over reach. It
js obsolete.
.
C. I guess the bt1siness.

. .
S. It can be no othe1 tl1an to gii'e n1e f /lff
bob (nothing else than a plot to otlt\vit me).-Massenger.
A BOB..;._a shilling. It is a Slang idiom.
The trip cost me a bob and a b.ender (a shilling.
. and six pence). J. M. Dixon.

Bol1em\a A. FLAVOUR OF BOHEMI.l\. a tone of unoon


ventionality ; of neglect of social rules. Bohemie,,.-.
innocence and truth.

--------------------------
. is the nan1e applied in London to the quaiter where
artists a11d Iiterary n1en live as be:.-it suits them,
wholly i1egleoting fashion and the elegant world.
111 F1 a11c.e and some otl1er countries Bohemian is
the name applied to the gipsy race, who, wherever they go, live a rough kind -of life, -apart from
other people.
.
Meantime there is a flavour of Bolzemia about
t l1e place whioh pleases' newcomers. To be sure
Bohemia never had any clubs. Besant.
Jlold To MAKE BOLD to take the liberty; to 1nake
free; to venture.

''I mal'e bold, young woman,'' he said as tl1ey
went away, ''to give you a warning about my
nephew.'' Besant.
To-MAKE BOLD WITH to tackle; to deal with.
By the time I was twelve years old I had risen
' into the upper sohool, and could- 1nake bold wi;tli
Entropius and Oesal'. J. M. Dixon.
.
As BOLD AS BRASS impudent, without modesty
. or shame.
Fred
Bulloolt
told
Osborne
of
his
son's
appear'
ance and conduct. ''He came in as bold as brass''
said Frederiol\:. Thackel'ay
.lJolt To SIT BOLT UPRIGHT to sit up straight suddenly from a i'eol ining posture ; e. g. At the noise
made by the thief he sat bolt upright in his bed.
To BOLT FOOD to swa.llow without masticating ; e. g. It is better to take half as .much well
111asticated, than to bolt tlie whole meal in a hurrv.
}3onc A. BONE OF CONTENTION something that
cat1ses strife. It is from two dogs fighting over a

.-'-----------

Bo11e

37

Bold
..

bone thrown between them.


.- .
. The possessio'n of Milan was a barze of conten
t~o1z bet\veen the two monarchs. J.M. Dixon.

:- BO~E TO PICK WITH something to oooupy


Dne, a d1ffiou)ty, a grievance, controversy, dispute.
I consider that I have got a bone to piclc with
Provi.de11ce about. that nose. H. R. Haggard.

'

36

Blunt-

Blunt To BLUNT THE EDGE OF :u mil:-:e tool less


effective for doing_ its work ; t g. Time blunts tli!~
edge of grief.
Blush To PUT TO THE BLUSH to Ci.l.U5e to sho''
shame or confusion by grov;-ing rEd in the flice. _
Ridicule, ini::tead of putting gt1i!t and error ta
the blush turned her forin1dable shafts against
innocence and truth. Macaulay.
_
AT THE FIRST BLUSH- at the first 'g1ance.
All -purely identical propositions, obviously or
at first blusl1, appear to contain no certain instruc,..- _
tion in them.-3. M. Dixon.
Boards ON THE EC.ARDS -following the profess.ion
of an actor.
Li.Iv wa8 01z fl;e board.- but Katie could ger
nothing to do. Besant.
_
TO GO BY THE BOARD-to be lo".'t or de'itroyed.
lt comes from by tlze board '.vhich mean8 over t-hecoard or side of tbe ship.
To SWEEP THE BO.ARD - to take all the cards.
There V.'as keen contt--st in the game of
bridge, but John and his -partner s:cepi tl1e bourd.
ABO\'E BOARD - openly ~ e. g. He does thing~
aboi'e board.
GRO.ANL~G 130ARD-ab11ndant meal ; f:.. g. Tn
bis house the servant::; get a groa11ing boarcl.
Bob To LEAR:K A BOB-to join in chorn.<.:. {Slang)
To GT\TE THE bOB-to cheat: to over reach. Ir:
i~ obsolete.
, 7

C. I guess the

bttsine~s.

S. It can be no other tl1an to giie me fill.'


bob (nothing else than a plot to oun-..~it me),
-11.fa
s~enger.
.
- A EOB-a shilling. It ie a Slang idiom.
The trip cost me a brib and a b_ende:r {a ::hillinf
and six pence). J. M. Dixon.

Bol1emia A FLAVOUR OF BoHE:.11_-\ a tone of uncon'\entiona1ity ; of neglect of ~ocjaJ rules. B<Jher11ir,,.

Bo11e

37

Bold

,....------- - - - - ---- -------------------. is the nan1e applied in London to the quarter where
artist.s a11d Iiterary n1en live as be~t suits them,
wholl~' neglecting fashion and the elegant world.
111 Fi a11ce and some otl1er countries Bohemian is
the name applied to the gipsy race, who, wherever they go, live a rough kind of life, apaTt from
other people .
.Meantime there is a jlai1our of Bolzem1'a about
the.place which pleases" newooniers. To be sure
Bohemia never had any clubs. Besant.
l~old To MAKE BOLD to take the liberty; to inake
free; to venture.
. .
''I mal\e bold, young woman,'' he said aR they
\vent away, ''to give you a .warning about my
nephe\v.'' Besant.
To1'.lAKE BOLD WITH to 'tackle; to deal with.
By the ti1ne I was twelve years old I had risen
into the upper 'school, and could. 1nali.e l1old tvffli
Entropi.us and Cesar. J. M. Dixon..
.
,
AS BOLD AS BRASS impudent, without 1110desty
. or shame.
Fred Bullocl\: told Osborne of his son's appearance and conduct. ''He came in a.<J bold as brass''
said Frede1icl\:, Thacke-ray.
}~olt To SIT BOLT UPRIGHT to sit up . straight suddenly from a reoli.ning posture ; e. g. A.t the noise
made by the thief he sat bolt upright in his bed.
To BOLT FOOD to swallow without masticating; e. g. It is better to take half as .much well
n1astioated, than to bolt the tbliole meal in a hurry.
J}onc--A. BONE OF CONTENTION something that
cat1ses strife. It is from two dogs fighting over a
bone thrown between them.
.
. The possessio'n of Milan was a bone of confe12.
t101i bet\veen the two monarchs.
J. M. Dixon.
A BONE TO. PICK WITH something to oocupy
.011e, a di.ffioulty, a grievance, controversy, dispute.
I consider that I have got a bone to picl' \vith
Providence
about that
nose. . H. R. Haagard.
.
.
a

'''

Blunt'

36

Bohen1ig

Blu11t-TO BLlJN'l' THE EDGE OF-;;o rnaie tool Jess


effective for doing. its wo1k ; e. g. Time blunts t]ie
edge of grief.

To

to C<.LUfiE.l to sho\Y
sl1ame or confusion by groi,.ving ied in the face.
Ridicule, in~tead of putting guilt and e1ro1 ta
tlie blush ttirned he1 fo1m1dable shafts against
innocence and truth. Macaulay.
AT THE lllRST BI,USH- a.t the first g1anoe.
All purely identical proposition1:1, obviously or
at first blusli, appear to contain no certa,in instruc..- ,
tion in the1n.-J. M. Dixon.
,
,,
Boar<ls ON THE EOARDS -following the profession
of an acto1.
. Ltly was 01i the bou11i, but Katie oould get
nothing to,do. Besant.
.
To GO BY THE BOARD--to be lo~t or destroyed.
It comes from by the b<Jard \Vhich n1eans over the
boa1d or side of tbe ship.
,
To SWEEP THE BOARD - to tttke a11 the cards.
There vvas keen contt-st in the game of
bri<lge, but John and l:lis _pai.-tner swept t/1,e botZrcl.
ABOVE BOARD - openly ; e. g. He does things
above boo1d.

' GROANING BOARD-abt1ndant n1eal ; e. g. Tn


his house the se1vants get a groa11ing board. . .
Bob To LE.ARN A BOB-to join in chorus. (Sla.'ng)
To GIVE THE !:SOB-to cheat ; to ove1 reach. It
j~ obsolete.
,
C. I guess tl1e bt1siness.

S. It can be no othe1 tl1an to g1'.ie n1e f lttf


bob (nothing else than a plot to ot\t\vit me}.
-Massenger.
A BOB-a shilling. It is a Sfa1zg idiom.
The trip cost me a bob and a llender (a shilling
and six pence). , J. M. Dixon.
Boltemia A FLi\VOUR OF BOHEMIA a to11~ of unconzentionality ; of neglect of ~ocja] rules. Bt>hemi{,.
Blltsh

paT TO TI-IE BLUSH

Bo11e

Bold

------------'
is the nan1e applied in London to the quarte-r where
artist.s arid Iiterary n1en live as be~t suits them,
\vho1ly neglecting faRhion and the elegant world.
ln F1 a11ce and some otl1e1 countries, Bohemian is
the name applied to the gipsy raoe, who, wherever they go, live a rough kind of life, apart from
ot.ber people.
Meantime there is a fla'l.1our of Boll-emia about
the plaoe which pleases newcomers. To be sure
Bohemia never had any clubs. Besant.
J3old TO MAKE BOLD to take the liberty; to inake
free; to venture.
''I make bold, young woman, he said aR they
went away, ''to ~ive you a warning about my
nephe\v.'' Besant.
To. 11AKE BOLD WITH to tackle ; to deal with.
By the time I was twelve years old I had risen
into the upper sohool, and' could 1nalce bold tvi;f h
Entropi.us and Cesar. J. M. Dixon.
AS BOLD AS BRASS impudent, without inodesty
. or shame.
Fred Bullool\:. told Osborne of his son's appearance and conduct. ''He came in aB bold a3 b1ass''
said Frederick. Thaokeray.
Jlolt To SIT BOLT UPRIGHT to sit Up straight suddenly from. a reoli.ning posture ; e.g. A.t the noise
made by the thief he saf. bolt upright in his bed.
To BOLT FOOD to swallow without mastica..
ting; e. g. It is better to take half as .much well
n1astioat.ed, than to bolt the w1iole meal in. a hurry.
Bone A BONE OF CONTENTION something that
cat1ses strife. It is from two dogs fighting over a
bone tl1rown between them.
.
. rrhe possession of Milan was: a bone of conten
tio1i bet\veen the two monarchs. J.M. Dixon .

a BONE TO PICK WITH something to oooupy


.one, a difficu!ty, a grievance, controversy, dispute.
I consider that I have got a bone to piclc with
Pro,~idence about that.nose. H. R. Haggard .

,-------

- -

--.

-----------

------

'

Book

Born

38
'

To MAKE NO BONES OF to have no scruples in


regard to something ; not to hesitate ; to pttblish
openly.
.
He makes no bones of swearing or lying.
To THE BONE to the inmost part.
Book IN THE BOORS OF ; IN THE GOOD BOOKS OF in
favour with ; a favourite of.
I was so much in his books that at his dicease
he left his lamp. Addision.

Tben I'll tell you what, MI. Noggs; if yoti


want to keep in the good boo/cs in that . quarter,.
you had better not call her ''Old lady'' any
more. J)ickens.
To BRING TO BOOK-to call to account.
''By the Lord, sir, it's an extraordinary thing
to me that no one can have the honour and
happiness of shooting such beggars without being
brought to book for it.'' Diokens.
To BuOK TO A PLACE to take a ticket which
entitles yo11 to travel to a place ; e. g. This pas ...
senger ; is booked to Madras. '

To BE BOOKED FOR fixed up for an engagen1ent;


e. g. you are boolced for t\vo songs 'in the concert.
Born-IN ONE'S BORN DAYS in one's life tin1e (Slang)
At last Nicholas pledged himself to betray
no further curiosity, and they walked on, both
ladies giggling very much, and declaring that
they had never seen such a wicked nature in all
thei1 bo1n days. Diclcen~,
NOT BORN YESTERDAY worldly \Vise ; not easily
gulled. (Slang)

She was considerable of a long-headed woman,


was inother; she could see as far ahead as most
folks. She warn't bor1z yesterday, I guess.Holiburton.
BORN WITH A. SILVER SPOON bo~n in \Vealth
and luxury
''What! the settlement I have made is 1nore
than enough five thousa11d pounds more than

'

39

B-0111
-

' ..

~---

------

----------------------

enough. One can i:ee, young fellow, that you


were b1)1n with, a silver spoon in yot1r mouth.''
-Longrn.an,s Magazine:, 1886..
BORN WITH A GOLDEN SPOON IN (.)NE'S MOUTH .

to great sp1en~ou-r ;
The re'sult of
hin1 thoroughly
lot, and disposed

bei:r to great wealth.

his training has been to make


discontented with his present
tc> consider hi1nself aggrieved
i11ucu above the majority of his fellow creatures,
bec.ause he was not born with a golden spoon 1'.n liis
11101tfh. Florence MaTyat .
. Bosom A BOSOM FRIEND -a very intimate, tl'tlsted
friend.
Botto1n ONE'S BO'f'IOM DOLI,AR . one's last coin. An
AmeTioanism.
I would have pa1ted with ni11 boitonz dollar to
relieve he1. Besant.
AT THE BOTTOM itl l'ea.lity ; essentially.
He was a kind-heal'ted man at the bottoni.
-Jam es Payn.
TO BE AT THE BOTTOM OF to be the real original ; to :be the chief instigator i.n any affair.
I an1 sure Russell is at tlie botto111 of this
movement to get rid Gt our present musioal
direotor. . J. M. Dixon
. ..
To TOUCH BOTTOl.1: to ieao h the lo\vest point.
GET T() THE BOTTOM OF' to find out all about ;
~. g. I lll\ii:it get to tlie bottor:n of this affair.
KNOOK THE BOTTOM OF .take away the very
basis of e.g. Yot1r remarks lcn1Jck tlie botfo1n of his
argt1,11 ent.

.
Bo'-v To D'R.AW THE LONG BOW to n1ake extravagant
staten1ents ; to exaggerate.
'
.
. Then he _went into a lot of partioulars and I
began to think. he was draw1'.ng _the long bow.W. D. Ho\\'"ells~

.
TO HAVE TWO STRINGS TO ONE'S BOW to have
other alternatives.
'
'

'

'

'

'

'

40

-----------------

-----

---~

. Moreover, in his impatient an1bition and indefatigable energy, he had sought a second string
to liis bow ; the pttblio and the .publishers -;howed
their sense of his abilities as a pamphleteer a1id
a novelist. Edinburgh Review.
.
Tu DRAW A BOW AT A VENTURE to n1ake an
attack blindly; to say or do something \-.. ithout
1~nowing exaotly what the result will be.
'' And your inotber was an Indian,'' said
La iy Jane, drawing lier bow at, a venture. -- Mrs.
E. Lynn Linton.
A BOWING ACQUAINTANCE-very slight, )in1ited.
to this only ; e. g. I have only a bowing aoquairlta11ce
with bim.
I3o,vels HAS NO BOWELS is devoid of the feelings
of oompassion e. g. I wonder his maste1 has 71!>
1

boivels.
Bowl-To BOWL OUT to stop in a successful career.
A ph1ase used in Cricket.

''Bou1led. 01.1,t etc. ? '' said Routh.


'' Stamped, Sir,'' replied Dallas. E. Yate ...
To BOWL OVER to overwhelm ; to knock dov.rn.
It v.ras within a day of Thursday's \T1sit that
Bennet's last defenoe was thus placidly 1JrJtolecl
ove1. Sarah Tytler.

Box IN THE SAME BOX equally embarrassed.


' How is it that you are not danoing ? '' He
murmt1t'ed something inaudible about '' part.ne1.''
'' Well, we are i1z t lie same box. ,, H. R. liaggard. (provincialjsm)
IN THE WRONG BOX in a false position
; in a
.
.
scrape.
To BOX THE C01iPASS to make a complete 1011nd
abcut in any opinion.
. So my lady reasoned in her rapid. \\Yay, a11d
1>1.>xerl tlzc com'pass all round. Mrs. E. J..1ynn
Linton.

To BE IN A EOX to be in a fix.
'

'

I3ox

41

Brea cl

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ----- ------ ---To BOX HARRY to take a beef steak, i11utto11


ohop, or baoon and eggs with ale or tea, instead of
.the regulatio11 dinner of the oomme1cial t1avell~r ;
to avoid reO'ular
hotel table, and tal{e something
0
.substantial at tea-tin1e to avoid expense. It is a
Comn1erci.al phrase. (Slang)
.
Boy A BOY IN BUTTONS a lad who act8 as door-servant and waiter in an establishment.
The veTy boy irt buttons thought n101 e of his
'pron1otion than of the kind mi-::;tress who had
housed, clothed and fed hi.m when a parisl1
orphan. G. J. Whyte Melville.
Brace-BRACE ONESEI.F UP-to make oneself ready
for an effort ; e. g. I bracad tn11selj up for passing
the examination.
BRACING AIR-Stin111lating ; e. g. lu so111e
places the winter has a b1acing air.
B1ass--.A BRASS FARTHING a . symbol of vvhat is
\vorthless.

. He could pe1oeive. his wife d.id not care <>1ie


b1ass fa1tliing about him. H. R. Haggard.
A MAN OF BRASS an inp'l1dent fello\V ; r.. g. The
chief was a 11ian of b7ass.
.

Brazen To BRAZEN OU1' .AN .A.CT to carry it on


impudently; to be without shame.
As to Bullying Bob, he b7aze11ed t/ia matter out,
declaring he had been affronted by th~ Franklands, and tl1at lie \'\rq,s glad he b.a i taken his
revenge of them. 'Maria Edgeworth.

B1ead To TAKE BREAD UP AND SALT to bind one


self l)y oath. An old-fashioned phrase.
'l'o Bl~E~,,_ K :ORE A fJ ...,.. , o eat ; to be a guest.
'
As of te11 ~ts 1\1r. Staunton was i.nvited, 'or in

'

'"iied I i1nself, to brea!c bread at the Villa des


9natiti. givers, so often did Violet express her
l11te11t1on of eating lier o\\"n luncheon or dinner
111 c?n1pu.ny \\'itl1 Hopkins a faithful old servant..
-\"\. E. Norris.

.. ,,,.-,
'
'

',.

'

, . .I

'

Bread

42

B1eak

material welfare ; what


sustains life.

FoT1ner. pride was. too strong for present prudence, and the que~tio11 of br1 ad arid but'er was
thrown to the winds in re\rolt at tbe sba1 e of
the platter in wh:ch it was offered. Mrs. E.
Lynn Linton.
BREAD .AND CHEESE the bare necc:ei:saries of life.
A BREAD .AND CBEESE .~1.ARRI-.\.GE a marriage
with a man who cannot afford to give his wife
luxuries. (prov1ncia1tism)

You descri.be in. ~vell~ ch9seh la_ngtiago the


miseries of. a b1ead and che<'se 1na1:r1.a(1e to your
eldest daughter. G. J. Wh~te Melville.

BREAD AND

BU'l TER

'

B1eak--To BREAK DOWN

'

(o) to loose control over one'i::: feelings.


''They had better not try," replies Lady
Swansdown, and then she suddenly .l>reaks dow'I~

and cries.- Floren<Je Maryat.


(b) to fail in health.
I have worked hard since T came here ; but
since Abner left mo at the Pi11oh it' ha-sn't been
mans work. J aoky ; it has been a wrestling
match from da\vn to d :Lrk. No n1an could go on
so and net brealc down. C. Reade.
'.
To BREAK IN. UPON, ON, TNTO to' interposeabruptly in a conversation.
.
'' Oh, don't talk to me . about. Roge1s l '' biRwife broke in. W. D. Ho\ve1ls.
To BREAK GROUND-to commence digging 01 excavation, to begin.
.
..
To BREAK OFF to p11t an end to.
Well, then, I consent ;'o b1enlc <>ff with Sir
Charles, and only see him once more- as a
friend Reade.
To BREAK UP to be near death. to show signs
of approaching dissolution.
'' Poor Venables is brealcing itp, '' ob~erved
Sir Brian as they strolled away.- Good Word.c:r
1887. . '

Break

Break

43

BREAK ONE'S MIND- to open one's mind, e. g. I


will brealc 1ny mind to you.
BREAK JOURNEY to halt; e.g. _I am not going

to brealc my jou1ney any where.


BREAK REARI- to cause sorro\v. e.g. He brolce
, his mother's lieart.
.
BRE:t\K IN UPON to startle by appearing une:x:..
peotedly; e. g. '11he polioe b1oke.in upon the robbers.
BREA.K OUT to rage violently : e. g. The fire

urolce out there.


BREAK OFF

to stop abruptly;

e.g. He brolce of/

in the middle of the story.


BREAK FORTH- to burst out ; e. g. The sun
brolce fo1'i"h from the clouds.

BREAK COVER to oon1e out of hiding : e. g. The


\volf b1olce cover in a fine style.
BREAK THE NECK OF accomplish the hardest
part of a job.
.
BREAK A LANCE WITH- to argue.
BREAK BREAD WITH-to be entertained by.
.
.

BREAK BiJTTERFLY ON TRE WHEEL-te

power.

waste

To BREAK WITH-(a) to brealc tbe matter to ; to


announce news to. It i.s obsolete.
Let tis not breal~ witli him Shakespeare.
(b) to quarrel with, to fall out as.friends do.
'\ But what cause have I given 1:iim to brealc
tvith me ?'' Says tbe countess . trembling.
-Florence Ma-ryat.
, To BREAK THE ICE-(fig.) to. get through first
difficulties.

.
'' I will not,'' said' Loohi el, .'' b>ea1c tll.e ice.
Tl1at is a point of honour with ine.'' Macaulay.
To BREAK NEWS to make anything known, esp.
of bad news, \vith caution and delicacv.
It suggested to ine that .I had better breal~
tlz.e news to them (of their father's death by the
explosion of a boiler), and mechanically I accept
~

Hre;1tl1e
44
---------- --- ------- - - - - - - - - -

Breast
"'------

ed the suggestion and rode away. sadly to the


1
Italian Villa. '1. Jie Mistletoe Boz1,gh, 1885.
To BR~AK.LOOSE to extricate one's self forcibly;
to break through all restraint.
Breast To MaKE A CLEAN BREAST OF to make a
full and free confes~ion of something that has been
kept a seGret.
;
She lesol ved to mal,e a clean breast of it before
she died. Scott.

ll1eatl1 THE BREATH OF ONE'S NOSTRILS so1nething


as valuable as life itself.
Then novels were discussed in the sooiety
~vhose flatteries were as the b1f!ath of Jiis nost1ils.
-Edinbu1gli Review, 1886.

ro REEP

ONE'S BREATH

TO COOL ONE'S POR-

RIDGE - not to talk at all ;

TAKE BREATH to take rest.


IN O.NE BREATH in quick succession ;

e. g. He

says yes and no in one breath.


To 'l'AKE AWAY ONE'S BREATH to cause sur
prise.
.
He was so polite, he flattered "Tith a skill so
surprising, ho was i.-o fluent, so con1pletely took
away lier b1 eath, that when he finally begged permission to deliver a valedictorv Oration to all the
young ladies, Mr~. Billingsworth, witl1out thin
king what she was doing, granted that pern1ission.--Besant.

UNDER ONE'S BREATH very quietly, in fear. .


'' A. good thing they did not bethink i.hen1sel\es of cutting of my hair,''she. said under hei
breatli. J. M. Dixon.
.
BATED BREATH in anxiety and g'Leat suspense.
Brcatl1c To BREATHE AGAIN
be relieved from
anxiety.
To BREATHE ONE'S LAST to die.
It had b1eaflied its last in doing its master
service. Thaokeray.
'l'O BRE..i\.THE FREELY to be at ease

to

Brick

45

Bring

. Now that father has gone Otlt, \Ve can breath!~


freel1J.
,
To 'BREATTIE UPON to ta1nish or soil.
To BREATHE STRIFE OR INNOCENCE-to instil
i.t into one, also to Jove it. e. g. He
breatlie~
.o.;frife wherever he goes.
Brick A REGULAR BR1CK a good chap, a pleasant
man (Slang}.
In brief I don't stiok to deola1e Father Dick,

so they oalled him for short, was a reg1.ila1


b1i"clc. Barham.

. WI'.l'H A. BRICK iN ONE'S HAT drunl~. .It is an


An1.erioan slang. (Slang.}

I think our friend over there has a b?iclc in


11.is lia1;. J . M. Dixon.

B1i1ig 'l:'O BRING INTO PLAY--to. oause to aot, to let


'

. in

'

motion~

They very inoongruity of thei1 relative posi~


tion.7>roiig7z.;; i11to pla11 all his genius. Afacmilan'lf.
.l\1agazine~ 1887.
To .BRlNG A.BOUT to bring t.o pass ; to oause to
happen.

.
There are many who decla:re that they would
be \villi.ng to b1i11g abo1tt an Anglo-Russian
Alliance upon the terms of giving Russia her
head ir1 the direction of Constantinople. Fo1t1tigli1~l11 Revifw, 1887.

To BR1NG ROUND to restol"e fron1 illness.


'' Ho~v is poor old No. 50toda.y ?''
'' lYiuch the same.''
''Do you think you will b1i'f1g Tii1r1, 1ou11cl,
sir '? '' A. Reade.
'
'To l3RlNG DOWN to hutnble.
To BRING
UP (a) (of a sailing vefse1) to stop; to

cease moving.
(1)) To educate or Tear.
'l'he cbilc:l showe'd e"X"iraordinary intelligence
ann \V"aS, therefore, brou..glit 1lp by the Duke.

'

Bri1ig

46

:Bring

To BRING TO BEAR to cause to happen; to bring


~o a successful issue.
There was therefore no other method to b7ing
t/1.ings to bea1 but by persl1ading you that she
was dead. Goldsmith.
.
.
.
TO BRING DOWN THE HOUSE-to oall for the
entl1usiastic applause.
.
Eve1y sentence brought dow11 the house as I
never sa\v one brought down before. J. R.
Lowell.
TO BRING OVER -to convert.
.
To BRING TO 'l'HE HAMMEJ;t to sell by auotio11.
All Diggs's penates (household things) for
the time being were brought to hammer.
-Hughes.
BRING AN ACTION to sue in a low court . e. g
I will bring an action against you.
,
BRING TO LIGHT-to publish ; e. g. The n1atter
was brought lo light.
BRING FORTH-to bear; e.g. A good tree b1ings
forth good fruits.
.
.
BRING HOME -to make the force felt; e.g. His
death b11.ngs Jiome to me tl: e sorrow of losing
friends.
BRING BACK THE ASB.ES to reverse for.ner
defeat ; e. g. We b1ought baclc 'f.he ashes thi~ year
in the Hockey tournament.
BRING UP THE REAR-to 111arch last; e.' g. Tpe
infantry biouglif itp the'rear.
BRING TO LIFE to restore from a swoon; e.g.
Tl1e fall made him senseless but he was 11rought

to life.

BRING TO MIND to remember ; e. g. I


hard but I could not bri1zg it to niind.
BRING TO p .'\.SS to mal{e nappen ;
BRING ON -to lead to."

BRING IN to intl'aduce.
BRING OUT to exhibit clearly.
To BRING TO BOOK see under 'Book.'

tried

47
To BRING TO BAx- --to compel to face the ene111y
by n1aking escape impossible ; e. g. The stag was
. b702tght to ba11.

Broad BROAD DAYLIGHT full daylight.


AS BROAD AS IT IS LONG-tells as muoh one way
. as the other; e. g. His talk: is as broad as it i~ lon!/
BR ;AD TONGUE -of looal pronunciation. e. g.
Broad Sco,r.:ch.
..
BROAD STORY OR HUMOUR not avoiding indeae11oy .

1111no1
. BROADLY
exSPEAKING
neglecting
.'
oepttons.

B1oken-BROKEN ENGLISH-imperfect English, suoh


. as . a fo:eigner .not 'vell llp in the language
.might use.
.
BROKEN .GROUND uneven.
BROKEN MEAT- sora ps. ~
BROKEN SLEEP inte-rmittent.
BROKEN TEA siftings
.BROKEN WATER-choppy.
BROKEN WEATHER t1ncertain.
BJ:oo~1~:...Nmv .BROOMS sWEEP CLEAN those ne.vly
appointed to office are apt to make great changes.
If 11eu1 broo1ns do not sweep clean; at any
rate. they sweep away. Blaclcwood'~.
Afaga. zine,.1887.
. . . .
.
.
To. J"uMP THE BROOMSTICK-to be irregularly
married ; to go tlnough an irregular form of ma1. riage, in .. which both jump over a b1oon1-stick.
.(Provi'ncialism) . .

Tl1is woman in Genard St1eet here, had been


married very young ove1 tlie broo11isticlc, as we
say to a tran1ping man. Diokens.
Bro.\'n To DO BROWN (Slang)'to do tliorol1ghly; to
deceive 01 take in con'lpletely.

His '\Vas an imaginative poetical c'o111po"lition,


easily scorched enough, but a111Jost incapable of
bei11g, thorot1ghly d<)ne brown. G. J. Wl1yte.
}.fel,rille. . .

46

Bring

To 'BRING TO BEAR to cause to happen; to bring


~o a successful isstie.
There was therefore no other method to biing
tlz.ings to bea1 but by pers11ading you that she
was dead. Goldsmith.
To BRING DOWN THE HO"GSE-to call fo!" the
entl1usiastio applause.
.
Eve1y sentence biought dow11 the house as I
never saw one brought down before. J. R.
Lowell.
To BRING OVER -to convert.
TO BRING TO 'l'HE HAMMER to sell by auction.
All Diggs's penates (household things) for
tbe time being were brozLght
hammer.
-Hughes.
BRING AN ACTION to sue in a low court . e. g.
I will bring an action against you.
t
_
BRING TO LIGHT-to publish ; e. g. The matter
\vas brought to light.
BRING FORTH to bear ; e. g. A good tree b7ings
Jo1th good fruits.
.
.
BRING HOME -to make the force felt; e. g. His
death b11.ng.s home to me tte sorrow of .. losing
friends.
BRING BACK THE ASRES to reverse for ..aer
defeat; e. g. \fi.Te b1ought baclc 'the ashes this year
-in the Hockey tournament.
BRING UP TBE REAR-to n1aroh last ; e.g. Tpe
infantry brought zLp the rear.
BRING TO LIFE to restore from a swoon ; e. g.
The fall made hi1n senseless but he was l1roitght
to life.
BRING TO !v1IND to remember ; e. g. I tried
hard but I cot1ld not bring it to mind.
BRING TO P ~6,.SS to make nappen ;
BRING ON -to lead to.
BRING IN to intraduce.
BRING OUT to exh1bit clearly.
To BRING TO BOOK see under 'Book!

to

'

47

---------------------- - - - - - To BRING TO B~.\Y--to compel to face the ene111y


by n1aki11g eRcape impossible ; e. g. The stag was
b1oiiglit to bay.

Broad BROAD DAYLIGHT full daylight.


AS BROAD AS IT 1S LONG-tells as much one way
as the ot.11er; e. g. His talk is as broad as it is lorz!/
BR .>AD TONGUE - of local prbnunoiation. e. g.
Bl'oad Sco'.:ch.
. BROAD STORY OR HUMOUR not avoiding in ..
dea~11cy.
.
BROADLY SPE ..\XING neglecting tnino1
exoept'ions.

Broken-BROK.1."N ENGLISH-imperfect English, suoh


. as a fo:eign:er .11ot \Vell 11p in the langl1age
might use.
BROKEN GROUND uneven.
. . BROKEN MEAT- scraps..,
BROKEN SLEEP intermittent .
. B~OKEN TEA siftings!
BROKEN WATER-choppy.
BROKEN WEATHER t1ncertain.
Bi;ooni -NEW BROOMS sw EEP .. CLEAN those ' ne .vly
appointed to office al'e apt to make great changes.
If riew brooms do not. sweep clean, at any
rate they sweep. away. Blaclcwood'~
111agazine, 1887.
.
. .
.
To JuMP TEE. BROOMSTICK.,.-to be irl'egularly
married ; to go 'th1-ough
irregular for in of n1arriage, in whioh both jump . over a broo1n-.stiok.
. .(Provincialism) , .
'

This woman in Gel'tard Street here, had been


ma-rried very young ove1 the broo1nsticlc; as we
say to a tran1ping man.. Diokens:
.
Bro;.v11-To DO BROWN (Slang)'to do thoroughly; to
'' deceive 01 take in completely. '' . ' : . ' ' ' .

His was an imaginative poetical ootnpo'1ition,


easily scorched enough, but al111ost incapabl of
being,. thoroughly done brown . G~ J. WhyteMelville. ,
.

'

an

'

'

'

'

'

.
'

"

.'
'

----------~

I~1

48

B11ckle
-- -

- --- ----- ------ -

llet

--------

.A. BROWN ST"(JDY a reverie.


Bt1ckle To BUC"KLE 'IO to apply oneself diligently
to work.
'
We all bzic/;,led f.o \Vith a will, doing four ho11rs
a day. H. R. Haggard.

81111 A BOLL'S EYE-the centre of a target of a different colour from the rest.
.
'' 'ro MAKE A BULL'S EYE ,, to score a great
success ; to gain a striking advantage.
The Repti.blican's had mode a bull's. eye, and
we1e j11bilant, New Yorlc Herald, August lstw

1888.

A BULT.. lN A CHINA SHOP

a synonym

for

man who does harm through jgnorance or fury,.


a man completely out of place.

. Poor John I he \vas perfectly c_onscious of his


own ponde1osity-more so perhaps than his
sprightly mother-in-law gave him credit for.
He felt like a bull in a Clii1la Sh.op.- Mu11ay's
li1aga7ine, 1887.

TAKE 'i'HE BULL BY THE HORNS to face a difficulty or danger with.oourage; to take the initiative
boldly in a struggle.
'
Happening, therefore, to meet Monckton one
windy morning \vhen he was walking int<J Kingscliffe to keep an appointment, he resolved to talce
f lie oitl l lJ-// i:lie horns. V\i. E. Mo1Tis, in Goocl
lVords, 1887.
1
'1 HE POPE'S BULJ;-the letter or ediot of the Pope
containing a decree or decision isstted to the
Ron1an.

CATHOLIC CHURCH So called fron1 bulla the


Italian \Vord for a seal.
AN IRISH BULL a ludicrous blunder involving
con1t11only a contradiction in terms.
R11llet EVERY BULLE!' HAS lTS BILLET it is appointed beforehand by fate What soldiers \Vil! fall jn
l)attJe, it is no use contending against fate. .

"

49

B11ndle

Burv

As one talks now of ''every bullet having its


billet, '' or thinks of life as an appointed span.
-Conte111porary Rc11iett1, 1887.
Bundle To BUNDLE IN to enter i.n ~n t1nceremonl11s
fashion.
I ~ay, Frank, I must have a dip~ I shall btt11dle
in. G. F. Whyte.Melville.
To BUNDLE OFF, BUNDLE OUT to send away
summarily.
B11rn To BURN ONE'S FINGERS to suffer from interfering in other's affairs, or fron1 embarking in
speculations.
He has been bolstering up these rotten ironworks too long. I . told him he wot1ld btzrt2 his
fi:rigers. Mrs. E. Lynn Lint.on.

To B"uRR THE'OANDLE AT BOTH ENDS-to expend


one's resources in t\vo direotions.
Washington Irving talks of Goldsmith bur1z
ing thP candle at both e1zds in the heading to Chap
ter xxiii of his life.
BURN A HOLE IN ONE'S POCKEI' - refers to money,
when one is eager to spend it. .
To BURN ONE'S BOATS-to out one's self off, as
Cortes did, from all ohanoe of retreat ; to stake
everything on success.
Then he took the perforated cardboard and tore
that likewise into small pieces. ''Now I have
burned niy boats with vengeanoe,'' he added grimly. -James Pyan.
'
A BURNED CHILD DREADS THE FIRE those who
have suffered are wary.
A BURNING QUESTION a. matter in dispute which
urgently presses for settlement.
'
B11ry To BURY THE HATCHET to oease . strife. It
comes from a Red Indian oustom in wa.rla.re.
BURY THE l? AST forget all previous unpleasant- .
ness; e. g. Let us bury the past once. fot' . alt.
, ......

'

..

.BuEh

'

Butte1

50

Bush GOOD WINE NEEDS NO BUSH. a good thin,g


does not require adv:eftis1ng.; it con1mends itself.
. If it be true that gc:od wine needs no bush,. ~'Tis
true that' a goo'd play needs no epi1ogue~.Shakespeaare.

.
'
Busl1el UNDER A BUSHEL secret.ly; without otl1ers
kn owing it.
. .
..
'
Ah, yo11 can't give a dinner under a b71,<:Jiel.
-W. D. Howell~. .
..
TO HIDE ONE'S LIGHT UNDER A BUSHEL to l~on
ceal one's limited n1erits; e. g. He 1\.nows \.\'ell how
to
hide
his
light
under
a
bu.~hel ..
.
'

'

'

'

'

Business-SEND ABOUT.ONE'S BUSINESS, OR GO A:EOUT

ONE'S BUSTNESS...:...to dismiss promptly;' to go off.

It.is generally used in ~ismissil).g an intruder.


Bidding the Soldiers go abo1tt th.eir bu,:"i11es.~
an,? the co,aah to orive off, 11ill let go <)f bis
prey . sulkily, and. waited for other opport,1nities of revenge. Thackeray.
To
!vIEAN
BUSINESS.
to. be in earnest. ;:to have
.
.
.
.
serious intention~ ..
I

He really felt very. much hurt and seriously


alarm Ed, becau:::e it. never had occured to hin1
that the other two should also mean bz1.~inct'.S.
-Besant.
. ,.

TO. i\1AKE IT ONE'S,BUSlNESS--to take upon 011e-


. self t~e .task of ; e.:fl l shall malce it m,y b?i~ine.gs
to find out the trttth of the 111atter.
' , To H4-VE NO BUSINESS -T,O DO-;no right to interfe1e ; e. g. Y ol1 liad 110 bztsi1le~s to .~011 anyt11i ng. . ,. , ,
.
.
.
'B11tter- BUTTERED :F:INGERs....:.nngers th1ough ,,-:hiol1
a ball slip~. It js u~e.d conte1n1Jtuously of a cric:.ket

i)la"ye'l' \\~ha
fails io hold a ball.

.
.
.
.
'

'

'

'

TO LOOK AS iF BUTTER WOULD NOT i\fEL1.' IN


O~E'S .11QDTH to.. look unconcerned ; harn1luss and

innocent. lPro,?incialisn1)

--

__

----------- ------------ ------.............


.
......... ---
. .
-
___
...
Ip_.
....
-.r-
-
.
.
........ ... _......, ..
-- -- --...
....
-- -- -- ----......
- --.....-:.::_---'
- ",.. ---" ------
-- . '
...................-,._......... "
------" -- --- ---- --

- -

--

--~

..__.,_

-~---:-"';: --:~---'' ,,

'

'

."
.,.._ ' ...-''
' ..
..

-- - --'
-------~~'

..........

- .... -..._-. ">..:'......'__'t..:.


,

~,_-.,.,...._

--~

.~

j~~

...._.

j: -

-~

--~-

..

---..--~

._I

- - ....

......

---w...... -------'--- -

'

,,.

"
~---' -

.--}'-(-....

..1 ...... -

- ----......

'.""'!- ....-

--

' _ ...
..;::J-1; ...

-......... ....:

.
---
-..
- - - ------ - ---.
---.- .
- ---- .. ...
---- -----....
--,--- - - ------_--------__- _- --- --__-__. ,. .
----------- - -----. ........
-.
.......
. .... ....:
'-

....

__
' :--...."'"
,,... ,_
.
"'"'---- ..... .....:

--~

..... -----.._~-.
~

~:-.

. ._

.-"'.".

,-.

-~

...

,_

- -

'

....

...::::""---,

'

----

~-

,,

.... ~
......._...

... '

),

'-

.__

~::..

...

---~-~-''.

""

------.-,_..,,.---,....
---. - __- -.....- - - ~

----~-

- ---

___ __...... _____ r


- _...
_ _.
_ _ ....J._
...

--- ---,_
- r. ----..,,,; J

........... ~'---""'
-,- -

_ _ i:..,. .....

- - , , - --~

:'
_;_

.L " '

__
......

.......;::.

'

-""'"'..._

_...

---

.::....

,_'

--

........-~ ,............-......

---~

.
...................

' .........

~\,~

-...
.....................

..............
-1.:..__,...._,
.... ....
' ..........
' .

-~-"'

~-

~-

---

,.. s;;:.

'.t'1"{1 NG-,t,' ~~ \\ ~\
t~\\\\1- \'t 1'''\'\~~)~\\\'2!

..\~\'
~"-e
, "\.j.:,_
...

-_... -o.

'

.......

T ha,,.-e l1t.):1<1hi~

- price of

:fi~e

},ln(l

hundred.

To Ev"Y OFl"

r r0m oppositio11

o-r othe; benefit.

J~~tl~~ll ! t'}'~ tl\t.~ l\\,\~1\1';\\~ \'1.

flit~ ~\,,llt\\'::.

l"'l;;(~~l'\:N--t()

~'l\' ll\~

1~~1 .\'\'l\1~\ \~

t,, \'~';\::-<,)
\\l ''''''\\\~

~':'\\\~(' \"''~'

l\ll11

$\\\\\

Buy

, : Bny

52

-----------------

-----------~~

It was the potential dest1oyer of their house


whom they had to propitiate :the p1obable possessor of their lands whom they liad to bzty off as
best they could. Mrs. E. Lynn Linton.
To BUY UP to purchase the whole stool(.
.

I was so delighted with his last box of curios.


that I bought them up.
TO BUY OVER to gai11 by bribery.
To BUY A HOUSE OVER ONE'S HEAD to purohasea house while the tenant is in occupancy.
To BUY A PIG IN A POKE to buv
.without

seeing. the goods. e. g. To go by the prospeotrts


is to buy a pig in a polce.

(ale

.'

'

.' -.

'

';,.

.
. ..

'

':

'

..

t'

"

'

,
,.~
'

.
. .
'

.:-

-t ' .... ~,

..
..
"
...
'

'It- r-t"f
;;,.

f>

... .,. __

~.

11'1l
.....
!',."'
:>' ~-~

'

\\e nro
otl1er-

..

,/

...

. :.......----.. ':-.
-. .
.. . ..,

'

.'
.. .
'

>

..
. .
,.
' ."

' J,

'

Call

Call

54

To CALL TO ACCOUNT to sun1n1on to render an


account; to demand an explanation fro111.
.
She oan't call e11sigi1 Bloon1ington fo account;
oan she, hey? Maria Edgeworth.

CALLED TO ONE'S ACCOUNT . rer11oved by death.


'
AT CALL-This phrase
is used vvitb regard to
money which is deposited and oan be drawn at any
time without previous notice being given.
CALL INTO BEING to create, to mal{e operative ;
e. g. Our agitation callp_d a new trouble 111to be'ing.
C.A.LL OFF to renounoe engagement ; e. g. , The
viceroy's visit has been called off.
CALL OVER roll-call ; e. g. There was a call
over -of the soldiers on the parade ground.
CALL ONE'S OWN to possess; e. g. The beggar
has nothing to cnll .Jiis ow11.
. CALL TO MIND-..:..to recollect; e. g. Try to call the
faots to you1 mind.
CALL TO THE BAR to admit as a barristeT ; e. g.
He was recently called to t]ie bar.
CALL TO WITNESS to appeal for confirmation ;
. e. g. I earl you to wi1:nes.c; in this matteT.
'
To CALL DOWN to invoke; to pray to Heaven
for.
To CALL FOR-( a) to need or demand.
I do .not thirik bis lette1 call."3 for ar1 ans\ver.
(b) To olaim.

The' phrase is used where a visit is paid \vith a


special pt1l'pose. For instance, a parcel is often
labelled, ''To be left till called for.'"
To CALL FORTH to bring or summon to action ;
to elicit..

She was conscious that fe;v wo111en can be


certain of callitzg for{Ji this oonsideration.Be3ar1t.

To C~<\.T,,L NA11ES to speak disrespectft1lly to or of


a person.
.

To CALL ON OR UPON to invoke t11e aid of; to


appeal.

'

'

Landle
55 .
:all
- - - - - - - ---- -- ..
What signifies calliag eve1y mo111er1t upo-n
the: dev.il and colirting his ~tiendshi.p. Gold
,
s111itl1.
(l1) to pay a visit to.
.
'l'o CALL OUT to challenge t'). figbt a dl1el.
lv1y 111aster was a man very apt to give a short
anS\\Ter hin1self, and 1i.kely to call a. n1a n out for
i."C after\vards. Mal'ia Edgeworth.
.
'l' > CALL A PERSON TO ORDER to declare that
the person has broken the rules of debate, . 01 is
behaving in an unsee1nly manner.
He had lost his tempel' in the house that evening ; he had been ca[/, d i;o 01der by Mr. Speaker~
-Wm. Blacl<::.
Tv CALL OVER THE COALS -to find f :1.ult with.
He affron1ed n1e once at the last election by
calling a freeholder of mine ove1 the coa.!s. Maria
Edgeworth.

Tu CALL IN QUESTli>N-to challenge the truth of.


lf the n1oral ql1ality of tl1e hero oould n:ot in
safety be called in questio12, and suggestion of
v.Teaknes:; in him as a write1 was still more
endurable.-Ja1nes Payn.
.
.
Tu CALL UP-to bring to re1nen1branoe; to

summon to a t1ibunal.
TO OALL A'l'TENTI)N TO 'to point ou.t.
To CALL AWAY to divert the mind. .

to bring in from ou.ts Lde," as the


notes in circulation.
Can1el TO BREAK THE OA1VIET,,'S BACK to be the last
thirig whicl1 causes a catastrophe. The proverb
run;,; ''It i's the last straw that breaks tl1e camel's
l)ack.''

I do n'ot know. exactly what "it was that Biver


did at last; it was something which not .. only
' b1olce the ca11iel.';:: baclc, bl1t . made the o p run
over.-Besant.
.
Candle-TO HOLD A CANDLE TO ANY ONE-not fit to
be some one's inferior, not to be oompared wi.th.
TO CALL IN

56

Candle

Cap

As for other fellows fellows of my O\VD


standing there isn't one to show a candle to 1ne.
-Besant.
To HOLD A CANDLE TO THE DEVIL to do kno\"\Tingly \Vhat is wrong.
Here I have been liolding a candle to the de,~il
to show him the way to misc bief. Scott.
BURN THE CANDLE AT BOTH ENDS-to expend
energy without restoring it by rest; e.g. At
this rate of work I am burning tlze candle at both
ends.
Can"as-To GET OR RECEIVE THE CANVAS An obsolete phrase signifying the same as modern TO GET
THE SACK.
I lose my honour if the Don receives the convas.
-Shirley.
Cap -THE CAP AND BELLS the characteristic marks
of a prqfessional jester. These \;>ere carrjed by
them in the middle ages as tokens cit their office.
And look you, one is bound to speak the tr11th
as fa1 as one knows it, whether one n1ounts a
cap and bells or a shovel-hat.-- 'l'hackeray.
To CAP THE GLOBE to surpass everything.
1
'' \Vell ' , I exclaimed, using an expression -of
the district, '' that caps the globe, bo\vever.''C. Bronte.
IF THE CAP FITS, WE.AR IT the allusion or
remark hits or suits ; if the remark applies to you
consider it \vell.
The truth is, when a searching sermon is pre. ached, each sinner. takes it to himself, I am glad
l\.1r. Hawes fitted the c.ap 011. Reade.
CAP IN HAND symbolic of reverance or submission. Refers to one \vho has a favour to ask.
To SET ONE'S CAP .A.T of a woman, to set herself
to captivate a man's fancy and to make him_ her
husband.
The girls set tJie.ir caps at h-im, but he did not
marry. Reade.

Capital

57

Card

To CAP VERSES to compose or reoiie a veri;e beginning \'rith the final letter of a verse given by
the previous speaker. A favourite pastin1e.
TO CAP THE CL1MAX- to go beyond. already large
limits; to say or d0 so1nething extraordinary.
Capital -TO l\1AKE CAPITAL OUT OF ANYTHING to use
anything for one's own profit.
. .
I suppo::ie Russia waE not bound to wait till
they \Veie in a position to make capital out of
her again. Mathew Arnold.
A CAPITAL CRIME-a c1ime legally punishable
with death.
'
CAPITAL P'lJNISHMENT Punishment of death.
CAPITAL SENTENCE-death sentence.
Card-- ON THE CARDS likely to turn up. (Provincial). Of course the success of the mine is always
on the ca1ds. Mrs. E. Lynn Linton.
A KNOWING CARD (Slang) one who is wide
awake.
A GREAT CARD a popular or pro1ninent man.
.(Slani,)
Captain D'Orville, the great card of the regi1nent, catne clanking into the porter's lodge to
get a glass of \vater for the dan1e. G. J. Whyte
Melville.
HAVE THE CARDS IN ONE'S HANDS . have every
thing under or1e's control.
HOUSE oF CARDs-something flimsy or t1nst1bstantial.
. ..
. . PLAY ONE'S CARDS WELL OR BADLY to make,
.o.t not to inake, the best of men's ohances. :
SHOW ONE'S CARDS expose one's . secret or
desig11.
. ,
SPEAK BY THE CARD . speak with elegance to or
to the point. It is probably a sea phrase, Card here
being the 111ariner':; compass, which gives the
ship::- direction exactly. .
..
.
.
How ,absolute. the knave is? We must speak
by 'tlie ca1d, or e~t1ivooation' will undo us.Sbakes?eare.

'

Care
'

58
THROW UP THE CARDS

Carriage,
to give i.n ; to confess

defeat.
He peTceived at once. that his f 01mer em_ployer
was right, and that it only remained for 11im to
tliroio itp liis ca1d.~. W. E. Norris
Care OARE KILLED A CAT Thi-: l)roverb l"efers: to
the depressing effects of care l1pon the bodily
health; it even kill{d a cat, wl1ich has nine lives.
''Come, come." said Silve1, ''stop this talk
.................... .care lcilled a r.at. Fetcl1 ahead for
the doubloons.'' R. L. Stt3venson.
Carpet-under discussio11. (Provincial)
COME OR BRO'CTGH'f O'N THE CARPET to be introduced. CARPET \Vas forrnerly used for table-cloth.
He shifted the di~course in his tuTn and con-:
trived to bring another subject 1tpo11 tlie ca1pet.Graves.
A CARPET BAGGER one wl10 con1es to a place
for political or other ends carrying hifO. \Vhole
property qualifit~ations for citizenship in his carpet
-bag. An Yankee spec.iulator who, after tl1e great
United States Civil War, we11t to the Sot1th to
make money ot1t of the impoverished country.
At election times 11e was the tel'ror of Republican stu1np-orators and carpP.f-l1agge1.~
. Blncl;wood' s Magazine, 1887.
A CARPET-KNIGHT one dubbed a knight by mere- court favour, not on account of hi:i n1il1tary exploits, henoe tin 'effeminate person.'
As much valour is to be fot1nd in fea!"ting as
in fighting ; and son1e of ol1r oity <'aptai.ns and.
carp8i.~-lcn1glits will make t11is goc)d, and prove
it. Burton.
Carriage CARRIAGE co}.-1p ANY people \vho
are
wealtl1y enough to keep prirate carriages.
There is no phrase mo1e elegant and to my
tac;te than that in which people are described as
''seeing a great deal of ca1ria;1e-compa1zy.''Thaokeray.

Carry

59

A CARRlAGEAND P~1R a car1iage dra\vn by a


..pa1r of hor-es.
.
.
C_.\RRIAGE DRIVE a p1ivate -road in a park.
CARRIAGE OI,OOK one going in any positio11.
Carr) To CARR,YALL BEFORE ON~to bea~ down all
. obstacles ; to be popl1la1'.,
.
.
Adeli11a Pat.t.i ca11ies all bejoie lie1 wherever
8he goes. J. M. Dixon.
To CARRY-. THE DAy to be StlCCessful,; to win
t11e dav.
When ~uch
discussion~ a1'ise, n1oney gene
ially rarres tlie day and
~hould
do. A..
Trollope.
To CARRY ANYTHTNG TOO FAR-to exceed rQ~
asonable 1in1its. :
'
Of cou1se You n1ay ca11y fhe thing ~oo fa1, as
Mr. A ,,~as twitted by Mr. B. with hav.irig sent a
tnan to sleep in hjs church. Cb1111iill Jvlagcizine,
~

1&88;'

..

<

'

'

<

To CARRY, vFF (a) to help to pass, to gain, to

'''ln as a '[Jr1ze.
:: She \\as . one iequiied none of: the circumsi ances of stt1died dre.ss to car1y o.ff aught in her
own ap Pl arnce ... A. Trollope. . . . . .
(b). To cause the death.of. . .
The change of "air ca11ied li?'.m o.ff-Ten1p1e.
To CARRY IT OF.F-to mal'e a b].'ave sliow .. The
. phrase .is used when .a ,person is J)1ac.ed in an
. awk\\ard or ht1iniliating position,' and .tries :to hide
his teelings
of. shame. . . . . .
. . . . .
.
.
Frightened:too -I could see that bti.t car1ying
it off, sir, really. like Satan. R. L. Stevenson.
To CARRY
ON
to
manage.;
to
condt1ct.

.
. .
-
The internal gevernment of England could
be ca1ri'ed 01i only .by tbe advice and agency of
English ministers.--Macaulay.. ,

(b) to misbel1ave.

'

'

'

"

'

'

,,

'

'

Carry

60

Cast .

When he's got no money he is tempted to


do \vicked things, and ca11ies on sha1neful.Be~ant.

To C.l\RRY OUT to bring to completion.


'l'o car1y (l11t the aims he had in view, he
tolerated and made use of persons whose oharacters be despised. W est11iinister Review, 1888.
To CARRY ONE'S POlNT to overrule objections t:l
one's plan or view ; to succeed in one's aim.
They were bent upon placing their friend
Littleton in the Speaker's ohair, and tl1ey bad
car1ied their point triumphantly. Macaulay.
To CARRY THROUGH to accomplish.
The whole country is filled . w.ith suoh
failures swaggering beginnings that could
not be ca1ried throiigh. Thackeray.
CARRIED AWAY BY ONE'S FEELINGS overcome
. by emotion.
.
.
Having an honest and sincere n1i.nd, he was
not r.a11ie.d away by a popul a1 p1eju ..Z:'c :.Tillotson.

CARRY OVER to induce to join the other party.


CARRY WEIGHT to have force ; to possess au ~ho:rity.
BE CARRIED AWAY to be highly excited.
CARRY COALS TO NEWOASTLE--to do some thing
unnecessary; e. g. To send tea to China would be
carryi11g .coal to Newcastle.
0.A.RRY THE WAR INTO ENEMY'S COUNTRY to
bring counter charges ; e. g. When Mr. Jinnah,
accused the Congress of unfair dealings, the Congress Leaders carried the war into hi;; count1y.
,
CARRY WEIGHT le influential ; e. g. His opinion in this matter ca11ies weiglit.
Cart TO PUT THE CART BEFORE THE HORS~to reverse the natural order of things.
To begin physics at this stage is to put tlze cart
before tlzc horse. Study Geometry first. .
Cast To CAST ABOUT (a) to contrive ; .to place.

Laste

61

. Be cast aboiit all that day, and kept bis brain


\Vork1ng on the one anxious subject throl1gh all
the round of i=ohe1nes and business that came
with it. Dickens.
(b) to look about; to search for.
Here he cast aboitt for a co111fortable seat.R. L. Stevenson.
. CAST ASID~to discard.
CAST A SPELL ON to. bewitch.
CAST A STO~E AT. reprobate conduct of.
CAST IN ONE'S LOT WITH- decide to share for"'
tunes of.

~-~~~
CAST INTO THE SHADE-to render less1noticeable.
CAST DOWN depressed in mind.
For my part I was horribly cast. down,__.
R. L. Stevenson.
CAST OITT qt1arrel.
.
The goddesses cast <,ut over the possession of'
the golden apples.

CAST UP-(a) to bring up anything as a reproach 1


{Scotch.)
For what between you two has ever been
None to the other will Ca$t itp, I ween.-=- Ross.
(b) to appear unexpectedly.

CAST AN EYE-to loolc at.


BE CAST to be defeated. (Pro:vinoial)
THE LAST
CAST
the
last
venture.
.
.

CAST IRON iron di.reot from the s1nelt f11rance


and
will~
. .so inflexible e.g. A.man
. of cast iJon
.
CASTING VOTE The deciding vote of a chairman
\vhen the aye's and no's are equal.
A CAST OF THE EYE a squint. e~ g. She has a
cast of tlie <ya.
. .

1 Caste
To LOSE CASTE to
thrown out of the SOJ
ciety
of
one~s equals.
.
'
You may do anything _you please \vithout
lost"r1g caste n:okenP.

'

be

'

'

..

_(at

62

Castles

Ca~ ties

CASTLES IN. THE AIR ' grol1ndles:; or v i.sio11 ary project:; 01 sche1nes.
These \Vere but like c'a tle::; -in tli ! a1'.1 , and in
men's fancies vainly i1nagined~_:.._Si-i; _\. Ra'.eigb.
CASTLES IN SP.A.IN-possessions that hae no
real e:{.ister1ce.

Dick is going to Cork today to join his regiment: but he is going .to.w1ite to. me, and Iain
to w1ite to hi.m. ..Is not. this brick and mortor
enoogl1 to. buili. qu1t.e~a. big Spanish cast!e \\.1th?
-Rhcda Broughton~

.
Cat A_ CAT HAS NINE LIVES . a proverb expressing
the prevailing belief that it is_ ve1'.y difficult to li:.ill
a cat.
He ~t1l1ggled hard, ai1d had, as they say, as
n1any fities as c.-at. Bunyan.
,
A 0.1\..T AND DOG l~IFE-a life or petty qarrel.3.
I an1 sure we ha\re l_lved a cat~c112d-dog life of
..
it.-S. T. Coler;dge. :
.
TO RAIN CATS AND DOGS--to rain heavily ..
. ''Bl1t it'll perhaps 1a111 cats and cltJg.'{ ton1or10\v,
as it did yeste1day, and .You can go,'' said God- .
frey. - George Eliot.
TO MAKE A CA'l''S p Aw OF--to . Uf:e a::: a mere
tool. The i1~rase is- taken fron1 the fable of the
cat and monl\::ey. The latter \vished to reacI1 some
cl1estnuts . t.hat ''Tere roasting. on tl1 e fire. _and l1sed
the pa\v of 11is f1ie11d _tl1e cat to i;1;et at tliem.
'She's made a cc.it's paiv of yot1; that's plain
enot1gh. . Florence M a,.yat..
,
To SEE HO\V TH~ CAT JUMP_S to see ex;:ictly
ho\v arid 1vhy a thing happens. (Slang)
I :~ee hotv tlie cat JUmp13; _1niniste-i'kno\\TS so many

langt-lage~ he hain't been particular enot<.gb:to


keep 'e111 in separate pal"cels. Haliburtion.
To GRiN LIKE A CHESHIBE 0.<\T_ to be al 1vays
sn1iling, displaying t~e gum's and teetl1.'
1

CaicI1

63

Cai

. ,

He lay back in his obai:r, tapped his boot \Vith


his cane, a'nd \Vit.h a g1i'l1 ori his face such as a
Clieslii1e t~at ini.ght wear 'vho feels a .mouse under
ner l)a\V. .1 a1nes Payn.
..
..

TO SHOOT THE CAT-to vomit. (Sla11g) .


To TURN A OAT-lN-P AN to change sides dex-

terot1sly. (P10,rino1a1)
..
. .
.
.
\Vl1e11, George in ptidding .tin1e oame o'er,
And 111odera i e n1en Joolred big, si:r,
I t1l.rned a cat-i11-pan onoe more,
_l\.nd so becan1e a V-.' hig. si1. The .V.ioar of

Bray..

'

. 4.\. OAT .MAY LOOK AT A: KING sjgbt is free i


t;. g. ,,~ell, you aslc me. i1ot to lool;;: at. yotlrgirl; why,
a cat 11ioy -toulc af; a lc-i1ig. . . . .
: .,
. SEE.WHICH WAY 'fr1E. O~.\T J:Ui)!PS defer advi~i
.ing lill one .knows the \\1 i1111ing side. e. g~ In all
I11atters ot disptlte my ttnlce's principle is to \Vait
to see wfiicli iv1.1y tfie c.it :umps.
.F1:GHT I-IKB KILKENNY. CATS till . both are

killed.
Catcl1-:--TO .CATCH .AT ANYT~lNG to . try e_a.geriy to
.seize ; lo. '\velcome. : .
. .
. ..
Drowning men vvill caf:cli c.t straws~. ..
. .
:..
.
.
. , \V. E.Norris.
1,o OA1'CH I;l' .,....t~. get a. scolding or the like; to
suffe1 unplea~a11t co11::;eq11en~es. (Slang) . _..
, .'.'E_c0d, i11y , lady ! '' said Jon.as, looking after
he1, and bitil].g a piece. of straw .,al111ost :to wonder; '':;.,.ou \vill catcli. it fo1 -this . \Vhen you are
J11a1ried." -Diokens. .

.
. . '
.,,,
''
'l'o CATOII ,ANOTHER'B EYE . to att1a9t hjs, atten. tion. A florid-faced gent;ema11, .\vith a. -11io~ head
of h?~11, from tt1e i:;ot1tt1 of "[relaridt had st1ciceeded
. catching t/1.e speaker's .. eye by .. tl1e tin1e 'that
... Mr. \V a1ding had got 'itito the 'gallery. ..A. Trollope.
To - OA1'.CH. N__.\.PPfNG~to _gai11.'. ari advantage
. through the teri1porary ..r.a1elessnes3. of a'nother.
'

\ ' , ' '

'

,'

c,

Catcl1
.

64

Cause

free

Oldfield looked confu~ed; but Somerset.


of mother-wit, was not to be caiight nappi11g.o. Reade.
CATCH ONE'S FOOT~to stt1111ble. Ca11ght hin1
one in the eye hit.
UATCH ONE'S BREATH- Gasp.
CATCH HOLD <.iF Grasp.
CATCH IT Suffer punishment.
CATCH ME Ne> fea1 of my doing that.
To CATCH tTP-(a) to overtake.
On he went hot\r after hou1, over the great
deserted plain; but he did not succeed in catJ
clii11g up the bishop. H. R. Haggai d.
lb) to interrupt a speaker with a critical 1emark.
As for thoughtfulness, and good temper, and
singing like a bird, ai1d never being cross and
catcliing a. pe1son up, or getting in to rages, as
Melenda did, the1e was nobody in the world.
like Polly. Besant..
To CA.TOH A ORAB to be strttok with the handlti'
of the oar in rowing and to fall baokwards.(Slang).
I thought you were af1aid of catching: the
\vrong one, which wotl.ld be catching a crab,
wotl.ldn't it ? Besant.
CATCH MFr-an emphatic colloquial phrase in1 ...
plying that there is not the remotest possibiljty of
my doing something.
To CATCH A TARTAR to oaptt1re what proves to
be a troublesome prisoner; to i::eize holcl of what onewoltld afterwards willingly let go.
Reckless Reginald soon found he had caugli1.
a irater in his new master. C. Reade.
Cause
TO MAKE COMMON CAtJSE WITH-to unite fo1'
..
a. common object.
ThtlS the most' respeatable Protestants, with
Elizabeth a.t their head, \Vere freed to make
Ci>mrnon CCllLSe tnitli the Papists. Macat1lay. .

55

------------------

'

'

>

'

'

'

... ~-- ....

Chicken

66 .

To 01ench- the matter by chapte1 and verse,


l should like to reoall what I-have said of these
. tlleor1es a.nd principles in . their most perfect
' and most important. literary version. John
Morley in the Nine.teenth C'entu1y.
. .
Cl1aracter IN CHARACTER -appropriate.
_. . .
. Read it; is it not quite in cha1acter ? .Disraeli.
0:UT OF CHARACTER unsuitable.
Cheap To BE CHEAP OF 'ANYTHING (Soot.) to get
off wit'h less than one deserved or . expected,_ as of
punishm~nt.
.
,
.

The thi.ef got ten day~s imp1isonment, and the


rogt1e was cheap of it.
. .

. To li'B!fiiL CHEAP to be affronted or a a9hamed.


When I found t4at I iealJy was. -not in,7 ited,
you ,ma;y be sure I; fi:lt c}iqc1p. :
.
Cl1eese To GET THE OHEffiSE-to recei.ve a check or
. disappointn1ent.(Slang)_

.. .
.
<Che,v-To CHEW THE RAG to be sullen and abusjve
. It is commonly used _in the army. (Army slang)
_ '. Hewas';cl1.ewing .-the rag at me.the whole after..

'

'

'

.'

on some
'

me1nory.
.
,
It \\ras possible she \Vas .011ly pretending to
sleep, in .order to clz.ew the cud (enjoy the 1ne. ..mory) of some thought at some greater leist1re.
-J an1es Payn.

(:i1i~k~n

No CHICKEN no longer young. ..

COUNT NOT YOOR CHICKENS TlLL THEY ARE


HA.'l'._CHED -be su1e that a thing is actually in your

possession before you speak of it as yours, or aot


as if it. we:re yours. ' ' ' .
.
. . .B11t aTen't we cozl-nti1lg oiir chic7c(1ns, Tag, be. Jore tlieyre hafclicrd ? - If Tittnouse is alJ of a
. sltdden become _-~uch a catch, he'll be snapped up
in a minute. S. Warren.

"

"

0El ~REN HEA'RTEl


ti111id,
_cowardly~
.
.,
.

'

'

67

Cl1ild

-----~--------,-.------------

Child CHILD'S PLAY something very .easy to do.


It's child's play to. find . the stuff now. R. L.
Stevenson.

'
.A CHILD OF FORrruNE r. person peculiarly successful. .
... . .
Chime-To CBlME IN WITH to harmonise. with; to
agree or fall in with. . .
: . .
Perhaps the severest strain upon Mr .. Linooln
was in resisting a ..tendency of .his own sup

porters wb.ich. chitned i?i, with his own private


desire3. J. R. Lowell.
CI1ip CEIP OF THE OLD BLOCK one with the ohara~- "
teristics of his father.

''He will prove_ a e:liip of .tJie old. block, ltll


warrantt'' he a1ded~ with . a sidelong . look. at
Margal'et. James Payn.

.
CHIP IN to supply one's part; to interpose; '
CI1i,;el To CHISEL to cheat defraud._ (~rov.)
.
Why is a. carpenter like a sw.indler ?..Because

be c1iisel8 a deal. J.: M. Dixon.: ' .: '


Note a pun is here made on the word chisel
'the
word deal (wood).
, -:

-
Cf1it' A aHlT OF A GIRL a sinall
slender. woman ;
e. g. She is merely a: chit of a gii;z but look at. her
-
-uluok.
.
.
CI~oice To HA\TE _'No oHoioE . no partioul~r prefere
nae ; not to care which.
- ' .
.
Clioke.:...To .CHOKE oFF: to get,i]d of;'to put an -~rid
to. (Slang)
.
.

,
.
~ Indeed, ~he b-i:siness :of war:-nurse ~sp~oially
. 1s so repulsive tnat most volunteers were choked
off at onc_e."':"'"' C1ornhill Magazine~ 1888. . .
cr'lop -FIRST CHOP in the first rank; fil."st : olass.
' (~lang)


.
.
" You must be firs~: .cllop in . 'the.
George Eliot.

-
..

, . ~o CHOP T..OG10 io .dis;;iute in logical terms ; to
bandy words.
, _. :

or

and

or

'

heaven. -.

..

... ..

Clean

-----

~-

--

- - - - --------------

---------------

He was angry at finding himself chopping logic


about this yol).ng lady.- James Payn..

CHOP AND CHANGE to btty and sell. .


CHOP UPON--to meet suddenly. (Slang) -
I know not what iny condition would haveDickens.
'
_:
- . . been if I had cliopped upon.
To CHOP IN to break in, interrupt.
.
To CHOP YARNS to tell stories.
Described as a carpenter, but a poor wo1kman,
Clara Martha; and fond of cliopping ya1rzs, in
\vhich he was equalled by none. Besarit.
Chord. To TOUCH THE RIGHT CHdRD to appeal skil
, .ft1lly to_ emotion e. g.. His speeol1 was cleverly
,. designed to tOllCh tlie rig lit chord.
.
ti~cle THE CIRCLE IN ~rHTCH ONE . ~IOVES one's
area of action or sphel'e of inflt1en0e; e. g. I-am not
in the circle in wliicli lie nioves.
,
_,
COMES FULL CIRCLE ends at starting point;.
e. g. The series js so arranged that it co111e~ full
'

'

circle.
Ciaret O:NEs

CLARE'l' JUG a Slang expression.


Claret is slang for Blood. Henoe it is used fo1 o_se ..
,. To tap one's cla:ret jl1g=to oause a n1an's. nose

to bleed.

'

He told Verdant that .. his .clc11et had b~en re..-.


peatedly tapped. 17 e7dcii1t G1ee11, ch. :xi. -
Clay WET ON~'s CLAY to drinl\:, . :Figt1rat~vely qL~y
refers to humll.n body.

Clean To MAKE A OLEAN BREAS'l' OF ANY . THING to


own up frankly_; to mal\:e a con1plete confessio11.
For several days he had z11ade -up his.mind
tha~ when _he should be qt1estioned . upoit the.
sub3eot, he would ea1n the oredit of candour and
grace of \VOmenly gratit11de -bv malci11q a cleat1
b1east of 2t~ Blaokamore.
~

,
.
SiiOW
A CLEAN p Am OF HEELS 'tel esoape b-y

Tunning.
'

'

Clear
---- ---

--

--

--

--

'<-

- - ---

These n1n-roons, "\\~re ni.nawa:y sla.\-es \Vl10 had


bid a sudden goodbye to bolts a-nd shacklest w~iips
and rods, and shotv11 their tyrant-s a cleati pa1.1 of
lieels. G. A. Sala.
THE CLE.AN THING t.he Tight thing to do.
Clear To OLE.AR OUT t-0 be off.
''It would be <1' pity, sirt if \'.'e had to claar
ou.t and :run.'' said Ma:tirice. Mrs. E. L)"nn
Linton.

Close To CLOSE A B.A.BGA!N t.o enter int.o tin agree..


ment.
To CLOSE WIT.ff to agree to.
'
This offer \Vas at 011oe c!~)scd tvit11. br t,ho delighted rnstio. v-,r. E. N orrir::.
WITH CLOSED DOORS-in private, the p\tblio beiJlg
'
excluded, as in special cases in court.
70'l'E-\vhen vot.es are fou11d 011 coun"{;..

_"1_
CLOSE
'\

ing to be nearly equal, for and aga.inst


~"1. CLOSE BOROUGH a oonstit,uency where \raters
are dominated by an influenti~l magnate.
A CLOSE SHA\TE-a.lmost a collision.
CLOSE AlR stifling.
CLOSE \TIEW llea.r.
CLOSE friendshi1l-de11se.
<1LOSE REASONJNG '\\Tithout on1itting details.
CLOSE QU.A.liTERS-hand to band figl1ting.
CI~OSE FISTED- stingy, niggardly.
. .

Cloth TIIE CLOTH the oleTgy;


_.\nd for the 8ake of the poor n1an hitnself too,
and for
his
wife,
and
for
his
children;
and
for
t11e
.
.
sake oft.be cloth. A. Tiollope.
To CLOTHE IN WORDS to express
ideas'
i11 \V'Otds.
.. '
. To CLOTl:iE ON Oit UPON-to. inYest..
Clo11d
UNDER A CLOUD in trouble or disfavour.

Thot1gh Cesal' \Vas not, for various reasons, to


be pronounced a tyrant, C ioero _advised tl1at ho
. should be buried privat.ely~ as if his name wns
'
ttnde1 a clottd. FroU:de. .
.,
. .
'

'

'

..

70

--Coach

wAIT

TILL THE CLOUDS ROLL Bx-

to \Vait for

more favourable circumstances.


EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING the darke~t
problem has some redeen1ing brightness; nothing
is wholly dark.

'' Oh, even the Lapham cloud has a si!vt!r


lini'lzg,'' said Corey W. D. Howells.

Coacl1 To DRIVE A CO.ACE-AND- FOUR OR A COACH~


AND-SIX to break the provision of ; to find a safemeans of evacling.
.
You may talk vaguely abotlt driving a coachand-six thro11gh a bad Aot of l arliament
Diol~ens.
,

Coals-TO BLOW THE CO.AL to excite pas~ion.


TO bALL OR .RAUL OR BRING OVER THE CO.ALS-

to reprimand; to find fattlt witl1.


'' Fine talking l fine air~, truly, Miss Patty:
This is by way of calli1zg me over the coals for
being idle, t st1ppose ! '' said Sally Maria
Edgeworth.
.
To CARRY COALS TO NEvVCASTLE-to take a thing
to where it is least needed.
'' Sure, sir,'' answered the barber, ''You are
too wise a man to carry a broke11 l1ead thithe1,
for that would be f afcing coc1ls to lv~ewcastle. ,._
Fielding.
TO HEAP COALS OF li'IRE

ON ONE'S HEAD-to

exoite remorse by returning good for evil, and thus


making the enemy to be. ashamed of hin1self. 1t
bas a Biblioal rei:erence, vide Roma11s xii. 20 .
Now their aged faces were covered with shame,
and every kind \Vord frOJ11 their master \Va~
a coal of fi1e bztrning on thei1; heads. A. Trollope.
TO Ct\.LL OVER THE COALS to ieprimand ; e. g~
I "\vas called over tlie coals by lll)T t'ntner for n1y
-misoonduct.

1
Const 1 HE COAST IS CLEAR there is no 'danger of
interference.

Co'ck

71

- Coast

'

wait till the coast' is c:lea1~, them strike tent and


away Reade.

', ,
.
. . .
"
Coat - To 'IURN ONE'S COAT to' change one s principle ; to change from one pa1ty to anothei. .:
This is not the first tiriie he has fu1ned his
'

coat.

'

I'

.. .

''

. . '

TO CUT ONE'S COAT ACCORDING Tei ONE'S' OI~OTI:I

-to regulate expenses .by income.'; not to live


beyond income by extravagance.: ' ' .
. . ..
1
Uncle'', Sutton was displeased. ' Debt is dis ..
honest said he, '' we can all cut bu1 G<Jat p.ccording
to ou1 clotJi.'' Reade. '

'
.
To DUST A MAN'S COATJfOR HIM -~o give him a
castigation.
. ' ' " ,
Father Parson's .. coat v.re11' diisted ;. or, short
and pithy animadver'sions ori that famous farrel
of abuse a.nd' falsities, entitled J1(_;iceste1~'s Commonwealth. -Adve1tise1nent 'quoted .by I Di_s1aeli.
TO WEAR TBEKING'S CO.AT to serve
a soldier;
e. g. 'He was .seleoted to wea1 the king's. ci>at~
Coh,vells-COBWEBS 8ubtleties; e. g. what h'e spoke
was a tissue of cobweles.
._ , , '
COBWEBS OF THE LAW_.:.:. Musty~ rubbish; e. g.
His advocate was talking 9f the eabwebs of the lotv.
Cock- !'HAT COOK WON'T FlGHT..:..:..that . e:i.:pendient
will not do. ,.
'
.

. I tried. to se~~~he arms on .the ca1;riage, but


t liat coc!c woiil dn't fig lit. 0. Kingsley. , : : ,
COCK OF THE WALK_:_ chief
a set.':, . ....
. Who shalt be coc;c. of' the walk? . Heading to
Oliapter xvii of T1ollop''s '' BarchesterTow~rs.''
'A COOB: AND-BULL STORY an incredible tale.
.I did hear some coclc~and-bull. sto111 the other
day about tl1e. horses riot having\ ruri away at
a.11 ....,...._Rhoda. Broughton~:. . ., : '. :.
To LlV'E LIKE A FIGHTING OOOK 'tb ~live in a
luxury.
..
.-

as

of

. A COCK IS .ALWAYS BOLD ON ITS OWN DUNG-

HILL- every one fights we11 \vhen sli.rrounded by . :. :_.


friends and admirers.
.- .
" ..:: "

To BEAT COCK-FIGHTING-to : Sllrpass . anything


oonoeivable.
The Squire faltered out, ''\vell, tl1is beats coclc
-figliting.' Lytton.
To COCK OR TURN UP ONE'S TOES - to 9.ie.
Coin- To PAY A MAN BACK IN BIS OWN, COIN to
give tit for tat ; to give as good as one got. , .
If you leave him to be captu.red, it is only

pa11i11g

liim back in liis ow11 coi11.

a prov~rbial phrase expressing ironioa1ly great coldness or indifference.


GIVE THE COLD SHOUI.JDER to be indifferent.
LEAVE. OUT IN THE COLD : to neglect ; to ignore.
THROW COLD WATER to disc.ourage; e. g~ My
friends tlireto cold water on my proposals.
COLD-BLOODED murder an unprovoked, deliberate' : murder without any cause to excite
personal anger,_hatred or revenge .
.
COLD COMFORT no .comf9rt- but more pain and
irritation.
COLD MANNER wanting in- cordiality.
Collar AGAINST THE . COLLAR-difficult; .causing
fatigue. The phrase is taken from a horse's
harness ; when a 'horse goes up-hill the collar
pulls on his neck. (Slang) .

The last mile up to the head of th.e pass \,ras


. a good deal against the colla1.
Colour COME OUT 1N ONE'S TRUE , COLOURS--to
appear 1n one's real charaoter. .
:
DESERT
ONE'S. .- COLOURS- to abandon one's poRt
.
.
, or: .dt1ty. , .

. . . .
p AINT. IN BRIGHT COLOURS to exaggerate.
.SHOW ONE'S COLOURS . show .or adhere to one s
inclinations, opinions, or party..
.
. '
Cornl>-TO CUT A MAN'S COMB to humble hi1n.
He'll . be a-bringing other. folks. to preach
from Treddleston, if his comb isn't c1tf li oit.
-George Eliot ..
To C(JMB . ..A }.IAN'S HEAD-~to give him a thrash
.
'
,
ing. (Slang)

Cold COLD AS CHARITY

'

'

'

'

73
---- ----- -----------------------------.. ''
1'11 ca-rry you \Vi.th me to my country- box,
a.nd keep you out of harmts way, till I find
you a wife who will comb your head for you.
-.Lytton.
Come about C01'1:E '..<\BOUT to happen.
Ho\v cor1ies it aboitt that, for about sixty years,
affairs have been placed in the hands of new
inen~ Swift.
CoitE AT to reach.
By the the time Abrttbam retur11ed, \Ve had

both agreed tha.t money \Vas never so hard to be


co11ie at as now. Goldsmith.
COME BY to obtain ; to" get.
How came she by'that light? S11a.k.espeare.
A COME-DOWN a fall; to be reduced. (colloq.)
'' Now I ari1your warship's washer-\voman.''
The dignitary cqloured, and said that this was
-' ' rather a come-down. Reade.
C011:E 1N - to- prove ; to sho\'T itself.
A. lmowJedge of Latin q11otations comes ,;,n
handy sometin1es. , -'
. COME OFF . happen ; take -place.
A. day or t\vo afteTwards he infor111ed A.llen
that the . thing he had in his inind was really
coniing off. Besant. .

'.
.1.0011:E INTO. COLLISION to strike again ; e.g.
The goods train ca~1ie irito collisio?2 \vith the pasN
. senger train. . .
0011E UP TO to conform to ; e. g. -This book
, . comes itp to my standard of taste. .
COME -TO A POINT
arr!ve
some ...sort of .
. -, decision ~ e.-. g.- We have discussed it long, let us
eo11ie to a point..
..
'
. -COME lNTO. ONE'S HEA.D to strike one; e.g. It
never co;11e i11to niy head . that the p-roposal would be
carried out in that wav.
- 1:
' ~ C01'1E TO GRlEF to be in trouble ; c. g~ If you -
aGt in that way, you \vill Sllre1y co1ne to griej
..- '
..".

~~------

to

at

Come

74

Come

COME UNDER-to fall in the cla.ss of ; e.g. It


might come u11de1 tl1e head of u~eful knowledge.
00.iE OVER-to obtain gieat influence
Miss Gray has ''c<.l?ne ave1 him,'' as Lamb
Says. where that vulnerable regic.'n is con- , ,
cerned. Sarah Tytler.
.
'
COME OUT be discovered ; become public.
No bod.., oaJ1 prove
that I knew the girl to be an
heire:1s ; thank. goodness, that can't come oiit
~

-Besant.

CoME ROUND to come rot1nd (a person) to


deceive ; to cajole.
His seco11d \vife GC11rze 1our1d the old i11an and
got hin1 to obange his will. ,
COME O'WILL sometl1ing that co111es of its O\Vn
accord ; an illegiti111ate ohild. {Slang)
COb-1E 'I'O GRIEF n1eet with disaste1.
The Panama canal scheme is likely to co111e
to grief o'vi11g to want of funds.
.
COME AND GO UPON rely upon.
Yotl have an excellent oharacte1 to co11zeand go 'ltpo11.
COME 'l'O LIGHT to becon1e llublic ; to be disclosed.

The reader 11eed not fear, ho\vever : he shall


not be troubled with any long aoco1.1nt of
Mr. Fraser's miEortu11e,- for it ne\.,.et,. c'aine lo light
or obtn1ded itself upon tbe \Vo1ld. H. R. Hagga1'd.
COME UPON THE p .A.RISH to })ecome a pauper.
C01v1E TO PASS to happen. . '
\Vhat thot1 hast spoken ts <,'07ne to pass; and,
behold, tllo11 seest it Bible.
COME TO HAND to reach, e. g. sour letter canie
to hatzd yesterday.

reoov-er oon-soiousness:
e. g. Whe11 he carnt: to liiniself, 11e found n1e stan-.
ding by hin1.
CO?i!E SHORT--fall short of; e. g. \Ve came sliort o..f
the gloD of God.

.
, . :
,
COME 'fO. ONESELF-to

COME TO . 1.. GRISIS

Cominon

75

Come

reach a tri.tica1 point; e. g.

political situation has come to a c1ise:;:.


COME TO BLOWS to begin fighting ;e.g. They
came to 'blows at last.
..
COME iN'IO FORCE-take effeot; e. g: The new
Bill will come into force from the first of A.p1iJ.
COME INTO O'NE'S POSSESSION-- to be obtained by;
e. g. The property came into his pos~ession long
ago.

to stop a1l, together ;


e. g. The work came to a stand~sti.11 .. COME ACROSS to meet' with ..
COME TO THE POINT speak. plainly on the real
question, without ciroumlooution. . Its opposite is
beat about the buslt.
After a good many apologies and explanations,
he came to the point and asked me for the loan of
my horse~
. . :
.
COME IT STRONG . (Coll.) to do or say too muoh.
What ! little Boston aslt that.girl to m~rry him i
Well now, that's com1'.n' of it a little too strong.0. W. -Holmes.
.
Commit COMMIT ONE'S SELF to compromise one,.s
self ; to pledge one's self wittingly or unwittingly
to a certal.ri: course.

.. . .
. . When you.will.be asked by the ,judge to make
any stateme.t, l'egarding. the offence you have
been oharged . \vith1: ren1em.ber not to comm1'.t
'!!ourself.
.
. ..
.
COMM.1T, TO MEMORY 'lo lea1n .by . heart; e. g.
You must commit th.is poen1
n1e1nory~, . . .
COMMIT ONE'S _HONOUR. to compromise.it;, e.g,
By his conduct he committed liis 'sow1eign's honour.
Common. I\fAKECOM!vION CAUSE W1TH to have the
same interests and aims with. .
SHORT C01dTIONS insuffic1ent supply of food; .
Our men not being yet on sliort cor1t11o?i.'3; none
0f them had ston1acl1 enough to try the experi
ment. G. A. Sala.
,
COME TO .A. STAND-STILL

'

to

'

'

''

'

'

''~,',,.,,,,

76.

Cool
.

Company

KNO'\V A MAN BY HIS COMP .A.NY- to deter-

mine b.i-:> character by the quality of his friends.


Conceit OUT OF CONCEIT WITH no longer fond of.

Hart field will only put her out o,.f conceii; with
a11 the other places she belongs to George
Eliot.

.Confusion.

CONFUSION WORSE CONFOUNDED-a still

wor.e state of disorder.


.

With ruin t1pon ruin, rout on rot1t. co11~ftis1011


worse confiinded.--Milton. .

Conscie11ce IN ALL CONSCIENOE-ce1tainly ; (Coll) by


all that is right and fair.
Plain and precise enough it is, i1z ltll co1zscience M. Arnold.

MY CONSCIENCE I- a vulgar: exclah1atio11 of aston i.shment.

TO HAVE ON ONEs CONSCIENCE-to feel gu:lty


about; r.:. g. He ha.s his m1sdeed z1,pon liis coizscie11ce,
CONSCIENCE CLAUSE In :Acts and Edicts a.

exempting persons whose co~science \vill be out1aged.


.
Contact-TO COME IN CONTACT WITH to n1e'et ; to
have rlea!ings with.

Now it must be iemembered this was a n1an


who had lived in a city that calls itself the 111etropolis, one who had been amember of the State
State and National Legislatures, who had co11ie
i1z co1ztact wit1i men of letters and men of business,
with politicians and members ofall 'the profes. sions, during a long and distinguished career0. W Holmes.'
~
. Cook COOK'S ONE GoOSE (l3lang) to finish off; to
'
kill.
. .
.
, ''You see,'' said To111, ''that if you shot1ld
happen to be wrong, f)r.tr goo.~e is coolced without
the least doubt.'' Besant
Cool TO COQJ_, ONE'S HEELS to be made to \vait
'vhile paying a visit to some inportant personage.
(Colloq.)
.
..

C~ol

---~-~

Counsel:

77

---- ------------------~-------~-------

We cooled t>tt1 1ieel13 during the ordinary and


intolerable half hour. G. A. Sala.
.
A COOL HUNDRED-the large sum. of pounds.
The knowing ones were cursedly taken in
the1e. I lost a cool hztnd1ecl myself, faith.
Macl-:enzie.
. .
COOL AS CUCUMBER not agitated.. . .
.
~ Never fea,, Mi.s:> Nugent dear'', . said Sir
Terren9e ; '' l'n1 as cool as a czt<Jlt?nber .~ .-:- Maria
Edgeworth.
,
Coi.11 To TREA"I> ON .ANOTHER'S CORN-to injure one'fl'
'. . feelings. .

;.
Henoe.: the reputation .he .enjoyed of being
something more than blunt-spoken of being in
fact a pretty good . specimen of the perfe-rvid
Scotohn1an, arrogant, opinionated, supercilious,
and a trifle too anxious to t7ead on.people's cor.ns;
Wm. Black.
'
.

CORN 1N EGYPT :.....a. plentiful. supply.' of p:rovi '


sions. A familia.i- phrase borrowed from the Bible.
''Uncle's bo.s: has arrived,'' ,saidthe minister ;
''there is co1n in Eg11pt today.''
.
Co1ner DRIVE INTO A ;CORNER . to .. put in a fix ; to
embarrass.
.
don't . want, to . act the constable, '' said
'.' i. he farrier, ' driven i_nto
corner by this nieroi1 ess
'
reasoning, ~' and tliere's . no . man ~oan say 'it of
me if he'd tell the truth.''.. George mliot.
.
DONE IN. A CORNER ' done clandestinely;: e.g.
Black market deals are done in a cor,1er.

STAND ONE . IN A CORNER - to punish one e. g
He stood tlie child in a cornet fo1 an offence.
TURN THE . CORNER . pass the .critical point
of illness; e. g. .He was fatally ill, but he has tu1ned
thecor?1e1.

. ~
Counsel To KEEP ONE'S OWN COUNSEL-:-to keep a
secret.

.
Old Sedley llad - l~pt. liis otv11 co1t,.11sel. Thac.- ,
keray.

..

'' +

a.

78

Count

Country

to trust to; to look for \vith


confidence.

'' Count upo1z me,'' he added \vjth bewildered


fe1'vour. R. L. Stevenson.
To COUNT OUT to declare the House of Commons
a.djourned because there are not. forty me1nbers
present. When the Speaker has his attention drawn
to this faot, he m11st count the member present,
and finding it under forty, inust 'deola1'e the sitting

Coi1nt--COUNT UPON

onr.
.
. .
Adelina Patti made her debut,~ May 14, 1861,
\Vhen Mr. Puncli counts oitt the House and adjoul'ns to Mr. Gye's . theatre. Fortnightly Review, 1887.

. To - COUNT FOR (MUCH OR LITTLE)-. to be worth,


to aff eot <Jaloulation ; e. g. That factor does i1ot
count for . m11c7i our plan. '
.

in

Cct111tenance . TO KEEP .ONE COUNTENANCE OR IN


. to lend moral support. . _COUNTEN
. ANOE
.
Flora will b'e there to keep ?JOU counle1ia11ce.R. L. Stevenson. . . .., .
, - _' '.

TO KEEP ONE'S COUNTENANCE to 'preserve one's


'

grav-ity.

'<...

'The tv.ro maxims of any great.mari of oount are,


: alw'ays to lceep. lii.~ ' counfen ance, and never to
keep his word. Swif.t.
.
:
'.
.. HIS . COtJNTENANCE 'FELL he
looked disap pointed. . ... ,.. '_,

.:
. .''Tomorrow you said tomorro\\T,. I thinl\: \Ve
- .vill devote to reoitation. '',
. . TO LEND ONE'S~ COUNTENANCE. TO to
moral
A1ppo:rt ; e~ g. You sl1ou1d not le11d you1 <:o1intenance
to such a shady affair.
. .
.. OUT OF COUNTEN ANOE abashed ; c. g. He was .
OiI.t of cou.tztc1z a11ce at his folly.

At1ntry TO O:N'"ESEL'F ON ONE'S COUNTRY' 'to stand


one's trial before a jury. (Prov.)

'

',

'

'

give

Cot1rt

Coventry

79

A.n outlaw who yielded himself \Vithin the year


\VaS entitled to plead not guilty' and put himself on
his cou11t1y. Maoaulay.
..
Co11rt-TO BRING INTO COURT to a.dduoe as an autho
rity.
Btlt in the case of _i.\.inos, tb.e beards alone
were broitg1if. i11 to cou.1t. B: H. Cha.mberlain.
Cousin-CousIN BETSY a half-witted person. (Prov.)
I do not think) there
is- a man living
'
dead
.
'
t
for tha.t matter that can say Fosters wronged
him of a penny, or gave sh,ort. mea~ure
a child
or ruusin Betsy. .,M1s. Gaskell ...
To CALL cousINS~to claim .relationship..
My new house will have nothing Gothic about
.it, nor pretend to call coiti!-ins with mansion-house
. . If. Walpole.
.
. .
COUSIN MICHEL OR 1fICHEL . i;he ~ick11ame given
to a German, as'' .John Bull'' _to an. Englishman,
and '' Brother Jonathan '' to a!1 _4._1nerican. .
' These were truly' days of Cuu.si11' .llficliel, . cor
responding in a .n1ea~t11e .to the. ~'"gold' old colo.. nial.times .''.of New England.
.Anqn,.
.
.
Courage-TO TAKE COURAGE IN BOTH HANDS to.venture boldly, e. g. I toolc courage in .both., h.a11ds and
. plut1ged into business.. .' . .. '. . ,
;
To HAVE THE COURAGE OF. ONE~S .CONVICTIONS.. to' be 'ready to declare. or a9t _upon one's. firm. belief
e~ g. May friend 1icis no 'courage
of
hi~
convictions."
'
.
Coventry To SEND TO COVE.NTRY
exclude f rom ,
so.cial interoou~s~ ; to bo~cot~ ; to ,?~ve ~o dealings .1
\\1th. Se11t to Covt!nt111.-s1gn1fies ln. disgrace or
disfa1our \vith one's associa~.es. '' Mostly used by
chool boys, wl10 inflict the .Punishment fre'q11ently
' on their f ello\vs.


'. : ': '
. In fact that solemn asse111bly a" levy of the
: school, had been heldt at which the captain of
the s~hool had got up a.nd g~ven out that any
boy, in -wbatevel' form, who shou1li thenoefo1iih
. . appeal to a lllaster, without having n!'Bt" gone to
0

or
to

'

'

'

,_

to

'

'

"

'

Crack .

80-

Crocodile!

'

-----------------------------

. . some .prepositor . and laid the .. oase befo1e him,


- ;should be thrashed- publicly and se1zt to Covent1y.
- Huges.
.. ... ... .
Crack Tu CRACK .A. CRIB to break into' house with-..
the intention of robbing it. (Slang)
.
Any n1an oalls himself a burglar. when he's onoe
learned to c1aclc a crib. Besant.
..
To CRACK A BOTTJ..E . to drink
in
a'
friendly
'
.
.
way;

.
He -..vas al-..vays ready +o c.1acl; a bottle with
a
.
friend.
. . ,
.
To CRACK UP ANYTHING -to p1aise it highly.
Then don't objeot to n1y c1aclci11g up f.Ji:e f!cli<>0l_liouse, Rugby. -H11ghes.
.
.
'
A CRACK HAND one who is an expert'. .
He is a c1ack liand at entertaining children
.To :'RACK A CRUST to get . along fairly well in
the world ; to make a small but suffio1'ent inoon1e ..
" IN A CRACK instantaiieousJ,r
,:
. .
, ..:
.
Poor. Jack Tackle's gritny ghost. \vas vanished
in a craclc. Lewis.


THE CRACK OF DOOM th'e. and of: the wo1ld. e. g.
The sinners will rise at the c1aclc of dob11i__ an:swe1.. for their sins.

. : ' .. : '. .,
.
.
'
Credit REFLECT CREDIT ON to bring 01edit to o..- g.
Such a ,crop reficcis credit on your fa.rming. . .
. To GIVE ,LlTTLE . _CREDIT _Tu is no. compliment
to. e. g. Your
Suppo_si~ion
g~v_es little c1edit
"your
,
'
.
in telligenoe.

.
'
Cieeps T0 GIVE oNE THE- oREEPs to cal1se one t-0.
-'shudder.
.

.
. :. .
'
. They give 1ne tlie creeps the whole. lot_. of t~e~n,
and that's a fact. H. R. Haggard.
.
_

.
Crocodile CROCODILE TEARS affeoted. tears, hypoo.ritical grief from the old story_ that crocodiles
shed tears. over the hard necessity- of killing anin1:l.ls for f ood.
.

He (Lord Lova t) laid . all the blatne of the


. Frasers' rising ttpon his son, _saying with c_rocol

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

to

'

'

to

'

Crow

81

Crop

dile tears, that. he wa~ not the fi-rst who had an

'
undutiful son~ G. A. Sala..

.
.
Crop To CROP OUT to appear above the surfaoe.
The prejudice of the editor of the newspaper
against .Amerioa crops out in everything. he
writes. H1ogo . News, 1887~. :
.
Tu CROP UP (a) to happen or appear unexpectedly.
So bitter is this feeling that it crops up in all.
public meetings. Spectator; Marcli 31, 1887.
(b) to rise 'in different plaoes unexpectedly.
He did . not, he said, want to have mushroom
watering-plaoes c1opping up tinder. his nose . Good Words, 1887.
'
'
Cross TO CROSS SWORDS to have'a d\1el.
Captain Richard 'would soon have crossed
swords with ' the spark had any villa i:riy been
afloat. G. A. Sala.
.
ON THE CROSS-Unfair'; dis'honest .
CROSS AS TWO. STICKS~ particularly perV:erse .and
."
. . :
' . .
disaggreeable. : .
CROSS THE PATH OF ANY ONE~to thwart hi1n.
0ROSS ONE'S MIND. to fl.ash aoross the mind.
CROSS EXAMINATION the examination of a
witness in a co11rt of j1istice by a. lawyer of the
opposing side . .- .
.
: . . ....
Cro'\v . EA'r CROW . to. do .\vhat is excessively unpleasant ; to be_ fol'ced to do something disagTeeable. It
is Americanism.

. .
:F{ot!. In. oon1mon parlance, eating crow .. ,as .an
expre3sion of . humiliation, is much the same as
eating humble pie, but. ev'idently. is more expressive.
Its origin is too obsoure to be definitely reachedt
but it oame irito use during the :late Tebellion, and
evidently it was born in the camp. Many years
. ago I hea-rd the late G~ P. Disosway, who was a
oonfirmed humorist, tell the following. story~. which
he had . received. from a soldier ; and I also heard

from Captain. Ballou


.of
the

115th,
Regiment
:.
.
'

'

'

.' '

.
,.

---- -

A private ,in one of the Pensylvania Regiments


got leave to go hunting, and unfortunately shot
a tame: Grow belonging to a planter' who happened
. to,come up just as.the bird \Vas lrilled. The unlucky
hl1nter ,had rested -,his musket against a,tree, and
the planter seized it and pointing it at. the hunter,,
exclaimed, ''you, Gan eat that .crow. or die.'' There
being no escape the hunter got through part of
his distasteful meal,- when. the planter .relenting
said, '' Youve done. pretty.. well ; here, take your
g\1n .and get off right smart. ''.-The soldier as sooln
.as. he. got. the piece .. in. the hand,: . immediately
turned ,the -tables, by ~evelling it ,at the planter, exclaiming, '' Now, you will eat'. .the rest of that crow,
or I'll shoot. you on th~ i:;pot .. ~The1e. being. ~o
.. escape, . the thing was done: In afew days the
. . planter ,had occasion 'to .visit' the 'canip, a:p.d. a_s the
soldier recogni'sed 'him, one .of the .officers inquired. ''Do you know_ that man:?''.'' 'Oh, yes,." replied.. the planter, ''we, .dfned together'. last. . week.''."' New Yorlc C'orrespondent, Tioy rimes.. .
. HA\rE A CROW ,TO , PLUQK .. WITH .ANY:, ONE to
have scimetlling. to se~t.le: with son1e :one. (Pr_o.v.)
. . Ab; Master George. : J; liaiJe d crow tdpluclc witli'
.'
yozi~ Florence J\1arryat..
: '. :
.A.S THE CROW FLIES in a straight' line.
.'
: ,':" He' went, as tli~ cr'otiJ flies over the the stubble
ai1d b-Y" the : he.dgesides, never pa~sing to Ciraw
breath.-l.1:rs. Oliphant.
: '
CrO,\'ll CROWNED'. WITH SUQOESS . 'to be Successf11ily
, Co1npleted e.g. His .laboui;s wer~ crow11ed witli sitccess.
Crv

To
CR!
OP.t'
withdraw
from
a
bargain.
'
- !
.
'.
:. '
,,
'
. '
...
'
.
. . . . .Osborne will c1y o.ff now_, .I suppose, since .the
; . . fami,ly is.,smashed. Tha.ckeray.
. .
:. ; 'To. CRY OVER SPlLT 111LK to spend time in usel' . -Oss regrets.
. . ..
';
. '... j ..
. . '. .,WQ.'at's don~,. Sa~ can't. b~ hielped., there. 1~ no
.. use 'in. c1yi1ig Ovi:-T :ipi It 11iillc. "Haliburlon. .
,.

.-.

'I

'

<

'

'

'

,,

to

'

'

'

r,

... .cup.

83'

-Crying

'

To CRY UP to praise.
' ; ::
I was prone to take disgust towards a girl so
idolized and so c1ied i1,p, as she always Was.
Jane. Austin.

A FAR CRY a great distanoe.



GREAT CRY AND.LITTLE WOOL appearanoe With...
ot1t reality; much ado about nothing.
.

To ORY ''WOLF'' to give a false alarm~ It is from

the story of tbe shepherd boy in. the Aesop's Fables,


who oried ''wolf'' when there was none, but wasn't
believed when there Vv as one.
,
WITHIN ORY OF within' hea1ing distano~:
C1-ying-A CRYING NEED a flagrant abus~ den1and. ing quick redress. :

..
.

. A' CRYING . SH.A.ME-Something ' notoriously


' shameful.

:
Cue .
GIVE THE cUE . to give a hint.; t6. furnish an
opportunity. The Cue~ ~n the language of the stage,
is the oatcl1-word from which ah' actor knows where
hi~ part' comes in. . .'. . :
'..-: _.. . ." '. .. .
This: ad1nission gave tlie cue to Todhunter to take
.UP his parable and. launoh out into'. one' .of h:is
e:ffu.si've laudations of Parr and .all. "his works.-

To

'''1\\,

"

. 1.fac11iflan's Magaz'ine. . . . .
.... : " .
.Cup Hif:). CUP RUNS OVER'_' he h~s mor~. th~~ e~~ugh.
It is borrowed from the Bible Psalms
xxiii.
5.
.
.
. I do. not know. exactly what it ...was that Biver
...did. at 1ast; it wa~ something, which not only
broke the oaniel's back, but .made the eup run
' '

ove1. Besant.

. . : - . - - . . . : : ".
IN ONE'S CUPS under the . influence 'of liquor;
intoxicated. .

. '.
. : :
'
.
He had often signified in his ~ups, the pieasure
he proposed in' seeing her mairied to 9ne of the
richest men iri the county. Fielding.
' 'MANY A s LIP. BETWEEN THE CUP' .AND. TEE LIPa proverb signifying that something adverse may
occti.T at the last moment.

'

,.,.-

84

Curry

. .
'
Curry. TO CURRY FAVOUR to seek favo11r by flattery. (It is a corruption of ciir111 favelt=to curry
the chestnut horse).

Many changed their religion to c2trr11 favoiir


with Kip.g James..
.Curse THE CURSE OF CAIN
Cain was condemned
to be a wanderer and a vagabond as be killed his .
.brother Abel. See Genesis oh. iv.
Those in the provinces, as if with the ciirse of
Cai:n iipon their beads, carrie, one by one, to
miserable ends. . Froude.

THE.CURSE OF SCt)TLAND' a name given to the


palyingwoaTd oalle the nine of diamonds the win
ning card in a gambling game w hioh ruined many
Scottish families; or according to another explanation~ the card on the back of which was written
the message autb.orizing the Massacre of Glencoe. . .
NOT: WORTH A CURSE-absolutely useless_; e.g.
- That man IS 'llOt worth a curse
.. CURSES 'CC>ME HOME TO ROOST they harm the
curser ; e.g. You .must remember that cit res come
home 1oost.. -.

.
CURSE ALL: THE SAINTS IN 'l'HE CALENDAR.cursing right and lett ; e. g. At this mishap he
was cursing all the Saints in tlie 9,alenclar.
.C11t. CUT IN to strike into a conversation; to thro\V
in a remark st1ddenly.
''Worked in the fields summers, went to school
winters ; regulation thi:g ? '' Burtley cut in
. . W. W. Howells.
To OUT ONE'S LUCKY OR ONE'S STICK to take
, one's departure ; to go off suddenly.
.
'
Jeremiah grinned, his eyes glittered. ''I'm in
lucks way,'~ he.said ; ''and now, mother give me
. a glass of brandy and water, and . I'll C?.tt my

lucky.'' B. L. Farjeon.

-.
To OUT OFF WITH A SHILLING to di~inherit
' bequeathi~g o_nly a shilling, to lea\re a small st1m
~.
as a legaoy.

to

'

'

Cut
Because l'n1 such a good-natured brother, you
kno\V I i11ight get you tt1rned out: of house and
......
home, and cut off with a shilling any day. George
Elion.
. .. ,
To CUT ONE SHORT to oheck ; to inte-rrupt another w_l1ile speaking.
.
..... " :
Ton1 pulled himself togeth~r. and began an. explanation ; but the colonel cut hi11i short.-:Ha1per' s
Jl{agazine, 1886.
.
. " . . . , . .
To. CUT OR TO. our. DEAD to r~fuse to recognise.
She would cut he1 dearest friend .if n1isfortune
befell her, or the world tti.rneci. its. back on her.
-Thackeray.
. . . '
. . ..
To CUE A FIGURE <>R D.'\.SH -to.make a conspicuous appearance ; to do so11.1ething .attract . notice.
To Cl(,t a dido is a Slang phrase. .
. .
It seen1s iny entertainer was all, this while only
the bt1tler, \V'ho, in his mastel''s absence~ had a
n1ind to <!lt a figu1e. Goldsmith.

To cuT'up ROUGH .to beco~ne :quanels61ne; to
rei:ient any treatment.
.' .
Re'll ci,1,t iip .'lo rozlgh, Ni~kelby,' ~t. 011; talking
together withot1t him.- Dickens. .
.:
To BE OUT UP to be deeply. affected.; to.-criticise
severely.

. ..
Poor master I he was awfttlly cut up. at having
to 1eave you.
.
. . . . . . . . .,. :
Well then, of cot1rse, I . was awfully ciit up. I
was wild C.Reade.

. . .
-
.
TO OUT ONE'S EYETEETH. to' learn bow' 'to . -cheat
anotl1er i11an.

..
Th~~ ere fellers.. ciit their eye .te<:.th afor~ - they
ever sot foot in this co11ntry {America), I expect.

to

'

'

'

_,

Haliburton.

'

"

To CUT OFF ONE'S JIB . one's rig. o:r personal - ap ..


pearance.
A
sailor's'
phrase:
(
slang
)
;

.
1
I knew him for a parson by the cut ~of. his ji'b,
_.,

"

'

'

'

.,

'

'

. .

86

Cut

CUT AND COME. AGAIN -a hospitable phrase


.Abundant supply, from the notion of cutting a slice-
and rett1rning at will for another~ .
Cut and co1ne again was the order of the

evening.
CUT AND RUN to make off ; e. fl He cuts and
runs with his job.
CUT AND THRUST lively interchange of arguments e. 'g. There was a cut and thrust between
the Government and the opposition in the Legis.
lative Assembly.
CUT BOTH WAYS to serve both sides; e.g. Your
argument cuts both ways.
CUT NO lCE to effect li.ttle or nothing ; e. g. His.
defence cuts no ice.
CUT OUT FOR designed by nature to do it; e. g.
You are cut out for this job.
CUT PRICES OR RATES lower them as oom-petitive measure. . :
CUT THE P .A.INTER secede, esp. of colonies ; e. gr
Indl.a will cut the painte1 froin Britain.
CUT A LOSS . abandon losing speculation in
good time.
CUT AND DRlED oompletely ready for exectitiori ; over precise.
DmECT OR UNKIND CUT injury
to one's
feelings.

TO CUT THE GORDIAN KONT to solve a difficulty


in a speedy fashion. There was a knot tied by a
Phrygian peasant, about. which the report was
spread that he who unloose~ it s.hould be King of
A.sia. It was shown to Alexander the Great, who
.out it in two with hls sword saying, '''tis thus we
loose our knots. ''

Decision by a majority is a mode. of ~1,ttirzg a


k11f>t whioh oan not be untied . .:....Sir G. C. Lewis.
CUT '.rHE GROUND:FRoM UNDER to li~ve one in
an illogioal, position', with no reasonable argument in his favour.
.
'
.
'

~I\

'

87

.Cut

..

I cut tlie groun.d unde1 hi11i, by provi.ng that the


dooument on which be relied oontained an impqr.
tant erasure. J. M. Dixon. . ' ;
TO CUT OUT to supplant ; to secu1e.' aiiother
place or privilege.
. "
.
'
.
.
:
.In a _few: weel\.:s' some fellow- fr.oin :~i;le West End
will come in with a litle and a. rotten rent-roll
and cut all us oi~t, as Lor9. W~tzr-fus did. last year
with Miss Gr6gra1n, who was. actually . e:qgaged to
Podder,
of Podder and Brown~s
Thaolteray.
,
.
'
To CUT ONE'S . THROAT to act. so as to ruin
oneself.
..
. .: .

He saw it all now; he had let the old man die


after he hadexecuted the ,.fresh will 'disinheriting
him. He had let him die ;"he . had effectually'. and
beyond reden1ption c'u,t 1ii:1 own tli1oat .: H. -;Ro.
Haggard.
. ,

'

'

CUT ONE'S COAT ACCORDING TO .ONE'S .CLOTHto k~ep expenses within. one's me~ns; e.' g. You
must cut your
coat
accordt.ng
to
your
clotli.
.
.
.
.
.
. CUT A SORRY OR POOR FIGURE-to malt~ oneself
. ridicuJous; e.g. He rose to address the .meeting
. but, he cut a very sor.ry figure .ofter all. . . .
CUT OFF ONE'S. NOSE TO SPITE ONE'S FACE to
indulge one's bad temper to one's hU:1-t ; e~ g. If
you reftlse to go because. you. are angry With me,
. YOll Will just. be C'l(,fting off y(>ur t10Se to spite your
face~
.

: .
CUT TO THE. ,QUICK .. to make.'. on.e' feel.keenly;
e. g. .The clerk was ciit to t1ie quiclc by.the ~uspioion
of his di~honesty. .
.

.
CUT 9APERS . to. be: uduly ,_iiY.eiy ; e~ g. ,-He wus
C'ltt.ling cape_1s on t.he stage.. : : . . : ... . . :
'

'.

'

,',

'

',",

~.'

'

.'

'

'

'

'

. ..

..

.'

..

....

lJah

SS

Damo11

Dab-A REGULAR D.AB AT .ANY THING-very skilful


in anything. (Slang)
''I'm a regular dab at figures, you know, ''
said Jeremiah to his mother. B. L. Farjeon.
Daggers To LOOK OR SPEAK DAGGERS' to look in a
hostile manner.

I will speak daggers to her; but will use none


- Shakespeare.

AT DAGGERS DRAWN in a state of hostility.


Lord Shelburne had always desired to kee the
Bedfords at a distance and had been at. dagqers
draw1z with them, ever since their introduction
into the Government. Trevelyan.
Daily. DAILY BREAD one's neoessary food ; e. g.
Give us this day our daily bread.
..
Dan1ocles THE SWORD OF DAMOCLES . Damocles
was a cou1tier in tbe palace of Dionysit1s the elder,
ruler of Syracuse. Having extolled the felicity of
prinecs, he was answered in the 'following fashion
by his master. 'He was invited to a Stllllptuous banquet,' and arrayed. in royal robes was given the
principal seat; but over his head hung a' sword
suspended by a single horse-hair. By this Dionysius
meant. to inti1nate the precarious natul'e of the

po\ver and fel1city of princes.


.
So they laugh and love, and are to all appea. ra.nce blissfully content through the morning
hours, and descend
breakfast (but for that
sword of DfJ.mocles suspended. over their heads)
. . as happy in their mutual affection as ever were
Eve and Adam \vhen first presented to each
other. Florence Marryat.
D11mon DAMON.AND PYTHIAS- sworn friends~ The
classical name of Pythias is Phintias. He offered to
die for his friend Damon.
''St1oh unscientific blanderbasli,'' added the
doctor, flushing suddenly purple, '' \vould have
estranged Damon a1zd Pythias.'' R. L. Stevenson.

to

Day

89

Damp .
.

..

Damp DAMP. ONEs ARDOUR to discourge one; e.g.


My b'rother damped all my ardou.r in'this ad'\Tenture.
Dance J)ANCE ATTEND.A.NOE:--to wait obsequiously.
It is used <ionn'.temptUdusly.
.
Welcon1e my lord; I dance atfe11dance here.
-Shakespeare.
.
To DANCE. AND PAY THE PIPER to labour to
amuse, and have the expense of the entertainment
. besides.

.
l'll either teach in the sohool once a \veek, or
.. g1ve you a st1bsoription ; )Jut I am not goiJ;lg both
to dance and pay tlie piper. J. M. Dixon.
To DANCE UPON NOTHING to be hanged (Colloq).

lf ycit1 do .not take care, you will soon dance


iipon noihing.
\

TO

LEAD. A PERSON A DANCE OR A PRETTY

DANCE io let a person on an undertaking on


false hope to delude. (Prov.)
.. . . . . You gave me t11e wrong address, ~nd have led
me a p1ei'ty dance.
. ,
TO
bidding ;
.
. DANCE TO ONE'S 'l'UNE - to do one's
.
. . e. g. Many people dci?1ce to their maiter~s time.
lJa'rken To DARKEN ONE'S Df'OR to O'l"OS!' the thres

. . hold of one's. house.


. He is a dishpnourable scoundrel; :and ..if. after
this assuranoe, you receive him, l shall '. n~ver
dar!cen yo1tr
C. Reade.
. . '"
.
. door. agai~i
.
. . '
Davy DAvY JONES a sail9r's term for death (Slang)
:. :K~ep iriy bones fron Davy Jones Popular Song.

. DAVY JoNES'S.LOOKER the place wbeTe dead


men go. A. common expression with sailors... It is
also used 'fo't the sea, as the grave of nien who died
on the sea.

I tAil' the.e, Jaok, thou'st free ; ieastways; if we


get to Jamaica without going . to:Davy : Jo1ies's locker.
-G. A.. Sala.
.


Day To HAVE HAD ONE'S.DAY :to be past one's pri
me ; to bediscarded for something. new.
.
'

'

'

'

'

'

1 '

'

'

...

Damon

88

lIJab

.'

D
'

Dab-A REGULAR D.AB AT .ANY THING-very skilful


in anything. (Slang)
''I'm a regular dab at figures, you know, ''
said Jeremiah to his mother. B. L. Farjeon.
Daggers To LOOK OR SPEAK DAGGERS to look in a
hostile manner.
I will speak daggers to her ; but will ui:;e none
- Shakespeare.

AT DAGGERS DRAWN in a state of hostility.


Lord Shelburne had always desired to kee the
Bedfords at a distance and had been at daggers
drawn with them, ever since their introduction
into the Gove1nment. Trevelyan.
Daily ,DAILY 'BREAD one's necessary food; e.g.
Give us this day our daily bread.
Damocles THE SWORD OF DAMOCLES Damocles
was a courtier in the palace of Dionysit1s the elder,
ruler of Syracuse. Having extolled the felicity of
prinecs, he was answered in the following fashion
by his master. 'He was invited to a Slllllptuous banquet; and arrayed in royal robes was given the
principal seat; but over his head hung a sword
suspended by a single horse-hair. By this Dicinyf'ius
meant to intimate the precarious natul'e' of the
power and felicity of princes.
So they laugh and love, and are to all ap1Jea'
rance blissfully content through the morning
hours, and descend to breakfast (but for that
stvord of Damocles suspended over their heads)
as happy in their mutual affection as ever were
Eve and Adam \vhen first presented to each
other. Florence Marryat.
.
:Oan1on DAMON AND PYTHIAS- sworn friends~ The
classical name of Pythias is Phintias. He offered to
die for his friend Damon.
''St1oh unscientific blanderbasli,'' added the
doctor, flushing suddenly purple, '' would have
estranged Damon aizd Pythias.'' R. L. Stevenson.

Dead

91

Deatl1

He had come across the fr1lit .of the Dead Sea,


~o sweet and delicious to the eye, so bitter and
nauseous to the taste. H. Trollope .
: DEAD HAND the mysterious .. inflt1enoe of a dead
. person .whom: .one has injured. An old supersti
tion of this kind still lingers.
.
A DEAD LETT:E:R something ~-o longer in force;
.a rule never atterided'to.
The rule about ready money was soon a dead
letter. Trevelyan.
_
.
A _DEAD HEAD one who enjoys privileges with"'
P:U.t paying, as in theatres eto.
.
Poor, hopelessly abandoned loafers, wearing
plainly tlie stamp of dead-head on their shame
- iess'feature. A. C. Grant.
.
DEAD SET a determined effort ; e. g. She made
a dead sef against hiin (i. e. to win hini in marriage).
DEAD FORMS mere formalities; e.g. These .are
official dead forms. .
'.
DEAD CALM Unbroken silence .
. DEAD AGAINST Utterly opposed to.
DEAD.CERTAINTYc-Too sure.
. ,
DEAD EARNEST real determination.
DEAD HEAT race in which 'two or more wjnners
. :finish exactly even.
' . .
DEAD HOURS when nearly every one is_ in bed.
DEAD LAN.GUAGE-a language no longer spoken
-in ordinary lif.e. .
.
.: .
DEA.J? BEAT utterly exhausted..
DEAD DRUNK stupefied with: l~quor.": .
DEAD AGAINST oompletely opposed to.
DEAD WEIGHT a mass without motion.
. DEAD LOSS-a loss without any hppe of recovery..:DEAD CAPITAL-'.-unprofitabl~.
.
..
.
.
DEAD LEV
err, montonous ; .11nvarying.
.
DEAD, SHOT. unerring .in aim.
..
Deatl1 WEARY - TO .DEATH excessively
fatigued.
This 'phrase really: contains no reference to acttl.al
dying.
.

..

Dead

90

Day

'.'Old Joe, sir,'' said the major, _."'w:as a. .bit. of. a


favourite in that quarter once'; but. Joe . /iad : his,
day.''
Dickens.
'.
. .
EVERY DOG HAS HIS DAY the period. of enjoyment allowed to any creature is a short one.
''Let Hercule's hi1nself do what he.may.
The cat will mew, and dog will have his day.''
-Shakespeare.
. .
HIS DAYS ARE NUMBERED he has only a short
time to live.
.

. .
Marocco alone yet ba1s the way, and Marocco's
I

'

'

'

days are prami.callY. numbered.-- Grant Allen, in


C!orztempo1ary Review,. 1888. . . .

NAME 'THE DAY to fix the day of marr1age.
To CARRY THE DAY to win a victory.
.

l t was the cry of '' free . education '' that cGr


1ied the day~
'
. .
'A DAY .AFTER THE FAIR too late to' see anything ..
You have arrived a day afte1 th.e fair Your
. friends have gone.
, .
.. . .
DAY.s OF GRACE . Commonly, three days all~wed
for the payment of a l.ili. peyond ~he date n1~:rked
: for payment.

.
.
' ONE'S DAY OF GRACE tp.e periolf during which
a man still has time to repent of his sins and
change his conduct;

.
"
Dayligl1t To THROW DA Y::LIGT UPON . to reveal.
'

.: But for that accident, the: mystery and the


. ,vrong being played out at Caromel's farm might
.. never ha'V'e had dayliglit. tlirown upon it. Mrs.
.
Henry Wood. .
.. . .
.
Dead DEAD AS .A HERRING OR AS A DOOR-N.AlLstonedead; without any life. The herring is a fish
which dies immediately afte1 it leaves the water ..
'' What l is .the old king dead ?'' . :
'' As "11ail i11 door.'' Shakespeare .
.
'
DEAD SEA FRVJT-fr,uit ,fair to .the eye, but orun1- bling to dust when the skin. is broken. .
.
'

'

'

Dead:

Deatl1

91

'

'

.
He had oorne, a.cross the fr1iit .of the Dead Sea,
so sweet and, delioious to the eye, so . bitter and
nauseous .to the taste. H. Trollope,
. . . DEAD HAND the mysterious . inflt1enoe of a dead
. person whom .,one has injured. An old supe-rsti
tion of this kind still -lingers. .
.
. -.'A DEAD LETT:Elt something no longer in force;
. ' a rule never attended to.
The -rule about ready money was soon ,.a dead
lette1. Trevelyan.
,
':A DEAD HEAD' 'one who enjoys privileges with"
. out paying, as in theatres eto.
Poor~ hopelessly abandoned loafers, wearing
,
pla'inly tbe stamp of dead-head on their shame
1ess'feature. A. C. Grant.

DEAD SET a .determined eff.ort ; e. g. She made


a dead set against hii:n (i. e. to win him in marriage).
DEAD FORMS mere formalities; e.g. These ,are
offiaia1 dead for ms. .
, ,

~

'DEAD CALM Unbroken silence.

DEAD AGAINST Utterly opposed to.


DEAD,CERTAINTY-Too sure.
.,
DEAD EARNEST real determination. . ,
DEAD HEAT race in which 'two or more win11e1s
finish -exactly even. .
", .' ' .
.
DEAD HOURS when nearly every. one is. in bed.
DEAD _LANGUAGE-a lang11age no longer spoken
in ordinary life.
. ,

'

'

'

'

DEA1? .BEAT utterly. exhausted. ,


DEAD DRUNK stupefied with liquor. ,
'

D'Ei\D AGAINST oompletely


.to.
DEAD WEIGHT . a mass without motion.

DEAD LOSS- a loss without any hope of recovery

opposed

'

.. . DEAD CAPITA.L-.:...unprofitable.
'
. ]?EAD
montpnous .; un;arying.
. 'DEAD - SHOT.
un.eriing
in aim.
. .
.
'
.

LEVEL

fatigued,
This 'phrase really contains no reference to aotual
dying.
.

Deatl1

WEARY TO

DEATH excessively

D.eatli

92

'

Deuce

The houses themselves weie mostly gableroofed, with latticed windows, which served excellently tt) exclude the light, and wbioh gave
a blank a.nd lack-lnstre .look to the edifices, as
though they were weary to death of the vie\vover
the way. W. Clark R:ussell.

IN AT THE DEATH present at the final aot of any


exciting series of events. rnis is borrowed from
fox-ht1nting.
.
DEATH ON ANYTHING having a great inclination for any thing ; skilful or sure in performance.
He wander.ed abol.1t all day stepping now .and
then, as .he promised his mother, into .the bl.1siiness places to enquire for employment ; but no
one wanted an honest lad who could read, write,
apd vvas '' dt:atli 01i figu1es.'' Life ~1 "P.residtnt
Ga1"field.
,
.
Debatable a debatable ground a borderland claimed
by two parties.; e. g. You .. must be oareft1l of the
)point for it is a dc:batable g1ound.
'Debt To PAY THE DEBT OF NATURE to die. . .
Coleridge is jt1st dead, having lived just long

enough to clos'e the eyes of Wordsworth, who


paid the dr:bt of ttzatiire 'but a week or two before.
-C. Lamb.

"
.
'
DEBT OF HONOUR-not legally recoverable; espesially of sui:ps lost in debits, .at cards eto. e. g.. One
i111.1st not go baok upon.on's dr:bt of lio11our.
Detice PLA~ THE .DEUCE WITH disorganise, i11in.
Deuce was a den1on ainong the Briga.ntee, a ,~ribe of
the early Britons.
..
. ..
''Yonder is the .inn, ~'he exclaimed ''a handson1e h01.l90 enough, one must allow, .and standing in quite' a little park of its o~n, . but 'for all
that I have a, presentment that the c )ok"ing
will play the deuce. with - my .digestion, and that
one shall be . poisoned with .bad wine.'' James
Payn.

'

'

Devil

Diamond

93

De,il DEVIL OF A MESS a. bad mess. (Slang).


.

I am in a dev1.l of a mess with iny fathe-r.

BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP SEA

bet

ween two menacing dangers.


Rupert's position \Vas desperate ; his friends
had forsaken him; he was oaught b~tw<?en thg

devil and tlie deep sea. G<!nt'ema11's Maqazine,.

'

1886 .
. THE .DEVIL TO PAY a heavy sun1 to pay back;
very serious consequences. (Slang) .
And now Tom is come baok; and the-re \vill
be the devil to pay. Besant.
.
. To WHIP THE DEVIL ROUND THE PuST to evade
. rules or provisions.
.
DEVIL-MAYCARE reckless; needless.
I onoe had .the honour of. being on intimate
: terms . with a niute~ who, in private life and off'
duty, was as comioal and jocose a little and fellow
as e.ver chirped . out a devil-may-care song ...
::
Dickens.
.'
GIV.1 THE DEVIL HIS DUE allow even the worst
. man Ctedit'for What 'he does \Vell. ' .
Arthur Bro.oke was a atraightfor\vard ancl
just young fellow ; no respeotor of persons, and
always an~ious to give the d;;vil his dug. W. E ..
N ooris. .
TALK
OFTHE DEVIL AND HE ls si:rR'E TO APPEAR .

sa1d when pe~son: named is _seen coming.


.
DEVIL
..
TAKE
THE
HINDMOST
motto
of
selfish.
'
competition ; e. g. .Only lata on have .. this. an<l
'

' '

'

'

'

most. . . . . . ..

Devil talce th<J hind


Di11mond A ROUGH DIAMOND

a person with unat~


. tractive exterior who possesses good q'.ialities of
mind and heart. (colloq.)
.
:. ~- As . for Warrington, that . rougli dia1nond had._
not had the polish of a dancing master, and he
did not know how to waltz.
.. Thackeray. .
. .
.
. ..!\. DIAMOND. OF. THE FIRST WATER a diamond
perfeotly pure and transparent.
:

Diamond

DIAMOND CUT DIA?o.1.0ND an encounter botw~en


two very sharp perRons.
..
Notwithstanding_ their difference. of years,
..
our pair are playing a ga111e very com1non in
s9ciety, oalled diarnond czif diamond. G. 3
.Whyte-Melville.
Dickens WHAT THE DICKENS ;_what the devil . It is
a strong form of l1ir hat.
. :

I cannottell tl1liat' tli"3. diclce1zs his name is.Shakespeare.

Die -THE DIE lS THROWN OR CAST . the question is


decided.
:

.
A.tall events, what use was' there' in pla:ying?
'J.'lie die was throw11, and now or ton1orrow the issue
inust be the same. Thackeray. . . " . ". ..
DIE IN HARNESS to 0011tinue one's cicc'upation till
death ; e. g.. Some wish to retire 'and others wish
to die i11
lia1ness~

.
'
.
.
Dine TO DINE WITH DEMOCRITUS . to be cheated out
of .one's dinner.' .
.
,
. .
...
,,
To DINE ~TITH DUKE HUMPHREY-to go w1t.hout a
.. meal, lil~e those who, unable to .pr'ooure. a dinner,
. loitered about Duke Humphrey's walk in old 8t.
Pa11l's.' .. Son1e gep.tlemen. weTe visiting the ton1b of
D'uke Humphrey of Gloucester~ and: one of .the paTty
was by acciden~ -sh.ut. -in the . abbey. H-is: whereabouts reinai_ri undis~'overed until the party had
risen fron1 dinner. T.he poor fellow h!Ld .been with
. Duke . Humphrey and: had got no "'dinner at all.
Henoe the phrase J.:M~'.Dixon. . .' .
A.s for the Duke in the fan1ily, I hope it will
not be Dulce 7-IurriplireiJ and that Trip will
not be invited to dine . with him~ S. .BaringGould.

'
.
. :

'
Dint ..:. BY DINT OJ! By tht'. force of e: g: . He got the
first prize b11 dt.11t of hard labour.

Dit<t DIBT CHEAP very cheap. .


'
Thirty pounds . a \veek. . It.'s too cilieap,. Johnson ; it's dirt ch.'.ap_..:.Diokeris;'

'

'

'

'

'

'

Dirt

Do

95

. .. To EAT DlRT to submit to insult.


'
.Though they_ bow before a calf, . is it not
a, golden one? though they ,.eat dt1t, is it not
'
dressed - by a .French .cook G. J . Whyte
Melville.
_,
Ditch To DIE IN THE LAST -DITCH . to make a despe. .rate resistance ; to resist to the uttermost.
Division DIVISION OF LABOUR tin1e saving specia
lization among \vorl{ers;
. ' .
- '. DIVISIONAL: REST rest from work allowed in
.-shifts.
.
.
Divine-DIVINE
LIGHT 11eavenly guidance;
e.g.
. .Sai1:J,tS
are
led
by
the
divine
light.
.
.
.
.
Do....:...To DO AWAY WlTH to abolish, to destroy.
Delightful M-r:s. Jordan, whose voice did away
with the cares of the whole house before they saw
her come in James Payn.
.
:,
. ,.
To :Do UP to make ba11lcrupt.
.

. He observed.that there was-a .pleasure in doiizg
up a debtor which none but a creditor could
know. Ma1ia Edgeworth. ,_ "
---
..
TO .DO FOR A MAN . to ruin him.
. .... '
Do TELL you asto11ish
A.: familiar .American
: phrase'.

..
_. ..
. .
.'' A- dressmaker l '' :crjed her -ladyship. 'Do
tell. I was in that line myself before I married.''

'

'

'

\''

'

'

'

'

'

'

,,

me..

...- - .

_Bes.a~t.

.'_~

..

, _

.-

,:

To DO BY to behave towards.
. .
'. 'One
does. as .one is done b'lJ. Wm. Black.
..
To DO A PERSON IN THE ID'.E to cheat. {Sl~ng)
_ T_he Jockey did. your friend i1z the. ei113 for that
horse.
.
Do THE . Cli"Y...:..to visit the sights of the city.

(Colloq_;} . : : ' :
..
., _: BE DONE FOR to be 'defeated or ruined. . .
HA"\TE DONE-desist.
.
HAVE DONE WITH-not to take
. any interest.
. .,
-,

'

'"I

"

'

'

'

'

'

'

96

Doctor
..

Dog.

DO-NOTHING
idle; jdler;
e. g. .He is. a:.- dono.
.
thing follow.
. .
.
.. .
.
Doctor PUT THE DOCTOR ON MAN to cha-at him.
.
Perhaps ways and .means may be fot1nd to
at tlie doctor upon the old prig. Torri Brown.
~. .DOCTOR'S COMMONS ' the Governri1ent Office in
London where bills are kept and marriages registered. Before the establishment of the Divorce
Court and Probate Court in 1857 ..t.}1e Doctors of
Civil Law were required to dine together four
days in each term; called ,, eating their terb.1s.''
She had a superstitious kind of. notion that
she would do better
a future state . if she" had
been recognised by the social law in this; and
that the: power of -Dcct<i1's commo11s extended
beyond the office of the Registrar-General., .' Miss E. Lynn- Linton.
Dodge-DODGE ABOUT-;--Depart from the straight for\vard order in dealing with thi.ngs 01 persons.
'
MAKE A DODGE BEHIND to elude by a pretext.
Dog A DOG IN THE MANGER ~ selfish m~~' who
refuses to allow his neighbou_r to enjoy -what he
' himself
.has
no
use
for.
.
.
'
.
'' I suppose it is wrong and selfish,'' he i::aid,
''.~ BUI?pose I am a dog. in tli? mange1. A.
. ,Trollope.
.
.
.- .
.
DOG CHEAP very obeap, a good bargain.
(Colloq.)
. .
.
.
. . ~ ....
You got the fowls dog chr ap at a dollar forty
. the dozen.
.

:
.
'
.
THE'DOGS . QF WAR-famine, sword and fire.
And Cesar~s spirit, ranging for fire
.

V\riti1 Ate by his side, came riot from.hell


Shall in these
confines,
with a mon~roh's voice
.
'
.
Cry ''Havoc,'' and let slip __ t.ii~ -~l~gJ .of war.
-Shakespeare.


To G6 'rfo THE. DOGS- to go to ruiri.
,

'

in

'

." Dog.
'

DoU'
, _, eo

97

'

'

. One candidate chap says, ''Fellow oitizens,


. . . this oountry ''.i9 'going' to .thi clogs hand over
- hand.'' J ~ M. Dixon.
.
.
- . ' ., To LEAD 'A DOG'S LIFE to, pass. . ~ miserable
-
existenoe.

.
I am afraid I led that boya dog's lift!, R. L .
Stevenson.

..
a
light
sleep
proken
by
the
slightesi;
DOG-SLEEP
.
.
no1se.

_
..
DOG'S NOSE a kind of mixed drink.

'DOG TIRED OR DOG'WEA.RY completely tired.
Dog EA.RED of books in which the corners of th0'
1eaves have been turned down to mark partioular
pages.
THE DOG STAR the sta1 Sirius, the
largest
of the fixed stars. The days when it rises a.re
called dog days as it spells diseases among men
on earth.
DOG 'ON IT ! :a minced oath (:for God dainn it)r
(Vulgar)

. EVERY DOG HAS HIS DAY See under. Day .


DOG .LATIN-.-~a. debased. medi~val form of. Latin,.
used by physicians, lawyers and others, .to \fhom.
.the language was only partially known.
.
,.
.
. .
It, was much as if the seoretary to whom
was .intrusted the direction . of negotiationf!
\vith foreign power~ had a suffioient smattering
of dog . Lat.1t1 to make himself . understood ..
:_MacaUlay.

.
GIVE A. DOG.AN ILL NAMEAND HANG HlM when
a person'~ reputation is :bad, all his J!.Otions, even
though well-intentined, . are viewed with suspicionr
It is better to get rid altogether of .a pian who has
1ost. his good name, existence being thenceforth a
burden to him.
. You. n1ay sa.y \Vhat you~ 1~ke in .your kindness and gener:osity it: is. a case of ''give a dog
an ill na~e and hang -him." The .. only question
'

'

'

'

'

'

'

D~or

Dot~ble

98

is whether you are ~q be conden1ned with the


dog that l1as been justly regarded as a ne'erdo-well
till
he
has
'been
branded'
with'
an
.aoousa'
tion of theft. Sarah TYtler.
'.. .
Door To LAY AT ONE'S DOOR-:-to oharge v.rith; to
ao<}Use any person.
.
. A great many, faults n1ay be laid. at t]iei1 door,
but they ate not fairly to be charged w:ith fiol\:leness. J. R. Lowell. :
. ,
. NEXT DOOR TO very nearly. .
. .
A sedi.tious word leads to a broil and a iiot
. undiminished .is but. .next ." doo1 to a tu111ult.
-L'Estrange.
.
.
Dorcas given. in. Acts, ix. 36, as the Greek. t1ansla1
... tion of 'l. abitha, the name of -the Christian
woman
.
. . of Joppa, famous for: her good wo.rks. esp. the
making of olothes for the poor hence Dorcas
. Societies, ladies societies for making and providing
. ' clothes for the poor.
.
About. a year ago the ladies of the. Do1cas
Socii:ty a:t our Cliul'ch 1nade up a lon'g quantity
: of shirts,.'trousers, and soaks. Max Adler.
Dot DoT AND CARRY
(Pro~.)
'01'i~i1regula1ly.
.
.
..
I was not new to violent death. I have served
His Royal Highness the Duke of. Cumberland,
:
and got a wot1nd at Fontenoy.; but I know my
.. pulse went dot and carry 011e. R. L. Steven~o11.
,
Double DOUBL]i) .lli'YED having a dec.eitful
.
counte,,, ..
nance.

' '' . DOUBLE-HEARTED treacherous.. ' .


, ' DOUBLE-MEANING . deceitful.....
.. . '

. . :DOUBLE-DEALING dt1plicity. : . .
.
~

.The young .lacly \Vas quite above. all do2tble~


. (leali1ig ; she had no inental rese1vation. Maria
Edge\vorth.
.
...
DOUBLE-MINDED-a man wavering betwee11 two
. cot1Tses of act.ion ; fiukleminded~ . ,
' : DOUBLE-EDGED..:.Outting both: \vays ;. used .:of an
argument, weapon, etc .

'

Down

Draw

99
..

Down To BE DOWN UPON A P~SON-to .find


fault
.

'

with.


Poor ' Boswell I his . appearanoe isn't aristo..
cratic I admit; and Mrs. <.ireenw:9od. was rather.
d<>w11 ' upn11 me ' for asking hiin here! Good
11r. 1ds, 1887.

.
DOWN. oN ONE'S r~ucK (a) in ill luck ; very unfortunate.
.
'
'
.
I wouldn't turn you away;, 1\lan, if you wer_e
dow12 on your zucli; ...:.....B. L."Stevenson.
'
{b) 111 low spirits.
. .
The order f-0r tl1eir execution arrived and they
were dow1i 'ltpon tlieir luck terribly. C .. Reade.
DOWN IN THE MOUTH in low spirits ; sad. .
\ell, I felt proper sorry for him, for_ he was a.
very clever man, and looked out up dreadfully,
and amazing down in the mouth. Haliburton.
DOWN TOOLS cease to work.
-
DOWN-CAST- dejected ; e. g. He was . down-cast
at his failure.
:
_
DOWNFALL fall fron1 prosperty; ~- g . H\s'down

fall i.s su1e.

DOWNPOUR heavy shower of . rain_; e . g. We


had a dow11pou1 yesterday.
: .
'_'_
DOWNRIGHT straight forward, plajn'; e.-.g. He
. is a d11wn 1iglit lia-r.
.
Dozen-BAKER'S DOZmN, DEVIL'S DOZEN-....:..thirteen.
Formerly bake1s gave an extra: loaf or. -b11n with
every dozen ~old to ~ustomers: Giving a man a
b~l' 1s clozcn is a Slang-' exp~ession. for '.'giving
h1n1 an extra flound beating.''
.
Drag.-: To DRAG IN BY THE HEAD "AND. S~OULDERS>
to inti-oduce abruptly and without sufficient: cause.
. We ha\e enol1gh to do to think of 6ri-rselves
in tne''e days, v.ithout draggi?l(l -in th'e absent
.
l>y liead at1d slioztlder.~. Florence M~rryat~
Dra\V DRAW ON ONE'S IMAGINATION 'to
'iroauinative or lying statements. . .. . : , : .: .
DRAW TRE LIN",E SO'l\IEVIH~RE-:-to di~oriminat-0 .
to fi>e a limit; to impose a.n al'bitra:ry restrictin'-~::;:':
on one's behaviour from fear of going too far.,' =: : .-:._

make

'

-.

100
.. On.the principle of ''~doing at Turkey.. as the
Turkeys do'' we should even have ridden donkeys on the, sand, if I had not put a firm vote on
it ~aying, '' .we , . must draw tlzP- line some
... where.'' The Mistletob Bough, 1885.:

To DR Aw A PERSON OUT to 1ead a '.person to


express his real opinion or sbo.w his real cha1auter.
There are many subjects on which I shol1ld
lilce to d1aw hi1n ,out . Haliburton
TO DRAW THE WOOL OVER to hoodwinlc; todeceive.
Sir Henry w~s. the fortunate. possessor of what
Pat was pleased to. call '' a. nasty, glittering
eye,'' and. over that.eye Pat doubted his ability
to d1~aw the wool as he had done ove1 Celtic Orbsr
: 0. Reade.
DRAW. IT WiLD to . state a thing without exaggeration .
. '' l say,'' interposed John
Browdie, nettled
.
by these accumulated attacks on his wife, '' drarv
it wi.ld, dra'i"t wild.'' Dickens.

D'RAW ON ONE to make a written demand for


payment.
.
DRAW BLANK to draw a prize in lottery.
DRAW A LEAD ON-to aim rifle at. .
DRAW THE COVER to beat the game out; e. g,
We dreto the cover and started a fox.
.
DRAW A FOWL to disembowel it.
..
DRAW IT MILD to avo~d exaggeration.
DRAW IN ONE'S HORNS to become reserved or
cautious ; e. g. The boaster bad to draw in hishor1is before ,me. .

. DRA:W UP to assume .a stiff attitude.


'
DRAW. THE LONG BOW to exaggerate ; to tell
lying tales.
DRAW THE CLOTH to cleaT the table after meal
.esp. before dessert.

DRAWN STUMPS. tolcease


play (cricket).
.
DRAW RE:lN to cbeok horse.

'

'

'

101

-.,------ ---

---------------~
---

arranged in orde1 ;'3.:g. The troops


were drawn iip in battle array. . . :

A.. DRAWN GAME-one in whioh. neither party


DRA'\VN UP

.
wins.

:
A DRAWN F ACE--distorted with pain, fear eto.
Dri,,e To DRIVE AT ANYTHING to ~peak \vith a
'
certain enri. in vie\v.
''What are you d1~i'l)ing at ? '' he went on.'
''I show you a bit of rny mind and you. begin- '
talking round and round.'' Besant .
DRI,\7E TO ONE'S WITS.END to perplex utterly.
LET DRIVE-to aim a blow. 1 '

DRIVEN.HARD pressed for .time; e.:g. With so


in any thing:.; to: do I am driven. liard.

DRIVE A COACH AND SIX THROUGH . defeat the


intention of .. legislation .espeoially by. disoover" ing loop-;hole _in the wording. e: g. The O].)PO~ition
dJove a coach i:J;11d .~ix through the statutes.
DRIVE A QUILL to be a writel-.
.
J?l.op - TO DROP. IN to come in casually~ ..

If be oould drop in on Sunday week, he might


go home the wiser. Blaokmore.
TO DROP OFF to depa;rt, disa!>pear.
The n1atrons dropped off one by one, with the
exception of six or ei.ght particular friends, who
11ad determined'to stop all night. J)iokeils.
A.. DROP IN THE BUCKET..::..:a contribution' soarcely \Vortl1 m'entioning. ': ..
. . .
The laolc of good water was severely felt, :but
this 'vas only a1i-icrc drop i?1 tfie bucket of. their
111isfortunes. J. M. Dixon.

TO TAKE A DROP .TOO MUCH-to get intoxicated.


'TO DROP A HINT to let fall --a remark meant
to .be taken as a hint of something more important
kept iri tl1e back ground. e~ g. -I meant to drop (1
lii11t. to you for yo11r guidance that your neighbour is
: is not very honest.
.
. .
.
Dro,,~n-TO DROWN THE MILLER to mix \vater and
.
spirits in. so unequal proportions as to :make t.he
concoction unpalatable. .
..
.

Drowning

Duck

102

Drowning DROW.NING MEN CATCH AT STRAWSwhen a man is in a desperate situation he seeks to


save himself by every possible means, even when
those which offer are ridioulot1sly inadequate.
''Either beoause drawing men .will catch at
.straws, or because he 11ad really 1nisplaced confi;..
denoe in my abilities, this assuran9e seemed to
comfort_ him a 'great deal~ . w. E. Norris.
Drug A DRUG IN THE MARKET unsaleable article.
Watoh.-guards and toasting-forks were .alike at
a discount, and sponges were a dru.g in the
market. Dickens.
- ,
THE DRUG HABIT the. habit of taking opiates
e. g. The ohinese have the d1it,g . haoit . most
. .generally.
;
.
.
Dry : A 'STIRRING OF THE DRY BONES a ievival. of
life" Where all seems -'dead. It is Biblical. See
Ezeoh, xxxvii. 1-10.

'
Every nation: 'when first it feels the stir . and
. touoh of' a 'new' life, will commit follies and
excesses ; when that new life is felt in the
body of literature and art, the follies and exoes ..
ses wil~ be greater not,' of course of suoh national greatness but ,g'reatel' oomparativelythan when the dry bones of politics are stirred.
-Temple Bar 1887. . .
.
DRY HOUSE-.an inn \vith the sale of. intoxicants
.-prohibited.
DRY WIN.E . wine free . from sweetness and
fruitness.

.DRY MAN impassive, ooldly matter of fac,t.


DRY LIGHT absence of any bia::i.
Duck. MAKE DUCKS AND DRAKES to use recklessly ;
to 'squander, waf?te. The phrase comes from a
game played with. a flat piece of stone or metal,
\vhioh, when flung \vith its broad surface almost
. parallel to smooth water, 'skips up and down,- ]ike a
bird. It would be foolish to use ooins for sucl1 a.
purpose.

'

'"
D11ck;

Dutch
' .

lOS

A .fine thing for her, th.at vvas , a poor girl


without a farthing to her fortune. It~s well
if she doesn't rnake ducks a11d drakes of it some
l1ow .. George El1ot.. ,.
.- .:
..
A LAME DUOK--a.1nan who can
P~Y 'hi~ debts
on the stock exchange~
i
, .
A DUCK'S EGG nothing. o A phrase" UEed. at
s~hools and colleges whena batsman in a cricket0
n1atch scores
He got a ditclc's eqg at the last examination.
D11ll DULL AS DITCH- w ATER . entirely tlninteresting.
What passed through b.is mind was something
like the following ;
.
'' Beigho l 0 Lord 1 Dull as ditch-water ! This
is n1y only holiday, yet I don't seen1. to enjoy
it.'' S. Warren. .
.
'
Du ml> A DUMB DOG -a person' 'who remains silent .
\vhen he ought to speak out and protest. ( Colloq. )
He \Vill be afraid to tell them unpalatable truths.
The Minister will be a dumb-dog. Haliburton.
DDMB 11ILLIONS the populace.
THE DUMB ENGLISH The Er1glish people who
are taciturn by nature.
DUMB BARGE utilizing tides, having no sail
or oar or steam.
D11n1p-IN THE DUMPS dep1essed and melancholy ;
e. g. My frie11d is i?t the du1nps today.
Dust TO RAISE A DUST-to make a 001nmotion.
Tl1ere was small reason !o raise s\toh a dust out
of a few indiscreet words. Baoket.
TC.) SHAKE OFF THE DUST OF ONE'S FEET to
depart indignantly.
TO THROW DUST IN ONE'S EYES to deceive him.
TO BITE THE DUST to fall to the ground.
IN THE DUST dead.
Dutclt A DUTCH .A1JOTION an auction where goods
are started a.t an extra.vaga.ntly high price, and ,

not

'

'

'

.,

~4"-' > ~.

..,

Dutch

104

Dutch

'

'then gradually lowered in price until tbe people


sho\v a V.Tillingnes" to buy them. . A com11ion 111ethod of businesl::i among travailing pedlars.
They (the politicians) a1~e always bidding against eaoh other in the Dutcli Auction by which we
are brought down surely, though by a protracted
.prooesi:i to the abolition of every sort of qualification Gold win Smith, in Co11temporary Review,
1887.
.
DUTCH COURAGE courage that results fl'OL11 indulgence in strong drink. Probably the phrase
came to be used from tl1e extensive tise .of Dutch
gin, known as Hollands.
You shall have some fizz to give you Dutcli
courage- Besant.
A DUTCH UNCLE-a clu1nsy, uncouth man.
Yqu look like a Dutch uncle sinCJe you shavect .

"

---

105

Ear

Ease

-------------- - - - - - ----------'=---..
'

f~a1

in a confused heap;,'said of a
house falling.
'
:
you'll 11ave those ttniversi.ties of yours: about
1i0tlr
if don't consent to take. a lesson

fron1 Germ!:iny A. Trollope


. ABvUT ONE'S EA'RS

eurs'soon

G"JlNG A'l' ONE EAR .AND OUT A'l' THE l 1'l'HER.-

used of words which inake no . perma1nent in1pres ..

.
;:;1on.

HAVE A PERSON'S "EARS 'to be seoure of his fa~


vourable attention.
HAVING ITCHING EARS-to be desitotlS of 'hearing
i1ovelties. See 2. Timothy iv. 3.

. . . OVER HEAD' AND EARS deeply engrossed or involved.


. '.

TICKLE THE EAR - to flatte1.



'
..
WALLS HAVE EARS- a prove1biaJ pr11'11se imply'
ing' that there n1ay be listeners behind the wall.
BY THE EARS quarrelling. ,
Take any t\VO men that are by the eais ; they
opiniona.te all tl1ey bear of each other, impl1te all
sorts of unv.,ortby n1otives, and i11iBooni=-true
every 8.ot Halibu1ton:

.
LITTLES PITCHERS.HAVE LONG EARS--that 1nay
be listene1s, mo1e explicitly young persons are
quick of bea.ring. .
.
.. Ptche.rs liave t:i'l1.~, and I have 111any servantsShalcespea re.

'Ease A'l' EAtiE IN ONE'S INN It is an uld fashioned


phrase thorougl1ly at home and comfortable.-..
Shall I uot talce mine ease .1:1l 1111'.ne i11nShakespeare.
,.
ILL AT EASE uneasy ; not home, e. g. Every
011e feel ill at. ea~e in a stranger's house. .
. STANDING AT EASE :L military pose which. gives
rest, when soldiers are freed from ''attention.''
So t.be ladies sat in a circle,' and the gentlemen
Si.O{ld at ease, tired out .before the close of the
evening Haipe1'8 lifagazine, March 1885.
'

Egg

106

Eat

EAT ONE's WORDS to . retract ; take back \Vha_t


one has said.
''I \Vill swear by it ( my \\rord) that you lo.ve
me : and I will make hin1 eat it that says I love
not you.'' .
.
"
:.

''Will you not eat you1 word?'' Shakespeare.


-EAT OUT ONE'S HEART to pine cl.Way, from
brooding over n1isfort11nes; to suffer intensely
. from di8ap-pointment. .

. . ..
She withdrew covered with mortjfication, to
!!1de her head and eat out her hea1t in .the pt ivacy
of her O\Vll uncornfortable home. Ge11tlenian's
Magazine, 1888.
TO EAT HUMBLE PIE to ha\e to hu1niliate .
oneself; e.g. Why, did you da-re to do that.I Now
you have to eat humble pie.
,
Ebb TO BE AT A LOW EBB-- to be in a ' state of
decline; e. g . My business is at a low ebb.
Ecoomy THE ECONOMY OF NA'l'URE The organisation made by nat11re.
ONE'S INTERNAL ECONOMY internal strtucu1e.
ECONOMY
OF, TRUTH--avoidance of thrusting

truth 1n an inopportune occasion.


.
Edge TO SET THE TEETH ON EDGE-to rouse an
instinctive di.sl1ke ; to cause unpleasant. sensations.
I had rat her hear a brazen canstick tu1 ned,
Or a dry wheel grate on the axle tree
.
And that would set 111y teeth nothing on edge,
Nothing so much as mincing poetry-Shakespeare.
Egg-AS SURE. AS EGGS- certainly. ; assuredly. Perl1aps a corruption of ''sure as x is x'' a dictum in
logjc. (Colloq.)
6.\.nd the bishop said, ''sure as er1gs i's eggs, this
here i:-; the bold Turpin'' Dickens.
.
PU'r ALL .ONE'S EGGS INTO ONE BASKEr.:_to risk
all on one enterprise.

.
r. know your l1appine.=;s depends on her. All
your eggs
in that one baslcet.

. . are
. .
Eat

'

'

'

..----------,------..... ~-,...:~---

- '-

?""":'

-.;
~
--~

'' >

....:--

r--.c~-o
~

-- -- ------"--.... -~

---. .--,- - ...... __


...... ,__ ... ""
- ,. -.
.....
_,
- - ---..........- __ . ___, --- --

~.--~

I ~

--~------

'> I

t--~

~--.-

--.'t'~"r? _.....-1. - ..... , , " I '' ;'.

:-

.,__

-._

";

~---

. . . -- ,_,
. . ~ . ;,-.l\
. '.'>o--............
.._ '-- ....

~
' '
..............

\.

.....

lo......
.l.. ''"'""

...

-----

-~

;.:: .;:;:,.,,.,
i-' "?::"""t"i:
~'~
\-:-.-~
...
" \~.;)
.... n' . . '\
::.. . ~
.... ; .....'"-, ';'>.!
_.._,,u
~ ..
J....... .:;\.~"'\....
i_.,.
\.. .........~'."'!"-"
Eleph c~nt r;-o
ona11i.ted witn s.11 tl1e 1s.tt-:-: u10\e11:~11ts ~ t\." l"~~
.lo.

kno\, ing.

- a .ti-le
~
f- qlllt.e
.o
H e is

- l..
n~ :-..~

~-r-~

I..~
,t

tllll'tS't'i~\ ~

h.a~ ~cerz tht.~ e?c-plir:r;,t..

Ele,enth r1.};\"i:.S.TH E.Ol:R-lt'\st iuou1e11t. tt


to !\:fa.thews. n;:. 6-9.

r~t\-.r~

t!Qll1~ ht\rt: ~t- tllt'l


ele-i'-f!nfh ho!Li an1ong tl10$e ,,l1ci llt\\t> bl'tlt~ tl1~
heat and burde11 of the tlay- ? R. L. St~\~t'i:-:on .

Sir, ha\e

'

llt.'

yolt 110 sht\lllt"'

t(l

. End AT LOOSE ENDS i11 Ol$Order.


A.T O~B'S '\'\TITS' F..ND t\t tl1e end of QllO..$ t\l)\l\t~~
to decide or act..
Tv 1f.AKE EOTH b.Nl)S 1t1:ET to li\e
income.
E"en 1'111. \\rhiol1elo. tl1e 11e!ld ole"rk, ,,l1o~c
children '''ere ofton t\iling, t111d ,,110 11t1d t\ g:ood
deal of tro11blo f<l r11ol>c butll <:tl<fs T7ltlt~t. s111ilcd
benignly on l(t1tu-M-rs. Olipl1t\11t.
BEG1N AT Tl-t'E '\rl~ONG END-t.o Il1t\l'lfil~O l"R1rlly;
come to tho end of 011e~ TEATRER-to gt) t\S ft1l" t\S
one's powers por1nit.

ENDS OF JUSTICE -purposes for \\'hio1\ .l.l\Stico


is administere~ c. g. Ends of jl1st.ioe \Vil! I'\()t l,o
ser\"ed if people . nre . detni11ed \\'itl101tt. trinl.
NO END OF A 1i'Et.l. OW

Keats '''t\s

'10 etzd

a \ery l\lCO l\1t\ll. ,

of afcllotv.

BoRO.llt.
E1~ougl1 ENOUGH AND TO SPARE-: plo1lty. <l. fl Of t'nlk
we have 11ad e1zot1gli a11<i fo spare ; lot \1.S not 110\v.

108

Equal

Equal EQUAL TO THE OCCASION able to act V.'ith


being confused.
.
The ''Raven,'' however, is more than equal to
the occasion Edinbu1gh Review, 1887.
Ever EVER AND ANON frequently. e.g. f!Jve1 atzd
anon was be seen roaming abo11t in the street5.
FOR EVER AND A DAY for good e. q. : li""'o1tune
\vheeled away with scornful laughter. for ever and
a day.

Eye MAKE EYES AT to look at in a amorous way.

On the other hand, he . had a word or two of


serious warning to say about Miss Sparks. ''It
is all very well,'' he wrote, ''to laugh at the
young lady who makes eyes at you, but jokes of
that kind sometimes turn out to be no laughi11g
matter.'' Good Words, 1887.

.
BE A SHEET IN THE WIND'S EYE-to be 1ntoxicated. (Prov. )

HAVE AN EYE TO to contemplate; to have ragard to.


THE EYE OF GREECE-A.thens, a na111e applied to
i.t by Milton Paradit;e Regained, Bk, iv, 1. 240.
A thens, the eye of G7eece, mother .of arts .
'
GIVE AN EYE TO attend.to.
To HAVE A. GOOD EYE TO ANY SHING to be
quick in recognizing.
.
I remember her, however, as a sensible won1an,
and, liav1'.ng a good ey<' to the main chance, she
had been a capital wife. to William Hugh
Con\vay.
.
. .
MAKE A PERSON OPEN HIS EYES to cause asto:Q.ishment.
MIND YOUR EYE .. (Sla1zg). take. ~are.
To SEE WITH HALF AN. EYE-to see' witbo11t djfficulty.

,
. .
,
To CAS'l' SHEEPs EYES AT to gaze at in a modest
and diffident but longing way, as a bashful lover

109

Eye

1 he knight ackno\vledged that he had long


"been casting a slieep's eye at a little snug placeMaTia Edgeworth.
OPEN A PERSON'S EYES To show him so111ething.
of \Vhiob 11e is ignorant.
UPTO THE EYES deeply engaged; . oon1pletely.
A neighbours' estate, mortgaged up to the e!1es,
was sold undel' the hamnier C. Reade.
IN THE WINDS EYE against the-wind.
Proper soared they were to see a vessel, with-01.1t sails or oaTs, going right straight ahead,nine knots an hour, in tlie very wi'lzd's. eye Haliburton.
MY EYE- a ,vild asseveration. (Slang)
To SEE EYE TO EYE-to think alike. A phrase
taken fron1 Isa. Iii. 8, and used mostly in religious
matters .
Until we can see eye to eye this question onChuroh Government, it is bette1 that we should-worship apart. J.M. Dixon.
ARGUS EYED jealously. watchful.
[Argus was a fabled mounter of antiquity; said
- to have a hundered eye's and set by Juno to
.watoh Is, of wl1om she \Vas jealot1s.]
LYNX EYED l\:een-sighted. There is a touch
of slight or resentn1ent in the \Vord. -1

'

.-

'

"

110
'

IF .

'

''

I.

Fair
'

'

'

Face F .ACE THE MUSIC-(U. S. Slang) to a:cciept the


situation at its \vorst.
.
. .
.
~ . PUT A GOOD F AOE 0 ~~to assume a bold ' or oontented bearing as regards.
.
. .
In a word, Mrs. Bute put good face agai.nst

fortune, and l\:ept up appearances in the most
virtuous manner-Thackeray. ,

PULL A LONG FACE-look dismal or sad. . .
WITH A BRAZEN FAOE--the thief,,thot1gh caught
in the very aGt, denied 'his guilt .with. a .brazen/act
(with impu~enoe).
ON THE FACE OF IT His argument is on. the face
of it (obviously) quite correct.

.
ACCEPT ONE'S . FACE- to show him favour or
grant his request.
.
..
FACE A 'fHING OUT to refuse .to retire through
sham~ or fear of obloquy.

. She thinlts with oat4 to face the matier out... 'Shakespeare.


.
.
. ..
. RUN ONE'S FACE-(U~ S. Slang) obtain things on

. . .
oredit by sheer ii:npudenoe. .
PUT A BOLD 'FACE 'UPON -to. act boldly as if
there was nothing to be ashamed of.
.
"
Dundas had little .or rather nothing to say in
defenoe of. his own -consistency but h'e put a
bold face on the 111atter, .and. opposed the motion
~Macaulay. .
.
. . .
Fag FAG-END close, termination ; e. g. Is this possible at this fag r!nd of the century?
Fair-FAIR GAME-open to attaok; deserving of
banter or criticism.
Bourrienne isfai1 game, but the whole of his
statements are not- worthless-Spectator, Fr1.bru'

'

'

ary

18, 1888.

'"

'

FAIR AND SQUARE honest.


His conduct all through the transaction had
beenjai1 and square J. M. Dixon.

Fair

Fall

111

fair ,and open e~ g. He


ca<ries on business fair and above l>0ard.
FAIR F1ELD AND NO FA\7 0UR impartiality and
opportunity to all.

FAIR MEANS OR FOUL- any means. e. g . I Olttst

. get n1oney by fair nieans or foul.


FAIR NAME-reputation.
F AlR SEX \VOmen.
F AlR HAND \vriting easily read.
A F Am MARK-a mark free from obstacles.
FA.JR PLAY in \vhich there is no cheating.
FAIB PROMISE-promise not hollow.
FA!R WEATHER cloudless weather.
A FAIR WEATHER FRINND One \vho deserts you
in difficulties.
FAIR WIND favourable wind.
FAIR WORDS-pleasing \\-ords.
Tu BE ON THE FAIR WAY OR F.AiR ROAD TO ANYTHING-to be likely to succeed in.
The n1erohant gained largely over the tall
demand for. ~ill~, and' r'..-; now on tliefai1 way to
make forl11ne J. 11:. Dixon. .

.-
BID FA1R to promise .~Tell~

:
The lad bids fai1~
rival bis elder. brother in
scholarship.


.
FAIR AND SOFTLY .GOES FAR IN.'.A DAY: . courtesy
a11d moderation enable a_i11an to effect_ a great deaL
''Slo\v and s\1re,'' saic i11s friends, ''fair and
sojtl11 goes fa1 i1z a day. What he has, he'll hold
fast ; that's i11cire than Marvel ever did:'' Maria.
Edge\'\orth.
Faith lN GOOD FAll'H \Vitb sin'cerity.
.
Tl1ere \Vas no doubt. in any one's n1ind that
Allen's fatl1ef had acted i1z good faitl1 Bes1,1.nt.
Fall FALL AWAY to decline gradually.
.
The ten1pto.tio11s of tbe lo\\~er fourth soon
proved tc:>o strong. for hin1, _and he rapidly fell
01vay-Ht1ghes.
.
.. FAm AND ABO\'"E BO.ARD

. To

'

"'

'

to

. .,., ' .
'
.
.
.
.. . "'

.' ,. '

,,~

Fall
. , .

112

Fall.

TO.FALL AWAY FROM--to. desert; to abandon.


'. ''We.~hall'.beat hjm yet, said. Hawes, assum.ing
a firmness he did not .feel,.
this man sb'.ould
fall away from ''b.irri and perhaps bear. witness
. against him-- C. Reade.
..
. TO.FALL FLAT-to be unsuccessful.
It (the paper read by Warren Hastings) Jell
flat, as the best 'written . defence . must . have
fallen fiat on an assembly accustomed. to the
animated and strenuous confliots. of' Pitt and
Fox Macaulay:

. .

To FALL F.OUL to con1e into collision ; to quarr~


el with. .

, . ,.
In their sallies their men niight 'fall. foul of
each other- Clarendon.

TO FALL IN (a) to place themselves in oTder. It
is a military phrase. ,
..
(b).to become the property' of a person afte1 the

lapse of a certain time.


_
A.t his lordship's death in the Spani1:1h aam~
paign, in the year 1811, his estate fell in to the
family.of the Tiptoffs Thackeray.
To FALL IN WITH to meet with ; to come aoross.
''Did y-0u ever fall in with any Yankees'?''
''One
or
two,
Sir.''
CReade

,
TO FALL BACK UPON to have recot1rse to some
expedient
or
resource
in
reserve.
.

TO.FALL OFF (a) to lose ground .


One iegre~s
~<;>te that a~ter he1 engagement
:to Torn there came a sad falling off in her. thirst

for knowledge ':Besant.

.
(l>) To be l~ss pretty.

. .
::1he did not know: how much her beauty had
grown since V-alentine found out and provided
for her a,n infallible remedy, against the dreadful
disease kno\vn to girls as talli1ig off'' Besant,
TO FALL OUT to happen to quarrel e. g. It was
'wrong of him to fall out with his friends .

lest

'

'

',

<

to

Fa"ncy

113
'

'

To FALL. SHORT bF to oorhe below: expectation ;


e. g~ The supply.fell snort of what.'Jie needed;
'
TO FALL THROUGH to oome to ,' no'thing e. g.
OU:r whole proj~ot fell th1ough by his carelessness.
A F ALL!N G MARKET when prices are deolihing.
F ALL!NG SICKNES$ epilepsy, in wh~oh a man
" sometimes falls down suddenly'iri a' :fit. :
THE FALL OF .MAN " his sinful state. . .:
TO FALL TO to oommence withenergy.
' ' '''The.Bells do, father,'' laughed Meg as she.set the basin and knife and fork :before him,
"
''Well ?''
'

''Seem to my pet, said Trothy,falling to with


great vigour Dickens.
TO FALL TO THE GROUND (a) to fail from lack of
st1pport.
' .
You had better let them know that Sir Abraham. is of opinion that there is no case at any rate
against Mr. Harding, and that as the. action is
wordfd at present it must fall to tlie ground.A. Trollope.

(b) to have no practical effect.


. ..
These \\Tere your words, sir ; they did not fall
to th.e groii11d.- Reade.
.
To TRY A FALL- to engage in a wrestling match.
You sb all try but 011e fall. Shakespeare.
To FALL UPON ONE'S FEEI' ' to oome well out of a
difficulty; to gain any unexpe'oted fortune. 'rhe
n1etaphor is borrowed from the natural fact that a
oat, when thrown from a height alights on 'its feet
arid thus esoapes injury.
As usual,. I observe. that you have .fallen on ,
your feet.- },facn1illa1i's lifagazi11e, 1887.
FALL Ful:JL OF to quarrel:; e.g .. They fell foul
of n1e when I FUggested that meaFure.
Fan FAN THE FLAME to aggravate an evil; e.g.
Re~istence will only fan the flame of agitation.
l'"n11c) FANCY FREE free from th~ power of Jove ;
with tl1e affections not engaged.
:

'

'

'

'.

....
'

,Far
.
.

114

Fat

. In maiden meditation, fancy free, . Shakespeare.


. FANCY
PRICE-an unreasonably high price
put
.,.
.. .on an article.
.
F~r F .AR ORY A long distance. A p'hrase. borrow.e<l
.: fron;i the well-known say~ng~ ''It_ is ~- f~r ory to
Lochawe. ''
..
.

. .
It is a Jar cry from Portugal to Bohemia.Contemporary R1-vzew, 1887.
. .
FAR. .At-.D AWAY .a very great deal. . .
.
. Public opinion is . not . altogether wrong in cre
.diting the. Jews \vith an amount . of wealth
larger by a good deal than is their due, and,.
what is perhaps more to the point a proportion
of rich families f a1 and au1ay beyond anything
.
. that.is fo~ad among gentiles Spectator, 1887.
Fartl1est .AT FARTHE'ST, AT THE FARTHEST making
. the largest possible allowance of time.
Parliament will certainly rise the first week
:. in April
at
farthest
Chesterfield.
.
.
.
Fasl1ion . AFTER, OR IN, A FASHION in a way; to

certain extent.
..
He knows French after. a fasliion.

. ..
Fa'st. PLAY FAST AND LOSE to be unreliable ; to say
. one thing. and do .. another.

And shall _these hands, so lately purged of

blood.

.
Play fast and loSP \vith faith. Shakespeare.
FAST COLOURS Colours
in
cotton

or
muslin

\vhich do not fade or _wash out.

FAST LlVlNG-Living luxuriously, dissipated, de


voted. to pleasure.

A FAST MAN a spendthrift ;
an extravagant
inan.

Fat To LIVE ON'THE FAT OF THE LAND-to 'live in


Juxury.
It is \vell known that the Slopes never stat'Ve;
they always fall on their feet like cats ; and let
. them fall w!iere_ they will, they live on the fat
of the land. - A. Trollope.
,

'

115

Feather
'

THE FAT lS ON THE FffiE-things have gone to


confusion.
He's a credit to YOllT nation, that man. He's
actually the first pot-book on the crane ; the
whole v.-reight is on him; if it weren't for him
the fat woiild be in tlie fire in no time Haliburton . .'
.
Father-TO FATHER ANYTHING ON A PERSON to as
. . .cribe its origin to hi1n.

Of the poor pagan poets, it must be confessed


.
That time, and transcribing, and critical note,
Have fathered milch on t./ir:m while they never
\vrote Byron.

' ' .
Fallt To A FAULT even. n1ore than is required; to
. excess. .
.
.
.

The golden youth is generous to a faU;lt.. .


Wm. B1ack.

Favour FAVOUR ONE'S FATHER-to. resemble him;


c. g. In appearance this boy favours his fat.her.
Feast FEAST OF REA.SC)N AND FLOW OF SOUL intellectual intercourse where the conversation reaches a high point of excellence.
There .St. John mingles with my friendly
bowl,
. .
.
.
The j east of reaso1i and the flow uj soul . Pope.
TO FEAST ONE'S EYES UPON to regale, to fare
st1mptuously ; e. g. She was . feasting . her eyes
upon the beauty of the sunset.
.
Featl1er To FEATHER ONE'S NEST to accumulate
wealth for one's self while serving others in a.
position of trust.

You have forgot this, have you, no\v you have


feathered y1Jur nest ? Congrieve. .

A FEATHER IN ONE'S OAP__;,some stTikingmark of.


,. . dii:;tinotion. .
.

The fellow's very carelessness aliout these


charges \Vas, in 1'1:argaret's eyes, afeatlwr in hi.s
cap, and proved, for one thing, their absolute want
of foundation. James PaYn
.

'

'

'

'

116

Feather
'. . .
.. .
'

to be g1eatly elated or in
high spir1 ts.

..
Martin leads the way in . liigh. feather ; it is
. quite a, new :sensat.ion to hin1 . geLting oompa-
,
.
ions. Hughes~
. SHOW THE WHIT l!J : ,FEATHER to .show signs of
- cowardice a white feather in a game cock~s tail.
being
considered
as
a
_sig~ of dgen~racy.
.
.
,
_
.
.

My blool ran a little cold at that but I .finish. . ed. my liquor.. It was no use flying a white
feather ; so say I ''Here's to the corsair's bride.'''
-C.
Reade..
,.

MAKE THE FEATHER'S FLY to 'throw into oonfu. : &ion by. a sudden attack.
.
~
Few FEW AND FAR BETWEEN few and inf1equent ;.
e. 'g.. The visits of my friend, like those of angel,
are few and far b1:tween.
'
Fiddle PLAY FIRST'OR SECOND FIDD.LE to 'take ~a.
iea:din'g or subordinate part in anything.
'.
Tom had no idea in :playing fi1st fiddle jn.
any social orchestra Dickens.

SCOTCH FIDDLE theitch~ . It is so called from


. the motion of.the hand in, scratching. (Prov.)
Field-TO KEEP THE FIELD to maintain one's.
ground.

'

A FIELD PIECE- a cannon.



FIELD OF VISION the whole area seen.
Fig A FIG FOR ANY.ONE an expression of oontempt
.

''that do I care-for him J ''


Let it come, i'faith, and I'll pledge you all.
and a fig for Peter I .Shakespeare.
Figl1t TO 'FIGHT SHY OF to avoid from mistrust.
. . If you fig lit shy ~f him, .Miss, you may re~em~
ber this, that you will fight sh11 of me at thesame time A. Trollope.
.
LIVE LIKE FIGHTING-COOKS to get the best of:
. meat and. drink.
'
.

BE IN HIGH FEATHER

'

'

'

Fight

!17

. . 'ro 'FIGHT

Finger

FOR ONE'S OWN HAND

to Rtruggle for
one's personal interests.
.
Each should fight for his own ha11d." Wm.
Black.

' '
. FIGHT TOOTH AND NAIL to fight .with great
fury; e. g. He fought the bill footli and ?tail.
Figura TO MAKE A FIGURE-to distinguish one_self.
Besides, he would have been greatly hurt not
.
to be thought well of in the world; he always
111eant to malce a figure and he though~ worthy
of the bast seats and the best morals George
Eliot.
Fin-TO TIP ANOTHER YOUR FIN. to shake hands
. with him. ( Slang )
Come, old fellow, tip u~ your fiti.
..
Find-To FIND IT IN ONE'S HEART to persuade .one~
: self.

I could not fi11d it in my/ healt to d1smiBs the


old man, who had been about the house so long
- J. J\1. Dixon.
FIND FAULT WITH to blame; c. g. Hefound
fault tvitli me for idling away. my time.
. .
FIND FAVOUR WITH to prove acceptable ; e. g.
My proposal f ound favour tvitli him.

FIND ONE'S F ff.ET to be settled jn a position ;


. e. g . . Let hin1 fi11d his feet in his
po'st.
Fi11ger A FINGER IN THE PIE_:_a share in the doing
of. anything, often of vexatioU!'I. meddling.
But then they deaTly loved having a finger
i11 tlie pie pa.roohial HUGH CONWAY.
To IIA\7E AT ONE'S FINGERS ENDS. t-0 be perfect
n1aster of a subject ; to be. able to repeat oT use
\vithout any trouble.
He was the boy to talk to the publi.o ; soft
sa\'\"'der, he liad tlzcm all (It lz.i.-, fingers' e11d.s
TO .ARRI\TE AT 0 NE'S FIN GERS' ENDS . to be
redttced to poverty.; to becotne poor .

ne\V

118

Fire'

Before he was three month' out of his Government post, Brown had arrived at his finge1's
end. J. M. Dixon.

Fire To FIRE OUT to expel. It is Shakespea1ean. .
To FIRE UP to . fly into passion ; to beo.ome
angry.

Now a high-minded, honest man would have


fired up at this B. L. Farjeon.

SET THE THAM.ES ON FIRE-to do something


striking.
.
.
TAKE FIBE to become aroused about ~ometbing.
FIBE AND SWORD destruction ; e. g. The invaders .carried fire and sword wherever they went.
FIRE AJ.liD WATER difficulties;~. g. 'l~o ...accomplish this you will have to go th1ougb. Ji,re and
'

water.

Fish BE NEITHER FISH NOR FOWL, OR NEITHER


to be neitbe1 one. thing,
nor another in principle ; difficult to classify.

She would be betwixt-and-between kincf of


thing, as cook said, with her nose in the airneitlu-r fish nor fowl and very likely a spy and
a plague-E. Lynn Hinton.

A QUEER FISH a person of odd habits. ( Slang )


''And what sort of a fellow di.d -you find
. Crawley, unole Tom?''
''Such a queer fish . so unlike anything elsein the world.'' A. Trollope.
A FlSH OUT OF wATER it :refers to a person
who is placed in a position which is t-t range and
distasteful to him.

Mr. Dance stood there, as be said, ''like a


fish out of water.'' R. L. Stevenson.

A LOOSE FISH a: man of dissipated habits.


Mr. Henry Fielding, a write1 of plays and
.novels then much in vogue, but a sad, lqose fii!h
-G. A .. Sala.

.
ALL'S FISH THAT COMES TO HIS NET. be is not:
very pa1'tiot1lar Ol' sorupti.1ous.

FISH, FLESH, OR FUWL

.
'

'

'

119

Fisl1

Flash
-

"

'

Everything is fish tliat co1nes to Mr. Frey's


net_:__ S pf ctator; FE.bruary 18, 1888.
MAKE FISH OF O~E AND FLESH OF A1' OTHER- to
t11ake invidious distinctions ; to show unQ.ue partiality.
I mean to show no favouritism ; all the. class
.will receive the same treatment. I do not
. . _1nind to malce fi~h of 011e and fisli of anotlirr- .J. M. Dixon.
TO f'ISH FOR COMPLIMENTS to lead people to
praise you, because they see you wish to be praised.
''But you did, perhaps,'' she added innocently,
fishing fo1 a compliment Thomas Hardy.
HAVE vTHE:k FISH TO l!'RY- have son1et1:l.ing else
to do.
''I never aslted you about your spill the other
nigh1 ,'' says she in her lottd voice, . ''I had
. other fis~i to fry.'' Rhoda Booughton.
Fist THE MA1LED FIST the huge might or force. e.g.
rrhe mailed fist of the British is hidden under
soft glove.
. Fit-.TO FIT IN WITH to agree exactly \Vith.
Under such temptations oa1 elesa or ill-educated people, even if they \Vould not invent
ciroumstances 01 dates, a1e extremely apt to
t\\ ist them so as to fit in with 'vbat they have
undertaken to prove Spectator, _4..pril 14, lb88.
IN THE FITNESS OF THINGS_..:. \vhat is ideally
. right ; " g. It was not in tlie fitness of tlii1igs to
do this.
Fits-BY FITS AND STARTS-spasmodic and irregular
burstR of activity ; without steady application.
Re \vorks by fits a11d starts, and \Vill not apply
himself.
Flame AN OLD FLA11E-a for1ner sweet heart.
I suppose she was a11 old flame of the colonel'8 ThackeTay,
Flnsl1 A. FLASH IN THE PAN to fail af1er a fitful effort ; to give up without acco1np1ishing anything.
1

Flash

120

Flea

.
The phrase is taken from a flint-look gun, which,
though loaded, fails sotllet~mes to go off when the
flint is struck.
. .
.
T.he rising at Kilrush was a mere flash. in the
pan.
THE FLASH GENTRY thieves ; professional rogues. ( Slang )
.
'
'' Nioe boys, both'' said their father.''' They
won't turn up their noses as if they were gentlemen. A pretty kind of flat?.h gentlemen you
are 1'' Besant.
.
FLASH ACROSS THE MIND to occur as a sudden
thought; e. g. This. idea flashed ac1oss rriy 11i'nd
last night.

TO FLASH FIRE to throw angry or passionate


glances ; to make the eyes glisten with strong emotion
.
..
The ~yes of the Indian monarch flash~d fire,
and his dark brow grew darlcer, as lie :replied,
''I will be no man's tributary.'' Prescott.
. TO FLASH ON ONE to occur suddenly; e.g. This
idea flaslied on me.
FLASHED OVER telegraphed, e. g. The news
- jlaslied ovi:r England.
FLASH IN T11"E PAN -to gleam without result ;
e.g. H1s soneme was merely a flash in the pan.
Flat A FLAT a dull witted person.
He hasn't got these qualities yet or he \VOl1ldn't have been such a flat to-night as to Jet Jack
Raggles go in but of his turn. Hughes.
I TELL YOU FLAT I tell you plainly;

THAT'S FLAT I mean it.


. TO FALL FLAT Not to.produce effect; e.g. I'he
joke jell fl~.
FLAT MARKET Sluggish~
FLAT BEER has lost effervescence.
Flea_ A FLEA BITE-(fig) a trifle; a thing of no i1n-
portance.

Fl'ea"

121

Fling

Doubtless to a nianof Mr. Aird's fortune such


thi t1gs are but fl -a-bites Jam es Payn.
... A F.LEA IN ONE!S EAR a caution ; anything especially irritating.
. '' wouldn't do it, if it was ever so ! '' exclaimed
Mrs; J ennynge, who in this extremity had
utterly di~carde'd her French f )r the Verna4
. oular. ' You try it your self, and see if he don't
put you down pretty quiclc, or send you flying
" 'witli a flea i11 y<>ii.1 ea1. - James Payn.
.Flesh FLB.SH A.ND BLOOD Human nat\1re.
Not as 1 \visb to speak disrespectful o'the111
as have got the power i'their hands, but it's more

tbanjl sh arid blood.-George Eliot.


'l'O MAKE THE FLESH CREEP to cause a sensation of dread. and horror.
''My dear Mi. Aird, you 11ialre ou1 flesh
creep!'' remonstraied Mrs. \\'allace; whereupon
:he.desisted_,,J ames Payn.
vNE'S OWN FLESH AND BLOOD one's relations
or descendants; e. g. JJ1y owt1 flesli. an l blood to
reb~ _againbt me?
SINS OF THE FLESH uncl1astity ; the sensual
appet1tfes.
'Fling TO FLING FROM to quit in disgust.
.
He jlu?ig from her and went out of the room.
.
.
S.
Riohardson.

TO FLING OVER to desert ; to cease to as~ist .


''Of col1rse. the. old girl will fli11g hi1n over,''
said the physician Thacl{e-:ay.
TO. FLING uUT-to spealt or aot recklessly.
TO HAVE A FLING AT to attack sarcastically.
I even went so far as to indulge in a fling at
tl1e State House, \vhioh as we all kno,v, is. in
trttth a very imposing structure Holmes.
TO HAVE OFE'S FL1NG to indulge . iri full .
is .to liave tll.1/
. As f?r n1e, all I l<.)ok fot\\ar_d
lilt le flttzg and then to give up the gaieties of

to

Flint

122

.- . . .

London and take .a quiet villa, and have a gar~


den Besant.
Flint-TO FIX ANOTHER'S FLINT-to . punish him ..
(Prov. )
'' That is w.orse still~'' . said .I, ''. beoause you
oan't resent it yourself. Leave hi111 to . me, I'll
fix his jlintfvr hi11i." Haliburton... . .
.
TO SKIN A FLINT--to be excessively mean in
one's dealings.
Flood FLOOD OF LIGHT full inforrnatjon ; e. g. Your
investigation bas thrown a flood of light upon the;
subject.

Floor TO TAK]} THE FLOOR to rise to address a p_ublic meeting. .


Mr. Hardcastle th.en touk tlie fl,001, and, in a.
long and able 8peecb, advocated the oal1se of
bimetalism-J. M. Dixon.
TO HA VE THE FLOOR to have the right of
addressing a meeting by rising before othe1 intinding speakel"s.
The chairman ruled that Judge Ellis had the
floor.
,.,.
Floa tsam FLOATSA~'l AND JETSAM- goods Jost at.
sea, and either floating in the water. or cast on
shore.
.
Flock IN FLOCKS a large number ot people.
Flog TO FLOG A DEAD HORSE to \vaste energy. ; e. g.
No usefiogging a dead liorse.
Flow FLOW OF SOUL genial inter course.
FLOW OF SPIRITs-habitual cheerfulness.
Land flowing with milk and honey land of
plenty.
.
Flo,\er IN FLOWERS in a .state of blooming; best:
part.
.
FLOWER OF ONE'S AGE Prime.
FLOWERS OF SPEECH-ornamental phrases.
NO FLOWERS I11timation tl1at \vreathes are not.
desired at the funeral.

Fly

'

'

123

Fly

'

'

"..

'

'

ly .FLYfo..WAY absurd; fantastic.


.
It w:as not easy to put her into a fly-atvay
bonnet now, or to keep tl1e bonnet in its place
. on the baok of her poo1 nodding head when it
. \Vas got ori Dickens.
. TO FLY OUT AGAINST OR AT to speak in a rash,
impulsive manner against.

It'ud. ill become a man in a public office to


. fly oiL1 (speak rashly) against King George.. George Eliot .
. To FLY IN THE FACE to insult; to oppose.
Every evening before we left Paris I saw. her
and implored her to trust. herself t.o' me and
leave 1a1is as 1ny wife ...... But, with all this
~he was firm, and would not fly in 1ier parent'8
face. C. Reade.
To FLY IN THE FACE OF PROVIDENCE-to do a
deliberately imprudent thing ; to count danger or
death.
Dr. Cooper had told her that to sleep ,vith the
child would be to Jl11 i1i the face of providence ;
i.f any mischief was really brewing, she would
in that oase be certain to stl.ffer fron1 it.---0.
. Reade.

vVlTTl FLYING COLOURS honoul'ably; trium ..
phantly.

But for my part I have always thought that


their both getting their degree at last with flying
colours after three weeks of fan1ous coach
for fast men, fot1r nights \Vitbo11t going to bed,
and an incredible consumption , of \-vet towels,
strong ciga1s, and brandy-and wate1, \\'as one
of the most astonishing feats of mental gymnastics I ever heard of.-- M. Arnold.
FLY AT to attack suddenly.
.
FLY TRE KITE to obtain money as by acconimo
dation bills; the endorser himself having no money.
A. FLY IN THE OINT}.1ENT some sligl1t fla\\" \-Vhich
corrupts a thing of value. See Eccl. x. 1.

.'

-FIy

124

. '"

Food

BREAK A. FLY ON THE WHEEL to subject to a


punish1nent out of all proportion to the gravity of
the offence.
.
. .
.
..
To FL}'. OFF AT THE HANDLE to become' excited ;
.
. to act impulsively. .
He was full of oroohets that way and the sight
. of the sea, or even a mere flower, would make
him fly right off at th~ handle.- Hal_iburton ...
A FLY LEAF-a blank leaf at the beginning or
end of a book.
.
.
FLY TO ARMS-eagerly begin war .
FLY INTO A PASSION lose one'd temper.
FLYING DUTCHMAN-a Spectral Ship .
Fol<] To FOLD O.NE'S HANDS t;) be idle ; to do nothing but rest oneself.
.
To no New Yorker; to no American, would
that seem areason for foldi'lig hi.~ hands. Nineteenth Century, 1887.
Follo'v To FOLLOW SUIT to do any thing on the
same lines as another. It is a phrase taken from
card-playing.
.
But when the fortunes of Kingsciffe began
to rise, the fortunes of the gallant admiral follow1-d suit Good lTt.,..01d.'J, 1887.
FOLLOW H011E, FOLLOW OUT-1o follow. to the
end.
FOLLOW ON to continue endeavours .
FOLLOW UP to pursue an advantage closely.
FOLLOW THE MULTITUDE to aot ab most people
do, without considering right and wrong.
FOLLO\Y IN THE w AKE. OF ANOTHER to foll9w
another person's course.
FOLLOW A TRADE to practise it .
Food-To BEu01i1E FOOD FOR FISHES to be dro\VDed.
But he \Vas dead enough, for all that, being
both shot and drowned, and: \vas food for fish in
the very place where he had designed my slaughter R. L. Stevenson.

Food

. 125

Fcot

-~

- - - - - - - - - - - ----- - - - - - - - - - . TO BE'FOOD FOR' WORMS to "be uea.d a.nd burie'd:-'


. The ~erti~cates are all genuine ; Snawley
.. had another son.,. .. he . lias been married twioe,
: his first wife is dead ; none but , h'er ghost oould
tell she didn't write th at letter ;none but Snaw-
ley .hin1self can. tell that this is not his son.
: and:that son is foodfo1 ivorms. Dickens.
.. FOOD FOR . POWDERS a contemptuous name
applied .to. a soldier.
. '
There go the poor oonsoripts fo'od fo1 pr wder
: ( soon to be shot down on the battle-field ).
-J.M. Dixon.
-.FOODFOR 1iEDlTATION material for the mind .
Fool FOOL SERRAND a silly or fruitless enterprise ; search .for what oan not be found.
TO .FuOL AWAY to spend to no purpose or profit.
Instead of leaving your lessons fo1 tomorrow,
you have 'been fooli11g away your time in idle
talks: '
. FOOL'S P ARADIS~a state of happiness based
on fictitious hopes or expectation~.
Into a limbo large and broad, since called
The Paradse of fools Milto11.
TO MAKE A FOOL OF to b1ing a person to ridi. Ct\le ;to disappoint.
lt was all very well to have Mr. Slope at her
feet, arid to show her power by malci11g a1i utte1
fool of a clergy man A. Trollope.
To PLA.Y THE FOOL to behave as a fool; to
sport. .

To BE A. FOOL FOR ONE'S p A'INS to take unnecessary and thankless trouble.

If you propose to take hin1 in and board him


for that small sum, you will be a fool f 01 your
9

pa1.1i8.

NO FOOL LIKE AN OLD FOOL-aspecially spoken


of an aged lover..
Foot-TO PUT ONE'S BEST FOOT FORE1iOST to appeal'
at greatest advantage~

Foot

' '

126

Foot
'

Linlithgow , put he1 best foot - forward last


Saturday, when , the freedom of tba t ancient
and royal city was presented to the Earl of
Rosebery St . .A.ndrews C1.tieen, 1886.

TO PUT l )NE'S FOOT IN IT to spoil anything by


indiscretion; to say something embarrassing.
Women have suoh confot1nded queer ways.
You're sure to put your foot in it if you inter
meddle Wm. Black.
WITH ONE FOOT IN THE GRAVE , very feeble ;
l1aving but a short time tu liv-e.
It is sometimes the fate of a. poet to succeed,
only when he has 011e foot in tho. grave Besant
TO PUT DOWN ONE'S FOOT to refuse to go
further.
I remember when th el ate Sir George Co,.n wall
Lewis wanted to get some statistics. about the
religious denominations, your friend Bottles,
who is now a mLllionaire and a Churchman was
then a Prtioular Baptist.. ., No,'' says Bott] es,
''here I put .down niy foot. No Government on
earth shall ask me I am a . Particular : Baptist or
Muggletonian.'' M. Arnold.
,
AT ONE'S l!'EE'r
-in a suppliant attitude;
Sllh.
.

m1~s1ve.

.
.
It was all very well to have Mr. Slope at her
f e.et, to shoVv her power by making an . utter fool
of a clergyman. -A. Tr'ollope.

THE CLOVEN FOOT One of the marks of the devil.


To
display
the
cloven
foot
is
to
betray
an
evil

.
purpose.
.
.
But they had not long been man and wife ere
. Tom began to.show. the clove11 foot G. J. Whyte:Melville.

To FOOT 1T to .dance.

Of oou't'se they found the master's house lockei


llp and al] the serv-a11ts away in the close, about
this time no doubt footing it away on the grass.
Hughes.

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

Foot

127

Forelock

TO PtiT ONE'S FOOT :ON ANOTHER'S NECK to


. crush or trample upon him.
. .
She should tramp the road as a mendioa.nt.
: He wo11ld pzit his foot on her neck Hall :caine.
TO FALL . ON ONE'S FOOT to meet with u'ne:x:pected good luck.
. 1
: ~ had .already fallen on ni.y feet . . Te7]1ple Bar,
. ' 1888. .

To FOOT A BILL to pay the expenses incurred.


Goa,-.in the oaf"e of final French ocOUJ?atj.on,
. ~ight continue its work of propagandism; but the
.Church would have to loolc after the work and
foot the'bifls ..:..Harpe1's Monthly, September, 1887~
To PAY ONE'S FOOTING to pay the neoessary
f43es on t eing admitted to any olub or society.
When he had paid his fuott.ng, the members all
. wished him good luck, and d1ank his health.
.: J. M. Dixon.
.
Force. TO FORCE A MAN'S HAND to. compel him to
.act pren1aturely or to adopt a polioy he dislike~.
The best guarantee again~t suoh. a, ; ~ourse is
. the repugnance of the Ge1man Emperor to en. gage
a new st.riiggle ; but if it :were determined
on
by
all
but
hi1nself'
the
emperor's
liand
'
might be Jo1ced. Spectato1, 1886.
. 'ro COME INTO FORCE-to begin to be enforced.
Refer~to a law or .regulation. _ .
.
. . The law maki11g paper money no longer legal
tender comes into force next July. J. M, Dixon.
The n1.arch of an army or
, A FORCED . MARCH
a detachment at its most rapid speed. e. q. It is
. no use taking the boys i?l a fo1ced 1na1cli at the
end of tl1e E:ession. ,
Fore TO THE FORE forthcon1ing; on the scene ..
..
It never did.really occt1r to him that any one
would have the \\ ild audacity to run a\vay \vith
one of l1is siste1s, \\bile he, 1\1:r. To111 Beresford,
\\as to f.lle fore. V\Tn1. Black.
.
Forelock -To T~.\KE TI11E BY THE FORELOCK-to seize
.tl1e ocoasion pron1ptly, so ri.s to anticipate opposi

in

'

_Foreg~~e

128

Fo11rth

"'

. . . tion. ;.to avoid delay. Time is .:r~presented . as an


old 'man with a single look of haii .on the forehead
and. an hour-glass ana
a
scythe
iri
his
hands.
'
.
.
.
: .. Time flies here'. with such a. frightful rapidity
. . :. that I am compelled to se1.ze occa~ion. 'by the f<>relock -Thaokeray.
. :
.
Foregone~A FOREGONE' CONCLUS!ON
conclusion
resolved on before hand, or determined before
: :: :
:argument.-

Foriorii . A. FQRLORN HOPE-a desperate ent.erprise of


which there ll:i no reasonable probabil1ty of suocess.
Fc;>rget. TO FORGET QN.ESELF t9 lose one'~. self-oontro.l or digi:iity ; to decend to .words and_ ,fteed's unw9rthy of one's self.
.
. .. ,
. . .;
f
The little .gentl.eman shocked the .properity
of the breakfast table .by a loud utterance of
three words, of which the last two -were ''Web_:. ster's unabridged.'' and the first was an emphatic: monosyllable; ''Beg pardon,'' he added

''forgot myself.'' Holmes.


, ..
Fork TO FORK:OUT to hand out money ... ( Prov.)

I'lljorlc out ari:d stump- Di~kens. :


Forty FORTY WINKS a. short nap after dinner (irt.
Jndi~ after luncliJ; a s_hort sleep during ..
t~e day.
Then came forty winks ; and afterwards he
\vould play whist for high stakes-Saturday
Revit w, 1888.

.
Fours TO GO ON ALL FOURS..;_(a) to go or cra\~l on
hands and knees. (b) To be exactly apposite.

No sin1ile can go 01i alljoztrs Macaulay.


Fo11'ftl1-:-THE FOURTH ESTATE the press ; .newspapers.
. -All these: I had to pass by, and to confine

n1yself to a broad and general description of


the origin . of these higher representatives
journalism whicu v.e all have , in out minds
\V he 've speak of the activity . and po\ver of
. . the fotlrlli estate Charles Peabody, in Erzgli~h
.T011.111 nl ism.
.

'

'

'

_,

"

of

--- - ------- THE FOURTH OF .TULY


---~-

dav.

'

America11 Independence

Fri~ii<T

129

Fourtl1

'

We my prove that we are tl1is, and that, and


the other- oar Fourth of July orators have
proved it time and again the 'Causes have
proved it-.J. R. JJowell.
..
Free To MAKE FREE to ventu1e.
. .
.
My lancllord triade freR to send up
jug of
claret witbout my asking. Thaolcera~T~
A FREE LANCE-A nie1nber \Vho does not. join
any party. The tErn1 was originall~r applied to a
n1e1oenar:v soldier.
A FREE POR'l' A port wl1ere customs are not
-levied on iu1ported articles of commerce.
FREE TRADE Trade not interfered with ,by. im-
pcsition of taxes.
,. .
,.French rro 'fAKE FRENCH LEAVE-(a} to depart \vithout permission or notice.
You must tal~e Fre1icli leave and run away
i:rom Newly and yo11r charming wife for six
months-Austen Pen1ber.
(b) to do a11y thing witl1011t premission.
Tl1e solicitl>r talcing frenr.li leave, led us across the spanious
vestihltle to the library,
r11uoh to the ti1naze111ent of the, seryant B. L~
Farjeon. ..
,
.
,
. J!re.sl1 FRESH W.ATER-not salt.
,
'
FRESH AlR 'llntainted, pu1e.
FRESH FLO"\VERS not faded.
. .
THE FRESH OF. THE 2.'lORN!NG . tl1e fresh part

a;

of it.

'

'

'

'

rosy.
l"1ct ll'RET AND FU11E to sl10\v angry.impatienoe.
li'RE'r ONE.'S LTI<'E A\V~\Y wear 011t one's life
li'RF...SH COh1PLEXION

'

\\'Orry.
Frit~11cl-J3E FRIENDS WTTH-to

'

'

'

i11

be on intimate relations wtth.

'' \Vl1~.,. \Vere )crtt ~o glu.d. f<) b? friencls 1nith.


l\1:. Pe11l ?'' asks t11e reaaor Currer Bell.

'

: Friend

130

.. F11ll

'

'

.. .. . HA
AT
. VE
. COURT to have a friend in
. A
. FRIEND
.
a position \vhere his influence is likely to be ltseful.
, . . '' Not in that. place, p~raps,'' rett1rned the
. .
grinder, with a wink. I . shouldn't wonder
~ . ',; .f1iends at court, you know-but never - you mind
rnother, just now ; I' n1 all iight, that's all.''Diokens.

.
.
TO MAKE FRIENDS to be ieconoil ed after a.
quarrel.
.
.
.
Frog FROG-IN-THROAT hoarse11ess.
:, FROG IN THE WELL one with a' limited outlool;:.
FROG-MARCH a punishment with carrying a
person: face downwards by four tT1en holding a
limb each. .

- Front ~ TocoME'TO THE FRONT-to bec,onie .conspicuous ; to attain an in1portant position.


About .;this time Bismarolc began. to. come to
the f1ont in Eul'opean politics-J. M. Dixon .
..Fr~', - SMALL FRY persons or things of !ittle -import.
.
a.nee.

._
The coming of Sherida11 was qt1ite another
matter compared. with hi111 all other i11anagers

we1e sn1all fry_:,J'ames Payn.


'OU'l' OF THE FRYING PAN INTO THE FIRE-fro1n
. a bad positiOil i11to a WOTFe.
-. '
'' l'm out rif i:lie fr11ing-i11to the fire.,'' -she said,
laughing. ln::;tead of 011e~ I have now two to
co11tend with.'' J. Iv!. Dixon.

.F11ll .IN FULL CRY hurrying fast ; .in hot puri-11it.
- Cry here n1eans a pack of hounds:
Se\'en n1t1tineel's-.Job Anderson, the boat
s\vai11 at their head appeared.in fii!l cry at the
f:lot1tb\\est oorner R. L. Steven~on.

.
FULL FIG-e1ega11tly ; making a great display.
_ ( Slang. )
_ .
.,

.
'
So all of us cabin party went and dressed
.
01~rselves upf1lll jig, and were introduced in dlte
forn1 to the young qt1een Halibu1-ton.
~

'

'

'

"

,_

'

'

'

'

'

'

"

'

'

..

'

'

'

. .~ull
,-

-~-

131

Furtl1er

I.N FUT.,L SWING

at its
'

lJtlsiest.

The street n1arket '''as inf1tll swi11g Besant,.


.
.
...
FuLL BROTHER of san1e fatlier aild.n1other.:
' FULL SPEED
order to. pursue
course
.
' AHEAD !
..
'''it.h energy.
..
.
.
}'ULL SWING vigorottS \V'o1king. ~ .. '
FULNESS OF THE
HEART
. en1ot1on. . .
.
.
Ft1ri n-iAKE FUN OF to ridictl.le..
'
FIGURE OF FUN grotesque J)0rso11.
'
Fund FUND OF P ATIENCE-stoclc.
IN FUNDS 11aving 111oney.

F1111 k
IN A FUNK frightened
; Pttt abot1t.

J.f I \',1 e1e l?oxjr,


I sl1ot1ld 'be i1l a fit11 fc 1nyself.

... Besa11t.
..

bI...aUE FUNK cowa1d.


'
SHOW FU~K try to sl1i.rl~. .
.
Fu1tl1er I WILL S'EE YOU FURTHER FIRST a violent
for111 <>f ief\lsrt J.
'

'

'

'

' , , ' -

'

'

'

~1-

,.

'

'

'

'

'

' '

.'

\
"

'

'

...

,.;)
.. 'uat.1
. '

'

132

G
.

'

'

.-

..

Gad - UPON
THE
GAD- .. . It is a Sha]\:esperean ph1ase.
'
.
Restless; always n1oving hither a11d thither.
I'have i10 opinion of Mrs. ' Charles's nl1rse1y
maid. I hear strange stories of he1 ; she is
always upo1i tlie.gad .Miss Austen~
To GAD A~OUT .one- vvho
. - walks idly about.
By this ti111e our .friends had grown iather
wea1y of gadding aboiit Hugh Co11way.

Gall GALL AND . WORMWOOD anything eitren1ely


<lisagreeable and annoying.
,
The talk eddied-even to the a1istocratic ba~k
waters of Clinton :Hall, where it- vvas so mu.cl1
gall a11d .wo111i1vood to the famiJ-s.- Mrs. E. Lynn
Linton.
IN THE GALL OF BITTERNESS in a state of ext1eme i11ental soreness. Acts viii. 23.
Gallo\YE GALLOWS-BIRD a IJerson of aba1doned i1JJ pea ranee. : .
..
: . "
''It is ill to checl:.:: sleep or sweatin a sicl{man,'' said he ; ''I know that fa1, tho11gh I ne'e1
n1inced a1Je nor gallows-bi1d C. R.eade.
Game DIE GAME-to l:.::eep up , courc.1,ge to tl1e last.
~-'

'

'

( Colloq. )

I su.y that coacl1t11an did no1; r11n a\-vay, b1i.t


that he died ga1rie Dickens.
To MAKE GAME OF to make short of ; to ridiculer
Now, in the Fleet Prison, where I w1ite thii-;,
t11ere is a sma11111an who i.s a1\vayr-; jeering and
11ialci11g ga1ne of me Thacl{eray.
TO l\1:AKE A GAi1E OF to pla'jr \vi.tl1 ieal e11e1gy
or sl:.::ill.

THE GAME IS

NOT WORTH THE CANDLE-the


thing is not woTt.h the labo111 or expense of it..
THE G .~ 1-IE IS WORTH THE CA NDL'E-one \\ri.11 be
repaid for one'!3 trouble~.
George co.11 never take what J r11ean to of{e1'. ; __
if 110 should, tl1e Egyptian \vill be spoiled in-

'

133

-------------------------(ieed, tl.nd tl1C'.

tvill lic

ga11ic

tl'<lt'f Ti

H. R. Haggu.rtl.

tl1t.. t~n.11cllt~.~-

THE GA1'1E 15 l1P tl1e i-;t1l1('1110 ltt\~ ft'\ ill'<l.


GAME FOR J1N\ 1rHING---'rOitdy t<1 \rc,11t:ttl'l'

a11xtl1ina.

If

~J

)roll

<l<)11. '\'.

sto1>

~1 t)l11'

jtt ,,.

l
ft, 1()1'\t..

lll)l)l

.
111111

'l
~'t)l\

l1t\\~e

to .figl1t; 111c ~ tl1it:~. tt little 111<.11<.~ t.l1il1


).,.ott're gar11c! ~f<1r. I ti111 tl1i11ki11g.
1-1. 1{ i11g~lo~,._
...~ GA}.~E AT \"\'l:lICH t,\\ro CAN l)I.. AY---(\ (.1()1ll'Bl~

()

itct.i.011 eq11<t ll~1 Ol)Cll tt) ll l\Ot.1101 llOl'SOll.


''I'll l1n ''"e yo11 lJt)i:l1 l icl,o<l \\t}1<3t1

t.11tlt

1 ".\"i11,''

1e5t)i11e<l t11n

T ~ei. t)l\i
l1();_, l)<,gi.ni11g 1:

~11ive].

''Tt110 .c~.t71!

11lc7.!)

(ff.

t}1(1f gci111r., .\11i.11cl ~-<l,,,,, Rt\11

1 0111 ..:..-H,1,ghos.

Gate---rI'JIE

Gr\ Tl~

OJi' JUS'.rI()l?---1>ltl.(IC

\\".llt\l'l)

ll

8()\'(l r

eig11 01 j'l\(1gt~ ~tit. to clisi1011~t\ j1\$tic<~ ..

In. t'l1.crli<\\ 'lt


t.irt1es, it: \\.llR sit11ntccl 8C)\1lt}ti111(.'8 rit tl\t) cii:Jr g11 t1)
i11 f10J1t <.)i: t;l1<.) t.e1111)l c 01 1)1;11t1r 1ll\l>1io J)ltlt,o, rt.1~<
\vl1t)10 11<.> t1ct.11t11 . gat(' oxis\ec\, t11<~ j11clr~rr1011t;,8(\1t
1

\\.-tl.~ Clll'l<.Jt-1Cd i.11 a :-;t111Ctl\l'l} tl\t\. t Hl1gg(1Htl)Cl g11.tll8, .


GA'l'ES O'F Dl~A'l'J:I~-a i1l11oxC' Cl};))l'.C8Ri11~ tl1c1 J1t)tl

'

a1)pro:.1t~l1

c)f tlt'U. t11.

..

.
t;\)('

13REi\ 1\. (} ~1~s---\() t..i11t.c'!1 (.~()}}t)f~e 1if1:()}'


')l'CH
c1i11ecl ii111t~. i\ 11 Oxi:o1d i1'11<l c:!11.r11l)1iclg() Jll11'l\~(\,
If: ~'t)\J. l11t~1tlc gafr.}{ <l[/cti11, ,,.(, i-;l1;\ll l111vl1 yo1

1'tlsticaterl--.'f. I\1. J)i:xo11.

1\7 01~'1~ GA'l1';---i11 l)<leti<:al

,
i111iigOl1"'

tl1c1 Ht,ltli

t.1a11s1)n.1t~11t-. gat<.' t)1: tl1l~ 11011~<.1 <lf ~1<~0}>, 111r1)11r~l


\vl1it~\1 c\rca\11~ ap31crt1 (\i~;to1tt~<l 'i11tc1 J)1~n.sr\nt l\Tl<

<l('ll11si\'O ::;l1tt1)ef'.
1
'l I-IF. . ("J /~.11.; 01' l10It N OR 1!01~ 1\-(; ATF.--<>11 c' ci: tlt (
t.\\'<J gat~H of
\' iHiOJlS t lltl.l'.

(~<JnlC tJtt<-'. \\r]1ilt~ l)\\i; C)f 1 ll(~ Jv<_)f~

~;ite l'UR'> t\1e

u11r<111.

(lten111, t.11rl)\\gl1 \.rl1icl1

}1tt:c;i-; tli<>~t

'l l1c-n 11( (TJa\tcl) rlrl~t\t11ccl tl1ut lit! l1r1.cl 1.1lr)'\IJ<


1)<l.J)ist, (Jf 1111 l1is d1t~t\n1s. tl1e tllll~ .0111~, \Ve t.;\18
\lC(\t., \1;\1'\(~l1 l~l\l11t) t\\'\'{)'\\!1:l' (flt" <Jttlf tif 11<1111.- 1

l\1~t('.11tllll~'

Ga11ntlet : '

134

Gath

Gath TELL IT' NOT iN GATH do not let yo~r enemies hear of it. The 11hrase is llsed when something sad or shatnefl1l has occt1r1ed whLch inight be
used as a taunt by one's enemies if they heard- of it.
The words were fi1st used in David's song o( lamentation over Jonathan, lcilled in battle. (Obsolete)
Tell it not i1z Gatlz, publish it not in the streets
-of Askelon; least the daugl1ter of tl1e Ph.i1lstines
rejoice, lest the daughters of unci1ct1111cised
triumph. 2 S a11i. i. 20.
_.
Gat]1er GATHER ONE'S SELF TOGETHER collect all
one's powers like one about to leap.
GATHER TO A HEAD to J'ipen; to con1e into a
state of preparation fo1 action or effect.
GATHERED TO ONE'S FATHERS dead and bl1ried.
\Vhen his glitter is gone, and he is gatlie1ed toh-isfatlie1s, no eye will be din1 \vi th a tear, no
heart will mou1n for its lost f1iend. A. Trollope.
Gauge TAKE THE GAUGE OF to estin1ate; e.g. It
-is better to tal\e first tlie gattge of tl1e n1oney needed
for the jobe.
Gauntlet TO THROW DOWN THE GAUNTLET OR
GLOVE to challenge.
.
The com1Jany th1ew dow1z tlie gau11tlet to the
n1aritirne powers in the world Macat1lay.
'
- .To RUN THE GAUNTLET to undergo the pun\sl1. ment of the gal1ntlet ; to be exposed to l1npleasant
. remarks or t_reatment. The pl1rase 11sed in this
: figu1ative sense comes from the ct1sto111 of inflicting a 1Jt1nishment bearing the nan1e. A p1isoner,
st1ipped to his \''.aist J:iad to run bet\veen t-,,ro lines
, of soldiers ar1ned with gloves, and \Vith sticks and
\vith \veapons,- with which, they struclc him as - he
passed.
We ''rent to the jetty to see the '11sba11ds' })oat
come in, and fo1med part of the long -10,,r of
spectators, three dee1>, who had assembled to
watch the ilnfortunate paf'sengers -]and and ru1i

"'

.'

Gear
--

Get~

135 '

~----

flt<:.

.. -

---

(j(J,U,7lt/ci"

--- -- ______________ .:

________..__- --

of UllSCrtll)UlbUS Ccini.111ent ai1d pe1-

son.;,l ren1arkl' a.11 dowi:i t11e line : Tlic :Z.fist,letoe


11011.glt, 1885. ''
.
' '.
'
'
Ge.ii ODT OF GEAR
Ollt of
.rt111ni.ng
orde]: ; . :i.1np1e.
,
,,
'
pared.
.
. .
St1cl1 delt1sion~ 11ave ha1Jpened to i11any of us,
and most con1;1Jonly \\~hen t.l1e inind: 11as been
distt1rbed and, tl1i:o\vn out of gc(tr by tln\vonted
ci1cl1n1sta11ces J an1es Pay1n.
Ge11tlc THE GENTLE,'CR,\F'l' angling~.
, '
'

'

GENTLE RULE-111ode1a te.

'

'l'HE GENTLE SEX \Von1e11.'


GEN'fLE AND SIM ~L"E-n.11 people \\'l1etl1e1: of high
01 lo\v birth.

GEN1'LE 1iEADER---a11.th or's for111u.la of address.


Gt}1 GET ALONG WI'rH YOU . un excla111ation of imPtltience, often l1sed i11 a })antering \Vtiy.
,
''Gu, go, get along \Vith you, do,'~ she said at
lttst, as 11e1 e)'"es call.ght his J.1ur'1a11's'JJ!r;,gazi11c, 1887.

To GE'l' ALONG to f<l.re ; to be


a good sti.l.te.

in

''well, doctor, ho\v 11as tl1e poor patient been


getti?1g alo11a ?''
'' 011ly fai.rly ~ sl1e is still very \VOtik~' J. M..
])ix.011.
GE'l' AT

.
.
.
to utt-ti.i11 : to 1et\.Cl1.
\\TJ.1en a doctor cottld be got at, lie said that, but
,

fo1 Mrs. Lt1.pl1.am's timely care, tl1c lady lived\'\T. D. Ho\vells.

..
GET ON (a) to st\cceed ; to rise in life. .
Tl1roll.gl1011t the co11ti11ent;; in E1iglu1id, ai1d
in An1erictl, tl1e enori11011.s 1najority of tl1e popultlti()J\ u re stirving for s11ccess in the1r so\Teral
})1ufe$sio11s a.11d calli1lgs ~ overy n1an ''Titl1 the
do\tbtfltl ex:cetltion of a fe\\r Trri..p1)i.!'t inonk.s, is
trying to V<Jt. 011 Spcclator, 1888.

.
(n) t-0 i1111ke progress ; to i111prove.
.
Ile ~{)OU {j(Jt c11z so \Voll tl1ut. 11c dist~anled the
tl1e otl1er MtL1rays Magazine, 1887.

.Get

136 :

Get

TO GET ON WITH ANY ONE-to find oneself in


congenial company.
'
She could get 01i with Mr. Adai1 J ari1es
Payn.
To GET UNDER-to obtain the supe1io1ity ; to

st1ppre$s.
Towa1ds three o'clock the fire \Vas. got 1/11rJe1,
and da1kness and silence succeeded Maria
'
Edgeworth.
GET BETTER to i1np1ove ; e. g I am gett(i11g
bette1 day by day.
GET THE BETTER OF to get adva11tage ove1 ; c. g.
In this 1ace he got the better of his l'ivals. .
GET BY HEART to con1111it to memo1y e. g. We
shall have to get this lesson b11 lieart.
GET A HEAD OF to surpas~ ~ e. g. He got <t:
liead qf his bitothe1 in studies.
GET LOOS~to escape: e.g. The p1isoner got
loose.
GET THE STAR'!' OF to have the adva11tage of
.. lJeginning ea1lie1 ; e. g . . He got tlie sta1t of 11.s i11
trade.

'
.
. GET RID OF to free on es elf f ron1 ; I do not
kno\V 11ow to get 1id of n1y bad 11abits.
GET WIND to leak 011t ~e.g. The plan got 1vind.
'
.

GET INTO IIOT WATER. 1Jeco111e invoIvd in g10at


diffic11lty ; e. g. He has got info liot 1oate1 in that
})t1siness.
To GET Up to airange ; to p1epa1e. .
A few -.days afterwards a con1n1ittee, consisting of.Lady Mona, ." Beaut.y'' Stiontt, an(1 T\frs.
Walter . P11llen, is asse1nbled in Lady Swansrlo\\rn's boudoir t,o clisc11ss the lJeRt i11eans of
getting up tl1e }Jro}Josed : theatricals F101ence
Marryat.
.,

TO GET ONESELF UP to appea1 in a striking or


elabo1ate costl1me.

'

137.

Get

Ghost.
.
"

Like n1ost

\Vl10 are not in t11e ha.bit of


'' gc1'.f.1"11 g tlie1JZ$<!ltes 11.p'' every day, he \\ru.;.: al\va.ys
111en

i11ital)le \\1 l1en tl1us clot.hed in l1is ."best: G. F.


'\l1yte-MeJv ille.
G1'1' 'l'HROUGH to pa~s ~ c'. g. De> yot1. hope to
ge1'. tlir<iug}i i~he 01-'..a1nination.
.
GV.T UNDrR to sti.pprcss; <~ ~7 ]3y t.11e: e\~e11ing
the fi1e \\1 as g<1t 11,11de1.

1
A
GOT-UP 'fHING a falJ1ication ~ cJ. g. 'l l1is is
i11erely a gotttp affair.
1
1 0 GE'l' OVER A PERSON to over co111e tl1e opposition of.

llo\\1 l1t1\1 e Yot1 i111111aged to get 01:~1 11ou1 111.,Jtl1eri1z. /atv is a. i11yste1y tc) t11e Dickens.
'l'O GET OFJi' to esf'.epe,
.
.
He '''ill g~i: fl.ff. T.'111 tl1 e only \Vi~nes$. A. jutY
\\'on't l)eliev<' a lllrtck111an in t11is cot1nt1y H. R.
llugg,ir<l.
.
To GE I' ONE'S B"'\CK UP tc1 lJe. t1 ngr~r ~ to be ir:rita- _
tecl. ( Sla11g. )
''A re ~roll.?~' I E<l. id ''l)egi11ni11g to get 11iy: bacl.,;
tl.p.''-H. R. I-laggard.
.
'I'o GE1' liET..IGION to 11ecolll(l J>iOl1S ~. to lie re1igit)\\t-:. A Cc)lloquitl An1e1ic.a11 J)hru.se.
.
I1e11e Pttscoe 011ce i11eta knigl1t on <t 111ission:11:,' 11lutf<)11:1, u11d fo1\11d l1e'd got 1<~lir1io11~r:c!"tl 11 i.

'I'o (.1E'l' liOUND--to

pe1s1lacie~ tall-. 1')\ror.

i~

r J3ilJlicnl

J)f11ttf'e.

i(;J1ost---~'o GI\-'l<; UP OR '1IEI,D UP 'l'HJ..~ GHOS'.l'

lt

t()

die.

i11 tl1c~ t1i:to111o()Jl t.}10 1foltJ1tebu.11k


r(~11<l1!l'<:d 1cp /1i8 rJllo:-;t. lle l1ad ne\"'er 1Jec11 cons1;it1\t~ ~i11ce l1is ~ejzi.1rc
R. IJ. Ste\enso11~ .
'.l'o }{i\1E .N01' A (:; J{()S'r Oli' .<\ CH~ NCfE--!0 I1a \e llO
Tl'<\ ~1)ll tl l>1 e })ro's11oc.t.
.
)~till <lo 11ot tcll 1110 tl111t Ctti.~\vell is u11pl~ing
f<}l" tl1u lIebrc.\\' cl1tiir.
l:-Ie /1r1;{ 1zor r1 g/1,,..'f <!f ,,
.t\b()\\t fti\tl'

('/l(lllt~.

.T. 1'1.

DiX<'lfl.

'

'

. f'

Gi" t

.. '

Gird

138

- - - - - -~----- ------ --- - ------- ------


Gift BETTER NOT LOOK A GIF1'-HORSE IN 1HE MOUTH
-to c1iticise a gift.
.

The poet gives as v,rell as i11a l;;:es ~ the rest of
t1s only receive ; we criticise tliese gifts : we
ventu1e to loo le i1ziv tlze nioztlli <if tlie fairest giftl1<J1se Besant. .
.
THE GIFT OF TH1 G_->.B flt1ency of Sl)eech ; t1sed
slightly conte1111)tt1ot1sly e .. g. TJ1e i11en \\rho take
the lead. in a caste i11eeting a1e those \vho 11ave
cool effrontry and the gj~t <1 tlte g<ib.
Gig GIGL.AMPS a joc11la1 na111e i;oJ. spectacles~ 01 fo1
one who \vears them.

'hen Pa1.1l's father appeared 11e \\'as sal11ted


with the irreve1ent na1ne of ''old gigla111ps."J. M. Dixon.
.
.
Gild ;.l1o GILD THE PILL to !11ake .t"Ln unpleasant
tl1ing loolc attractive ; to do so1netl1ing to i11ake a.
disagreeable thing seein less so.

.
I jttst lay myself out to get to the blincl s~de of1
them, and I st1gar a11d gilcl tlic~ pill so as to 1nalte
it pretty to look at and easy to s\va1lo\VHalibl11to11.

GILD.ED SPURS e1nblem of k111ght hood .


GILDED CHAMB~R Hol1se of Lords.
GILD i!:D YOUTH young n1e11 of v1realth and
fashion.
Gill~ ROSY OR RED ABOU l' 'l'HE GILLS fill.Shed with
drink. By the ''gills'' 11nderRtancl t11e flesl1 abo11t
the ja \VS. ( Slang. )
.
, WHI'rE IN 'l'HE GILLS sl}o\ving signs of terro1 or
sicl~ness..
.
.,,.Wl1at's the matteJ., yo11ng'an?'' asked Joe
surprised. ''What i11alces Y<)t1 so u liitc i1i tlze
gills?'' Besant. .
Gird TO GIRD UP TH'.- LOINS to p1e1Ja1e oneself fo1
hard work. It is a Biblical phrase.
The 11ouse av.raltes, and sl1akes itself, girdsttp tlze loi11s for the day's ,.,,01k Rhoda
Bro11gl1ton.
.
'

139

e.

e GIVE ONJ.~'S Si' LF AW Ay_ to bet-ray one's secret


y a sli1) of the tongll.e : to say llil\\rillingly \Vhat

.a111a.ges one'8 own ca11se.

.
. .
GIVE CO'tJNT~':NANC 1: T :. to favo1.1:r; . c. g.- The
udge said he \Vo11ld not give cr1u11ta11a11e.e to gamlJling.
Gl\7E CREDltNCE TO to believe; c. g. You ot1ght
o exan1i11e t11e state111ent befo1._:> yo11 give c1cde11ce
0 it.
GIVE THE CH.ASE TO to Pllrs11e ; c. g.
:e111<in gave tlzc cliase t(> the t11ief.
GIVl~ A FALSI~ COLOURI~G to misrep1esent. c. g.
[0\1. 11ave give11 the ''rhole story afal.<;e colouri11g.
GIVE EAR TO to pay hee(l ;.e. g. l wisl1 Y0'\.1. to
1os1Je1 a11d asl{ yo11 to give yea1 f.o i11)r advice.
GI\7E THE GO-BY to ignore ; to evade e. g. I-Ie
rave the IJroposal tl1.c go-b?J.
GIV 11: NO INKLING to l;;:ee1J secret ; c. [I He gave

i111,z:11g of tl1e matte1 to l1i111.


GIVE THE I~lE TO to contradict~ e.g. Y 011r
1ction 11111st I1ot gi11c tl1c lie to yot11 \\'Ord.
GIVE ON!<~ .A r..TliT to acco1nn1odate in a convey1 nee ; c. g.
I can gi11c i101,, a lift if yotl 1ike.
GIVE THE Ri;JNS 10 allo\v 11nrest-rained freedori1;
i. g.
Yc)\1 sho111<1 not give tlze 1:ci'1lS to Yo\1:r hobby
10

J1orse.
G.VE THE ~LlP
rli<~

slip to t]1e

to
police.

o~cape

; e.g.

'rhe t.l1ief gave

ex1lresR ; fou1 fortl1 ; e. g.. \'\Then


1e l1eard tl1e s1;1d ne\\'S, l1e ga''l! t'<~1?f f<> 11is feeling!'

GlVE VENT TO

u lotldcrJ' .
.
- ._
..
G1\7 E ONE 1 HE CHAPTER AND \-r:EllbE-to givo tl10
~1111 pr<)of ~ <~. g. giic ?11(! fl1c cl1apfc1 a11(l 1.:c1~ or else
L\\ ill i1ot accept ).,.011r f'tti ten1en 1-.
Gl\~ CURRENCY ru to circtl.late ; .. c. !I Yotlr
.l\\n l)Coplo ha,ro giv(~n c1i11c11c!/ to tl1is report.

Gl\r~ FULL l">LA). TQ nllo\v n lt\rge sco1)e; c. g.


,\ }'loot f/itic,~.f11fl pl<1y i<> his in1nginnt:ion .
(}1\7E Qi.1ARiER 'TO to sl1'\e]d; to ~Pt\rC' tl1c li\-e!':
Jf~ ; <' {! \\ille11 tll~ f'<o1dicrs \\t'1:e gl1;,~n q1in1f(~r f('J 1
:l1t')~ S\1:rrendl~red. .
ii1

'.
,.
'
,

'

'

_,-

..

.:....-

'

140

Give
--------- --- -

--

"'

---

GlVE UP THE GHOST


gliof)i on 1st. April.

to. die ;

He

e. g.,

gctve up'
.

'

1ead into ; open. upon.


Then "'re passed on up this till at last \\Te r
cl1ed the top, \r,rhere we found a large standi
space to 'V\rhich th_ere \Vere th1ee entrances,' a.ll
s1nall size. Two of these gave 012 to rathr na-rr
galleries 01 road ways c11t in the face of the P
- cipice. H. R. Haghard.
,
GIVE ( JNESELF OUT AS OR IN to .l)YOclai111
one~
to be.

Be gives Jii11iselj out, si1, for what no\V a dt


they .call a patriot a n1a11 fro111 _East Pr11.s~
R. L. Stevenson.
.

GIVE UP (a) discontin11e the 11s~ of ; abando_n.


The n1iddle aged it deprived of .their. gast
po\ve1s. so that they have 11ad, evei since,
gtV(~ t.lp all 1}1ei1 l)ee1, pqrter, _ po1t and she1
J311rgundy and Chan1pagi1e, cla1et; a~d Rh
GIVt- O.N TJ OR UPON
'

'

\Vine--Besant.
'
.(l>) S11r1ende1: ada1it beaten.
Tl1en, fo1 he1 fear f OI'. her i)lace, and bee a;
he th1eatened that 111y lady sl1ould give he1
discl1arge \Vithot1t t11e sausages, ::;he gave up, c:
fron1 that day fo1\vard al-.vays sat1sages 01 ha<
01 pig-n1eat in-._ some shape or ot11er \vent 11:
t11e table Maria Edge\.vorth.
,
Grvt-.<\NP-TAKE .POLICY a policy ~f . n1i1t
<t<.~co111odation and forbearance.

N otl1ing can be n101e anno~ring t:o a11 01din:


ma11 tl1an to find the - \vife of his. bosom ..
-..~
.

bas.jogged along with hin1 very. con1fo1-tably i:


gii:e-cind-tale policy style fo1 n1any years, suddej
tr1.r11 iound and lectt1re hi1n ~lpo11 11is a111ia
'
JittJe \veal\::nesses. Ht~gh 0011\\'llY..
.
GIVE FORT If OR GIVE OU'l' llttl)ltsl1 ; e111it. ,
'

'

,.,,,

' I

''

'

'

'

'

..
.
' Gl"\1,_,
:. GlVC
141
----------------- -------------Soon after it \\'as givc11 fo1i"l1. und believed by
i11any t11at tl1e I(i11g \Vas dead H. R. Huggard.
GlVE ourr come to an end.
. But ,before they 11ad covered 11alf a. i11ile 1)001
1Y1rs. iV(ordau.nt's stre11gtl1 ga11c out. l!J11glisl1. llltts
t1ated Af(tgazi11e, i 887.
G'l\iE lN yield assent. or obedience to ; ad1nit
defeat.
.
; .
They did not yet give i11 ; tl1ey had 11ithertt1
gone only 'abotit t-l1e: st.reets; tl1ey ,. .1ot1ld go t.()
i)laces \vhe1e people ineet together Besant..
GIVE OVER (a) cease l1opi11g for one's recove1y.
\T alence told 111e -~}1at he had been given ot:e1
tl1at 11e could not live lllOl'e tJ1aJl Ri};: 111ont}1so1
,

~o

Flore11ce Ma1ryat.
(iJ) Yield, co111n1it.
'rhey (the P1otestarit clergy} i11ight 11ave
t1ttujned to t11e inflti.ence .\vl1ich i$ no\v gii1c11 Ol!er
entirely to tl1e }Jriest Tl1ackeray.
.
GTVE ONE~ELl" 'UP . (a) to surrende1 to' t:b_e poli<.~e.
Ne'''s can1e tl1at tl1e Brighton .1111l.1dere1
had

fJitc12
11i111selj up.

.
. .
(7)) Lose ho1)~ <lf sa"ing pne's life.
..
\Vl1en I su.\v that the floodR had ca11ied a\\'tt''
t11e b1idgc, I gaec 11i]/Rclf ttp for lo~t.

GIVE"'\ PERSON UP (a.) despair of seei11g one. .


.
Tt \''as ut that 11nl1eard of liol1i (11 P. 111:.) tl1at:
!\f if:s H11ntle)r; \\Tl1ose ex1Jerience of p1ovincia 1
l1t11)1ts \\:1s: 1i111itcd, tl1c>t1gl1t' fit to pt1t . in. an
:lp11ciira11CC', t1nd l1er 11ostcss'!4 ejac1llation of
'' At lu!'t l \l1J.r, \\'O {ltlt'r. ?/Ott "1.tp t1Jore than a11
l1011r t1go ! ,, clrO\\ fortl1 no tl.J>olog~.. fro1n J1or--
lioocl liror<l:::, 1887.

.
.
.
(l1) Rtnotlnr.e ; ref1.1sc to n.ckno,-..ledge:
H<.' 11ad 11ocri. li\"ing ''' l1at \'\a!3 ;1 \\iI<l, (~t.)llegc
'

1ifc c\e11 in t11~~e ,,ild (ln.~~s; anrl


ti.l111ost gitcti l1i111 1ip E. Yatc~.
(;\\:'T, '"'.z\\'--)'i~ld: llr(~nl::. do,-..n.

l1i~

fnn1il-v l1arl

. .
.
' .
"

'

142

- - - - - - - - - - ------

----~

On one occasion, as she was being brot


down fron1 her look-out cha1nber in a new ca
ing-chair, it gave way S. Ba1ing-Gould...
To GIVE THE LIE-to contradict flatly ~ e. g.
inan's actions may gi'l.:e the lie to his words.
To BE GIVEN TO addicted to ; e. g. 'This 1
is give1i to drinking.

GlaegOlf A GLASGOW MAGISTRATE a salt he1r


It is said when George. IV visited Glasgow, s
salt herrings v.-rere placed, in joke~ on the iron g1
of the carriage belonging to a well-known .Glasi
Magistrate, l'Vho forn1ed one of a deptltatioIJ
receive the King. ( Prov. )
,.

Glass

THOSE WHO LIVE IN GLASS HOUSES SRO'


NOT THROW STONES people vvho are thetnse

open to criticism ought not to criticise. See


opening verses of St. Mathew,' vii.
. And there is a old proverb abot1t the ineXJ;J
ency of t.tiose wb.o live i1l glass 'houses throt
b'tones Florence Marryat.
.
A FRIENDLY GLASS a favou1able d1ink.

To HAVE A GLASS rfoo :MucH .to.be dr1lnk.


Glazier Is YOUR FATHER A GLAZ.IER .. ? a v1ll
' expression, signifying. '' Do you suppose tha
can see tl1ro11gh yot1 ? '' It is used when a per
in front of you obstructs Yo11r ':"ie\v. ( Prov. )
Glout IN THE GLOUT lt1cky.
:: My ,mamma V.'as in the glout with lier I
. dat1ghter all the day S. Richa1dson;.

Glol'e THROW.'l'HE GLOVE TO see under 'Gat1ntlet


. HAND AND GLOVE-see l1nder ,'Hand.'.
PUT ON OR WEAR GLOVES attack -:an advers,
in a Iliild or geneious way. .
,. ,
He (Macaulay) pu.t 01z J,lp glove.'3, ,took .. in h~
no buttoned foil, when on .well-chosen occasic
lie carrie do\vn to the hol1se to n1ake a speec
J. Cotter Moriison
. .':

.
.
.
.Glunt Furnish a:n exce.ss of goods for t11e m::trlcet,
for them. .
tl1at a sale can. not. .be fol1nd
.

-,

'

'

'

. Go

~Go

'144

A11d then it is so 'mncl1 easier in everything


gn.wit/1. tlie st1ea111., and to do \vhat you .are
expected to do lvirs. Oliphant. .

GO WITHOUT SAYING be plainly self-evident ;;.be


an evident fact or natu1al conc111sion. It. is translated r'f10111 the"French, Cela va Sans di1~e: . .
That, st1ch :accusations . are not 011ly tltterly
false. b11t were beneath cont{fmpt, _goes withoitt
,<taying ~4.ll tli.e .I ea1 Rorvnd, 1887. " .
Go B.Y TfIE. BOARD
be lost. It is a. nat1tical
.
ph1ai;;e, no\v in ordina1y t1se.
.
Her ra,Ltling shrot1ds.. all sheathed in ice.
''Nitl1 the_ . n1asts, we11f. b1/ ,t11.e boa1d Lo11gfello'\\T.
,
.
.
Go Bi:. escape by artifice ; any intentional
dis.
.
iegard. : .
.
Go OUT OF ONE'S W.A Y to trot1.ble oneself
. ~'My dear, I an1 sorry yot1 did not sn1ell it~
but we can't help that now,'' rett1rned n1y iaste1
vritho"t?-t p11tting hitnseif in a passion
goitl{/
out of liis way, b11,t just fair a11d easy _l1elped. hin1~elf to another glass Maria Edgevvorth.

..
Go ALL LENGTHS to hesitate at no act.
He is 1eady to go all lengi~/1.s in his advocacy of.
i:l10 ten1pe1ance question.
,
Go MAD, to lose one's balance cf inind; e. g. He '
ha"r.; rJ011e niad over cinen1er.
.


GO TO .T r1E DOGS, to l?e ru:ined ~ e.
He has
gone to tl1.e clogs~
,
Go TO RACK - .AND RUIN to 1}e . -in a .. \vretohed
, condition : e. g. His prope1ty has go11e to 1ac!c a71cl

to

_.

or

'

'

g...

ru111.

'

Go HALVES Wl'l'II 0.NE-to share equally; e.g.


will )'"OU go lialve.c;. wit/1. 11ze i11 buying tl1e plot of
ground?
GO AGAINST THE GRAIN oontrary to nature or
ir101i11n.ti6n ; e. (/ It gor..c; agai11:::f. 1n11 grai1z to bo''"
down to e1er)" body.


'

'

' .

Go

145

'

'God's

----------------~-----------

. Go ASTRAY to deviate fron1 the right path; c. g.


In his youth he went asf:ray.
.
Go ON A FOOL'S ERRAND to undertake a fruitless
enterp1ise; c. g. You went 011 fool's errand when
you tl1ought ot malting it t\p with hi.m.

Gu IN FOR to ta.lee in ; c. g. Are you goi1ig infor


the next examinatio11 ?
Go TO THE WALL-have to ietire; be pushed
aside.
You inust. go tf> tliaf, wall if -you are not prepared to serve our interest.
Go FURTHER AND F.A.Ili WORSE-talte extra trou
ble and find 011eself in a wo1se positio11 tha11 before.
Well, t1pon my sot1l, I don't blame you ; you
migl1t have goncf1irtlicr andfaircd wo1se H. R.
Haggard.
Go I-I.A.RD WITH be in real difficulty or danger.
Well, n1y dear sir, if \v.e don't stand by him
and 11is fan1ily, it \V1ll go liard . wltli l1:i11i; and .in
t11e end we will feel sorry.
Goit Aot in a st.rilting OT dasl1ing man11er ; to be
extravagant. ( C(1lloq. )
I 11eaTd 11aster George '\\Tas going it, from the
Saunders. F. Marryat~
,
.
.
Go Tl-tE v-rHoI.E HOG go to the fullest extent.
A GOING CONCERN n. business in' acti\1'e opera.tio11 : e. g. 11y shop is no mere idle .spoota.tion

'

'

"

bt1t a qoi't1g co1zecrn . .


God's Gons 4<\CRE tl10 c11urcl1yard ; u. l>urial ground.

As 11er eye roa.1necl fron1 sea to Inna it foll


u11011 tl10 l\ttle cl1u'l'cl1 1mmen1ately boncatl1 lier,
into \\l1of:c Go1l's acrr, t11e footpath desoended . .Tn111<!R

G-ons

Pay11.
13001' TEE !~IBLE.

GOD S1<:ND

'

u Ilicoo of luck.

GODSP}:f~U

st1ccess.
C'T{)D \VII.1~1NG if conditions nllo\\.
1 f\

_.

"

"

.. '

" '

~olden

146

Golden

Golden THE GOLDEN.RULE-'' Do unto other as yott.


would have others do 11nto you.''. .
. . .
,.
My dear boy, have you ..not .learned the
: , Golde1i Rule.? In all human .actions loolc for
1
the baest. motive and attribute. ('1 his is said
. . in satire, the real_ golden rule is from the . Bible
as above) 'Besant.
..
THE GOLDEN BOWL IS BROKEN a euphemistic
:expressio11 for death. It is talcen from the Book of
Ecclesiastes xii, 6 ''Or ever the silver cord. be
loosed, or the golden bowl be b1oken, or tl1e pitcher
be broken at the :fou11tain, or the wheel broken at
the cistern. Then shall the di.1st return to the earth
.as it was; and the spirit shall return unto God who
oave
it.''
.
.
.
'
.
.0
'
'
'
',
And thus go ori f1om year to year, until the
golde11 [Jowl is b1olcen H. R. I-Iagga1d;
. GOLDEN CALF an edict issued by the Emperor
Charles IV in 1356, mainly for the purpose of setting the law: of imperjal elections.
WORSHIP THE GOLDEN C.A.LF bow down' before
. . something unworthy._. This phrase refers to the.
actions of the children.of Is1ael during their jour. ney from Egypt at Mount Sinai. See E.lCodus

'

XxXll.

The burgeois mind is instantly prostrated before tlie golden calf of com1neroial prosperityW. M. Black.
A GOLDEN AGE-'' The premitive period of
ht1man race which was oharaoterised by purity,
simplicity of manners and enjoyments : any period
of brightness and prosperity.
A GOLDEN ME.AN a middle course or P.osition
between t\vo extren1es.

GoLDEN OPINIONS v_ery favourable opinions.
GoLDEN- OPPORTUNITY a highly favourable
opportunity.
.
GoLDEN JUBILEE the celebration of the - 50th
n

nniuAl'c;:!'t l'V nf. 11 n

AVP.nt.

Good::

147

Gone

. .

C70nc

A. GONE CA~E-something 11opeles$ ; a person

\vho js despaired of. (Colloq.)


.
When officers at'e once detet'mined to ride a
man do\vn, it 1s a gone case \vith him. R. H.
Da11a.
.
TOOF .t\R GONE-in a hopeless or desperate condi-

tion.

To l.l.se a JJhra.se not ofte11 applied to a young


lady, sl1e was too far go12e (l1opelessly tn love)._- .
.James Payn.

Good As GOOD .AS A PLAY very interesting.
J.Ie swore it \vas a.~ goc>d a.'3 a pla11 to see her
in t11e cl1aruotar of a fine da111e. Th:l.ckera.y. .
l\.S GOOD .AS GOLD-tl10Tol.tgl11y good and fully
tru~t,vortl1y. It is generally used of person.

'' She is a~ g<1od a~ gold,'' said Lily \Vhen the

door \\as olor:;ed. A. Trollope.


.
FOR GOOD AND AI.l"'-finally ;
conclusion; to
end the i11attor.
When tl1ey \\rcrc i11nde sensible that Sir Condy
''ras going to loa ve Ca~tlo Raalcrent f 01 good nnd
all t.t1cy set up a \Vl1illal\1 that oould be hea.rd
to the fo.rtl1ost end of the street. Maria Edge\Vortl1.

Goon 1'10Rl-i!NG TO J\NY . THING farewell to it.


(Prov.)

\Vl1on anytt1i.ng's ui>on 111y l1en:rt~, g ~od 1norning


lo 111) J1otld ; it is not \vorth :-1 len1on.-Maria
Eo~e,,ortl1.

Goo~) FOli NOTiflNG you aro a good for notliinn

in

(\\"ortl1losR) follo\\".

entirely dependable.

AS GOOD J.\S ONE'S \V'ORD


I~

GOOD rIt1E

in }lroper season.

A GOOD HA1'"'D-an excellent ''"orkor.


JN GOOD GRJ\CES in favour .
JN GOOD EARh"IBT very sincel'cly.
GOOD lJl~EEDING polito n10.nnors forn1od by good

OO\lOtl.tio11.

.,

Good
.
,.
.
..'

'

~.

148
..

Goosebe1ry: :'
.

'

..

Goon .CHEER provisions for a feast.

Goon HUMOUR a oheel-ful state of mind.


Goon NATURE-kindness of disposition.
Goon OFFICES .recomn1endation or a favourable
intervention.
'

. Goon SAM.A.RlTAN one who befriends a stranger


or friendless person in difficulties.
GoOD SENSE soundness of judgment.
Goon SPIRITS cheerful state of mind. - .
Goose Hrs GEESE ARE SWANS he places too - high
a value on his possessions.
.
All the Lauoastrian get?.~e are swans . Rhoda.
Broughtori;
. .
THE GOOSE THAT LAYS THE GOLDEN EGG 'thesource of one's wealth or cherished possessions..
This affectionate anxiety was .partly due td a.
certain apprehension the old gentleman experienced when the goose that laid lhe golden eggs
for hi1n was out of sight James Payn.

TO KILL THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN


EGGS to dest1oy the source of one's income. This
'phrase is taken from Ae!'opts Fable .
. To COOK .A. PERSON'S GOOSE FOR HIM-to cause
'-his dt:'ath.

''You see,'' said Tom, ''that if you should


- . happen to be wrong,, our goC1se is coolced without
the least doubt.'' Besant.
ITs A GONE GOOSE WITH .ANY ONE there is no
. more hope for hin1.
.
Well, be tool\: the contract for beef for the
troops ; and he fell astern, so I guess it's a qone
goose wz'.tli
him
Haliburton.
.
. .
.GooselJe1ry ~ro PLAY G01 isEBERRY to act as a third
perso:Q. for the sake of propriety.
.
There \vas Helena out of her chair standing
by a entleman ...... while I was 1educed to
that position "~~hi~l1 is vulgarly but exp1essively
kno\vn as pla71ing gooseber1y-The J11i.stletoe
. Boltgl1., 1886. --

....

icordian

... '

.'

Grand

14:9

LIKE OLD GOOSEBERRY with great energy.


Take tl1en1 by the tail ...... and lri;~'-r oli like old
gooseberry Captain Ma1ryat.

:Gordia11 TO CUT THE GoRDlAN KNOT to overcome

a d1ffiottlty by violent measures. Alexander the


Great unable to untie the fateful knot tied by King
Gordiit.s of Phrygia, had to ct1t i~ tl1rough \vith his
S\Vorcl.
Franlt Muller n1ust die, and die 1Jefore the
lnorning light. By no other possible tnea.ns
could th.c Gordiarz Jcnot ba cztt H. R. Haggard.
Go.-go-ONE'S GORGE B.1SES AT one is sickened by.
Gospel GOSPEL TRUTH a thing as true as gospel.
GoSPEL OF SOAP AND '\Y A.'l.''ER a. }Jrinciple one
acts on.
A I-IOT GOSPEl..LER a rabid propagandist.
GO\'t'Jt ARMS AND GOWN war and peu.ce.
TO\VN AND GOWN nonmember and members
of Ox. ford .and Oa111bridge.
. .
Grace-TI-IE THRONE OF G'RAOE---It is a figurative expte~sion, n1ea11ing Godts seat, 11ea.'1'en. To oome
'
to t11e tl1rone of gruce' is to pray.
,
Tr1E J\t'EANS OF GRACE-opport11nities of heating
Cl1ri~t Ilreacl1ed. lt is n. religious expression.
Tno sl1op i$ next tloor to one to a oliapel, too.
Ol1, 110\\' l1andy for flie rne1.i11,'3. of grace Besant.
Giain AG.c\.lNST TI1E GRAIN against. tl1e- natural
ten11Jer or inclinnt1on ; tlnJJlensant.
. I 11a(l T'a.tl1er 11a\:e a. lit.tle, and do 'v11at I li.ket
tl1un ncqttiro n. great den.1 by \Vorki.ng agai1ist th-e

g~artt
tt

.Tan1c8 pa:yn.

\\rlTll .1.\ GR.t\lN OF SA 1~r ,,~itl1 Tcservti\ ion, as of


story tl1at cu.11. not. bo adn1ittcc1. '

So111t) of the a(l\entures descril>ad bv 11im


~11ould bo tal\:()11 1vitl1 (J gr<1i1t (if salt.
. ~ .

. .
(;rnn<l TI1E GRAND QU"ESTlON-Tl1e ulti.1nci.to question.
THE GRAND S'l'\.LE-style fit for great S\1bjcots.

'

.." ' '..'

..

''

~~rape

150

'

'

'

"Gri

't41:,-.. " -

l)Q .THE GRAND to put on airs.. .


. . , GRAND PEO,PLE-higl1 sooiety.
.
Grape SOUR GRAPES-things despised beoau~e th1
pannot be a~ta.ined .. It oomes into t1se from t'.
t?tory of the Fox a11d tlie G1apes in Aesop's Fables.

'' So it has got its big wax doll after. all, b


, it?'' asks one with a sneer ; '' only wig and . Io:
legs, and all l''
_
I am roused to retort. I tu1n and rend her.
''Sour g1apesl'' ory I, with red oheel;;:s : and
an elevated key Rhoda Bro11ghton.
. .
Grasp GRASP YOUR NETTLE-tac.kle diffio_ulty bold]
e. g. You a re a grown-up and yolt should g1c.i
.yourn~~

.
Grass To LET THE GR.ASS GROW UNDER ONE'S FEIJ.'1
to loiter, or linger~ to be idle and lazy.
Captain Cuttle held oii at a great paoe a:
allowed no grass t9 grow unde1 his f eet-Dioken1
Go TO GRASS to go into retirement. It is frc
'
.
an ,old horse not fit to work turned into a pasture.
GR.ASS WIDOW a. wife tempora-rily separat
from or deserted by her husband.
. A qr ass widow finds herself. in need of oon~
lation fo1 the cruel absenoe of her liege lord
. Mistletoe Bougl'li, 1885.

.Gray THE GRAY M.ARE-:--a man's wife. 'This. term


generally u~ed with the implication that the ni1
. :.: in partjoular instance is inferior to his wife and
. ruled by her. ( Slang. }
.
.
It was also quite clear. to those who thoug
about things, and watched this little lady, t1:J
'. .
there .may be meaning in. certain proverbi
exp1essions touohing gray mares Besant.

THE GRAY. oF THE. MORNING ti~e .after dav


when things are seen ~ut.din1ly e, g. ,Our. sl1ip .w

~,,.,.,,.,..;aotl ;n

+ho nrri11 of f.hd mor11inn.

Grease

.'

: Gree11

J 51

---------------------'---To GREASE THE P .ALM to - bribe, to llse


money for the purpose of corrupting a JJerson ''rith
a vie\\' to curry favour, \vl1ich . otherwise \\"01.1ldn't
l)e 11i.s. It is al~o so.id Palni oili?1g.

The contrri.cter found tl1at- his rates were


higl1er than other tender$, but l1aving heard
tl1at tl1e ll1an 'in charge co\110. be u.J!pi:oached
lie oat1tio11sly and nervously \\Taited on him
and gr<'ased his poltrt and thereby secured the

Grease

contra.ct.

Grcnt A. GREAT GUN- a i11a.n of note 11artict\la.rly a


preacher or lecturer.
THE GREAT UMW .ASHED- the great mass of
lo\ver classes of 11eople.
Greel(: AT THE GREEK KALENDS never. The Greeks
having no calends.
.
The London School Boo:rd have since exeouted

a stro.tegi.cal movement to tl1e rear, suspending


the obnoxious notice for a inonth, \Vl1ich is the
Englisl1 eqt1i,alent for the Greek Ka1ends .Toto11zal of P.drlco.tion, l887.
WHERE TRE GREEK MEETS GREEK when one
strong champion ineets anotl'let' of e;.\\ial i>to\vess.
When Grc-lcs joi11ell Greelcs, tl1en was the tug
of \\"aT Nathaniel Lee.
GREEK TO ANY ONE-unintelligib1e.

But, for mine own part, it \vas Grcclc to mcS\10.ke,-pea.re.

GRBr-:.KGlFT gift fraught with (1estr\1ction like


tho '''ooden horse : r. g. Be ware of l1is Greclc gift
for it is not to be accepted witl1 u. light; 1100.rt..
Green Tl-lE GR1IT'.u~~lai0NST"Elt jealous)'~ This is fig- .

Cl1err~r \\~us green '\\'lth jealoUf')., b\1t. tried to


l'1id() it \1ndor l)l'Otestntion of a.dn1irlltion The
~fi~trctor. Bottgli, 1885.
.
Gll'El;;N' HOUN-a l"U\\" inox1)orienoed yo1ttl1. {Slang.)
TBB W'Ei\'RlNG Or' 1'H'E GnEEN . Green is the lrisb
n1.1tio11t1l colour. Ireland is on.lled Groen or

't1ia.ii,~o.

. 152

Grinder

Emerald. Isle.'' To wear green shpws . patriotio or


, rebel sympathies.

They are hanging men or women for weari1ag


of the gJeen Pnpula1~ Song.
.
TEE GREEN ROOM-the retil'ing room for aotors
in a theatre, which originally had .the \valls
coloured green. This room. is a notori9us place
for gossips.
There was only one topic on whioh Sir. Henry
oould cenverse, and 1he was uncertai11 how it
would be received if he was to start. it-namely,
actors' gossip and green 7ooni whispers. Besant.
A GREEN OLD AGE .when an old. inan is cheerful, fresh, vigorous, undecayed, and has not grown
out of i;;ympathy with young people.
.
GREEN BOOK official publication of Indian
Government.
.

'
.
Grief To COME TO GRIEF. to be ruined.
.
.
Franoe and Bonaparte,. driven by. the Frenoh
fat, as you are by the British Philistine, and
the Frenoh fat has proved a. yet more fatal
driver than your8, being' debai.1ched and immoral, as well as ignorant came to grief. M.
Arnold.

.
...
.
.G1i11 To GRIN .A.ND BEAR !T. to suffer anything
painful in a manly way, without grumbling., . ''You scoundrel,'' he said bet\,,een his teeth,
''you have made a fool of me for twenty:. years,
and
I
have
been
obliged
.
to
g11'.n
and
bea1.
it..''
B. R. Haggard.

'

'

Grino- To GRIND THE FACE to oppress.

The Agent was one of your lniddle-men wl1b


grind tlie face of the poor Maria Edgeworth.
AN AXE TO GRIND to serve: one'sprivate. ends;
e. g. He raises the qu~:Stion , bec~use _he. has an
a:t~ to g1i1zd.

'

'

Grinder ~ student :who .works hard.:


John is going up to hi8 final examination and
is now a hard grinder.

Grips

---~---------

r::

,),)

----

Grips AT GRIPS WITH- struggling hard against.

Tom was daily gro\ving in manfulness and


tl1oughtfulness, as eyery high couTaged and \vellprincipled boy must., when he finds himself for
the first tir11e con~ciously at grips tvith self, and
the devil Hl1ghes.
COME ro GRIPS Close
combo.t ; e. g. The
matter ca1ne to g1ips bet\veen us.
Grist- BR1NG GRIST TO THE MILL to be a source of
profit.
A shy old pope created t\venty Saints to
bri1zg grist to tlie niill of tl1e London clergyBishop Borl'ley.

ALL ls GR1S'l' THAT COMES TO THE M1LL-I turn


every thing to account.
Gro\1nd BREAK GROUND take tl1e step in any pro~
jeot ol' l1ndertaki.ng.
GAIN GROUND-to advance ; to obtain an ad
va11tagc.

It \Vas very tiring and 8lo\v \\ C>rlc, yet. I did


visibly goiri gro7.t11d R. L. Stev.enson.
.
T 1 II.AVE TIIE GROUND CUT UNDER ONE'S FOOT--to see \\That one relies on for sup11ort , s\1ddenly
\vitbdra,vn.

His \\ns not a i1racti<!al n1ind, and it \\'as sure


t.o tt\ke hin1 somet.in1e to realise \Vl1at it 'means
to Ji ave t11c g101111d cut. f ro11i tt.nder yo111 feel Good
l{T orcl~, 1887.

.
A GliOUND SWEU a ro\1gl1 i-;eu near t11e sl1orc or
in il1ri.llo\\" ,,ater.

Gro,, 1'o Gl\O\v 1Jpo1; to gti.in great illfl\1cnce o~er.


.

It \\'f1.~

face Tlttl1er lo\~nlllo - t11an l)eautift1l


rntl1c1' t'en~itivc. tl1an inte.l1~cl\1al-a fn.~e \\11icb
f11c1i1 1tp{~l ~ot1 u~ ~:ot1 looked nt 1t and "'l1ich \Vas
nl\\.O.)"S lll~n~iint to look l\'f)on--W. E. Norris.
G1iO\\. D~\l~hc ll.~ t.110 CV"ening 1.".'\iligl1t fndos;
c. n. ..{\.sit gri>.tn <li11]; I bccr~n10 ~i.llXlOll~ for t11eir
~nfct~.

fl.

154

Grub

Gulf

to grow old by long service ; e. g


. Entering the India office at the age of eighteen,.
Mr. Brown has grown g7ay in the service.
Grub-GRUB STREET a street in London inhabited:
by bookseller's backs and shabby writers 'generally.
As a noun Gritb Street sigr1i:fies poor, mean authors ; as an adjective mean poo:r, low. The street
is now oa11 ed Milton str<'ef..
J obnson oarne among them the solitary speoimen of a past age, the last s11rviv-or of the gen.
uine race of Grub Street haoks Maoulay.
GRUB AND BUB victuals and drink. ( Slang.)
Gruel To GIVE A PERSON HTS GRUEL to punish a.
'person severely. ( Slang. )
He 1efused, and harsh language ensued.

Whioh ended at length in a .duel,


When he that was mildest in mood

Gave the turbulent ra~cal his p1uel Barham.


Grundy MRS. GRUNDY the invisible censer morutr.
who is frequently appealed to in the phrase. ''But
what will Mrs. G1'Undy .say?'' in Thomas l\1orton's
play, Speed and the Plougli (1800).
Gua1d To PUT A MAN ON HIS GUARD to tnake him.
oareful.
It was in such an outburst of rage that he
had assanlted John in .the jnn-yard of Wakker
strom, and thereby put him on his guard against
him H. R. Haggard.

OFF ONE'S GU ARD forgetful ; in a careless state.


Isaac caught both faces o.f/ thei1 guard, and
read the men as by a lightening fl.ash to th,e
bottom
line of their hearts 0. Reade .
.
Gulf A GREAT GULF FIXED a complete and per. manent cause of separation. The phrase comes
,. from the parable of Dives and Lazarus. See Luke
. GROW GRAY

'

'

xvi. 26.

Between hin1 and Mr. Carrutber there was a.


greatg ulf fixed. E. Yates.

155

Gun

Gutter

Gun
.

A GREAT GUN a person of great in1portance.


Time flew on, and f/1c g1cat. gu.11s 011e by one
returned-Pee], Garba111, Goulbo"l1rn., B.a1dinget
Herrios. Beaconsfield.

To BLOW GREAT GUN to be very stormy.


At last it blew great g1t.12s ; and. one nigl1t, as
t.he sun went do\vn crimson in the Gulf of lJ..,lorida,
the sea. running mountains higb, l saw Captain
Sebor himself was fidgety C. Reade.
To bTICK TtJ ONE'S GUNS to. maintain one's position in an a1gulnent; e. g. A.t any oost 11e will
sticlc to his guns.
SON OF A GUN a conten1ptible fella\\~.
Guts To HAVE GUTS lN THE BRAIN to be full of in
telligence.
To HAVE NO GUTS-to 110.ve no Teal value or
foroe. c. g. Tl1e fello\v lias no !J?Lts in lii111.
Gulter ONE OF TBE GUTTER-of lo\v origi11 .

----

,
.'

155 .

,liack

to. be in
very comfortable quarters. He.clc or_jiaclc is Sootoh
for a manger. Tl1e word is of. Scand~navian
or1g1n.

The servants at Locbmarlie must bring at hack


and manger Miss Ferrier.
A. RACK WRITER a . common drudge ; e. g. I
know you are a liaclc writer.

_Hackles-WITH HIS HACKLES up ready to :fight. e.g.

The o.ook stood with. liis hackles up.


Hail HA.IL FELLOW a familiar friend. 'Hail fellow l well-met ' frequently used as a kind of descriptive adjective.
.

.
His role was that of a liail1ellorv well-met .with
evel'ybody Sarah Tytler.

,Hair To A HAIR exactly ; with perfect nicety.
"
Oh, that's her nose to a hair that's her eye
exactly H.alibu~tort.

To split l1airs to make superfine distinctions.


.
1
Pray, don't let us be splitting hairs .A. Trollope.
.A. H.All{ BkE.ADTH ESOPE-an escape when almost
overtaken by injl1ry or disaster.
BOTH OF A HAIR both alike.
For the peddler and tinl\:er, they are two notable knaves, both of a hair, and both cousins German to the devil Greene.
MAKE THE HAIR ST.AND ON END to give the
greatest astonishment or fright to another.
When I think of 'the souls of the people in
that poor village, my li\1i1 literally stands 01z.
end-A Trollope

. Hack-AT HACK (OR HECK) .AND MANGER


~

OuMB A PERSON'S HAIB THE WRONG WAY to


irritate or provoke him.
KEEP ONE'S HAIR ON (Slang) to keep cool.
NOT TO TURN A HAlR not to be rufiled or dis-

turbed.

'

Half NOT HALF-to very slight extent; (Slang) not


at all.

1-Jalloo
".;
...
~,..

...
t.> ..

Halting.

----~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~--~~-'--

'

A BAD HALF PEN~TY

so1uething whioh is supposed to return to the owner, 110'\\ CV8l" often he tries
to get rid of it.
.
It \Va~ not the first time, nor the second, t11at
I 11ad gorie away n,q It seemed, per1nane11tly ..
-but yet returned like tl1e bad 11.alj pen11?1 N.
Ha\vthorne.
.
HALF THE BATTLE-no small part of the difficulty overcome.

To provide the patient \-vith a good bed, fresh


air, and suitable warmth is lialf tlie battle J. M.
7

Dixon.

HALli' 1-IEARTED.:... having no enth~siasm for the


\-vorlc in hand.
.
l{ALF 1\i.A.ST A flag is ht1ng at half t.l1e height
of a mast or flagstaff in sign of mottrning e. g. The
tri-oolotl.r fle\V l1alf mast on S\'>'arn.j Bhavan on the

rlentl1 of 1'1r. Desai.



HALF WAY HOUSE }Jossible ccm:protnise.
If nlloo I:IAT.-LOO BEFORE ONE IS OUT OF THE WOOD
to count on safety before one is out of danger.
Tl1is \\ as a favourite saying of the Dul\:e of
\Vellingto11.
V\711011 \'\'clli11gto11 bnd d1i,en tl1e French out
of Port\1go.l, lhe l?ortuge~e is-:;uccl a print of tJ1e
Duke, lJonring the legend t1ndorneatl1 '' Invin ..
oible \\7ellington fron1 gratef1ll PortugnJ.t' A
frie11d 11n\ing i:;ent the .D11kc a copy of tl1e Print1 l10 fih'uol;: 011t tl1e \\'ord '' Invinoi\1le,, \\i1l1 n. dasl1
of l1is J)On and \\rote belo\v ' Don't liallootill yOtJ
1-

<1rc 0:1t <,f


J.M.
Dixon.
, fl1e u1ood.''
'
.
.
TO CRY ltALLOO to \lt'ge dogs t;l1u~ ; to sl1011t to .
onll n.tte11tion to c. !1 Tl10 n1aster of the ho11nds
cric<f llalloo to tl1e dogi::i.

llnlting-THE 1IALT!NG FOOT OF JUSTICr}-an OXtJrcs~


~i011 \)OITO\\'Cd fro111 Lu.ti11 litera.tt1ro, si11gitifying
t11c f'10\\" llt1t sure })\lni$l11nont \\l1icl1 follo\,,~ "'rong
iorri::.
"

'

..

'Hand

158

Justice, though with halting foot,' had been on


his taclc, and his old orime of Egyptian days
found him at last The Times, 1887. :
Hammer HAMMER, AND TONGS with. great noise
and vigour ; violently ; throwjng all one~~ energies

into anything.

.
.
The ancient rules of a fair fight .. were utterly
disregarded ; both parties went .. at it . ham.mer
a7ld tongs, and hit one another , anywh~re wth
anytbi11g James
.
. .
. Payri. . . .
'. Up TO THE HAMMER first rate. .
To COME UNDER TBE HA'h1MER to be sold b:r
a11ctio:h ; e. g. All his gcJods came. unde'r_ . the

hamme1.
HAM1'IER

.
INTO . ONE'S

. .

HEAD ..:_to force

one to

' grasp or see the. idea.



Hand._To KEEH IN HAND-to direct or manage., ,
As /ceeping in hand the home-farm at .Domwell,
he lad to tell' what every field was to. bear next
year . Jane Austen~
,
:
To TAKE IN HAN.D--undertake; take charge of.
. I have asked the Principal of the college to
taTce the boy in hand.
'
.. .
AT FIRST-HAND without any intermediate
process.
. . .

Oh, indeed, I . should much rather come here


atfi1st-lianrl if you will have me Jane Asten.
. .

HAND OVER HAND

rapidly.

He made money hand. over hand Haliburton.


, HAND OVER HEAD . rashly; easily.
He set his magnifioientmain-sail and foresail
and main-jib, and come up with the ship hand
ove1 head, the moderate breeze giving him. 8.11
advantage 0. Reade.
;
A. GREA.T HAND IN ANYTHING .- very wel.1 skilled
'. in it.
.
'
.. . Hood is a great hand at taiki:rig H. R. Hagga 1d.
'

,. ,

'

159

Hand

FROM HAND TO J\10UTH

:without thought for

t11e ft1ture.
No \Vriter passes \vithoiit reports of bitter dis
tress in 'Ko1ea. The general mass of the inhabi~
tants live 1ron1 lia11d.to 11ioutli, nnd can . ba-rely
sup1)ort tl1e1nf-=elves at tl1e best of times Japan
Mail, 1886.
.

l{AND AND GL0\7E OR HAND IN GLOVE--on very

intimate term ti
'e \vere lia11cl and ylovc, the old n111n and me
-C. Reade.
T\ 1 l~EAR A HAND to lend help.
''Stop, ~top, daddy,'' said a little half naked
i111p of a l1oy, '~stop till I get my cock-shy.''
1
' \\Te11 ben1 ci lia11d then,''
said be, ''or 'he'll be
off ; I won't \\t'-it n m intite. '' H11liburto11.
To }.1AK'E A 1'00R HA.ND AT to make little impression upon.

N ot\vithstc:i.nrling tl1e captain's excessive jovia
lity, lto niade bii.t cz po-Jr li1.1.1zd at the smoky tonge
Dickens.
,
'l'o 1'1.1..\KE NO BAN'"D OF to bo unable to explain.
( Pro\'. )

No. sir, I can 11ial~n t10 hand of it ; 1 can's


describe 11im R, L. Stevonso11.
fJ'o G1\1'E ONE'S llAND UPON .:\.NYTHL~G to pledge
01lo's l1011o'l.1r to fulfil a pror11ise.
The i11on1e11t I cl1oose, I can be rid of 11r.
1-Iydo ! I give yo11. rny 11a1id t1.por1 tliaf R. L.
Ste\~cnson .
ON 1.iAKD in or1e's llosscssion.
r.Juf:t ycul' T bclicvo it \\'U.S so111cthing il\rl'Ul ;
)'Oll coul(l !'eo nt 1110 end of tl10 ~oa~on l1ow tho
n1otl1crg \\ere 11cgi11ning to 11ull lon~ facci::; \vl1en
tl1e~~ thc)lght. <)f ltll\'ing to stnrt oft~ on B:tdenJ):ldcn \\'itl1 a. \:l1ole lot of 11t1~nlt:l.\)!c t-irticles
<):'t liarici
\\:-111, l3!acl:. .

160 ..

Hand
""'" ....... -- -....

.
'

MY HANDS ARE FULL-I am very busy;


I have

plenty of work.

Robinson's hand.3 . we1e now full ; he made


brushes, and every day put some of tl1em to .
test upon the floor and walls of the building.-'-
C. Reade.

DEAD MAN'S HAND, HAND OF GLORY a charm to


discover hidden treasure etc. n1ade from a mandrake root or the hand of a man who had been ex-
ecuted holding a candle.
.
To HA VE A HAND IN to have a share of influence in an action
;
e.
g.
I
have
a
hand
in
this

matter.
WITNESS MY HAND note my signat11re . and
bear witness to it.
.
Handle ..To GIVE. A HANDLE to furnish 01 give an
ooca~1on.
.
. The defen~e of Vatinius gave a plausible .handle
for some censure upon Cicero. Malmoth.
To HANDLE WITHOUT MITTENS OR GLOVES to
. treat with.out any RUpe1fl11ous politeness or gentleness ; to attack vigorously.
.
.
He
it i~ tin1e for the good and
,
. declares
. that
true men to handt.e the in1postors withoi.tt glovt's
North Americr1n Review, 1887. .

To GO OFF THE HAN vLE to die.


My old gentleman means to be a 111ayor, or
'
governor, or pre~ident or soinething or other
before he goes off tlie liandle 0. W. I-Iolmes.
HANDWRITING ON THE WALL-any sign fore
shadowing d1sa:ster, or 'the announc:einent .of on
approaching catastrophe. This has reference to
. 'Old Testament of the Bible. In Daniel x. 5-31,
one finds at the feast of Belshazzar, the King of
Babylon, there ''came forth fingers of a nam's
hand, and wrote over against the candlestiok 11pon
the plaster of the wall of the king's palace ; and
'

'

'

'

'

..

'

--- --------------------------- ,'~_he king say; the paTt of thehand

that \vrote ..

a11d this is the writing that \vas written, ltfcne,


1
Mt!-rzc Te lee, .Uplia1si1z . 1 hi:; is tt1e inter_pr'eta:tion of
the thi11g: 1>1e11c; God hath numberedtby~ kingdon1
:e.nd finished it. Te/eel ; . thou art weigt1ed in the
bala11ce::;1 and found \Vanting. Peres.; thy king-
dom is divided, and given to tl1e Me_cles. and
Persians........111 that 11ight was Bel::;l1azza:r the
Ki.ng of the Cl1_aldeans slain and Darius ths Median
tool\: the kin~dom.''
flt1ng -TO HANG l<'IRE-to be long doi11g sotnething
01 to: hesitate.
Tne 1>lot, too, \vhioh had been supported for
fo11r n1ontl1s b~r the sole evid~nae of Oates, began..
i(> lia11g fire-Green.
.
HANU OUT {S/a1zg) to lodge; to reside.

I Atijr, old boy, \vhere do yot1 Jiang out.


.. Dickens.
. To GEl' '1HE H.1\NG Oli' A TAING to u11derstand
tl10 g~neriil nleaning, drift, or. priri.ciple of a11y1

i:hing. (Colloq).

HANG l3Y 'l'HE THREAD be in a very preaar1ous


I><)Sit1on fro111 tl1e s'vo1d of J)a1nocJos
.fi. sa.tlor kno\\~s too \Vell that his life liangebzt fll(~ f./1i ad to \vish t<> bo ofto11 ren1indcd of it..
l{. ]1. J),i11a, Jun.
. .
IIANGDOG LOOK (). guilt~.., depre8sed appea.
1

rii n

<-'

'' l1:e,

r'

'

l '' tittered his friend, " ).,.OU are so


-.s<) ft1nny I ''

l1c

I need be,

rctll~l.rl:::cd

R:\lil1t dryly, ''for


tl1i~ is ro.tl1er dttll nnd ci1illing. Look.ir1g o. littfe
brif::.!:::er, ini\n. , nnd not f:iO llar.gd<1g like. . clicl\.t11s
t!:.n~ 11~.\~K 1',on lIANK 011 equal tcr111~. {Pro,.)
If \\'-~ boCt)me Jlsrt.nor:>'. it tn'1~t btl l1a111:.f<)r.. hanl i\-rrn11g~n1011t J. 1,1. Dixon.

.
'

ll:i11Jl) -li,\PPY~GO!.liOKl..
ti1111ttF

11

n:-<

tl1e~ Cf)nlt:'.

f:\:i.sy

t;oing;

tn!~ing

-..

Bapp_y.: (

. ..

162 .i
.

.'- . .

'

Hard

ola.s~.-:

. . . , .Jn.. "the happy.-go-lucl'.l/: way of . bis

.. . C~ Reade.
.
. . . .
.
. . ..
~;. THE- HAPPY DESP.ATCii suicide: '.~neuphiinfsm
: for Hara Kiri, the J apari.ese metnod; :
~ .. . It was to provide Lord: Harry Brentwood with
: a_ seat (in:. Parliament) '-that: -.1 was to oorrimit
r
this hC1.ppy. despatch, (politioal suicide). MiStlet.ue
. Bough . 1855.

.
. .
" . THE HAPPY MEIDM' the xriiddie :course. which
a.voids two inconvenient extremes;

.
,
..
A"HAPPY. SUGGESTION a clever suitaole sugg~stion whioh ShO\VS the way out of 'an. embarrass men t~ ' .
"

. . "
Hard 'HiRri '.As THE NET.HER MILLSTONE v~ry'.hard;
unfeeling and.obdurate; Generally'. applied: to hu-.
man
character.
.
,
.
\ . .
. 'w~
the wilderness are exposed to'.
. .tations -which go some way,. to 'make: u. . :1 'silly.... and soft-hearted. Somehow~ few of us are ce~
. .tain to keep our hearts as hard os .the' n'ether'mill!

'

'

,-

i,

'

,-

' -~.'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

in

'

temp

.. .stone . .Nineteenth Centu.ry; :1887.

..

HARD CASE-art irreol~imably bad person. .


-.
. .
'
'
a fellW-'Jlerk
mine, and a . Jiard Case.

. . .... He"was
~

R. L.

Ste~ens:on.

'

of

'

A HARD DRINKER- one given to in .temperance.


H/\R1i F.AR~fo.ad coarse and insufficient in
_quantity.
.
.
HARD LINES a bard lot, a position of hard~hips
. A HARD SAYING-one diffic\.tlt to under~tand or
.to-obey.
BARI) SWEARING-when a witness .in giving
evidence on oatb, testifies what is not true, and
doeti tbii; for a. si11ister. purpose: c. g. It is feared
there is-much liard :;Wearing
in the courts of law.

HARD AND F AS'f rigidly laid down and adl1ered.

to.

'

. To GO H'ARD WITH ONE

' ..

.. .
:.
Faring ill or bad luck.

Harne&~.
.

163

Hare

'

It \vill. go llard toith poor :A-ntonius . Shakespeare.

..

HARD UP short of money ; having little money


to pa.y one's debts.

.
.
Every man in E11gland '\Vho was hard .UP or
hn.d ha.Td-up friend, wrote to him for. money ."in
loan, with ot" \vithout sect1I"ity Besant.
BARD-01iAINED uninviting.

HAR o ..p AN tl1e lo\vest level.


.
BE HARD PUT TO !T . to be' in

diffic1tlty.

great. Rtraits or

Hnrc~l1'1RST CATCH YOUR 1IARE_:.make

SU.to you have


n. tl1ing first before you tl1ink \vhat to do witl1 it.

It is a pl1raso taken from Mr. Gl_a$~es cookery


boolc \vl1ere ,. catcl1,'' 110\Vever, \viis a n1ispririt for
'' case.''---Skin.

AS ltf.l\.D .AS .A . M:ARCI-f HARE-crazy ; insane.


It is fron1 t11e gan1b0Is of tl1e l1a:ro during the
lJrecd i 11g sea son.
: .
.
.
''Oh,'' said tl1e ndn1iral, cc t11on ho. is mad?.''
''A~ o rnarcT1 l1,11P. sir, nnd l'n1 -o.fraid putting
11im in i.rons \vjll 1110.l~e 11im \vorso. It is a case
ior n l11nt1tio asylun1 O. Reade.
. .
}J OLD '\\1 ITII THE I-T .ARE AND RUN WITH , THE
TIO't1NDS-plny n dot1l1lo nnd deceitful game, to be

\\"it:l1 l>ntl1 Rides at 011ce.


iinrl' Ii.ARK i~AOK-To\1 0rt to t110 orii~innl l)Oint ; to
llcgin ng:a.i11 \\ l1orc 0110 l1nR loft off..
Ht\ci i.l1c)"" gone und told Silver, n.11 tnigl1t 110.ve
t\\TllC(l 011t d1ffcre11tl~r ~ bt1t tl1ey 110.d t11i1 ordori;,
I ::;\111posot r1. ncl decided t(> sit- qt1.1etl~.,.. \vl1crc thoy
,,. . cro n11t1 71orl~ l>ac.lc ngt1i11 to. ' l L\llibi1rlcro.' R.
1

I.1.

s~ C\"t~n~(ll.

llnr111..:....0\JT O!' TI .\1t\1S' \t,r.1\\. i11 porf~ct Rlfot!-r; c. g.


I llf()\'l~11t tl10 t~l1,ld f1tli f hri11ri'8 tf.G!I .
.
R:t!"n1s~ D11::.11~ H..\R'S'l~.:;s-dic nt on()'~ \\o-rl~ ~con
til'l'lt' l'\t ()lll!'~ r:1CCU,)ation \ln\i1 ont,s de'1.tl1 ; rCUlSe
to 1etirt- iro111 nct\\"C 1ifc.

--

. .

... :;.:;. .., ....

. .
" .
lnat-~
r Y n ' ~,

164~

'

- .

r..~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~--~~~-
,

t'

~

::;.;..::;;Nevertheless it. -Was!" hi~ (Lord i!Sllaf:tesburys)


constant, prayer .that he might die i11 lii1r.fzes.i .. an<I
:, _, ..:h'is last 'Years. were:fuil ::of unceasing: ac'tivity:lJC-isu1e
.Huu1,
1887.
.
.

:.
-:.
'

::
'

;,.
.
.
. ' . .
'
'
.
\

,.

"

.;

:,

'

'

'
''

I>

.,

.-

'

Harp' HARP.ON THE SAME,STR1NG. to .dwell cont1n11ally._on..one .toi>.1c.: '. ..::...:. . ,_. ;: . . ,: - . :
His'mind .tihe "thol.1ght: was _cert~inly. wandering, and, as often: happe.iis, it, ,cont1nt1~ 'to. harp

.. , on the same string.-. Ja:rries Payn. . : _. . :. .


Harro,v- UNDER.THE HARROW -in gieat distress.e. {./
Dt1ring the famine the- pt}ople \V:ere tlnder th, harro.w..:

"

~,

,,
" .,
'

'

_,,

'

..,. '

'

'

'

to'

'. nRAw ':HARROW .. OVER


,V"ound the feelings;.
:.:to:distress ; g; -. That lie shouid liav(J :1awn 1iar

e,

...: . roui
over
her feelings.
. ..

.
'.
.
.-,
.
.
.
.
'
..
'
.;
,,
" ...
.
.
. . '
liarum HARUM Al'TD SCARU?l-I wild; reckless. : Pro
. :bably i~ is pompounded of ha1e, from . the ,sense of
'

'

.ha~te.andfright,and

'

,'

-\

Scare.

, .: .

'

_,

Hasl1 . $ETTLE. A MAN~S HASf.1 (Slang) tb make a11


end' hirri ;-'to overthrow his: schemes ... :
, __ :~ .At . LiV:erpocii she: (the elephant)- laid hold of
. . 1Berriard; and would have :settlf'd
/i:s liasli for :'h.112,
but Elliot came between them 0. Reade~;
,. 'MAKE A HASH OF spoil or rtlin completely.

of

',,

litiste ThE MOhE HASTE THE LE:\S SPEED _:.excessive


haste is often the cause of delay.

' -,;
' : ; Women at'e ''fickle cattle,'' I remember.:.._I ~n{!
sure iny dear\vife will exct1se n1y Eaying so-jn
.. .: her presence --and'' mnst h,.,ste '' is often '' tvorst ''
speed with. them Florence '11a rrya t. . .
Hat .Tt; HANG,UP (.NEs
HAT lN .A: HOUSE-to mal(e

.. " oriesE-lf con1pleteJy at hbn1ein a: hot1se. Visitors


usually carry their bats i11 their 11ands, .when
. . . making a ..short visit ~ if .they a re in special i,n.t~e ~
macy they hung '11p_ tb~ir l1at.s to a hat peg :or

stand~

:.':' .:.
.. . ''.Eight hunared a year, and as nice a.hos~ as
any ger1tleman could wish to hang. ttp, ll.is lz.af
in. ''said Mr. Cumming. A. Trollope.
1

__

..

...

: ...

.-

165

~lfatcl1cs
. '
...;

Ilave
' .
..
'

- ---------------------.--.. ----.-.-.----...-

..

'

P.l\SS BOUND THE HAT-to beg for Sllbscription


or ttilce UJJ u. collection..
.
.
At tl1e "end of t11e 1nemoria.l meeting~ it wa.s
tlnun i111<),_\~l y dee cled t.o tl1e collect. subscription,
arid tl1e cl1n.ir111an'~ liat waR pa8s1cl rottnd.
.:
1-1AT 1N IIAND revureutially;. e. g. He stood

Jim

i1i /1.rii1 d

l)tforo l1is bosf::l.

A 13~<\D HA1'-11.- good-for-notl1ing-feJlo\v.


,
Tl1tTe \Vas. a ft~llo'.v \11 Ill~'" Kn.tie's fan1il~r

in t-l1e a~my, and turnod out


ba(l lic't indeed. - Besant;

\V<.1.S fo1'111erly

\V}10

<l

very

MJ\D J\S A H.ATTEl~ cot11pletely inso.11.e; \rer)


n.11gry.
.
_ . _
1Hntcl1l~s 1'0 BE UNDER HA'l'CRJ~S-:to be i11 u. state of
do1)rf'SSi()ll or J)Overty ~ to be sacl.
\\Tell, 11o's '11<.),v gln.d nnd t,.,1cle1 liatcli!.>s. R. L.

Steve11son.

~Intrl1ot TO 'DUR.Y T'Hl~ Ji,,.\ TCB1~i' t-0 prtt au end to


\\'nr, f10111 t11e Nortl1 A111oricu:11 C11sto111.
.
J)r. And1e\v Marsl10.ll 111nclo it up \vitl1 his
nd,er::1ir~", nncl
t}1e~,.. li\1'c.d 011 friendly torms
ll\"er after-.\a ds. \Vl1y do11 t so111e of ottr living
111ad,.ci 1111111 f 11.{? T1afcfi!'t zvitli n. lil\:o cffocti,e core,.
J
t11011~" t-- .. eti. 1rson.
.
...
'I' ' Ti\1'-0\\i 1111-i 11.\1or-1Er- to oxtii;gerate .
'fo 'fllliO\\r JiEL\"'E Al"TER H.._\'fChEl' to ncld loss
to l os:,:.
.
'ro 1110 tJl.> 1'Pl~ Tt ...\TOT~ET-to renow l1ostilities.
rf O 'f .:\.1\. l~ 'tJ t> TI''.!': 1i ..r\.TCHJ~l'- to t1ia. ko \\ o..:-.
'l'o ti'l~RO\V
Ul"' 'lllE !1A1Cl1E!'. tv tell friiJt11ous
.

ft~

!-....._or1c.::
- l

,. 1Iattl-'l'o lI "\U1.. O\"Elt CO.t\T.S-'-~eo ltnder Co(tl.'' : '


'
'2.I n,c-11..t\ \1'E ..;\I'- attack i tl1n1st.
11

P(te1, lint:~
. .
<lo\\'11r1~l1t. 1J1c1-.-..- S11rilcc!';11eri.re .
. '1'{) fJ_.\\'J: _,\1' ..\ 'I'Jil:\G- tiJ llcgir1 it: or r~ttu11111t it.
.
lfttt"< <if if \\itl1 )"011 Sl1ukes1lcaro.
rl'<) l~ .!\'I~ l'f Ol1T~-((t) t<) ~tittle n <lis1)\tt.:xi r>oint..
i\ 11<1

tl\(~toft.)t'l'.

'

'

Have

166
'

'

'

'

'

'

: "'- . I marched back to.our aooms feeling ravagely


inclined to have it out with Forbes for selfish..
. ness and lack of consideration Macmilla1i's Ma..

ga-zine,.
'

18~?.

. {b) to finish it;to.ha've something finally settled.


.
. During the. remainder of t.he day Mr. Bro\vdie
was in a very odd and excl.table s~ate"; bursting
occa~ionally. 'lnto an explosion of l.aughte1, and
-, then. tctking his hat and running in.to .'the coach"
yard to have it out by hi1n::;elf - Dicltens.
HAVE ONE UP to call .to account before a Co1irt
of Justice.

'

. HAVE A VOICE IN to have a right to. expressone's opinion ; e. g. I liave no voice in the matter.
HAVE AT ONE'S FINGER'S ENDS to have a thingready in one's mind; e. g. I have n:tY lsssons at U11'!/'
fingeri'.~ e7zd's.
,
.

.
.
.
.
HAVE NO LEG TO STAND UPON to have no foun-
dation; ;,, g. Morality without religion has 110 leg:
'

'

to stand..upo11..

'

HAVE IT OUT WITH

to settle dispute; e.g. You

. . must h.ave .it .out witli your :brother any ho\v.

Hawk -KNuW A HA WK FROM A HAND SAw .(BERN-

to

to be able :judge . between things pretty


well.

.
Wl1en the wind is southerly I k1zoro-a hawkfrom
a hernsliaw Shakespeare.
.
'Ha,vse To COME IN AT THE' HAWSE-HOLES 'to enter
navy at the lowest grade. (Navy slang.)
Hay MAKE .TIAY WHILE T.HE SUN SHINES to' seize' afavourable opportunity; to ~ake every opportunity
of
.favourable
circun1stances.

'

.
If Patty had not bee11. wise in her. generation
-if she had not 1nade hny .while the sun slione an<J:
lined her nest while feathers were flying abroad
-on the death of h'er master she would have.
.... come .to c1"uel ends Mr~. E. Lynn Linton.'
SHAW)
'

'

'

'

'

'

.167

U:ny
.

"

>

... LOOK FOR A l\TEEDLE lN A. , HAY-STACK

to look:
fo1 son1ething \vhero it is barely, poss1ble. to be
found.
.

11.t\KE HA'Y OF to t11ro\v into confl1sion; to


distt1rb.

.
Oh. fat.her. you n.re 1nafri11g liay .of iny. tl1ings.
Maria Edge\\'orth.
.
'
BET\VE'EN HAy AND . GRASS in an 1.1.nformed
state~ hobble.do 11oy. It is A1uericanisn1 spol:;:.en of
yout11s bet\veen boyhood and ma11l1ood
llnznr<1 AT .1.\LL HAZARDS witl1 all risl(S;

WINNING

billiardi:-:.

H.AZARD..:.-pockctting .object ball in

ball off ano-

J.JOSIN G HAZ.t\RD-pocl\:.etting O\Vn

ther.
fiend H.A'VE ,\. HEAD ON l1NE'S SHOULDER hav-o
b1ains or abilitieR.
'l,o be sure, l1er fo.tl1er ]lad a 11cad ori his
i!li(1tt.fdir,.~ , and 11ncl sont her to school, co11trary
to tl10 c1lsto1n of tl1e co1111try C. Reade.
]~AT HIS"IIEAD Or"F-do 11ttlo or no \','orl~; costing
more i11 food .tl1n.n l1e i.s \Vorth ; bo conslin1ed \vith

n1cJrtifictt tion.
lt \\tis my dttt.y; to ride,.::-ir. o. \ery considoral)lo distt.l.nco on n n1are \\}10 bu.cl boon eating lu.r
he d off Blri.ckn1ore.
1
r ~\.KE 1N1'0 ONE'S IlF..A.D con coi\o a suddc11
notion.
li'r<t11cis l1u<l tal:cn it it1t1J lii,-i li a(l to , stroll
o\cr to ,,~l1itcf.toncs'" t11u.t C\"ening ,f, 15:.
i)ixon.
'l'u ?tt~A.l\.1~ :NEITl:Ir.:R Ill~t.D NOR T.t\11.1 01~ .-\NYTHl'NG
--to lio \lllt\1;}c to .1lnd~rfitu11<l or fi11d n1cuning in
'

{lJl\.
t.fut<'111011t

or c\c11t.

somo q\\ccr tl1i.nr;~, 1f{iiin1 and


I couldn't rnal>l' licad ftur tail of ,.,hat ~-ott ~n.id1'.in:. Oli11l1nnt.

0\'}~lt IlF..'1.D AND 1~ ..\RS- coo1plctcl~.
iii!~ Ot'>('r lu:aff art<l crrr!. i11 <il.~bt-Tl1ncl:era"'."

You <lid

~:iy

Bilve

166
.

. .: : . I marched back to.our ao'oms feeling .ravagely


inclined to have it out with Forbes for selfish"'
. nessand lack. of consideration Macm-illa1i's Ma..

-. ga-zine,. 18~7.
.

_
.
. . {b) to finish it ; .to. have son1ething :finally settled.
- During the remainder of the day Mr. Browdie
was in a very odd' and excitable 'state; bursting
ooca~ionally. into an explosion of Jaughte1~ andthen tC1.king his hat and running into 'the coach..
ya1d to have 'it out by ht1nself - Dicil\:ens..
HAVE ONE UP to call .to account before .a Court
of Justice.

_ HAVE A_ VOICE IN to have a right to expres5


one's opinion ; e. g. I have nu voice in the matter
HAVE AT ONE'S.FINGER'S
ENDS
to.have
a thing.
.
,
ready in one's mind; e. g. I have n;iy Isssons at a11y
. fingeri';:; e1z d's. , .
. . . _..
HAVE NO LEG TO STAND UPON to. have no_foun-dation.; 0 g. :Morality .without religion has no leg;

: . to stand ,upo1z.

HAVE 1T OUT WITH to settle dispute; e.g. You


- . must h.ave .it .out wit]-,, your :brother any how.

Hawk-KNvW A HAWK FROM A HAND SAW .(HERN~


SHAw) to be able
'.juqge between things prettr
well.

to

When the wind- is southerlv


I knoto a Tiawkfroni
.
~

a hernsliaw ShakespeaTe
.
.
.Ha'\'Se To COME IN AT THE HAWSE-HOLES to enter
navy at the lowest grade. (Navy slang. )
Hay M.AKE :-IAY WHILE T.HE SUN SHINES t'o seize. afavo11rable opportunity ; to take_ every ,opportunity
. of favourable circumstances.

If Patty had not bee11. wise in .her .generation


-if she had not-made hay while-the ,c~un slione an<I:

1ined her nest wh11e feathers \Vere flying abroad


-on the death of 'her master she" would baV&
... come ,to .c117.el ends Mr~. E. Lynn Ljnton.'

'

'

'

'

H;ay
. ... .

....
167
. '

'
'~',I~

'

.... LobK FOR A NEEDLE. IN. A HAY.STAOK to look


- for soniething \vhere 'it
'bareiy. :Posstble, :to be
found.
. . . .' ... , , .
MA KE HA"2 OF. to throw into".. :confsion ; to
disttlrb." '' '
, -' .
'.
,
Oh. father. you: are making. hay ~of ._,my., things.
Maria Edgeworth..
, .
. .
'
BETWEEN HAY .AND ' GRASS iri ari ti.nformed
, state: hobble-de hoy. It is Americanism spoken of
youths between boyhood and manhood.
-.:Hazard AT :A.LLHAZARDS. with all risks;.
WINNING BAZARD...:..pocketting ':_bbj~ct. :ball in
billiards.
''
.
LOSING HAZARD-pocl\:etting own ba11 off ano ..
ther.

'
Head HAVE A BEAD ON. oNE~S SHbU.LJDER have
brains or abili.ties.
To be sure, lier father .liad . a head ,on his
sh<l1'1lde;-s ~ and had sent he-r to . school, 'contrary
to the custom of the .country C. Reade.
. EAT Hrs-HEAD OFF-do little or. no work; costing
more in food than he is worth ;. be consti.med with
mortification.
It was my duty ;to ride,. ::::i1. a .very. considera-
ble distance on a mare who .had been eat-ing her
. he .d off Blackmore.
, .
TAKE INTO .'ONE'S. HE.AD conceive :a .sudden
notion. , . . .
_.
Francis had talcen it into liis li:,ad to: stroll
.over to . Whitestoness that '.evening J. M.

is

'

'

'

'

Dixon. .
.
. .
To MAKE NEITHER HEAD NOR TAIL OF ANYTHING

-to be. uriable to .i.i.nderst.and . or .find meaning '.in


aiivstatemerit
or event. ,. . .
, '- ,
.,
Youdid say some _qt1eer things, Ma~am and
I couldn't malce liead nor t_ail of what you saidMrs: Oliphant.

'
OVER Hl:AD AND. EARS-.,compl~tely. .
.Hf.}'s over head a?ld ee,rrs:in debt _Thackeray
\

'

'

'

.. :168

.'

.. <

t,

}
.,,.

Hear

-' . .
. .
. HEAD- QVER..HEEI.S hurriedly ; befo~e . 'one has
' - , time to consider the matter.

.
This trust which be had .taken on.' him 'with,, .
out thinking ab )lit it, head-over-hi els -in fact,
was the centre and the turning-point of his
school.life'Hughes. .
. .

'
. To LET A MAN HAVE .HIS .' HEaD
allow him

: freedom. 'A phrase orgi11ally applied to. a horse


-Only. ( C9lloq.
)
.
.
.

.
:

..
,
.

.
..
She let him.have liis headfor. a bit,---and. thent
whn he'd . got qujte , everything and couldn't
', .
live without it, she 'turned hin1 into ;the streets,
where there is no claret and no champagn~- Besant. .
.
To COME TO A HE.A~-to approach completion:
The.plot was discovered before it. came to <1
hPad.
.. .
. .. .
'
. HEAD AND FRONT_;_ the outstanding .and impo1i. . . tant part.
:
. "
''Your good. conversation in Christ:'' -~,As ho
\vbo called you is hole, be ye holy
.all your

,,_.. . conversation.'' This : is the head and f1onf of


the matter with the writer-M. Ar11old.
-... .
. HE.AD AND SHOULDEiis by' n1any . degrees:
: _, .().g . He is head <ind .c~h<>ulde1s above.me in stttdies.
. HE.AD AND HEAR'l~ thoroughly; e.. g . .Tennys
. :.. ,on "ras h1::ad and 'h,~art a lyrl'c poet. -.
TO KEEP <>NE'S HEAD ABOVE W ATl!.R to .avoid .
.:. . bankruptcy. . . .

.
.: ~ .
He is not, .Iilce our f1iend Sir Hyaoinib O'Brien,
forced to fell tongue and brains and .consoienoe
,_
to lceep_ his. fi ad <1bove water-Maria Edgeworth.
:.:~Heap:..:.. STRUCK ALL OF A HEA '[> . c~nfound 'utterly
. I tho11ght he'd fainted too; he was so struclc
:. : all.of
a. hr'ap.:....Haliburton~. . .
.
. : .. : ...
'JI ear To HEAR TELL OF- to hear some . one speak
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~--~~~~~~~~~

''

',-

..

to

'

oL

'

I.,,.

..

in

.;

1 have 'never heard 'tell of a .man becoming a


. :.dressmaker-.:...Haliburton.

t'

''

~11-ea.vy

169

:''

'

. (ro HEAR THE

to' have preterna.... tt1ral acumen~:


:
To H.ll,AR ONE OUT to hear one t'othe end.
: _;
. \\'ILL NOT HEAR OF lT soot1ts the idea. . .
Heart-TO TAKE HEART to be encouraged. : .
It is difficult for the f111mer pa1ticularly in
. . some districts of Fife, to to'ke heart after the e:x:perience of the lai-t few days \v'ith -their cease'
less torroniJs- Sf. At1drw11 Obtizerz 1886.

. , TO CARRY OR WEAR ONE'S, HEART UPON ONE'S


SLEEVE- to expose one's in111ost thoughts to' one's
ne1ghbour8; to show the fee li1:i.gf', eto., .openly.
In bis youth, and i11.his .. unre~erved intercourse
with his sister, he (Beaconhfit'ld) w1Juld have
appeared to ca11y a . warrri' hea1t ttpon; .lits steeveEdinbz1.ry/1, Revi'ew, 1886.
.

GRASS GROW

t
1

'

BlS liEART IS, IN THE RIGHT PLACE he is of a


kindly a11d syn11lathetic di~posit.ion; he is faithful
and true-hea.rted. .
.
.i\'1 y daughters 'are' plain, disintereseted girls,
but th ir lieart.'-1 are in tltP right pl1.c~-ThaG~t:ray.
li'AVE\ iNE's:REART IN ONE'S MvtJTB. OR 'BOOTS : to l:~ n a t>tat.e of t.error.

REART AND SOUL-earnestly ; e. g. He entered


hra1t a?1.d soul into hi~ l)uRines:-i. ,.-. . . : . ~
~flea,t. n-IN THE SEV.ii:NTR HEAVEN . in .a state of the
most exalted l1appine9s..:_fr9r11 the CabbalistR, who
di111ded the 11eavens. into seven in an ascending
scale of happiness upto tl:e ab0de of God. ::
Henry, for hi8_
IJart,
: \Villia1n
'
.
. . . \'.'as . i?i. tlze. s<,ventli

'

. .

'

'

'

l1er:ven ~ Those days at Stariford were the


'

.,,

happie.~t

days.of

l1is:life~James.Pay1i.:

...

GooD HEAVt- NS- an ex<llamation of 'surprise.


: : . HEAVEN OF. BEA'7ENS-the . Eeventh heaven- or
the highl'st according to the e\v.~. .- , . . , . .

THE HEAVENLY 1..:ITY Tl1e


Paradise.,,
. ..
. .'
.
.

" HEAVENLY BODIES-star:-:~ .


~Heavy~ BEAVY IN' :HAND . dt fioient

. ring to be1.1rged 011~

..

in energy ; requi-

Origin.ally used in driving.

,Heels
,

<

l.70

.,

H ere

<

<

He:roa : : ..:
.

'

'

Hip

.. .

.. .. HER'E!S 'TO. YOU - I drink to . your good health.

An old-fashioned. phrase, used beiore 'drinking a


glass of wine or cordial with a friend .. ( Colloq.)
. .Here's.. to budgets, bags a_nd walle~s 1 . . ...
.: ,

Ht:;rB's to all the wandering train Burns. '


Herod.....:..Tt> OUT-HEROD .HEROD-to. be . more .outrage
ous than the most outrageotlS to pass all bounds
.. Bli.t Lord Randolph Churchill oiit-.H1r1 id.~. H rod
in the opposite direption .Fortnt'ghtly. Rtview,
1887.
.
'-Higl1-TO BE ON -ONE~S HIGH HORS~to assume an
attitude ot fancied i::.uperiority.'

He was an amusing fell ow,' and I've no objec..


tion to his ma_k1ng one at the Qyster Club : but
. he 1s a bit too'foiid'of riding-the h1'gh hors~ GeorM
ge Eliot.
:
.
HIGH AND LOW Everywhere;'. e. g. Wehava
Eearched high and low for it.
.
A HlGH FLIER one extravagant in pretensio~s
or n1anners.
..
'
H~ngei- OFF. THE H;rNGEB-in a state
confusion.
At other .tin1es they are quite off tl1e' '.hirzgrsr
yielding the1uselves upto the .-way of their lusts.
and passions - Sharpe. .

HINGE UPON-to depend upon; e. g. The whole


subject liinges 'up1>ri the construction you put upon it.
IIip-HlP AND THIGH . in no half-hea~t~d way ; show..
ing no' mer<;iy: lProv.)
,

- . :
'' P1otestants,', I mean, ''says he;.'' are by the
ears ad1ivin' a\vayat e~ch.otherthe. whole blessed time tbotl1:ar1d na1l, hip and thigli, hammer
ancl tongs Haliburton. .
.
.
.
,
.
_
.

TO SMITE RlP .AND THIGH to overthrow with


great slal1ghter.

:i, We shall .smi~e ~hem hip. afid tliigli,'' he cried
-B. Con)Vay.

.
.
.
'
. . TO HAVE .ON THE HIP to gain the advantage
uver in a struggle. It is a wrestling phrase.
.
'

'

of

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

,.
': .

"

172

ti:Hit

. ..

..

'.

r .....

How could Crawley : look at "hiin Crawley,


1< :::
.who.had already once .had liim ort the . hip ?-A.
. Tr.ollope.

.
. :. , '.: . .... :
Jlit- HIT THE NAIL ON.'THE H:EAD ., to''touch'. the exact
poi ri t~
: '
..
..
BIT UPON-to find: e. g. , You have hit upo1i the
. right path.
" .
.

\
HIT THE MARK-. ..to' 1do' 'the right' thing; e.g.
. You hit the mar le in buyirig things before" the market rose.
. . ,
HIT BELOW THE BELT to. play foul ; e. g. This

is a hit beluw f lie b :lt. .


. ..
..
. HIT IT OFF .wriH-to. agree
with; e, .g. How I
.
' . did liit it <1ff with -them I .
" ,
, . HIT HARD .. ?-ffected sensibly; e. g . I 'am hi!
hard by the coal strike.
: .. .
MAKE A HIT- succeed,; e. g. I made'. hit with
this plan.
.
,
.

:HohhJ To RIDE A HOBBY to follow a favo11rite


pursuit.

.
Nevertheless, some larlies have hnbhifs . wh1ch.
....
. .flie~/ ri 'e 'l.1 ith conside_1able persistance, 'I\1'rs.
:, -, Jennynge's hobby was a s.01t of. pearse.:horse, for
it consisted in a devotion' to the memory., of her
late i;;e9ond:husband-James Payn. . :
.: : To .RIDE- A HOBBY TO DEATH: to weairypeople
. . .utte1ly with one's
peculiar
notions
on.a subject
.
.
- ..,,.;
Jlobon HcBsoNs CI-IOICE~no choice at. all.. It is
: saidto
have
been derived
from . the . name of a
.
.
.
'
Carnbridge 1ivery-stable keeper,. who .insisted
: " on each cui-;to1ner . taking the -horse that \vas
nearest the door. , . . . :: . . . .. ..
'
NO university 111an \>Vould ride him, even upon Ho soris </i1> ce- Blaclcmore. . ...
,, ;Hocus-poCt;S 'Ho.ous~Pocu:::.-:- decepticiri. Said to'' be a
. . play on the words. Htc est corpus. us~ in t.he Mass.
Our aut.t1or is ple1.y1ng 1i,1r.us-p1,cils in the.,. . ,. very .8irnilitt1de -he 'tal\es ". f1om' 'that. jtiggler:...Bentl~y.

:
. , ' . .
.,

a.

',

'

'

',

. ..
.
-
....
_..,
og ........ .'

:~

'

..

. '

[Jog
-<}O:Ta-E
WHOLEiHOG
to'..
have~
every
,thing
tliaf.~l
.can
'
be go-t .. . .~. \,. . . :. . ', ..... ~ ' , .
But since we introducea: ther, ail. roads,,:if we
dont go ahea:d-'its a,.: pity:~: ;'We; never ;.fairly
: .' :: 'k11ew ;yiriat _:gqing; the. whole.-_ lio_g_ was till tqen.'Har' bu'rto11'. '' ' ' .:. '. \ . - .. . ....- ; : .. ,. '
BRI}.G ONE'~ HOGS TO A FINE 1'.1ARKET:...::..t'o" inake
a. complete mess of somethin b00 - ., : ' '
Hoist-HOIST
WITH
ONE':o:>ow:N
..
PErf.ARb.
_"beaten
~itl1
.
-.
.. ' .
- . .
. ,- '
.
one's own weapon"; caug11t _in one's own',t1_ap~ ..
.. . It's . too dteastrous ~ victory.. ',I'm'' hoist.: by
. . 11iy .< tpn .pet1~, -:<?~ught ~n ry . own . mouse".'tra. p.
'.

...

"

,.

'

'

'

'

' ;

'

...

'.

''1

.I

"

',

'

'

)"~~

'

'

'

'

"'

~'

'

'

'

'"'

'

,J

''

._

W. D. Howells.

Hold . To -HOLD. WATER

to . bear _olose. inspectionr t


A. phrai-1e gec1erally :used negcitiv~ly." _
. .i.
Tales have gone a.bout re~pecting her. No ..
thing very: ta~gible;. and. perhaps' '_ttiey' would
; not Ii .ve held. wi1t!,l' ~-Mr.i. Henry ,,Wood~ , . .
HOLD GOOD ,to b~ valid ; :_ !:! g. This. rule holds

\,

t'''

. _good

....

'

'

'

n~re.

HOLD
oon11)any

..

oN~to

.....

'

. _. . . ~ . . _ .:.
continue; e. g: 'The' trade~ of the
'

'

on for many years. : , :


. 'HOLD ONE'S OWN . to 'niaintain po~itidn.
I
". ~ffi q\lite Oa.pa.ble uf 'huCdt-?lQ my OWn againi;t hini.
- '.HOLD IN OHEOK .to restrt:i.in ; (1; g. - It: is d1ffioult
to Tio! d the 1ioters in ch ck. . -. ' _
HOLD ONE'S PEAeE--to. keep quiet; e.,g . . I asked
him to ll(>ld his peac in. thi~ matt.er. , _. _: _ ,_
. .HOLD OUT,.-9ffer; '' g. He. lio!ds 01it .promises
_,. whi<h ne .. can11ot .ful~l._. Th~. _ga1:riso_ h.:ld oui
(offe1ed res tstance) f >r a. long time.
. : ~"
.HoLD oN'.Es' TON.GUE _to be siien'.t
g. Hold
yoit.1 t(i1zvu1, boys I
-. . : : '::" : : . .' .'
- HOLD u P -- to Tai$e-; to support; e: g~ --- hold ''<tp
your head; my argument was 1&~/dup by my friend.
''. HOLD OFF to remain. at a dista;nce; c.. g.-,. If i
yott have l11e, liotd not off.:
., . '. : '
_....
' ; NEITHER'. ro HOLD 'NOR' TO BUILD i11 a. state
of governable excitement. , .
, .....
t1(!ld

e.g.

;c.

'ra1.oO
. e:,
.

Honour1.'
,

174'

Hole HOLE--AND

'

Eeoret; underhand.
- ..
But such is the wretched 'trickery of hole-a7z'd."
corner Bu:ffery Dickens.
. . . .. ~ ...
:. .JN A HOLE--'-in a .diffioult po~ition. . . . :.
. How he is going.to prove that I want to know
I've not got him in a hole~' you' see Justin
,. M'Carthy.

PICK HOLES IN find fault with"; e. g. He is
. fond of picking holes in others. .
, ., ,

MAKE A Hl>LE IN use much: of; g. I have


made a 11.olt! in liif; stock.: ,

:
" . A RO-p-ND PEG IN .A SQUARE HOLE' person not
fit for his place ; ~~g. He is a' round peg in .a square
hole.

.
CORNER

e:.

'.

,.

! .

l~

'

Home-TO BRING A THING

HOME

TO

<

'

PEOPLE

to

prove in suoh a. \-Va;y'that 'there is iio way .of esoa._ping'the conclusion., . .


.. . , , . . -.
'' y OU are .tlie woo.d-pig~oils : it says . go, do,
clo .al_I day~ and never sets abJUt any. work it-self
. Thats bringir1g it hom 0 to people Geo'rge Eliot.
, TO.BRING
ONESELF . HOME-to recover what one.
.
has previously lost .

. He is a 1it.t1e ot1t of cash juRt now.. However,


.l1e has taken a. very g-ood .road to. bring Jiim.qo/f
:hnme again, for we pay him very handsomelyMadan1t' D' Arl,lay. . .
,

Q,,E'S LnNG' HOME...:. th~ grave.

PAY HOME-to reta1 iate.


DRIVE AN ATT~ HOME_;_'fc) g!ve reb11ke in a way
that the full forr.e of it is felt~ IJ. g. I spoke to him
... of .hi~.duty
and
.I
think
l
dro11e
the
na-il
home.

.
.
To STR!KE HOME-with telling effect. e.g . Your
.. opponent . is puzzled; when your ttirn .to :reply
. con1es, Rtr1l;(J h(Jm
Jionour3 To DO TAE HONOR'l to aot . as host and
hoste~s at an entertain1nent.
..
'
Afterwardc:; Mi~s.. Amelia did tlie honours of the
drawing room Thackeray. "

:., rr,

'

'

0 .. .'
Hb.1

'

... - .

175' '

Hoof.' 'To HEAT OR' PAD THE H<)OF to :w~lk..:.. (SlaU:g~}::


. Charles Bates. expressed his opinion that it W~f.i
time to pad. tho. hoof .Dickens...
. -.
.

Hook_:By HO.OK bR BY CROOK . one way_ or. the other.


. OFF THE HOOKS (a) in disorder.:
. . . .
While 8he1idan is o_-f! tlz.e lioolcs, .. _, .
. And friend Delany at his books . Sw,ift. . . .
(b) aead.

..
.
. .. . . .
.
The attack was so sharp tbat Matilda," as his
reverence expressed it, was nearly off tlie hool,.
" Thaolteray.
:. .

ON t>NE's OWN HOOK oi:l. one's oW:n responsibility.


.
.
.
'.
..
:. . .
.
The very eye glass, ~hioh 'headed the cairi he
carried so jauntily in his hand, \vas out of,- keeping with t.beir eye glasses. and looked like .some
gay young lens who had reposed to be .put into
spectacle~-,- and was wrinli:irig
at. life on'
its own
.
'
.
hvolc J atneR Payn. .
..
." .
.
To DROP OFF THE HOOKS. to die; e.g. . The old
man dr<'1pp d 0.ff hi; 11.oolc's, .
. ' .. . ...

TAKE . ONE'S. H<?OK-to make off;

e. g. I 'gave
' hitn a bit of my mind and be tio/, hi:; lioo1, at .. once.
. .
,

' '

Horn To DRAw IN ONE'S HORNS . to be reticent or


.- timid ' CflfOk Onl''S ardour.
.
.
.
'
'
'
'' TI1is is not his opinion,'' said -the doctor
dryly~ \vho having been betrayed . into frankness
by ~.the other~s ~eemin!!_ acquaintance,:witb the
subject in question, no\v once : more seerned .in
.clined to draw in liis hc1r'll- James Payn. .
. . THE HOt~N <;F PLENT-Y a horn filled to overflowing \vitl1 flowers, fruit, corn the symbol of. prosperity-. a11d peaoe. A ccordin~ to the table, the horn: ;
of the goat that suoklod Jupiter~ placed among the
Stars as an emb]ecn of pleny. The goridefis Ceres

.is pictured to carry this horn in her left al'm.


Nature, ve-ry oddly, \\'lien thf lior11 of. plenty .
is quite empty, always fills it \Vith babies-J

. Besant.

fr

Ifouse::-.~
.... ... " ...

176 ..', .~

Hornet
' '

!. ........ /....

-------. - - - - - - ...-- .- . -. - - ------ -- - ----- ..


.
.

I~!".~~t-~Tq ..J?~~N<;t ~1 E;OR,~E'r's. NEST. AB9u.T-.PN:~~~ '~

~.A~S.'..;.'t<? stir:~'.ti:P:enehlies and.'.en1nities againHt

~!oile's self~

,' 1

!. :.

:'

:,

:~,

.,:

.....

~~-

; .....

fl6'gged. . .

The chief offend~rs:for 'the. tiffi''e w~1:e.


.: .... and 'ke:Pt in:bourj.os,- .but the. vic~priou~ ~ PllrtY. ~ha:d
brought a ni~1~ ~ior'l).ef..~' ne.~t . about t.hei.1 eare:.
'
.

,
..
;
.
.
.
.
,,'' .. '. " .. ' ; '
,
- Hughe:!,,
..
. . ,.
..... :
Hor.:Je To FioG- A. DEAD 'HORSE' to try t'o: :wo1k.-.:up
.ex~~1en1en.t ~bout a.thi:eadbare ..subj~ot:;. to,; agitate
: (' for'the. revival
. . . ' ...
. of a creed
. . that
. is'. exti.riot.
..,
.,
,' .8~rguing against. Tom 'Paine'.. is. like.1logging
. a d1~ad h1Jr8f! . J. l\f. Dixon..... - . , .
.. ~

t )

..

'

...... '

' ~

..

'

' ,

' '

'

'

(.

ONE . HORS~me'cin:; patty; in a

' '

'

'

'

'sn1a11~,\ray.
I

.-It

'

isanAn1erican.is1n
..
.::
.
.
.
:
............
:
1
''
:oh,"\vell, RhopeIslanrl .. isao12e !io1ie .stall
-., ' where every, _bo4y pays .taxe,s apd go'e.s to .ohuroh
'.~ .. W.m.
. . Bl ao k . , . .
- . ., ,
, ._
To 1~00K A,GIF'r .HORSE IN .TRE 1IOUTH,.- to''. cri.. "tioize gift; e: g. . Do1i't oritici.ze English edt1cation
.,f?r it .iR J?.?t. P.rop~r to !o.olc ,a.gift: h~rsc,i1z~flie..n?OZffh 1
1
To. PUT cAR'l.' EEF<.lRE ..'llIE bORSE .. to ;J'everse
right. order: .e. g . In e.xainfnin'g the: cat11"e :and
r;"eff(~ot of:~1i':U~mployi11ent' you 'are 'putti11g tlie cart
I.

' .

: bf<jre the ho1i.:?e.

. .'. . : . . .

' t '

,.,

. .. . . .

~-

......

. \ .To RIDE THE HIGH'HORSE-to. put on airs; e: g.


Froi h1,s ta~k it .~PP~a~s that young man 1ld; s: the
: higli '/iorse. . . : : .
, . . . .
Host..:....REOKON: W1THOUT f:N~'S. HOST. 'to misjudge~
~-to cafctilate without consideri11g fully the . piacti
1

cability of an;y plan.!" ... :,


) :' ::: ':
His fe'elings, in fact, we1e pre.ci::::eJy the sa111e
.. a!'i tl1.0~e \vhic11 :M:; .Harris -had. counti,d: without

. '. his lir>st "James Payn. '

:; :.....

:., ::
Hoi l.N R<>:r: \V.A.TER in a state of trouble or wrong:
.~ . He. was far oftener indisgrace than Richard,
, .. and kApt me, I may Fay,. in continucil 7,,:,t water,
. wonde1ing what .extraordinary ttick he :\vot1ld
, tal\e it into his .head to play next-:-Ann 1e Keary.
116~sr.' . TO KEEP OPEN ROUSEbe .hoBpitalJle. to nll

,,

___ _..._ ... M

'

'"

to

'.

.
.ouse:
'

'

177

Everybody in the country knew the colonel,.


and every body knew Drinlcwater Torn, and
everybody who had been to the colonel's for
several years pae.t (and that 'was nearly everybody i11 the country, for the colonel 'kept open
hou;;e). knew Polly. Harper's Magaei1ie, 1886.
To ORY FROM THE HOUSE TOP~--to announce
to the pub1ic. An Eastern phrase. The roofs
neighbouring
.of the l1ouses in Syria and the
countries are fl.at, and are u,sed in the evenings.
as family resorts.
.
Gabriele, rousing himself now and again 'ta
listen, heard nothing that n1ight not have been
cried .from tlie house-tops D. Chri.stie. Murray.
, .
HOUSE OF CALL -:-a house where workn1en of a
particular trade meet and where those in need of
\Vorkmen Can engage their services.
. . ..
The inn served a. hosue of call for farmers retu1n1ng from Easter market J. M. Dixon.

LIKE A HOUSE ON FIRE with rapidity. .


'' Yes,'' said Jeremiah exultantly; '' I'm getting on lilce, .a liouse onfire.''-B. L. Farjeon.
MAKE A 'HOUSE to secure the presen'ce of 40
members in the House of Comn1ons.
./
BRING DOWN THE HOUs~elicit universal applause e. g. .The actor was so successful that he
l11ouglit doton f lie house on him.
HOUSE .AND HOME domestic coin fort; e. g.
The poor fellow has no liouse and liome.
an in secure
scheme.
~
-A HOUSE OF CAR])S.
. Jo,\' -HOW MUCH? a satirical expression implying
. that the person who is addressed has.used an absurd1y_learned phrase. (Colloq.)
How ls THAT FOR HIGH? a vulgar phrase used
after tl1e telling of some wonderful story.'
THE HOW AND THE ."\\THY 'the manner and the
cause.
.

' ' .

'

12

,,

'

'

Huh

Hundred

178

IIuh THE HUB . OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM OR OF THE


UNIVERSE
a
name
often
applied
in
jest
to
.Boston,

Massaohussets.
.
-.
Calcutta swaggers as if i.t. were the liu.b of ilw
. universe Daily News, 1886 .
Hue-HUE AND CRY a cla1nour for something or in
purst1it of an offender. Name of a Police Gazette
established in 1710.

A hue a.nd cry hath followed certain men into


this house Shsi.kespeare.

..
Huff To TAKE THE HUFF-to be offended.
(Siang.)
.
.
Suppose he talces the hitff, and goes to some
other lawyer C. Reade.
Hum l1UM AND 1-IAW to hesitate in speaking.
There came a pause, \vhich, after hummi11g
and haw'ing a little, Phillip was the first t~ .break
-H. R. Haggard.

.
MAKE THINGS HUM to proceed briskly about an
affair; e.g. Now that you are ii1 it I hope yot1

\vi1I niake thing.s hum.

'.
A HUMMING BLOW vigorous.
Humble To EA.T HUMBLE PIE-to apologise abjectly.
H11n1ble, mumble, or umble pie was i11ade from tha
umbles or entrails of.the deer and fall.to the lot of
the inferiors at a feast.

..
Humour- 0UTOF HUMOUR displeased.
IN THE HUMOUR FO"R inclined to.' '
Huip-GIVES ONE THE HUMPS brings depression of
spirits ; e. g. Her singing gives nie t/ie liumps.
Hundred NOT A HUNDRED MILES OFF an 1ndireot
phrase for ' here,' ' in this very place.' It is fre-quently. used to avoid a direct reference to any
place. The ph1ase is used of events not far distant
in time.
, . - . ..
..
.
From all.of which reflections the reader will
gather that our friend Arthur was not a li1i1irlrtd
11zile.~ off an awk\vard situation H. R. Haggard..

>

Husband

1.79

- Hunks

a niggardly mean fellow.

AN OLD HONKS

(Slang.)
''Not one word fol' ine in his' will ... A. liunks,''
replied Mr. Bunl\:er; ''a 1n.iserly liunks.'' Besant.
H'l1sband THE HUSBAND'S BOAT a name given to
. the Saturday boats from London 'which brings down
to Margate during the su1nmer season the fathers
whose families are at the sea-coast.
I never shall forget t.he evening when .
went to the jetty to see tlte 'usbands' boat come
in The ]f.istle toe Bougli, 1885.
To HUSBAND ONE'S RESOURCES to manage
one's means with frugality.

we

-'

'

'
'

"

..

'

'

'

'

'

'

'.

-.

' '

'

.
-: -

-.

...

'

'

'

-.

,,

..

'

'

.'

.Idle::

.. ': Ilk

180

t.. ..

,,.

Idle AN IDLE COMPLIMENT

. ... .

A hollow and insincere

one.
.

IDLE WORDS elnpty and unpurposive.


IDLE PROTEST OR RUMOUR groundless.
.
AN IDLE HAND one unemployed.
IDLE MIND variant or unoccupied.
Idols IDOLS OF THE TRIBE errors of belief into
which human nature in general is apt to fall. A..
phrase, with the others whioh follow, invented by
Francis Bacon.


.
Teachers and. students of theology get a c~r-
tain look, certain conventional tones of .voice,.
a clerical gait, a professional neokclotb, and.
habits of mind as professional as their external~.
They are scholarly men, and read Bacon, and
know well enough what the idols of tlie tribe
a1e Abbott.
IDOLS OF THE CAVE-errors of belief into which
people living apart from the world are apt to fall.
IDOLS OF THE FARMER OR THE MARKETPLACE-
errors of belief arising from language and sooial. _
intercourse.
lDuLS OF THE THEATRE-the deceptions that have
arisen from the dogmas of different schools.
If IF YOD PLEASE this phrase has often a peculiar
use when inserted in a sentence. It calls atten ...
tion to a statement, of which the opposite might
have been taken for granted, and may be transla..
ted, ''Pray do not suppose the contrary.''

Rank is respected, if you please, evell at theEast End of London ; and perhaps more there
than in fashionable qt1arters, because it is sorare Besant.

IF IFS AND .A.NS WE.RE POTS AND p ANS a oon1diton or supposition.


Ilk OF THAT ILK of that same, used in connection
with a 1nan whose name is the same as that of his

'

181.
'

__

.::

. ancestral estate often \1sed e:i;roneously for '' of


that kind." It is a Scotch phrase.
.
I don't mean Beatrice to marry .Mr. Staunton,
even if l~e is a Staunton of that illc. W. E.
N orrii.::.

Jll

IT'S AN ILL WIND THAT BLOWS NOBODY GOOD-

few events are nlisfortunes to every one concerned.


Sicknesi benefit physicians; death puts nioney
in the poclcets of llndertakers ; fires .are popular
with carpenters.

. :_,.
-.
fll blows the wind 'tliat p1ojits nobody. Shakes..
peare.
,
ILL NEWS RUNS A p .A.OE-Bad news travels fast.
Do PERSON AN ILL TURN to injure his interests.
SPEAK ILL OF to ha1m.
TAKE .A.THING ILL-to be offended 'at a thing.
To GO ILL WITH ONE-to bring- one to grief. .
Image HE IS THE I?lfAG'E OF HIS FATHER the very
pictl1re of.
tmprove IMPROVE 'rHE OCC.A.S10N point out a moral
fro1n some event .tbat just occurred.
Holmes, who was one of the best boys in the
scbool, began to i1nprove tlie occasion:. .,, Now,
you youngsters,'' sai.d. he, as- he. maro.hed _along :
in the middle of them, ''mind this you're "very
well out. of this sorape. Don't you go near Thom
pson's barn again; do you pear?' Hughe_s .. .
1n INS AND OUTS nooks and corners ; the . ~1 hole
details
of any

.
. matter.
Now FO many tl1ings come cross and acro~s
in the cquntless i11s and Otlts,: that the laws of
CrippseA failed sometimes in some jot or trifle.
-Blackmore.
.:

IN FOR IT in a critical or dangero\ls situation,


Tl1e speaker, imagining I \Vas going to ri~e,
called my name. I was i11for it put my l1at down,
adva11ced to . the table, and dasl1ed along'

'

'

'

J3eaconsfield.

Iron.

182

Inch

-----------~-------

_______

,,

..

IN WITH .A. P .E.-R8u.N-have intimacy or familiarity


with.

. That's the -worst of being in Witli a1i audacious


chap like that old Nickleby Dickens. .

IN FOR A PENNY, IN FOR A POUND~-this phrase


is used when the san1e loss or danger . is incurred
whethe1 previous respon.sibility has been g1eat or
small. It compares well with the saying, ''As
well be hung for a man as for a sheflp.''
You neve,. know when he's .don.e with you,.
and if you're in/or a peizny, yo1t're i?i foj a pourzd
-Dickens.
-
Inch BY INCHES bit by bit; e.g. l1y inclies the

python swallowed the goose.


'
Is EVERY INCH A KING a thorot1gh one; e.g..
Akbar was every i11ch a King.
THRASH ONE WIT BIN AN INCH OF, HIS LIF'E . .
Beat
- almost to death.
. ..
A MAN OF YOUR INCHES heigl1t. .
.
AN INCH OF COLD STEEI~ a dagger thrust of that
, extent : e. g. In the scuffle he got an 1:ncli of cold
. steel in him.
Inside To GET THE INSIDE TR.ACK OF ANYTHING to
understand its working. It is an A1nerican phrase.
Intent To ALL INTENTS AND PURPOSES "in . every
respect.
~
.

Iron . To HAVE TWO MANY IRONS IN TEE FIRE to be .


trying to do too many things. at once. Irons are
here ~he bolts 11sed in the la11ndry to heat the boxi1on, and rebewed fJ.'.OID time to tim.e.

'

'

And then he (Lamb) tells what othel' literary


iro1zs are in the fire A~ Ainger.
IN IRONS having fetters on.
''Over board I'' said the' Captain.' ''.Well,
gentlemen, that saves the trouble' of pt1tting him
in iro11s -R. L. Stevenson.

Iron.

Irony

183

IRONSIDE a man of iron 1esolutio11. The plu1al


-I1011sides was the nan1e given to Cro111\vell's

irresistible horse.

AN 1NCH OF COLD IRON -a stab from a dagger or


other \\eapon.
_4 n 1ncli qf cold 11on brol1ght this \\'011derful
caree1 to an end.
THE IRON HAD EN fERED INTO HIS SOUL his
s1)irit \Vas broken ; the bitterest pang of grief has
ente1ed his heart.
True, 110 \Vore no fetters, and '''as treated \Vitl1
a g1ave and stately consideration; bl1t his bonds
\vere not the less galling, and the 1'ro11 ltad 11ot
tlie less entered i"nto li1s sou.I G. A. Sn.la.
To STRIKE WHILE THE IRON IS HO'!' to act with
energy and promptitude.
St1ike the iro11 wliile it's hot, Bob,'' replied I-

Captain Marryat.
THE IRON AGE-a supposed period of the .wo1]d in
the past \vhen i11en \vere harsh and rude i11 their

intercourse.
AN TRON

BOUND

COAST

a rocky Precipitous-

coast.
AN IRON HAND a harsh, severe hand.
AN IRON WILL a \Vill not easily bent.
.
'
.
Irony 'l'HE IRONY OF FATE--the curiolls providenoe
\vhich brings about the n1ost unlikely events.
By tlzc i1011y "of fate, the Ten Hours .Bill \Vas:
carried in.the very session '>Vhen -Lord Ashley,
llt1.\~ing cl1a11ged his vie\VS
the Corn Laws,.

on

felt it bis dut.y to resign his seat in Parliament


-l.AJisu1c Hozt1,
1887.

.
.
SOCRATIC lRONY sinlulated ignora11ce used t
confl\te an oppo11ent.

TliAGIC IRON\. use of lu.11g\1age \vitb inner,.


prophetic n1eaning u11kno\vn to t.l1e speaker and

])erso11s addressed.

;'.

..

Islands

Ix:ion

184

Islands ISL.ANDS OF THE BLEST OR BLESSED in1agi-

nery islands in the West, tho11ght to be the abode


of good men after death.
Soon your steps I shall follow.
To the Islands of the Blessed Longfellow.

issue AT ISSUE-(a) disputed.


'
This compromise which was proposed.: with
abundance of tears end sighs, not exactly meeting the point at issue, nobody took any notice
of it Diclcens.
(b) Disagreeing.
We talked upon the question of taste, on
which we were at issue -Southey.
11cl1ing -AN ITCHING PALM a greed for gain; an
avaricious disposition.

Let me tell you, Cassius, you yourself


Are much condemned to have an itching pal1n;
To sell and mart your offices for gold.

To undeserver:; Shakespeare.
ITCH FOR A THING a strong des.ire ; e. g. My
fingers itch to box his ea1's.
SCRA'ICH HIM WHERH: HE ITCH:FS hun1ou1' his
foibles.
:Ithuriel I'l HURIEL'S SPEAR the weapon of the angel
1thuriel, which exposed deceit by the
slightest
touch.
Mirables, the main story of popular religion,
are touched by Ithuriel's spea1. They are begin:.
ning to dissolve M. Arnold._

Ivory 'TO SHOW ONE'M !VORlES to show the te(3th.


. The negress sh.owed lier ivories in a long, rippling. laugh Marryat.
TO wASH ONE'S IVORIES to drink.
Ixion IXION'S WHEEL perpetual punishment; Ixion
was punished \vith revolving eternally on a wheel
in Hades.

'

'

'

.Jack

Jack

185

'

Jack

JACK-IN-OFFICE

a conceited and impertinent

official.
I hate a Jacl,in-office Wolcot.
JACKIN-A-EO:X something which
disappears
and reappears all on a sudden.
She was so1uewhat bewildered by this Jack-in-a
box sort of appearance Wm. Blaok.
' JACK-OF-ALL--!'RADES one who can turn to
anything.
He should, as I tel] him, confine himself
entirely to portrait-painting. As it is, he does
landscapes also, ''A Jack-of-all-trades,'' as I ventured to r<;imind him, '' is n1aster of none.''
- Jan1es Payn.
JACK-PUDDING a marry-andrew ; buffoon.
JACK F1,0ST frost personified as a n1isahie-yoll.S
fellow.

.Jack I<:etcl1 a pl1blic hangman. So named from one


under .J a1nes II.
He will come back without fear, and we will
nail him with the fifty potl.nd note tl.pon him;
and then J acf, Ketc7i C. Reade.
A JACK TA'R a Brtish sailor.
CHEAP-JACK a travelling hawker of goods.
(Colloq).
Cl1cap-Jacks have tl1eir carts beside tl1e pavement Besant.
YELLOW JACK (Slang) yellow fever.
EVERY 1'.!AN JACK one and all. -
..
A J ACK-A'.l'-A-PINCH. a person suddenly called
t1pon to perform son1e dt1ty. Often applied t-0 a
cler.gy111an witl1ot1t a fixed _positiont '\Vho is frequently summoned to act at a \vedding or a funeral
in the absence of t.}1e regular minister. (Slang).
'

BEFORE YOU COULD SAY J.ACK. ROBIN~ON

in an

instant: in1mediately.
'

Jack

'

186

Jekyll

These men a1e not the war1iors of commercet


but its smaller captains, who, watching the
fluctuations of this or that iuarket, can often
turn a thousand pounds ere we could say 'Jack
Robinson Reade.

JACK HORNER- the self-ind11lgent, complacent.


little boy who picked out plt1ms fro1u the pie: I1n-
mortalised in the Nursery Rhy1ueLittle Jack Horner,
Sat in a corne1,
,
Eating a Christmas pie;

He put in his thumb,


.
And he pt1lled out a plum,
'
And said, ''What.a good boy am I I''
Jacobs JACOB'S LADDER defect in khitting due to a.
dropped stitch; shaft of sunrays through cloud
rift,
.
Jail JAIL OR GAOL-BIRD a ht1morous name for one
who is or has been confined in Jail many times.
The J ail-bi1d \V ho piped this t11ne \vere \vithot1t a single exception, the desperate cases of
this n1oral hospital C. Reade .
Ja.m-A
REAL
JAM
a
1eal
t1eat;
e. g. This even-
.ing
'
s progran1me "'ras a 1eal 1a11z l
Jargon- CRITIC'S JARGON -speech full of technical.
terms.
.
Ja,v STOP YOUR JAW OR HOLD ONE'~ JAW-be q11iet ;:
cease fron1 talking 01 solding. (t>lung) .
If you don't stop your jato abo11t hiu1, yo11'11.
have to fight me H. Kingsley.
Jeddard JEDDA~D OR JEDWOOD Jus110E-hanging:
first and t1ying afterwards.
The case of Lord Byion ~vas harder. True
Jcdu1ood justice was dealt out to 11im. First
can1e the exect1tion, .then the investigation.Macaulay.
Jek)ll DR~ JEKYLL AND .MR. H1DFr--:-Dot1bleperson-
ality; e. g. So yo11 propose to play t}?-e parts of

. '

'

'

'

n..

T_J 11 ,.,,,,,,:, i'IA'

t.:r;,1~

.
'

.'

'
' '

'

'

; f'

'
1
{
I

'

l
'

'

.'

,j.

I'

''

'
.'''
I

.i

1~-

Jeremiad

--..: j

--------------------?-"--- . .---- ., . . ........__ . . .


-~-

Jere111iad ls.LJL'L.GE 1S JE~IA.1'-t~) t."~\~. . . ~~ \t1..'l~""',. . _ CO...cOiain.


-- ., .: t' sna
.., "tn'"'~
.::.u!
~~~..~
ri::or-ou~

. .

ii ,..,

"~

~ ~l'

.... l'"

la,,- the p11blie

1--

'l':.._... -,;,.... ,..;....... ~~."" .. l:._'""' ~ .J.....


i .......c:i .. ~ ... ~~i:.1...1 ""~ ~ ~

1e~l~1e~ tit:~ll\

tl.'

.._\

~ t''i:~1'~
.~ .. ,

..: .....

,.

...

i t~t~ci.r~~~

"'ill

.J:..l t: .. :t~ ... ;;:~~

Jericho To C-0 TO ..T:r.'RI\.."E.0-t1.'I gl' ~1\\:,\~. .i\ h'mo-.:e place to \Y'hic1i 0111: l$ 11\\ll:l.l\ll\.'\l::<l~ \.'\.'l\~\~~
ned. An expre~sio11 \ts-ed ~t~lltt.."llll~t\tl'l\\~l~. ~1'1,,,
allusion. comes fro111 t1't' B\l,lt~: l \ 11..~\1'\\\l\ t~''-'k
Dand's ser\ant~, a11d sl1t1\ed l)ff t1tt.' t.)l\t) l\~1lf t.)t
their beards ...... \\~1e11 tl1e, told it 1i11tl' 11~\ \~itl. 11l"'
sent r.o meet the1n! be~u l\$e t11e i11t:11 ,,....,\.~'\ l~tt':\ t l~..
ashan1ed: and the Ki11g: ~:lili.? ~t Tt\r1~ ~\t .lt'l'lt'll\."
until YOtl'C beards gro\'~ tllllt tjl~1\ ret\\\''l'l.'t (~ S~\ ...
m11el x. 4, 5.)
Seeing her I \\ished .Tt}l''$ ~l1t\\l)lC1s 1\~\\l llt't\\1
at Jert'cho H. R.. Hnggtlro
Jerusale111 JER'US.AL'EM POX\' tl llOl\kt>~~.
Jessie To G!VE -~ M:.t\N .TES$1E to tI1\'i\~l\ l1i.11'\ ~l..''l\l\..
dly. (Slang)
.
He at lengtl1 lo~t i1t1tie1\C('' ttl\tl d()\\.bli11~ \\l)
l1is sleev-es ll1tlde for tl1e tllt\I\. A1\d l~ <.'t'-'tt toll
yo\1 he gave !1:!'.111 Jc~.~i(~ .1. ~{. ])ix.011.
1
.Te,, JEW ~ EYE- so111etl1i.11g of l'igl1 \"'t\l\t~ \\~ i'\
'' wortl1 a ..Te\v's eye'' f1<.1111 tl1e C\t~tt111\ tlf t:t)1l:\i1
i11g J e,,.,.s f o-r i11011eY.
It's tl1e ne-r,.,.es, ho). . , t.l1e 111)t\~0R ; tt11cl 1\ <l1t)))
of the sttiff is \\"Ol'tl\' a Jt1tt1'~ <~!/'~ ft)\' sttitl(\~r\1\l~
a. man after u. i1igl1t of it, as \;\\O St\yil\l~ i~.
-Hall On ine.

.Tiff~ IN A .JlFFY-i11 i\n i11stit11t;: . ,,iil1011t clol1\;>' .


(Colloq.)

'

In a ;'iffiJ I 11a. ve sli1lpc<l o\01

Stevenson.

Jingo

t\1(1

sitlt)-1.~. l'J
,

BY , JINGO l\ . \vilcl ou.tl1 liti\.,.lllt.;' Jl(> tlofi11itt 1


x11en11ing. ('rulgu,r.) .
Ono of thorn, r tl1011gl1t, CXP1'()8~0<l llt'l' fi()ltt.ime11ts.,on. tl1is oooasio11 in u. vor~r oOt\1'Rl1 l)1t\.nJ\Cll' 1
\vl1cn'sho obsorvcd tl10.t, lJJJ 'tlic livi1111 .lf11g(>, Hl1<~
\vus all of ti t11uol\: of S\VOt'l.t Gol(lH111itl1.

_Jinks:

188

r -

~Joint
,

" I

_Jinks HIGH JINKS _boisterous fun; _e. g . Th~re


were a lot of high jinlc.s. in the evening. party.
Job . A. JOB'S C01.1FORTER 011e who agg1avates the.
distress of an unfortunate n1an he has_ oon1e to com
fort. See Bible (Boole of' Job), Job had three friends who came to him in his trouble as ootnforters,
but spent their tirne in reproaching.

''I told you so, I'told yol1 so!'' 1s the croak of


a true Job's comfortei-A'. 1r1ollope.
-

JOB'S NEVi1 S news of troubles and' calamities;


bad news ..
.

From ho1ne there oan nothing come but Job's
"
news Carlyle.
.
JOB'S POST the bearer of bad news'.

This Job's post fiom Du.mouriez reached the


National Convention Carlyle ..
.
. .
THE P .ATIENCE OF JOB_:_very great patience;.
M1. Prate has certainly the patience of job.
-1\1aria Edgeworth.
:To DO THE JOB FOR .A MAN to kill hin1 or ruin
hin1.
'
That last debauch- of his did the job jo1 liim.
JOB ~OT-. a lot of goods bought as speculation.
Do JoBS to 'hire or let out ho1se or carriage for
.
a time.
Joe A JOEMILLER OR JoE ~a stale jest: a je.st book.
Joe Miller was a witty actor of the eighteenth
oentury. His jests with i11any others added, were
published in hook form in 1737.

.
John JOHN ORDERLY the signal to shorten the performance at a show.

Join To JOIN THE J.f.AJORITY to die. It is a classical phrase.

.
General Wa1d, who oommanded '' disoiplined
Chinese Force'' had just joi1zed tlie niajo1ityPall jfall Gazette, 1887.

Joint OUT OF JOINT . in_ confusion or disorder.


The times are out of _ioint-=-Shakesneal'e.
'

'

'

Jon~

..i:: L .!.

.....

,. ,."'- ' ,-'


"' -- o--
-, . . . .,. ('.., ___ . \.'
___. ~'-li'1';~\1't
,. t "
_,\.::::-.t.
1..:.;. \.'!: ,\,_,_1;_,A

'-'-'-'!:.-$

..

ano::n.er s lo\t: er

'i.

~t,11nu~1'll"":~

ti:i.t' 1'lt~\tt's fl~'\~.. (l~t\.'\',)


' ....
'~
. h lt
' ,, t' h ~lt. 't)l~ ~-\)il.I 11~\~11~. '' ~~\l'l.
' ' 'l,
u.r- -r..o..enll$
''are yol1 ~1sh1.1u1ed. l)t ~-'-'\\'\"' \."l\\'tl t~l'l'-''11.'$.'"'"
';Yo'i.1-r- lady-sl1ip Tt:ft~r$ t1." tll' '-r1.)r~) _l\\ 1~;,~t~ ~

loll'\"'. Tr<:-. JOLl..Y

.......

\'

ROG"R

he inquired \\i.tl1 1'lltft.~ct g l~\\~\t~. t\ l\t1 i.t\\ii\l'~


diateJ,
. \\ent i1i.to 11t-!>.l$ 0f 1~\\\~l\t't'r~..-1\.. l~.
-Ste,e11son.
Jonab-Jo:S.iH a l111l\tQky 1'~1~::::~11g~r 011 ~l1i1)\,,,~\1'\1 ''\'
else,,here fron1 t11Q ll!'Ol)lll't .Tc1r1t1l~.
~

\\~\\t\t !~\\)\\'~
in a night i111d \\-itl1ers \\"itl1 e(111t1l r~\l)i(ltt~"
''I expect I l)e1011g to t-l1t.' t.)\'tll:''l i..,t~ ,ft'tltll~~
gt)tiid,'' said Ct1l1.'\pio11 bitrol"l)~ Ii'. J\.1,~i l'~~.
JOT OR .TITLE-tl1e llllllll.te~t; l)f\l't: t_l. (l, l'f ~{)\\

JONA.R'S GOURD-ti. pll\'i\St: l\l'llllit'd

t-\'

i11ake it less or n101~ l)y 0110 :it)f (ii titl1~ )'()\\'\' l\t:t.,
is f o-rfeited. '

'

'

JU>JPs ONE B.:\lL

Jun111

bail. (Slung)

to

fo1'.ft,\t:i\l{~ ()l\l'~~

t\l1sooi1tl,

t_)t\l_~t.'\'Jll)~~ ; tt. !l
\\Then I proposed u .tri1>t lie Jtt-1~tp(iti <1t tl\Q i.dt.'t\.
. JUl\'lP OUT 01!"' ONE'S S:KlN . tt) sttl 1t \\it.I\ jtl'\' t\l'
.fright; c~ g. 011 seoi.11g tl1 i)olico i.11. tl1oir <lt~11' t:}t{~
1obbers 3'a11ipcd t)tt.t nf t11t1i1 ~l~i11.

JU111P fro CONCLUSIONS lllt\l\:o l\t\~t~~r i11f()rOl\('O


JUMP . ' AT

t'\OCept

\\tit 11

'

' '

'

'

'

'

'

_Keep

190

-Kaow

K.

'

Kao'v KAOW-TAOW . behave in a submissive way,


It is from the Chinese. (Prov;)
. ..
To have to lcaow-taow'to Arnold
too, as I must
. .
. do of ool1r~e Anon.

Keep KEEP .AN .ACT hold an ao.adeniical disputation.


KEEP COMP.ANY associate.
.
.
This Miss Kennedy, and I hope I'm sure
-that you tw:o will get to be friendly with _one
another not to speak of lceeping companyBesant.

.
.
KEEP .ALOOF FROM not to keep . company with ;
e.g. The boy was warned to keep aloof from his
fol'mel' companions.

.
KEEP .A~ EYE UPON. to watch; e. g. please lceep
an eye iipon my boy.
KEEP IN" DARKNESS not to inform ; .e. g. we
. stayed toget.her for three years but all this time he
kept me in darlcness that-he was a married man..
KEEP WORD to fulfil promise ; e. g. You must
always keep your wo1d.
_
KEEP THE WOLF FROM THE DOOR to put off
. starvation ; e.g. We succeeded in keeping the ._wolf
from the door by dent of hard la~our.
.
KEEP BACK FRO}.f to co_nceal ; e~ g. . I will' keep
nothing baclc from you.

KEEP TO ONESELF to keep it. secret; e.g. Keep


it to 11ourself, please J
KEEP UP .APPEARANCES maintain an external
show ; e. g. We fill1st not spend imprudently sirn
ply fo1 lceeping up appearances.
KEEP PACE WITH-to go at equal speed; e. g.
I cannot lceep paee witli you.
KEEP JN WITH A MAN maintain the confidenoe
or friendship of some one.
I al"'ays told your father he thought too much
of that \Vatson, but I would keep in witlf lii11i

is

Keep, ,

Kettle

,191

if I were yot1, for they say he's coining money


' The Mistletoe Bough, 1885. .
' . KEEP ON~'s COUNTENANCE-p-reserve a calm
' appeal-ance; htding the emotions; lend moral sup ..
port to.
. ,
Flora will be tl1ere to lceep you cou11tena11ceR.
L.
Stevenson.
-
KEEP BODY AND SOUL TOGETHER maintain life.
One of the maids having fainted three times
the last day of Lent, to keep I?ody and. soul to-,.
gether we put a morsel of roast beef in her mouth
Maria Edgeworth.
KEEP DARK ABOUT ANYTHING to preserve
secrecy.
If you have tastes for the theatre and things,
don't talk about them, lceep darlc. Besant.
KEEP lN (a) refuse to disclose .
But, please, don't think old Grizzel mean for
lceeping in what had taken place; she wus only
obeying orders-Mrs. Henry \Vood.

(b) detain sohool boys after the regular . hours as a


pun ishm ent.
'

He was no n1ore n1oved th.an the Roman soldiers. or than the sohoolniaster is moved by the
sad face of a boy lcept in Besant.
.
'

l(EEP GNE'S HAND. lN to be busy ; e. g. Next


spring you will find mt1ch .to lceep your 1zand irz.
KEEP IN VlEW to have before one's mind; e.g.
I havi;:i always lcept this jdeal iri view.
KEEP OPEN HOUSE-to be extremely hospitable;
e. g. The preacl1er Tcept a1i open lzousa .
'
Kettle A. KETTLE OF FISH a task of great difficulty ;
an a\vlc.\vard n1ess; a muddle. Most probably it is
' from l~id<ll<:. (Slang.)
.

0
There, yo\1 l1ave done .a fine piece of wo1k
tr11ly ....... :.the1e is a pretty lcettle of fisli made
011't at yot1r 11011se Fielding.

'

'

"

'

'

'

'

'I<'.ey

-.

'

."

'

Kick

192
'

'

HAVE THE KEY OF THE STREET ' to

'I(ey

.be locked

out; to be homeless.

.

''There,'' sa:ld Lowton, ''you have the lcey of the
street." Dickens.

POWER OF THE KEYS the power to use and bind,


to adn1iilister ecclesiastical discipline a special
authority confe1red by Christ on Peter Nath. xvi.
19 or Peter 1n conjunction.' with other apostles;.
and claimed by the popes as the alieged successors
to St. Peter.
.
GoLDEN. AND SILVER KEYS n16ney'. used as
bribe : e. g. His progress Wi:J,S made sn1ooth by the
use of golden and silver key.q,
.
Kick KICK OVER THE TRACES throw off' control.
You must not l'ick over the traees, pr I shall
be.- forced to suppress. you, Lady An:rie ... ~ :. yo11.
are grpwing. a trifle too iridependent H. R.
.. Haggard. .
.
. .
. KICK THE BEAM to be deficient in. weight; to
fly into the air. Said of a seal e in a balance.
The latter quick flew up and kiclced the , bean'lr
-Milton.
'
KlCK UP DtJST carry on a valu.eless discussion;
'
c'reat'e a disturbance~
Amongst the IDll,nl1sc1ipt riches of tl1e Bod. leian, there.was a co.py of a ce1-tain old chronic}er about. whose very name ' there ha's. been a
considerable amount of'learned dust l<:icked .up:
-' .. KICK THE BUCKET die.
KICK UP THE HEELS . die.
KICK UP ROW OR A SHINDY see 'under ''Kick
uptheDust.'' :.. i

.
. ' GET 1'lORE KICKS THAN HALF PENCE receive
more abuse than profit ; to be badly or roughly
treated.

Let the s\veet wonian go :to niake sunshine


and
a
soft
pillow
for
the
poor
devil
whose
legs

are not models, \Vhose efforts are blunders, and


'

'

'

'

<

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

193 :: l'

' .

..,

J(int: '..

,..

who in general gets more lciclc-< than. lialf penceHeorge Eliot. .

KICK AGAINST THE PRTCKS struggle with an


over mastering force. The phrase. is used. in the
Bible (Acts ix. 5).

My father had quite as little yielding in his
disposition, and lciclcf'd against t.he pricks determinedly T. A. Trollope.
l(idney OF THE SAME KIDNEY of the same nature.
Fellows of your lcidne'} will never go through
inore than the slti1ts of a scrimmage Hughes.
l(illtenny See t1nder '' Cats.''
I\.ill KILL TWO BIRDS WITH ONE STONE see under
'' slrds. ,,
A KtLLlNG GLANCE-that shows overwhelming
., admiration; e. g. The young 101d directed a Kill
i11g glanc~ to\\'ards the girl.
GoT UP TO KlLL-very smartly dressed; e.g.
On tl1e day of ber debt1t she was got up to ]cill.
To BE TOO KILLING extremely funny: e. g.
My God, the boy is too l'illing.
f(i11g KlNG LOG one \vho, having a short popularity, is aft.erwa1ds. treated \Vith contempt. From
tl1e story ''of tl1e Frogs asking for a King in
Aesop'R Fal)les. To cl1ange l(i11g Log for l(ing
Stork is to change a stupid but harmless i-ul.er for
an oppressor and a tyrant.
.
Into that son1ewhat cold-waterish region adventurers of tl1e sensational l{ing come. down
i1ow and tl1en witl1 a plash, to become disre
garded Kt:1ig Logs before the next. session J. R.
Lo\vell.

'

'

'

TO BE UN\VILLlNG TO CA.Lt. THE KING ONE'S

to l)e in a
stn.te of perfect satisfaction.
.
He ,,T_ou1dn't condescend to call tha king liis
cc1tt8i11 just at this present time Haliburton.
KING'S EVIDENCE tl1e evidence given by the
a1)prover.

COUSIN

'

'

13
'

-.

.
w

'

Kiss

194.

. _K~NG'S ~VIL. sc:urvy.-..


.
. THE KING OF TERRORS Death.
KINGDOM COME-(Slang) the -state after death;
the next-world.

.
THE THREE KINGS. OF COLOGN~the three' wise
men of the east, Gaspar> Melchior~ and Balthazar.
.
K'iss To Kiss THE Roo. to. subinit. to punishment
meekly
and
without
complaint.
. .
Kite To FLY A KITE-see under ''Fly.''
KITH AND KI.'/ blood-relations~ e. g. All his
Kith and 7,in came to the wedding.
Kittle -KITTLE CATTLE TO SHOE a difficult person to
manage. (Colloq.)

But I an1 not so sure that the young lady


is to be counted on. She is l<-ittle cattle to: shoe
-George Eliot.
Knee TO BOW THE KNEE TO BA AL to conform to
the prevailing or fashionable worship of the day.
See Bible '' yet I have left ine seven thousand in
Israel, all the Jcnees V'hicli havP 11ot bowed to Baal ''
-2 Kings xix 18.
Whiggisn1 is always the scorn of tho1ot1ghgoing-men and rigorous logicians is ever i;tig1natised as the bending of tlie lcnee to Baal.J. Cotter-Morrison.
To BOW Tr.IE KNEE BFFOR.E to submit to.
In the course of the year 1859 several of
those eminent Frenchn1eh who refused to bnrv
the Jenee before the Second Empire had frequent
and fiiertdJy conversations with Macaulay on
future of their unhappy country G. 0. Tre
velyan.
. '
Knife W ~R TO THE KNTFE--mortal combat; deadly
strife.
So the strife settled down into a personal
affair bet\veen Fl ashman and our youngsters :
a war to the lcnife, to be fougl1t out il). the JittJe
'

'

' '

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

Knock:

195

cocl~pit

at the end of the bottom P.assag'e.. T. Hughes.


.
.
[{nock KNOCK ABOUT (Sla11g)' to saunter or loaf
about: travel \vitl1out definite ain1~
I an1 no chiclcen, dear, and I have lc11oclced
.
aboiit the v,ro1ld a good deal H. R. Haggard.
. To KNOCK ON THE HEAD to frustrate; to bring
to a sudden stop.
1'1:r. Hinckley told us son1e very interesting
facts connected \vith the original survey and
lcnoclced several ignorant delusions on the head
-\V. H. Russell.
KNOCK DOWN t-0 assign a lot in at1otion to a
. person by tap of 11arnmer; e. g. All the articles
were lcnoclced do1nn to m.e for Rs. 25/-/~
KNOCK UP--Collapse with fatigue~ e.g. I am
quite l~noclcPd up.
.
KNOCK UNDER to submit ; e. g. After a long
.and 11aTd tussle the rebels lcnocked iinder to the
. -Govern1nent.

1CNOCK OFF (a) to discontinue.


V\TJ1en the Va1let ]cnoclccd off work for the day
it \\Tas observed tl1at 11e \Vas possessec;l of a strange manner Besant.
(b) to cease to \vo1k.
Tl1ey grad11u,lly get the fidgets. This is a
real disease \\Tn'ile it lasts. In tl1e \Vorkroom it
has got to last until t11e time to . J,noclc o.ffBesant.
(c) to prepare ; get ready.
R.o'Ves, too you n1igl1t easily get UlJ Rover
\\'llile you a1'e about it, and Cassio and Jeremv
Diddler. You ca11 easily 7,11oclc the11i o..ff: one parl
helps t11e other so i11uch. Here they are, cues and
i1ll Dicl\:ens.
l(NOCK OUT to defeat~ e. g. Our team \\'as perfectly J,1zocl~'d oztf. i:l1is tin1e.
KNOCK TH F: BOTT01'1 OuT OF Tender a case invalid; c. g. The nutio11ulists knocked the bott-0m

'

196 ' .

I\no.w;-"
.
-..
/

,.__

l\.nuckle-r
.". - .. . ..
~

.. -- -.
. out of the Government-proposals .in the legislature.
Kno1v To KNOW WH.AT ONE JS ABOUT ' to. be' far' sighted and prudent. .
,.
. : :~
She makes the most of hini, bacal1se she, k1zotvs, what she is about and keeps a inan M. Arnold.
To KNOW WH.AT'S WHAT to be thoro11ghly acquainted with something; to be wide a\,rake:
A KNOWING LOOK a significant look, indicating that the pe1son looking knows lDOJ'e . of a lllatter spoken of tl1an is openly e:(p1essed.

I\nuckle To KNUCKLE DOWN to.adn1it oneself heated ; to submit.


We J<.11iiclc.led dow1z under an 01111ce of indignation Blackmore.

:
To KNUCKLE UNDER to yield; to bel1ave submissively.
'
The Oa1Jtain soon lcnuclc(ed u1zde1,. put u11 his
weapon. 1esumed his seat, grun?bling like a.
beaten dog R. L. Stevenson,
.
To RAP A MAN'S KNUCKLES to ad111inister a
s_ha1p rep100-.'.
'

The autl1or 11as groRsly mistranslated a passage in tl1e Dfi1lsio pro Popiilo A11glicano; arid
if the bisl1op were not dead, I Wot1ld here take
the libe1ty of 1appi11g his lcnuckles De Quincey.
~

~--

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

..

. . .
'

..

'

'

Labour

197-

;La'i-ge

--

L.t\.BOUR OF LOVE-work undertaken merely


as an act of friendliness and without hope of emolun1ents.

'
That l1is own tl1ougbts had sometimes wandered back to the scenes and friends of his youth
dl1ring this labo2ir of love, we know fro1n IettersBlacl\:'s Golds1nitli.
Lady LA.DY BOUNTIFUL-a cha:ritable matron. .

Every one felt that since Mrs. Armytage was


playing tl1e part of Lad11 Bountiful, it was .better
. that she should go through with iti--James Payn.
Lamp--SMELT~ OF 'T'HE LAMP sho\v signs of great
elaboration or study. (Colloq.)
Lance A FREE LANCFr-one attached to no party;
one wl10 figl1ts for l1is O\vn hand.
That 110 (Defoe) \vrote simply aR a free lance,
under tl1e jealous sl1fferance of the gove1'llment
of tl1e day Minto.
Land To SEE HOW '!.'HE LAND LIES to see in \Vhat
state matters are.

No\V Sec lit1tV tlie land lies, and l'm sorry for

it Mn.\'ia Edgeworth.

THE LA.ND OF. THE LEAL-heaven. Originally it


is a Scottisl1 pl1rase. 011 one celebrated occasion,
M1. Gladstone used the expression err6neo1'lsly,
as applying to Scotland.

We'll 111eet a11d ayo be fain


In fl1a land tf the lcal Baroness Bairne.
TI1E
LAND
OF
O

.\KES
Scotland,
becn,t1se
oatmeal
''
cn.l\'.:es are a co111111on kind of food a1nong tbe poorer
clasEes
'
'
THE LAND 01" NOD tl1c state of sleep.
THE LAND OF THE JJlVING this earth .

Lnrgc .A.. GENTIJEr.fAN .\'l' LARGE-a person \V1tl10\1t


..
'
nny ~l~riol1s occi.1patio11 .

Labot1r

'

'

'

'

198

L~rks

.-.Laugh
. .
'

. .

'

'

He was now a gentlc111.an at la1ge, living as best

he might, .no on.e but himself ~new. how. piis~


: Braddo
n.

..
,
.

'

Larks

.WHEN THE SKY FALLS. WE SHALL CATCH


LARKS an absurd staten1ent, 11sed to throw 1{d.ioule

on any fanoiful' proposition,


,
. , The .stationary s~ate n1ay turn out after all
to be the millenium of . econmic expectation,.
but for any thing we know the sl'11 may fall ancl.
we may be cataqhi11g lark', befo1e tbat'" n1illenitim
arrives Co11tempofary
Review~ 1886~
. .
'
.
Laugh TO LA:iJGH.'IO sCOEN to deiide or jeer at.
Lochiel \vo11Id have undotibtedly hav:e lazir7hed
the doctrine of non-resistance to' scorn .Maca ..
ulay.

.
To LAUGH IN ONE'S SLEEVE to la11gh inwardly:
His sjmplicity v.ras very touching ...... ''How
.they must have laitghed at yo11 in tllei1:, sleeves.n1y poor Willie!'' She answered . pityingly..
-James Payn.

.

.,

'

TO LAUGH IN THE WRONG SIDE OF-THE l.fOUTH .

to be ma.de to feel disappointment' or sorrow; to


.. .be httmilia ted.
.
.
.
By-and-by thou will laugh on the w1ong side
of tliy face Carlyle._ : .
. .
To LAUGH
OUT
OF
THE
OTHER
CORNER
or
SIDE
. .
. OF THE MOU1'H to be made to-feel vexation. .
. .
'' Nonsense l '' said A.dam. ''Let it alone, Ben
Cranage. You'll laugli orth' otller side o'your
moutli then.'' George Eliot..
A tAUGffiNGSTOCK ~n object of ridicule. a butt
of amusement e. g. you, are malcing yourself a. laughing stock.

LAUGH OUT OF COURT OV01'\Vhelm \Vi th ridiottle;


e. q. My plan was lauglzed out rff court.
.
GET THE LAUGH op.....:. turn tables on ; g. Let
usnow get the _laugh of him.
_:

'

'

e.

y,.....~~

~~

mTl'"'r.'

A.'rTl'""''tl"

+. ...... lr ........ :...t.:- ..... 1,... .-. . . -,.1 kt1mn_.

Lay

.19.9

uredly ;.e.g. .I found. that I had.no other .way but


, . t9 :1oin :in the. laugh.
.
'. .
ilE LAUGHS BEST WHO LAUGHS LAST a. warning
again~t premature exultation.
.
La,\ . A LAW OF THE Medes and the .Persians an
unalterable law.
.
" .
We looked upon every trumpeJ'.Y little custom
and habit which had 'obtained ii1 the school
. . . as thougl1 it had become a law of the Medes and
, Persians T. Hughes.
'
'
THE LA w OF THE LAND the public 01 con1inon
law of a country.
.
A L11'.1B OF THE I.AW a la\vyer. .
LAY DOWN.THE LA\V to be dogn1atio: c. g. You
oannot Lay dow1i the law in this matter.
NECESSlTY KNOWS NO LAW ju_stifies .. every
thing.

TAKE THE LAW INTO ONE'S OWN HANDS redress


one's \vrong by force; e. g. Any way, you are
llot allo\ved to talce llie law i12to your own . hands.
.
Lay THE LAY OR Ll'E OF THE LAND-the general
features of a tract of a country.

Fortunately, they both of tben1 had a fair idea.
of the la11 <if tlie land; and, in addition to this,
Jolin possessed a s1nall compass fastened to his
\Vatol1-chain H. R. Huggard.
'
To LA.Y ABOUT ONE to deal blo\VS vigorously or
on all sides. .
.
- .
.He'll la11 about bitn today Shal;:espeare.
To LAY BY to save. .
.
He 11ad not yet, it is true, paid off all the
,
mortgl'.Lges still less had it been in his po\-ver
to la11 by anything out of his inoome-Good11rords, 1887.

T? L~y. TEE

CORNER STONE-to 1riake a. regular

beg1nn1ng.
.
I .verily believ-e she laid tlic corner stone of all
her . future 1nisforti.1nes. .at that . very instant ...
Maria Edge\vortl1.
,

Lay

200
..

..

To LAY BEADS TOGETHER to" consult.. '

'

Then they laid thir heads together, and


whispered their own version of the story.
-Besant.
To LAY TO HEART to ponder deeply upon.
Lay it to thy heart - Shakespeare. .
To LAY VIOLENT HAND~ ON to murder.
To LAY BY 'I HE HEELS to render powerless ; to
confine. Originally used of imprisonment in .the
stocks, a punish1nent inflicted on vagrants and
others. The ankles were enclosed in a. boaid, the
culprit preserving a sitting poFture.
poor old Benjy; the rheumatiz has much to
answer for all through English countrysides,
but it neve1 played a scurvier. trick than in
. laying tliee by the heels T. Hughes.

To LAY lT ON to exaggerate~ to do anything


extravagantly.
.

Now you are laying it on, surely he co1-.Id not


get so high a salary J. M. Dixon.
.
A LAY FIGURE- a human
model
used
by
an
a1tist
..
.
Meantime you are not to be a lay figure, or a
mere negative C. Reade.

THE KID OR KIN CHIN LAY -the practice of rob. bing young children a special branch of the London thieves' art. Read the career of Noah Claypole
in Oliver Twist.
''You did well Y:esterday, my dear, '' said
Fagin ; ''beautiful ! six shjJJil:J.gs and nine pence
.
half penny on the very firstday. The lcirzch1'.n lay
will. be fortune to you.'' Dickens.
;Lead
To LEAD ONE, A PRETTY
DANCE. see under
.
'
,. Dance. ''

. To LEAD UP TO-to cond.uct to gradually and


cautiously.
.
. . . ..
_
Mr. Slemig does. not even aoouse the inoum: bent of insidiously leadi11g up to Mariolotory.

Staurday Review, 1887.


'
.
'

'

'

'

:Least
. . ' . To LEAD :.A . CAT-AND-DOG LIF~to be in the
habit of quarrelling ; e. g. The' husband and wife

ted a cut-and dog life.

. . .
.: '
. . To LEAD BY THE NOSE-to cause to follow obsequiously~ e. g. He leads his party by the nose.
A LEADING QUES~JON one in whion the' answer

is sugges ted.
.
Leaf To TURN OVER A NEW LEAF to take up . a new
and better course of conduct.
9
I RUppose he11 tu1n over a new leaf. now there s

a lady at the head of the e~tablishment

George Eliot .
THE' FALL OF THE LEAF the autumn; e.g.
When
the
fall
rf
tlie
ler1
comes
nature
is
"'idowed

. of her beauty.
'Lean LEAN YEARS-the period of scarcity; e. g. All

ho11~e 11olde18 r1rovide for the lean 11ea1s.


LEAN UPON-rely on fol' help; e.g. He knows
t11a.t he can lea11 upo11 n1e when there is need .
Leak TO SPRING A LEAK to let in water.

\Yhether she .~p1ang a leak I oannot find, or


whether she \Vas overset with. wind. But down
at once wit\1 all her crew she went-Dryden
'Leap BY.LEAPS AND BOUNDS by a series of sudden
antl rapid advances.
..
.
' .. _The.figuTe~ ~bowing the advance b.l/ leaps and
bot1,nds of .T e\viEih nat1Pel'i~n1 yea't' after year are
not less striking Specf.ator, 1887.

A L T1 A~ lN TBE DARK a raRh experiment; e. g.
We cannot take a leap i7t the da11, .
"Lease . A NEW LEASE OF LtF'E .
improved chance of
. living l~ng ; c.. a. He has got a ?2cw 'lca'.'!e of life
out of h1s last 1llness.

, Least TRE LEAST SA Ip THE: so9NEST n1ENDED it is


.. pr11dent to speak little.

.
' Th'e old Jady entured to approach Mr. Benjn
111in Allen with' a few comforting reflentioni:;
Of \Vhjoh the chief Were, th::Lt after a.}}, perhap~

an

'

.:Left

202

Leave
~

- : r jt was -well j~ was np' worse ; the least; :said tlte


. . .
. ,soonest mended . Dickens. :
Leave TO LEAVE OFF-(a) to cease; to terminate.
,. , First they .left iif \'\;:orshippingthe gods of Troy.
, :Besant. .

:

.(b) .to disconti11ue wearing.

He goes in his doublet ar1d hose,. and zeaves off
his wit Shakespeare.
. ....
TO LEAVE OUT I~ :THE COLD to neglect; to .exol,ude from participation .in anything. . .
.
:My boy wa-; to have been her heir, but she had
the dispoRal of 11ei.- property, and she. has bequea~
tbed it all to Cornell is, so n1y son .is left out in the
cold- Chamber's Journal, 1888.
.

To LEAVE IN A LURCH to leave in a . difficult:


situation without help; to aJ:>andon.
.. . _,
. -''My only. ex.ct1se,'' said he, ''is that it1never
occurred to me to t11ink that Tracy would leave
' " 1ne irz the lur:cli.'' Good TVcirds, 1887.
Tb'LE.AVE Nt) STONE UNTURNED'-to use all .practicable 111eans to effect an object; e~ g. He left. no
, stone untzt,1ned to secure that appointment.
' To LEAVE THE BEATEN TRACK to travel by a
route not co1nmonly used ; .e. g. This author leav.~s
: . thP beat<?n tracl' and gives a fresh outlook. . . .'
To LEAVE MUCH TO BE DESIRED-to be fal. from.
perfect; g. :Yot11 ,vork leaves mucli ,be desired.
Leek To EAT.OR SWALLOW THE LEEK to submit to
w~at. is h~miliating ... _. .

.
. '
.
.

It was certain that. he (Mr. Erin) .would have


to
swallow
a
very
large
leek.first
Jame.:;
Payn.
'
'
. .
.
.
Left OVER 'IHE LEFT. -understa11d quite the reverse
of what is said (Prov.)
. .

.. . .Each:gentleman pointed with his right thumb


over his left shoulder. Thig action, imperfectly
. -described by .the feeble. term '' t)Ver the left,'' when
.. . .performed by a.nY number of ladies and gentle
." men wl10 are
acc11sto111ed to act in unison, has a.
.
.- -

,I

'

e.

to

'

'

'

'

'

'

Left

,. . r~. '

~203

~'

. : :. .Very graceful and airy .. effect;:.. it's expression


one of light and airy sarcasm Diokens. , .
A LEFT..-H.A.NDED. COM"PL1MENT a" sa;ying wbi1
though appa:ren'tly meant to' t1a.tter, really. d~pric
tes. An unlucky piece of flattery. ... ,
. . :His quiet manner lett his speech punotuat1
. and his fishy eyes, level :voice;. and immoval
face put no dot to an ambiguous ''i;'' arid orose
'

'

.. . no ''t'' i1i a left-ha1ide~ cornplim~nt-"-New Ye


Weekly 'J.'ribune.
. .
To GET LEFT to be disappointed. (Prov.)
.Yes; .and 'there will be the same. inevital
featu1e about his canvass that there Was in Js:
He (Ole'\7'eland)
'11
get
left-New.
York
1-Veel,ly
T

bune.
. . .


ON THE L'EFT HAND in an irregular way. ' .
And then this girl, this Yetta, had . Clint1
blood in her, if on tlie left liand, and ~adly .mixE
-Mrs. E. Lynn Linton:.
.
A. LEFT-HANDED' OATH ' an oath .whioh .is I
binding.
.
:. .
''It must be left-handed oath.'' he said; as
obeyed her Hugh Conway.
.
.

'

. MARRY WITH TRE .. LEFT HAND to marry m<


.. ganatically ; e. g.. Sons of peers lose . their ti
if they niar1y iuitli tlie lf'ft. ~iand. .

THE
LEFT In. politios, the . progressive par1
.
Leg-To GlVE LEG-J3AIL-to ru11. off; .. to-. esca]
(Slang~) .
.
. .

Even an Attorney may. give leg-bail to (esca


from) tl1e. po\ver .. under \vhich he lives. Blac
inore.
:

.
ON ONE'S LEG about to n'lake a speecl1.
He (major Soott) \vas always 012 -his legs ;
\vas very tedious; and he. had only one top
the n1erits and wrongs of Hastings . Macaulay.
7
\ \ 1TROUT A L'F.G TO _STAND ON having no st1
port.
.
. .
Th.er oon1pa:red notes, and agreed that no s~
'

'

: ,J;.egion

tem but the separate one had . a leg to stand on.

'

-C. Reade.
..
Charles started pulling his leg~, in presence of
the family~.
.
.
.
\Legion THEIR NAME IS LEGION-they .are countless;
their number is .infinite. A phrase talren from the
Bible (Mark v. 9}.

1Lengtl1 A LENGTH in the full extent ; 01nitting
nothlng.

_
.
'' I p1op0Fe to go 'into the subject at lengt/z.
she oould feel nothing below her bosom H. R.
Haggard.
.
LENGTH AND" BREADTH- all over ; fl Schools
should be establii,hed through the length v,nd lire
adth of the country.

.
:J..et To , LET FLY OR LET DRIVE-to e.im ; a blow to
strike at with violence.
.
He let fly with such stoutness at tbe giant's
'head and sides that he made him let his weapon
fall out of his hand Bunyan.
.

To LEr OUT- to let some , secret beoo1ne known ;


PuLL ONE'S LEGS

to b oax.

e.

dis~lose.

Nave let out one d~y that be had remonstra.ted with hii-: daughter in vain Mrs. Henry Wood.
To LET WELL' ALONE to let things remain as
- . they are from fear of making them \Voree.
LET ALONE A phrase signifying'' much less;''
I have not had, this live-long day,
one drop to Obeer my heart,

!.
.
Nor brown (!1 ocJpper) to buy a bit of
bread wjth let alone a tart-Barham.
To LEr
ONE IN to make one responsible-without
.
his knowledge.
"
.
ire ~as let
for a good hundred:pounds by bis
bankruptcy.

. .
- ' son's
.
.
- . .-:
LET BE ! no matter !
.
.
Lemz~ Do not draw the ourtain.:
..

'

in

I ,,.. '

'

'


Let'
'. .

-.

' ,
,

205 :

Level'.

'j

Paul,, No longer shall yo11 gaze

out:

lest your f anoy



May think anon it moves.
. . Leon, Let be, let be !-Shakespeare.
TO LET BE-to leave alone.
. ,
Would it not be \vell to let he1 be, to give him
. .
. .his way and leave he1 to go hers, in pea~e ?H. R. Haggard.

..
. . . To LE(' THE .OA'l' OUT OF 'fHE B.A.G to, divi.1lge. a
secret ; ~- g. While talking with his friend he unconsci.01.1sly let tlie cat out of the bag.

To LET 'fHE GRASS GROW UNDEl~ ONE'S FEE r'-.To' do .a thing very, very slowly ; (tl1e phrase is
,usecl negatively) e. g. Now don't let t/iP. g7ass grow
u1ide1 your feet (=do the thing assigned with ut-
' 'most speed).
.
Tu LE'r BY-GONES BE BY-GNOES ~et the }Jast
remain unto11ched ; e. g. Oh, don't talk of those
times~ /l?t b11-gones be b!1-g1nes.
Letter To 'I HE LETTER-e~actly ; following instrt1ctions i11inutely.
He \vas overbeari11g, 11arsh, exacting a11d insis...:
ted on his order being carried out t J flic letfe1
-Hesant.
.
.
LE rTERS p A1'ENr a \\riting l)roceeding from the
Ct'0\\11., grantiog to a i>e1son the sole right to do
so111e speo1fierl act or enjoy so1ne specified privilege.
A }.IAN OF ! ...ETTERS a literary n1am.
LE'r'fERS OF THE LAND the precise tern1s of a.
statement.

TN LETTER AND SPIRIT both .in form and in


s1ibstance.

Lc,cl To DO ONE'S LEVEL BE-:>T to do one's utmost.


'' }lis level Best '' is the name of a . book b~
~1r. Hale, publisl1ed in Boston in 1~77.
:
He did ll.is lcticl best to get the appoi11tment.
r.ro H.::\VE ONE'ti l1Ei\D LEVEi;._to 11a.ve a \vell
l>u.la11ced mind.
T11e j11r;."' n1l1st be i11ad l ''
,

Lie:

''I guess not, Pat. They've the:reputation of


being a level-headed .. lot.'' Macmillan's magzgine,
1887.
.
.
.
To LEVEL UP . to raise to the same stat11s. First
used by Lord Mayo in 1869. . .

,
The older officials with sn1aller salaries ap... plied to have them levelled up. to the salaries
of the new comers.
. .
Lick To LICK INTO SHAPE-to give form and method
-from the actionthat the she-bear gives. form to
her shapeless young by licking them.

''But,'' eaid the dootor, as he resumed his ohair,

''.tell n1e, Bonnycastle, how you co'l1ld possibly


. .manage :to lick suoh a cub into shape, when you
~
do not reso1t to flogging.'' Captain Marryat.
To LICK 'l'HE DUST to be slain ; to be abjectly
servile.

His enemies shall lick the dust-Psalm LXXII-9.


To LICK THE SPITTLE-to be meanly servile.
His hea1t too great, though fortune little~ to
lick a rascal stateman's spittle Swift.
Lie As FAR AS IN ONE LIES to the li1nit of one's
. powers.
As far as i71 me lies, I mean to live upto her
standard for the 'future Florence Marryat.
T\> GIVE THE LIE ro to contradiot flatly. .
When another traducer went the length of
inoluding Margaret. in the indictment by the
. assertion that a female relative of Mr. Erin's
perfo1med the more delicate work of_ the auto.. graphs, be gave him tlie lie direct James Payn'.
Lm AT ONE'S Dt)Oli to be directly
imputable
te>

one.
.
..
;
Lm AT ONE'S HEART to be 'an object of interest
or affection to one. . .
. .
.
LlE IN ONE-to .be in .one's power.
To LtE TO ONE'S WORK-to
work
bard.
...
- .
.
. .
, They lay to the work and .finished it by, mid . .
.
'
day.

'

'

'

"'

Lie.:

207

;~

to remain unsold~ .
TO L1E ON ONE'S.HANDS :to:hang heavily, .,
Time laJJ on lier hands during her son~s absenoe.
,
L1E r'.N w AIT to am bush ; ;e.g ~ They lay in wait
to murder the rioh man.
L1E IN A NUT SHELL-spoken of a thing oapable
of brief exprssion ~ e. g. The explanation of his
strange oonduot lies in a nutshell the inan' 'is

insane.
Lm ON 'THE BED ONE HAS MADE-to take the
consequences of past oonduot; , e. q. You are
responsible for your present sufferjngs; you n1ust
lie 011 the bed yozt have 1iiade.

LIE OF THE LAND _po!:)ture of affairs ; e.g. I
must lcnow the lie of tlie l a11d before I can hold out
any hope to yot1.
Life-To THE LIFE very closely resembling the ori
ginal ; exaotly drawn.
,
Viator Hugo, \vho delighted in tl1at 1cind of
figure, \vould have painted him to f lie lifeS pecta.tor, 1887.
As LO:N"G AS Lt!- E-of the sa111e size as the living
bei1lg represented.
He niarched t1p and do\vn before t11e street
cloor lil::.e a peacock, as la1ge as lije ancl t"\vice
as I1atural I-Io.libt1rton.
To BEAR A CHAR!l'lED LIFE to escape death in
aln1ost a iniraculous i11anner.
Up and do~\'n t11e ledc1ers, u1)on tl1e roofs of
bt1ildings, o\."'er floors that q,unkcd and trembled
\Y-i'i:.11 his weigl1t, u11der the lee of falling bricks
n.11cl stones, in every part of t.l1at great fire was
l1e : but he bo1e a cli1.1r1nc<l life and had 11either
soratol1 nor bntise Dickens.
HIGH LIFE-the ,1nanner. of living of tho$e in
fashion able !.'OCiet,,. ; tl10 upper cl.asses of society.
AD\7 AN CED IN LIFE gro\ving old.
'
Ll1~E BEYOND life aftel' deatl1.
To LIB ON HAND

'

Lift-:
FOR THE LIFE OF ME-if my life were at ~take j
e.g. I cannot for the of life 1ne .unders. tand .what

..you say;

. '
. . .. .
. ... FOR ONE'S DEAR LIFE to escape death; e.g. At
the sight of the danger he ran fo.r his dear life. .
. . SEE LIFE to mix freely with ,others ;-e. g . You
cannot call him fool,,
all he has: seen 'm.uch
of, life.
,
: , :, ,
Ji"OR MY L1FE, 'FOR THE L1FE OF 1.>IE- although l
should lose my- life . as a.pena~ty. A .phral:!e:.used jn
strong assertions.
.
. .
. .
Nor could I,.jor my l1jc . s~e l1ow. tl1e creation
of the .\vorld had anything to. do. \vith. tl1e busin.ess
I
was-talking
of
A
'.J.11ollope.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.
.
Lift To L1FT. UP THE EYES-to loo le, direct. one's
eyes or thoughts to : to worlc with confidenoe. A
Biblical ph1ase.
.
.
I \vill lift nz11 e7/eS into' tl1e hills P~al1ns cxxi. 2.
Thou . sl1alt lift up tliy j ace u11to God Job.
xxvii. 26.

LlFT UP THE HEAD-to rejoice. Biblical. .


.
And now shall nly liead be lifted up above mine
ene111ies round about me Psaln1s xxvii.6.
,
LIF'r UP THE HEELS AGAINST . to treat violently.,

after

Biblical.

"

'

'

.
hatli lif,ed up liis

He that eateth bread \vitl1 i11e


heel ag11i12st me - John xiii. 18.
LIFT UP THE VGICE-to cry lottdiy in joy or in
sorrow. Biblical.
.
'
They shall lift 1tp their voices, they shall sing.
-Isaiah
xxiv.
14.
,
,
LIFT UP THE HORN to be arrogant in bel1aviour.
Biblical. .

'
Lift not up 11ou1 horn on high ; speak not with
a stiff neck Psalins. lxxv. :(): .

LIFT A H.AND AGAINbT

to: h11rt or OJJpose ; e, g.

You should no.t lift a liand against


brothers.

yo11l' fellow
'

'

: Light

209
-

..

' 'LIFT .A' HAND TO DO

make the lea.st effort to :

c. g. Do you ever lift a liand to . do anything


useful ?

.,

. ..

" . :
L1FT ONE'S HA'f bow ; c. g. I.: lifte.d 111y h'at to
him.
.
. .
- .
. '. .
LIFT UP ONE'S HANDS tolpray. .
, .
Ligl1t To SEETHE L1GHT-to come into aottial.exist
euce; to 001ne into vie\v.

The goorl. brother I But for _him my 'iloems


would never have seen. tlie lir1ht Besant. - -
To ?YI.AKE LIGH'r OF to treat as-of no iinportance;
'
to di:-regard~

.
Bltt n1y father 11ialce liglit of all plebeian notions
0. Reade.

To s1.:AND 1N ONE'S OWN LIGHT to hinder one's


own. udva11tage.

Do11't ~f1.i~1d i1l il1e po1)r. girl's light ; for pity's
sake, George, ltiave us in Ilaace- U. Reade.
To ~ET L1Gl:f r BY to under v:alue.
He sets lii;lit b!/ llis \v1fu s notions.
.
To Bl{lNG ru LlGtiT to. disclose-; to make1

kno\v11 ; to' 1~veal.


The dul\.e yet \vould have dark cleeds darkly
uni-.\ve. e<i ; hu \Vuuld llcvcr bri11g tl1e1n to liglit8 hul\.e~pearo.
,
.
bE'l'\VEEN '1WO LIGHTS-under cover of da1;knesi:;.
CJ11LDI{EN ()F I.. IGl-1' Cl1ri:-,tians as under tl1e
illlil11111tlt1u11 lif tl1e 1Jivi1'e ligl1t, tbat illun1ir1ation
'vhicl1 comes directly fru111 Gud.
.
Tu COME TO LlGIIT to' beco1ne kho\vn.
Con1e, let us go ; tl1ese things; thus come
to liylit,

S111otl1er her ~pirits up Sl10.kespeare. .


LIGli'l'-lINGERED GEN'fRY pickpockets. , .
LlGHT Ll'iEl~A'l'OR~ 11ovcls, tnlc4, books etc.
tl1at do not ieqttiro muoh sti1dy to understand them
LtGllT RE.ADlNG reading 'vl1i.ah does not require
me11tal effort to understa11d.

'

'

'

<

14

210

;L:iglit

''

--------------------..
.

Lin:o.---

a--person: .eas~ly .awaken~

. :A'JLIGHT. SLEEPER

:::,from:.,sleep.:

~-:.'.~~.

~.

,,

~-

To LIGHT OUT to make off; to disappear. On


Americanism.. .,: ,, .
..
.
: . ,.
Cheboygan Tribune. Oh yes,. the Soo is -boon1ing, and the following- :proves :it ;.Harry :Leavitt,
. . . .m,~na_ger of the theatre, . skipped: last,, w;e_ek.:; The
Eckert Robinson Co. did not -. take
. in .enough' to
-pay. expenses, and -left between two days.
BillY, . MacRobi~ ~ra~ged and l".obbed. ~ printer,
~
. ._nam~d Tom N el~on, on .Monday nigbt_and lit out.
Curious how tl- ey like to leave a live town . B_aztlt
:_.Ste_. Ma1~ News, .August -1888.
.
J.1IGBT OF OARRl.AGE loose in conduct...
.She .was said .to be .rather light. of carriage-Captain Marryat.
.
.
,
Like. HAD LIKE came n~ar.; \vas~on the point of.
.Wherever the Giantcame, all fell before him;
but the D\:varf had . lilce to have been .killed-; more
than once Goldsmith.
.
l STUMBLED, LIKE so to spealc, as it \'.\7 ere;
almost.

H~ SEEMED ANGRY, LIKE (the same as above).


. HE LOOKS LIKE WINNING very near.
LIKE ANYTHING to an ext1~me deg1ee; c. g.
I was glad like anything.

' .
LIKE A SHOT without hesitation; e. g. In' suol1
a case I \.vould go there like a shot.
'
Limb A LIMB OF TEE r~.A W a me1nber of the legal
profei::s1on.
.. . . .

.
.
- ..
Then, '.when this base-minded limb pf the law
grow to be sple creditor over all, he talces him
ot1t a custodian on all the deno1ninations. and sU}Jdenominations Maria Edgewo1th.

Line-HARD. LINES harsl1.trea.tment; undeserved mis~


f orfun e ~ "
. .
.
His wife . \voul~,.b.~ ~the .. best person, on~y it
would be hard lines on her A. Trollope.

'

'

'

'

''

'

'

',

'

'

Lion

Line
..

...

.-

...

.....

ALL ALONG 'l'RE LINE in every partioula'l".


The aoct1racy of the supposed statements of
facts is contested all along the line by persons
on t11e Sl)Ot
E. Gla1stone.: . .
To READ BETWFJEN THE LINE-to see a writer's
~oncealed ineani11g.

He ba".3 not e11011gh expe1ience of the way .l.ri
whioh inen have tl1ought and spoken 'to.feel what
the Bible writers al'e about-,...to read betwee.11 the
li11e:~, to discern \V]1ere he ought.to rest his. whole
\Vei.ght, and \Vhere he ought to P"!-SS lightly1-latl1ew Arnold.

w.

THE LINES .ARE FALLEN TO ME. IN PLEASANl'


PL.ACES I am fortunate in my worldly. surround.
.

1ngs.

A lonely \Vayfat'er, happy in the knowledge


that his daughter's fate \Vas no longer allied
with his, that \Vhatever evil might befall 11im,
l1er li11es were let ?'.n pleasa.12t places Miss
Braddon.

GIVE ONE 1..lNE ENOUGH: forbear to check him


.us in playing a fish; P. g. You say your brother is
obdt1rate; gi11e lii1n litl'J cnozigli and he \vill come
round.

BRING
1N'1'1..i
LINE-into
oonfor1ni.ty
of
vie\VS
01
'
.
fl.Ctioi1; e. g.
13 ~~11ou1d brirzg all tl1e 8Chools itzfo
liTIC \Vitll tl1is plan.
.t.\. LlNE 011' ONE'S O\VN cl1ooso and f ollO\V (l

-,v

'

-COUTse.

ON THE 1...INES LAID DOWN BY accordi11g to tho

dircct1ons or example of.

NOT IN ONE'S LtNE-out of one's provi11ce.


Li.on-A LlON OR A GREAT LION a very popular per
~on.

'\Te (Bul\vor and Disraeli) are great li'ons hero


as yo\1 111a.:r iu1agino Disrn.eli.
1'IJT~ I..lON'S SHARE n. disproportiono.t.elv
large
.
.

i;;l1u.ro. .

. '

Lip

212

:Live

From 1he story of the Lion who went.out. hun-


ting with an ass in the Aesop's Fables.
.Mr. and Mrs. Armytage had their bottle of
cha1npagne, of. which the iatte1, it was rather
ill-na tu1edl y said,, got tlie lio1.2 's slia1e . Jam es
Payn.
.
Lip MAKE A LIP pout .in sullenness or contempt.
I will nial'e a lip at the physician shakespeare.
LIP-SERVICE-insince1e devotion or . \VOI ship.
KEEP 01 CARRY A STIFF U.PPER L'lP to be stub-born or ill-te111pered.
.
It's aproper pity s_\1ch a cleve1 \VOman should
Carry such a ~t1ff itppe1
lip
Halibu1ton
.
.
.
.
'
'
Little THE LITTLE GO an exami11ation which candi-ciates for the B. A. Degree at the English Univer-sities have to pc1.ss early in thei1 course.
IN LITTLE . on a sn1all scale.
NO'.J.' A LITT;r.,:E. oonsiderabl~'"..
Li,e LIVE DOWN live so as to cause a scandal; to
be forgotten.'
. .
.
. He was beginning to live dr.1wn the hostility of
ce1tain of hi~ neighbours- \V. E . . Norris,. in
Good W 01ds, 1887.
L1VE UP TO A1fYTHING to prove oneself .by one's
life wortl1y of sometuing excellent. Puncli satirie
ses an asthetic man a11d his wife who, having
obtained a fine piece of old. blue china,
- re~ol\ted .
. .,, to li.ve up to it.''
. :.
A11d try to believe that, ~o far as in n10 lies .
I mean to live up. to her standard for the futu1e.
-Florence Marryat.
:

LI.VE OUT surv;ive: (U. S.) ~o be .in do1nestio


service.
.:
.. . .LIVE UNDER . to be a tenant under.

LIVE FROM HAND TO MOUUH to live a hard life.
, . e. g. The majority of the tniddle class men of our
,,
count1y livefrom hand to mouth.

LIVlNG ROCK a rock \vhicl1 has never been quar. :ried; rock still in its original bed.
-. .

<

213

Loaf

Lo cum

LIVE STOCK domestic animals kept on a farm.


LIVE FAST to lead a life of dissipation; e. g.

He who livsfast dies soon.


.
L1VE AND LET LtvE- to tolerate~ to IJUroho.se to
leration.

Loaf THE LOA.VES .A.ND FISHES the actual profits;


t.he.material profits. A phrase taken fro1n the New
Testament. Christ fed a multitude with some loaves
and a fe\V small fishec::. Those \Vho followed Him
not for his teaching, bli.t fol' the mere. gratification
of their ap1Jetite:; \Vere sa.i9- to desire the lo.ave~
and fishes.

.
Thenceforward he \Vas rich and independent,
and ~pared the temptation of playing ,'the poli
tioal gan1e with any pre~siug regard to the loave_s
c1nd fislies of office Edi12bzl-rgl2. Rcvictv; 1887. '
HALF A LOAF IS B'ITT1'ER THAN NO BREAD a
motto of oon1promise = son1ething is better than no
. fu~g.
'
1.orlt. To 1.0CK THE STABLE DOOR AFTER THE STEb)l)
IS STOLEN to take precautions too late. .
\Vl1on tl1e. sailors gave me niy inoney again,
.
they ke1)t back not only about o. thiJ:d of the
whole s\1m, b1l.t my father's l<>ather purse; so
t11at from tl1at day Ollt, I oa.rried my gold loose
in a poo1:::et \\ itl1 a bti.tton. I no\v sa\\r there
1n11~t lJe a hole, and clapped my ha11d to t110 place

in a g,.eat 1111rry. B11t this \Vas lo lonl~ f lie stable-


door after tl1'! ~f e'!d iva~ s.tolc1t R. L. Stevenson

LOOK STOC'K AND BARREL \vitl1 all J>elongings;


, len.ving notl1ing bel1ind; c. g. Yo11 must cloo.r out
lr1cl~ sf <1c:1c 012d bcr1rcl.

i ..oclccr NOT A SHOT TN TH'E T~OOKER no money


o.\ni1n.11lo; e.g. Aftel" lo.st nigl1t's erlra\~agnnce I
,,us left \\itl1 11of a ~l1<Jt. i11 f lie loc7~c;.

t.ocun1 Loouir TEt'ENS one \vl10 l1olds n sit11ation


, te1n-porarily: n. FtlURtitt\\'c:>,
, .
And t)o11old, 11e ~1nd l1is "Pnt1sl,io11e~ aTe gi'\en .

'

"

'

-.

,' .. over to zoeum tene1i.;' Ni1zeteetli Centitry, 1887.


Log; LdG~ROLLING 'a:. sy~tem o~ liter11ry: .o~iticism
conducted on the. lines of. n1ut11a1:. adnj.iration or
.. '. adulation; bestowed
one .ano"tb e1 by r)rivate
friends.
-'
'
.
. '
Tb ere. is certainly: rio; eXCltse: for literal"y. 'log
rolling.'. It is. a .detestable offence Nortli Ame
r?can. Review;:
1887..
;
.
:

:
.
'.
.'
.
. .
Logge~-l1eads ' Tt)
B.E AT LOGGER-~lEADS -quarrelling:
. about diffeiences of opin:on.

.A o6uple o'f travellers tba.t took. UP. ~n ass


. fell to . logger-heads which should be his master

'.on

'

Estrange: :

-L~
-

'

'

Loins To GIRD UP THE-LOINS see under


.''Gird.''
.
.
. Lombart Street LOMB.ART ST-REET TO CHIN A'. ORANGE
. some thing very valuable .staked against. a thing
.. of little valtie ; very long odds. fJ()mba1t Stieet, in
London, near the Bank of England, 1s a centre of
:' grea~~banking aJ?.d.rn!3rcantile .transactions .... , :

It
is
Lo,1nbart
Street
to
China
Orarzge,
''
quoth

uncle Jack.
.
. . ~'Are the c>'dds 1.n' favolir of fame against failure
' .
really so great?'' answered my father Bulwer
'

'

'

'

: Lytton:.
.

-
:L.jng-AT OR.IN THE LONG-RUN in :the. 'en.d;

even-

. tually.
. . .
.
.
:. ,

.
A ~tatesman .zn the lonq
rltn must yield to -royal

. solicitation--G. O. Trevelyan. - , . . .
. THE LONG AND SHOR1 OF THE MAT'ER tbe sum
:.
: of.. the ri1atter in a few- words.
-' ' . .
... But
motherwotild't p_art'with 'him-if bewas
a still worse encurnbranoe. It isn't that we don't
know the long a11d sliort .of nzatters; but it's, our
princjple George Eliot.
'
:
To DRAw OR".PUL'L' TH.E LONG BOW to exaggera. te ;to tellincredible stories. , .
.
:
King of Gorpus 'Vas 'on. the p'oint of' pulling.
.t:Jome dreaclfitl long bow, and pointing out a half-

my

01n,
.. ' .'.
I ..ong :
-----..------ --- --- . --- ----------------: dozen: of people in tl10 roon1 as R. and 1-i anci L.t.he most celebrated \vits ?f that day Thar.keray.
BY A LONG CHALK very . considerably.' (Colloq.)
A T.-ONG FIGURE (Sf i-;i12g) a high price or rate.
LONG CLOTHES clothes worn, by an infant child.
ONE'S 'LONG HOME-a poftic term for the grave.
THE LONG LAST SLEEP Deatl1.

. "
I.. ONG-WINDED tedious iz1. speech.or argu111ent.
L( NG FIRnI set of s\vindlers who obtain. goods
and do .not pay.
LONG r~EAD-foresight.
. ..
LONG ODDS-great inequality of stakes. in bett/j

1ng. .
LONG R.OBFE-Lcgal attire.
LONG T0~1-a gun of. great length.

LONG VIEWS-keeping in mind of distant consequenoes.


.
1.-ook L<JOK YOU l please observe \vhat I. am sayig.
To LOOK ALIVE, OR JJOOK SHARP to carry~ to
act llro111rltly.
.
''Tell young gent 7,, /oolc alive,'' says. guard,
opening the 11inti-boot T. Hugbes. .
To LOOK SHARP AFTER to-\vatoh oarffully.
Tl1e moment I became 11ere sole guardian, I
nad s\vorn on my knees she sl1ould never kill
anot.her 111an : Judge \vhether .I had to loofc sharp
qfte1 C. Reade. .

1
To LOOK BLUE- see under ' Blt1e.''
To LOOK DAGGERS see under ,;Daggers.'~
Tb LOliK A PERSON UP--to visit. informally.
I l1ti1 no idea yot1 11ad a visitor here. !v1rs.
Jennynge,'' lie said.
Yes; Miss Jooeline \\ras so good a~ to look.
'' rt:l ttp-James Payn.
To LOOK TO take co.re of.
She l1r1. ted to \\a.tel" l1er 10\vers no\t.; ; sliobude one of bet' ser~ante f () lnol: to t/irJ garden

'

-C. Ronde.

Loose:
'- .

216: "

'

a warning. of ooming danger. .


~

.
,
LOOK,ALTVE ! make haste. .
. .
.
. LOOK BFFORE YOU LEAP a void rash action.
LOOK BLACK frown. ' .
. ..
.
LOOK DOWN ONE'S NOSE. AT regard with silent.
displeast11e.
.
. . . . '
THAT IS 'YOUR LOOK 'OUT yo . 'must . provide
, against that.
'

....
If be choses to vote fol". the devil, that is his
. LOOKAHEAD, SIR,

'

look- out 0. W. Holme's.



To LOOK oui' to take p-recaution:s.

: .

Time sometimes . brings its reyenges,' and,


if it doe~, you may Tool' out, Mrs. Bellamy H. R.
:Uag ~a.rd..
. .
. - ..
. ..
:. To 'LOClK' FOR :'.A NEEDLE'. IN A.. B'AY STACK to
searoh after anything with very little chance of
.: finding it. .
'.
. . . .
t,
: Tb'e1e is 1ittle 'use searching :for hini in this
oro\vd; it is like loolcing for a ne1 dle in a hay
.! .. -sfacfc.

.
To LOOK THROUGH COLOURJ1D SPECTACLES to
see- th.ings not as they really a'te, but .'distorte'd by
:. one's prejudioes.
;'
. '
.
:
People who live much by thems_elves are .
1 : "'apt to worlc c1t things throztgh c1Jlnured
Spf'<:fac-'es.
TO LOOK ABOUT ONE to be cat1tious and wary.
John began tothink it high time to loc1Jcabout
him . Arbuthnot.
.
' .
. . - ..
. ..
'"Loose To L.OOSE ONE'S .PURSE-STRINGS to 'give
mon;ey 'toward8 some good object.
, .
.
. : ON THE LOOSE-dissipated. . '
:'
Her husband is, I fear, on t/iq loose just now.
: . A LOOSE FISH a dissipated man. . .
.
In short, Mr. Mills .\vas a loose fi8h _O. Reade.
BREAK LOOSE to escape f1om oonfinemf'nt.
t ;
GIVE ALOOSE TO to give free,ven~' to.., .
LET LOOSE to set at libertl'
. . .' .

' '

f,

'

Loose

217

Loss

------------------------'

'

' . . To LET LOOSE .THE BI.OOD HOUNDS OF w AR to


set in motion the destructive forces of \var.
Tu GIVE A LOOSE TO-to exp1ess free1y .
LOOSE E 'D want .of ocoupation; e. g. Soon

after tl1at I found n1y self at a loose 'e11d.



: Lo, SE FISH-~ a di~sol1l.te person.
A TILE LOOS~sometl1ing \Vrong \vit.h ~he brain ;
a d iso1derecl brain.

Do you think I a111


mad as he i.s? A,ttaok
a man \\~ho has just break-fasted_ wi~l1111e, merely
becal1se 11e has n tile lf>ose C:R.eade.
.
"Lord-'.LoRD
l1F
CREATION a man.. Tl1e.
term' i~
.
.
generall~ used. j JCt1larly.

No; T had. ratl\er l)e a \vo111an,.\vith nll her


imperfe_ctions, than one of thot;e" lord8 of crccz-.

f1'on. such ai:- \Ve generally find tl1em G. J.


W!1yte~Melvill<:'.
.

as

'

'

Lose-Ti) LO~E CAS1E-to be 110 longor \'\ elcon1ed


int.he 110'.1~es of respectable people.
You 1110.y l)1ealt every command in the deo-.
ul)gt1e \vith perfect gond breeding, nay, if you

n re u.cl :o\t, t~itf1.1lu.t losing ca"t<' J. R. Lo\vells .

To LOSE BEART to become dispirited.


De1)fl\ ed ot t::olid support in . the roar, the
n1en i11 front \\ill }Jroba.bly ln~e. 71eart, and be
. easily driven n.\vn.y or arre'1ted . Fortniglilly Re
Vi tlJ, 18f!7.
.
,
,
.
To LOSE THE DAY to bo defeated.
'
Yott \\ill be Hl1ot, and yot1r 11ouses \"'>Till be b1rrnt
and if ~'"O\l l(>~r. tht? do11 t11ose who, csca'})O will be
driven ottt of tl1e cottntr~" H. R. -I-Ingi:-o.rd.
To ! ..OS'E ONE'S HEA.D to be. ~xoited and rar::l1 ~
c. fl. :.\..:.. \\'e ''-'<'nt. i11to i1ctio1\ tbe co1ot1ol m1med to
lo~c fii:-i litnd and t\10 regiment got grea.tly ot\t t1p.
'ru LOSE oNESEL1"_:_ to lost~ ones \vn.y out of a
1

'

si tuo.tio11 ; to get l~o11tuRed ; !'. g. Tl10 J)leuder lo~t.


liirris1Jj i11 t11c n1idcllc of 11is CL1se
i'toss AT A LOSS-in u11oert-ainty; to l>e li.nnble to

decide.

Loss
.
.

218

, : :Jane .herself:was quite ot a: loss to think who


oould. possibly have- .ordered the-piano.-Jane
Austin:
.
Love LOYE. IN ..A. COTT.AGE marriage without a .suffi-.
oient income to live. the fashionable world.

Lady. Clonbrony. had not, for her ow,n . pazt


the slight~st ~notion how anyboy out ,of Bedlam
could prefer, to a good ho11se 1 a decent. equip~ge,.
and a proper establishment, what is called love
in a cottage Maria Edgeworth. .

THERE IS NO LOVE LOST BETWEEN TBEM.~they


dislil\:e each other.
.
.
: ...
There' is rio great love zost between the English
. conservatiye cabi.l!et and the Bulgg,rian Govern~
ment-Fortriightl11 Review, 1887.
.
Luck DOWN ON ONE'S LUCK see under ''Down.''
To OUT ONE'S LUCK to bolt..
Lucky He (Fagin) migp.t have got into trouble if we
hadn't made ozt1 luc.'~y D tokens.

Lug _IN LUG pawn ed.

My fidd!e in lug just now.


To LUG IN to introduce w'itho11t any appa1ent
connection.
. It doesn't matter .what the subject is, .always
p1ovidedtbat he oan lug in the bloated aristocrat
and the hated Tory Besant.
.
Lump HAVING 'A LUMP IN. ONE'S THROAT ready to
,

is

weep~

He grew more grave, and quiet, and slow. The


. lu?Jlp in my th1oat, grew larg~r every i11oment
Belgravia, 1886.
.
TO LUMt' IT to disJilce it.
. .- .
''She won't like that at all,''. said Musselbo\v.
. '' Then she inust lu112p it '' A. Trollope.
TAKE IN THE LUMP consider with an eye to the
average quality; e. g. I refuse t<? b~ talcen. 112. tbf!
lttmp with others~
. . .. :.-

.,

'

219~'

Lydiah:C

Lurch To LE.AVE IN THE LURCH See under ''Leave."

.t\

ATLURCH hidden or seoreted (generally for

bad IJttrpose).

'

'

To GIVE A LURCH to tell a lie ; to deceive.


Lustre SHED Lt[STRE ON to enhance the: glory of :
e. g. His presence shed lustre on the occasion.

.
.
Lydian. LYDIAN AIRS plaintive m.usic
1

'

'

-----

'

'

'

...

"'"

. ... .....

.;

... . .
' -

220

'

- -.

,_

ti

,_

M. - To- HAVE .AN

..

'

MUNDER THE GIRDLE-to'

'

liave the

courtesy tu add~es1:: people by the. title Mr.; or


Madam. (Prov.) . .
_ . . . _ ..
'1\fad "tvl.AD AS A HATTER see
,;Hatter.'' '
'

'

under

... AS -~tADAS .A MARCH HARE-:see under ''Hare.''


MAD - ON-enthusiastically keen; 'infatuated;
e. g. The young man has gone. niad.on, her.

MAD AT~anrioyed; e. g. He was mad at the


terrible mess of things.
MADDENING DELAYS a great f'Uspeni::e; e. g,
I was quite upset at the maddening dela11s of the
results.
Maggot M_.GGOT JN ONE'S BRAIN a crazy notion
or obsession; e. g. The fellow seems to have a maggot in Iii:- brai'lz.
Mahomet MAHOMET OOMlNG TO THE MOUNT.A.JNthe lt:>ss coming to the greater.
''As the mo11ntain would not come to Mahome.t, M i.!'S Rayne, you see that malioniet lias
come to the mnunfain,'' sbe says to hide her annoyance Florence Marryat.
Maiden MAIDEN SPEECH-first speeob.
Lord byron greatly, inded childisbly, elated
by the compliments paid to his maiden :-p1-ecli in
the House of Lords-Macaulay.
.

MATDEN HORSE -that has won no prize.


MAIDEN NAME-married woman's previous surname.
MAJDEN OVER in which -no runs al"e scored.
M..AlDEN SWORD that has not yet drawn blood.
Main IN THE MAIN, FOR THE MAIN for the most-pa-rt.
These new nc..tions co11cerning coinage have,
for lhe main, been put i11to writing above twelv-e
months Locke.
,
THE J\.fAlN CHANCE money; wealth.
.
l l1ave always, as you know, been a common
sense person, with a proper appreoiation of the
main chance W. E. Norris, in Good ilrord.~, 1887.

Make
-

.
make

~--~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

l\fake MAKE'.AT 'to run or 'move towards; to


a. hostile movement aga.ini.;t.

'
Tom rushed at J a;cob, and began dragging 'him
baclc by his smock; and the master made at them,
'

'

scattering, forms and boys in his oareerT. .Hugh es.

1fAKE AS 1F mal~e" atl appeara11ce of; to.feign.


Now; Mr .. Fetbltm\nd, \vhen thty .\\Te1e. going
out of the door, 1nade as. if 11e intended.to linger B't1nyan.

MAKEAGA;NST-to bo 1.tnfavourab1e to.


M.~KE AWAY WlTB_ to pitt.out of tl1e \vay~
Tt1e gentten1en 11ad sou1el10\V n1ade a\vay with
the obstructiveness - If,11pf!r's ]Jfagazi11e 1 1887.

. MAKE A WAY WITH O.NE:>ELF -to COllllllit suicide.

T t10 \von t.111 of .Gret: co \vere seized '''itl1 an


unaccountable mela11choly wl\lcl1 di~})Ol'ed se
Vb1al of tl1e111 to 1naf,1! uwa11 with tlicniselvesAddison.
MAKE A CLEAN 13R'EAST Oll, to confess fully ;
1
c, g. '1 he culprit 711U1[~ t.t C/t'Oll iJrc11. t tif r1is gtl.i.lt.
11..;\KE A FUSS .AEOU'l' to })e ur1duly agitated
abol1.t e. !I :Co no'\j 11i11/;e <zf,1.:-:s ab1111t such tr;flos.
J:vr AIZE A F< lOL OF-10 tict i:ooli~I1lJr; to deceive;
t'. g. I n1u.de a ft)1.l <if 1tit1.:1lf. rr11uy 11iadt? a J oul
cif y<Jt.l \vl1en they llersuudcd you to do tl1is.
J\1:aKE A M :UNTAlN ( 'l" A ?.!OLE I11LL . to oxagg111te; ' y. Do not 111ako a 111ountai11 of a. n1olo
llill.
.
1\fi\l{E IT A fOINT-to ren1ombor spocio.lly; e.g.
tnaf.;., 1't a p1Jint never to mi.-. '''itl1 hint.
}.fA_l{'E A
p.,\RAUE O'F-to 8h0\V off;('. g. .A.
pt:do..nt is OilO \VllO 1ncif:1','! p11rac[v Of l1is learnitlg.
J,f ,\KE .t\LLO\V .i'.NCE FOR n.llo\v concession ;
.r. g... You n1u!-t
r1i11I:( f'<>71lr. atft,tvn1zcefur l1is 0111.
.
n1!!tnes~. as 11c ls a no,~1ce..
1'f.:\KE AlrDNDS FOR 1o cornpenf:nte ; c. g. He
made an1plc an1e11 is fur his nideconduot to me.
0

'

.Make

222

MAKE BOTH. ENDSMEEI', to .balance income and


e~penditure';
frises :hay~ .:gon~; up "and. we

e.g.

:cannot male both;ends meet; ,. . . .


M.AKE .~ELIEVE-to .pretend.
. . . . . ;
.Rel' vie\v of the case waRthat his highness's
seo1etary, having. n.o be1ief in the :genuineness
of his master's pretensions, .fot1nd it nece~sary
to make believe' very much Jam es Payn. .
MAKE BOLD
'see under
.
. ''Bold.''- . . . . . . .
'MAKE BOLD WITH
under ''Bold.'~
..
.. .
MAKE ONE'S BREAD to earri a Jiving...
. .
.
MAKE BRICKS WITHOUT STRAW to .work with
Otlt having' the necessary materials' supplied. A
Biblical ph1ase tEi:ken from Exodus. . v~. 7... -- .
People do not look pre~sed, or:in.a hurry, or
tasl\:-mastered, or told to malce -briclcs toithout
st1aw Besant.- . .. .
.
MAKE A FIGURE to be conspict1ous; to distinguish oneself.. . ,



He never went the 'circuit but twice, and
then made nu figure for' \.Vant of a free and being
unable to spea. k in pti.blic-Maria Edg'eworth.
'MAKE FREE WITH to t1se without per1nisfii~n or

.ceremony.

These are tl1e same who have 112ade free 1nith


the greatest names Pope.
MAKE FRIENDS see under'' Friend.''
'

see

'

'

'

' '

'

. 11AKE HEAD OR HEADWAY AGAINST

to oppose

successfully.
.
:. .

.
Everybody was terror in his life,;and no one
.\\ras po\verful enough to .71talce liead again:Jt tl1e
free boote1s A1gosy, 1987. . . .
.
'

'

_to fulfil

'

; to malce 00111j)ensatio:ri fo1.


On looking into ...his affairs he found to fill
him with .dismay , deb~, : m.ortages, mismanaged
estates, negl.ect.ed 'cottages,
..
rn~;nsion goi.ng to
.
MAKE GOOD

_.,.._

..

'

'

'

~fake

---------.
.'

'

..

l\Iake

223

--------------

rl1in, IJesidP.s all his old arrears to be 11zade good

-Qua1tt>1ly Review, 1887.


MAKE LTGHT OF- to t1eat as unimportant.

. Up to the prei.-ent time he had maae rather


liglit of tl1e case, as for danger, 11e had poohpoohed it \vith good 11u111oured contemptC. Reade .
MAKE MUCH OF-to t1eat 'vith fondness ..
As hi~ wife had rema1ked, he always rnadc
muc/1. ~! G\vendolen, and lier i111po1tance had
risen of late George Eliot.
.
.
MAKE NO DOUBT . to be confident.
MAKE vFF WITH' to run away with.
The 11older of n. ho1se at Tellson's door, \vho
11iade off witl1, it, was put to death-Dickens.
MAKE FACES OR MOUTHS AT-to grin10.oe ; e. g.
"rhe boy 11iadr faces at his companion \Vhen the
teaober loolced a'vay.
MAKE l~OR to r11sh to\vards; e. g. On. seC'ing
t.l1e i11a11, tl1e. bea-r 1nadc for 11i1n
1'1'.AK.E li'RTEND.S \VI'rH be reconciled ; a. g. Ho
is a go11erot\s fello\v and \Vi.11 soon 111alcefriends
UJitfz. '!i'Ull.

:NI,\KE NEI'l'HER HEAD NOR TAIL OF unableto


11nderstttnd ; e.. g. l1e spolte for a11 l1our b11t I co11ld
11ic1lc! 'lll~itlt"r 11ead 11or t<iil of l1is s1Jeeai1.
MAKE UP ONE'S ?.!IND-to decide; e.g. I J1ave
ni<1<lt1 ttp 111r1 11iind not to go the1e.
1\1A'K 1..: UP FOR to amend ; c. g. He l1as 1nadc ttp
f<>1 tlJO lost ground.

1\1A1\.B UP TO ONr~ to tl.p})roaol1 ; e. g. Tho high\\1!1.~"' l11an 111ode tip to Tii111.


.
1fAKE A 1.l:ESS 01<' to spoil.~ e. g.. Yot1 l1a , .. e 111arlc

1-l!~:-S

OI' 'l'IlE \\l1olc t11ing


1

J\f.,\KE 01'"1"

to rtl.n

a\ta".'"
TllCJll1! <if \\it~ 1ny ll<)TSC.

\it.b; e.g.

~{A KI~ OUT to 1111der5lti tld


tJJlf tlto 111cn.11i11g (>f tl1is?

; c~ g.

_A._

stranger

Ct111 ~"'Oll 1nnl~e

:ftfake
....
..
""

-.-Make

~.22

~.

_ MAKE BO~H ENDS. MEEr . to '. bala no~. income and


expe.nditure ; e. g. Erises. hav:~ ._gone up :and. we

:cannot male.bothends meet; . . ' ._ . : . .


M.AKE BELIEVE-: to preten.d. . . . ;. .. :: _:
. ;Her vie\VOf the case. WaRthat bis .highness's
sec1e.tary, having no belief in the :genuineness
of his master's. pretensions, .fot1nd it necessary
to niake believe very much Jam es Payn~ - .
MAKE BOLD see under
. . .
.
. ''Bold.''.
.
'MAKE BOLD WITH see un.der ' 1 Bold.''

. .
MAKE ONE'S BREAD to earn a 1.iving. :
.
'
.

'

'

'

.,

'

'

t i .

'

'

MAKE BRICKS "WITHOUT

STEAw to work with


'

having the necessary material~' supplied. A


Biblical phrase t~ken fron1 Exodus.
7
..
_
.

.
.
. v~
.
People do not .look pressed, or.in.a hurry, or
tasl{-mastered, pr told .to malce . briclc$ .:tvithout
st1aw -Besant. . ... . : .. ' -

MAKE .A FIGURE to be conspiCtlOllS ; to' distinguish oneself..,



.
He never went the oirouit but twioe, 'and
then made 7lv figu1e 01: \-Vant of a' free and being
unable to spea:k in pttblio-Maria Edgeworth.
MAKE FREE WITH to use without permission
or
'
.ceremony.

These a1e tl1e same who have made free 1nitli


the greatest names Pope.

.
MAKE FRIENDS see under ''Friend.''
' MAKE HEAD OR HEADW Ay . .AGAINST to 'oppose
: .sucoessfully.

.
.
:
.
.
.
.
.
Everybody was terror in bis l~fe,. and no one
.\vas po\ve1ful. enough to .11ial'e liead agai1zst the
'
free hooters A1gosy, 1987. .
.
. .
. MAKE GOOD
to
fulfil
;
to
ni_ake
con1pensation
for

..
On looking into. ,his .affairs he .. found to fill
hi1n \Vith .dismay ,d(3bts, ,m.ortages, mismanaged
.-.
es~ates, n_~glected. c_ottages, . n)apsiC?2l ;go_ing to
.
...
Ot\t

'

'

'

'

'

'

,~-

'

-~Jake

::

Make

223

.
'
rt1in, f)esidAs a11 his old arrea1s .to be nzade good
-Quart{'1ly Review, 1887.

1'1A.KE LlGHT OF-to tieat as unin1portant .

. Up to the

pre~ent

time he had 'made 'rather


liglit of the case, as for danger, he :had poohpoohed it with good hun1oured. contemptC. Reade.

'
MA.KE MUCH OF--to t1eat .with fondness ..
As hi~ wife had remarlced, he alway_s made
much of Gwendolen, and her i1npo1tarice bad
risen of late George Eliot.
.. .
.
MA.KE NO DOUBT to be confident. .
. :
MA.KE vFF WITH to run away with.
The holder of a 11orse at Tellson's door, who
11iade off witli it, was put to death-Dickens.
MA.KE FACES OR MOUTHS AT-to grimace; e.g.
The boy ?1iade faces at his companion when the
teaoheJ; looked a\vay.

.
MAKE FOR :to rush towaTds; e.g. On. seeing
tl1e man, the .. bear 1nade for him .
MAKE FRlEND.S WITH be reconciled ; c. g. He
is a. generous fellow and will soon makefriends
witli you.
'
MAKE NEITHER HEAD NOR TAIL OF unableto
unde1'stand ;. e. g. He. spolte for an hour but I could
niul'~ 1ieither head 11or tail of his speech.
MAKE UP ONE'S MIND to decide,; e.g. I have
niade up m11 mind not to go there.
MAK fl.! UP FOR . to amend ; e. g. He has made rtp
for tbe lost ground.
'
.
:
.
MAKE UP 'lO ONE to approach;
The high. \Vay man 1nade
up to him. .
,
.
.
..
MAKE A MESS OF .to spoil ; e. g.. Yott have 1nade
.. A ME~S .OF- THE whole
thing.
,
,
.
. : '.-- M.AKE .OFF . to rttn aw:ay with; e; g._ A .stranger
made of with my horse.
,.
,. .
'.. . MAKE OUT :to und_erstand; e.g. Can you make
out tl1e n1eaning of.-this-? ..
:, .. . ...

e.g.

'

I ')
/

.1\'lak
. .. e

!\fan

224

.. , ,, MAKE'OVER to transfer the title. of.; e. 9. He


'inade over the p1operty to his b1otber. . : .' . '
MAKE THE MOST .OF to ui:e to tl1e best advantage.
_ ON. 'l'BE MAKE- bent.on self-advanoen1ent or pro-

.
, . . .
.
motion.'. .
Malice' MAT...ICE PREPENSE-jn: la"r evil . intent as
elen1ent in guilt ; e. g. 'l'here is llJ dotlbt that the
accused was inspired witl1 1nalice p1 .. pe'llSf!: ' .
Malign-~M.A.LIGN INFLUENCE ' an evil influence: e.g.
The dictator is a /J.1align
iii \.vorld politics
.. influencP
.
.
1
Malt '1 0 HA\TE THEMALT ABOVE T-HE WHEAT OF THE
MEAL to .be drurik (Colloq).
. - ,.
When the malt begi1zs to gr.t aTJOVe t/ig 11ie11l (company begins to get . di tlnk), they'll. begin to
spealt about government in , kirk and Btate
. Scott.
.

'

,.

'

1-

~iammon

THE MAMMON OF tJNRIGHTEOUSNE~S


:. wealthy and worlcly people. Ii's a Bibllcal phrase.
l\1ake to yourselves friendi:1 of f lic riia11i1n1J?l of
u?zrighfeou~ nes.s Ll1ke xvi. 9.

'Man MAN .ALIVE !-an exc1a1nation of astonishment.
It. is ue:ed vvhere one,hears or im1)oris sta1tli11g in

formution-(Vulga.r}

'' Ha11l ql1i.ok, Ede!'' sl1011ted Robinson. ''or


you w:]] d1own them, r11an alive.'' 0. Rearje. :
To A ?vl.AN -.:.everyone without excP1)tio11.
They had, t~ a mrrn, been willing enougl1 to
give their ve1dict for the old man's execution.

-H. R. Haggard.
.

.
A MAN' OF. EELf.AL- a' wicked, de'praved perf.!Oll.

It is a Scriptural phrase in common use.


'' St1san;'' replied Isac, '' you are good and l...,
innocent. You cannot fathom the hea1t:: of the

wicl~ed. Tb:is Meado\vs is .a 1na1z 'I Belial.''


C. Read.
,
:

,A MAN OF -HIS WORD

a t1utl1fu l or trtlst1,vortl1y

man ; {\. man to be depended upon.

.--.M1
.. an

..

. A.s for himself, Mt.-Osborn.'e~ lie was a" man of


his word. Thackeray.
. . . . . . r
A. MAN OF STRAW-a man of. no importance or
s11bstance ; a puppet.
.

This plotter, this deoeiv_er of th~ innocent, on


.whdm you vent your indignation, is a mere
man of Straw. The reality is a very peaceable,
inoffensive obaracter J. M. Dixon~
A MAN OF LETTERS-a literary man; an author.
As a man of letters Lord Byron ootild not but
be interested in the .event of. this contest
-Macaulay.
A MAN OF THE WORLD-one acoustomed to the
ways and dealings of i:nen.
What Mr. Yf ordsw?rth had ~~id like a _man. of
tlie world Macaulay.

.
THE MAN IN Tl-IE MOON a fancied semblance of
man \Valki11g in tne, moon. '
.
She don't know \vhere it will' take her to, no
more' than the 1nan in the -moon Haliburton.
MAN IN THE STREET--tl1e ordinary, uneduca-
ted man.

: MAN-OF BUSINESS an agent or a lawyer. 1


MAN OF SIN-the devil; anti-Christ. .
MAN OF H.A:ND:; a handy, clever fellow. (Slang).
Y.JU'LL BE ..A MAN BEFORE YOUR MOTHER a,,.
jocular expression of encouragement to a lad.
Used on a, historieal oooasion by Burns in addressing Sir V\~alter Scott.
You. mind your business half as well as l
mind
mine;
arid
. .
. you'll be man 'before Y.Dur mother
yet H. Kingsley.
.
..
'
-. . ' .
STATE . 'manhood. .
. .' MAN'S.
.,
. . : A. MAN IN. ;A' THOUSAND.: :a man so excellent~
that a thousand might' by passed by:. before.' 'o'n.6"'
... ,-0ould.. find.hisequal . .::: . ~:, .:. ~:7: .. . ;,., . . . :
,, . . . . rr
...
::: A.M.A.NOF-PARTS a...-~ari:-:;of superior ability,~
'man.'.of.more:thai:i ordinary':talents. .' . ;. ..... -~
,

'

'

'

'

'

'

15

'

'

'

,.~

'

~-,

,1

,I

-,

'

"Manner
..

Mare:

226

...

.. A MAN .OF SPIRIT a ...conrageous mart .of noble


" character. .
.
.. . ' . . .
..
Manner BY NO MANNEROF ME.ANS . Jl.Jlder .. no circumstances whatever.
. .. :... . .
.
..
,: .
. Not. ;tha,t he w:as, ;bJJ any manner :of means, pas1
:--, .. ses?ed witht)l,e: greatness of_ his own ideas, but
... :.that .. Mrs. F~rn1itage,.from a low, .velvet. chair,
looked up at .. him with. such emphatic in,quiry
and .implicit faith- tba.t he wai:i quite .in a diffi. culty how to speak or what to say-.R. D~ Black " more.'

. . .
'

.iVlAKE ON'E MANNERS to: salute :a . person on


meeting by a bow, courtesy.
.


.' To THE MANNER BORN accustomed to some. thing from the birth. ..-. .
.'
.
Many Too MANY OR ONE TOO :MA.1'.1Y not'. wanted :
in the \Vay. .
.
. .

'' We are one two n;iany for the job.


.. .

. THE
MANY
the
crowd.
.
.
'MANY .A TIME .AND OFT often and often : e. g
. }l[any atime and oft I have remainded you not to
go there.
.
ONE TOO MANY FOR more than a .match. for;
e. g. My brother alo11e is one. to9 many for that
fellow.
,

.
.
.
1uare To MAKE THE 1'.1ARE GO " 'to make a display of
.: prosperity ; to oarry, outundertaldngs. Gen.erally
found in the e:h.iJression, ''- n10Iiey makes the mare
.....

'

,,

'

'

'

. a-o ,,
b

The llfaTcinq f he 1nar~ io go h'ere in 'Whitford


'.'... witl1olit the money, too, some tii:nes0. Kingsley.
. . .
.
1
FIND .A MARE'S NEs r to make an absurd dis. !Jo.v-ery; to trace a -supp,osed .disco.very which tttrns
. .otit to be a hoax. . .
. . . .. . . : .
.'
.
'
.
.
He retired with a profusion of bows and. excu...
. ses, while Mr. : Reginald. Talbot.: followed in
'silence at his
. ,. heels
. .. .. like
. :a. whipped dog,.. who,
.

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

Mark.
.' .

227

professing to. find a bare in her .~orm, has only


found a mare's nest. Jame~ Payn.._.
SHANKS'S MARE . the legs..


I am riding shanks' s mare to-day.
T.,,,

' '

.,

. . ._ . . .
THE GRAY MARE IS THE BETTER HORSE:-the wife
'
rules the husband.
. . .
.
There is no equalizer of sexes like poverty
or misery, and thenit very often proves that

tlie gray mare is the better ho1se Burroughs.


?.1argin GO NEAR THE MA.RGlN :risk passing into
the wrong region, e. g. Dishonesty; B. g. That
way you stand the chance of going near the

11ia1gin.
MARGINAL

the gt:adual .decrease in


utility of a thing beyond a particular degree
:reached.

Ma1ines TELL TRAT TO THE MARINES-a. phrase ex


pressive of disbelief and ridicule, from the sailor's
contempt for the marine's ignorance ofseamnaship.
Unless you can put your information together
better than that, you may tell your story to the
ma1ines on board the Pelrous . H. Kingsley.
. .
.'
1\ia1k-MAKE oN:m's MARK to leave. a lasting im..
pression ~to gain great influence.
The at.mospl1ere of society is soiAntific l'lnd
asthetio, and its leaders althohgh. bound
be
moderately' we11 off~ . have~. ':for the . most part,
niade tlieir 111arlc by their brains Edinburgh
Review, 1882.
.
:
GOD BLESS~ . OR .SAVE, THE'"M.\.'RK . 'A superstitious utterance, originally used to avert evil. A
. phra.se. expressing ironical, astonishment .or scorn,
from the usage of archery. . Afterwards . it oa1ne
to hav~ very li~tle me~ning. .'~I beg your pardon.''
To be ruled by .my. oonsci~noe, .1 shquld :stay
with the Jew my master_, .wlio (God bles_s the mark J). _...... _
.is a kind of. devil . Shakespeare..: .: : . . . . . . . " '. .... -::~
UTILITY

to

~1''"

,, ..

_,,

-.
. '.

,'

'-

. .
'

.. ,

.
'

-.

Ma'rk
. -- - . .. -

--

. -.

'228
.. --- ..... -"

~.

...__. '

--- ._ .....
.
-

-~

-'

__ ...

Crystal Palace-bless the'niark I is fast.. getting


ready Ma.culay.
-- ... ' - : .
SAVE THE MARK. an.
invocation
God
for
.
.
.
mercy.
_
. ..
I saw the wound, I saw it with my eyes on
eyes God save fhe ma-:-1' I- here on -his, manly
breast - Shakespeare.. '
A MAN OF MARK a well-known or famous man.
BESI_DE TBE MARK not properly. referring to the
matter ; out of place. -

. . . . -. .
There is .a circle of elect spirits, to whoni the
whole. strain of this paper will, it is most likely,
seem to be beside the ma1k W. E. (}ladstone.
UP TO THE MARK good enough measured by a
certain standard ; in good condition.
_
Bob, although he had been a very short t_imebefore brutally knocked t.1pon the top of the kit
. cben fire, was upto the rrzarlr, and appeared ready
, f<"r action H. Kingsley.

.
HIT THE MARK to succeed ; e. g. You have hit
the 1narl<. in solvi11g :this problem.
"- : -MI~S. 'I'HE MARK to faiJ.
BELOW THE MARK inferior.
MARKED DIFFERNCE noticeable.
MARKED MAN regarded with suspicion.
MARK ONE'S MAN select opponent to be watched
and frustrated .
. MARK MY WORDS I form emphasizing prophecy.
MARK OF THE BEAST signs of iniquity, heresy,
etc.

l\'IarrO\V To GO DOWN ON ONE'S MARROW-BONES - to


. kneel .. _
. _
He shall taste instead of me, till he goes down
on his. m'orrow-banes to me C.- Reade.
.
J'!Iat:rr. MA'RRY~co:M~tJP a derisive or sarca"stic ex.. - clamation, now obsolee. (Vulgar)
. . _
l\l~sh- TO MAKE ONE'S MASH 'to. gain:- a -dev()ted adw
mirer. (Slang~) - -

'

to

'

'

'

".

- ..

'

Measure
.

.............

l\feasure'' TO MEASURE 'SWORDS ' to fight with swords,


. and :no'other weapori~ . :
. ..
So
measure . swords
:: :' peare:
.

. '.
' , '
.
and parted . Shakes
,, ..
.
.
.
.
.. ' .
',, : 'MEASURE ONE'S LENGTH. to fall" 01', be thrown
'down at 'full length. . .

If you will nieasure you1 '.lubbers t6ngth. .again,


tarry Shakespeare.
: . .
.
ME.A.SURE STRENGTH .AG.A.INST to' engage in a.
contest.

'

_The faotions whioh. divided. the p~irioe's oan1p


. had an opportunity' of ' m! asu1ing' : .strengthMaoaulay. . .
.
.
To' TAKE A MEASURE OF 'MAN'S FOOT .to .see
what's his character; to decide mentally how muoh
.
a
man is fit for or will ventu1e to do.
.
.
.
.
. . This was .Former Greenaore's. eldest son; who,
to tell the t1uth, had.. from his .. earliest years,.
.. talce1i the exaot measure of miss Tlio1ne' s footA. Trollope.
,.

we

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

MEASURE OTHER'S 'cORN BY ONE'S OWN BUSHEL. jdge others by .oneself. e. g. All men .. measure
others corn by tlieir own bushels.

..

TAKE MEASURES . AGAINST

to
prevent something.
.

l\1E.ASURED

LANGUAGE

'

daloulated

of studious '1noderation.
.

slow regular pace...


.. :. MEASUREDTERMS well weighed.
l\Ieet MEET H.ALE-W.A Y to make mutual concessions.
Margaret wa~ indignarit with her cousin
. . that he did not respond. to his father's kindness
with inore enthusiasm. .,, If he had behaved i:o
to me, Willie~ I should have .met him half-way,'"
.. she afterwards said. reprovingly - James
Payn
.
i\ierJ;y-.A MERRY..ANDREW ~ clown, one who makessport for others. Also U9ed familiarly without thearticle, like Tommy .Atkins, Jack Tar.

. . MEASURED STEPS

'

aotion

'

~i-1"

-'
1

~:

,,

..\~lilk

: 231

:Mi(isummer
.

... ..
..,.

... -
.'"' ,.. -

- ,...,..

His business,..is. jibes

... ,t

....

.. -,~~

'

aiici jes.ts.:' ~~d .'.this_ .fs. ;the

first time that I -eversaw :1'.r/erry Aridrew ar.


.rested :Beacorisfield.
. ' ,
l\f id summer MIDSUMMER MA])NESS... utter 1.naoy..
Migl1t . WITH MIGHT .AND MAIN .. with ?-11: .one's
. energy and ,resources. . . , :. . ....... : :-: ..
.. , :With mig1i~. a_nd .main ~hey . chased tp.e murder. ous fox-- Dryden.
. . . '.
, : . :...
Mild-DRAW IT MILD- do no:t exaggerate. .
: . :.: .:.
.
. Draw it a little milder~ .C.oombe,, do. ,.Malce it
four or five, and it will be much n~a1'er: the
marlc Florence M:aJ;ryat..
. .. ~ .
l\iilk To CRY OVER. SPILT ,MILK to' indulge in Useless regrets.
.: .
But it's no ttse crying over: sp.ilt :millc Blackmore.

, . , . '
,.

'

'

'

<

'

._,~.'1\',

''

'

.-

. :

.11

THAT ACCOUNTS FOR .T.BE MILK TN.THE COCOA-

that e~plai~s matters. (Prov:.}! . .


He has some land in the settlement belong..
ing to him. That_ nccounts. for the mill' in the
cocoa..nut-.:.-tha't'explains his anxiety' to have us
more out there__:J. M. 'Dixon~ ..... ,
:
. MILK AND WATER tastel'ess '; 'i11sipid.'' :. . , '

Hitherto the cionversation had so'. much of


1riillc a11d water in its :oompositi.ori, 'that Dalrymple found hi1nself able to .lceep it up and .go on
with h1s baokgroU:nd ,. at , the
'.tl.me A
Trollope.
. :'

NUT

same'

..

THE 11ILK OF HUMAN. KINDNESS~, nafurai f~el{ngs

of pity, sympathy, and generosity.


:. . .
. . . '- .. .. . . . . . , . I fear. thy nature ;
rt is too f1l.ll of. the rnilk of hitma?z -lcindness.
, 1 . . To oatch the near~st. w:aYc.
Shakesp_eare.
MILK ~~D .HONEY. sym.bol ,of .. products:of.a.rioh
. land. . '' '
' . . .' ' .
~
. Mrt:K FOR BABE~ .doctrine eto ~impiifted for the
ignorant.. .(opposit~ of:.sfJ."o.ngmeat). . : '.,

MILK SOP- an unma_tily man. e. g . Well,.:fighting


is not a job for milk .~ops like you
r

'

"

'

'

. .. .
'

' ,.

"

'

Miller
"""
'

<.

'

ir

..

1 ...

r .. ,,.~1--r

,,.,,.(

d
M JD

Miller TO DROWN THE . MILLER to Pl.lt tpo muoh

water in anything .. {Slang).


. ... : ~ . :
This pun oh is not , wo1th drinking--you've

drowned
the Miller.
..
Milling MILLlNG IN

..

THE

...

'

murder at

DARKMANS

night.

Men were mep. th~n, and .fought in the open


field, and there .was nae milling in the .dark-mans.
-Scott. (Prov.)

, . . , .
:_Mince:--TO MINCE MAT'rERS~ to speak._:. ~f _thi,ngs with
affected deliGaoy; to present in. too favourable a
.

light.
''
' ' .
. . " .
I11deed, not to mince the matter~ six or sev.en.
ill that sacred band 'were nullity 'in. person.-

C. Reade.
precision.

'
to i:nalce mince-meat of anything

MINCE-MEAT

throughly broken or cut in pieces ; to completely


destroy.

'
.
.
.
We should 4ave made :mince-meat of them all,
and perhaps hanged up.ope or two of them outside the inn as an extra sign-post-. G. A. Sala .
..MINCING GAIT walk with affectedly short steps
e. g. High ladies have to learn a minciug gait.
. . MAKE MINCE-MEAT OF destroy ; utterly. defeat
of refute; e. g. I made a. minae_-meat of his arguments.
.

..Mind MIND YOUR EYE (Slang) talce care what you


are about.
.
. . Wemu;;t mind our eye, George. A good inany
tents are robbedevery week C. Reade ..
MlND ONE'S P'S AND Q'S to be accurate and pre cise; to b'e careful in: one's behaviour.
I think that this worJd is a very good sort of
' . .. "world~ and that a man: can get al9ng in 'i~ .very '
'vell if he:minds.hi8 p's and q's A. Troll.ope.
OF. ONE MIND agreed.' : . . . .. : .. . '. : ' .
'

'

'

witli' affected

WORDS , articulate

MINCE ONE'S

'

I.

: . ' : l

"'

. .

,,

.
'

. . . . . . .

<~

''

.'

f'

''

.,
,

Mint
. '
r '.,

'

233

OF TWO ld:INDS uncertain what to think or do.


MIND ONE'S OWN BUSINESS
not .to meddle
in
.
'

'

g:

other's concerns ; e.
.1 nstead of. discussing his
habits you should rather tnind your. own busir1ess.
P .A~S OU'r OF MIND be forgotten; e .f I am
sorry that the matter passed entirely out. of my
mind.
To MY MIND in my judgment;

HAVE A GREAT MIND be persuaded to.


1\1int A MINT OF MONEY a large. fortune.
She went on as if she had a mi11t of mo11ey of
her elbow ~1aria Edgeworth.
"Mischief PLA.Y THE MISCHIEF WITH to disturb. any. thing greatly; to ruin.
.
Don't you l~now tl1at you will pla?J the very
1nisch1.ef witli our vagus nerves Wn1. Black.
Miss A Ml;:,S IS AS GOOD AS A MJLE-a failure is a
failure whether one COll,es very near succeeding or
not. A man will lose tl1e train equally by being a
minute as by being half an hour.too.late. (Colloq.)
Had the tie parted one instant sooner, or had
'
I stood an instant-longer on . the yard, I. should
j,nevitably have been thrown violently from the

. height of ninety or a hundred feet, over .. board;


or what is worse upon the deck. Bowever a miss
is as good as a niile a saying which sailors very
often have occasion to use R. H. 'Haggard.
MISS ONE'S TIP (Slarig) t,o fail in: one's plan or
.attempt.
,
'' . '
.. .
MISS THE TARGET fail to hit.. .. ;:. .
'
'
: . MISS SUCCESS fail.to reach~ . -' .
: ::.
Mrs::; EACH OTHliR fail to. catch .. '
' i . . : : . ''
: . . NEV ~:R MISSES A DAY omit. .
~
~ ' , .MISS,
WORDl:l
pas's
'
.
. over.
. '. :. .. . . .
MIS~ED AT ROLL-CALL absence noticed. .,
~-: ' Miss ONE BADLY . regret.absenc.e'of. : '.. . :
. . . THE Missm LINK. Suppose.a: ;intermediate type
~. ::'betWeen'man.and' ape~' ' . '
.. : . '.. . : -: ...... .. '
'

''

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

.
'

. ..

'

.
'

'

"-'

'

'

'

'

..

' ~'

'

'

-~I

,, I

''

'.

t ' ' ...

"

234

Mitten

Mitten Tb GET' THE.:M'.iTTEN ..tci

.. .

-.

'

'

- ..

~ina:ke'.~n 6ifer of

. marriage and.:1J0-:rejec\ted.' (Slan'g) . . " . ' . . . . . ..

There is a young lady I have set iny heart. on


,: thou'gh wh'ether she .is ,going' 'to' give me_ hers,
,,,.. or give me ihe .m.itten, I ain't_ .qui.te satisfied". 'Haliburton~.,
..
. . "
TO HANDLE WITHOUT THE GLOVES. OR .WITHOUT
MITT ii,NS -.see ,.,
"tinder
'' B and!e~
,,...
.. : : :- ... .
. :
... --.,':,,
.,',

Monkey MONKEY;s ALLOWANCE-ha~d biows.instead.


of food. 'A sailor~s slang; .
. . . ' : . . . ....
You fellows: work like bricks, spent money,
and got midshipman~s half-pay. and monkey's allo
. wance C. Kingsley.. , .
. -. ; .. . :.
.. To Gl! T OR HAVE ONE'S }.10NKEY
UP to be angry.
.
. You'll. Ji ave liz:s .mo1zlcey up d ireotl s H. Kingsley,
'

(Slang.)

'ro

. .- .

....
out :of

to drinlc Tllill
oocoa-nuts. It is a oommon practice for sai101s to
: buy ooooa-nuts; extract the m1lk, and fill them aga: .. in with 1um. (Prov.)

: " I. didn't peaoh. at Barbadoes when 'the men


' ; su.clced the 1nonlcey Kaptain Marryat. .
l\Ionth' A MONTH OF .SUNDAYS ' a pe1io'd t:b.'at' seems
,

SUCK . T.HE. MONKEY

very long.

'.

'

' ''

'-:

H.e ~ould easiii. have "revenged himself by gi-

...
,

ving me a kick.with his heavy shoes on the headsor the loin's, that would ,ha ye spoiled my running
for a month of Sundays C. Reade.
.
Moon A MOONLIGHT FLITTING a removal of one's
furniture. &c., during. night, .to prevent it being
seized for rent or debt. .
'
They took a i1ioonlight flitting soon after, and.
were never heard of more in the old c6t1ntry.J. M. D]xon, . .. . . . : .

:
MoONSHINE-(Fig.) show without reality; poa-
.. ched eggs with sauoe; (U. S.) smuggled spirits . .
. . SHOOTING OF MOONS same as '' a moonlight flitting.;,

'

'

'

..

Moon

Mountain

235

- .. , 9G'lf

'

:born

MO.ON. CALF. :a
fool.
-. ' . - . .
.: .
MOON-LlGBTER--a doer of agrarian outrages by

' .
. '
MOON-SKINER a spirit smuggler.
.. :
MOON-STRUCK a lunatic.

-.
Moot MOOT CASE OR POINT matter on which opinions differ.
._
. .
.'
Mortal MORTAL REMAINS 'the' perishabie body afte1"
death. night.

"

"

'

"

MORTAL WOUND fatal.


.
MORTAL AGONY OR FEAR very great ..
Two MORT.AL HOURS long and tedious.'
NOT .A MORT.AL MAN no-one.
Mother-DOES YOUR MOTHER KNOW YOU'RE OUT ?

a-

quizzioal expression used to person who seems too


simple and childish to take care of himself.
I went and told the constable. my property to
track ;
. .
. _
. .
He asked me if I didn't wish that I might get
it back.
' ' .
-. :. :
I answered, ''to
be st1re
it's :what I'm
..
. I do.!
.
cotue about.''

.
.
''
..
.
.
'
He smiled and said, Sir~ does your :1nother
. know that you are out ? '' Barh'am~ :

MOTHER-WIT common. Natural shrewdness.
It is extempore,: from my motlier-wit. Shakes-
.'
peare.

- .
MOTHER'"S APRON STRINGS- a' :Phrase" used to"
sjgnify '~watchful maternal care'' of a child too
young and thougb.tles~ to take care. of itself.
Little Smith~ fresh from. his mother's apron-strings, savagely . beaten ::by. the. cock of the
school H. R. Haggard.
. . . .. . .. .. . ,
..
Mountain To MAKE A MOUNTAIN .oF A. :M:6LE-H1L't,_
. . to magnify: a trifling matter. _ : : .. . . . :
. , S~ and nonsense, . Segrave! You're making
mountains out of mole-hills, as you. always doGood Words, 1887.

'

...

'

'

'

'

'

'

' '

"

ltfouse,. ' ,
~

'

.,

2S6..
-~

\.,

'

. ..

.-.

. ..

Mouse PLAY LIKE .A OAT WITH A MOUSE-tease or


\ torture with suspense.

: .
Mouth DOWN IN THE MOUTH despondent.; out of
spirits.

But open bringing the next ashore, it proved


to be only one great stone and a few little fishes;
upon this disappointment they were down in flze
mouth L' Estrange.
.
.
.
To HAVE .A GOOD MOUTH of horses amenable to
the bit.

ONE'S MOUTH WATERS he feels antioipatory or


in imaginative pleasure.
'

PUT 'WORDS INTO ONE'S MOUTH attribute them


.
tochim ; also tell him what to say~
ITSOUNDS STRANGE IN YOUR MONTH from you..
rdove TO MOVE HEAVEN AND EARTH . to make every
possible effort;
But of course all the Plumstead and Frarriely
. set will tnove heaven and ea1th to get him out,
'so that he may not be there to be: a disgrace
. . to the diocese. -A. Trollope. .
-Much MUCH OF A MUCHNESS-just about the . same
.. value. or amount.

The miller's daughter could not believe that


high gentry behaved badly to their wives, but
11
her mother instruoted her,
0 child, men's
men, gentle or simple they're niuch of a much... .. ness.'' .George Eliot.

Mud-TO THROW MUD AT . to speak evil of.


A \voman in my position must expect to have
. . more 1nud th1own . at her than a less important
person Florence Marryat. .
. . '.
-}lug TO MUG UP to. prepare for an !exami:ria~ion. A
college phrase. (Slang)
:
. .

. These students have been mugging up for their


~ University Eia.mination which begins. in a fortnight's time~

. '

~

,)

:_

l\fiill '.: ::

1'1ull rro MAKE 'A 'MULL 'OF lT . to' 'be a\vkward and
.-; unsuccessful.' . .. - . . . . . . . . . : ''
''I always mal\e. a mull. of it,' he. said to. himself
when the. girls we~t .UP .to get .their hats A.

Trollope. .

....
.
.
l\ium MUM IS THE WORD This is a secret ; e. g. Be... w.are, ~ ni1im 'is the word.

~u~~bin~~ BEAT TO ..A MlJMMY to give a severe

The two highway n1en caught the 1nformer


and beat hini to a mummy.
l\iump Mu MPlNG D.A.Y St. Thomas' Day, the 21st
Dece1nber, a day on which the poor were aooustoma
ed to go about the country begging. 'fo mump is
to ''beg'' or ''cheat!'
l\iurder MURDER WILL OUT. murder cannot ren1ain
hidden. The phrase is now current about secret
deeds which aTe not crimes.
Murder, as the proverb tells us, will out: and
altl1ough, of course we do not know how many
murders have remained undiscovered, appearanoes seem to lend support to the theory W. E.
Norris.

'

THE MURDER'S OUT everything is discovered.


Mushroom MU::lHROOM GROW'rH sudden develop
ment; an upsta-rt person or institution .
l\'Iustard grain of mustard seed a small thing capable

of vast development.
. Muster P .A.SS MUSTER be accepted as adequate.
To MUSTER STRONG to assemble in large num-bers.
Mute MUTE AS. .A. FISH perfeotly 1 silent.
.
!liutton To EAT ONE'S MUTTON to dine.

'

238

l\fntton

Mutton

< '

''Will you eat ;your mutton with me to~ay,


Palmer?'' said Mr. Williams at the gate of .the
: . : jail C. Reade. . . , ,. ..
' . :
..

'

'

'

'

l'

'

. RETURN TO ONE'S MUTTONS to return


to
the
sub.
. '
.
. jeot of discussion
a ..hu~ourous mistranslation
of
'..
the French proverb '' Revenous a nos, montons.''
-(Gallicism.)
.
.

.
.
LACED MUTTON a loose woman. It is Shakes.
pearean.
..

'

' .

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

. ''

'
'

..

..

'

.
'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

.'

'

'

'

'

'

'

, . . 'l

'. 24(;

- .

.. _.,

Nap To GO NAP to stake all the winnings. A ph. rase tal{en . frqm the game of nap.or.Napoleon .: ..,.
< c . "Go NAP take liigbest.r!skin th.is;. e.g. -;Go :nap,.
, : boy, this is the thing f or-,you ..... -. :.. :::
Napping 'To TAKE OR' CATCH' ONE: NAPPING to find
him unprepared.
.
. .
"
.
. No, George, Tom Weasel won't be caught napp
' . .i1zg .twice the same year C. Re.ad. " .
Napkin BY UP IN A NAPKIN nglect ~o u~e; e. g~,
These' useful .things were -not given to be-laid up in
a naplcin.
..
:
., '
Nature IN A STATE OF NATURE-Ifal{ed. , . ,,
The man was fot1nd in the cave. i?z a state of
nature, arid raving .mad. . .
:
Naught To SET AT NA:UG:HT to': disregara.:,. . ':
, . . . . . . .
: .
. : : Be .ye contented
To have a son set your d~crees at naitght.

'

'

'

'

"

''

'

:.... Seakespeare.

'

<

'

'

.: .
Near TO BE NEAR to -~e stingy or parsiriloniou~.. :

,.

, .

\'\Tith all her magnificient condt1ct as to wast-


ing alcoholic preasure, .. she was rather .. rzea1 .

Co11way. .
~ . .
.NEAR ONE.'S HEART-dear to one .

. NEA~ AND DE.AR close relations.


.
. A NEAR GUESS with little lnargin.
, . NE.AR UPON not much short of.
. ..
Neat NEAT A.s A .PIN very neat and. tidy.
Everything was ds neat as a pin jn the .bo11se
R.H. Dap.a.
.
..
Neck NECK AND NECK exactly. equal; !ceen and
.
'
. close. . .. .
.
.

If ne\V comers were to bring ]n the system of


71 eck-and neck trading George Eliot. ._ , To BREAK THE NECK OF ANYTHI:NG 'to acoom.. plisb the stjfes_t.par,t. of it. .
.
., : . : .
. Blow-hard was a c~p1tal sp1nner<of. a ya~n
... , , when be had brolcen the. 'fl!C/C . of ~i,S ~ d~_y's .work

-Hughes.

241..2

. . : ON THE NECK OF immediately :_after. : . .'


Instantly 'the neck of this came . news that
Fernando and Isabella. had oonolud~d .a. peace:
-Bacon. . . .
. .: : .
'
NECK AND CROP oomplet-ely.
'.
.
., Finish him;
and erop ; he deserves. it f9r
sticking upto a man like you 'Blackmore. .
.. A ;'STIFF' NECK obstinacy i~'. .'sin.' .. 'A. :B'ibli_o.al
phrase."
, , ', ......
Speak not with a stiff neck:-Psalms lxxv.5.
NECK.AND HEELS in: a hasty and summary fashio'n.. . .

: .
. -.:
He rushed to the scene of unhallowed festivity,
inflicted corporal punishment on' the" ~.'.fa ther of
the feast,'' and turned his astonished guests .neck
. aad lieels out .of doors w .. Irving. .. -. :
NECK VERS~the verse (usually Psalms Ii; i) in
early times placed before a prisoner claiming bene- .
jit'."of~clergy, in order to test his ability to' 'read;
whioh, if he could, do, he was burnad in the hand
and set free.
..

. .
.
Poor rogue I he was soon afterwards: laid by
the heels and swung ; for' there is . no neck
. verse

in Franoe to save .a gentleman from the gallows


'
-G. A. Sala.. .
.
, :
NECK OR NOTHING ' risking every thing~ ' . ' . '
It was neck
nothing with me whether I should go dow:n to the gulf of uttet neglect or .not
- Thomas. Campbell. . .
. .. . . .
., .
G'El' IT IN THE NECK suffer heavy blow. . . .
SAVE ONE'S NECK-to save life .
- .
Ned To MAXE ONE'S NED' OUT OF to niake money
from. Ned is a slang word far a guinea.'
. There are. a good ~~ny people~ there,- fro~
other parts, ~nd always h'ave been, who come
to lllake. money and 'notl1ing . else ..... and who
intend
to
up
killook
arid.
off
(de.part
\vith
all
- .
.
.
",'
"' .

on

'

neck

'

'

'

,,

'

'

'

'

'

or .

.,.

'

' '

16

'

~'

~,

,'

'

'

~'

I\,

'

'

,_,

Nest

242 .

Needle

their pro11erty) ~s soon as theJ>- have made.their


. . ned:out of the Blue-noses
::.
. . Ha- lib ll rton.:.
.
'

<

Needle tci GET.THE NEEDL~t6 get1rritated. .,


Take care lest .he ' get tlie needle
an.a
send.you
.
.
.
,,
.
'
. . .
.
'
.' ... . - ..
0 ff
.
. . SHARP. . AS ,A .NEEDDE- quiok~witted e. g. The
. girl is sharp.'.'aS:. needle. '.: .' . ,.: _'. . ... : .

,,

'

.!

'

'

'

. }f,EEDLE 1N A ]3QTTLE OF HAY

_an elusive thing ; .


~.. g.: The meaning of your talk is like a izeedle in a

bottle of hay.

_ .

TRE NEEDLE a, fit of nervou-Sness.': . .


" N:EEDLE-B.ATR.:.-shower bath with

...

:fivespray. _

Needs

NEEDS MUST WHEN THE DEVIL DRivEs' . one


must sub1nit; however ungracefully; to hard necessity.. . :Needs -.-means ' of Iieoessity' indisp:ensably,
often. used w.ith: must. -
,
-:
_:
''What youare .in, tantrumsagairi 1 ''said she
. :'' come along, :sir.. -.''.Needs. must . wlien .the deuil
. ...drives ... C .. Re~de. 1 . '-: : . . . _.
"
. .
Neptune A SON.OF NEPTUNE a:sailor~ Nepfu?ze was
:.god of the .sea in RoD?-an mythology.

This san of Neptune, dying suddenly,- 1eft all
. his.little .property .. to a degenerate. nephew, who
.
hated
salt
water
.R.
Buchanan..
"

.
:

.
:

'
'
.
'.
.
Nerve -:NERVESoF STEEr;.:..:...hard :grained, arid immune
from shook. e. g. Hitler had nerves of steel. .- ,
SUFF'ER FROM NERvES abnormal '.sensitiveness
to anxiety fear
or
arrogance
and
irritability.
.
.
.
. GET ON ONE'S-NERVES to upset'
'
.
.one.
.
Nest TO FEATHER ONE'S NEST .see 11nder '.' Feathe1.''
A MARE'S NEST see under''' Mare.'' . . . "
A NEST. EGG something l~id up as: the ,begin-:
:riing of accumulation. In a -nest where hens are
-expected to lay, it_ is oustom~rY. to place a real . or
. imitation egg to tempt th~ liens to _lay others beside
it. This egg is called the, Nest-egg
.- .. . ~

..
.. Books or money laid for .show, . .
.
.
.:. Like nest-eggd~ to make clients lay S. Butler.

,,

.,

,,.

"

!'

<

'

,,

'

'

'' '

'

'

'

'

24:} :. :

Never
.. .
'

~ick:

,.

' ,r

SAY DIE-don't despai.r.:1, . --.,_ ' ...'::::


Will you give him oomplimentst Sir. No~',~4's
.. oompliments an~. tell him~ . b~d :~iD1 .nev,~r, ~<1'
,:i
C
.
Re
.d
.
.

.
.
r-uie

a
e
.
.
,,
:'".''
~
.~.-~
. .
. '
,, - ....... New~;stle. NE~.AsTLE. :B:osFTIAtITY :roasting .a :fri
Never.

NEV ffiR

''1-

'

. ' '. ... .

.. ;

':

. ..,. '. . ..

,,

...

'

.. ,.

end to death.
Ne,vgate . TO BE: IN NEWGATE to be, .a .. ~.rimina.1
. Newga.t~ is the great prison of'London~ . .

'' No doubt he ought to be. in Netvgate,'' said the


other emphatically James Payn.'
..
. ' . '. . . -Nex.t NEXT.TO NOTHING. almost notl).ing at all..
-. Her "table. the' saine way; kept ,/for. next
..
to
.
. .'
~

..

'

'

''

'

not'f!,i7Jg

'

'

'

,'

!l',

'

M ari;:i. Edgeworth..

..

.: 1

NEXT'DOOR.TO-very olose to ; almost!. .

.. .
She observed to that trusty serv_ant.that Colo'! ..
nel Arden was neit door 'to a brute Theodore' '

Hook.

:_

..r;~-

,,

.: '.:

.~

.._. ' . . . - .

very dear to one. . ", :- ' ,. . :;


~:
They. could. talk unreservedly ":among" themselves of the subject that lay next their hearts.J ames Payn. .

: .
NEXT OF .KIN nearest relative. . They are
:next
'.
of kin, and you can~t s,eparate them... .Nexus THE CASH NEXUS bond of cohnection. oonsisting in. money . payments . .
'rhere. is. only
the cash ?1eXUS between hiin and' his son. . . .
Nicety , To .A NICETY , with'grea ~ exactness.. .. .
The hoti.se was all 1arranged'to a nicety. .. :
Niel~ IN THE NICK OF Tl.ME :_exa:otly at the. 'right
n1ement.
' : :
.
Tl1ings a.'re taking a inost. oonvenie'nt turn, and
in tlie very t1icf, of time-James Payn.. . .. ..
IN THE NlCB -at the right moment.'
'
. -He gave us notice in the nfck, andI got ready
for their reception Maria Edgeworth. : .: '-.- . ,
OLD NICK the devil.
. , ..... . . .. , '.
Arid the old n1an began to step out, as if he ,
. . was leading them on their way against old ,..ni,c1c
-Haliburton.
' = '
NEXT ONE'S HEART

e.-g: ..

..

~-,Ni~

244.

A. NIGHT: CAP a,. warni drink~ taken befor8-'.~


~:'going.. to bed.. . : , : :
.. :
Nightma1e THE NIGHTMARE ANn: Hm.:Ni~E"Fotn. frightful apparitions which appear at night~ Pro-.
''
-; bably ninefold stand" for ''nine fools~'.' See Shakes..;:. .. ~ .
peare's King I.1ear act iii. scene 4.
. ' "
: .. ;. Stars sho.ot and'. meteors.- glare oft~ner. acros~:
.... the valley than
'any other part .of the. country,
, . L" and. the, rLiglitmare .fI!ith. h.er f!Jhole. :ninefold" seems
to make it th.e favour,ite .. scene of..her gambols:-Washington 'Irving. '. .... .. . . .
. . ...
NIGHT . OUT festive'.' 'evening;' servant's. -free
ev.enmg. \ "
. ..
. . ..
..
IN THE NIGHT WATcri:Es-du1.ing .the wakeful
hours of night~ . '. . . .'. :;. .': .. ' .. . . ... :'-;. .

Night

in

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

. . . ., . , :
. .
. . .. \
.
N~e. ".~IN~. DAYS' .. WONl)ER .~Qmethirig .that. astoni-.
...

'

shes everybody for the moment and then heard of


no more.
.. . .
. ..,. .
. .
...
. . . . . .. . . .
.. . ,, :King :Edward. . You'd think it strange if 1 .
.. ... . should n1arry her; . .
,
Gloucester. That would be ten days' wonder at
Ieast~ . .: - .
.
. . '..the
.
Clarence. That is a day longer tlian a wonder
. lasts .Shakespeare.
. .
: : :
.. : ' '1:10 THE NINES ' to perfeotion ; fully. .
.
,:
Bran-new polished to the nines . C. Reade...
NINE T.ATLORS M.AKE A MAN . a popular saying.
in oontemp~ of tailors.. A tailor is often called a,
.
.
': ..
.ninth. part of a . in an.
. NINE TIMES OUT OF TEN nearly alway.s.
..
. . NINE'l'ENTH OF ..A THING nearly the whole of itr
.. TALK NINETEEN
TO THE
DOZE.ri has a .fast and
.
.
busy tongue. .
.
. . . DRESSED UP TO THE
NINES
very
elaborately.
..
.
Nip TO NIP .A BUNG to' steal-~ purse., (Slang) ~,
Meanwhile the cut-purse in the th1:ong.
:; : .-. Hath -a fair.' .m.eans t~. nip ~ bung .Popular
Ballad, 1740.
.

.
.
.
..
'
.

<

.,'~.''",'

',_

'

'

i .

: NO:Se

.245

To. NI~ IN

to cut off in the earliest

THE,.BUD
, . ~

, .stage.' ~
~ron1 the above it

:~.

:.f: :. : -..

If)

is quite clear that :the king

ha9. ample "'arning of-. the .rising, and possessed the means of 11ippi11g. it i1z -the btr,d Fortnight..
l11 Revietv, 188'.7. .
. . .\ : .
..
: No No GO see undei--''No.''
{_:
No END a very great Sllffi; a great de_al._ .,. '
. - -.: ,. . Tin1es are so i1ard .. Bl>x at the .ope1a' .110 end
-C. Reade. .
. :
'
'Noh ~4. .7zob of -tlie fi1st !vate1 ~~ slip_erio.r . sort of a
,
person. It is contraction for. nol)1em~n .. (Slang)
.

'

'

'

>

,,

'

. One comfort., _folk <:l:re beginning to take an


interest in us; Isee 11obs of tlie first uate1 looking

.. . .

,\ith, a fatherly eye int9 our


affairs C. ~eade.
.

'

:Nod

A NOD IS ' AS -GOOD .AS :A' wINK To. A. BLIND


HORSE there is no use- repeating a sign to thosQ
who cannot or do not choose to see. .
':
Thinks i to n1yself, a 'liod is as good as a tvink to
a blind hurse Haliburton: . .

'

THE LAND OF NOD sleep.


. HOMERSOMETIMES NODS

. '_ - . , . ._ . "

any one iliay

m.'ake a.

' '

slip o-r be dull.


, , '
l\ODS TO IT~ FULL-is.,dqo~ed,; ': Hif; '.house nod!
'
to itsfal~. .- -.. . _ . - . '., ... '," '.. ,_.,'
:
.,
.
. . . AT ONE'S NOD under.onets absolute-'. -power; _e. g.
He can have tb.ings done at his nod.
;:' -;. . ;.
-.Noggin, :To do TO :NoGGIN-ST.AVEs -'to . go_tc>' pieces;
. to fall into confugion, a .Noggi?l _is. a \vo'od.en Ct1p,
: . iuade with staves, like' a'oask. (Prov.) . . .. .
.
Silence ! or riiy allegory -:\Vill go : to .. izoggin-ata-'. , .. v;es . Ki~gsley. . .. _:-: : . . .' . -:. , : : .. :'
.

'

'I<

<

,,

L'

:Nonce

!,

,.,

'

>

' .

"

'

'

;>'

<'

'

'

'

'

~.,

'

'

FOR THE NONOE-'.-for, the ..present :time, oooa-

...
......

. .'
. ...
..
Nose WITH ONE'S NOSE TO. THE GRINDSTONin-:-hard .
. . ..at \vork: subject one to; severe .continuous toil or

...

,~

'~

"I'

Slon

'

'

'

'.,

(.

punishment.

'

,, . .
.
'
'

'

. , .

.,~

.: .

-'

,,:<1~1.;

,. .. . . ,. . , . , .. , .. ...

.....

'

_l

. . . . . . . . _,

,.,,_.

..

.' ,'

:No~e

: The clerks, with their noses at: the" grindstonee


andher father sombre in the dingy room~: work.:: r. :
irig hard too ih: his way Mrs~ Oliphant:
. TO SNAP . ONE't> NOSE oFF to speak in a cross
. ' . . .tone'to afny one; to address a person-sharply~
To MEASURE NOSES to meet.{Colloq~). . '.
To MAKE A PERSON'S. .NOSE SWELL
to make . him
.
jealo~1s. .. .
.. . . ,
-.
.
. : , .
. . . TO TU~N l)P ONE'S NvSE (AT) .. to._expresl? oontem.' ' pt for a person or thing.
.
:
'
.
He has the harsh; arrogant, Prussian way .of
.. turning up 1iif}rzose at things M. Arnold.
'
. _ PU'r ONE'S 'NOSE OUT oF. JOINT to. bririg down
. one's" pride or sens'e :of importance. '
,. ' .
' . :' Perhaps Maurioe may be able to drive: Lanfrey
out of the .field put his nose out of jo'int,' and mar..
,-._:. ~,: :ry the girl himself Mis. E. Linn :Linton. . ~ .
, . .. TO CU1' OFF ONE'S NOSE TO. SPITE ONE'S FACE-toact from anger in:suoh a .way as to injure oneself.
,.. If -you refuse to do .bec~a use you are angry wjth
me, you will just be cutting off. your. nose to spite
your face J. M. Dixson. . (, . . .

.. .'; To LEAD ; B'Y' THE - NOSE. to , Call.Se ' . to. follow


blindly.

;
..
:
.~
.
.
'
. . ..
.
-, : :

...

~.

<

' .

' :, . Though~authoritybe:a stubborn bear, _yet he is


of ten led by the nose by gold Sl1akespeare. '
(, ( . To T.A.KE.PEPPER'.lN THE NOS:fil-:to. take offence..
~
c' olloq.) . - . ..... " , ' . ' :. ,. . '' . . . " . . '
To THRUST ONE'S 'NOSE lN'fO to meddle officious:: ::1y.-w~th anything.'. -:: . ._' ' .
: '":. ; . : ...
. ' .
I liked'the .man: :well~enougb, and showed .it, if
he had'nt been 'a fool and "put his.nose into. my bu. : : siiiess -C. Reade.
.
:
TO WIPE A PERSON'S NOSE-to cheat him. (Slang)
... '.: .. I':v:e w_iped the old man's noses~: .: : ._. : _\:'..
UNDER ONE'S NOSE-in one's immediate proximi.~:ty.; :close:to,.one.: :Ii' e'.'!'
-J~~ , ' , '
: : Poetry takes me up so . entirely that, I scaroesee wh:at pa.sses under my nose Pope. ~ ,
.

<'

"'"~.

'

'

'

! ... , , ,

'

'

.... ,

'

'','".,

'

~No't.

'

247

'.

.. To PAY''IHROUGH .THE Nosi-::.to pay ~n extrava/


gant price.
'

. Booner than have =a fuss ,J paid him through


the .nose everything that. ...he. _claimed A..
Trollope.
.
.
Not N O'l' A BIT OF IT See under: .:_'.'.Bit,.'' , . : .
Now Now AND THEN-occasiona1ly.

. A mead here, there a heath~ and .now .and then


a wood Drayton. .
.Now
AND AGAIN--at intervals.
. . .
"
.
He makes his appearance now and again.
Now OR NEVER .this is the moment to aot; e.g
. Be 11p and do}ng for the prize . now or.never . : .
No.,vhere To BE NOWHERE to fail to secure a leading place.
In fiction~ if we accept one or two historical
novels, which avowedly are their existence to
a laudable admiration of Scott, Italy is literally
nowhere Athi.?neum, 1887.
Nl1ll NULL AND VOID useless.
The document began by stating that the
testator's former will was null and void H. R.
Haggard.
Nl.1mher .NUEBE:& ONE-a person's self. (Colloq.)
But .let me hear about yourse1f Angela;
I am tired of No. 1, I can assure you H. R~
Haggard.

Nunky NUNKY PA'Y. s the Government. pays for


everything. Nunley here stands ior ''Uncle,'' short
for'' Uncle Sam." The letters U. S. stamped on
United States Government property, ,were joculary read'' Uno1e Sam.'' ''Uncle Sam'' thus came
to mean Government, and give rise to the phraseTo STAND SAM. (Yorknism.)
..
N11t To BE.NUTS TO to please greatly.
These were nuts alike to tlie civilian and theplanter G. O. Trevelyan.

'

'

. . . . . . .

'

248

Nut
.

N11tshell

'

To BE NUTf? ON .ANY'l'HING (Slang) to .be very

. r .

'fond of.

.. .

"

'

. , : My. Aunt is aWful .. nut8


Wrri. Black. ,. '

on Marctis

' '

Aurelius

. . . . .."

OFF ONE~S NUT ~razy insane. Nut is a slang


term for the head. :
.
. -- ..
'

, ... , : He,, was . getting everyday off his nut, as they


put it gracefully J. M' Carthy~ ,
" ..
A HARD NUT TO CR.A.CK a difficult
problem
to
.
soI v:e. .;
. ..
.
:
.
.
.
.Nutshell IN A . NUTSHELL in small conipass; simply
and ter:iely. .,

' ..
. .
.
.....
.
. '
-
.. .
..
I

.,

_,

~-

'

, '

> '

'

.
'

..

'

.'

'

.
'

.Oak .

Occaiioti

249

'

. .

'

'
'

'

'

'

Oak SPORT ONE'S OAK in English :University slang.


to signify that one. does not .wish vis:ltors_ by olos..
ing the outer door of'one's rooms.
' '.:
He remembered that he ha'd been concerned
in the .blocking up. of that chapel _door. and in
the sticking of a striking. carioature on that
supeT ciliously sported oalc Sarah. Tytler.
.Oar PUT IN ONE'S OAR to .give advioe .when not
wanted; to brealc into a conversation uninvited.
I put my oar in no man's boat Haliburton .
TO LIE ON THE OARS to rest, to take', things
. easily.
.
;
I bad finished my education ....... so I left
Paris and went home to rest on my oars . 0. Reade.

. .
CHAINED TO THE OAR forced to drudge ; e. g.
I bad to rough it out as I was chained to the oar~~
HAVE AN OAR IN EVERY ' MAN'S BOAT. to inter
. fere in every body's .work ; e. g. He is hot liked
by anybody as he has an oar in every mari's boat.
. .
-Oats TO sow 'ONE'S WILD OATS ' to indulge in usual
youthful dissipations.
'

. Dunsey's taste for swapping arid betting might


turn out to ' be "something more, than rowing wild
oats George Eliot.
' '. .' .. .'

Observe THE OBSERVED OF ALL OBSERVERS the oen..


. tre of attraction. It is . a quotation from Shakes
pea.re's Hamlet, act iii. soene 1.

We children admired him; partly .for his


" beautiful face and 'silver hair; partly for the
solemn light in which we beheld him-' once a.
. : , .week, the observed :of all the observers; .1n the
pulpit-R. L. Stevenson, " in Scribner's Maga
. . .. zirze.
..
., . . .
. 1887. . ,
... . . .
1
0ccasion-ON OCCASION in case of need; from time
~ .. to_ time.,," .

.,-(.

.
.
:
..
-::,.~ :
. - .

'

'

'

'

'

'

'"'

'

'

odour

250

I am glad to find .YOU can stand your own


trumpeter on occasion .though I wish yot1 wpuld
.. oh~nge the time : Sm.ollet. " . . ,
'
TAKE OCOASION_.:.to take advantage of. an opportunity.
_ '. : -
.

~' '
In, rummaging ove1 desk to fi11d 'a uorkscrew,
.. young Ludgate 1ook vccas'ion
open an~ shak~
' a po_cket.book, froni w hi oh fell a shower of banknotes Maria Edgeworth. .
.
.G1yE . OCCAS10N.!J.'O~ oarise; e ...g~ 'rake ~are'not ..
.to give occasion to such unpleasant everits.. The k
ing has no occasion for officer's services a forraula.
. . of dis missal.. . . ':
:
.
ONEs LAWFUL. OCCASION affairs or business.
Odds AT ODDS (a) at variance; oppos~d to.
.
'Mr. 'Pilgrim bad come mooning out .of the
hot1se, at odds with all the festivity and tired of
. .. the crowd Thackeray.
.

.
(b)ata.disadvantage. i . .

.
. " : What warrjor was there: howeve.r famot1s and
~-. .. : skilful that oot1ld fight at odds with ,him ? Sha-. kes peare. ". .. ,


..
.... ODDS A,ND; ENDS. stray. articles ; casual infor'
mation.
. . . . :.
.
.
A few more odds and. ends before the . oonclu
. : ' 'sion ofthis article . Spectator, 18.86.
" BY" LONG ODDS by a great . difference; most:
decidedly.
'
,.
. ,._ ..
- He: is by. loni ~dds the ~hl~st ~f the ci~ndi-
dates.
' - . . . . ' - ' : . . .
.

.
.
NO
ODDS
it is of n~ conse:iuenoe..
. .
.
.
.
.
.
,,
.
. . . . "I have .lost 'my. hat.''.- ; No odds come with
. ' Out one.''. ' .' .
. . . . . .' . ,
,' . .
.. .
: . . THE- ODD M.AN the mari whose vote is a decisive
'.. .factor in ..the . case of a tie. ..
" . .~. .. ..
0 DD MAN OU'l wa.y of selecting one 'of.: thre.ei
... , persons by tossing coins till only two agree. " '
Odour IN BAD ODOUR in bad repute ; ill spoken
'

to

' '

'

'

'

'

'

'\
,r,

'

'

'

'

'

of. -

.,Off..:.

. 2'51

Mat Crabtree would not be 'liiridered from


wrapping up.:. the . girls and handing them to
their seat seats by. the .trifling. objection that he
was in bad . odour with .both of the. womenSarah Tytler~
. . .. .
.
. :
ODOUR OF SANCTITY the aroma of goodness~ It
. , ~as a current belief sprne ages ago that the corpse
of a holy person emitted a sweet. pe~fume. The
phrase is now used figuratively. '1'.He died in .the
odour of sanctity'' means ,, be ~ied having' a .saint-
ly reputation.''
: . .
.
The white washed shri.ne where some holy
.
marabout lies buried in the odour of sanctity
.
G1ant Allen, in Cantemporary Revi'.ew, 1888..
Oft' To BE OFF to refuse' tb
to an agreement~
, to go away quickly. ' i . . . . . . . ...
: .At last when bis hand
on the door they
offered hi1n t~velve thol.1sand five .hundrE3d. He
begged to consider of it. ' No, they .were peremp-'
tory. If he v1as off, !;hey were off-:--0. Reade.
WELL OFF in comfortable circumstances ; well
provided. _. . '.... . . .. ..
He seemed to be very Well off as he was.Miss Asten. . . ..... : . .;. . . " . . .. : .
OFF AND ON at intervals; ,occasionally. .
. ,'' WeJl, :p.erhaps .two: m~nths; :off.' and:; on.''. J ames Payn. . .
.
. ..
.
.....
, OFF'ONE'S
HEAD orazed; distracted.
.
.
.. .. . ., ...
. , . . The fact was, the excellent o]d.Jady was rathe:r
off her head w:ith excitement -. J;l.ines Payn. . ..
OFF COLOUR
...
:shady;;
df.~r~:P\itabl.e
..
.

.
'..
.'

',
,
.
'
. '..

' His: reputation and habits. being 'a. trifle off


colour, a.s the phrase -.is;: he had fallen. back on
a number. of.prac;itical pe1sons,-:who. doubtless, :e.ar..ned a libe1al commission on. :the foolish .Purchases
they indl1ced him .to make. Wm. Black .. : .
:.. ' .OFF WlTH YOU I go hence ; . . . . . . . \
OFF w1TH H.1s :HE.An. behead.him;,..
'

come
:was

i_

'

'

'

'1

'

'

,,

'

'

'

'

'

'-.

'',

'

',

'

'

'

'

-<

'

.......

I....

'

l .. ..

. -

Office
. .

..252

-- -

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~--~~~~~

WE ARE OFF NOW . juist starting.


. OFF DAY free froni engagements.
.
: : . OFF ONE'S']']:ED noteating well . . '
. O~F THE MAP out:of the picture~ . . . .'
Office ~IVE THE OFFIOE-{Slang). to suggest?. suppl
information. -



. Then back after me ; I'll give you the offic
.
I'll:mark you out a good olaim C. Reade. ..
.-Oil . TP OIL ONE'S OLD'. WIG .. to make te person 9rnnl
North of England slang. '
,. .
.
.
To POUR OIL.ON .. TROUBLED WATERS to aot ~
peacemak.er. . ' . . .
. . . -. .
iny .. telegrarps ancl _letters to th.e Times
did all in my -pouier to .th.row. oi:z on -the trouble
.waters, by explaining mutual 'misunderstanding
and combating . the false accusations. made 0
both sides H. Mackenzie W allace.
. ..
', . OIL oF-P.ALMS money. See under ''.Palm''.
TO STRIKE OLD .to make a valuable discovery
'AN OILY TONGUE a' flattering toniue.' e.g. . Tb
:: 'fellow seems to have on oily tongue. . ._. TO F9UR OIL ON FLAMES _to aggravate _the pa~

: .
so
, '
1 ns .. :
SMELL OF OIL bear marks of" .'stUdy ;' e. g. E
has a smell of oil on, him.
:;
. "

.. BURN THE.MIDNIGHT OIL to read or work late.


. .
'
OIL THE WHEELS make thinga :go snioothily b
courtesy or bribe~ ; '
-

. . .
..
''
-Ointment A 'FLY- IN THE OINTMENT see und~r Fly
Old 'OLD 'AS THE RILLS " .very ancient.
.. . .
My dear child this: is nothing. to me . to an~
!
, one. _ What you have eA.-perienoed is as old l
the hills Florenoe
Marryat. -

.
Olive TO HOLD OUT THE OLIVE' BRANCH 'to mall
~ overtures -of peace.: - ' 1
OLIVE . '. BRANCHES children.- ' ... See ' PsalII
oxxviii. 3. The Bible .. expression . is olive plan
'.' Thy wife sha.11
vine
_by t~e sidE
.
.be as fruitful
.
..
'

'

In

'

'

1.

'

' '

,,

Ope.n

----------------------.. , of. thy house; thy children like olive plants round
thy table.''
. .
On ON FOR ANYTHING . ready
engage in it. .

Are you on for a row on the river '? .


.
Once ONCE AND FOR ALL-once. only. ~nd nrit again;
,. : Must tell' you
'and for oll that you will
get nothing . PY,'. kneeling to me . H .. ., ~ ;E!ag.r
gard.

' .:
. ' . c .,
. ; : ONCE IN A WAY ver'y rarely.
. . ''Tis butfor once aTzd awuy. Maria Edgeworth.
ONCE AND AGAIN repeatedly.
I have told you once and agan that you must
. not smoke in this room. . ..

One ONE TOO MANY FOR A PERSON more powerful


than he..
..
.
.

..
;-;.
..
I rather fancy we shall. be one too manfJ for
h,f,m-W. E. Norris. . . "
.. ,
.
' .AT bmr--6 one mind ; agreed. . ' \ , .
So far, we are at one with Mr: Morley-Journal.
of Education, 1887. ' ._

.
'
. . ONE HORSE-inferior. (S~ang) .
. ...
One of them destroyed; Manitouline, my island
of tbe blest, with a few ,conterrip~uous criticism.
It was, he declared, a very one;.ho18e sort :of place.

-W. H. Rii~sell. .
.
.
. . .
Open WITH OPEN ARMS-gladly. . . :
.
.' ;
They. were both received with open ar1ns by the
Mayor and old Dewar C. Reade. . .
OPEN.AS THE DAY utterly without deception of.
hypocrjsy. . .
. . ..
.
.
Open as the day, .he made no secret of the fact
. that he was alone in. the world-James Payn.
AN .OPEN QUESTION a fact or doctrine about
which different opinions are permitted ; . a matter
ttndecided.

.
Whether the' army is sufficiently orga~ised
.. or sufficiently provided or sufficiently well led~
... ma.y be an open question . Spectator, J 887. . ..

to

'

' '

once

'.I'

'

_,

'

'

. Out
.

'

AN. OPEN
WRITER . a --\vriter with little

or snow.

or no -frost

: " :.
AN OPEN VERDICT a verdict:' given when- the
guilt of the .acous~d ,is .::ieft . und~tern1ined for laok
of evidenc'e. .
.
: ' .
: .. ;.... . .. ' .

: AN oPEN'.-couNTRY.:..:.. a 9is~r~c~ of :.c.ountrY.--fiee ..of


't'
'
~-rees.,

~-

'1''

.--

- , - . :

~.~

,:-

AN OP~ VIEW an undisturbed view. . .... _'


AN OPEN DAY full, cl~ar, diffused daylight; as
opposed to twilight. .- --~ .:. :.. .. ;_ :.. : . ':.
. 'OPEN;H.A.NDED MAN . generous with his money.
OPEN HEARTED MAN siricere,: frank man ..
..... AN OPEN MIND a' rilirid not yet' made'- up; . _
AN OPEN SECRET a 'secret-- already become

'

'
'.,.

'
'
'. _ . .:.. . ~-~.;.

'

~
k .nown . . .. ' _
.
.Orange A SUCKED. ORANGE-a whose powers are
l

'~

.'.

exhausted."
(Colloq). - -. : - ." . : ..
.
By tl1 is time Dibdin was
sucked oif.inae ; his
brain
was
dry.-_

:-:

.
_

c
.__. . _
,
..
.

a_

'

-O~i

..

'

'

~.

'

'

'

'

-~

'

'

. TO BE OUT'' to be mistaken." .(Colloq.).. ' . ~

'' Oh, there you_ a7e out,: i11de_~d~ oo_usin Wright;


.. she's. more of .:\lrhat: y_ou . call_ a. prude .than a
coqueti e.''.' Maria .Edgeworth.
.. ;

. . . OUT:.AND~OUT

completely....._ :... , . . . . . ..

- : Now, I'in as proud of tlie. house as any__ one.


I beiieve it's the best house.. iri the Fohool oitt
and-01i-t Hugh es. : ,
,- : .._ : - :

_ OUT OF SORTS . (a) indis~osed ~ not i,vel]. - ..
-.
I am ou.t of sorts,. boweve1; a.t present; oan
. : no:t,write. Why? -I can not-tell' Macaulay.
TO OUT HEROD HEROD see under ''Herod." .
.
' - '
. OUT OF COLLAR _w_ithout a -place. Se1vant s
'

.slang:

.~

'

'

'

-,-
. . . . _ . ; .
- The old butler has been. out if collar since last
autumn:
-
. . _,
. OUT AT ELBOWS-:-see under,. Elbow.'' - ,.
~-'

'

.~

'

'
OUT OF . ,FRYING p .AN INTO FJRE . out. of one di. -fficulty. -into . a greater. one. e. g.. To elude the

255

OUtruii.

polioe the thief jumped off the roof. : Thus lie jum:..'
ped oiit of .the f111ing pan into .fire. .. ' '
OUT OF WOOD- out of danger.. . . ' .
You are not out of the wood: yet. .
. AN OUT-:AND-OU'J'ER a tboro11gh goer; a first
rate fellow. (Slang). . . . , . .
. :. . .
Master' Clive was prono.unced an out.and-outer.
-Thackeray. ,
.
. .
1
Outru11 TO OUTRUN ~HE CONSTABLE to . become
bankrupt. .

. : '. . : . .. :
.
A minute of the financial board, pribJished in
the cambridge Reporter shows that the .uniV:ersity .is in danger of. outrunning the constable .Journal of Educationt 1887.
. .
- . .
Out\Vard OUTWARD 'MAN body ; also . jocularly~<?10'!.
.
. . thing ete;

" . . .~ :
To OUTWARD SEEEING apparently.. .
'. '
OUTWARD THINGS - the world around' us. ; '
Over '-OVER AND OVER several times; repeatedly.
.
She 'had (heard)tbough~o11er and over' again.
For it was Toby's constant topic Dicl\'.:e!is; . ~

OYER AGAIN once more ; again from the beginning.


. . : : . :
:.
Q\7ER AGAlNST facing, .in contrast with.
OVER AND ABOVE-in addition. . . . : . . .
OVER ONE'S HEAD without consulting him; bey
' ond his oornprebension. . . .
OVER HEAD AND EARS .deeply .immer~ed especially in debt or love.

.
'. . .

OVER SHOESOR BOOTS-'-no half measures~


OVER THE WAY on the 'other side of -the street.
'''erlancJ . AN OVERLAND FORM-a form. ,vithout -any .
house upon it.- De\ronshire dialect. (Prov.) .
Owl TO TAKE O~to be offended. (Slang) . .
"

'

'

'

'

'

\,'

'

'

' '

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

. .
.

'

...

.
'

'

'

Paddock"

256 .

...

-----------------------~

P.-:-TO .MIND ONE'S P'S AND Qs. See under'' Mind.''


'To BE P AND Q to .be of the first quality.
Bring in a quart of ma.ligo, right true; : -

'

And look . y;ou rogue, that :it be p and q:.'. .



; ... . Rowlands (1613).
'

'

'

'

'

'

257

Pagoda

Palm

J!agoda To SHAKE THE PAG{)DATREE=to gain a


fortune in an easy way. It. is an A1zglo-Indian
'
phrase.
. . : .
:
. . . .
Whe11
had thol'oughly learned this lesson
he \Vas offered a position in India," in the service
of J ol1n Company, . under . whose. flag,_ as we
kno~, tht- pagoda tree wa~ worth shalcing. (it was
easy to a mass a lat'ge fortune). Mrs. E; Lynn
Linton. . .
.
.
'
.
.
.
.
.
Pain-TO BE AT PAINS to take tro11ble; to be oareful.
ON PAIN <>F DEATH with death as penalty; e. g.
Y qu budge .from here on pain of deaf li.
To TAKE PAINS-do one's best.

" FOll ONE'S. PAINS


as one's reward.
. ,
Paint PAINT RED break out in a boisterous glee ;
given over to merriment. An American phrase.
Singapore has been in trouble. During the
greate1 part of three days 22nd., 23rd., and
2:4th, of February-:-the town was'' painted red''
by Chinese rowdieR, and the air was full of bludgeon~ and buckishot.-- Japan Mail, 1887.
NOT so BLACK AS HE IS p AINTED less criminal
than he ii- made out to be.
.
PAIN'IED LADY kind of butterfly.
Pale To LEAP THE PALE-to get ' into debt; to spend
more than one's inoome. (Slang),

Palm. TO PALM OFF ANYTH~G to pass anythjng


under false pretence~; to get anot~er. to accept
.
.
. .
ignoTant1y a. fals~ article. .
Once upon a ti1n~ a Scotchman made. a. great
impression on the ~imple mind in Natal by
'palrtting off some. tho\1sands of florins a1nong
them at the nominal value of . half.a-crown.
-H. R. Haggard. . .

,,. . .
To BEAR .THE PALM : to be pre-eminent. The
leaves of the palm tree were used as symbols of
A palm - leaf was . carried tefore a con. victory.
.
queror.

he

'

'

"

'

17

P~lm

258

-- - -

, . . Of man's miraculous mist:i.kes, this bears the


. . .. palm Young.
. .. .
.. .
.
To GIVE THE P.A.LM TO to acknowledge as superior.
.,
Hav~ng discussed the subject of .. nat.ionality
'.
and love, Mr. Fi.nch gives the palm without
. . hesitatio' to. _Am~rioan. love. . Literary ,TVorld,
August 25, ~887.. . . . . : - . . .. .
.
. pALMY. DAYS . prosperous times; e. g. This man.
-had his palmy days~

.
GREASE ONE'S P .A.LM bribe him ; e. g. You cannot get a ticket 'unless you grea'se' the palm of the
stationmaster.

.
Pan TO P.A.N OUT to result ~ to. appear in the consequences; exhausted. It is an American Slang.
She didn't pan out well Wm~ Black
. . FL.ASH IN .THE PAN to give U:p without acaom;.
pli:;hing anything. .

_
Pandora-PANDORA'S. BOX a collection of evils.
PandcJra was a beautiful woman to whom Jupiter,
' in order to punish the theft of heavenly fire by Pro.. metbeus, .gave: .a . box containing all the ills of
b.11man life, whil'.lh,
on the box being opened. spread
.
.. over .all the earth.
.
,-
' Pa11dora's box \vas opened, for him, and all the
pains and griefs his imagination l1ad ever figured
were abroad Mrs. E. Lynn Linton.
Pap- PAt' WITH A HATCHET l~indness clone 'in a very
rough way. (Slang).
.
.
He means well, but his kindness is pap with
'

- a liaf ch..,t.

Paper --.A PAPER LvRD . a lord of justiciary; a judge


bearing the title of lord. It is a Scottish phrase.
A PAPER WAR .a dispute carried.on in w1itting .
. PAPER. ARMY OR PROFITS. not existing;
(Send in one's papers) to.resign.
Par-AT PAR selling at the. face v:alue.
' - ABOVE f'AR stock selling higher than the' face
'

valt1e.

.
'
. '.
BELOW PAR~ selling lower; also, not in one's
usual health.

'

,.

259 .

Parsnip

Pa:rsnip'..:...FINE.WORDSBUTTER: NO PARSINPS_:faii' .:Pro


mis'es do 'not "olotlie or' feed the persons ~d whom
they are ma.de~ .. : ' ._,,. ; '' '. ....
. Who
th~ bi~~d~1in~ i~li6t whb said that
, fi1ze. ~wqrds butte.1 no P.arsnips f ... Half, o~ the parsnips of sooi.ety .. are;. served and . rendered pa.lat-.
able with no :other sauce . ThacJ{eray. . . .
P~rt p ART AND PARCEL
'essential. part ; what is
inseparably bound up with something else~ ,
.
..
''Well Mr: Squeers,'' he 'said, welcoming that
Worthy with his accustomed .~smile; of '-Which a
sharp look: and a thoughtful ~frown were partand
: . pc1.rCt!l, '' how do you do ?'' Dickene. ..
Parthian A P ARTHIAN SHOT .a sho_t or ljloW- gfven
while pretending to fly ;' a parting shot; The Par..
thians, it is said, were acousto1ned
shoot while
retiring cJn horse-back ori full speed. .

Aunt .Esthe~ was right .there., and. that P,ar


thian shaft she had let fly at. a venture-'' I see
that it is: the poet who is the favourite '' had
also food for thought in it .Jan1es ,Payan.

Pass Tb PASS BY OR OVER to overlook; to disr~gard~


It conduces u1uch to .our content if we pass
by tl1ose things whioh 11app~ri. to our trouble.-.
J eren1y Taylor. , '

'
To C01iE 'IO A PRETTY p ASS-to be in a bad.state .
,
.Thingl'i are coming to ci pretty pass when you
take me to task fo1 not being in earnest.J. 1\'1. Di.xon.
. ,

PASS THE TI1v1E OF DAY . to. exob.ange any 01dinary greeting of civility.
.
:
.
A PASS WORD-a word privately agreed.on. before
hand to be given as a. sign . of com1adeship before
one is allowed to pass.

Pass.age-PASSAGE OF ARI\iS--a. quarrel,. esp:_ ~ords,


As for Mrs. A. and Mrs. B., it see1ned 'as if
tbey \Vere 11.nable to 0IlCO:Unter one another with.. . . out a passage of arnis Goo~. lfTords, 1887~ .
I

was

'

-~1''

'

'

an

to

"

'

'

of.

'

P~ss~ng

260

-'

P.assing PASSING , :RIOH . very_ -wealthy~ Passiug is


. .trequently used as an intensive. by Sqakesp~are.
A man he was to all the coun~ry_ dear, .. :.
. . _.And passing rich on forty pounds a year.
:'

Goldsmith.
- ::r'. -PAS.SING S'IRANG:E...::....exceed!ngly, strange~ ..
. -' . PASSING F-:AlR. surprisingly_ .fair. ' . '
.
PASSING 'BELL - a bell tolled' at the hour of death.
- PAST MASTER a -thoroughly experienped. person i
an '' old hand."
: .

Pat p AT <..>lj THE.: BACK . iil: approval ; e.' g.'.' He got a.
. pat on the bacic from his master for his work. 1.,he
.-story came pat tu.his purpose opportune~ apposite.
HE HAS HlS STORY PAT ready for use, needing
no rehearsal. .
.
_ . .- _.
Patch . NOT TO BE ..A. 'pATOR ON ANOTHER. PERSON. .
not fit to be cc)rnpared with.

He is not patcli on yozt for looks (niuoh infe...

. rior to you in personal appeara nee( C. Reade.


Patrimony--THE PATRIMONY OF ST. PETER the states. of the churoh ; the land formerly subject to the. : Pope.

,
Patter . TO PATTER FLASH-to talk 'tl1e jargon of tbi... '
eves .

Pause GIVE ONE PAUSE- to cause him to hesitate.


Pave PAVE THE WAY FUR to lead up to, make possible.
Pay _To PAY OUT-to have revenge from.
,.
To PAY THE DEBT OF NATURE-see under ''Debt.''
To PAY ONE'S WAY-to live free of debt.
But it may be said, as a rule, ti at every Englishn1an in the Duke of Wellington's ar1ny paid
.
his way Thackeray.
1
To PAY THE PlPER to have all expenses to pay.
'' Ay, r.aoes and balls, fine clothes arid fine eating, them's the ways of the gentle fo11cs, and we
pay the piper,'' growled a 11umble cynic Sara.b
: Tytler.

. THE DEVIL TO PAY see under ''Devil.''


' To p Ay THROUGH' THE NOSE-see under',, Nose.,,

I
''

2ti1
- .

'

'

I .
''

I'
'
'

'

to return .like for


like; e.'.g. 1 shall pay 1ii1n baclc irt the sa;rie coin.
WHO BREAKS PAYS the guilty ,must. take the
Conseque11 aes.

IT DOES NOT PAY bring proper returns~

. . .PAY FOR uNE'S' WHISTLE-pay high for sbnie


aapr1ae.

'
Peace To HOLD ON.E's PEACE to be silent.
She said, and held her i:-eace : Aeneas went
ti ad f ron1 the ca.ve.
Dryden.
Pearls To' CA8T PEARLE BEFORE SWlNE-to . give
what is preoiotts to thoi.::.e who are unable to under' stand. its value A Bib1ical phrase .
1
1. hrough him the oa1)t.ain offered them fifteen
dollars a i11onth, and a month's pay in advance,
but it waR like tli1owing p~a1ls before .swine' . 'PAY BACK IN THE SA'ME COIN

'

'

I' '

....
R.H. Dana..
Pecker -TO ~EEP
'

'

(Slang) Peokerspirit. To keep up one' spirits; to 110 cheerful.


Kerp up yo1t1 peclcer, man ; yqu will be. all right

tomorro\v C. Reade.
.

To PUT UP A.NOTHER'S PECKER ' to irritate or displease him.


. . . . . .
He thinks 110 can do. what he likes ~with me.
I am not. quite sure of that if. he puts. up rr&y peclce1
-J. M. Dixon.

Pecper5 . 'TO OLOSE ONE'S PEEPERS- (S~ang). Peeper
means the eye. To sl1ut one'i;; eyes. . . .
The next ql1estion wa:i how long they should
wait to .let the inm, ates close tlieir peepers a.
Reade.
.
. ..
.
..
.
rr'cg-To TAKE ONE DOWN . .A PEG;-:to .humble ,one; to
humiliate hin1.

.
The
brilliant.young
athlete.
wantedta/cing
down
a peg Litera1y world, 1882.
. .. . .
, .
' ' To COME DOWN' A PEG ~to b~ lowered :
hltmili: ated.
: -, , . ~:

,
..
Well; h~ has co;ne dotvn a peg ~r~vo, that's all,
and he don't lilce it H. R. Haggard. .
.
.
.
UP ONE'S ..PECKER

'

'

or

'

"

Pell

262.

. .

a pretext or .occasion
f<(r . disc.otirsing.; ~.' g~ '.He. onJy wants a plg; to hang
., his talk on.
. .. . .
,
PEG AWAY" perse~ere at.
, . .:
.
mark
limits
of.
.
.

.
PEG OUT
-
.
Pell-PELL 1-IELL in great confusion ; heaped in disorder one upon the other.
.
The. great. force Onlmples. up like
empty
...
glove, then turns 'and gallops pell mell for safety
to 'its ow11 lives H. R. Haggard.
Penny A PRETTY PENNY a :considerable sum of
money. . . .
.
'
The O\Vner had spent what he was' wont to to
terin pla yfu11y a pretty penny on his booksGeorge Eliot.


PE~NY GAFF '(Slang) a low class theatre ..
A PENNY FOR YOUR THOUGHTS ' a' playful rem. ark m.ade to one who seem8 immersed in thought ..
.
Judy, looked a little bit puzzled at this. ''.A
' ' 'penny for you1 :thought~ Judy,,, says her sister
-Maria Edgeworth. .
; PENNY WISE AND POUND FOOLISH saving. small
sum$ at the. risk of larger; niggardly on :improper
occasion.
'
'
' : To TURN.AN HONEST.PENNY to earn . money ho
nestly.
.

.
. I attend sales, and never lose a. chance 'of tur,.
_ning a penny- C. Reade.
.
" PENNY WEDDING a wedding ceremonial in Soot. : land, at whicih the invited guests made .. contribu..
tions in money to pay the general expenses. -.
.
: . TO THINK ONE'S PENNY SILVER to have a good
opinion of one~ elf. . .
.
-:
,. A PENNY-A-LINER-a' literary drudge or haok
who writes for poor remuneration. ,' . " . ' ,
.. : ... PENNY . READlNGS ente~tainme~ts in England
: chiefly consisting of readings. and music,, for the
--'bentfit of the.uneducated who .are admitted. on a.
, .

. PEG TO HA.NG .THINGS ON

'

'

'

'

an .

<

'

'

'

'

Pepper
pe-p?er- To ?1'.?P} ~ D\ 'IB:E 1\QSE to be<.,'Oll!.l'\ ir1it&too~
.,., ........
'\ h
un otu rasn1011ec. u_ra~e

Becs.\l~e. I entert~'l.ir1ed tl1is ~t:ntlt,'.\l\lt\!\ f\)1' ll\Y'


ancient" he take-;> pepf?t~r -~~r? tl:.~: '?itl&.~ Gl1u1"rti.~1 l1i.
~ PFPP'F.R CORN R~-r - !.1.11. in~tg11ific<il\t O't 1\l)llli~

na.l rent.

An admirab1e plan l lr1.1t \\'t! \\"i.ll .ti1.kt) t.l~t" 110\1.. ses firs.tat a p;:~pp._;r cc>r1i rr-1zt-Beaco11sfie1d.
Perch To TIP 0\'E;R TRE PERCH t<.) die.
Peril AT YOUR PBRlL i.f yoll dti:r(' tuk~ t.ht.' ri$k of
e. fl Ren1ember, yo\l. do it. ot.!/t"ltir p-ti;$l.
'
.
IN PERlL OF v;ith risk of.
'

'

Petard
~

HOIST

"ITH

ONE'S

lll10l)l"

Hoist.''

Peter ROBBING PETER 'l'O P ..:\i P .c\tJL t~1 k:i11g \\l1tl.t


is dt1e to one to pa~~ auotht-r. 'I'll(:\ orig\11 1,)f t-llil:1
ph! ase is In 1540 the t1bbe) c.lt\'ltol1 af St, Pt.)t.or'~,'

.Westminster, ,,~ns udvn11ocd to. tl10 d'\gnit~1 of n


cathedral by letters pt1.tent; b\1t t.el.1 ~ot\\'8 ll\iol i.t
wa.s jo1ned to tl1e diooese of Lo11do11 l\!;ttil'lt ti11d
"ma.uy of its ei:.ttites a.ppropritited to t.l\O l'l)Pt~i1s St.
Paul's Cathedral.
.
.
Ho'v ''Tas he to pay for it? Tl1e .\101~0 \\.t\~ l\ot
has. To leave it wo11ld be to 1<>l> J.>ttt1r tc) PO!/
Pau.f Leisure Ho1i.1, 1887.
.. .
.
PErER FUNK an o.uotio11 wl1ero tllo l)l(ldor~ l1ti\'O
a seoret understandi11g. Tl1is is ..tl111t1;ica11is11i.
To PE'l'ER OUT-(used i11 11i?'.1ii1ig) to booo1110 oxhau8ted.

It.is so.id. 11is ~ensylvania 111onopoly 11n.i:; po ..
tered out, and is no\v obligocl to got l1is R\\l)}>ly
from Canada Tli~ Natio71, 1890. . .
. BOIS~ THE BLUE. PET!.1;R-give tl10 sign of lifting
anchor a11d st.a.1ting.
. ..
.
Pelt)' <'Olll-PETTICOAT GOVERNMEN'r t110 '' l'\llo of
women.
. ..
.
..
...
This afforded fresl1 subject of d orision to i;l1ono
\~ho scorned 11ett1coat Govcrn111e11t 1'1:n.ria FA.a,vortli.
'

''

'

Phillip.: ::

264

,... . pJC k

>

Phillip TO APPEAL FROM PHILLIP DRUNK TO PHIL..'.


to ask for a recon~ideration of any oase
because the first decision was given .without due
gravity, the arbiter being under son1e engrossing
influence.


.
.
If they had any fault to find, let them go to
her, which was not even ap-pealing froni Pliillip
dru1ifc to Phillip sob,,r, but fron1 lioness in the_
jungle to .the lioness. in the. cave Mrs. E.
Lynn rJinton.
,
,,
Philosopher THE PHILOSOPHER'S S'.['ONE. an imaginary stone or mineral compound longso1.1ght after
by alohemists as a means of transferring other
'metals into go]d.
.
'
.
. .
.
'
That stone .
.
Philosophers in vain so long ha. ve sought;

Milton.

:
.
Pick TO PICK HOLES . to find fat1lt.
:
''That means that you' have been trying to pi,cl'
hole.~. in him, anci that you oan't '' 1eturned
Mr~. Lindsay, a little defiantly- w. E. No1ris.
To PICK ACQAINTANCE OR A QUAHREL-to' get '
.into good terms or thuse of enmity.
.
To PICK OUT to sflect the best out of a lot of
things.

' . To PICK-UP to recover' health ; e. g.' ''The in' valid is picking up .


.A PICK-ME UP an~ thing taken to restore the
strength. (Colloq.)
I find the. syrup you gave me a capita1
pick-m,,-u.p.

.
.
To PICK TO PIECES to oriticise 11arshly.

Th'e ladies were drinking tea:~


piclci'!'g their
neighbours to pi~ce.<J.
:
LIP SOBER

'

'

and

To PICK A HOLE INA 'MAN'S COAT. to find a weak


place in ones character.
' It if"" difficult to piclc a 'hole

in our 1nini.~ter's coat:

'

265

Pick

'

'

v:ery best of any-

. THE PICK OF THE BASKET the


,', thing.
I

'

'

It cannot be pretended that we have thus far


succeeded in obtaining the piclc of the basket-
. Dni/11 Telcgr<rph, 1885.
: .
. 'PICKING AND STEALING here piclcing has the
" same sense as stealing.
T PICK A LOCK to open.
.
To PICK WOOL~ COTTON, HAIR, ETC to separate.
To PICK A FOWL to !'!trip off its featbers."
To PICK THE 'I EETH to cleanse
To PICK AND CHOOSE-here' pick' has the same
meaning as choose.
'Pickle HAVE A R< >D IN PICKLE-to have a punish. ment ready.
I have a rod in piclcle for Tom V11hen he returns
home.
. pie To GO TO PlE-to fa11 into confusion .
..
BY COOK AND PTE-a minced oath =By God and
the service-bool\:. 1t is a 8bakesperean phrase.
.: A FINGER IN THE PIE -See under ''Finger.'' .
'~iece _GIVE A PIECE OF O~E'S MIND to te11 him unple..
. asant truths.

'
On the 0001-step of t11e house where Hilda
l(dged stood her landlady, pivi11g a piece of
lirr mini 1o a butcher boy, both as regarded
hi5 maste,.'s rneat, and his ..personal qualities.
H. R. Haggard. ,
..
~Pig A PIG IN A Pl)KE-something bought without
ini--:pection, goods acoepted and paid for blindly.
PIG'S WHISPER (Slang) . a low whisper; a. very
short space of time. :
.
.

To DRIVE ONE'S PIGS .TO MARKET
to snore. .
..
.
.
.

'

TO BRING ONE'S PIGS TO

: sell at

a loss;

A. PRETTY MARKET

to manag-e affairs badly. .

'

'

to

''He never could ha:ve. ~rortglzt his pig8 to a


wor~e 1narlcet,'' observed Sa\vbridge Captain
Marrvat.

.-'

'

Pigeon
-

Pins
- '

266

.. Gu TO, PIGS .AND W:BI::;TLE _ to go tQ-utter-rt1in.


PIGS 'MIGHT FLY \Vonders might happen; e.g .
.. Many people book upon-~he
hope that,.pz'.g8 mightfly
Pigeon PIGEON OR 'PIDGIN ENGLISH . the oorrup1
language, half English and half Chinese, u~ed ir
. commercial transactions througl1out the .fa-r E~st.
The grammar of Pidgin English i:o not Englisl
but Chinese Sayce.- .
.,:
.

" TO PLUCK A:PIGEJN to cheat a simpleton;


''Here uomes a n1.ce pigeo1z to pluck,'' .said on~
of the thieves O.' Reade. - - '
PIGEON'S MILK an imagina1y substance - whic]
simple boys are sent to purchase on All Fool~
Day (April 1).
-.Pile MAKE ONE'S PILE to amass a fortune e. g. I1
. this b1Jsiness he has made hi.s pile.
PILE IT ON to e:x:aggerate; f'. g. You are pilin:
it on the wl1ole sto1y.
.
.- . - .
PILE UP THE .AGOUG . make the most of .painfu
details .. _ . . .

. .' .
.Pill A. BITTER OR HARD PILL TO swA.LLOW . some
, thing wounding to the. pride ; a mortifying. necessicy
Sir Hahilton could not hep reaognising th
the truth of this observation, but Metternic:
made him swalow anothe1 better pill .Pulic
Opinion, 1886.
.
Pillar FROM PILLAR TO POST hither and thither.
I'm afraid we. shall, be prett~ well knooke
. about from pillar 'to po.'3t during the next. montl
. Florence Marryat.. .
.Pins PINS .AND NEEDLES a feeling as of prick.in:
under the skin; the tingling sensation in a. ,l1m
which has been
_. .
..
. . bonumbed.
ON THE PIN watchful.
'
He .was 011 th-e pin .to see who should be ..ohosen.
To PIN ONE'S F AlTH
to
fix
one's
trust_.
,
.~.

'111-.,...,..,,, ~'h"

...,,;,.,,,..,,,,,1

fl,,,

./n:fh

.f=,._,.

'

hAt.fP1'

01'

f(l

Pinch

Place~

267

PIN-MONEY-on. allowance made to a lady for


dress and other personal expenses..
.
. .'
PIN-DROP SlLEN'OE-such a silence that you
might. have heard a pin fall.
.. :... , .. ,
.PIN-PRICl.{ aot or remark: intended to. annoy~ ...
Pinch
. A 1'. OR ON .A PINCH-in a case of .necessity. or
..
l

''

~.

'

difficulty.

.,
.
. , Th~JI" at a pinch oan bribe a vote. Swi~t.
Pipe TO PIPE ONE'S EYE-to .weep. (Colloq.)
.

. He-then beg~n t() eye his pipe,


.
And tben to piP". his rye Hood. .
.
,
PUT .A PER.SON'S PIPE OUT to disappoint his
. plan~. (Slar1 g.)
.
.
James Orawley's p2'.pe is piil out Thackeray.
PUT TH.AT IN YOUR PIPE .AND SMOKE I'r listen
to that ie1nark and think over it. rhis saying gene ..
rall Y. accompanies a rebuke.
.
.
. . PIPE .OFF to. watch a nurse or person for . purpo
ses. of theft.
.
. .
.
. PAY THE PIPER. to defray the cost of. an enter..
tainment. .
.
P~P1NG. HOT~quite hot; e.g. W:hen I put my
hand into .the water it was piping hot. .
... PIPING.. _.TIMEs-me1ry times; e.. g. when the
father was in trouble the son was 'having p2'.ping
..

<

'

. ti111es. :
'

'

.
'

'

. .. ,
<

'

Pitch 'PITCH AND p AY . pay ready money~


PITOH A YARN to tell a wonderful story.
.
The ::>kipper is in great glee to-night; he pitches
, . . l1.1's 11arns with gusto- Cliamber's Journal,: 1886.
PlT(~H INT<)--to assault.

.
.
''Dear Tom, I ain't going
ptch into you,''
.
said Arthur piteously T. Hughes. .
' PITCH 1'.J? _STRONG :to speak very Warmly.
I wonder he did not over do it then, he pz'tchea
. it so ~trong-Dail11 Telegraph,. 1885.
',.
.. Pl't'CHES HAVE EARS. see unde1 ., Ear.'' . .
Place IN PLACE-appropriate; opportune. , : .
Then was shs fair alone, when none
....

to-

'

268 .

Place

----------------------'-'-= ..

. was fair iil: place Edmund Spense:f. .


Plague PLAGUE ON may a cu;rse
on~.
BE AT THE PLAGUE .. to be at the trouble.
PLAGUE-SPOT source of moral infection. .

rest

'

APIKE-STAFF

cal laugh-George Eliot.


PLA1N

SAILING

-.

smooth course; e~g.

not all a plain sailing.

Play

ve~y pl~in or' evident.


''plain as pilce-stoff,'' said Pack; with an. ironi.:.

Plain . PLAIN '..AS


.

'

Life is
.
::

. . .

PLAY THE DEVIL, DEUCE, 'oR MISCHIEF' WITH-

to inj11re : ~o hurt serio11sly. . :. ._

- - In short, ._in your own 'mem.orable words, to


play thq very devil with eve1ything and every
body Dickens.'

PLAY FAST AND LOOSE seeunder ''Fast.~'

: ' . PLAY ONE FALSE to deceive one.


''Now, 1001c you here; Anne,'' said; George in

in

a sor.t of 11iss. and standing over her


a threatening attitude, ''I have suspected for .some time
that _you were pla11ing the false 'in this business,
and now I an1 sure of it.'' H. R. Haggard.
'PLAY ONE'S CARDS- to carry out a 8Cheme
We.have seen how Mrs. Bute, having the game
'
in her hands, had really pla11ed her cards well
;
Thackeray.

: .: :
..
PLAY TRUANT to stay away from school without
leave. It is a school phrase; elsewhere it is used
ylayfully.
:
. ._
~- MAKE PLAY te take the lead.. .

Gray Parrot 1na7ce play wi.th Duke of Ricl1mon8


and Florio next Driily Telegraph, 1885.

, CH!LD'S 'PLAY easy work. '


PLA y DUCKS AND' DRAKES . WITH 'to" squander;
.. .e. g. ,He is . playing duclc~ ..an:c1 dr.a!ces ~ith his
' money.
.. '
, ,.
, '' ' . - . . ' ' ,
COME INTO PLAY to begin to operate; e.q. In
political .matters .very .. often , passions come .into
rilay.
. .. .
. . .
. . ,,. .
,,

'

;f

'

'

'

-,

Play --

Pla-y

269,

... . IN .PLAY not seriously.; .e.g. . He -was saying


this in play.

. To PLAY. HIGH . with. stakes ; e.g. They play


high in that o_lub.
..
..
, Tu -,PL.A.Y AT DOING to do half heartedly; e. g.

The boy was pla11ing at studying.


.
To PLAY O~E'~ .CARDS to . u~e one~s. o hanoes
well ~ e. g.. You should plcry your. cards if you
want success.
. .

PLAY FA1R
to .act honestly~. e.. g. Always play
.
fair. . .
. . "
.
'
. P;LAY IN'fO lHE HANDS .OF to act so as to givtr
oppo~tunity to ;'e. g. He played into the hands of
. -. ' his enemy. ; -- : ' ' . : : -.. '
'

'

,,

'

,1.

'

'

'

,
'

' '

nowN (,N.

.
to
tr~at

dlshonourably
;.
.
,:

PLAY
.IT
Low
.
.

'

',

e. g. You played low dow1i


. . on. him.
. . . PLAY .'lHE. GAME kt:- ep the. l ules of a. oode of
11onour ; e. g. Whatever may happen, you must
~

t.>'

''

'

play the ga1ne. .: _.

. .

'

to act with courage ; e. fl In


difficulties "you inl1st play the mari.
PLAY up...:.. do your share ; e. g~ play up,
it is -your turn now.

PLAY AT OROS::; PURPOSES


to.
thwatt one. ano
- . . ther : P. g. The-y are pf1111ing at cross purposes
. PLAY .A SECOND FIDDLE to talce a ~ubordinate
yart ; e. g. The actor refused to play a second
' jiddl
'
' - . - ' . . ' , ' ' ' ' - :
:. ' .
PL,AY THE MAN -

.'

PJJAY OFF ONE AGAINST .ANOTHER to. use two


7
people for one s purp_oses; e. g. With this objeot
. he . \Vas playing off orie . of lii.s e'ight: bours against

another.

'

'

---------C-...------.,
. ' .: : PLAY THE DEVIL, DEUCE'OR MISCHIEF'w11li to
injures, hurt or ruin.
,: :. : :
'
1Please PLEASE THI: PIGS---if all.be.well.

'
.
'' Please the p_igs, '' then said M'1'. A v'enel to
'
hin1self, '' r shall pop -: the question.'; . Bulwer
'
Lytton.
-
'
..
J-F YOU PLEA8E.:...:.:see' under ''If~'~ ;. , . . .
PLEASED AS'PUNOTJ~highly pleased:
.
.
;t:Jlouglt- PUT ONE'S H~ND TO THE PLOUGH to. begin
an ltndertanking: It is a Biblical phrase.

''And Jesus said unto him. No inan having


-. p1tt his hand to plough,, and .looking baolc,.: is fit
., .' . for.,. the kingdom
of
God.''
Luke,
ix.

62.
.
.

.
.
.
.
'
.
,
LOOK BACK FROM THE PLOUGH . to give .up work
.that had been seriously undertaken.
..

. ' .;__ . BE PLOUGHED .. to' 'fail in an examin'ation: College


slang. P1uclced is also used. . . . .
:. ; I arri sure to be ploughed. at the final exami, 'nation~ , : .
:
.
Pluck PLUCK OFF to abate from -the rank ; to
. . lower oneself.. It .is .Shal\:esp<1rean.
.
..
Plume PLUME ONESELF.
UPON
to be. proud of. , .
.
..
The idea of a man .pluming on his virtue,
Daily 'J.'elegraph,' 1885.
.' .
. .
BORROWED PLUMES ornaments which do not
belong to the wearer. -

''I know some people do not ca1e


appear
in bc1r1owed plumes, '' the elder woman v.rent on
,.
. . -Sarah Tytler~ . .
Pocket PUT ONE'S HAND IN ONE'S POCKET to . giV'e
money in
charity.
.
' . ,
.
'
. . I. daresay Dr. Goodenough, . amongst other
. . . philanthropists, . put his Ii and in his: poclcetGeorge Eliot,

J'~

---~-

--

- - - - - - -

<,

~r'

.,,

'

,,

'

'

...-

'

'

'

'

'

to

'

'

'

'

'

'

Pocket
PUT ONE'S PRlDEIN ONE'S POCKET to be humble
. 'for-the moment.
.,
.-. ; : . ;
: If rYiiss Blanche~ should ask you how we are
'
getti1:1g on,: Rachel; put. y<iu1 pride i:n ymir. :paclcet,
mind that-J. G. Whyte-Melville.
.
,
i . ., POCKET AN INSULT
to put up witJ.i .. an .insult.
The remarlc was a rude one, but the .man chose
.
. . . to prcket the insult..
.
.
. . ,
A POCKET-PISTOL . a jocular name for. a flask to
carry liquor. (Colloq.)
.

.
Comir:g from Newman Noggs, obscured still
further by th53 smoke of his poclc-t-pistol, it became
wholly unintelligible, and involve:,1l
in
utter
'
.
. darkness Dicken.

. KEEP HANDS IN POCKETB to pass time in idle


ness -~ e. g . It is not proper for a young man to
keep ha.nds in p'1ckets~
HAVE PERSON OR THINGS IN ON E'S POCKET be
able to dispose of; e. g. Y 01.1 need not wor1y about
him, I have him in 11iy pocket.
EMPTY POCKET lacl{ of money. . .
DEEP PUCKET
wealth.
.
.
iPoint J:'OlNT FOR POINT all particulars.. .
Let me have a detailed acicot1nt of the skirmish
. mind it must be pr>int for point.
CARRY ONE'S POINT to gain what one contends
for in controversy.
GIVE POINTS TO to give an advantageous hint
. on any subjeot.
.. .

STAND UPON POINTS to be over sort1pulous.


SSRATN A POINT to go beyond proper limits .
A CASE ON POINT a case which illustietes the
:subject under discussion .
He quotes iiistances i12 point f roru ~he history
of Rio. Grande
. Gonte1nporary Re11iew, l'.- 88.
PoINT~BLANK directly; e.g. He'. refused;
.offer poz.nt bla1zlc.
. .
. . .' . . , .

OFF THE POINT irrelevant.

my

'

Poke

2.72

. Pot
.

..

'

'

. . AT ALL POINTS-in all 1espeots. . .


WHEN IT COMES TO THE PONT . when 'the 'mo. ment for acting comes;. e.g. What you say is aJI
.well in t.alk but when it comes to the point. nobody
minds it.
. :. '
A POINT OF HONOUR a question .that concerns
honour.

. .

ONE'S STRONG POINT ones m ?st effeotive quality..
Poke . PlG n.- A P<.>KE see. under ,, Pig.''.
' .
Poker OLD POKER the devil. (Slang.).
. . As if O:d Poker was coming' to take them. away
:._H.':Walpole~

,.

.
Polish POL1SH OFF to finish; to settle.
:
Well sir, I couldn't finish hirr1, . but Bob had.
his ooat off at once he stood up to the Banbury
man for three minutes, and polished :hi1n off in
. four rounds easy- Thackeray.
Pooh POOHPOOH to express contempt; to ridicule."
Poor POOR AS A CHURCH MOUSE barely having
anything to live upon.
. .. .
'' Or e of your young men is j'ust married,''
Dobbin said, now coming to the point. '' It was
a very old attachment, and the young couple.

are as poor as cJiu1ch 1rtic1.'' Thacbe:ray.


Pop POP CORN-to parch or roabt m;:iize or Indian
uorn uu.tjl r.he grains explode with a '' pop." It jsan American phrase.
Post POST ONE ELF UP IN to obtain full information
about.

Tell me all about it; \\ hat books you had to post
you1~elf up in fo1 you1 examinations, and how
you carne out of them .Rara.h Tytler.
. .
POST AND RAILS THlA. tea having a number of
stalks floating in it.
Pot Go TO POT to go to ruin. Originally said of
old metal to go into the melting pot. . . .
Alli's one, they go to pot Dryden .

'

. Pound

273.
"

'

'

'

what . inay happen to be in the pot


for a meal ~ithout special preparations for guests ;
ordinary_ fare. .
.

"He should be very welcome to take pot-luck


- . with him Graves.

.
. : .. LET NOT POT CALL' THE KETTLE BLACK'...._clo not
., criticise neighbours unless you are .free frpril blame
yourself... . . .
. - ~ .
' .
. . You thinle it's_ ~ .c.ase'. of 'a pot~ calling.I lie: lcettle
'black, perhaps, . 1m blaolc. enough, gp9dness
knows; but you yours.elf said just now that'_ you
-'
: did.n't believe I had sunk to her depth of .infamy
-W.E; Nooris:

.
-": KEEP THE POT BOILING to procure the neoes, saries of life.
. ' . . :
; - Bi these and a score more little petty arts1
. . just lieep the pot_ boiling,. James Payn. . . ..-
Go TO POT be ruined; e. g. His enterprise failed
and he went to pot.
'

'
Pot 'BELI.Y . the owner ofof a protuberant belly.
' '
Pot BOlLER . work . of. art done merely to raise
money ; _all artist doing SllCh work.
POT OF MONEY large sum ...
.
Pott\to THE POT.ATOTRAP a Slang term. for the
., Mouth.'' '- -. , -::.
. :
On thi.i-:; A.lfred hazarded a conjecture. Might
it not. have gone. down .his throat? '' Took his
potato 'trap for . the pantry ,door lla l Ha 1''C. Reade.
. . -
, :
.
PoL,t1d OLA.IM ONE'S POUND OF FLESH to demand
_, 1)ay1nent of debts due to 011e, even where their
pa.yn1ent ~nvolve~ .. ml1Ci1 suffering.
Tl1is phrase
has oome 1nto general use . fron1 Shakespeares The
.J.ferclia11t of T7e1zic", where Shylock demanded repy. n1e11t of his debt from Antonio.- - _
.,
Tl1e St1ltan's vie\v o? Gern1any. is tl1at he ought
to seek for the 11elp. of the Gern:an officers and
of Gern1a11 fina11cial guides~ on the ground that
. _ - POT LUCK

'

'

''

'

,,,

Ii

.- !

'

'

'

'

'

'

.,

'

'

18

'

'

'

'

Prizes

274
. .

:' . a,11 the other great powers toaritpoti11d offiesl~ from


Turkey Fortniqlitly' ;Review~ .1887.. - ' ..
Po,vde1 .NOT WORTHP.OW.DER AND SHOT .. riot \v'ortb
. . the 'trouble or the. c'ost~ . . . _. . . . . . .. ' ..
. _ . . The. place . is not . wo1lh . pdwder and: shot J.
M. Dixon-. " ' : . . .: . '.
:' :. :SMELL' PO,WDER.~be :Pres.ant :at battle-; g. '.The
. nob~e lord s_ays".that he, smelt powder._ .:
. ;Ptr.T', 'MORE. POWDER'. 1NTO IT . force put into a
. 'b''
. ..' . .- ,
1o\v.' .
. . -. . - . .
J?q,ve~' :A.-~O:'t"E.R_ OF POEPL~a-Iarga .. number; e.g.
-. I -'sa\v blow a power nf people on the. coast. -_ .. _.
POWER OF. WORK large . amount . of work.; e. g.
What a power of work he does daily J , . . .

.
P1emi11m AT -PREMIUM-.much sol1.ght --~fter; increated in .value;. . . :~ .
. _.. . .
: .:
__ :... Serva!}ts '.ate at, a '.' preniium; masters_ at a dis- .
.. co'l1ri.t, in the colony .C. Reade. . ... . . . '. ...: . .. ,
'
P1elt) .. A PRF.TTY Tlitl:E .l>F IT . a dfficult- -0r: . unpleasa nt condition 'of affairs."
_- ~ _-,
,
Mr. Samuel Erin had for .t~e present _a pietiy
ti1ne oj ?:t.
.like~
man 'oaught in a
downpour of hailstones, \Vithout a.n umbrella-,
- .James Payn. -.
:- .

A PRETTY GO a critical situation. .


Prick' PRICK
UP THE EARS to appear attentive.
.
.
Pri1111ose THE PRIMROSE PATH the pleasant and
alluring road which leads to destruction.

But, good my brother,


Do not, as some ungracious pastors do~

Show me that steep and throny way toheaven.


Whiles, like a pl1ffed and reckless.libertine,
. Himself tlie prim1ose patli of dalliance tread.
And reeks not his o\vn rede Shakespeare ..
Prizes PLAY PRIZES' to be in . earnest. It . is old
. fashioned.

: . . Tl1ey did not pl(1J/ p1izes, . and only pretended to
. , quarrtl Stillingfleet.
:: :
.
PROS AND CONS for and against; e. g. I agree
.

'l'

''''

'

e.

'

'

'

'

He wB-s

'

'.

- ---'....
'
-._...... ,
..,., .

. -.,

'' '

. ..... !

~
.' .,-...

",1.,.)t __ __
~
.......
t'--'
-...
- - -- -- _.... _.._ -.-.......
__ ...'
.
..=.
- - -\ ..........
~

1-4, ...... ...._ ...

..(!'

--- --

-..

.__

.-

...

'-

...... ...... --..- "'"''"'"''"""" ...........


......... . ~ ...... ~ ~ ..: ' ~:"'

......., - ,' ....~

.,ot'

-.

....

.,,~

'

---~

~--

--- __
-----,..

.....

"~t

-..__.,.
...................
"'
...................................
,,

~ .....
'

_,

" '>:-

,,;_\

'r
n
.
,
.
.......
..-.
....
.
:
- . . ,.......
.1
v
-~'.<ti<!~ .it~~~'<. .. ""''1"'-~'
'
Pt?LL. '.i'HE s:r.R!~\~--t.._, l~i.\ t\\~\ 'f~\~\l' t1\\,\\\~~~\ \\\,\\\~)\\
-nromote!' of a11 ...\tl1i.11~.
....
. The n1e11 \\-ho 11i~sI ~Ii~~ ~f:i't:~;~ ~\\'\' ''''\'~'\ ''' \.t,~)

.... .l..~

~-

-~"'

1"" "';:; ,.....

Cape. Tht'Y' ,,~a1\t t\.-.. \l\'\.\"'t' t.'\'-t't~ lh''~1.l~1\l\\;,,\


ottt of Sot1tlt .A.fril,~\-l"I~ l\. l l~'B.1~"' \\t\
Pur;r, A LOXG J;',,,\(,}1::.--t\) t0t.'f". &\\\ ~\\\t\'\\\\\l~\l\\,,\,,'\~
PULL 'F.:\.0ES " ....g~ill'\~' "'t.".
PULL THE L.'GG--ll\'t\Qt\St) \\\\

!5port.
PuLL \\:"ET..T.. \\l'J'rl.l~--~l(:'t' ill ll~\\'1\\\l1\)',
PuLL.. OliT Oli' '1'111\~ l1'l,'\1~ _:,t\l.\'l\ tl\\'\'~\tt'\\\1\\ tlt1\'l1\\ t.
01 fa ilt1re i11to tl. \'"l\'t t'1:::.
PULL 0Nlt;$1~t1\i' '.\'()t'tl~tl\1~\.{...-lt) ''t\(\\\\"t.'''
n1and.
PULL UP O~l~'S Bt)L11\.t:i--L)i_\ ''t'll.t\~ ll)'\' t'l1'~,tt.
11JLT.. l)EVtT.. 1')\l f !J l~;\ 1\ l~\i---t1\\(\t,\\,'t\ tt11\\,\1i\ t.

botl1.si(lt,s.
P11lse

FE1''1L

'tl1inlci11g

ON1~'$ l"\JlJ$l\.t.()

Oll

f;Ull1(.)

J)()ll\1;

t;ll

seoret opinio11H.
Oll Uil'J~ lll\l)~llOJ\,

tl\1!.

'

1?crur.:rc Pi.Jl.iSJi~,.-1;\10

'\\'l\ilt <~1111 111


<lii-it\(l\'(\l'' I~ 'tltll'f\lll\'rl

fi\\il.

i1l<,vc)1\\()J11:

<11

; '

, . Put
Purcl1ase HIS LlFE-IS NOT- WORTH A YEAR'S PURCHASE
-he is not likely to survive more than a year ..
Purple BORN IN THE PURPLE-of princely ranl\: or
birth. Pttrple is the impe1ial colour 01 .colour of
. : :th~ sovereigns..
,
:. ., . , : .
. . .To thin.k 9f that dea1 young man.(Pririce Louis
. N apolean), the. apple" 'of. his mother's:.
bor1z

and nurtured in pu1ple, dying 'thus~.. '.is t9o fear-.


. .. ~ f ul, too awful . Queen Victor1a. '. .... . . ....
Pu1pose .:.to. ~MALL PURPOS~ .fPr ..vei;y little. goo~ ...
'l'o small .purpose. 4ad the.: oouncil. of Jei;usalem
been aseembled, if once their determination being'. set d'own, 'men. might afterwards 'hav"e ae..
. fended 'their former opiiii6ris 'Hooker." ..
Pusl1 .BE PUT TO THE PUSH 'to "be "tested bi difficult
' circumstanoes (Colioq.)
.... -One
he
.is
put
to
the
push:'hi$:
native
enei;gy'
will
'
, .. , " . , ' , '
appear.

:
.Put :HARD PVT TO .IT" ill g1~at -~i;otibl~~ .. : : . ... . . .
't 'Yott are.: desperate ..har.d. p.ut .to, .'wonien, '' said
the Deemster Hall Caine~'.' . !: ..
,. ..
''. PuT THIS AND
THAT
TOGETHER'
to
drawan
infer..
,,
ence.
. . .,
..
.
.. Young as I was, I also cou1 p.ut:,,~t~O.t and that
together Captain Marryat.
' ' : ..
PUT-UP JOB .or AFFAlR .one arranged. before
.... 'hand; ~ conooct.ed plot. .
. ' ; . :..
A suspicion of the "'hole affair being what
. , .. the police call a put-itp. f)'lle, Was pasi, in'g t}1rougb
.
his mind 'Jam es Payn. .

... : .
PUT ,ONE: .ON. GOOD ~Eff A VIOUR to pt1t one to

eye,

'

.,,,

''

'

>

'

'

'

,.
\

'

'

..

..

'.

'

j'

'

'

'

'~

',\

~ t

"

>''

>

"

'

'('

': '

(':'

'

test. . . ,

'

'.

'

FUT ON SHORT ALLOWANCE-pu'liish \vith reduo


tion of provisions.
.
. Tb BE PUT OU'!' to be displeased.

PUT TO THE ROUT to put to :Eliglit ; e; g. ..The


arrival .of troops put the 1ebels t<? tlie roitt. .
:
: PUT TO' SEA to : begin voyage;' e. g. The ship
...:;ut to sea with 100 passengers.. . ~
.:

Pnt

'

i- };- . ~, , ..._
~ S' ;;:-~'1P--l'
...- "'1,.. ~ ,, ~ ""
-. ~.......
.....1.~ '~"'~:.~..\.. ::.,1(,.,.
1
i L' J..1 IT .A WORD FO"R t,') ~~t'l:;.1111~.11d~'

P U.i

!.S:i'O '1.i::iB SE.AUE

.~""'! "'\'\(.'>, ~C-11\)$~\}~


,, '

PuJ: TH2 CART BE.FORR Tli:i-: R01'\$}':~.. t.:.) tlv tl1ll~~

in a wrong o!'der.
PuT O~b'S BES r POOT FO~B}tl"\S1'--t\) t\~ l''1l\t''$

~e-st.

PUT A LO:KG 'FA.OE liP{.)~

.:.\ }f.:\'l'l'l~l~--t'~'

~\l'l1t't\\'

sorry and woltnl1ed i11 fceli11~.


PuT ls---POX to dect:>i,-e; tt) l1lt\Kt' t.'110 d<.) l\\t)tl,
-than. a f ai1 s.hi1:re of \\"Ol'k.
Yott look n11d talk likt' ~1 litcl~~ ll0l'l1 ~\l\ll tll'i.'ll~
and fear you ,,ill l)e f)ttt tl.ptlll l~Q~t\l\t._

PuT FORTH eX(''t'{;; bri11n: l)\\t~ ~ t~. (}, ' l't:t. f<)1'il~
, :a.ll yo1.1r. ene1gy; T t10 t-1'\\Q ~i1ttf..fc11tli {t~ l'l1.'~~('ll\~.
PUT OFF postpo11e.
PuT ON to \"\'eu.-r.
'

PuT OUT oxting1.tiRl1.


.
:-. . PUT UP \\l"filf stny \\it:l1; S\lffo1 1)1\.tiei11t:l~,.~
PuT BY ln.1d u.side fo1 ft1t11ro \t~o.
~-

'

'

'

'

.
.

'

--~--

"
'

'

..

'

,.

1"!8
'
;
2 ' ,'l,-.

Quality
,f

...

'

.,

. ..
Q'.

'.

!-.

,.

-' .

..

. , . - .

'

'

.,

.'

.~.

'

I
\

',.

.~.
j

'

'

Quality . THE QP'A~IT'Y_ .. perso!1 of 'high 1anlr; clolleotively.

' : :
: :., :
By degrees, the ql1ality gav.e up going and the
fair, of course, beoa1ne: disrep11table~ . .-"..
.Atlze1zeztm, 1887., ... , .. . . . . . . : .. . . . .. :
Qua1rel. QUARREL .WITH ONE'S BRE.A.D .AND BUTTERabondon the .emp~oyment one. liv~S.. __by e. g ... If you
show resentment' you will be dismised ; why should
yoi1 q1,arrel :with,-you1' bread and butter ? . " :..
.
Q11arters. GlVE OR SHOW QUARTER. to . act with
clemency ; tobe lenient." . . . .
To the young, if yott give any tole1able quarter,,
. .-you indulge; them in their idleness and ruin
them Collier.
:.. .
. . .
. ..
.
Queen. QUEEN .ANNE I.S DE.AD. that.is- stale news.
A pb1ase used sarcastically: .. Tbe Amerioans
. , . :say. "Rats,'' or. ','Tha_t~s.
awfttl . ch.est!iut, ;, when
a stale story. is told.
..
. ,
. . . Lord 'Brotigb.am,' 'it appears; isri 't , dead, though
. , " Qeen :Ann.e is; '. Ba1hani. : . . ., .
'QUEEN'S ENGLISH correct use of the English
langi1age. A plea fo1 the .Queen's Englis1i is the
title of a book by Dean Alford.. , .
. . .
TURN QUEEN'S EVIDENC~to become informer for
the ~ake of a pardon.
:: ,
.
1 hate. a convict ..\vho tur11s a Queensevidence.
- H. King!3ley. .- . . . . . .
. .
.
QUEEN'S HE.ADS Postage stamps.
Queer BE IN QUEER STREET- to be in unfortunat.ecircumstance. The imginary residence of persons
in :financial and other difficulties.

.
No, si1, I make it a rule of mine-the more it
looks like Qzteer St1eet, the less I ask. R. L.
Stevenson .
.A QUEER FISH. a.n eccentric person. e. g. your
friend is a queer;fish.
1

'\'.

,'

'

,,

'

<

'

_,,

an

,__

'

,,

'
.
280 ,,

.....
. , . R,...;..
a ....

'

...

el

'

'
'

--,

'

'

'

,.

'

.' .

'

R . THE TBRE.E R's a ht~n1orous terni for reading, wri


ting and arithmetic. These subjeots were formerly
considered the necessary parts of _an, ordinary
education.
-~
,'
. ..
.Back GO
TO.RACK AND .RUIN-to'
fall into utter des
.
pair ; to go to destruction.
.
.
Some must go to rnck and ruin, Kate, my dear.
-Dickens.
,

LIVE .AT R.ACK AND MANGER


live': sumptu-

to

ously and wastefully ; to : spend money needlessly. (Prov.)


,
' "

John Lackland ....... tearing out the bowels of


St. Edmundsbury Convent in the most ruinous
way by living at rack and ma'nger there. Carlyle.

to

be

guided b.Y::the e-ye


alone in work without the assista'nce of line or
rule. (Prov.)

( : . RACK ONlD'S BRAINS-to strain one's thought to


the : utmost. e. g. I .bave been rac.ki1zg: iny brains
to save his name. . .

.
'
Racket BE ON THE R.ACKE'r spe'nd one's .time in
WORK BY RACK OF EYii;

'

dissipation.
. .. :
. .
,
.,
He }iad been' off on th_e racket. perhaps for a
week at a time Daily Teleg:-aph, 1885. ' : . .'
ST.A.ND THE RACK;ET , ~o be responsibte. . . .. .
Re is' '.ready as myself to stand tlze racket, of

as

. subsequent
proc.eedings,
,
'Daily
.Telegrapli,
1882.
.
.
Rag GENTLEMEN OF THE ORDER QF THE RAG.' mili
tary .officers. The ''Rag'' refers to their red
uniform.
_
.
.
,
'
It is the opinion which, I believe, moat of
yo:ung gentlemen of the order of the rag .deserve
, Fielding. '
'

.
,.. RAG~T.A.G AND B9~~'1;'4I~the dregs of the people;
._,,'those loungers about _a city who are always ready
' .. to .flock together and make a. mob. Fo?nd also
in the most correot form, tag-rag and bob-lazl.

'

'

'

<

'

Rage

r ,

281

Ran

: Mr. Gladstone, in faot, is tired of being out


in the cold. The pleasure of leading the rag-tag
and bob-tail--proves but so-so, compared with the
'pleasurse of .oon1ma.11ding the House of Com. . . . n1ons St Andrew's Citizen, 1887.
IN RAGS in old clotl1es-; torn~ e. g. He is so
poor tha.t he comes to the office in rag8.

A RAG OF 'EVIDENCE-a scrapA



iRage ALL THE RAGE-quite the fashion; extremely
.

popular~
'

'

..

'

' '

:Rain IT

'
'

NEVER RAINS BUT IT POURS

'

''

a phrase often

. : used \vhen a Tapid succession of events occu;rs_..


.' '.It signifies son1ewl1at the same as '' misfortunes
never comes singly.'' but bas a wider application
by its reference .to all ki11d~ of event.s.
..
'Nevertheless - for, in spite of the proverb, ''it
rietit>r rains 1>11.t it po1t1s,'' good fo1t11ne seldom
befalls us mortals withot1t alloy there were
. drops of bitterness._ in his full.cup-:-Jame_s Payn.
. . A RA1NY DAY-a time of tro11ble or difficulty.
. ,.Thou'lt give aw~y all 'i:,by earn in gs .. and never
be uneasy because you have nothing against
a 1ain11 dt111 George Eliot.
.

RAIN ' CATS AND 'DOGS ?:. e. in torrents; e. g. 1t


'

'

'


was 1oi111'.ng c'lts and dogs last everi iD;g..
'.Raise RAlSE ONE'S BACK to become obstinate.
' Hehas r-ai~ed his bacl\. more than once against
orders emanating from the palaca in a manner
that bad the. hairs on the head of the bishop's

\Vife to stand aln1ost on .end A. Trollope.


RAtSE THE \.V!ND._:to obtain money by any shift.
. To 1ai.c;e tlie 1vi1zd - so1ne lawyer tries J. and
H. Sn1itl1.
.

'Ran1p ON THE RAMP \vild; in state of excitement~

(Slang.)

a
- . :'


,
'Rampage ON THE. RAMP .AGE-drunk. (Slang.). ' .
!Ran ON THE RAN-TAN excited;. r6aming. about furiously. (Colloq.)
'
:: ~

'

282 .'

Rank
-.
'

'

Reckoit;

----,..-----------------------
'. .. \:John:: .l1ad. J)ee11~ .v:isjb]y. ~'012;, the.'1:an-tan'' the
,., :--,IJ:ight before R. L. Stev~nson'. ~ .. .
. : .
::.- '.A RANDOM SHOT a shot with :no par.ticrilar aim.
. bt still .striking something; e. g: Many-. students
at an exa1ni11a ti~~in, .in attempting.. an' answer. to a .
. . question .they are. 11ot sure . of, .take a random:shot.
Ranli RA.NK _.ANI>. FILE'.....:the whole body of .common
soldie1s.
. ' : :-.'
. . .. : .. ......
. IN THE RANKS _:_serving as.a .common. soldier. ,.
. RlSE,FROM THE' Rilis.
l:)e promoted .to :the
position of a oommissioned
offioer
after
having
. .,,
,,
.
..
, ...
~

_,

,~'

to

'

'

'

served. as a 'private. soldie1~ . '

''. . . ' ' .


Ransom. flOLD .TO RANSOM_: insist on ransom fo1
rele~13ii:lg; e. g. The priso.rier$" of \var ~e1e '?eld
. to rarisom by the enemy. . . ; :.'. . . . . .
KlNG'S!RANSOM very laTge sum'. .
'
Rap . RAP OVER'THE KNUCKLES see under ''Knuol{
' 1es.'' '? '
,
. ,- . . .
.
~:
'. ' . .
.
.
Reach-: REACH-ME DOWNS .. ready made: .seJond~hand.
cloth PS . ' So oalled . in .Dori.don' beoatise :. in intending purchaser of s\ich ..olothes aslcs the shopman
. t'o ''r'each-lii111-down~' them in order to try' them on.
(Cockneyisin;)
. .... '

Read READ A LESSON. to sc.old or .repr.imai1d ..


.
Oh, you cian speak to my Aunt Mollineux: and
she wilI 1ead you fine lesson. O. _Read1;3._ .
.. .
. READ BETWEN 'IHE LINES_:.to detect
meaning.
not expressed.
. .. . . . . . . . , :. .
: . . . . .
: H<' has -11ot enough: experience of the way in.
. whioh men .. have. thought and spoken to feel
. . what the Bible writers are about-to read between
the li1les, 'to discern where, he, ought to' rest his
whole, weight and where he ought to .pass.lightly
-Mathew . Arnold. . '..
. . .. .
. . ; : , .. , . '
Recl~on RECKON WITHOUT ONE'S HOST'.- .!3ee under
'' Host.'' . ., -~ ., , , - . . ,. :. ... . .. . ~ . .
D.AY OF :RECKONING.
time,
-of
atonem~nt. o.r ve,n.
.

'
. ". .
geance.

.
'

'. . .

'

,..1

'

'

'

>

'

'

<

'.

'

'

..

,'J,

',

'"

''

''''

"\

'

:'

'

'

'

'

'

'.

'
'

'

'

Re'cl . i

283 .

'.:. Rei11s:

,,... .

t."

~~~~~~~~~--~.~~.~~~~~~.-~~~~

. OUT. ,, IN ..ONE'S ,.RECKONING mistaken...in .. o:e's


expectation. . .' '., , ... '.; :. . . ~ .', ..... : ...
.
. .
,.
'
..
Red RED TAPE useless official formalities.'. . . ..
.. :
Unlike a Minister. in England. _who steps into.
offic_e with the re'd.; 'tape out and' dried: fo;r, ?:i.m,
.. :Lord Wellesley .had no, ,on~ ~o .advise .. him.Asiatic Quarterly Review, 1887. '
.: :
... RED BOOK a .book bound in red, esp. one contai. ning the name's .'of. p'erso'ns in, the.. 'serv~ce ..of the
. state, official regl1lations, or. the like; the .:Peerage!.
- ;_RED COATS 'a" name coinmonly:given. toBritish
... sol diet's;
. . .
..
. . . :
..

RED FLAG' the symbol 'of revol11tion'. .


. RED;.RANDED ... in the act of crime~ . . . ., . : .
:EED-HERRING--subjeot raised to distract attention
from the point in hand.

'
RED-LETTER DAY auspicious or fortunate as a
day. . 'flie holidays or Saint's days are indicated
i11. red letters ,in the. calenda-rs.' .
..
:
. . . - - .:All .being-~ho~idays, t feel
if I had none. as
. they do in heav-en, . i,-vhere 't's all. rr-d letter days

"

'

>

..

'

''I

, ,

.,.

'

,_ ,

, ,

'

, ;

, ,
'

, ,

'

as

, .. . . .. .
P AlNTEP RED~; refe1s to a village .or town given
Charles

Lamb. ... .,
'

'

.. ove1 to Il1er1iment and high jinl~s ... It is an America11 pl1rase~ . . .'. .' "i . . . . . .
' A RED RAG TO ABULL what especially .provolces
. . and irritates. .
.
.. .
.
. " He ((:leorge II) hated .. b9oks,., and the sight of
. oriT in_ a drawing room wa~. as: a 1e,d .rt;ig to a bull
.
. emple Ba1, .. 1887.
.. .
. .
.
Reel OFF THE REEL . in uniterrupted succe~sion. . ' .
Ref1isal HAVE THE REFUSAL OF '....c\NYTHTNG~ to have
the right of tal\:ing in preference to others.
Mrs. Flint \Vill never let M1s. .Steel lzave tlie
1efusal Haliburton. . : . -~. . ._ . .
Rci11s GIVE THE REINS 'to leav_e unchecked; to re~
lease from control.
. ,. .. .
.
But 11ow 0011ld 4e thus
~ein_s to 11is temper ?
J a1nes Payn.
..

'give

284 .:,

Resurrection

Ride

composed

Resrirrection.-RESURRECTION PIE-a pie


of
the odd bits of meat that have been cooked already
(Colloq.)
' :. .
- ; . ."
' .-
Retur1i RFTURN TO OUR MUTTONS to 'return to the
main ~ubjeot of Ottr narrative. " (Gallicism.) . '
To return to our. muttons . .this rrio'de of progress1on.
. .

.
. At length upon'. Spanking Bill niade some .in1~
pression Barham. " . ".
: .. :,
: .
Rl1y1ne NEITHR:.RHYME NOR REASON. wi.tbo.ut either
sound or serise; wanting in'sense arid every :other
valualJle quantity. Sir Thon1as advis~d an author,
who had sent his "mantisor'ipt to . read, '.'.to put it
into rhyme,'' which, when he had done, Sir Thomas
said, ''yes, marry; now it is sonie'What_; before. it
was
neither rhyme or reason~
. .. , . . , .
.
Ribbon THE BLUE RIBBON:--see under ~Blue.''. . .
Richmond ANOTHER RICHMOND IN "THE FIELDariother unexpected adversary. ' It
a Shakes. pearean phrase from Richard iii. Act v. scene 4,
At the battle of Bosworth, King. Riohard1ep1ies
to his attendant Cateshy, who urges hiri:l to fly,
''I thirik there be six Riohmonds in the field. Five
I have slain today instead of him.''.
'
. This time it was a rival suitor who made his
appearance, and Brian's. hq~ Irish 'temper rose
when he. saw another Richmond i?i the. field- Fergus W.',.Hu1ne.
.

Ride RIDE AT ANCHOR to remain '1notion1ess; e. g,


The ship 'rides at anchor in the bay.: :: : : ;
. RIDE ROUGH SHOD to. pursue a oorse regard.:..
less of distressing. o.onsquenoes; e. g~ He rode
. . roughshod over my feelings.- .
RIDE FOR A FALL to act . reckle"ssly ; g. Be
careful, don't ride for.. a.fall.: . : ;; : . . . ... .
RIDE THE WHIRLWIND direct the revolutionarr
. " forces ;e.g. His speech shows 'that he is riding the
whirlwind.
' " ~ '

'

I,

'

,-

'

'

'

'

is

'

e:

:Riot

286

Rise

.-.and gets back two .shiIIings:.as change:. Then.


he_ says, ''Oh, here is: a six pence; -give -me back
' ' . the 11alf' crown;''. which . the ~hop: 'keeper~ tak~Ii
' unawares,. proba:bly' :does, and' the: oheat 'makes
'. off with t_w:o 'sh~~iings~' . . : : .. :' ... :. :" ..:; ; ..:
FORM A RING ' to 'make a union of- rriariufac: .. '..' turers of 'a certain' article'~ so as. to_: keep-up the

price.

. -. :: :: . , ,.

.. ..: .'Exp~rierio.~-~a~ "sh~~n:that the oper~tion of

:'these trusts, or .1irigs~ or syndfcates,: is completely


. batie~ul ~ T!ie _Scof.sman, 18.90~. . . '. : .... " . :... :
~ING IN ONE'S EARS. haunt oiie~s memory ;, e. g
... Her.song is.stilI 1inging in myear3;"; ;.: _, ':.
' . . '. RING .. TE;E, .CURTAIN: UP begin' the "plii.y. on a .
t
'
'

'

... .s, age.: , ,-- _


.,
.
. . : ,. . .
-, : ' , ,: , ~
RING THE. KNELL' OF herald:the
aholition
etc.
of
.
. '
.
..
.. '
.Riot RUN"RToT an act without:restr~int,or~o~D.trol;
' ; . to' b'e lawless in' conduot : '' .':: . . ' _,_ ... -.:-._,' :. '."
The day was brightly and lovely, and I found
.:'. iny eyes:running not the-same as: they ~'had done
: during my first ride .ori British soil. Bur1ot1ghs. _
A R!OT OF EMOTION OR IMAGINATION' . unres~ .
,. trained jndulgence in or display_. or .enjoyn1ent of
1 emotion or '.imagina tiori. . . . . : . . . :
. .
Rip RIP UP OR RIP OPEN, OLD SORES to reopen a
. bitter quarrel. whioh was almost forgotten. . ,-
LET HER RIP let the ship rush along; . do not
che:-:lt her speed.

:Ris_e' TAKE A' RISE OUT OF to fool: to n1ove a person


i~to mak~ng _hin1self_ ridiculous ...(~larig;) ._ .: .
1 . On one occasion, I toolc
what we used to .call
(l .,,h~:,. 01),f of Calverlef,-Te~ple, Ba_r, 1887.
RISE Ltiill'}\:.;~.HOENTX ~~OM ITS ASHES:. An ~vil
. that ris.es . a&-ti ~n _f1om ,_1t;.::. dea.~h ~ f.. _g~ .- ,~ebell19~
""~. . , ~?~~.~~~h!,1:1~ --~hP po11quero.r ,lil'!. a plioen1.:p /~om ft.~
'

<

'

' I

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

,I

'

..:n e

'

<

'

~.

,
, ,
.
.
.
,
.

, SPIRITS RISE - 1Jecome mo1e cl1ee1ft1l. ,


.
B,ISE TO THE OCCASION-develop poweis ec1ual to

"'~
~~
, ... ~v

e.,~

'

Roa cl

287

Rolling

Road A. ROY.AL';ROAD a ioad wit110\.it .difficulties.


: . .There is. no royal 1oad to learning, . no short
... cut. to: the acqt1irement of any~ val11able art .
. A_. :'rrolJope .. :. .

.
' . : .
". - ... T.A.KE. TO 1'HE ROAD to become a highway man.
Roast CRY ROAST MEAT to be unable to keep one's
. good .fortune to oneself; 10 p1oclaii11 . one's good
luok. (Colloq.)


.. : . The foolish hea1t not being able to :fare well
but he n1ust cry roast meat, would proclaim his
. . good fortune to the world below C; Lanib. . :
Rol>-ROB l:>ETER TO PAY PAUL see .under ''Peter.''
Robe ... THE LONG. ROBE tl1e . legal profession, j11dges
' and lawyers.
.
.
Rock ROOKS AHEAD a phrase signifying that some
. danger :n1enaces.

,. :
. . : ._''Take him away again, sir, don's let l1in1 .stay.
: . :Roclcs ahead, sir!'' Mr. Bunlter put up. his h_ands
in wa111ing Besant.

,
ON THE ROCK::; penniless:
. . ' '
' . ROOK-BOTTOM :PRICES the -lowes't possible 'prices.
.
'
Roel HA,VE A ROD IN PICKLE see .under '~Pickle.''
Rogel. . THE JOLLY ROGER see under ''Jolly.', .
Roland GlVE .A ROLAND FOR AN OLIVER to. give tit
for tat.
.
. .
.
He then took a sheet of paper, and said he
would soon give li<:r a Rola1id for
OliverC. Reade.

R.olli11g ROLLING S'l'ONE G.A'IHERS NO. MOSS .


restless 'vanderer iemai.ns poor.

He l1ad been a Rolli1ig sto11e which, if it had


gatl1crc~d 110 111o~s. hn;d rolled on it (made no money,
.

'

'

'

'

an

J an1es Payn. .

R\ lLL'ED INTO ONE-made_ into ' a single person
or thing-~ c. g. T am i11y servant, cook and n1aster
rolled i11to 011(~.

.
.:
ROLLING IN 11rtvirig Superab11ndance of (mo11cy
l\1xt1ry et-0.)



'
had used IJleut::-.,. of 1t).

'

Rome

288'

.ROLL OF HONOUR list of the patriotic dead.


'
Rome ROME\yAS NOT BUILT IN ADAY great results

. cannot be obtained 1Ii a short :.perio'd; p~tienoe is


required in the production of anything valuable.
. ''Yes,'' said Ella, amused by this very moderate
.. . -compliment'to her artistic sli::ill.-;: :''it. is the one
'. . . with the ooa~t guard :station . on it; but .I .have
. ' ' not had tirr e to put that in yet.'! ' ' . ", .
'. .. .. .. ,:''I see ; ~ R.ome was not built i1z a. day, .wa~ it ?''
. ; '. . James :Payn. _. ' ;.
. . : , .... : .
Room PREFERANC>"1B:E&Roci1r Tb ms co~fPANY to
-dislike his society. . .
' ... ' .. .
. . . . :.
Root: THE ROOT oir ALL EVIL tne 'love of: mon~y: -'
is. the Biblical. 1 Tim. vi. 10.
-..
THE ROOT'OF THE MATTER. deep seated religious
faith; that which is essential.. A phrase .niuoh
used by the. Puritans, and . bor1owed : from the Old
.. ;: . ~estament, .''seeing the root af the matter. is'.'.found
in me.'' Job xix. 28. .
.
,
1

: :

It

ROOT AND BRANCH . 001npleteJy.


.,
RO.JT OF BITTERNESS . a , :aangerous error dra\V-

, ing. away to apostasy. : ,

. . ,
ROOT OF THE M..ATTER-:-really important qual1-:
ties:.
e.
g

..
He
has
the
roo~ of the. matter .in him.:.
.
-
..
'

. .

'

'

'

. .

'

Rope' GIVE A ROGUE ROPE ENOUGH. AND HE -W:ILl


. . HANG HIMSELF a wicked person is sure to bring

about his. own' ruin.

.'. . . .
. . . . .. - .
He is a bad n1an, and a dangerous man, hl1t
. let hin1 be. He is taki11g plent.l/ of 1ope, and he
will 11ang himse!f one of. these days H. R. Hag

ga~. .

''

. .
.
so1nething which has the loolr

A ROPE OF SAND
of ~trehgtb, but is_.in.reality useless. . ..
.
Where he (love) i:;Pts his foot, rocl::s bloonJ with

flo\\Ter::. or the ga1den becomes a wilderness acco. rding to his good-\\Till and pleas:i.11e, , and at .his

whispe1 all. other. allegiances ni.elt:


ropes of sand H. R. Haggard.
I

,''

like

<l,\Vay._

289 .....

Rough~:

KNOW THE ROPES be ,at home: in some sphere;;.


, e. g.: . I lcnow,.the ropes of this time of work.
.... GIVE LONG ROPE TO. leave one free to bring his

. '
ruin.
.:
.
llose UNDER THE ROSE-under the pledge of secre
cy ~ in confidence. The ancients took the. rose~ as.the symbol of secrecy. .
: .
... '': .
John, sdaying nothing, continued: to disobey
: the order, 11:ndei-. the 1ose R; L. Stevenson.
A BED OF R 1SE a comfortable situation;
: ;
Life oould not 'have been a bed, of: rose 'for any
: of theni Mrs. Henry Wood.

Rot ROT OR ALL ROT humbttg; nonsense. A favott
rite school boy phrase in England. .
.
Let's stick to hi1n, and' no more rt>t, . and d1il1k.
his health as the head of the house T. Hughes.
Ro1igh . ROUGH-lT to do without ordina-ry .conveni
ences; :to bear, endure hardships.
-.-. :Take care of Fanny, mother : she is te11der ;.
and not used to rougli, it like the rest of us Jane
Austen~

,, ROUGH . .AND READY not over .particular btttjust good enough.


ROUGH .AND TUMBLE i1regular; e . g . . He leads _
it: rou.gli a1zd tttmble 1ife.
. . ROUGH
'ousTOMER one whose manners are
.
coarse.
.
.
ROUGH Dl.AMOND - see under ''Diamond.''
CUT UP RJUGH to become q11arrelsome or
violent. .
. .
THE. ROUGH
. bIDE <)F THE TONGUE.:_rebttl~e; abu~e.
Johnson, . after the manner. of critical bears,
often -licked ,vit.h flie rough side <if the to11g1eJ. M. Dixon.
..

A ROUGH GUESS-a guess made \vithout careful
calculation and t11erefore st1pp6s~d to . be approxi
matel~1' correct ; e. g. He anived at the gt1re by
a roiigh r;tte[{S... .

'

'

'

19

'


Ronn d A ROUND 0 - nothing. '' '
, .
A ROUND ROB11q a docu~Pent, signed by -nun1be1
'of individuals, whtoh has th0"'nam-es. radiating f_rom
the centre. so tliat no na1ne ht:ada tl1e Ii.st. .
.. A ROUND. DOZEN a dozen .and. no less., . . . :- ;
: ~BE_.ROUNJ?. Wi.TH--.speak plain.t1'Uth ..;to. .:
. IN ALL THE RlJU.ND OF NATURE .. in" -ttie .cvole
OI
.
circuit of nature. - ,
. : " - . ,,.-. ... :
. THE '. DA~L
Rt/Ul;lD. ordin~ry: :'. : occupations - of
'

t .

the day.. ~.
~-~:
:~ ,~ ~-t'.!" ~'
To GO' THE ROUND . to 'be pas'sed on.': ~: -' : :
To GO ONE'S ROUND ,' -take
a-. customary
walk of
'
.
L

1 ....

...

"

,_

'

;- '

inspection.
. ... . ... . .
. .- . - .- . . _
RotrND NuMBE.R.s roughly--corrre.ct , ..numbei;~~
stated,without odd'unit~. , '. . . : , . .__ . . .
:aouND Hotii;~iock-:up ... : ''.' :: _.-. ,._ - '
'Rou'ND
~EG. IN .A s.QUARE . HOLE-person
bettet...
.
,---
-fitted for another post. than the.one
be '.fills
. -- . .
, , ..
.
.
.
Row A RQW._ .0 :PIN_S used1. :to. signify ,\vhat is of
.'.small .valt1e. or i1nportan9e. (Colloq.)
.- ; : ., : ,
-.
. '~Me,'' would be my mot1rnful reply; ~'but. : he .
~ ;J'. .. doesnt amount to a row of 'pins.''" Robert Grant,
quoted in Edinburgli Rer1iew, 1882.

.
Rtib THERE'S'. THE RUB ''that is the.point; which causes me trouble. A quotation. from Sbalcespeare.
'Hamlet's Soliloquy~
,. '
._ .
R11b~con~PASS TrE RUBICON to take-a decisive,,'. ir-i:evocable step: The ;Rubic6.D: was a stream of ~an
tral Italy, forming the boundary in the 1epulJlican
peri.od of_ a11cient Roman History bf.tween .the, province of Gallia Cisalpina and Italia proper: Juli11s
Cesar, wl1ose military command was lin1ited to _this_province,. _reao l1ed this stre~m and cros~ed it-and it
was a virtual doc.!aration of war against' the repub1i c. . . . : . .
. . .. ._ . _ :
. .. . ' Tl1e 'die \\Yas tl1us cast, R1tbidon_ cros.~ed'-Q1tar. . terl11 ~Review, 1887.
.. . :
. _
. -
.
Rucldock. RED RUDDOCK . gold coins. (Prov;) ' -

.,

'

.'

'

. ''

'

',

,'

'

'

'

'

'

#''~

"'

'

'

J'

'

l'
''

''

.' "'
'

'

'

''

'

'

Rule

291 .

---------------------------R11le RULE THE ROOST 'oR ROAST to"govern; to have


the chief <)ne in everything. - -. ;
,
The ne\v-made duke tl1at rtiles .the ro<l3tShakespeare.
.
.
.
.' . .
.
.
Mrs. N asl1 / was ruli11 g the roast at. Caro_mel's
farm, being unquestionably both mistress and
inaster --Mrs. Henry Wood.
.
'
RULE OF THUMB- any mechanical op~ration performed in an irregular senseless way.
Run1- A RUM bTART (SLANG) a stran,ge condition
of affairs.

'' Come,'' said Silver, struggling'with hi:3 ashen
lips to get t'he word out, ''this won't do. Stand
. by to go about. This i~ a ri~m sta1t.'' R. L Steve11son.
A RUM CUS'fOMER (SLANG) a person difficult to
tnanage.
If they (the Di1tchrnen) 0011ld only keep their
l1ands out of their breeches pock~ts, they would
be ru.mmer.c: custome1s than they are now Captain
Mar1ya t.
'
:
Ru11 IN THE I.ONG RUN see under ''Long.''
RUN AMvOK R AMOK to rush ahead violently.
It'is a Malaypl1rase.

Ready to run amvck with any .one \vho crossed


him Disraeli.
RUN TO EARTH to secure the capture of.
It looks extremely ugly, to say tbat the least
of it, that all the men 'vho helped to run to earth
, the various n1embers of the Ruthven faMily were
Tiol1ly rewarded Spectator, Ja12uary 7, 1888.
RUF OF ONE'S TEETH as lllUOh one can eat.
THE RUN OF PEOPLE OR THE COMMON RUN the
ordinary people.
Perhap~ I am soaroely an example .of \Vl1at is
ponularly oalled th' comn1on run of visitors at the-_
''Ultramarine.'' -Jan1es Payn.
RUN UP A SCORE-:-to buy articles on credit.
RUN AGROUNDED to be stranded.
RUN CUUN'fER TO is contra1'Y to .
'

...

Round

29C .

R11ddcck
-

Round A. ROUND 0 nothing. (: . . ; : ' :


A ROUND RbBr1q- a docu~rien:t, signed by -numbe1
. of individuals, w hi.oh has the names. r'adiat!ng '"from
the centre, ::io tl1at no na1ne 11eads tl1e li~t. .
.... A ROUND. DOZEN a dozen.. and no less. . . . .. .
. . -BE .ROUNJ? .W1TH- speak plain ~1:-ilth ."to. . : -.
IN ALL THE R1JU..ND OF NATURE. in. tlie:cycle OJ
qiroui.t of ~a11.! r~. _. . , . :. ... :.. : .. :. . . .1 ;
. THE . ])AIL" R9,Ul:TD .ordinary:-:: occupations. of
the daY., ,_,~-;~ :.~:. -~ .
~ .. ,: ~ '. ~--
To.. GO
..THE ROUND
on.-.. . . . , . .
_,,),.
- be passed.
. .
To GO ONE'S. ROUNP ,. take a. customary walk, of

ct1 on. _ __
. . ... " . . .. , .. .. . .
1nspe
. . ..'...
:
ROUND NUMBER~ roughly, ~<;>rrre'ot. !.. num~er~~ .
stated, without o~d units. . , . :.. , ! ' . . :
Rott~:D
HOUt:>:Erloc'[{-up.
.

.
_'.:

....

.
.
ROUND PEG IN .A SQUARE .noLE-person better. :
fitted for another post thari
the one he .n!Is. , .. . .
..
. .
'Row A ROW .. OF -PINS used-~ cto (signify ;What.'is of
~,small
-v~lt1e
iinportanae.'
(Colloq.)
:
.

.
.
,
'
..
.
''Me,'' would be my mot1mful reply; ''but he .
_,_. (::doesn't amount'.to a row oj.:pins:'' <;-Robert Grant,
quoted in Edinburgh Review, 1882:
,
,
.
.
.
Rub THERE'S THE RUB 'that is. the.po}nt. which causes me trouble. A quotatio_n from Sb'alcespeare.
Hamlet's Soliloquy. ,

..
.
.
Ruhicon-;-PASS TrE RUBICON to .take a decisive, irrevocable step.' T~e Eubic6n was .a stream of; cen
tral Italy, forming the boundary in the ieP.ul;lican
period of ancient Roman History between the. province of Gallia Cisalpina and Italia proper: Juli11s
.Cesar, whose military command was lin1ited to this
.province, reaci1ed this'stre;:i.m.and Ol'OS~ed it and it
was a virtual doc'!aration of ,var against: tl1e re
public. . . . .
.
. . . .. . _
: -.
. ..
. The die v-;a!;j th11s cast, R1tbiaon; cros.<!ed ::__ Q71.ar: . te'r.l11. ReView,
.1887,
,. , .
_.

.
.
Ruddock RED RUDDOCK gold coins. (Prov,) . ,

to

'

''

'

''

'

'

',,~
'

or

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

Rule

Run::

291

R11le RULE THE ROOST OR ROAST to govern; to have


. the chief one in everything.

,
The ne\v-made duke that rules .the roast-Shakespeare.
. . . : .
Mrs. Nash was ruling the roast at. Qaromel's
/
farm, being unql1estionably 'both mistress and
master --Mrs. Henry Wood.

RULE OF THUMB. any inechanical operation .per


formed in an irregular senseless way. .

Run1- A RUM. bTART (SLANG) a stran_ge condition


of affairs.

' Come,'' said Silver, struggling ..with his ashen
lips to get the word out, ''this won't do. ~tand
. by to go about. This i~ a r~ni star.t.'' R. L. SteM
ve11son.
A RUM CUS'f'OMER (SLANG)
person difficult to

. inanage.


If they (the D11tchmen) cot1ld only keep their
l1ands out of their breeches pockets, they would
be r1t.mmer.~ custonie1s than they 'are now. Captain
Marryat.

: ,
: . '
Ru11 IN Tlffi J,ONG RUN see under ''Long.''
RUN AMOCK R Al\10K to rush ahead violently.
Itis a Malay-phrase.

Ready to rutz amocl' \\Tith any .one \v:ho crossed


him Disraeli.
RUN TO EARTH to secure the capture of.
It looks extremely ugly, to say tbat the least
of it, tl1at all the men who helped to run to earth
the various n1embers of the Ruthven faMily were
' ricl1ly rewarded Spectator, J anuar11 7, 1888.
RUF OF ONE'S TEETH as inuch one can eat.
THE RUN OF PEOPLE OR THE COMMON RUN the
. ordinary people.
Perbap~ I am scarcely an example of \vhat is
popularly called tli' com1non 1un of visitors at .th~.
'' UJt.ra1narine.'' -Jan1es Payn.

RUN UP A SCORE-..:..to buy articles on credit.


RUN AGROUNDED to be stranded.
RUN C0UNTER '1'0 is contrary to

a:

Salt

. ' 294

Yet for old sake~s ~ake she is still, dearf:,


.
The prettiest doll in the world--C. Kingsley.
Sal~ ABOVE THE SALT-at '.the "upper half of the. table;
: . . . among the guests
distinotion.
BELOW THE SALT-i.n an interior position.
His lordship's business, however, lies ohiefly
those, : so to ~peak, below the salt- G. J. Whyte

-Melville. ,

EAT A. MAN;S SALT to partake of his hospitality;
to be one's guest. Tnis oomes into use from the
oustom among tt1e Arabs; and oostitu1ed a :saored
bond between host and guest. It is oon::;idered unseemly for a perl"on to pa1take of ones ho~pitality
and then speak ill of him.

.
,Qne does not eat a rrzan's salt, as it \vere, at
these dinners. 'lnere is nothing 8acred in t.his
kind of London hospitality Thackeray.
TAKE STORY ETC. WITH A GRAIN OF SALT Allow
for probable exaggeration in it; e. g. .He flie.s high;
talce 'his wo1ds with a grai1z of salt.


THE SALT OF THE EARTH the better part. of a
con11nu;.1ity which ha:-i a good influenoe upon the
rest. Tht expression is taken f1oln the Bible,
Mathe\v .v. 13.

'We are to call UP before us the ctissenting ClOID


mun1ty of .the pe1icd, with its strong. underlying
sense, not only that it was the salt of tlie earth,
but that its bot1nden duty was to prove itself so
-'Mrs.
Oliphant
.
.
'
.
RAT.HER 'l'(JO SALT This has ieference to an ex. oessive hotel. bill or overoharge of ar1y kinr.. (Prov.)
.
SPILL SALT This is unluolty. lt. is also oonsi~
. dered unlucky to help anotl1er to salt at table :
1
'H.elp to salt, help to sorrow.'' (Prov.)
Some of these eggs. were fol" bre~ltfast, and I
: ate them v.:..ith a good appetite ; but in helping
myi:;elf w!th scilt I spilled it, on v.rhioh she started
up .with a sotearn Thaokeray.

of

'

'

'

'

.,_

'

'

Sand'

Salute

~-------~-'------------------

'

. : . Every man \~ h.o is wo1th :his salt .has his eriem ies 'l,. Hughes.

'.. TRUE T.' ONE'S SALT faithful to . one's em1)loyer.
7
if aithful as they tvere to their salt they had never
so :n~uol1 as dre.att1ed--that.tt1e n1aster whom they

had served so loyally could betray them J. A ..


Fronde .
. WITH 'A GRAIN OF SALT see ll.nder ''Grain.''
Salute SALUTE ONE'S EYE-to become perceptible to;
a. g. The sight that s1lztfed h1's eye took him by

'

surpril'e.

lciss ; e. g. 'fhe
.priest imprinted a chaste sali,te on the girl..
:
Sam To STAND SAM to entertain friends; to pay
f61' refresh111ents. S ani is a aontraotion for ~'U nole .8an1~'' a jocular 11a1ne for the U. S: Gove1n111ent ..
T.b'.e lJhrase origi11a1ly meanf'.l to pay al1 extJenses,.
as the government does. (Yailkeeiscn.)
.
Sarnaiitan . A G OD. SA?l1ARI I AN. one .'\vbo behaves
in a lcind and <lompas"..,ionate manner to t11ose 'vho
have .no claim upon hin1 . See th~ parable of 1he
: Good of. Sa naritan- Luke. x. 29.
I toolc leave .of the. got1d Sa1tza1itaiz; who ap-
pointed to of my niggers' to see 111e out of the
\Vood C. Reade.

Sa11cl-SAND HAS RUN OUT-the appointed term has
con1e to an end. :Sa1zd is here the sand in tl1e
hourglass, by \V-hich time '''as fo1me1ly 111easu1ed.
,._ '1-fush, rriyahild-never talk of 'dying. PlaaFe
God,,..you n1ay have many years of
life
before
.
.
you. . ..
.
,
.
.. ...'. . Slie . shook . her : golden 11ead a little E<adly.
IMPRINT

CHASTE

SALUTE

'

''No <footer; my sa1id . lias J'ttn nu.t ; and perl1aps


it is as \vell.'' H: R. Haggard.
.
' : . ROPE OF SAND . see 11nder ''Rope.''
. . .
.
. BUILDR ON SAND..:. 'an unstable stn1cti.tre; c. g .
. : In counting upon his help YOll are 'si.npl) 11uilding
01i sa11 ds.

'.
'
SANDY nickname for Sootchn1an. -

296
'

. Sap

S.APPED. CONSTITUTION

the :vigour of which is

exh ai.1sted by exoes~.

.
: ; . . .. . :
T_I-IE S.APIENT~.AL BOOKS. . ihose consisting of

. . wise sayings. . : . . .. . .
:
Sardine--PACKED
LIKE SARDI1'ES
a. crowded oon1
.
.
pan y.
. .
.

:Satan SATAN REPROVING SIN. It is ui::ed. when the


persoij.'
\.vl10.
fault with . . 'another. is equally
. , .
.guilty of the bad habit ..
. . .

:Satin-A YARD OF SATIN a glass of gin. - It is a
Lo11don SL~ng._ . . .
,
.Sauce Wt-JAT is SAUCE FoR THE. GANDER. TS SAUCE
. FOR THE GOORE like things clema11d like treatn1ent.
:Now,. wlzat !{s sauce.f<>r the: g<Jl'Se. is .sa11ce for
the -gander. : if you put .a, pressure on . one . class
to maJce it train itself .. properly, you n1ust p1lt a
pressur~ on o.thers~ to. the Fari1e. ~nd-M. Arnold.
'

'

'

'''

'

finds

'

'

POOR MAN'S SAUOE..:...-l111nger.

,.

SERVE ONE WI'T'fl T'Hffi SAME SAUCE- to .1eqttite


. Oile i'njury \Vitll anot}1er';' t'o Irlal{e to 'st1ffer...
' '

'

- .

'

,.,

'

'

-Save SAVE APPEARANCES to avert publio exposure.


" SAV:E ONE.'S BACON oome'.off. unb'urt. . .'
. ..
SAVE.ONE :"'1,BREAT.H keep silence. ," . :
SA\1E 1.}NE'S FACE a\ ofd humiliation .. : ...
SAVE THE SITU-~TION.-- avert in1minent disaster ..
SAVING CLAUS~excieption .. .
.
' S.A.VING GRACE-reneen1.ing feat11re .... : . . .
-Savour SAV0UR OF TH.fl: p.8.N ..to betray jts origin.
... .:To: SAVOUR OF 'J:HE FR1'1NG P .AN to show. sign& '
.of h e1e::3Y.
. .. .
. . .
...
Bisi1op Nix. of N orwioh used to call the: persons

: ,vhon111e s11speotecl {)f l1eretica'l opinipns. ''men


: . savn1i.ri,.,g ilfihe/111ing
pr;iz~'~ southe~~...
.
.
.
Say To SAY ONE'S SAY-:-to_.all .one has to say; to
. te1l one's own.story in 011's O\Vll way.
. .
.
. Ladies and gentletnen, the.. workman has said
h.is sa11, . and I hope the company has .been am,
used-C. Read~. .. : . , . . .:. . . . .
...
9

'

'

''

"Scafce

297

Score

EASIER SAJD.~EAN DONE it is not so' simple as


it sounds. : .
..


.
TH4 T IS TO S~<\ Y-1n other words.
You J)ON'T SAY so ! a forri1ula of surprise.
. To HAVE NOTHING TO -..AY FO'.R. ONESELF make
no self det ence.

. '.. : 'WHAT SAY. YOU TO? How $hould you lilte ?


- SAY THE WORD give the order to act.
SAY OVER recite to fix in tl1e memory.
. WHAT ONE HAS TO SAY sha1e in deoi$ion.
:Scarce MAKE ~NE'S SELF SC.ARCE to deoan1p; 1o
. withd1aw:

.. When a lady tells you decidedly she can't


~top .to talk to you, and \vhen she appea1s upto
her eyes in cle.aning boui::e or i-:omething of tl1at
sort, the next thing to do is t.o malce 11ozirself
. scarce George Eliot.

:Scarlet-SCARLET WOM.Al\ the \VOman 1ei"erred to in


Rev. xvii. 4, 5.- Pagan Rl)t11e, Papal. Rome, or a
personification t..f the wo1ld in its anti-Ol11istian
sense: The Church of,. Rome .
. . T11e latter old lady (Ron1e) may be the ~ca1lct
woman, or the beast with ten horns if yo11 \vill
-.J
..
R.
Lo\vell.
.

.
.

SR.ARLET FE\T"ER
feminine preferer ce for
n1il\tary men. The Britli-h military colour is Red.
~cl100In1aster.- THE.'8CJ-i00LMAS'1 ER IS .ABROAD- see
u11der ''Abroad.''
:Scissors- Sc1~s0Rs A:ND PASTE-:-the in1plements of a
newspaper st1b-editor,- who cuts out extracts from
other journals 1or l1is own.
They e:a.\V in the applicant for the editorsl1ip
. merely an inferior whose duty had .Probably
lain i;, the .~cissors and paste department. Be~ant.
.

:Sco1e Go OFF A SCORE-(a) to make a spirited start;


tolose self- control. (Colloq.)

, Reuben would answer, goitzg off at score in l1is


old way- H. Kingsley.
(b) to proceed ".,.itho1it break.
'

'

'

. '

Scot

.298

Seo t

SCOT. F R;EE . q11i_te. t1n inju1ed. . . .. . : . .


I oould riot name a sirigle \vor11an of my. acqua
intance of who111 I.nave not heard. some story
or, othe1.. Ev.en dear, good, old I-leste1 doesn't
corrie 'oil' scotj1:ee : Fiorence Ma1ryat. . . ::.
Sci T AND LO,.. pa~Trnent exacted by ,tl1e parish.
The rigl1t .of voting at Westn1inster was fn the
householders .paying. sc<Jt an cl lot Macaulay.
Scotcll OVT OF ALL ScorcH e'xcessiv(c;J.y.

I DID. NOT SCOTCH MY MIND I _spol\e .plainly.


WE HAVE SCOTCHED THE SNAKE, NOT .:.BILLED :1T
-prevented a danger but not re1noved .it complet1y...
Scrape-ScR:A.PE .ACQUA.lNTANCE; WITD. to get on,
tern1s of
_a oha-
. acquaintanoe; ton1ake f1iends in
.
nee way.
_. .
.
. SCRAPE ONE'S PLATE ]eave nothi11g on, it.
SCRAPE UP to a111ass nlul1ey !)y S(~ve1:e economy.
SCRAPE 'l;ifROUGH jll!'t n1anage to p'ass.
. .
GE'l' INTO. A.. 'SORA.PE awkwa1d . 'preJjca1nent.
resulting fron1 one's es1:apad1.,. . .
~
Scratc!1 BRING ONE TO THE SCRATCH. to cause one
.
to corne to a decision. The Sc1atch. is the line Ill
a prize ring Lip to whicb.. the i o)\er:-; are led.
1'111 the fellow.to. b1i11g old Bry(~e up to tlla scra-. tcli_-G:eo1 ge El.jo.t. .. .
..
. COME TO THE SCRAT(JH-cometo a deci~ion. -
111deed, had it ll<>t been fo1 a. littll\ 1noident.
about to be detail.ed; it is doubtf t1l if. Mr. Bellamy
\\'ould have :vercomd to ilie :i:cratclt at all H. R.
I-!a.gga1d. .
.' '
.
.
, . ,,_
OLD SCRATCH the deviJ ... (Slang.}
'
I'd as soon tr11st niy affairs to Old Sc1atcli as
to hir11 Mrs: Henry 'wood.

!'

'

'

'

.,

_,,..

'

'

'

'

'

,,.~

,,

'

.,

I '

<

Ser<
;

'v

A SChEW LOOSE-:-son1ething defective; a. dis,

turbiiig element.
. . . . . . . :
. . . .
. . .Our landlady turned vale : ' no doubt she thou-
ght there v;as a scrlw loose in my intelleot-0. W~Holmes.
.'.
'
.
: ..

Sea

, Season

.299

' ' '

AN OLD SCREW

a miserly fellov.1 (Slang.) ...


.. '11 his gentlen1an and the gltard know :::>ir Pitt
very well, _and laughed at. him a great deal.
They both agreed 1n calling him a11 old screw,
wl1ich means a very. stjngy. avaricious person
-Tl1aclceray. . -'.
.
.
DRAW ONE'S SCREW to draw one's alary.
(Slang) .
. .
.
.
. . . - . .
He is a reporter on ,the. Netos and drat.vs a h.and
.<;01nt? .~cr<~r11
BeRant.

REG' LARLY SCREWED drunk~ (Slang.) ' '


SCREW ONE'S COURAGE 1'<.l THE S'IiCKl:NG POINT
-to sutnmon
boldness
strike ; e. g. If you
want success in the entervrize, :crew yo2i1 courage
to tlie sf.icking poi11t.

PUT THE SCREW ON l1ring r>ressU:re to bear on


person to d'J sornething ; e. g. If he do not agree,

up

to

prtt the screw on him.

-ScR.i-.w~~D ON THE. RTGHT WAY to 11ave sonse;


e. g. His. l1ead is ,'lcrewed. <in tlie right 1i.a11.
'
5ea HALF SEAS OVER-half drtlnk. Slang.)
A'l' SltA unable to givo any explanation or solut:ion.
I cotlld :not have been more ctf. .<?eu. had I seen a.
Cl1inese lady fron1 Pekin .1frs. He11ry Wood.
Senr-SEnR AND YELLOW LEAF old age.
The baby in \\ hose honour tl1ey hnd all met

is a i11atron in the seai c111 d 11ello1v leaf Thomas


Hardy.
. ..
.
Seaso11-IN SEASON AND OUT OF SEASON _at all _times .
. He Made ma11y. enemies .by t l1ese things, 1tttered in 8P.<rsoit and <u.t nf sca~o,1. .~facn1-illmz'g
.ltfaga2i11e, -1887.
.
.
SEAso :-. ED FOOD food spiced to render it n1ore
1

po.latable.

SEASONED TI1'1BER-tin1ber thoro11gl1ly dried that


. the sap has.gone Otlt of it.

SEASONED woriKER ft1lly experienced 011e.

'

Scot
. .

.298
'

Seo t

SCOT FREE

'

q11i_te - ltn injured ...

. ; _. ... : .

I could riot name a single \von1an of.my. acqua


intance of; wbo111 I.nave not heard some story
or other . Even dear, good, old .Heste1 doesn't
ooine off scotf1ee ~ Florence Marl.yat. . . .'
801 T AND LO.I' payment exacted by tl1e parish.
The right. of voting at We~.tn1inst~r \\~~s, in thehousehoJ_ders paying scot ancl lot . Macaulay.
.
Scotcl1 OUT OF ALL Sco1cH e'xcessi\ ely. .
I DID.NOT SCOTCH Iv.1Y MIND I spoke plainly.
'

\..

WE HAVE SCOTCHED THE SNAKE, NOT BILLED tT


-prevented a danger but not re1noved it oomplet1y.....
Scrape-SOR:APE .ACQUAlNTANCE WITD to get on,

terms <?f acquaintance ; ton1ake f1ie:Cds in . a cha


.
.
ncewa~
.
..
.
.
SCRAPE ONE'S PL.A.TE leave 'nothi1~g ori it.
SORdPE UP to an1ass mu11ey lJy sC.ivere economy.
SOR.A.PE '!'.ii.ROUGH -j11~t i11anage to pass.. .
. GE'l' INTO A' SCRAPE awk\va1d p1eJ.ica1nent.
resulting from one's est:apa.d1:. . . . , . :
.
Scratc!1 BRING ONE .TO THE 'SCRATCH . to cause one
to corne to a decision. The Sc1atch is the line ina prize~ring up to whicb'th:e 1'oxe1:-;_ are.led.
r1n the fetlo\V 19 b1~i1;g old. Bry(ie tlp to tile scra
_ tc_h _:George El.i
. COME TO THE SCR.A.TCH-con1e to a deci.~io11. ' ..
111deed, had it ll(>t been fo1: a lit.tltl ino_ident.
:. .about
to. be detailed, it- is. doubtful
if- Mr. ~ellaroy
.
., . wouldhavet:\'ercon1.etotlie .~c1atclt at.all H.R.

'

ot. . .

. ,

'

I-Ia.gga1 d.

. . . ; .
.:
OLD SCRATCH the devil. (Slang.}
.
: .. I'd as soon tri1st my aff ai1s to Old Sc1atcli as. to hin1 Mrs. Henry wood .
.Serf,.,. A SChEW LOOSE-:--son1ethi11g defectiv~; a dis
. turbing elerrierit." .
. .
.
Our landlady.turned vale: no doubt. sl1e thoUght there was a 8CflW loose iil Illy intelleut Q. W.Holmes.
- .. "
;

Sea
.

, Season

. 299

'

'

a miserly fellov. (Slang.) . ,


. , This gentlen1an and th~ guard know cir Pitt
very well, and laughed. at 11im a great deal.
They both agreed 111 calling. him a1l old screw,
wl1ich means a. very stingy. avaricious person
-Tl1ackeray.~.
:
.
DRAW ONE'S SCREW to draw ones.alary~
(Slang) .
..
. ..
He is a reporter on .the Netos and draws a ha12d,<io1nP .-c1efJJ
Besant.
REG' LARLY SCREWED drunk~ {Slang.)
AN OLD S.OREW

SCREW ONE'S COUfiAGE T<.1 THE S'I.lCKll'IG POINT


-to su1nmon
boldness to strike ; e. g. If you

up

want success in t11e entervrize, :crew you1 cottrage


to tlic sticking poitzt.

PUT THE SCREW ON l1ring pressure to bear on


person to d'.> something ; e. g. If he do not agree,
ptit the screw on 11im.
'
SCRr.\VF..D ON THE R1GHT WAY to have sense;
e. g. : His head is "Crewed. <in tlie right fl'a!/
5ca HALF SEAS OVER-half dr11nk. Slang.)
Ar StA unable to give any explanation or solut.i.on.
I co11ld not have been more af. sea l1ad I seen a.
Cl1inese lady fron1 Pekin M1s. Re11ry Wood.
Sear-SEnR AND \'ELLOW LEAF old age.
The
baby
in
\Vhose
l1onour
tl1ey
11nd
all
met
.
is a 111atron in tl1e sear a11d 11ellorn .l<~af 'ThomasHardy..
.
Season..:.... IN SEASON AND OUT. OF SEASON at all ti.mes,
. He r1ade many enemies by 1 hese things, tl.ttered in st"<1son a1td <u.t ef seaR011 i\1acmillan'a
:

.
..3fagazi11.e, 188~. . :
SEASO"ED FOOD food spiced to render it n1ore
. :palatable. .
. SEASONED .TI?.IBER-tinllJer thorol.1gl1ly drierl that
the sap has.gone out of it.

.SEASONED.\VOliKER ft111y experienced one~


'

.:second

.'
See
'

' 300
.
'

'

..

'

Second' . COME OFF SECOND BEST to .get the worst of

a: contest.

' .
.
. . .. 'fhe Koh-i-Noor, as we named the gentleman
. ,. " with the diarnond, left us, 'however, soon after
that '' little mill,'' as the young fellow John
called it, wnere he crime off .iecdnd best-0. '\V.
Holn1es

:See

SECOND THOUGH JS reconsideration. . . .


SEE DOUBLE-to be drunk.
,. .
.

HAVE SEEN ONE'S BEsr DAYS..:.:: to have been in


. better condition : to be now
the decline.. '

ori

He's an English1nan, . and, I guess, has. seen


bett e1 days .Haliburton.
. .
.
. .
SEE ABOU'l' A TtlING to consider it.
. ...
SEE ONE THROUGH to aid in aociol)lplisbing or
. doing, esp. somethi11g.diffi6u.lt 6i: dangerous ...
. SEE A PERSON A'L' YORK FIRST an ~xpression of
extreme unwillingness, . used whe:re. wher~. one is
11nvilling to do a service -or grant a 'favo_ur. _(Prov.)
If a girl 1ike Miss J e11ny11ge :had done_. it- th
ougll, as a matter fact, she would lictve seen him at
r
Yo1k first-it \\Tould have been oivil, and that's
all Jam es Payn.

As FAR AS--ONE CAN SEE-unde1stand; to the


best of one's judgment. .
.

You SEE-as I wish you to know. . . . . . . ..
. I sn:E I grasp the situat.ion.
.
LE'l' ll-1E SEE_:_ give i1.e .a 1noment to think before

.answering.
. .. . ..
I SEE THINGS DIFFERENTLY NOW I 'have. ohan
. ged 1ny vie\1\rs:
'
..
'
SEE EYE TO EYE-take exaotly the sa.n1e vie'v of
'
.a question~

.
SEE LIFE OR WORLD gain
experierioe
of
men
.
.
. ar1d 1Jl<i.nners.

SEE srARS see lights danoi_ng as result of : blow


.on head.
'. .
..

SEE THE BACK OF be relieved <f the presence of.


SEE THE LIGHT ' be born, be alive~
'

'

Se11d.~

301. .

See. ..

--------------------- --------

~--.

SEE THE RED LIGHT take fright.


..
..
'
SEE TO iT THAT take
01; provide that .
. . SEE ONE'S WAY
TO DOING-find oneself
able
to
do.
.

Seed RUN. TO SEED to become . exhatlsted ; to grow


weak.
.

Mr. Monks is aware that I am not a youngman, m-y dear, and also that I am a little riin to
serd--Dickens.
_
Sell SELL AN01'HER MAN to deceive him.
.
:
. Did I ever tell you how the young vagabond
sold me last half ? T. Hrigl1es.
.
SE1~L oNE UP to sell a debtor's goods~ to fo1ce- .
one to become bankrupt.
,

Then he would send in his bills, sue her,


he1 up, and drive her out of the _place stripped'.
to the last fai:thing Besant.
'
.
SELL OUT (a) to leave the army. This pl1rase
...vas used \vhen co1n111issions in the army were bougl1t and sold, a system abolished by M1. Gladstone in 1869.
.
It \\Tas in this period that he quitted .the Gua. rds, and sold out of the army Thackeray~

(/1) to dispose entirely; to get rid of investments.

Still a great loss wot1ld be incttrred by selling


out of them at a period of deprssion . C. Rende.
SELL ONE'S LlFE DEAR kill or \VOUnd assu.ilants
before being killed; e.g. You can't have your \Yay
\\Titl1 r..!e ~ I \\Till sell niy life dear.

SELL ONE A PUP- S\Vindle bi1n.


SOLD AGA.1N l exclamation used by 01 to a clisappointed person.
Sc11d SEN!) TO COVENTRY see under '''covontry.''
SEND ONE A.BOUT ONE'S BUSINESS to dismiss pe-
remptorily.
.
.
U po11 tl1is I \Vas, naturally, mollified and
.~c12t hi rn abo11.t 111'.s 1J11si11css. hoping to l1a vo seen
tho last of him at Highmore C .. Reade .
_,
'

care

'

'

sazz

'

'

'

'

- Second

300
.

See
____,
.

Second COME OFF SECOND BEST 'to get the worst of


. .. a contest. . :


Tl1e Koh-i~Noor, as we named the gentleman
. ,. - w. ith the diamond, left us, however, soon after
that ''little mill;''. as the young fellow John
oalled it, wnere he crime off .~econd best_:_. 0. \V.
I-Ioln1es . .
:

SECOND THOUGH. IS . reconsideration..
. ...
:See-SEE DOUBL~to be d'runk.

HAVE SEEN ONE'S BEsr .DAYS- to have . been in
better condition.: to be. now on the decline. .
He's an English1nari, .and, I. guess, -lias. S<!en
bett ei days .Haliburton. .. . .. .. . _. - . . . : .
SEE ABOUr A r tJIN G to consider it. -. . . - .
,
SEE ONE 'l'HROUGH to aid. in aocomplisbing or.
doing, esp. something.difficult or_ dangerous._ ..
'.
. SEE' A PERSON .8.'l' YORK FIRST 'an'.. expression oi'
extreme unwillingness, used w)l.e:re .where one ii,
. t1nvilling to do a service or grant a 'favour. (Prov.):
If a girl I ike Miss . J ei1nynge hid done.:: it- th~
ough, as a matter .fact, she would. li<ive seen him a::
York first-it would have been civil, -and that' t
.. .
all James Payn.
!:
. As FAR AS ONE CAN' SE~unde1stand; to th:
.

'

'

'

best of one's judgment.


. . " ~
~~
You SEE-as I wish you to know..
- - ..... ;
I su:E r grasp the situation. .
. . . ~;
LEr 11E SEE give i1.e a 1noment to think .befo,;...
-.:...
.ans\vering,'
.
-- S:Jl.

_ . 1 SEE T~INGS_ DIFFERENTLY

NOW.

_I ,'_h~ve . ,,.,TJ!)oi

ge<l 1n y views. .
. - - ,:
SEE EYE TO EYE-take exactly the same v1e\v -~.
, .a questio11;
" . .
-
2:>
SEE LIFE OR WORLD gain experience of me;:::-r
and ,ri,~nners.

.
77:
SEE STARS-see lights danoing as .resultof blo:;~
. .on head. . . . .
. . .

~
SEE T.f!E BACK OF be relieved c_,f the presence c~
SEE THE LIGH'r be born, be alive~

... '1

..

.
'

Sen(}...'

301 .

'

--

SEE THE RED LIGHT take fright.

' . SEE TO' IT 'THAT take care or pro\iide that.


. : .SEE
ONE'S
.yY A Y TO DOING-find oneself able to do.

Seed RUN. TO S)!jED . to become e.xhai.1sted; to grow


weak.. .
.
.
.
, Mr. Monks is aware that I am not. a _yo11ng. man, my dear, and also that I am a little run to
seP.d--Dickens.
.

Sell SELL AN01'HER MAN to deceive him. .


; Did I, ever tell you how the young vaga.bond
,qold me last half? T. Hughes.
.
SEl. . L .. ONE UP. to: sell a debtor's 'goods~ to fo1ce .
one to beoome .bankrupt.

.... Then 'he WOttld send in his bills, sti.e her, sell'
: he1 up, and drive her out .of the place stripped:
to the last farthing Besant.
~ .

SELL OUT (a) to leave' the army~ . This phrase


\Vas used \vhen co1n1nissions in the army were ho
ught and sc;>ld, a system abolished by Mr.. Gladstone in 1869.
.
'

..
.
.
It was in this period tha't he 'quitted .the Gua. rds, arid sold out of the army Thackeray. ..
(/1)
to . dispose
entirely; to get rid of investments.
.
.
, Still a 'great. loss .wotild be incur~ed. by selling
out of them ata period of deprssion C. Reade.
.
.
. SELL ONE'S LlFE DEAR kill or wound assailants
before being killed; e.g. You can't have your way
\vith .r..le ~ .I will sell my life dear.

SELL ONE A PUP- swindle hi1n.
;:...-soLD .A.GAiN l exclamation used by. or t6 a dis-
1
~ppointed person.
.
.
1
~11d" SENI) TO COVENTRY see under "''coventry.~'
SEND ONE ABOUT ONE'S BUSINESS to dismiss P0
remptorily.
.'
.
.

Upon tl1is I 'vas, naturally, -mollified and'


,'
.'~cnt hi1n about liis l1usi11ess. hoping to 11ave seen.
tl1e last of him at Highmore C. :Reade. : . , .
" .

'

'

'

'

'

'

. .

..

..

'

302 .

Serve

Set
'

take

Serve SERVE A PERSON ou1'


~eve~ge. on him
for real or fanoied .wrong;
- .
.. . .
.'
. ''Little brute,; or'ied: Ha\ves viciousyl; '~I'll
work him; 'I'll serve lii1n out.'' O.. Re'ade.:. . '
SERVE ONE RIGHT to treat one as he deserves.
Be knorJked hirn clean off his legs on to the
. deok, where he Jay stunned and bleeding.. ''Serve
liim right,'' 01ied Charlie from. the hatchwayG. J. Whyte-ly.1e1 ville. . . , . . .
. -.
SERVE ON.I!.'S. TIME-go . through : one's: term of
office, imprisonm~nt etc:; . ..... ;. ! : ... .
SERVE .ONE'S TURN have the effect one desires.
Set SE1; ONE'S CAP UP see: under ''Cap.'' .. : ,_
SET ONE'S FACE AGAlNST to oppose resolutely.
No1 ,was it. ~n the least: on asthetio grq'l1nds
that he had set hisfaee agt.linst.. the _whole. scheme
-Guod lV91tfs, 18~7. . . : ... ; ..
SET 'l'HE 1 NETH ON EDG~see under ''Edge~''
SET. ONE'S F AUE
LIKE
.
. A .FL1NT-to. .be . resolute.
They \,rere a couple of lion-1.ike: m_en; they
had s t ~he1'.r face l.ike a.flint-Bunyan.
.
- ,. . SET THE THAMES ON . F1RE to be conspicuously
able.
.. .
.
:

, I har41Y expeot 'him to set the


'fire;
, but I hope his mother will-never have reason to
be ashamed of hin1- W. E. Norris.

.MAKE A DEAD SET AT to single out' as. the. o}>..


jeot of one'i; attentions.

The old lady made a dead set at the: parsonJ. M. Dixon. . .


_
' ." ,,
SET ONE'S HAND TO to sign ones name;. e.g.
He would not set liis' liand 'to then1 o'ontraol. .
!-'
SET PEOPLE BY THE EARS n1ake theni qttarred;
SET RIGHT to correot or settle. ,
,
SE 1' ti'J'ORE BY to value; to think higl1ly of.
SET THE TABLE IN A ROAR to cause laughter in
-tl1e company. . .

.
. SET A THING OFF to sho\v it at an advantage. SET UP FOR to. p1etend to be. - . . . .
. :.
SET oNE'S HEART ON. to love, oherish.

'

Thames .on

'

Set
'

Shacle
' '

,'

'

SET A PRlCE-to fix: it.


SET THE RAZOR to. sl1arpen.'
'
SET THE CI..OOK to regulate. '
SE'l' THE 'fUNE-to give a pitcl1 to.
SET THE BONE to adjt1st :properly.
: SEr THE TRAP.-'-tO lay it out .
. . SET ABOU'r com111ence.
SE1' A GO lNG to. give a. start.
. SET A'B'.ALL ROLLING-to start.
SET .A'r NAUGHT to defy. ' .

'

SET AT EASE-to cd111fort.


SEL' AT.LIBERTY to free.
SErFt)RTH-1odescribe~

'

'

'

'

to exhibit.

8E1' ON FOOT- to start.


SET.OFF to s1art.
SE'I' IN -to begin.
. . SE'r ON to attack,

'

'

'

'

'

instigate.

SET UP--to establish.


5ettlc 8ET1'LE A MAN':::; HASH to kill l1irri.
He received sotlle te1rible l~icks on this back
and legs. ''Give it him on the 1iead !''. ''Kick
his life out!'' ''Settle his l1ash !-;..C: Reade.
Scvc11 SEVEN DEADLY : SINS~ pride, ' ~ovetousness,
lt1st; a.nger, gluttony, envy and sloth. .
.
"
Sure, it is no sin; .
or of the dcadltJ sins it is the. least Shakespeare.
A SE\'EN DA":i:'S WONDER son1otl1ing \V.hich absorbs. pt1blic i11terest fo1 a sl101t tin1e and then iii
'

'

'

'

'

'

forgottbn.

..

.Tl1e . scvan clny's tvo1zdcr - about tl1e b J:\-. had al


moi-;t died away I-I.ugh Con\vay~

Se v;n ' SE\VN UP= intoxicated. (Slang.)

'

,Iie tool;;: care to tell )'Oll t.hat ~0111e of tl1e party


\Vere pretty considerably '' scw1z ?lp '' too Tha
okeray. .

.
.

' SEW UP 01'1-"E'S STOKING to put one to sile11ce


5l1n<lo FALL 1Nr0 TfiE SHADE-to cease to attract .
attention.
'

304:.

g11ake .

Sl1eet .

'

'

But, finally. the original Semite. fell more and


more irlto the shade. The_ Aryan came to the
front-H. R. Haggard.
. ..
.. _
Sl1ake SHAKE A LEG to dance.
I explain: that -the stage js ready for. them, if:
they like to act;, or the concert-room, if they
\Vil! sing; 01 the dancing room, should they wishc
to ~hake a leg Besant. (Slang.) - '

No GREAT ::>HAKEB of little .value.: The colloqltal expression is ''Great shakes'' \V hich means a.
thing of great account, something- of value. . -.
Oat111eal i.; no great sliake~ at best ; It ain'.t-~ven.
so goocl for. a horse as real yelloV\r Indian .corn.
-Hal ib11rton.

..
SHAKE OFF THE Dosr FR 1 >l\i ONE'S FEET 'to re-
nounce all intercourse with.

Soon after the i11terview j11$t recorded, he I eft.
Barohe:::ter~ shaking the dust <lff his feet as he entered the.railway, carriage A .. Trollope.
. .
.. SHAKE IN ONE'S SHOES to be in a state of apprehension or fright. .
.
.

- A.LL OF A SHAKi--trembling.
IN .A SHAKE-very ci uio.kly.
.
.
Sliarp SHARP PRACTICE-grasping beha v.io11r ; conduc.t defensibl. on legal ground~, bli.t is yet' considered ungenerous.
.
'
,''I ua_ll this,'' said Tommy, in. ,a great raget .
''c'onf_o11nded sharp p_ract-ice.~' . Besant.
_..
WAS TOO SHARP FOR ME--overreached or baffled me.
\

SHARP:1s THE WORD. exhortation to hasten.


SHARP L\JOK OUT vigilant \Vatch.
. .'
S!J.eep e)es CAST SHEEP'S .EYES AT see under-''Eye.'" .
. BLACK SHEEP the . disreputable of a .family or
g1oup.
:

., We are as liable to 11ave blaclc sheep-here

.as else\vhere, ''.the aTchaeaoon replied A. -:Trol.


Jope
,
.
.
WIND .
s11~et A sFiEET (oR THREE SHEETS) 1N THE
.
tipsy.
'

'

'

I'

'

'

'

'

'
'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

305

Si1elf

Sl1illi1ig

Captain Cuttle, looking, in candle in hand, at


. Dt1nsby inore attentively, believed that he was
lh1ee sliee'-s i1i the wi1zd, or, in plain \\orc1s, drunk
-Dickens.
.
A SagET .ANCHOR tl1e chief support or the last
1efuge for safety; e. g. Wl1atever you do in life,
you mu'st have a sheet ancho1.
.
.
. .
SHEET LIGHTl\11NG lightning in wide extended
flashes.
Sllt~lf - P lJT~ J...AY. ON THE SHELF to put aside from duty
01 service, no 1011ger engaged in active work.
What is a n1an to do when l1e's piit 01z t/irJ slielj
and has no home? Good flT 01ds, 1887.

Sl1ell SHELL OUT{Slang) to pay out n1oney.


'\Te can al \\~ays n1ake the old villain sliell outi
as he ought Mrs.E. Lynn. Linton.

COME OUT OF ONE'S SHELL to be oom1nunicative.


SHELL OFF come off in scales.

Sli.ield THE OTHER SIDE OF THE SHIELD the other


side of any question. The &to1y is told of t\vo
Knights \Vho, meeting at a post fell to qt1arrelling
abottt the material of \Vhic}1 the Shield Was composed. Tl1e one held it to be of gold, the other sil\.,.er.
li'rom \vords tl1ey can1e to blows. After n bitte1
struggle tl1ey discoverecl that botl1 \Vere right, sinoe
the 011e side v.us gold, a.nd other side silver.
Sl1ift MAKE SHIFT to find \Vays and means of doi11g
smething ; to contjn110 witl1 difficulty.
By my otl1er . lalJours I r11alcc sliift to oat and
d1ink and 11a\e gold clothe~ Goldsmitl1.
SifIFr l"OR ONE:>EI..F i11anage someho\\' ; contri\'e
to do; e. g. He mltst slz.ift, as lie oa11,fo1 liimsclj.
Sl1illi11g TAKE THE SHILL1NG to enlist as a soldier
l)y accepti11g the recruiting officer's shilling. This
IJl'aotice is discontint1ed from 1879.
It \\as tl1en tl1at, not oaring \\l1at becor11e of
inc. I foul; tlic Q11ee1i's sliilling,. and becr11ne a
. soldier. H. R. Haggard.

')fl

Shine.:

Sheo

306

Shin.e TAKE THE SHINE OUT OF (Slang) to outshine;


to surpass. Also, but less correctly, off, of. .
Yot1 will l1ecome a rival potentate to my governor. You \~ill tal'8 tlie shine out of him directly
-o. Reade.

Sllip-WHEN ONE'S SHIP COMES IN OR HOME-\vhen


fortune is made. (Colloq.)

Y este1day afternoon I brought my long business to a bead; tlie sliip lias come liome; one
more dead lift, and I shall cease to fetch and
carry for the Princess Ratafia R. L. Stevenson.
SHIP-SHAPE neatly arranged.
.
THE SHIP' OF THE DESERT the camel.
MAKE A SHIP w ROGK OF come to naught ; suffer

ruin.
.

.
'
.
.
-. .
.
Shiver BREAK TO SHIVERS i11to small fragments.
. .GIVES ME.THE SBlVERS
repels
or
horrifies
me.
.
.
Shock SHOCK TACTICS-in military, use of cavall"Y
to charge ir1 masses:
.
. SHOOK TROOPS- getman special service troops in
the great war~ : . . .
Sr:idCKER very bad specimen of some thing.
SHILLING SHOCKER sensation.al novel.
Shoe SHOE A. GOOSE OR .A GOSLING to engage in a
foolish or fruitless understanding ....
'' The sn1ith that will meddle '\'\Tith all things
may go slioe tlze goslings," is an old ,proverb.1\.faria Edgeworth.
.
DIE JN ON1!.'S SHOES to die by violence, especially
hanging.
.
THREAD THE SHOES STRAIGHT to. be upright in
one's conduct.

.
\VAIT FOR DE.AD MAN'S SHOES look fo1\vard
' \vith expectation to his death.

The old cock n1eans to c1ow yet over some that


are waifing for. his shoes. Scott..
ANOTHER PAIR OF SHOES quite a d'ifferent
matter.

'

'

"

'

'

Shoot
.
'

307

Silo rt

Promise and performance are very dijferent


pair of shoe.~ Blaohmore.
WHERE THE SHOE PINCHES where the diffioulty
or the oause of discomfort lies.
.::
SI1oot ::,HOOT THE PIT to cheat a landlord by leav..
ing w,thout paying the rent. It is same as ''Moon
light fitting.'' (Slang).
Sl1op TALK SHOP to converse (esp. out of season)
about one's o\vn trade or profession.
'' When he had a few clergymen round him,
ho\v 110 loved te> make them 11appy ?''
'' Never tallced sliop to thetn, Did he?'' said the
archdeacon A. Trollope.
Cun1E '0 THI!: WRONG SHOP. apply to the \vrong
pe1son.
ALL OVER THE SHOP in confusion.
H.AVE EVERY THING IN THE SHOP WINDOW be
superficial.
5 I1ort SHOR'r COMMON-see under'' Common.''
SHORT CUT-a path \vhich saves time ; a method
\vl1ich saves ti111e.
Cateohis111s of history, man\1als of arithmetio,
slio1t cuts to a s1nattering of science, and guides
-to t111ive1sal knowledge Edinbu.1gli Review, 1887.
SHORT SHRIFT-swift lJUnishment; little. time to
repe~.
.
The neighbou1s would fo1m a possa in a t\vin
l\:ling, ancl ol1ase tl1e thief night and day till they
secured 11im; and tl1en sho1t sl1.rift for the poor
\\re to h-J.fac1t1 ill an' s Magazine, 1887.
TI1E SHORT .AND LONG OF IT the sun1 and substnnoe of the matter.

TJ1e sliort a11d long of it 'vas, I couldn't te11 \vhat


to n1ako of lier Mal'ia Edge\\orth .
MAKE SHORT ~70RK OF to settle son1e difficulty
or 01>position pron1ptl}".
To nE SlIORT '\VITH ONE-to sho''T annoyance;
t'!. g. He tnas tJt?111 sliort uiif.11. 111e.
T AXE ONE UP SHORT interrupt

.. '

. ...
~~

308 , .

t.--;"-

----------

--

- --

--- - - - - - -

----

'

BISCUITS eats1io1t c1t1111ble i11 the 11101--itli~


SHORT MEMORY-that of 'one \.vho .soon fo:i;gets.
SHORT OF BREATH soon \vinded.

.SHORT SHRIFr quick disposal. .


: .

. .
.
Sl:iot A. SBOT IN THE
LOOKER a last - re.se1ve
of, n10~
.
.

I '\

' '

. ney .or food etc.


. .
'
'' As Jong as there's shot in. tl1e lor.l~e1; she shal1
: want. for nothi11g,'' said tl1e gene1ot1s fellow ' :
Thacl\:eray. .

.

.A BAD SHOT a w1ong guess.

lil.011lcle1 Gl\7 E A SHOW, OR TURN THE


DER to treat coolly.

..

COLD SHOlTL. .

Sinoe I discarded him for Nave, he has.ti1.rned


. . tize cold .ghoulde1 t1pon i11e Mrs. Henry \iVood.
SHOULDER 'rO SHOULDER \Vith 11eart_y and uni
ted action.
.
. .
..
HAVE AN .OLD HEAD ON YOUNG SHOULDER~ to
be wise beyond one~s years.
. .. . .
,
You appea1 to have a1z old head :zlpotz ve111 y(JU?l{l:
' s1ioulders Captain Marryat.,

Wl'fH ONE'S SHOULDER '.10 THE COLL.AR . hard

:: . Have I not alV.rays had my shoulde1


~rork.

'-

collar ?

at

tq the

A Trollope.

. ..
PUT ONE'S SHOULDER 1'0 THE WHEEL- to give
personal help hea1tily.
.
..
It was only because he had never yet pitt hi~
~hoi1.lde1 t9 the wheel :Wiiss Bradden.
\VITH ONE SHOULDER- with one consent.
.
S110,v SHOW. A .LEG-(vulga1) to get 011t of bed ..
SHOW ONE TI-IE DOOR- to disrnisl'l a person 'fro111
. one's hot1se or presence.
The t1pshot of the n1atter for tl1at ..vhile was,.
that sh_e shoivecl :both of thern to tlie .dou1--R L Ste

venson.
.. .
.
.
SHOW ONE'S HAND to reveal one's pJan of action
. '. .... Fro1n time 'to time a man n1ust .sh. /W his liand,.
but save frolU ,one SUpretne exigency. U. \VOn1aD
need never he1;s H: R. Haggarn:

309

---------------------------------

to reveal to the \vorld a


. person's real cha;racter.
.
.SHOW O:NE'S TEE1'H--to t.hreaten; e.g. Tl1e Bri
tisl1 lion slio1os his teeth to the Russian bear
. SHlJ\\T THE \\'HlTE FE.l\'l'HER- to give indications
'
of co,vardice ; e. g. Scott ne\'er for .gave his bro. tl1e1 for .-ili1roing the whilefeotlier in the engagement
: . . \Vitl1 the Vegroe.::.
.
. . SHOW 1'BE CLOVEN HOOF reveal 011e's. evil
, .. nature ;. a. g. The stand taken by the 1finister
. S.J1ow.s t}le cloz:c1z 11.ocif i11 hin1.
SI1111l) St{ RUB _<\.BOU'l' to get along iolerably.
"'.Sl1t1t SHUT TEE ST_.\BLE DOOR WHE...~ T'HE STEED IS
STOLEN to tu.lee precautions \vben too late.
And then it all came out the old story of sllutting the ~table-door on tlze stolen steed, and separa
tion when tl1e i11iHcbief of constant co1npanion.
shl}) 11ad been tione l.fi~<Jflrtoe Botlgli, 1887.
SHVT UP HHOP--to cease working .
. Al) out t.hi~ time, in the beginni.ng of 1824, Jamaica Gi11ger Beer con\pany. sliut u.p sl1.op-e:h.--plodedt as (}tll' said, \Vith a l)a.ng ! r11ackeray,
.Biel{ '(BE RICK MAN (IF EuftOPE-Tt1rkey, a nan1e
given co11ton11>tuousl::,T, in vie\v <>f its eX}Jected
pattitio11.
.
It \Vas \vitl1 Sir Humjlto11 ~;(~~nlllltr, tl1e E11glisl1 i-\111bas~adc)r, tl1at tl1t' CzaT l1eld tl1e fa.mans
. , conv,:rsation Oil t11e f'Ul)je0t of tl10 ~ic/c 11lG1l, and
tl1e pu.rtio11 of Tt1rk1:"y, '"'he11 Eg-ypt \\Tas 10 have
been England~ share P11blic Opi11i,>1z, 1886.
SICK AT HEART OP1)!0~:'-(:rl \vith grief.
SICK l\T LO~lNG THING in despair.
SlCKENlNG HYPOCRISY-disgUsting.
Si<le- PUT ON SIDE-to be arrogant and assuming in
manne1.
You ,,ill p11f <)n all 111P- ~icl(] pott please '"hen
YOll are ot1t.,,~<!e tho office
Besant.
. _A,. SlDJ~ lSSUE-a q1iestion akin to tl1e 01te$tion
-
<lirectl~ tinder consideration.
SHO\\r A PERSON D'.P

'

Side

.Simon

310 .

Side LIGHT incidental information on a subject.


Sigl1t--.A. SIGHT OF THINGS-a great number of things.
Bought a sight of f2trnitu1e couldn't hardly
get some of it upstairs- 0. W. Holmes.

A SIGHT FOR SORE EYES something pleasant to


see.
.
..
.
Silk MAKE .A. SILK PURSE OUT OF .A SOW'S EAR to
make a handsome article. ot of coarse and inferior
materials.


'' Ay,'' ~aid the warder, in passing.:'' you may
lecture the bloke, but Y<JU will not mal1.e a silk pur
se out of a sow's ear.'' 0. Reade.


THE SILKEN 'l.'lE-the soft and invisible bonds of
love and affection.
:.
The love's the gift which God has given
To men alone beneath the heaven ........ .
It is the secret sympathy,

The silver link, the si/lcen tie,


Whicb. heart to heart, and mind to mind,
In body and in
soul can-bind Scott.. :

Silver EVEkY CLOUD HAS .A SILV.bR LINING there is


always some ray of hope in the darlre:st condition
of affairs.
:
'

'

'

'

BORN WITH A SILVER SPOO ~ lN ONE'S MoUTH-

see under'' Born,''


SCHOOL' a name 'used by
Tbacke.ray for the school of novelists who describe
0nly elegant life and fashionable so.oiety. .
Up to the heights of fashion with the charming enchanters_ of the silver-fork scliool Thaokeray.
.
.. SILVER WEDDING celebration of the 25th anniversary of the day of one's marrjage.
.
Simo11 REAL SIMON . PURE-autl1entic, genuine.
From Simon pure, character in Mrs. Centlivre'&
A Bold Strol'e Fortune, who is counterfeited by an
imposter.
THE

SILVER-FORK

'

'

3Jl .

Si11 .

Sit

And tl1en Mr, Toogood had only: written one


short scrap of a letter in a triun1ph ~ '' Cra\vley
is all l'ight, and I think I've got the real Simon
Pure, by the heels.'' A. Trollope.
.
Sir1- FOR MY SINS a judg1nent for . soniething or
other ; used jocularly.
,
SIN u:NE's MERf'IES be ung1ateful for good lt1ok.
You YOUNG SINNER I used of any mor:t.al joouw
larly.
Sine'v SINEWS OF V\' AR money.
Six1k LEA VE HIM TO ~INK OR SWIM do not help him,
let h1111 fail or succeed by his o\vn efforts.

Her husband told ber that she inust sinlc 01


swirn witli liim-Edmund Yatei=.
Sit SI'r UPON A PERSON-to snub hin1.
My lady felt lebuked, a11d, as she afterwards
expressed it, ::at upon Mrs. E. Lynn Linton.
SIT ON THORNS to be in a state of discomfort
or agony.
..
He was sitti11g 01i tliorns, all the time, . afraid
lest sl1e shoulu refer to the 1ate event J. M.
Dixon.
SIT OUT sit apart; to a\vait tl1e close. A phrase
gene1ally t1sed to those \Vho don'c dan<Je tn a ball.
Frank danced beat1tifully, but son1eho\V we
l1ad given up dancing together lately, and used
to sit uitt ottr dances together Af1stletoe Bough 7
1885.
SI'l' ON THE RAIL OR FENCE-to iefuse to support
any pa1ty. It is A1nericani~m~
SIT EGGS to ren1ain too long as a guest. (Slang)
SlTS THE WlND THERE? ls that tl1e tendency
of affairs ?

SIT HEAVY ON oppress or burden.


SIT lLL ON be u11suited to the . character or ap'

pea1a11ce of.

S!T LIGHT ON -not trouble the coni::ci.e11ce of.


SIT LOOSELY O.N (of. principles) be little regarded

by.

312

:Six

Ski11

:Six BE AT SIXES AND SEVENS to be' in disorder; to


be confused.
All g~s to sixes and severt8. a universal sattlrnalia seems to be p1oclaimed in iny peaceful and
01derly family Scott.

-Skeleton SKELETON IN THE CUP BOARD, CLOSET,


HOUSE some hidden domestio source of sorro\\r er
sha1ne.

I find that the skeleton in n1y domestic cloEe.t


is becoming a pretty big one Dickens (lette1s).
' REDUCED TO A SKELETON lost all flesh and fat
due to sickness.
. IN A SKELETON without details.
A SKELETON .AT THE FEAST a thing that ailoys
pleas11re.
Skin SKIN A FLEA FOR lTS HIDE to
excessively
inean and a va1ioious.
.

~'Generous J '' I exclaimed; ''Why, he's. the


ineanest little hunks that ever skinned aflea for
the hide and fa.t.'' G. A. Sala.

SKIN.A FLINT-to be excessively grasping.. Hence the term sl,in flint for a mise1.
..
Just as tbe toper squeezes the empty bottle and
the miser skins the flint- Besant.
BY OR . WITH THE SKIN OF ONE'S TEE'III very
riarro,vly. . .

't is true tbat ten years before this he l1ad,
after an almost heroic resistance, yielded to
aoo'ept office in the Palmer~ton ministry, a11d
esoaped only . by the ski1l of his teeth Leisu1e
Ifour, 1817.
. .

SAVE ONE'S SKIN escape without injury


We meet "rith many of theso dangerous oivi]i. tie~, wherein it is hard for a man to save both 11is
slcin and his oredit L'Estrange.
CHANGE ONE'S SKIN be.metamorphosed.
'

be

WOULD. NO.T BE IN YOUR- SKIN

for what threatens you.

exchange J!lY lot

"

..

'

Ski1t

Slcep111g

313

------

---- - -

---- ----- ----- -~~ --------------------JUMP OUT OF ONE'S SKIN be beside oneself with

JOY or surp11se.
SKIN AND BONE-reduced to a skeleton : e. g.
after severe ill11ess 11e is all skin a11d bo11e
S~iirt SIT UPON A MAN'S SKIRT to n1editate revenge
against him.
'
Sky SKY A PICTURE-to place it in an ex11ibition
high up on the wall.
This flight of Eastern i1nagery wa?; due to his
picture having being ski.Cd in the academy James Payn.
LAUD OR PRAISE TO THE SKIES to be lot1d in
i)raise of.
S1a1l SLAP-BANG SHOP a lO\V' eating houEe. A Lon.:
don term. (Sla11g)
They lived i11 tl1e same street, walked into town
every morning at the same hour, dined at the
san1e sl<Jp-barig every day Dickens.
SLAP-UP excelJent, very grand. (Slang)
tvlore slap-up still, l1ave the t\VO shields pain-
t.ed on the pa11elis \Vith tbe coronet over Thao
keray.

SL.A.P IN THE FACE rebuke Ol' rebuff.


RUN SL.AP INTO-coll 1de with.
SLAP-UP i11 the late't fashion.
:Sleeping . LET ST..EEPING DOGS LIE do not refer to
tbe unplea~ant eve11ts of the past.
Pete1 Scot.t \va.s a jeallJU!' n1a11 . to begin with
and it \Vas be~t to let :-leeping dtig.ll Iii: St .A~z
dretvs J.faqazi11e. 1887.
SLEEP UPON EVERY THING - to defer action until
next .1nor11iug. ,Caut.ious people ofte11 pref<. l. to
\Vait at least t\\'elve hours before they comn1it them..
~elves to u.. oot1rse of aotion.
.
Still ho \\"ont into brealt fast \vit11 some i::ligbt
l1ope tl1ut, no''' Mrs. Glegg ''sf ('Pt tlpo11 it.'' her
.
anger might be s11bd11ed eno1tgh to gi\'C \vay to

11er us11ally stTong sense of family decorum.


-George Eliot.
-

'

'

'

314

Sleeve ..
'

.Slip

LAUGTI IN ONE'~ SLEEVE see under. '~ Laugh.''


CARRY A THING ON ONE'S SLbEVE-to reveal it to

Sleeve

the publio gaze.


.
He (the poet) should talk well; but not .with
an obvious f:triv1ng after epigram ; . he should
be sensitive, but not car111 his 'va1zity openly on
his sleeve for the <laws to peek at-Besant .
. DO ONE'S SLEEVE -seoretly,
.
''Ko, not tnat woman," ,said Mr. Rending, enjoying joke in his sleeve A Trollope.
TURN .UP ONE'S SLEEVES l)repare for fight or
work.
HA\TE SOMETHING UP ONE'S SL'EEVES-consealed

but ready for production at need.


Sleigllt SLEIGHT OF HAND expert manipulation; juggling.
'
Slide LET THINGS SLIDE leave matters to develop
themselves.
.
She was not one of those diplomatists who
advocate a ma~terly inaction, and let things slide
James Payn.

"'

Sling SLING ONE'S BOOK OR ONE'S DANIEL to moveon.


SLING INK write c_ontroversiaJJy.

Slip SLIP ONE'S BREATH, HOOK, OR WIND

to die.

Pray to God in heaven, unle~s you wish to


see me run away, and if I do, he ~lip:J off the lzook
-Blackmore.

SL'IP ONE'S CABLE to dje,


SLIP THROUGH ONE'S FINGERS to .die unexpec~
tedly and without a struggle.
SLTP INTO .A MA~ to give hi1n. a. sound
beating.
.
.

'

THERE'S MANY A SLIP' TWIXT 'fHE CUP AND THE

LIP-people can not oount on any thing until it is


actually in their grasp. Charles Reade says, '' the
. original is Greelc, and comes do\Vll to us \Vitb an
example. To the best of my recollection, the
ancient legend runs, that a Greek philo~_opber was

315

s1011gl1

SloVt

discoursing to his pupil on the . ability of man to


foresee the future ay, even the event of tl1e ne>-.t
1
minute. '1 l1e pupil may have, perl1aps, granted
tbe uncertainty of the distant future, but he scou
ted the notion that men could not make sttre of
imn1ediate and consecutive event~. By \Vay of
illustration he proceeded to fill a goblet. 'I pre
diet', said he sneeringly, 'that after filling this
goblet, the next event will be th<\t I shall drink
the wine'. Accordingly he filled the goblet. At,
that moment his servant ran in ' Mai-tet 1 a wild
boar is in our vineyard !' Tll~ master catlght up
his javelin direct.ly, ran out to find the boar and
lcill him. He had the luck to find the boar, and
attacked him witl1 such spirit that Sir Boar killed
hi111, and the goblet filled. Fron1 tl1at incident
aTose in Greece tl1e saying, polla mataxti pelei l~u
lil,os lcai clieileos alcr a l ''
A SLJP OF THE TONGUE-a sligl1t mistake in spea.o
king, a wrong \\To\d \vhich slips ot1t of the. mouth
before the speal"er is aware of it.
A SLIP OF THE PEN- a slight n1istake in \Vriting
not intendded.
GlVE THE SLIP TO-escape fron1; e.g. Tl1e prift
soner gave tl1e slip to to policeman~

SLIP ONE'S 11E110RY- to be for gc..tten comp}e ..


tely ; e. g. The po1nt had slipped my t11e1nory.
SLlP OU'r O'F ONE'S HANDS- 0\ ade one's grasp ;
e.g. Tl1e oppor1u11ity is slipping oitt (Jj 1101ir ha1z'.fs.
Slo11gl1 A SLOUGH OF DESPOND- a ~tate of utte1
despo11dency. See Bunya11's Pirgri111~ Prog1e~s
'' 'l'he first stage.,,
Sl1u seen1ed to le stt1ck in a slorig}i aj c!espo11d
and could not n10,e in any direction to get out

it 0. 1ieade.
Slo,,-sLO\V CvACB a laggard; a sluggis11 person t
a lazy or. inactive person.
'

316

S111ell

------------------'-He's not very quick in temper, or in any thi11g


else ; he's what we call a slow coach Captain
M.arrya t.
.
.
How SLOW YOU ARE-dull witted.
..
HE WAS NvT SLOW TO DEFEND HIMSELF reltlCtant 01 backward.
.
YOUR BROTHER HAS A SLOW TEMPER ~ot p1one

to .anger.

SIJ

.
He was beginning to doubt this clerlc \vho
attended that meeting on tlie sty 0. Reade.
8111all A SM.ALL-BEER CHRONICLE-a reoord of insignificant dome!,tic events. .lt. is a Shal\:esp~a1ean
phrase -Othello, act ii: scene 1 : '' so suckle :fools,
and ohroniole small-beer.''
;
This small-beer clironiclP- is scarcely justified by
the fact that many of Agnes's acquainta11oes a'nd
correspondents \Vere ' persons of
distinqtion.
-Atlieniuni, 1887.

SMALL HOUHS the hours immediately following
. midnight.
.
Although a fog rolled over the city in tlie s11iall
7iours, the early part of the night was cloudles!!
--. R. L. Stevenson.

SMALL T.A.LK light or trifling conversation.

She was absorbed 1n digesting Rolfe's every


word, and fixing his map in her mind, and filling
in details ; so small f al le stung her C. Reade.
SMALL .ARMS rifles> muskets, pistols are so
c ;illed.
.

. SMALL CRAFT a term appljed to small boats;


skiffs.
SMALL FRY- ooJloquial for children.
SM.A.LL WARES trifling haberdashery articles, as
buttons, thread, tape. .
.

S111ell SMELL .A RAT to detect something wrong. . .


Of his attachment the doctrine of the Tr.inity
the Bishop of Exeter may make what protes1

ON THE SLY--secretly.

'

to

'

'

Smoke.

. .' .

'

S11ap

317

'

...

. tations he will, Arc11deacon Dei:iison will s1nell


a rat in them Mathew Arnold.
SMELL OF THE LAMP Studied. composition (of
. boOli:S and' style).
.
THE EGG SMELLS is putrid..
.
.
. SMELL OUT' discover secret l)~ polcirig about.
S111oke END IN SMOKE to come to no p1aotical
ie~ult.
.

SMOKE THE CALUMET OR PTPE OF PEACE-to be


formally reconciled. It is a Red Indian custom to
~n1oke on reconciliation.
(A.rnericanio;;m.)
This dinner was essel).tially a well-dressed pow'vow to witness the burying of the hatchet and
the smoking of the calumet Mrs. E. Ly11n
Linton.

THERE IS NO SJ\IOKE WITHOUT FIRE-:--every .sto1y


has some foundation.
Go L1KE SMOKE-with speed and success.
S11ails AT A SNAIL'S GALLOP OR l').AOE-\-rery

slowly.
And if 11e 11avpened not to feel

An angry hint from t11ong or ~teel,


He by degrees will seldom fail
T'adopt the gallop of a s1iail Combe.
Stl.~tke
A SN_.\.kE IN THE GRASS a secret foe, an e11e
111~1 concealed from vie\v ; an llilSeen danger.
SN ~.\KE IN ONE'S B();;JOi\1: person \Vl10 repays
011o's kindness \'rit.h treachery ; a treacheroltS cold\1eti.rted person.
S11!tl, SN..:\P O};"'"E'S FlNGERS AT to defy; to sllO\\'
<)11e's conte1npt for.
Y 011 li\~e \\itl1 me, nnd S?lap Y<-'tlr ji11ger.~ at
J-l a\\es a11d all 11is ore\';-C. Reade.

'

SN ..~P ~~ ~1.:'...N'S NOSE OFT-~

to !"peak .t:l1nr1))y

l1in1.
\\!ell, "ell, you needn't s11ap fx
(~,,111e, \Vl1n.t l1us . t.11e yo1tng1nn11
ll""<lrd ..:~ 1887.
,

tt)
'

11J an'.~ 1i r1,"c

rloing?

'

tJ.lf i

Gw.)d

318

Sneeze
.
.

, .Soft

Sneeze SNEEZE AT A THING to despise it; to., think


little .of it
.
.
A buxom, tall, and comely dame
Who wished, 'twas said, to change her naine,
And if I could her thoughts divine,
\Vould not perhaps have sneezed at mine.

Combe .
S11 uff TAKE IT JN 8NUFF to take offence~
'
You'll bear tl1e light by taki'l1g it in tmujf;
Therefore I'll da1 kly end my argument.
.
.
Shakespeare..
IN SNUFF OR IN TEE SNUFF . offended.
To SNUFF PEPPER to take 'offence.
. I brought them in, because here aie some of
other cities in the room that might snziff pepper
else Old Play.
.
.,
UP '.l.'O SNUFF knowing ; crafty.
A rough and tough, and possibly an upto.snulf
old vagabond Dickens.
SNUFF OUT die.
So ONLY so.so only thus; tolerably.
.
So AND SO-and unde1mined or imaginary pe1son.
But my name is.so and so is a safe ans\ver, and
I gave it-J. R. Lo\vell.
.
So BE IT 1- a fc>"rm of acceptance
or
resignation.
.

So CALLED called by but doubtfully deserving that


name.
.
So F .AR so GOOD all is well up to that point.
So THA'l''S THAT winding up of statement or
discussi'on.
Soap IiOW ARE YOU OFF FOR SO.AP ? a meaning
leRs, bante1ing phrase, at one ti1ne it \\ras ver)' com
mon in England.
(Colloq.)
'
Or put 'their heads into his sl1op, and asked
ltow he was off fo1 soap S. Baring.Gould.
Soft SOFT SAWDER {B. S.} to flatter.
It is done by a, lrnowledge of soft sawdtr and
human nature Halibt1rton.

So1t
319
Soldier
- - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - - -------SOFTY-a silly person~ a weak fool.
SOF I' SOAP-to flatter to some end.
Soldier A SOL-DIER OF FOR'l UNE-a milita1y adven
turer.
SOLDIER OF CHRIST active proselytizing Chris
.

tian.

OLD SOLDIER

a pe1son of experience:
Son-SON OF A SEA-COCK a ter1n of oontempt used
by sailors 1o their cnmpa.nions. (Slang.)
A SON OF MARS a soldier or military n1an.
SON OF 1.fAN Christ; any man.
SON OF THE SOIL-country man.
so11g SELL FOR A SONG OR AN OLD SONG to sell
very cheap.
A. skeleton clook and a couple of bronze figures,
piclced up in one of t.}1e slumps in Covent Garden for a snng-Mi~s Bradden.
~

to try to pacify a
greedy enemy by g1anting him favot1rs. In Roman
mytl1ology, it i~ found tl1at C'e1beru.s is the name
of i be tl1ree-headed dog tl1at g'\.ta.rded the palace of

sop-THROW A SOP TO GERBER.US

Pluto, the King of the the infernal regions.


To Cerberus tl1ey give a sop,
His t1ifle barking n1outh to stop.
S\vift.
Sor10,\-sonn.ow a \Vord used in Ireland to give a
negative 111eaning 1o a Fentence.
'l'HE hfAN OF SORROWS Cl1rist.
A SO\tllY FIGURE-ridiculously bad.
A. SORRY EXCUSE stirring a1nused cont-01npt.
A SORRY l~L1GRT stirring pity.
So1l

NO'l'H11'iG OF rJ-IE SORT

a fl.at de11ial.

IN SOME SORT to a certain extent.


OF SORTS-not. fully cleserving t11e namo ; c. g.
A \Vat' of sorts is going on.
A GOOD SOR'l' a ge11ial person.
rnAT'S YOUlt SORT 111ut is the \VO.y to do it.
0U1' OF SORTS

i1ot

in 011e's usual health.

32()

80111

------So111

- -----

----.

- ----

~----...,_

_____

-------~-------

SOUR GRAPES. a thing. despised because it is

unattainable. See the sto1v of'' Fox and the


.
. Gra1Jes '' in Aesop's Fables.
.
.
.
So'\' SOW WjLD OATS to be ''rild and extravaga11t
in yout.h.
.
. .
. . . ., . .

,, .
Upon n1y hono11.1,'' said Sir Brian, '' yot1r
excuse seems to n1e to. lJe vo111 conden111ation .
.If yo11 were a spend-thrift, as yo11ng fellows often
are, t11ere would JJe chance of your ,c:owi1zg ?foui:
wild oats '' Good 1Vords, 1~87.

'

'

'

Sow THE WIND AND

REAP

'

THE WHIRLWIND to

behave reclclessly and wicl(edly, and s11ffrr a dread


ful pt1n'ishment. It is Biblical. From Hosea
.viii. 7.

.
"
His portrait of the poor crazy-l11ained, Lord
George Gordon, who .CJowed tlis wi11d whioti the
'
country . was to reap in 1vl1.i1l1v-i11d; is excellent.
-F. Marzi.ali::, in Life of Dicke11.c~.
. . HAVE THE WRONG SOW BY THE E~i\R-to hav-e.
captured ~he wrong person.
.
.
.
.
Hpwever,~ this tin1e he'd got. t}ie rv1orzg SOtl] by
, _ .f/ie ear T. Hughes.
Spa<le CALL A SP .ADE .A SPADE to call things by
their plain nan1es, without softening; to speak 0111
plainly.
"

Sbe \Yas not an e1)ito1ne of all the vi1tues,


: b1lt a 'voman of a deoided te1npei, not11sed to'
mince matters, and calling a .'!pade a .<ip<zde.Mrs. Olipl1ant.
Spa11isl1 SP-'\NlSH 0.A:STLE so111etl11ng vi~ionary a11d
unreal. See t1nder '' Castle.''

. .
\VALK SPANISH to be con1pelleil to \'\;alJ~ on ti1):-.
toe throttgh being lifted llP by tl1e .collar and tl1e
seat of tl1e trot1serE> 11ence to p1ocerd or act u11der
comp11lsion.

S1la1c . SP ARE 'l'HE ROD AND SPOIL THE <?I:IILD fail


to cl1astise;

.. _
SP ~i\RE NO P A1NS . clo all thu t pai11s can effeot.

'

'

321

.S1lirit

------------ ------------------SPARE HER BLUSHES do not make lier blush ..


e. g . Her character and attainments spare liar

blu.cilies.

. .

W..A.S SP.A.RED THAT HUMILIATION was saved:


from.
HAVE NO SPARE CASH left 0\"0r.
You NEED NOT SPARE TO ASK MY . BELP-

hesitate.
Spea1 ACHILLES' SPEAR it was said tl1at thii; spear
could both wound and cure. It is fro111 Grecian
my111ology.
S1>clling SPELLING BEE a gathering w11ere prizes
. were given to the persons \Vho are best at spelling.
These co1npetitions \Vere very popular in Great
Britain about the year 1876.
It. was also spelled in a manner disapproved
by the great Bt1tter, and disallowed by Spelling
l> es Besant.
S1le11lo,\-PLAYING SPENLOW AND JORKINS
plan
of attri.bt1ting one's (Spenlo\v'~) hard deali11gs to n
l>arner (Jorlcin) kept ir. t11e l1ack gro11nd. (Cha1acters) in Dicken ~s Davi<l C11pperfielcl).
~
S}lltillX 'tl:IE SPHlN'.X'S RIDDLES a inonster of Greol~
_ rnytl1ology, \vitl1 the head of a \Von1an a.nd tl1e
body of a ltoness, t\lat p1oposed riiidles to tra\ellerst a.id stra11gled t11ose \Vl10 cot1ld not sol\o tho111.
Hence. an enigtntl.i.:ic or insc1t1t11blo JJerson.
\.\rl1a t t-ol11tio11, if an~-, hn ,,.e )ro11 f ot111d for tl10
!abcJur qttestipn? It \\ns tl10 1f.Jplii1ix':-i ri(fdle
of the ni11cteen'tl1 ce11tt1ry, ]~. Bellan1y.
S1li('l<.-RPICK .1\ND ~P.1\1\ \'Or!- neat a.nt1 tri111.
A spiclc atzd i-;patz new gig at the door1

Hul ibt1rton.
51, i11 srIN A Y.t\liN-to tell a 1011g story.

Blo\\'l1ard (,i.s tl1e boys called . l1i111) \\'a~ a dr~


o1d file, '\\~itl1 n1ucl1 .AindneFs a11ci l1ttmo11r, a11<l
tl1e onpi{:u.l spin 1ia1 <if a 11ar11 T. H 11gl1cf.
511irit-OtiT OF SP1R1TS-~ad ; nlelnnchol}T.

2t

Splice

322

Spoil
'

'

, He was out of spirits.;. he had grown very


silent; he did not read; it seemed as if. he had

i-omething i11 his mind R. L. Stevenson. . .


IN HIGH SPIRIT extremely vivacious; actively
jubilant.
IN LOW SPIRITS .depressed,
. , .
ANIMAL SPIRITS- natural cheerfulness of healthy
youth.
. ,
ARDENT SPIRITS--strong alcoholic drinli:s, like
, , whisky brandy.

"

PEOPLE OF SPIRITS not inert or submissive.


.
W .AS AMONG THE NOBLEST SPIRITS OF THE.AGEpersons from intellectual or moral or , emotional
'

'

'

'

'

'

standpoint.
TB'E SPIRIT OF THE TIMES. a tendency prevailing ~t a time.

' '
TAKE CRL'rIC!SM IN A WRONG SPIRIT incorrect
. '.
point of view.

MAN OF UNBENDING SPIRIT--mental


attitude of.
.
.
.
courage.
. ,
. .
.THE POOR IN SPIRIT .the meek. , . '; .
'
Spli~e- SPLICE THE MAINBRACE to. serve out an
allowance of spirits ; to fall to drinking. .It is :a
'

'

'

'

'

71

autical slany.

GET SPLICED

'
to be 111arried. It is a sailo1's

p}i1ase.
'

Split- SPLIT ON A FRIEND to bet1ay hin1 ; to 1eveal


a scheme in \vhioh he was concerned.
Robint-on sighed. ''\hat is the matter ?'' said
his master, i;rying: to twist his head round.
' N otl1ing only. I am afraid they they won't

split. Fellows of tl1at so1t don't split on a com


rade \Vhere they oan get no good by it.''-

. C. Reade.

..
.
SPL1T ON A ROCK to meet some unforeseen and
di!-=astrous difficulty ; to go to ruin.
SPLIT HAIRS see under'' Hair.''
.
.
Sl'oil SPOIL 'fHE EGYPTIANS -to get supplies . from
'

one's enemies.

A Biblical phrase.

E:>:od. xii. 36:

323

StlOOll

More, he might even he able to spoil tliat E gyphis auetio1i George, giving him Iess than

H. R. Hagga1d.
Spoke PUT A SPOKE IN ONE'S WHEEL-to thwart a
person by some impediment ; to hinder one's
schemes.

You have put a formidable spol'C in 11iy wheel


by preventing the extension of the bo-roughW. G. Norris, in Good Words, 1887.
5po11ge SPONGE UPON ANOTHER FOR to get money
or food in a mean way ; to take advantage of another's good nature to obtain money from him or
a place at his table.
The ant lives 11pon lier o\vn honesty; whereas the fly is an intrude~ a.nd a common smellfeast (greedy fe11ow}, that sponges upon otlie1
people's trenchers T.J. Estrange.
.
THRO\\.,. UP THE SPONGE to akno\vledge defeat ;
to give 1111 tl1r contest. This has its origin from
Boxing inatol1es.
p .ASS THE SPONGE OVER-obliterate or annul.
\VET I..IK.E . A SPONGE-soaked tl1rough and
th1011gh '\\Tit.h \\ine (spoken of a drunkard) ..
5po<>ll

lT TAKES A LONG SPOON TO SUP WITH EIJ\i-

he is a de\..,.il or o.n evil spirit. It is fro1n the proverb, ''It tuJ,es a 1011g s1)oon to s1ip witl1 the de~il''
-i.e. ti1e devil is so ct1nning that if - one forms a
lenguo \\,.itl1 11i111, tnost of tl1e prcfit.s are su1e to go
to hin1.
11.e hnd \"'Ol11ntnrily ~t1.pped wit.Ji flze dezJ1! 1
n11d l1is .{;1)non 1111.d been too sbort--Mrs. E.
L)'11u J.Ji11to11.
BORN '\\'ITH _t.,. SlL\7 1~~ SPOON IN Ol-!'"'E'S hiOUTH

under '' Born.''

see

l30ltN VirITH GOLDEN SPOON 11\ ONE'S 1'10UTH

under '' Born.t'


..
1. f AKE A SPOON OR SPOlI~ .A HOR?\
nn ent-0rpri~c.or ftlil deplor<lbly

see

t-0 succeed in

094
.),.,,

Sport;

Sp1eaif

----------------- .He may be good enough so1t at cricket or


bi1liardst ;:i, smoking-room 01 a drawing room,
but that's about it. He will neifher make a spoorr
1zor spoil a horn Sarah Tytler.

. . SPOONY OR BE bPOONS ON to be silly in the


manifestations one's lo,re for a woman ; foolishly .
.fond of her.

George is getting spoonif on that gi1J, ..or sheis getting spoony on him Floren.Ce Mairyat~
ON THE SPOONS making love.

,. .
SPOON-FED artjficially encou1aged. . :
.SPOO.N UP THE BALL-((}ricket) stril;:e feebly up1r
wards so as to give an easy catch.
Si.l>ort SPORT ONE'S OAK see u11der ' ' Oak.''
- WHAT SPORT how entertaining 1
IN SPORT by way of jest. . .
MAKE SPORT OF ridicule.
BE THE SPORT OF FORTUNE-to be tossed about
by. .
.
SPORT A WI-IITE HAT exhibit on one's person;
. A SPORTING OFFEH very fair and generous.
S1l0Ut up THE SPOUT at the pawn-broke1. ' '
I have n't a .. suit of clothes fit to go in. even
my wig and gown are up the spout together
. D. Christie Murray.

:
.
Sp1:at THROW A SPRAT TO CATCH A V\1 HALE-to venture something small in order to obt:ain a large
return. (Colloq.)
''What are you at? Are you ma.d, '1 om?
W11y, the1e goes five poundi-:. What a f:in 1''
.''Did you never hear of the :n1an tl1at fl.21,ng
away n sp1at to catch wliale ?'' . C. Reade. .
S1>reacl SPREAD-EAGLEISM a bombastic. and frothy
patriotisn1 ; boastful American patriotisn1. (Ya11keeism.)
Husl1, my lord ! you forget that . you are a.
Britisl1 peer. No spread eagle for yoti Besant .
. SPREAD A FLEET to keep i1101e open order..
SPREAD ONESELF tallc bumptiously. :
~-------

'

'

'

325

----

-~

~ ~

...

- -

Sc1uarc

------:-------- -

GAVE US NO END OF A SPREAD meal provided


51>rec-WHAT A SPREE l breal~ing loose fro1n routiI1e
for fun or oarousing.


Sprig A SPI~IG OF NOBII,ITY a soion of a noble
family.
,
51lring-SPR1NG A l\11N'E UPON ONE to, lay a plot and
annot\noe suddenly its con1pletio11.

S1>1tr- ON THE SPUR OF THE.11011ENT acting on first


i1npu.lse , \vitl1out. reflection..

Tl1e criticism offered on the :::p1tr of the 111onic1it


11ad been, in reality, advanced by \vay of p'ortest
against the \Vhole docu111e11t .J a1nes Pil.y11.

WIN ONE'S SPURS gain ieputat1011.


SET SPURS TO-prick \Vith Sl)Ul'S ; e. g. He set

sptirs to his ambition.


:NEED TI1E SPUltS_:be of sluggisl1 tempo1an1ent;
e. g. Y 011r pious desires need tlie spu:rs.
SPUR A WILLING HORt!E-to be.neecllessly' im1Joitunate.
. ..
5<111arc -ALL SQUARE quite satisfactory.
.
ON OR UPON THE SQUARE- honest~ honourable.
For now l'n1 upon the sqtiare \\ith yot1 (I a.n1
treating yo11 openly and fairly), I n1ust be stri1-

1'.faria Edge\vortl1.
.
BREAK SQU.1\RES to depart fron1 an acoustomed
.order.

A SQU.c.\.l<E 1.1EAL-a
full
111eal
\'V hicl1 ~atisfies.
,
.,
.
Talleyrand, even at tl1e age of eighty, ate
l>ut 012c~ ~qr1.are n1cc1l a dn.y S <!f.ti1clay . llevicw,

igl1t' ar1 ar11)\\'

1888. ,

.,
.
SQU,\RE-'TOES-a conten1ptUOllS name for a person
.

",f atrict

Tl1c Pt1ritans \i;ore shoes of t.his

I 110<7or ~11all forget tl10 solcnl.n romonstanoes


of 011r oln squarl!-1oc.~ of a rector nt. Haokl1nmTl1nckeray.

<JAL!. lT S(:!U.AnE-c~n5ider matters 5o.tt1oo:

~hnpc.

'

moral:-.

Stab.

Stand

Stab .ON THE ' STAB ' 'paid regular wages ;:on the
. staff of a :firm.. Stab is here . a contraction for
''establishment.''
.
Stable LOOK OR SHUT THE STABLE-DOOR WHEN THE
.. ..
STEED IS STOLEN see under'' Lock.''
. . AN
AUGEAN
S'J:'A.BLE-a:g:reat
irremov;able
mess
or
. .
'
m1sanoe.
. . . , , _. . .
Aooounding to Greek . mythology, . Aug~ns,
' l\:ing of Elis in Greece, had a stable oooupied by
three thousand oxen; 'which had not been cleansed
for thirty Gears. Hercules cleans.ed itin one day
by turning a river through: it.] . : . . :
Stage A STAGE WHISPER., ~ ~hisper. that oan be
heard by many ; a loud whisper~ as that of: an aato1
meant to be heard by the audience. '. . . . . . '
Stake ST.AKE AND RICE-a .wattled .fence.
It .is pro
'
vinoial E:r;iglish.
.
. . . . . ,. . " .
.
.
Stale LIE IN STALE-to .:lie :in , ambush . It is .provincial English.

,
.
Stall ST.ALL A DEBT~refrain from pressing its paY
. ment... It is provincial English. .
. . . , .:
:ST.ALL YOUR MUG go away.
, .

7
Stand ST.AND ONE'S. . ROUND to . maintain Oll0 8.
position.
'
ST.AND TO ONE'S -GUNS to offer resistance ; t-0
defend oneself.
. Titmouse, . though - g1eatly alarmed, -stood to
his gun pretty steadily s. warren~ . ST.AND oUT not t_o comply; toreft1se
~ield
. If the ladies will stand out, let them remem
ber that the jury is not all agreed Swift. .
..; STAND ON~'s FRIEND to prove . faithful and
friendly in a. difficulty or a crisis.

.
A STANDING .ARMY an established .permanent
_,army.
.
.
,.
A ST.ANDING COLOUR fixed and fast. .
STANDING CORN. corn .in. the. field.

'

'

'

'

'

to

'

'

Stick

Stnr
~----

--

-- -----

---~---------------------

STANDING JOKE-:-continU0\1.S . st1bjeot for mirth


<

or ridioule. . .

S'rANDING WATER stagnant:..


.
STANDING ORDERS rules made by an organised
bod3r to :regulite the mode of conducting business.
1\frs. Dolly regularly expected that Ellen should,
as she called it, stand lier friend in tbcse alteroa.t1ons Maria Edge,vortb.
.
STAND ON ONE'S OWN BOTTOM to.. b~ indopen

dent.

The original f orn1 is. still in use, '' Let every vat
(or tub) stand on its own bottom.'' (Slang.)
But I think it's better to let every tub stand
01i 1'ts ow1z botto1ri Hugl1 Con\vay.

Stn1 HlS ST.till IS IN THE .ASCENDANT he is lucky.


'!'HE S'J'ARS .AND STRil:'ES, OR THE ST.i\R-SP.ANGLED

BANNER-the flag of the United States of An1erioa.


Stn1t~--S'l'ARE lN THE FACE-to be very evi(lent to
tl1reaten."
.. .
.
Starl~ STAR1\ AND STlFF extren1ely rigid ; c. g. Tl1e
corpse bocy111e star le 'a1id stiff.
S'rARl( MAD OR N.t\KED completely.
. ..
Stn\c S'rAVE OFI" to prevent; to keep ba.ck for a.
time and \vit11 a r1iffiol1lty.

I l1ii.ve. n1oro infltte11ce in the land than yotl
kuov. of. Perhaps, everi, I could static .off tl1e
\vnr H.. R. Hn.gga.rd.
.. .
Stcnl-:-ST.E.t\1, A J.1ARCH ON to gai11 an advantage
.

\111pe1ceived.
.
.
.I lo~g to see you 11nppy long to bel1old tl1e
ol1oico.
St\Cll a 11eart as YOllrs. Pray do not
sf cal a marcli . upo1zn10 ; let mo kno'1." in ti1110/lfaria Edgervt)rfli.

. .
.
Sten1~-S1'EY..I THB TIDE-to resist; c. g. lie 11nd to
:ifer1i tl1r. tide of opposition
to
got
the
m11cl1
coveted
-,.
-

of

.
lltl7.C.

,,

Stiel{ STICKIN-TBE-?.rOD an old foggy; a slO\V pernon


''"ho is wholl)' \vitbo11t tho spirit. of .enterprise or
t1dventure. (Colloq.}

.

"
. ..
.

_.
<

"

:Stiff:

Stock

328

This rusty-coloured one is that respeofabie old


stick-in-the-mud, Nicia~ T. Hughes.
:
. A POOR S1lCK a person without oharacter or
energy.

, . . .
' .. lfe 'was a poor.' stick to make a: .preacher on
(of.} Halibt1rton.

.STICK ONE'::> SPOON IN THE W .ALL to die. (Slang) .


Stiff DO .A .BIT O;F STIFF , to, accept. or, discount a
bill ; to cash a bill. (Prov.)

.
I .wish you'd do me a bit of . stiff, and just tell
your fat'4e:r ~f I. _may overdraw my account I'll
.vote
with
him

Thackeray.
,
'
A STIFF. 'UN a. corp..,e. (Slang.) .
. A s.TIFF NECK a 111an of unbending disposition. ,
: STlFF WINE-of fo midalJle strengt.h.
STIFF UPPER LIP determined~temper. .
.
Stile HELP (A LAME DOG)' OVER .A STILE-to assist
a poor 1ellow in a difficulty. ,
:: .
.
I ca.n help a lame. dog over a stile C~ Kingsley.'
Still STILL WATERSRUN J)~";JP silent arid undemons~
. trative people have generally great powers of
thought and action.
, .
..
.

.. ~' What, kic;sing her and hand, he a clergyman !'' said. Miss Dunstable. '' 1 did not . think
they ever did such things, Mr. Robarts~

, ''Still waters run deepest,'' said Mrs. Harold


'

, Smith-:- A. Trollope.
'Stock MAKE' STOCK OF 'tomake use of for one's own
benefit.

.
. . ..
They could not have 1nade stock :of it,., as.Sus. sie would have . done in the .. circumstances,~
-Sarah Tytler.

, ..
. . A STOCK. PHRASE-an expression in ~onstant use
by a person, so that it has become a . ma1f nerism.
, STOCK-IN-TRADE-a person's mental. resources;
the accomplishments or 'possessions "which, .a .man
can tum into money.

'

'

'

'

Stool

329

Stolen

She has ideals, convictions aspirations a


whole sfocl'in-tradP. of things that a good
n1any tzirls t~eem to get on very well.\vithout.
-Wm. Blacl;;:.

STOC'KS AND STONES t1nfeeling person, c. g. I am


11ot st<lclcs a11d Ftones to see this \vitl1011t being
inoved.
Stolen STOLEN FRUIT something \vl1icl1 is very
sweet..
It was so sweet to bear Edward praised by one
.who did not know us; it was like stole11 fruft:C. Reade. .. .
.
-Stone STONE THROWING finding fa11lt \Vltl1 . one's
neisrhbourR. It is probably taken from Christ's
saying, ''lie t11at is witl1011t e:in a1nong yo11, let
l1i111 first cast a stone at her,'' John viii. 7.
A STOl\TE'8 THROW- not v~ry far ~ as fa"t" as one
could thro\v a. stone. e.g. His garden is not n1ore
than a st<>tle's f hrotv from mine.
GIVE ONE A STONE FOR BREAD to mock l1im
\Vitl1 pretence of l1elp. e. g. \Ve asked for bread
and tl1e govern1nent gave us st.011es.
A HEART OF STONE-very cruel
. STONE BLlND-ootnpletely.
-.
S'l'ONE DEAD co1111)letoly.
:Sto11t~ WALI ..1NG ,or~T co..utiou~ def cnoe by o. ba.ts1110.n \Vitl1out atty ca.re for rt1ns.
STONY LOOK -one of nonl'eoognition.
STohTY GR1EF Jla rnlj.,.sing tl1e faculties.
LE:\\'E NO STONl~ UNTURNED to do ovor~i-thing
thu.t Ct\ll bo dono in order to sooure the effect
desired.

~ \V c ~l1t1 n 't. /cat}!' a sft11ze tL11f11r11cd on either


$ide, ~tid (~tiirk S. \Varron.
1'1AR'K \VITI! A \\:"IflTE STONE to t11nrk n.s }lat'..
tictt1<LTl"!i~ fortl1nato .
:'Stool l<'ALL l3ET\\1 Ef.~N TWO STOOLS to }r)SO both of
l\\~o t.hitlgs bet\..,cen tl1c c11oir.o of ,,hicl1 ono wn.s
bcsitnting.

'

'

:Stiff .'.

Stock

328

. This rusty-coloured one is 'that respecfable old


stick-in-the-mud, Nicia~ T. Hughes.
. A POOR S1lCK a person without character or
energy.
.
:
.
. 11.e was a poor stick to niake a. preacher on
. (of.) Halibt1rton. .
.

STICK ONE'ti SPOON IN THE WALL to die. {Slang).
Stiff DO .A BIT OF STIFF to accept . or. discount a
bill ; to cash a bill. . (Prov.) .
'
. .
..
I wish. you'd do me a bit of st1ff,. and just tell
your fathe1 if I .may overdraw my account I'll
. .vote with him Thac.keray.
. .. .
A STIFF. 'UN a: corpHe. '(Slang.) . . . . . .
. A STIFF NECK a 111an of unbending .disposition. .
. STlFF WINE-of fo midable streng~h. .
1
STIFF UPPER LIP determined temper. .
Stile HELP (A LAME DOG). aVER 'A STIL~to assist
.~poor 1011.ow in.a difficulty .. ,
. . .
I o'an help a lame. dog over. .a .stile
C.' Kingsley..
.
Still STILL WATERS RUN J)F;f P silent and undemonstrative people have generally great powers of
thought and action.
.
..
:
,, What,. ki'lsirig her and ha'nd, he a clergy' man !'' said Miss Dunstable.. '' 1 did. not think
they ever did such things; Mr. Robarts.''
'' Still waters run deepest,'' 'said Mrs: Harold
SmithA.
Trollope.

.
'
.
'
'
-Stock MAKE STOCK OF 'to:makeuse of for one's own
beri efit.

.. .
They could not have -1nade stock. of it,, as Sus
sie would have done in the ciroumstances,
-Sarah Tytler.
- . .
. . . . .
. .
. .
.
A STOCK PHRASE-an expression in constant use
by a person, so that.it has become a, maI,tne~ism~
. : STOCK-IN-TRADE-a. . person's mental resouroes;
the accomplishments or possessions : whioh .. a ma.n
oan turn into money.

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

. ,

Stolen

.'

.'

siool

329

She has ideals, convictions aspirations a. _


whole sfocl,in-tradP- of things: that: a; good
n1any girls .seem to get on ve1-y well without.
-Wm. Blaclr.

STOCKS AND STONES. unfeeling person,' e. g. I am
not stocks and i:;:tones to see' this without being
.
moved.
. .
- ..
Stolen STOLEN FRUIT something which is .very
sweet.. i
..
It was so sweet to hear Edward .praised by one
. who.. did not know us; it :was li~e. stolen fruit
' C. Reade. ' :

.
'
Stone' STONE THROVil1NG finding .fault \vith one's
neighbours ... It is probably taken from Christ's
saying. ''Re that is without sin among _you, let
him first cas_t a stone at her,'' John viii. 7.
, .
A STONE'S THROW.:_not ve-r"y far~ as fa-r. as one
o_ould . throw a ston_e. e. g. His. garden is.not more
than a stone's throw" from mine. . : . .
GIVE ONE A STONE FOR BREAD to . mook him
with pretence of help .. e. g~. "'\e' ~aslced for bread
and the goveTnment gave
stones. . . . :
A HEART OF STON~very oruel. . . . : . . . ,

''

'

'

'

'

'

'

,'

'

us

STONE BLIND:-oompletely. .

. STONE.DEA~

. . .., : ': .....

co1npletely.
.
:
,
,~ -. -~
.
'
'
.
:Stone wALL1NG very .. cautious.
by -a bats
man without any. care for runs. : . . ' -: -' - . - STONY LOOK-one of nonrecognition.-SToNY GRIEF paralysing the faculties~.: :
LEAVE NO sTONE UNTURNED. to do everYthing
that can. be done in order to secure the effect

defe.noe

desired.

) : . _. .

: . .
.
. - "' '
' We shan't leavl' a stone unturned on: -either

side, said Quirk S. Warren.

to ..mark as paT
.
ticularly
fortnate;
,
..
,

..

.
.
,
.,
....
".
.:
..

_
:,
.
-
.
. . - .
.
.
:Stool FALL BETWEEN TWO S'I'OOLS to" lose both' of
two thi~g~ betwe~n .the o~oi9e. Qf ,w:hioh :one was
hesitating.

:MARK WITH.A WHlTE STONE


'

' '
-

"-

~-

Story

330
Straw
..
.
----------------------------:=:::::..
. . ' .. What on. earth - should she do?. Fall to the
. . ' . ground ' betwe~tl . two stools ? N 0 ; . that \V. as a
. ' man's triok,. and she was a woman, every inch
-C. Reade.
Story WEAK JN THE UPPER S'l'ORY . crazy ; feeble ..
minded.

:..
Straigl1t A STRAIGHT TIP private and correct information.
' . .
:
' '"
We got the straight tip ; that's all
need:
know. Miss Braddon~
.
Strain STRAIN AT A GNAT- to make. difficulties about
something insignificant. It is a Biblical phrase ..
See Ma th. xxiii. 24.

: . ..

You are just the chap to strain,- at a gn.at and


swallow a camel Halibi1rton.


Stralv. MYEYES DRAW. STRAW I am very sieepy,.
(Prov.)

. .. .
.: .: Lady :Ans. I'm very sure_ :ti_s. ,tjme all ho.nest
.
. . .
..
folks to go tQ bed. .
. . .'Miss . . Indeed, 'l~Y e'yes dr'aw straws. Swift.

THE LAST STR.AW . that which finally ca uses a.


oalami1y. See under
which it has
.. '''Camel'' from
.
originated.
.
.
. ...
Identification would ~mean Joss of c1edit, tlie
last straw i11 many oases. Tptclafor, 1887.
.
NOT TO CARE A STRAW OR TWO S'l'RAWS to be
perfectly indifferent~ A straw is the symbol of
what is worthless.

.

I don't think. she could have cared.two .~traws
. . about the \voman. Murray's Magazine, 1887,.
. A MAN OF STRAW:. see under'' Man.''
-.
, MAKE BRICKS WITHOUT S'l'RAW- to start ori a.
useless venture e.g. you won't persuade me as J.
am not man who malces bricks witliout ~traw~
. CA.TOH :'AT .A. STR.AW try hopeless expedient
in desperate case e.g. A drowningman catches' at
a straw. :
. : '
:

you

'

'

,,.

, A

11AN mA WHITE STRAW

,,..,

_,,

Straw hat... ,.

Strike

331'

Strike STRIKE ONE'S COLOURS . or FLAG to sur..:


render.

. :

Anastasie was aware of defeat; she ~truck. her


colours instantly. R. L. Ste".enson

'
'
STRIKE ALL OF' .A. HEAP to astonish.
I ran to'Paley andtold him what had befallen
upon the house. He was not struck all of a hec1p,
as I thought he would be. C. Reade. .
STRIKE WffiLE THE lRON Ii:; HOT see \1ndet
''Iron.''
St111cl~. STRUCK UPON
attracted by. . It is. Am

er1oan1sm.
St11dy.-A BROWN STUDY a dreamy condition of mind.
He'll poison his patients some day when he'.s
in a brown study. Florence Marrsat.
Stuff- STUFF AND NONSENSE-utterly meaningless ;
e.g. What you say is stuff and nonsense.
S11gar. A SUGAR-PLUM any piece of pleasing
flattery ; something very nice.
Sttm SUM .A.ND SUBSTANCE-the purport ; e.g. Give
me the sum and substance of his speech.
S11nsl1ine To HAVE BEEN lN THE SUNSHINE to bedrunk, (slang)~
S11p SUP WITH PLUTO-to die.
HE NEEDS A LONG SPOON THAT SUPS WITH THF(
DEVIL parleying with tempters is risky.
S\\allow. ONE SWALLOW DOES NOT MAKE A SUM..
MER \Ve must not frame a general law from one
single phenomenon.
SWALLOW A CAMEL-Let pass down one's thrpat;
e.g. His plan is not so . rigid, it can swallow a
'

'

'

'

'

'

camel.
EXPENSES SWALLOW UP EARNINGS use up.
HE SW.ALLOWED THE STORY accepted the state.

m'ent credulously.
..
SW.ALLOW .AN INSULT pocket or ~tomach it
quietly.
SWALLOW ONE'S LIE- reoant one's words

332 .

s.~:ell.

Slvell.. SWELLING ORATORY of ,inflated kind.


HEART SWELLS feels like bursting with emo.
tion.

. . SWELL WITH PRIDFr-h'ardly -able- to conta.in it.


.
'
. SWELLED
.
HEAD
oonceit.
-. .
.
SWOLLEN- ESTIMATES inordinately high."
S"tveet. A SWEET TOOTH ...a liking for. swe~tmeats and
dainties.


.
..
I know she has a 3weet tooth still in . her head.
'

'

-Marja

Edgeworth.

'

. ,
,

'

'

,
'

-'

''

,'

"

'

'
'

'

'

'

..

..

..
' '

, .-

..

'

'

..

' '

..

'

'
~

'

. '

'

'

.'

'

.-

'

'

'

. . .'

_-

'

- ----

----- ------------------------------- ---==-.- . -

T,

To

Tailol<

333

. T<):

with perfect exactness.


.

The fool forgets tl1ere is an Aot of Parliament,


and that \Ve have complied with the provisions
to a T 0. Reade.
.
MARKED WlTH A T -l)randed as a thief.
DuT THE I'i:; AND CROSS THE T'S- make the mea
ning or the ' details .ql1ite olear. .

Tal)le TURN T8E TABLES-to bring about a complete"


reversal of circumstance:;.
If Mr. Dillon had said that such an outrage
as this was nothing. bl1i the turning of tlie tabll 8
on the atrooities of the penal code, we sho11ld
i1ot have blamed him Spectat<Jr, 1887.
UPON THE TABLE-known to every one a inatter
of publi.c opinion.
.
KEEP A GOOD TABLE-provide 111xuriot1s food.
PLEASURES OF THE TABLE-eating and drinking.
TO AT

'

UNDER THE TABLE-drunlr.


.
.
LAy p APERS ON THE T-.A.BLE for inspection.
Tag TAG RAG AND BOB-TAIL see 'under ,, Rag:tag

and l)ob tail.'' . .


.'
Tail X.EH.P THE TAIL IN 'l'HE '\V.ATER to .thrive; to
prosper. (Slang.)
: ..
. .
TURN 'l'AIL-:-to retreat in an undignifiecl way.
'' Neve1 thougl1t I s11ould -- live to ti1.1n tail in
tl1is way,'' gro\vled one soldier to anotl1er as
they passed out E"lzgl-ish . fllust1aterl Magazf.ne1
'

1887.

(U. S .) to goad- or"i11sult


tho pacific and long-s11ffering British public feeling
fo1 political purposes in America. . .
TWIST THE LION'S TA1L

BETWE~,N

WITH 'l'HE TAIL

THE LEGS

in a

CO\V

a1dly way, after the manner ofa beaten cu1 when


he
sneal~s a \Vay. _ . .
. .
'
.
.
,,
T;:~ilor .NINE TAlJ...ORS MAKE A MAN . see . linder'
Nine.''
'

'

'

'

.
,.- -. .
-

'

,_, ......
>
.,
_,

Take

Take

334

Take T.A.KE HOME TO


pletely.
Joel did not at
peculiar meaning
Trollope.

ONESELF to understand comp


.
.
.
all take home to }ierself the
of
friend's words
:

T.A.KE TO THE ROAD to become a:highway'man.


The pewterer was unfortunate in his business,
and took to the road . G. A. 'Sala. . .
.
TAKE ANYTHING TO H'WART to bear it serioll.sly.
]NA PRETTY TAKE ON much affected~ .
. .
She was in a pretty take on, too sir; beoause,
as she El aid to use her very words she was
chiselled out of a dance S. Baring Gould~'
T.A.KE BY STORM overcome by one single blow.
In face and manner and speech she was of
those sweetly innocent girls who take men's
hearts by sto1ni Mrs. Henry Wood. : .
.TAKE TO ONE'S HEELS-see under,, Heels.''\
TAKE A TELL1NG to reoeive advice or a rebuke

patiently.
.

TAKE INTO ONE'S HEAD to rer:olve l1pon .. with


out any apparent reason.
:
..
.
Mrs. Crumpe took it i11to her liead that she
could eat no b11tter but of Patty's ohu1ningMaria Edge\vorlh.
.
TAKE 'l'IME BY THE FORE LOCK not to slip an
.opportl1nity; e.g. We must tal~e ti'flze by the/ore
lock for once it is passed, there is no recalling it.
TAKE .A. LEAF OUT OF to follow the n1etbod of,
.e. g. He seems 1o talce a leaf out of his tea.ch er.
'rAKING DOWN A PEG OR T'\VO to humble one's
pride; e.. g. Re needs taking down a peg or two.
TAKE IN HAND to undertake; e.g. Do1l't talro
any work in hand without being sure of doing it.
TAKE INTO .ACCOUNT not to forget ; e. g. Y JU
must talce this also int<> accou1if.

TAKE LIBERTIES WITH disregard etiq11ette ; e. g .


Remembert you should not take liberties with your
i;uperiors.

her

A.

..

. Talk

335

Taking

--------TAKll''TBE BULL BY THE HORNS grapple with


a difficulty ; e~ g. In moments of danger you
should take t!le bull by the '}iorns.
T.i\KE THE WIND OU1' OF ONE'S SAlLS-frustrate
one by anticipation ; e.. q. While I was. planning
this, he toolc tlie tvind out of 1ny sails.

TAKE AFTER The gir 1 takes. after' (resembles,)
her 1noti1er.

TAKE UP ARMS The rebels took up arms (began


hoi:;tilities) against (;he Government:
:.
-TAK'E 'l'HE FIELD Ne:xt n101ning the ar1ny .took
th<~ field (began operations of campaign.)
TAKE HEART- to gain C0\1rage.
TAKE IN GOOD. P.AR'l' I will add one word more
wh1ch I hope you 'vill talce i?z good part (in a frien-

dly spirit).
TAKE TO TASK to censure, r'eprove.
.
. TAKE AT ONE'S WORD to believe what one says
e.g. I t11ulc him at his word.

TAKE IT INTO ONE'S HEAD to be . und11ly pos..


sessed with the idea of.
TAKEN ABACK surprised.
TAKEN IN deceived.
TAKEN UP W1TH-occupied with.
TAKEN DOWN pulled down.
Taking IN A TERRIBLE TAKING greatly agitated.

'

(Slang.)

.
''Zounds; Blanche l what did you say.?''
burst Ollt the gene1al in a terri'ble taking, as . he
thought ho~,. everything must come out_.:.G. J.
Wh~te-M.elville.

X'~tll~ TALK A PERSON'S HEAD OFF . to be excessively


talkative.
..

. .

.
I only hope, lleigham, that old Pigott won't
tallc your head off i she has got a dreadful tongue.H. R. Haggard.
.
. .
.
TALK (}REEK .to talk. above. the understanding.
of one's hearers.

'I

.....

l''a_ngen t

: . Tar

336

., .. T.ALL T4LK exaggerate.d and boastful language ;


.. e.g:_ . Th~ young man has a tend ency for ta/ l tal.l~.
Ta11gent Go t)FF AT .A TANGEN'!' to break off suddenly into a different line of thought~ This ph1ase is
. used of quick and sudden movement::;, wh~re a
per:-;on breal(s away. unexpectedly.
: : . . John Treverton, smol(ing his . cigar; and le~
:: ... ting his thoughts wander away .at a tangent
every now
and
then.
Miss
Braddon.
..
' .
Ta11tal11s A TANTALUS CUP a cup in whioh the
water .. :vani .;hes as soon as the thirsty person
attempts .to drink. In Greek mythology~ it is read
that Tantalus was a son .of Jupiter. For.revealing
his.father'.:; secrets he was punished with a raging
: thir:::t and.the water and fruits that he saw olose
at hand always receded from his grasp~ Tantalus
cup is a philosophical toy, having a siphon. within
the figure of a man whose :chin is .on a level with
its bend.
.
. . ..
Nothing occurred to interfere with the plan.
of action decided on by B ilda and Phillip ; no
misadventure came to mock 1hem, dashing the
Tantalits cup of joy to earth before their eyes H.
R. Haggard.
.,
.
Tantrunts IN ONE'S TANTRUMS--in a bad humour.
' What, you are i12 y1 ur ta11t11J,ms again J'' said:
sl;e. C. Reade.
'.
Tape RED 'J'APE-offi.cial delay and obstru'otion. . :
Tapis ON THE 'fAPIS on the table ; under oons1deration or discussion. Tapis is ~.,1e11ch fo1
'.' Carpet." (Gallioii::m).

\1\Te}I, ~~ iny engagement to Lady Catherine


. is still on tl1e tapis. it ,,ill be as well to assu1ne
t11at I did i1ot (give her a ol1ance of ma1rying
.
me). Mi~tletne Bough. 1885.
Tar-HAVE A TOUOii OF 'lHE TARBR'tJSH-t.o have an
infusion of negro, Indian. 01 colot1rcd blooa in the
veins ; to be partly of 'n eg10 blood.

'~.

------- -

Tea

337 .

Ta111atio11
-

-~---

--

-------- -------

---~----

-----. - ---

~---

----

- --

TARRING AND FEATHERING 'a punisb1nent i.n. flioted upon an unpopt1la1 person.' Joseph.Smith,
'
the founder of n101"monis1u, was so. treated. Ki1,1.g
Ricl1a1'd, before sailing for the Holy Land, had:
a law e11acted i.n the fleet that~ a robber who shall
l1e convicted of theft, :.;:ball have his head cropped
, afte1 the manner of a champion, a-d. boiling pitch
sball be poured thereon, and then the feath~rs of
a cushion shall be shaken out upon. hi1n, so that
he may be known, and at. the first 'land. at which
the ships sl1all touch 11e shall be set on shore.''
TARRED WITH THE SAME BRUSH . to have; the
sa1ne faults as another.

We are all tar1ed witli tli~ sanie b1ush, we
'\Von1en.-C. Reade

Ta111atioi1 In a iarnation 11urry-damnably in haste .


e.g. Why are you i1z siich a tar11<Jtion hztrry ?
Tattar CA'rCH .A. TARTAR see und01 ''Catch.'.'
. YOUNG TARTAR ill-tempered child. e.g: My boy
is a you11g Ta1tar.
.
.
T~~slc TAKE TO TASK to
reprove; to find fault
".l.h
Wll
.
I\frs. Baynes toolc poor madan1e severely to task
for adn1itti11g such a man to 11er as~emblies.
Thackeray.
Tatoo-THE DEVIL'S T.ATOO the act of d1urrin1ing
\vith.the finge1s 011 a table, in al)senoe of mind or
in1pa'liience.

T.here lay half-a7dozen ruffians writhing ..on


the ground, and beating tlie devil's tatoo with their
heels. C. Reade.'

'
Tax THE BRAIN 'to strai11 one's n1ind: e.g. . The
minister taxed liis brain to solve the problem. . .
...
TAX THE .P ATIENO~to tire one's patience. . ..
Tea A. STORM IN A TEA-'OUP a disturbance .marked
by much noise, bt1t of no importance.

'

22

'

'


'

Tear

338

'

-----------------

Tell

'

-------~---

'

~----

For all tr at his sympathies had been entirely


with her in the reoent :squabble,." what a ridiculous little sto1m in a . tea-cup it was ?'' he thought
with a laugh-Murra11's Magazine, 1887. .
A TEA FIGHT a sooial gathering where, tea is
ihe beverage drunk.
.
Tea1--'l'EARS ONE'S H.A.m pull it out in grief .or an
xiety.
.
.
TEAR ONESELF .AwA y f OJ.'.00 oneself to go.
TEAR"AWAY
go
vehemently
along.
.
Teens IN ONE'S TEENS the years of one's age from
thirteen to nineteen.

He wa:; a ripe soholar even in his 'tens, as.
the Latinity of bis letters proves Edinburgh
Review, 1887.
.
.

.
Teetlt . 'fHROW, CAST, IN ONE'S TEETH ' to fling a1 '
one, as a taunt.
You've got the girl, and \Ve l"lUSt keep' her;
and keep her well too, that she may not be able
to throw it in yo21,r teeth that she has made ~11oh
saorifices for you Blaokmore.

'
TOOTH AND NAIL in defiance of oppo~ition .
FROM THE 'l'EETH OUTWARDS \Vithout l eal 'significance ; s11perfioially.
Muoh of the To1y talk aboi1t Gene1al Gordon
lately was only f101n the teetli outwards JJaily
NeriJs, 1886.
Tell TELL TALES OUT OF SCHOOL to reveal private
matter~.
.

.
'' Look here, Duffhan,'' he \vent on; ''\Ve
\Vant you to go \vith us and see somebody ~ and
to undertake not to .tell tales oztt of sc/1,ool.''
-Mrs. Henry v.,r ood.

THE STRA1N .SOON TELLS ON ONE produces n1arked effect.


'
.
. TELL lT NOT IN GA'fII let this not reach. and
gla<lden the enemy.
'

'

'

'

'

'

Ten1pers
Tether
339'

. ---- - - -- ------- - - ----- ----- ---------------------Tempers GOD TEMPERS THE WIND ~O THE SHORN .
LAMB gold makes misfortunes bear lightly on the
feeble.
''Yott are \rery kind,'' said Mrs. Crawley.
,, We lntlst only bea1 it with such fortitude as
God \vill give us, \Ve are told that lie tenzpe1s the
Wi'lid to tl1e sliorn la11ib-A. rrro]lope.
Tempt TEMPT GODS to risk angering them or the
fate. e. g. You are tempting Gods by your fool
hardiness.
Ten TEN TO ONE-almost certainly; ten chances
to one.
.
Whenever the reader lights upon the title
which Fox bad waded through so mucl1 to earn,
it is ten to on: that \vithin the next halfdozen
lines there will be found an allusion to the
gallowf Trevelyan.
ONE OF TEN THOUSAND an exceptionally ex
cellent person.
She did not know that she 11erself was a woma1z.
of fen t liousand. She spoke believing herself to
be a con1mon type of hulnanity James Payn.
Tenable A TENABLE POSITION that oan be inaintained against all attack.

.
A TENABLE THEORY that can meet all objections.
Tenter l1ooks ON TENTER HO<>KS to be in suspense
or anxiety. Te11ter hoo/cs are hooks on \Vhich a
\\reb of c1oth is stretched by the selvages on a
frame.
I must say I s11ould li.l\:e to have . it settled as
soon as possible, because it keeps a man on tenter
hoo1,s, '3 ou lcnow, and feeling like a fool Florence !v1arryat.
Tetl1e1 TO 'l'HE END OF ONE'S TETHERS as far as one
is able to proceed.
. .

I tell you plainly I have gone pretty well to
tlze.
enci of .my tet/zfr \\'ith yotl C. Reade. ..
. .. . .
'

'

'

'

'

'

l
'
,
, '

.'

'

Ti1ank

' .
-----~-.

340 .

. k'',
TIl.!C

-- - - - - - - - - - - -

-------- --

Thank A .THANKLESS '1 ASK a work for which, if ..


you perform it, . yo will get no th~i;i.lcs or.. c1:edit...
e. g. .A mediator's 'job is a thanlcles~i taslc. . :. .
Tl1at: AT THAT a phrase jn common use in A.111e. rica, signifying that certain conditions are con
ceded.
.

To be, looking at .him; guessed that he could.


not weigh less ,than Eeventeen stone,. and he:'
was all with.in the mark .at iliat. H .. Rr
H~ggard.

:
T11erc. '!'HERE'S . GOOD FELLOW that will. be .. 01 is-:
right of you, especially as a coaxing request.
GET THERE-attain s11ocess; e.g. You are right
abo.11t your object ; you must get tlzere. . .
.
. THERE, I TOLD. YOU SO iri dra'\ying attention .
. . THERE! THERE 1 in closing d1sct1ssjon:
.
TI1ERE YOU ARE.! you are perfectly rigl1t in
wha~ you say or do.

.
Tl1ick. THROUGH THICK AND THIN in spite of all.
obstacles ; witho11t any warn!ng.
These fellows wl10 attacked tl1e inn to-night:
. boldt desperate blades for sure and the rest
who stayed aboard that lugger, and more, .I
dare say, not far off, are, one and. all, . tlirougl~
tliiclc and thi12, bound that tl1ey '11 . get that
inoney. R. L. Stevenson.
LAY IT ON THICK to flatter or praise .extravag'
antly.
'THICK SKULLED
OR
.SKINNED
not
sensitive;
'
stupid.
.
There was something in your companion's
thicl-.-ness of skin that tiokled his humour... James
Payn.
.
A BIT THICK too much of . a good thing, more
than oan be put up with.
'
AS THICK AS THIEVES intimate.
'
IN THE THICK OF IT- at the most cro\vded parl
or important point.
THE PLOT THICKENS things-get complicated.
1

'

, Tl1iii

TI1oroi1gi1

'341

---------------------------Tl1i11 RUN THIN to seek release from a bad bargain.


THIN SKINNED sensitive.
,
1'hi11g-.THE THING the right thing; just what ought
to be.

\Vhere energy \Vas the tli1:ng, he was. energetio


e11ough _4.ll the }Tear Round, 1887.. .
'
Do 1 HE HANDSOME THING BY to ireat
generOllsly.
..
,
MAKE A GOOD THING OF 'IT to reap a good,
advantage fron1.
.

KNOW A THING OR TWO to be shrewd. .


''Mr. Levi,'' said he, ''I :;ee yo.t1 know a tliing
or two; will you be so good- 11s to ans\ver_ me a
q11estion ?'' 0. Reade.

Tl1i11k THINK NO END OF A PERSON to have a very


11igh opinion of one's cha1aoter.
TI1on1as A VERY THOM.AS an unbelieving, incredu..
1ot1s person. The disciple of Christ who bore.that
i1an1e ief11sed fl1r a time to believe in Christ's
resu1rection. J obn xx. 24, 25..
'
.1\!I:oreover, when he sees the lock of hair a'Jid
the lo\e-~ette1-and perhaps thero may be otber
discove1ies by tl1e ti111e 11e tetur11s 11e must be
1
a VPr11 7 lio11icis riot to bel 1eve such ~roof.J a.tnes Payn.

Til.0111
SlT ON THORNS_.to be
a po~ition of ex..
oessive discon1fort ; to be tro11b1ed in mjnd.
She did not say anything at the breakfast
table, tho11gh A1111a sat upo1i t12.or12s lest she
shot1ld ; HelE'n \\as so apt to speal\: ltpbh in1~
p11l!'e. lYlr:-. Henry Wood.
.
.
'l' J-JORN JN 'l'HE FLESH any: . cause of constant
ir1itation. Bibli.cal.
.

There was F.iven to ine a th.01n in tlze flesh... 7
. . ..,"- c or. x11.

in

'

'

Tl101ot1gi1 A. 'POLICY OF THOROUGHNESS unoo1n..


. pron1ising
.
.application of principles.
A. TifOROUGH-PACED LI.AR practised. ... -

'

'

. 342

. Tilougllt

Throl'i'

-------------- - --- - - - - - -----------Thougllt TAKE THOUGHT set one,s mind to work.


A THOUGHT just a little ; e.g. . Head. a t/ioughi
higher, please .
Tllousand ONE IN (of) A THOUSAND anything ex
oeedingly ra1e, implying a high degree of rarity or
exoellenoe.
THOUSAND AND ONE an innumerable coll~ction.
The servant girl entered, bringing in a slip of
pape1 upon a 'salver, the name no doubt, of
one of those thousand and one persons who were
now always coming to ask permission to. see the
manuscript.-Jam es Payn.
Tllree THE THREE R'S reading, writing and arithmetio, e.g. Teaching the three R's is an absolute
necessity in modren times.
.
THREE SCORE AND TEN seventy, as ordinary
life period, e.g. He died at usual three eeore
and ten.
THREE ARMS OF THE SERVICE the .artillery the
cavalry and the infantry.
Tl11ead. TAKE UP THE THREAD to resume the treat.
mentor discussion of.

THREAD AND THRUM all the good and bad together.


.
HANG BY A THREAD-~o be ill immi11ent d.anger.
A fate whioh has a11 eady overtaken . one
Jiving, and. hangs by a thread over. -other~.
Spectato1, 1887
. : THREAD OF LIFE-the thread imagined to be
spun. . out by the Fates.
Tllrougll THROUGH HANDS finished ; executed.
'' AnJ now,'' continued the btitJe1, addressing
the knife boy, '' reach ine a oandle, and we'll
get this tl1.rougli hands at once.'' R. L. Ste.venson.

.
Tl1ro'v THROW THE GREAT CAST to. venture every
thing.

--

---------In a . \Vord, George had f,h.rotvn the great cast.


-Thaokeray.
THROW DUST lN THE EY'ES OF n1islead.
It is not an honourable oooupation to throw
dust in tlie eyes of the ~glish reader. Contemporary Revieto, 1887.
THROW THE HANDKEROHlEF to choose a wife.
Tbe Sultan is saict to select women for his harem in
thi.s fasnion.
. .
THROW THE HANDLE AFTER THE BLADE-to lose
even the little which re111ains to 01e.
The question is, will you at all better yourselves by having l!OW one of your hot fits,
spealting with promptitude and energy and, in
fact, going to war with Russia. for what she
has done ? Alas ! my dear 'frie11d, this would be
th1owfng the ha11dle after tlie blade with a vengeance.--M. Arnold.

THROW DUST or 11Ul) AT to speal\: evil of.


A woman in my position inust expeot to ha.ve
more mud tli1owri at her than a-, le$S itnportant
pe1son. Florence Marryat.

.
THROW ONE Al' THE HEAD OF put one forwaTd
.as a mattel' of right ; e.g. Int.he court the woman
th1ew herself at th~ liead of the accused.
THROW COLD WATER UPON disoourag'e.e.g. The
teacher ilii'eW cold water Uf..O?l our plans. ,
THROW A VEIL OVEl\ not willing to talk en;
e.g. When I started the subject 'he . threw a
-veil over it.

.
.
'
THROW IN ONE'S I.OT WITH..:..: decide to share the
fortunes_ of ; e.g. I am ready. to tlirow. in my lot
with, yours.

.
.
THROW lN THE FEETH OF reproach with
He threw n1y faults_ in tl1e teetli oj me. .
. : .
THROW LlGHT UPON help to . elucidate .; e;G;
Police investigation .thretv light upon
the
murder.

.
.
.. THROW STONES AT .to censure ; : e.g. Don't
throw shones a.t others' ~faults.
, _- : .-

--

--- ------

----

--

--

----~

;.g.

'''

.,

TI\11mh

Ticket

344

. THROW ONE'S EYES UP exp'ress holy horror;


e.g. Whe11 the girl began to talk boldly he f h1tw

liis eyes up.

'THROW STONEs.....:..to find fauli \vith otl1er people


1
'1 here' an old/proverb. abol1t the inex1}edi.
ency of those who live in glas$ houses' tlirotving
stones, which I al\'" ays think that we would do
\vell not to forget. Florence Marryat.
Tl1umlJ .BY RULE OF THUMB il;l a rough and ready
practical manner, found by experi'ence to be 'convenient.

.The real trl1tl1 is, Wir1terbor.ne, that medioal


p1acti'ce i11 places like this .is a ve1y 1ttle nf th1t.mlt
matter. Tl1on1as Hardy.
UNDER ONE'S THUMB-uude1 one's influepce.
. '' If yoll thinlc I'm going to be afraid of Mother
.,ran, you are inistaken. Let co1i1e what may,
I'm not going to Jive 1tnder ll.er thumb.'' . :
.. So he lighted his cigar A. T1l>llope.
. . .TURN THE. 'l'fiUMBS UP-to decide against. It
1s a' Classical phrase. The Romans in the an1pitbeatre.turned their thun1bs up when a . con1batant
was not to be.spared.
.
They have unanimously turned tJzeir thurr1lJs 2tp.
'' Sartor,'' the publisher acqainted J1im. '' excites uuive1sal disapprolJation.'' R. Garnett...
. . BITE ONE'S THUMB .AT. to show conten1pt for~
Tick BUYON TIOK bl1y on c1edit.
. .
There are few, I guess, \vho go upon ticlc as
niuch as _\ve do Haliburton.

.
To rrHE 11CK \.vith exact punctuality.
TICK AWAY THE T!li!E-pass it by counting the
ticks~
.
. . SE.r TICK AG.AlNST. rrark off.
'
Go TICK-defer payment.

"Ticket GO.ANY 'JICKET to vote for any oa11se. It

is

an A.11zerican pol'it.ical plirase.

. Yes ; I love the QuaJcers. I hope they'll f/:)


the YJT cbstcr ti'c/cet-:Haliburton.

1~itlc

. 345

----------~

- .~

- --

---

~-

----------

---------

WHAT'S THE 'l'ICKET ?-what lS to

be done ?

(Slang.)

''Well,'' said Bob Orot:s, ''wh<1t':3 the ticket


. youngster ? are yc)tl to go aboard "vvitl1 n1e ?Ca1)tain Marryat.
"
'l,HAT'S 'l'HE 'fICKET 'YClU have. done. tl1e right
thing ; that's well do11c. Fro1n the wj11ni11g ti.cket
j11 a lotte1y.

'Tide TIDE OVER to su1111ot1nt difficulties, for the


ti111e at least~:.

'1,0 GO \\TlTII THE 'l'ID~do what other.3 do ; e. g.


Ji1 111y new positio11 I c)11ly go with tlie tide.

THE '1IDc~ TURNS-e\rents take ne\v;directio11;


r.. g.
\itl1 tl1e 1. N. A. trials th.e tiue turn(1d i11

. Indian politics.

TAKEN AT THE TIDE the iight 1110rrilnt used;


e. g. Fortune, tafcen at t/1e tide, leads to success.
Tile A 'flLE L008E see u11der '' Loose.''
'fi1l1e IN NO 'IlME very quiokly.
.
.
They
l
18tened
a
n1on1ent
;
there
\vas
i10
fresh
.
sound. ' Then Brutus slipped do\VU ' the f1ont
stairs in 11u t1:1ne
; he fc ttnd door not bolted C.

Reade.

" 'rIME .OUT OF MIND f1om a reniote date ; longer


: than any one oa11 ret11en1be1.
TAKE 'f!ME BY TI-IE FORELOCK
act 'pi."omptly ;
to i11al\:e no unrieoei:i8ary delay.
. .
:
Now, Si1, it's got to co111e
blo\vs sooner or
- later; and \Vhat l propose is, to take ti11ie ..b.11 the
)oreloclc, as the :-a-ying is, and con1e to blows
. son1e fine da). \V 11en . they least expect it R. L.
Stevenson.
.
:
TIME AND AGAlN very frequently.
'. . . '
. : . 'l'i1ne a1id: agai12 .l've bad .IDY. doubts \vhether he
: oared for Irene any \7\7 lio\vel1s. .
.
A 'l'lME HONOURED CUS'l'OM a custom \.\'hicP, has
..- been maintaintd t'or a .long time. c. g. In every
. . . sooiet.y there are inany time-honoured c1.i.sto1ns.
Ti11 TIN money. Sla11~1~
'

'

'

to

to

'

'

'

' '

<-

._
'

'

Tip

:346 .

Ton1

Tip TIP ONE THE WINK- to winl\: as a caution or in


mutual understanding.
.
For without putting on his fighting faoe, he
calmly replied that he bad seen Mr. Metaphor
tip the r11ink, and whisper to one of his confedera
tes, and thenoe judged that there was something
mysterjous on the carpet Sn10Jlet.
ON THE TIP OF ONE'S TONGUE ready to be
uttered.
.

Mary Wells ran in, with an angry 'expression


on the tip of her tongue C. Reaue.

TIP UP to pay money.
.
TIP ONE'S FIN to . hold out one's hand to shake.
(Slang)
Tiptoe ON TIPTOE-in eager expectation ; in a state
of excited suspense.
.

Religion stands on tiptoe in our land,
Ready to pass to the Amerioan Strand.

.
Herbert.
TIT FOR T.AT a blow for a a blow ~ e. g. He used
my carriage without leave and I gave him tit for taf
by 1.1sing his horse without leave.
'Toe TOE THE MARK to be oaref u} in one's. oonduot.
. Now yo11 know what I. am! I'll make yot1
toe the niarlc, every SOltL of you, or I'll flog you.allr
fore. and aft, from the boy up R H. Dana, Jun.
Toil TO TOIL AND MOIL-to drudge e. g. He wae. toiling and 1noiling the whole day and night.
Tom TOM, DICK, AND HARRY any persons taken
at random.

If that girl inst in Jove with you, she is some


thing very like it. A girl does not po'p over like
that for .Dick: Tom, 01 H arr11 H~ R. Haggard.
TOM 'l'IDDLER'S GROUND ail imaginary garden
of ease and wealth, wl1ere children piok .up gold:
and 'silver.

.
I'm here, n1y. soll's delight, upon Tern Tidl1;rs:
ground, picking up tl1e demnition gold arid silver
-Dickens.
.
:
'

'

-----...-

--- ---

Torcl1

347

.Tongt1e
-~---

---------------

-TOMBOY romping girl.


TOMFOOL buffoon.
TOM N DDY simpleton.
'

Tongue WITH THE TONGUE IN TBE CHEE'K-111s1n..:


. cerely ; mockingly.
And if statesmen, either witl1 1 heir tongz1,e in
their cl1eek or with a fine impulsiveness, tell people that their natuTal taste for the bathos is thtr
relish for the sublime, there is more need to tell
them contrary Mathew Arnold.
HOLD THE TONGUE-see unfler '' Tongt1e.''
KEEP A CIVIL TONGUE IN Ol~E'S HEAD - a.void
rudeness.
HAVE LOST ONE'S TONGUE-to be too bashful.
ON THE TONGUES OF MEN -talked of.
READY TONGUE-po\1\rer

of repartee.

LONG TONGUE-loquacjty .

Top THE TOP OF.THE lvIORNlNG TO YOU

a morning

Now old-fashioned.
'' Y Oll, doctor ? '1.'op of the niorni11g to you,
sir!''' cried Sl.lver, broad awalce and bearing
good natul'e in a mon1ent R. L. 8tevenson.
To THE 'IOP OF ONE'S BENT fully ; to the farthest
limit.

They fool me to t}2e top of my bent Shakes


pea re.
TO TOP ONE'S BOOM to hurry off. It is a See;
phrase.
A '!OP-SAWYER a :first-rate iel1ow. Ot the two
men who' work a framesaw in a saw-pit, the one'
who stands above is called the Top sawyer.
Well, he m'ay be. a topI3awyer, but I don't like
him C. Reade.
'
TO TOP 'UP WITH. to finish with .
Wha.t'll you drink~. Mr. Gregory, at my ex
pense, to top u.p with ? Dickens.
Torcli. BAND ON THE 'l'ORCH.::_ to continue the wor1:
of the enlightenment. It is a Classical. pbrase.
salutation.

<

T <.JtlCll

348

-----------

-------------------Tl1ough Italy DO\V (i11 the sixteentl1 centu1y)


ceases to be the guiding \ight of Eutope, het
work has been done among the nations: and in
their turn France,-England; and Germany ha11d
0?1 the torc/1, and the \var1nth and ra<liance . .!'11r
vive still, and aie ieflected in .the Italy of 011r
O\Vn rtay Q1J,arie1/11 Revi(;;w, 1887.
. .
-fo11cl1 TOUCH. AND Ge; precarious. It is said of a
critical sit11ation, "'here a very_ small jnfluence
will turn the scale.
.
.
TOUCH PERSONS OF]f tc> be too clever for tl1em ;
to be inore than a match ;or them.

' \Veil done, my good boy,'' ret11rned "'he ;


''I ~:110\v you \vould tc2lcht/ienz t1.f.''-:-Gold-s111ith.
TOUCH IT OFF Wil'H THE NINES to do anything
perf ectl~r ; to get. \vi th great cleverness. _
If I didn't foii,ch it off to tlie nines,. it's a pity.
'' I never heard you p1eao\1 .so well,'' says 011e,
11
since you were 1oca ted here.'' Halibtl.rton.
TOUCHED IN THE WITS slight.ly mad. . .
. NoBou-t CAN 1oucH HIM FOR SPEED--oome i1ear
oon1pare \vell.

.or

As

1, 1UCHING in the matter of.


'NEVER TOUCHES BEER not in the

~ing.

habit of drin .

NO'l'HING \VILL. TOUCH 'l'HESE STAINS . improve

. .upon.

"

'

COULD .. NOT TOUCH

THE POLITICS

'p .APER

. \\ras

beyond one's atte111pt


THE Sl:IAKESPEREAN TOUCH the peculiar quality
"
fo11ncl in.
.

-FIN:ISIIING 'l'OUCHES-:-bringing wo~k to com


pletion
.
PUT TO THE TOUCH . test in practice..
TOUCH BOTTOM arrive 'vhere any change must
be for the better.
-
. . . . .. .
.

TOUCH
_ONE'S
H.AT-salue
respectfully.
.
.
.
.
TOUCH
OF. N.ATUR~11atural trait.:
.

' '

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

,
,

'

To11t .
'

~-

Treat.1

349

'

--~---------

~-~---------

------------

severely hl1rt ~he feelings


. .
..
defilement by dealing with

TOUCH TO THE QUICK

of.

TOUCH PITCH

ri~k

doubtflll people.
To11t '!'HE TOU'r ENSEMBLE - tl1e wl1ole' taken to-
gether (French.)
' What a lovely \vo1nan this. is ! ''said IVIrs.
Bellamy, with. enthusiasm to 1'1iss Lee, so soon
as Phillip was out of earsl1ot.'' ., Her to1tl.
ensemble positively kills one.''-H. R. Haggard.
To,v11 A MAN ABOUT TOWN a ftishionable gentle111an ; a n1an who sper1ds his life in oity .. clubs anc.l
in pleasure.
.
' V\Tt1y .sho11ld I give her pu1e l1eart to a niarr
about tow1z ?''
.
'' Beoause you v.rill breaJ.~ it else:' said J\1:iss
'

Somerset-C. Reade .

T1acle

Two

OF .A TRADE- t\''o i)eople in the sa111e

business or. profession.


It is proverbial that two of a t1ade seldom ag1ee
-Edinbu.rgli ReviftV, 1887.

T1a"\'C lier TIP THE . 'l RA VELLER-to decline'; to fill


\Yith false impersonation. (Siang.) .

Aha l dost tl1ou tip me l}iq traveller, n1y boy ?'


-Sn.ollet.
T1ead TREAD THE BO.ARD to follo\V the stage as aprof ession.
The theatres occupied a i11uch l1igber 1>osition. in ~ooiety. Kemble , and his inajesiio sister(
Mrs. Siddons, trod tlz.e boa1d Ja1nes Pa.yn.
TREAD ON A MAN'S CORNS to annoy or hurt:
h in1.
.
.
..
.
'' Only,'' he added, ''I'm glad I trod .on ]Jfaster"
Pew's corns,'' for . by this time he had heard my
story- R. L. Stevenso11. .

TREAD ON EGGS to walk .with the utmost care.


'' It's real mean of him; isn't it ?'' says Miss
Smiles. '' Why, it might come to her husband's;
'

'

Tree

'

True

350

ears any day, and poor Emily will feel af: if she
\\Tas treading on eggs all he1 life.'' Florence
Marryat.
T1ee UP A TREE in a fix ; unable to do anything.
I'm co1npletely up a tree this time Halibu1ton.
A 'l' THE TOP OF THE TREE among the leade1s of
one's profess ion.

GENEuLOG1CAL TREE a chart tracing tbe des


cent from ancestor.
THE TREE-the cross of Christ.
. .
-Tremble To TREMBLE 11\1' THE B.ALANCE;_to be in ,an
11ndecided state where a small thi11g niay be deci
sive ; e. g. The matter is t7emblit1g in the balf111ce.
--------------------~---

To

BE ALL OF .A TREMBLE-to shiver~

g.

P.

know not \vby he \Vas all of a t1e111.ble \vhen I went


to him.
Trip CATCH A MAN 'TRIPPING to disccver a 'man
making some error or con1mitting some offence.
Though tl1e police know him, and 'wo11ld give
tl1eir eyes to catcli liini tripping, he neve1 trumbles ii1to their trap Miss Braddon.
Triton A TRITON OF OR .AMONG THE MINNOWS a
man who appears big, because his compa'nions are
so small, .Triton is a Sea deity, son of 1~ eptune, \vho
cal1ns tl1e waves \vitl1 his trumpet.

Hear YOll this Triton of the ?1iinnows Shakespeare.


. .
Troja11 LIKE A TROJAN gallantly.
He 11ad lain lil-.e a Troja1z behind his rr1attress
i11 the galle1y; he had followed every order
silently, doggedly, and "re11 R. J.J, Stevenson.
Tr11e TRUE BLUE-a faitbft11 IJartisan; thoroughly
faithft1l ; staunch.
.
. Sqt2ire B1'0\'\rn, be it ~aid, was. a f1ue blue 'I'ory
to the backbone T. IIug11es.

.. TRUE AS STEEL . faithful.


A TRUE BILL description given to an accusation \vl1ich on .a IJreliminary investigation is iegar
.

;551'

Trun111

---- - - - - - ded as supported by evidence st1ong enough to


wa-rrant a trial in court of justice. e. g. Political
p1isoners weredetained without trial as no true bill
was possible agai11st them.
frump HOLD TRUMPS to be sure of victory. Trumps
are the winning cards at whist or bridge. The
word is a form of ''Triumph.''
You never hold trumps, you know ; I always
do George Eliot.
PLAY ONE'S 'IRUMP CARD to use one's best
chance of sli.ccess.
He was a man with power in reserve ; he had
still his trump card to pla11 Besant.
TRUMP UP to forge ; to collect from any
.quarter.

Trumpet BLOW ONE'S TRUMPET see under ''Blow.''


t'rumpeter- BE ONE'S OWN TRUMPETER to speak
favourably of one's own performances.
He hoped I was a good boy, which being compelled to be my own t1umpeter, I very mod.estly
declared 1 was Captain Marryat. .
!'ry TRY CONCLUSIONS to have a decisive struggle.
It is Shakespearean.
. .
.
After that he . would have to try conclusimis
with the own people Mrs. E. Lynn Linton.
Tttck TUCK INTO to eat heartily of.
'' I \von't myself,'' l'etuined Squeers ; '' but if
you'll just let-\Vackford ft(,cfc into something fat,
I'll be obliged to you'' Dicl\.ens. , fttg THE TUG OF WAR the , hardest part of any
.
undertaking.
When Greel\:s joined Greeks then was the tug.
of war N. Lee. .
'
fl1n e 'IO THE TUNE OF . to tl1e _amount of.. .
Then Mr. rritmouse vent11red t.o apply to I\fr.
O'Gibbet, that gentleman being Mr. Titmouse'it
debtor to the ftt11e ef some fi.\'e hundred potl.nds.
-S. \\7 arr en.

----

-~

'

'

'

'

35i,

. 'f111n

-----
-SING ANOTHER TUNE-change one'.s .tone especia'lly from arrogance to hun1ility. :e. g.'. On the.
arrival of the policeman the offender began to

~----------

--------------

si1zg another tune.

-~

---

. .

--~--

-----~

. THE 'IUNEFUr.. N_INE-the nine muses. e. g. Arts


~nd. sciences are in the gif~.
the tuneful r1ine
Tttrk TURN TURK to grow ilJ:terr11)ered. and arro~
. gant ; to; become . hopelessly. obstinate. . .
Ernrna's having tu1n Tu1lc startled 1ny father.
-H. King~ley. '.

-
Tu1n TURN UP ONE'S NOSE AT see under '' Nose.,.
.. TURN ONE'S COAT .. see urider ,, Coat.'' .
TURN IN ONE'S GRAVE-it is a phrase .u~ed with
ieference to dead. people, when :someihing happens
which would have annoyed the1n exceedingly whe11
'alive.
.
: _
. .-.
. 0. William Slagg, you must. have . .tiirned in.
your grave Hugh_ Conway. . . . _
. _ ..
TURN THE CORNER to pass a critical state .
. For the p1eserit this young. man (altholtgh he
certainly had turned tlie co1ner) lay still in a
precarious state Blaciknio1e.
,
.TURN ON ONE'S HEEL to go off \v ith a gesture. of
oonten1pt.
1
.. . TURN OVER A NEW LEAF see under ' Leri.f.''
'l:URN A PENNY see under '' Penny.''
,.DO-A BAD TtJRN
injure.
- .Go to Crawley. Use n1y name. He won't
refuse n1y friend, for I could do liim an ill turn
if I ohose-0.
Reade.

TURN ADRIFT tl1e boat was turnefl . ad1ift {set


floating at random). .

TURN A DEAF EAR TO to refuse to listen.


.
..
TURN ONE'S BACK UPON to ~how no ..interest
in or consideratio.n for.
.
TURN 'ONE'S HAND 'IO .ANY THING to find.some
sort of employment.

of

'to

'

Turtle
353
Tlvo pence:
- .
----------------TURN ONE'S HEAD OR BRAIN success has turned his head (overthrown his j11dgment so as to
. make 11i1n proud).
.
. :
. rfURN THE SCALE -that evidence . turned the scale
. (changed the . preponderance) in the prisoner's
favour.
.
TUt<N .A COLD SHOULDER the en1ployer turned
.a cold shoztlde1 (treated coldly), on the _candidates.
. 'rURN ONE'S STOMACH this sort of business turns
my stomach (is highly distasteft1l to me.)
.
TURN THE TABLES to reverse the state.of aff
airs
.
.
TURN TAIL to run away in a co\vardly 111anner..
TURN UP ONE':; NOSE AT to show conten1pt.
T11rtle TURN 'lURTLE-to capsize.
Yes, Mr. Keene ; but turnin_g .~1.frfl~ is "not ma.king quick passage except' to ,:the'-other .world
-Captain Marryat.
,

'f ,veedle- TWEEDLEDtJM TWEEDLEDEE . used'.'-. to indi


cate distinctions. that are the slightest P.ossible.
T\viddle TWIDDLE ONE'S
THUMBS making them
rotate round each other for want of something to
do.~ e. g. That boy is donothing, he simply twiddles
~

'

--------~--

/1,is !hu1nbs.
T'viligl1t TWILIGHT SLEEP

name of .a metl1od of
making child birth painless.
,
,

Tl\'O PU1' OR LAY TWO AND TWO TOGETHER to dra\V".


a logical conclt1sion.
. . . ..- <fj
Gwendolen was a woman \vho could -pitt itv<>
arid trvo together George Eliot..
.. .
HAVE TWO S'IRINGS TO ONE'S Bow..:.. see.under
,, J3o\"V'.'' MAKE TWO BITES TO A . 'CHERRY- see' under
'' C berry.''
_.
.
.
. .
TViTO CAN PLAY . AT THA'r '. GAME Eee tinder
'' Garne. ''

T\\'o IJe11ce WANT TWO PENCE IN THE SHILLING to


be wea1\: in the brain.
. .
..

'

23

. -

'

"

Ugly':.- :

' '

'

354
'

.
'

'

{j11ctio11

'

Ugly .A.N UGLY DUCKLlNG something which is' des


' pised for its want of beauty. but which afterwards
. \vins admiration. This phrase is come into t1se
frorn tl1e fable in which the t1gly ducltling proved
to be a beautiful s\van~ ,

And then we all, get into our carriages, with


the ugly ditclcling, transforilled within tl.ie last
quarter of an 11our into a swan, leading. the
way Rhoda Brougl1to11.
,
AN UGLY CUSlOM~R-a dangerous antagonist
an unpleasa11t individual to deal \vith.
Some of these good loolcing young gentlemen
are tigly custo1ne1s enough vvhen their blood is up
-G. J. Whyte Melville.

.' UGLY MA'N the actual verson \vho garrottes the


victim in a confed eraoy of th1ee, the othersf the,.
: ~forestall and baclc~tnll, covering his escape.
A.S UGLY AS SIN repulsi_ve in appearai1ce.
.
\Vhy, ~he is as ttgl11 <l3 sir1 l Thotfgh s~e is
.
' : my friflnd, .1 .. n1ust aclcnowl edge tba t ]/.laria
. ' Edgeworth: - :
UGLY DUCKLING-person who tu111s Otlt tho
genit1s of tl1e family after being thot1gl1t tl1e
dulla1d~
,
U11clc TALI{ LIKE A DUTCH lT.NCLE-to iebt1ke \vith
kjndness.
, , UNCLE SAM govern111ent of U. S.

U11ctio11

J... AY A FLATTERlNG UNC'IION TO THE SOUT,

-to sootl1e oneself \vith a pleasant fancy.' It is a


Shakespea1:ea11 pl11ase.

Bring me to the test,


Ai1d I the. n1atter \vill re-wo1d, '''hicl1 n1adness
Woltld gamble from. Mattier~ for love of grace
Lat/ 11ot tliat flaiterir1g 1111cton to yo2t1 soitl.
,
,
Hamlet act iii. sc.. 4.
STL1RY TvLD WITH UNCTION \'\ith e11j<>y111ent or
.
gusto.
'

'

355 '

Upper .
-

Up. UP AND ABOUT, no longer in bed; dressed and


n1oving about ; capable of and ready for. : :
. up STIOK--to pack llP

UPS .AND DOWNS successive rises a:n'dialls.


The Up!'! and downs of the' rival parties furnished subjects for two ~xqellent . ,cartoons Foi- ~
t1z ightly Reviero, 1887.
, . . . , .
Up .AND DOING actively employed; .e.g. Let
us now be up and doing.
' .
.

.
BLOOD ls UP is ang1y, e. g. My blood was up
.a.t his words.

. . .. Up THE SPOUT in pawn ; e.g.: All his gdods


.are up the spout.
WH.A'r A'B.E YOU UP TO ?-what mischief do you
mean 1
IT lS UP TO us TO FIND THE MONEY-oonfrontin g us as our part.
Up '10 A THING OR TWO l\.nowing ; skilful. '
As King Solomon says, and that man was
rip to a tlii11g or two, yol1 may depend, though
our professor did say he wasn't so knowing as
Uncle Sam, it's all vanity and vexation of spirit
-lI1::1.libu1ion.
Up TO 'l'BE EYES-~ee 'tindei ,, Eyes.''
U1>pc1 THE UPPER HAND-the control; power of
Government..
THE UPPER TEN THOUSAND the highest circle of
society.
.
Ne2~t con1es '' The I-Iistory of a Crime'' (pace,
Victor Iiugo), of the high falutin' order, intended
\Ve ~uppose, to give one a glimpse of the iniqui ..
ties of tl1e upper ten-:-Edinb1trgl1. Review, 1887.
THE UPPER STOREY the head or brain
.Yot1 see, the point we shol1ld gain wol1ld be
t11is, it \\Te tried to get him through as being
a little touched in the uppr.:r Storey wbateve1
\Ve could do against his o\vn will A . Trollope.

'

. . . ..

virgin

358

follow a cow and to found a city \vhere the cow


should sink to the grass. This city was Thebes,.
and when Cadmus had killed a dragon wnich lived
near by, and sown its. teeth in the gro11nd, the
armed men who sp1ang
up
formed
the
original
.
.
. population. Cadn111s married Harmonia, daughter
Of Ven US, ana after . deat}l they \Vere turned into
snal\:es.

.
'

Virgin VIRGIN SOIL the soil which has never yet


been cultivated. e. g." The ~olonists were attracted
by the virgin soil of the land.
Virtue.-'M.A.KE .A. VJRTUE . OF NECESSITY
to do as if

from inclination or. sense of duty something one


inust needs do.
Malcing a virtue ef necessity, there- are n1any
in England who begin no longer to regard Constantinople as a British interest of the first niagni.tude Fo1~nightly Revkw, 1887.
\ro.gue IN..VOGUE-in fashion; e.g. The use of sim
ple words i!( in vogue .now- a-days.
HAVE A GREAT VOGUE be in pop11lar favour ;
~ e. iJ. His Iectuxes had a great vogue
.

Voice . GIVE VOICE TO express publicly ; e. g. I am


giving voice to the general sentiment.
.

'r

WITH ONE VulOE-;-unani1r;ously


.
MY VOICE IS FOR PEACE-opinion or vote.
'
ol11n1es SPEAK, TELL, VOLUME:5 to 1nean 111uch ;

to be very significant.
_
The epithet so often heard, and in sch kindly
tones, of .,, Poor Goldsmith,'' ~pealcs volitrnea
-W. Irving.
'

-..

,
' '

. , .,

' .,
'

..

' '

.--

--'-'

.Wage

W all-flo,ver

359

- -'

-'

- '

Wage-_:_LIVING 1;\r.AGE a 'vage on 'which it is pos!!!ible


for a worl;;:man and his fan1ily
livefairly.
Walk ,.WALK THE PLANK (SLANG)-punishment frequently imposed by pirates on tl1eir captive.s. The
\1nfortunate victims we1e made to walk along a
plank pa1tly ove1l1anging the water. After a few
steps tl1e p1anlr tilted, and they were shot into
the sen..

I had to ta lee it or tlallc f lie pla1llc~ C. Reade.


WALK ONE'S CHALKS to go away v.itho11t ceremony.
. Tl1e prisoner Cllt his stick, and walked his
challcs, and is off to London-C. Kingsley
. wALK TI:IE CI-IALK LINE, MARK . to keep a correct cot1rse in manners of moral.
~1ake him tvollc the cliallc line. .

' - '
WALK THE HOSPITAL to be a student under cli11ical instructions at a general ho~pitol or . infi.rmary.
when medical colleges were not introduced into
England.
~
.. _
Lor,' no ; its quite a strange,.; a yo11ngman
. that's just been tral lcin g t/ie oropital ,; b11t they
say he's very clever Mif:S Braddon. -.
' \VALKING DIC'IIONARY a perf:Oll full of 'inforn1ation.
. , :
: ..
.
WAiKlNG .GENTLEMAN perfor,.Uer of part that

requires little skill to act it. '


_.
.
. . WALK ONE OFF BIS LEGS-tire him 611t~
WALK OFF WI'l H --ste1:1]. _
_.
\VALK
OUT
WilH
have
as's\veet
heart
..

.
.
vVALK OF L1FE one's oocu'pation.

'
WALK.THE BOA'RDS act on stage.
~r aJl-fio)\"Cr A WALL-FLOWER . a. lady .. v.ho . at a
dance finds .no partner.
.
: .
_ '' I never dance.'' .
. .
- r. . . _
... '' What ! . are y'ol1 never tired playing tllc uial,l. floucr ? Do not German waltzes inspire you ?''.
-Miss Braddon . .

to

wall~h y. '

. l

Wasp

350

. .

Wallaby ON THE WALLABY 'l'RAOK a slang Australi.an phrase .meaning that. a. person travelling
through the bush . w'ith his,, swag'' loolcing for
work ; ,to go up country fo.r work.
'
. ' .
wa1~ WAR TO. THE KNIFE see unde1 ''Knife.''. '
.. PUT. ON THE WAR PA.INT to \vear .one;s. finest
clotbes.
.
.
'' Have you. seen the hero
the evening?''
. '' Who ? Do you mean the Portugese (}overnor in.
war
paint?''
H.
R
Haggard.
.

'
.
.
Warming . WARMING-PAN a pert-on put into a sitt1ation to hold till another is able io take it. .
.. We ttsed. to call him in ot11 parliarnentary days
W. P. Adams, in consequence of his be'ing warming parz for a yot1ng fellow who: .\'\'as in l1is
minority Diokens.
.:
Waslt W .ASH ONE'S DIRTY LINEN IN PUBLIC to discuss unpleasant private matte1s before strangers.
'WASHED OUT. pale and bloodless in appearanoe ..
: She noticed th.at the youngn1an who sat beside him looked rather pale and u1aslzed out :. Hugh Conway.

"\VASH. ONE'S
BAND OF declinPrespousibility ;
e. g. I am no more in this business and Iwash 1ny
.. lia'l1 ds of it.

'
NEVER HEARD SUCH w ASH twaddlling talJr.
NEVER TASTED S_UCH WASH
weak
liqttid
food.
.
. . ,
Wasp A \V.ASP'S NEST a place where the.re a1e
plenty of enemies.
'
It was . into a wasp's ?lest that the imprudent
Lo11sie 'thr11st' herse1f-:-Illust1ated Lo1zdon 1" ews,
1887.
.. . . . .
.
'
\VA'rCH AND w ARD striot guard : e. g. The
sentinels K.ept 1.vatcli arzd 1va1d tbe whole pight..
ON THE WATCH FOR ~ooking out for ;''c; g. I
am on tne watch for a good t11tor for my boys .
. '. "' p .ASS As' A wATCH 'IN THE. NIGHT . be . soon for
gotten ; e. a :I , \vas no doubt reminded of the
appointn1ent but it passed as a watch in the niglit.
,

'

of

'

'

..

'

'

wate1

. Way

361

. . IN THE WATCHES OF THE NIGHT while o:ne ltes


a wake~ e g. Somebody called on me in the watches

. . of the last night.


.

Water THROW COLD WATER ON AN -ENTERPRISE io


discourage its promotion.

Among them \vas Aurelia Tuokert the scopper


and thrower of cold tJJater Besant.
IN DEEP WATER in diffict1lties.
. .
..
.OF TfIE FIRST WATER-of the highest type; very
. excellent, origi11all~ applied to precious stones.
One. comfort, folk are beginn1ng to take an
interE'St in US. 1 see nons of the first Wate1 lOO
Icing \vith a fatherly e-ye into our affairs
0. Reade.
'.
. BE 1N HOT WATER io be in trouble .
Tom .uias in eve1lasting hot water as tl1e most
incorrigible soapegrace for ten n1iles roundT. Hughes.
WATER STOCK to give away a proportion of the
shares in a company at a la-rge disoount or gratis.
But there's no tlsfl crying oyer spilt n1ilk or
wafered stoclc either J. M. Dixon ..
A .w A TERY G:RAVE death by crowning. e. g.
The captain of :the. _ship 4ad a wate1y g1ave.
Wax WAX FAT AND KICK to becon1e unruly . and
to manage tl1rougl1 to great prosperity. .A. Biblical
phrase Deut. xxxii 15.
.
:
During the prosperous . period wl1en revenue
. .. \vas advancing by leaps and bounds, it is to
be apprehended that waiters as well as sailors

'

waxed

fat a12d. kicked

Blacl,1oood'$ !Jfagaz11e,

. 1.8~6.
. .
. . .
..
.. ,.
.
,
'
:,. : IN AW AX angry. (Slang) . .
''You needn't get i?1to a wax over' it, old ohap
said my .father H. Kingsley.
way WAYS AND MEA.N8. necessary fu'nds arid the
manner of procuring tl1emJ
., ' .
'

'

362
.

W-.eal
'

--Wltite.
.

'

'

'

'

Wben mo11ey has to be .rais-ed, the Hou~e of


Comn1ons re~olves itself into Con11nittee of.Ways
and Means-J. M. Dixon.
.
Weal WEAL AND.WOE-in all circumstanoes. P. g. To
him l am linked it:i iveal and tone
'. .
Wear WEAR ONE'S HEART see under '' Heart.''
WEAR AND TE ..\R-deteriqration by u-,e; e. g.
B1it1sh goods stand a .Jot of 2vea1 a11d tea1.
Weatlter- 'IO WEATHER THE STORM to . resist o:r
overcon1e a misfortune.; e. g. Our life is like a.
voyage on the ocean and we shall have to tveatlze.r
. ..

many storms.
'Wedge THE THIN, OR

'

'

'

'

S11ALL~ END, QF THE WEDGE

of

the insignificant-loolcing beginning


a .,principle
or practice which will yet lead to some thing great
and itnportant.

.
It \Vas 1he tliin edge <if tl1e zvedge~ in good truth
and the driving bon1e had. to come. Mrs. E.
Lynn Linton. (81 ang).

Wet WET ONE'S. WHISTLE-( Slang) to talce a drink of


.liquor.
.

WET BLANKE'l'- a person or a thing whose presence damps or checks enthusiasn1. e. g. .The boys
were fretting and'fnming when the Head .n1aster
came as a wet blanket on them.
"
.Wl1ack-TAKE ONE'S WHACK to drink liquor..
Wl1eel PU r A SPOKE lN A l\!AN's WHEEL . see under
'' Spoke.''

..
Wl1ip THE WHIP-HAND the control.
'
'WHIP AND SPUR ..vitl1 the utmost haste; e. g.
On getting the message I went tl1ere tvhip . arid
'
.
spitr.
.
~iliistle PAY DEAR .. FOR ONE'S WHISTLE-- tci. pay t-00
much for some coV'eted possession 0r pleas1ire.
We \Vent off in a very great state, but still
having to pay. with needless 11eaviness Jor our
tukistle G. A. Sala.
"
,

.Wl1it~-AT A WHITE HEAT in an intense pas~ion;


very angry or excited.
.

'

'

'

''

Wiclfl

3G3
Win
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ----- ----------'
They let tl1ei1 thinking be clone for them, in
.
critical n1oments, by Persian jotlrnalists at a
tvliite lieat Conf.e1npo1ar11 Revieiv, 1887.
A WHITE SEPULCHRE somethjng out\,Tardly fair.
but i11wardly corrupt. A Biblical phrase-Math.
xxiii. 27.
So that I conf:ider inyself a better won1an
than you are. 011 yes! I l\:now -you don't stand:
alone. I kno\v there are plenty like you, in the
best society wliitcd sepulclirest fair \vithout,
and rottennes and dead men's bones withinF1orence Marryat.
WHITE FEATHER-see tlnder '' Feather.''
A WI-IITE ELEPHANT an unprofitable dignity
-
w11ich is very costly to support. e.Q. Man:v of thedepa111nents of Governn1ent are burdened- \Vith
tvli1te elephunts.

A. WHITE LIE-an evasion, a bar111less untruth.


-Wide GlVE A v.r1DE BERTH-see u11der ''Berth.''

WIDE OF TBE MARK irrelevant ; e. g. Your


answers are all tvide of tlie 11iark.
"\VIDE EYE'S-A.lert ; e. g. I am wide - e11es on
- , tL1is point.
.

Wido'\' W1DOW'S MlTE humble contribution; e. g.


Wl1at I can give is a tvidow's niife.
~\VIDOW'S WEEDS in inournir1 g ; e. g. 'fhey are'
in 1vidow's weeds 1101v.
Wilcl-A WILD GOOSE CHASE-a foolish and fruitle5ssearch.

' "\.\iouldn't ton1orro\v


for - this :wild gooS!!
cliase?'' inquired \iVheeler- ' 0. -Rea.de. _
Willo'v WEAR THE WILLOW , (a) _to occupy the low~ .
est place or seat:, ,
: (b) to be in n1ot1rning.

(c) to be forsaken.
-
v;ri11 \VIN ~~TA CANTER-. 1~ _gain an easy victory.
''Petty finery \vithout, a pi11ched and stinted
stomach witl1in; a ca~e of Back versus .Belly,.
the plaintiff tvi1zning i1z a cantei , 8. \Varren.

do

'

Wind

364

.To WIN LAURELS to gain honour; 'e. g. Mr. X


has won fresh lauarels in the world of literature.
WIN ONE'S SPURS earn . Knighthood ; e. g. He
has wo1i his spurs for war services.
. .
WIN l'.~iE DAY gain victory ; e. g. . .In the last
war the Allies won the day.
Wind IN THE WIND . the position of affairs.
.'' \Vhat is in the wind, I wonder?'~ muttered
Ti~mous- S. Warren.
.
GET WIND. oF to be informed of ;to oirculate as
news.
:

Luckily Mr. Hodge speedily : got wind of our


misfortune G. A. Sala.

.
Go 10 THE WIND to be utterly lost.

At this all young Fielding's se1f-res1raint went


to tlie winds 0. Reade~

.

IT'S AN ILL WIND THAT BLOWS NOBODY GoOD


see under '' Ill.''
\Wing CLIP ANOTHER'S WINGS to hamper one's movements ; to reduce his. power of action.
TAKE UNDER. ONE'S WINGS-to protect; to be
under one?s protection.

We heard you were under Lady Pat.rick's


wing, and left that you were safe Florence
Marryat.

ON THE WINGS 01!' THE WIND with great speed.


HJS WINGS ARE ::iPROUTING he is too angelio
for this wo1ld.
.
.

A TOUCH IN THE WING wound in arm.


. ON THE WING-flying.

'WINGED HORSE pegasus.


. .
Wil.'tGED .WORDS going like arrow to .mark.
.
..."
Wi11l~1ng LlKE WINKING (Slarzg) very rapidly.
Nod away at him, if yot1 please, li/ce _.winlc1.11g
-Dickens.
.
.
.
Wire PULL THE WIRES 'be the hidden worker -of
puppets, both lithrally and metaphorically~
:WmEDF.AWN -of extreme subtlety.
..
WIRE IN to
put
all
one's.force
into
atask.
.
.
.

1
-

'

,.

'

'

'

'

'

Wisl1

--------------------------

Wislt THE WISH JS FATHER '10 THE THOUGHT-we


readily credit wl1at we wisl1 t.rue.
Wit AT ONE'S WITS END-Utterly preplexed.
Mr. Felspar was aln1ost at ,wit'3 end hotv to ad
-James Payn.
HAVE ONE'S WITS ABOUT ONE to be quick at
seeing and acti11g.
Dripps, if hiti wits had been about lii1n, inust
11ave yielded space and \1 owec1 Blackn101e.
Witcl1 Bli NO WITCH to be quite sharp. (Colloq).
Tbe editor
.. is clearly nu wii''.l'li at a riddle-Carlyle.
.
TB.E WlTOH IS IN IT- there is some mysteriousr
supernatu1al influence at work.
Witl1ers vUR W1TBERS ARE UNWRUNG we aTe not
hurt or irritated. The metaphor is tal{en .from a
galled horse, the \Vithers being the ridge between
the sl1oulder bones.
Let the galled jade wince; otlr wit 11.qrs a1e
untvrung Shaltespeare.
Wolf- KEEP THE WOLF FROM THE DOOR to keep.
'
out hunger.
Giving the l)eople that employment to which
they bad always been acousto:ned,. and without
which they would, in many cao;es, have found
no difficulty in lcecping the wolf from tlieir liitn1ble
doors Miirra11's J.fagazine, 18ti7.

Wooce11-THE WOODEN SPOON tl1e supposed to be
conferred on the lowest gradt1ate in a college list.
Here is something a tvoode1i spoon that he
says he quite expected to have won for a prize,
but the exan1iners have gone and given it to
Mr. Richard L11tbridge instead Annie Kea1~y.
V\700DEN NUT~fEG!:: citizens of Counecticut State'
in America. The name. arose from a swindling.
ti'ansaction successftllly carried ot1t by a mercl1ant of Ha1tford, the capital of Connecticut.
The people of this state a1e .noted for their shar.1
pness in commercial transactions.
;

366 ,.

Worlll'

He . called me a Yanky peddler, a .cheating


vagabond, a toooden nut1neg Haliburton. . .
the British
Navy; there was a time when ships of war \Vere .
THE WOODEN W.t\.LLS OF ENGLAND

built of wood.

'

'

'

st11pid fellO\V.
DR.A.W OR PULL 'I HE WOOL 'OVER ONE'S EYES-

WOODEN HEAD

Wool
to cheat or bood\vink him.
_ .
Go A-Vi1 00L GATHERING- to go astray ; to be

bewildered.
.,, \Vhat i11isconception ? '' aslcEd' the' Pater,
who.:e wits, once gone a-tu1Jol- gaflLeriiig, . 1arely
came back in a bu1ry Mr8. Hen1y Wood.
MUCH ChY AND LITTLE WOOL fuss or trouble

with little result.

.
WOOL fACK Lord Chancellor's seatin the house
of Lords.

'
. .
WOOLLY \TOICE-not clea1.
'
WOOLLY PAINTING lacking
in definition or
111minosity.

'

'
'

'

to control.
.
How ottr n1ut11al f1iend ivo1lced tlze ropes is
more than I can 1ell you H. R. Iiagga?d.
MAKE SHORT WlRK OF to gain easy victory
.
over.
.,Ve all thougl1t he would 11ic~!.-e slto1t wo1/c of the
soldier officer G. A. Sala.

\Vork-WORK'TBE ROPES

'

'

'

'

'

'

ALL IN THE DAY';:> '\\,..ORK no1mal.


THIS WORK A DAY WORLD the ordina1y p1acti. cal. life. .
.
'
HAVE ONJi.'S \VORK CUT OUT FOR ONE-be faced
\Vith bard 1as};;:,
' '
-W oild ALL THE WORLD. AND Ii:IS WIFE-eve1ybody;
also an. . ill-assorted
mass.
.
.
.
.
Mifl.s Pray; i11adam, wl10 \Vere 1he con1pany.
Lady s. V\Thy, there \Vas ull tlze toorld and liis
.
'

'

tvife -Swift.

'
'

'

wool . :

366 ..

Woi.~lcl.

He . called me a Yanky peddler, a cheating


vagaqond, a tvooden n?J,f1neg Haliburton. . . : .
THE WOODEN
WALLS OF. ENGLAND the British

Navy ; the1e \va.s a time. wl1en ships. of war \Vere


built of wood.
.

WOODEN HEAD stt1pid fellow.


Wool DR.AW OR PULL 'I HE WOOL OVER ONE'S EYESto cheat or hood\vink him.
.
Go A- V\1 00L GATHERING- to go astray ; to be
bewildered.
.,, \Vhat i11isconception ? '' askEd the' Pater,
who.::e wit8, once gone a-tUtJol- gatlzeriiig, iarely
came bacl\: in a bu1ry Mrs. Hen1y: vVood.
MUCH ChY AND LITTLE WOOL fuss or trouble
with little result.' . .

.:
WooL f:ACK Lord Chancello1's seat in the house
of Lords.
,
:
WOOLLY v'OICE- not clea1.
. .. :
WOOLLY PAINTING lacl{ing
in definition or
l11minosity.
.. .
'\Vork-WORK THE ROPES to control.
. .
How 011r i11ut11al f1iend tvo1ked' tlze ropes ir:
more than I can 1ell you H. R. Hagga1 d.

}.11.AKE SHORT \VLRK OF to gain easy. victo


.
over.
.
.
We all thought he wo11ld 11ictle slto1t wu1lc of
soldier officer G. A. Sala.
. .
ALL IN THE D-~Y'cl WORK no1n1al.
.

'

'

'

'

'

'

THIS WORK -~ DAY WORLD

cal'life. .

'

the ordi11a1y p11.'.

HAVE.ON].,'$ WORK CUT OUT FOR ONE-be

fc. .

with bard i asl\:.


World ALL THE WORLD. AND HIS WIFE"'."""'eve1ybo1

also an.
ill-assorted
i11ass. .
.
.
.
Miss Pray, i11adan1, wlio \ve1e 1he con1pa
Lady s~ Why, .there \Vas ull tlie tuorld and
wife -S\vift.
'

'

'

'

f '
I

'

'

'

, '

CHAPTER II.
.ADDENDA.

. l<.,or~ign 'Vords and Pllrases.


".a fortiori with stronger reason.
1 a men sa et toro -frotn board and bed
posterio1i from effect to cause.
a priori-from .cause to effect.
a deux betwee11 t\vo.

a' iond.....:.thorol1ghly.
a hues. clos In private.
..
'
ab, extra 1rom otl.tside.
.
ab initio from 'the beginning.
'
ab sit omen may the foreboding suggested: no
be trl1e. :
.
~-ad captaodam vnlgus to take the .fancy of th
n1ob.
.

ad hoc for thii1 purpose. .


... i
ad idem (L.), to the same point.
.
ad lntinitum (L.), to infinity.
.
.
ad interim (L.), for the n1eantime.
ad libitum (L.), at pleasure.
.
.
ad nauseam {L.), to the pitch of prodt1cing disgust.
ad .valorem (L.), according to value.
alfaire d'amour (Fr.), a love affair.
aiiaire d'ccear (Fr.), an affair of the heart.
ailalre d'bonneur (Fr.), an affair of honour.
agent provocateur (Fr.), a spy, who, professing synl
pathy, eggs on his victims.
.
aide-de-camp officer assisting general by car1-y
ing orders.
.
aide-fol, Jo ciel taidera Help yourself and God wil
11elp you.

,
al'abandon at .random.
a labon heure well-tiined.
a Iabri unde'i.' shelter.
.
_aide-mernoJre (Fr.). an aid to ~~e n1emory.
a la campa~oe (Fr.), in the country.
a la main (Fr.), in l1and, ready,
a la mode (Fr.), according to the custom.

>

.:a

'

24

.'

'

~oung'

368:

x.

..

a superior quality 'of bePr; -(Slang).


And I said,'~ ~ pint of double
:r'. and
please
.
to dra\v it niild_:Barham.
DOUBLE X

'

.
'

'

'

'

'

' '

'

.,

..

-.

"

' .

'

Yarn SPIN A YARN see under'' Spin.''


.. , ;
Yello'v YELLOW JACK the yellow fever. .
I have in places hot as pitch, and 1nates dropping round with yellow J acl' R. L. Stevenson
YELLOW BACK cheap novel; in' yellow paper
boards, common in the 19th century.
YELLOW BOY gold coin
'
YELLOW JACKET state garment in, , 'China
for.

.
..
persons of great distinction.
.
., .
YELLOW MEN Chinese, Japanese Moagols etc .
YELLOW PERIL the danger that yellow men
may over whelm white civilization.

YELLOW PRESS densational and especially oh


'
" auvinistio newspapers.
Yorl{shi1e COME YORKSHIRE OVER ,A MAN to cheat_
or swindle man. .(Slang)
.
,
. .
Young A YOU.NG HOPEFU4-:-a slightly contemptuous
and sarcas~io term for a naught boy. .
,

'

'

..

END

. .

. .
,

..

..

CHAPTER II.
.ADDENDA.

'

..

'
'

'

, . .
. Ji.,oreign Words and Pltrases.
.a fortiori with stronger reason.
1 .~ men sa et toro-frotn board and bed.
n pnsteriori from effect to c.a.use.
a priori -from cause to effect.
a deux . bet\vee11 two.
a fond....:.. thoro11ghly.
a hues clos In private.
ab. extra iron1 outside.
ab initio from 'the beginning.
.
ab sit omen may the foreboding suggested . nc
. . be tr11e. .
. .
ad captandom vu1gus to take the ft\noy of th
n1ob.
ad hoc for this purpose.
ad idem (L.), to the same point.
ad infinitum (L.), to infinity. .
ad interim (L.), for the meantime.
ad llbitum (L.), at pleasure.
.
.
ad nauseam (L.); to the pitch of prod11cing disgust.
ad .valorem (L'.), accordi.g to value.
artaire d'amour {Fr.). a love affair.
atiaire d'cceur (Fr.),
affair of the heart
.aiiaire d'bonneur (Fr.), an affair of honour.
agent provocateur (Fr.), a spy, who, professing syn:
pathy, eggs on his victims.. .
.
.
aide-de:.camp officer assisting general by co.rcy
ing orders.
.
.
.
aide~toi, le ciel taidera Help yourself and God wil
help you.
.
al'abandon at randon1.
a labon beure we1I-ti111ed.
a Iabi"i undel' shelter.
.aide.:memoire (Fr.). an aid.to the memory.
a la campaf.tne (Fr.). in the .country.
.
a la main (Fr.), in liand, ready. . .
a la mode (Fr.), according to the custom..

'

an

24

370

Foreig11 W 01ds

a la mo rt (Fr.), to tlie death. .. ; .: : .


a l'antique (Fr.), in an.tique style.

Albion (L.), an old. na1ne of G1eat Britian l1sually


said to te fron1 tue white (L. aloil:;)_ cliffs of
Kent.
, . :. . , _:, . ,
't

'

'

: .

"'

.,

alma mater: (L:.),; benign: tnotber' appljed by oJd


students to thei1 university;_:' . .. . ' . . . . . :
..
alter ego (L.), one's second' self ; a frie1id.
.'
a micas curiae (L.), a friend of court'; 'a disi11terested adviser, not a party to the
amor patriae love of one country. : .. . . .
. : '
amende honorable satisfactoryapol:ogy... " ' : : ;_ '.
am or pro pre (Fr.), s~ff;esteem:: ' '.' -.. :.
am or: vine it. omnia (L), love conquers a.11 thi-qgs..
Amina mun~i (L_.), the sol1l. of the. world.. ii 'Pl~t~nic
; 'conceptiou. < :: : _. .'. : .. -,, ., . ' ' ; ,: . ._

.
anguis in berba snake in the g1ass. .
.
. -..
animo et fide by col1rage and fa1th~- : :. : .
amino, non asiutia by c;o11rage no!;~ by c1:aft.' " :
Anno christi (L.), in the:year 'of Christ.. . : . : .
Anno dimini (L.),-in the year 'of the 'Loid. . -' ."
Anno mundi (L.), ye.ar ofthe w9rld. -_-.
., .
Annusmirabilis the yeai of .wonders;. . .
....
aute merediem befoie mid-day. . , : .
'. :
a on trance to the uttermost.

" . ..
.
antiqua1ium '(L.).; a .co_llection; of _an.tiquities. .
aqua vitae (L.) \vate1 of life. . . . .. .
arbitrium .(L.),! powe1 of q.ecision: -' : . .
a perte devue beyond the the range of. vision. . .
a point to.the point exactly;
. , .
a posse ad esse fro111 possibility to actua!ity ..
.a prima vista (It.), at fi'rst sight; . , . ~
a propos (Fr.), to the p11rpose. : . . . , .
., ,
a propos de bottes (Fr.), \vithout .r e~l relevarioy:
a propos de risn (Fr.), irrelevancy~ . ' ..
Arcades ambo (L.), aroadians botJ;l~ l:Joth alike.
a1gumentus ad hominem .an argume11t . dra\vn
fron1 an opponent's principles.,': : . '. . .
. .
ar2:nmentum ad ignorantium a11' ai. g11ment. fol1nded

case. . .

'. ... ' '.

'

371
----

--~

-----------~----~

argumentum ad invidiam an. argument whiah appeals to low passions.

argumentum ad jndicium a11 ~ppeal to con1ri1on


sense.

.
arriere pensee (Fr.}, a mental reservation.
asbestos gelos (Gr.), inextinguishable laughter
.a salti (It.), by fits and s~arts.

.
.assora (Ar.), a chapter or section of the-Koran.
astra castra, numen Iumen(L.}, the st.ars my camp,
God my lamp;
.

a tort et a travers (Fr.), at random.


a toute force (Fr.), by all means.

a tout hasard (Fr.), at all hazards.


a tout prix (Fr.), at any price.
.
.a travers (Fr.}, across, through.

Atropos, one of the Fates of Gree~ mythology, who


cut the destined thread of life.
. .
au contraire (Fr.}, on the contrary.
au courant (Fr.), fully acquainted \Vith matters. .
atidax et cautus (L.). bold and cautious.
au desespoir (Fr.), in despair.
.
audi alteram pa1tem (L.), hear the otherside .. :
audiencia (Sp.),. court qf justice.
..
au jour le jour (Fr.), from day to .day, fron1 hand
: to mouth,



au mieux {F1.), on the best of tern1s.
au revolt (Fr.), adieu until \ve 1ueet agair1. .
beau jour (Fr.), fine day, good ti1nes.
beau monde the fashionable world.
beaux esprits- n1en of \vit.
beneplacito (It.) by your leave~
oene vobis ! (L.), b.ealth to you!
!Jen venuto (It.) welcome.'

. bete noire (Fr.). a bugbear.


blllet'd'amour (Fr.}, lovP.-lette1
.. billet doux a love lette1.
.
blsdatque eito dat He gives t\vice ,\vho gives

"

'

'

c1uickly.

bona fides (L.), good fait!1. .


.
bonchien cbasse de race ohildre:ri have t11e bad
lities of their parents .

qua~

Foreign. -W O\"{~S.

372

'

-----------------

-------------

bongre, malgre whether willing or not. .

. bonhomie (Fr.), good- nature.

bonjour (Fr.), good-day; good-1n.orning.


bon mot (Fr.), a witty saying.
bonsoir (Fr.}, good e"ening. .
bonne foi (Fr.), good faith~
. . . .
bon ton (Fr.), the' height of fashion. . '
bon voyage ! (Fr.}, a good journey to you !

..

'

'

.. .

cacoethes scribendi (1;), a manta for scribpling.; .

cadit quaestio (L.), the question drops.:

caeca est lnvidia (L.), envy is blind. . ..

cap-a-pie from

head to foot.

caret it is wanting.
carped1em make a good use of the present.
casus belle (L.), whatever
.inv_olves ~or. justifie:t
.
war.

.
cause celebre (Fr.), a peculiarly notable.trial.~ .
cave quid dicis, quando, et cul (L.), beware what
you say, when, and to whom.
. , .
cela va sans dire (Fr.), that goes \vithout saying<
it is a matter of course ag.reed !

"
celui qui veut, peut (Fr.), who has the will. ha3 th~
skill.
ceteris paribus (L.), other things oeing equal. ..
chateux en Espagne (Fr.), castlt:1s in Spain, castler
in the air.
charge d'alfaires a subordinate diplomat.
chei d'oenore a masterpiece.

3bevalier d'industrie (F1.), lit. a lcnight of inclust1'y;.


one \Vl10 lives by persevering fraud.
.
ci1cuitus verborum a round about expression.
cl1culus in probando begging the question.
.
. cogito, ergo sum (L.), I think, therefore 1: a111 [De:i
oartes' fundamental basis of philosophy].
comedie humaine (Fr.), the na11ie . applied .1o the
collection of Balzac's novels,' plan11e<l to form ~
co111plete picture of contemporary society,
' comme ii taut as it ~hould be.
.
communl consensu by common consent.
con amore
with love. . .

'

'

373

Aud Phrases

--
-----

------------- ------ - - - - - - commune bonun1 (Fr.), con1mon good. _ .


eonditio 5ine qua non (Fr.}, an indispensible condition.

,
consensum iacit legem (L.), consent _niakes 1a\v or
rule.

consilio et prudentia (L.), by wisdom arid prudence.


. . .constantia et ltirtute (L.), by constanos and virtue.
-~onsuetudo pro lege servatur custom is the la\v.
contre-temps a n1isohanoe.

copia verborum (L.), plenty of \vords, fluency.


~oup d'etat ~F1.), <l1amatic effect.

.coup de main (Fr.), sucden bold attack


.coup d'essai first atten1pt

.coup de g1ace finishing stroke.


co11te que coute (]'1.}, cost what it may
.credat Judeus Apella (L. ), let the J e\v Appella
believe that [if 11e likes] I

.cul bono ? (Fr.), for \Vhose benefit. is it '.?_ Who i9


the gainer?

.cul de sac a blind alley.


. .
.cum grano salis (L.), with a grain of salt, i. _e., \Vith
son1e all o\vance.

-eum privi1egio (L.), with privilege.


.
.
.damnum abique iojuria (L.), loss \vithout.
legal

lllJUry

.de auditu by hearsay.


de bonne grace (Fr.), \vith good grace ; 'villingly.

. ,deceptio vlsus an illusion.


,de die iodiem frot11 day to day.

. ,de facto (L.), fro111 tl1e f u.ot ; actual ; really.


dei gratia lL ), by tt1e. grace of God.
de jnre (L.), in la\v, by right.

.de mortuis nil .nisi bonum (L.), say notl1ing but


goocl of the dead.

.de .nihilo nibilum, in nihilum nil posse reverti (L.),


. fronl nothiilg Ilothing, into nothing notl1ing Qtl.Il

retur11 .
.de novo (L.), a new.
deo gratias (L.), tl1anks to God.
deo Volente or D. Y. (L.),: God willing.

374

Foreign W01cls

,,..-.-------------------------- ---de. rigueur (L.), st:riotly ieq_uired; inde8pensable.'.


deo favante with God's grace~ . .

deo juvaote with God's helps.

de piano with ease~


.
de profundis out of the depths.
dernier ressort last reso11rce~
:
desideratum a thing . desired, b11t regretfully wan..
ting~

. ..
..
detour a oircuito11s nlarcb.
de trop too much.. .
.
deus avertat (L.), God forb)d .. , . '
dictum de dicto (L.), hearsay report. dieu et mon droit (Fr.), God and n1y right. .
divide et impera (L.), d,ivide [yo11r. opponents], and
so rule them~ . .
.
.
.
.
do lee ~ar .nl.ente (It.), S'\V eet doing-nothing ; plea..
sant idleness.
.

double entendre (F1.). double meaning.


dramatis personae characters represented ..
droit au travail (Fr.), right to -wo1l\. .
... droit des gens (Fr.), interna~iorial la\v.
dulce et decorum est. propatria mori (L.), it ia
sweet and glorio11s tq die for one's country.
dulce. ~ Domum ! '- sweet strain Home\va1d ! ~
dam vivimus, vivamus (L.), ,vhile \Ve live, let us
live.
..
:
.. .
dum spiro, spero \vhile I b1eathe, I ho.pe.
durante bene placito (Late L.), d11ring
good
plea
.
.
.
. s111e.
. .
;
. durante vita (Late L.), d11ring life.
. .
e contra on the other hand.

e contrario on the contra1y.

edition de luxe (Fr.), a splendid and expensive edi


tion of a b'oolc.
.
. .
ego et rex meus (L.), I and my king [Cardinal
.
.
Wolsey].
emeritus one ietired from active offioial duties.
en ami as a friend.
.

..
en attendant in the meantime.
en avant ! (Fr.), fqr\vard I . .

'

'

..

'

...

eniant
de
Ja
maison.{F1.),
ohild,
o.f.
the
house,,
quite
h,...
'
'
-,'. ,.

at home. .
. .
enfant gate {F1.), spoilt ohild. , . . . . . .
en garcon (Fr.),. like ~ '.l:>achelor, .. in a. baohelo1's
. , style.
.
. ..

: ; en masse (F1.}, in a body, universally. .


en passant (Fr.), in passing, by the ,way.
en plein jour (Fr.), in broad day.
..
: en rapport (Fr.), in: .direct rel~tion .; in _sympathy
-

with:
"
en route (Fr.), ori the way. .
. . 1 .

en regle aooording to rules.


.
. .
.,; en suite
oon1pany.

.
.
. . ~ntente cordiale (Fr.), cordial ~nderstanding bet..
. \Veen nations.
" en tout. cas (Fr.), in any oase or emergenoy.
entre nous (Fr.). between ourselv~s.. . . .
. en ville (Fr~), not.. at home..
.
.
errarehnmanum est to err is hu1nan.
,.
esperance en di en hope in God .. . .. .
esprit de corps te~m spirit.
:.
.
. .

in

et hoc genus omae (L.), ev~rytl1ing.of this sort.


et sequentes (L.), and those t?'l-t fallo\v ....
et sequentia (L.), and what f oll~ws. .. . . . .
et tu, Brute (L.), you too, B1;utt1~. . [Oesa1's e:::fcla-

mation when he sa\v. his much-loved Brt1tus


amongst his i11urderers ]: . . .

Eureka [Heureka] ! (Gr:), I have foundit.
'
ex abrupto,without preparation. .
ex animo heartily..
.

.
. excels~oi s_till J1igl1~r~ .... .". . : :" . " "
. .
., except10 ~robat
regulam- ... ' .exception
proves the
- .
rule. : . : , .
.
.
' except1s exc1p1endls the requisite exception being
inade.
. . .

. :
ex en ncesso a elm itt;edlv.
' . .
'
ex cathetlra (fJ.), froin~ the 'o.hair of office, esp.. the
Pope's 'throne :in the Consistory, ...or a. professor's
chair, hence. authoritatively~: judicially..
:
ex curi~- (L.), out of. c?urt.
. ,. ..

'

'

_,

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

F ore.ign "Words

376

'

'

'

exempll gratia (L.); "by way of example, .for ins

tance,- often abbreviated e. g, .


... .
,
exeunt omnes (L.), all go out, or retire.
.
ex officio {L.), by virt1e of his office. .
..
ex oibilo nlbll fit (L.), out of ..nothing
nothing
oomes.


'

ex pa rte on one side. . . . .
. .
experto erede believe one who "has had experienee.
experlmentum crucis a decisive exi>erim'ent.
ex po~t faclo (L.), retrospective. .
. .
ex taclto {L.), silently. : : . '..

extra judicium (Late L.), out of. court, extra-judicially.
~
. . .. .
facile princeps (L.), obviously pre-1lt11inent ; an
easy first.
_ . . . . ..
facllls est decensus Averni easy is tbe downward
road to fall.
. . . .
fac simile an engraved resen1-blanoe of. a ~an's
handwriting.
-' . . .
.
factotum a man of all work~ '
'
facta non ve1ba (L.), deeds, :not words.
lactum est (L;), it is' done. ' . , .
faire sans dire (Fr.), to act without talking~
lait accompli(Fr.), a thing'alrea~y done.: . .
far nlente (It.}~ doing nothing. . ..
fata obstant (L.}, the Fates oppose it. . .
faux pas (Fr.), a false step~ .. , . . : . _ .
f elo de se (L.), a suicide. : ... ' ,
femme de 'cbambre (Fr.), a lady~s maid. :. . .,: .
f2stiaa !snte (L.), 11~sten :;ently. . . . c - '
fen de joie (Fr.), a bonfire ; in English. (11ot in.
Frenoh), a firing of guus in token.of joy.
llat justitla, ruat. coelum (L.), let justice be (lo11e1
though tlie.lieavens :should fall.. , ..
flat lax (L.), let there be light. .
. :
fide et am ore (L.). by faith and love. .
fidei defansor (L.}, defender of the faith ..
fidus et aridax (L.}, faithful and bold~

. .
fllius populi (L.}, son of the pe.ople. ,. ... : . ' ...
finis coronnt onus the end crownsthewor~
.

'
~

--

---

AndPlirast's

377

-----------------

, tlo'reat (L.), let it flourish;


.
fortl et tideli al nil difficile (L.), tq the brave and
;; ''

faithful notl1i11gis difficult.

.
tortuna iavet fotlibus (L.), fortune aids the bold.
iortuna sequator let 'fortu11e follo\v;
. .
frangas, non i1ectes you may break, but you~ will
not bend 111e.

fronti nulla
iides
there
is
no
trusting
to
appear.
.
anoes.
.
.

fug1t irreparabile ten:1pus 'tin1e flies and cannot be


returned.

frau (Ger.), mariied wo1nan.


'
iraulei<1 (Ger.), unma1ried women, Gern1an go\'er
neso::.
iraus pia (L.), a. pious fraud.
fulmen br.utum (L ), a 11armless th11ndorbolt
.:gage d'am'our (F1.), pledge of love,. Jov.E:)1oken
.gard'ez (Fr.). t:!.lce ca.1e, be 011 yo11r guard
.gardez Ia fol (Fr.), keep the fai~h. .

ge11darrnes (Fr.), arn1ed police.

.gens de 'cooditio11 people of rank.


-gibier de potence a gallo\vs bird.
goutte a goutte drop by drop.
gratis for notl~ing:

,granda fortune, granda servitude (Fr.), great
\vealtl1. gre<t.t slavery.
guerre et mo rt (:U,r~). \va-tto .the death.
,gutta cavat lapiden1 (L;), the drop \Vea.rs a.~Tay the
stone.

;bannlbal ante portas tl1e on~111y o.t tl1e gates .


.bant et bon ('b"'r.), great and good.. .
.
hie et ubique (L.), here and every where.
hie et nuae l1tire n.11d no\v. '.hie jaeet (L.); 11ere l\o~.
:hon1me de l~ttres (F1.). nan of letters.
. .
.homoe hon1lni lupus (L.), man is n. 'Nolf to t\ ma.n.
:homo sotus aut,'deus aut den1on man a.10110 is either
a god or a devil.

.
.~honi soit qui mal y pense (~,r.)~- evil to 11im that
eTil thi11ks the n1otto of the Order of the Ganer

. Fo1eig11
W 01lls
.
'

378

----

. ------------

'

---~--~~---~~~-~~-~-~~
-~
,,_

hunores mutant mores

(L.), . honou1s change


'
. rnannerf.
..
.
.. :
honor virtutis premium . (L.), ho:riou1.- _th_e reward
of virtue.
.
. .
'hors de combat ('Jfr.), 'unfit to fight, disabled~ : . , . .
.hors I& loi (Fr.),.outla\ved.
.
.
hostis iiono1i invidia (L.), an enemy's. hatred is an

is

honour.

.
bumanum est errare (L.), to er1 is hun1an.
ibidem. (L.), in the same plac.e, thing, or cas~.
ich dien (G'er.), I Eerve,' Prince of \Vales' m,otto.
idem (L.), the same.
.
.
. . : .
!d est (L.), that is, of ten i. e. .

ignis iatuus (L.), deceptive light.

ignoramtia legis excusat nemin em ignorance ot


the law excuses nobody. . .
.
.
,.
ignoratio e!enchi igrio1ing of 'the .point issue-:
il farit de iargent (Fr.), n1onev i~ neoessa1"?~

at

ii gran reiinto'(It.), 'the great iefusa~. . .


'
il penseroso (It.). the pensive 1iian.' . : , . _.
impasse (Fr.), a cul,dE.:i.sac, an insolubale difficlllty.
impedimenta (L.), lug~;age .; baggage .of an army.
I

imperiam et Jibertas (L.), e1npi1e and libe1~y~ '


imperium in imperio (L.)~ a go".erriP.1e11t
\vithin. an...
.
other.

'

/.

., .

in aiticrilo mort:is (L.), at the poi11t of death.,


io camera (L.), in judge~s room. . . .. , . . .
in caud'a venentim" th'e sti11g.is.in 'the 'tail... , .
in caelo quies the rest.in 11.eaven.

in
esse
in
being.
.
.
.
...
"
.
in extenso <it f1l11 lengtl1:
'

'

'

.
.
.. .
.

..

act or COIDrr1itting the" crin1e. , .


.
.
.
in ext1emiss (L.), at the point of death
infra dignitatem (L.), belo.w one's dign1ty. ,
jn loco parentis (L:), in the place 'of par~pt. .
in.medias ies (L.), into tl1e n1idst of things. . .
" 'in
medio vi1tus virtt1e lies in the mean. : .. ..
.
. Ill memor1um to the n1emory of. . : .
-.

in i'Iag1anti :delicto (L'.), . in:

the .very

in no mine in the name of.


'

'

. ...
~

.;

37~

----

---~

------

--~---

------

-- -

---~---

. in nuce in a nt1tshell.

---,.

in nubibus (L' ), in the clot1ds. . . .. .

_: . in.propria persona (L.), in person.


. in

'

re (L )~ in the matter

of.
in
rerum
natura
in
the
nat11re
of.
things.

in saecuta saeculorem for ages and ages. ..


in status quo in the state in which. it \vas.
in situ (L.), in .its 01iginal situation.'
.
inter alia (L ), among other things. .

inter nos (L )1 bet\ve.en ou1selves.


in toto (L.), in the whole ; entirely.

. ipse dixit (L.), he himself said i the mere word .


, ipso facto (L.), in the fact itsel[ ; virt11ally.
jacta est alea (L.), the die is cast.
'je ne sais quois I kno\V not what.

. jeu de main l,l. practical joke.

. jeo de mpts pun.


. jen d'esprit witticism.
jure divino (L.), by divine law.

jus g1adii (L.};tne l'ight of the sword.. .
for
ktema
es
aei
(Qr.),
a
possession
[to
.be
kept]
.
ever.
.

labore et bonore (L.), by labou1 and honour.
labor improbus (L.}, peri:istent ; dogged lab6u1.
labor ipse votuptas {L.), labor itself is pleasu1e.
laesa majestas (L.), j11jured majesty ; treason.
la grand.a -nation. (Fr.), the great . nation the
Frenoh. . .
,,
.
l'allegro <It~), the n1erry, cl1eerful, inan.
. iaisser faire to let things alone.

la critique'east alsee. et l'art. est diliicile criticism


. is easy and art. is difficult. . ... . .
Ja maladie sans maladie hypochondria.
.
language des balles lang11age of the fisl1 market.
. lapsus calami (L.), a slip of the pen.
'
lapsus linguae (L.), a slip of the tongue. . .
le beau moade (Fr:), the fashionable \vorld.

le roy levent.(Norm. Fr.), the ki11g wills it. :


les aiiairs font les ho mm es business makes men ..
le savolr vivre
. to know how to live.

'

'

"

"

'

380

Foreign Words

---------

------~----

~-------

Je savoir faire to know ho\v io aot. . .


,
lettre ue catchet (Fr.), a royal warrant.

iettre de marqne (F:r.), a Jetter of marqua~ or repri~


sal.



llcentia vatum (L.), -poetical license.
iit de justice (Fr.). bed of jl1stice.

locum tenens lL.), flubstitute.


lOCtlS paenitentiae (L.), room fol" penitence.

locus standi (L.), a right to interfere...


lusus naturas a freak of nature.

ma foi (Fr.), upon my faith.

magna est veritas et prevalet: (L.), truth is


and

prevails~

great

magoa est vis consuetudinis the fcroe of habit i8


great.

magna civitas magna solitrido a.. great oity is a


great de-ert.
1 .
magni nomJnis umbra the sbado\v of a g1 eat name.
magnum bonum (L.), a. great good. _
magnum opus (L.), a great work.

mala fide (L.), with bad faith; treacherousl-y.


mal a propos (Fi.), ill-timed.
mandamus a law writ.
manibUS pedibUSQUe \Yith llligbt and main.
manu propia\vith one~s own hand.
materlamilias (L.), the mot her of a. family.
matinee (:B,r.}, a morning recital, or peiformance.
mauvaise honte {Fr.), fals.e modesty, bashfulness.
maxima debetur puero reverentia (L~). the greatest
revorei1c;-, 18 duti to the boy . i~ e.~ to the inno
ce11oe of the age.
mega bibliou, mega kakon (Gr.), big :tJook, great
evil.
.
.

memento mori (L.), remember that -you must die. .


mesalllance (Fr.}, marriage \Vith one. of lo\ver
station.


.

mens sana in corpora sano (L.), a soun4 mind in a
sound body.

mirablle dictn (L.), wonderlul to tell.


.
modus operandi (L.), plan- of aoting.

'

381

And Pl1rase\

. . modus vivendi

(L~). mode. of living. .

mon ami (Fr.), n1y friend. .

.: .
multun1 in .parvo (L.); n1uch in little.
mutatis . mutandis after i11aking the neces!:iary
changes.
.
.' . :
. ' ,

. mutuus consensus (lJ.), n1utual consent. .
: natura to iece, e poi ruppe la stampah nattl.re f()1:. '1r1ed hin1 and then b1ol;;:e tl1e model. . . :
naturam expel las f urco, ta men. usque recurret yo11
111a.y drive out .11at1ire by .violence .but-. she \Vil!
ever ~ori1e rl,1.s4ing bacl;;: again. - ' :
nee cupias, .nee metuas (L.),. nei~her desire 11or fea1.
ne ced~ malis (L.), yield not to n1i~fortune. .
nemine contradicenle (L.), without opposition, also

nem con. . ..

.
:
. nemine diss.e11tJente (L.), noone dissenting.
nee dens iotersit nisidiguns vindlce nodus Let not

.. a god be introduc.ed unleEs the difficulty be;wor1hy


of such intervention.
.
necessitas non babet legem necessity has no law.
nee quarrere nee spernere houorem neither to seek
. nor despise honou1s...
.~
.
nee scire fas est omnia the gods d_o ,not i)ermit us
to kno\v every tl1ing.
..
ne japit~r qtiidem omnibus placet not even jupiter
pleases every bcdy.

ne plus ultra (L.), nothing furtl1er.


.
. ninil ad rem:(L.), 21othing to tho point.
niJ admirari (L.} 1 \vonde1 at notl1i11g, u.d1nire 210.

1 l1ing.

.
.
'
nil desperandum JL.), never despt'l.ir.
nimporte (Fr.), it matters not.
noblesse oblige (F1.), ranlc imposes obligations.
nol13US voleus (L.). \1l1ether he will or not.

:Iolle prosequi (L.), to be tl.U\villing to. prosecute ..


nom de gu~1re (Fr.), an a~st1med. r1atne; travelli11g
title ; pseudony1u [nom de plume
not Frerzcli].
nous verrous (Fr.), \Ye shall see.

is

obiter dictnm (L.), something said by tl10 \vu,y.


octroi (Fr.), the duty paid a.t the gato of a oity.

382.

Fo1~ig11

W 01ds:

'

un-

omne igno tum. pro magnifico (L.), everything


known magn'ificient. .

'

omnia mutantur, nos et 'mntamur in illis (L.), all


. things change, and we change with then1.- .
01a et labora (L) pray and, labo11r.

,
0 tempora. ! 0 mores (L.), 0 the times l Q the man.. ners ! i .. e.1 what: sad times? what dreadful
doings?
..
ouvert. (Fr.), open. . .
,
: pace (L.), by leave of.

pari passu (L.), with eql1al pace ; togethe1'.


particeps criminis (L.), an accomplice._ -. . .
pater partiae (L.), the father -of his- country.
peccavi (L;), I have sinned. . . : .
pis alter (Fr.), the last or worst shift. .
.
poste restante (Fr.), a department in a post office
in which letters so addressed are to be called' fbr.
post. ho.c, ergo proctor hoc (L.), afte1 this, therefore
beoause of this (a fallacious reasoning]:
post mortem (L.), after death.

post obitum (L.), afte1 death.
premonitus praemunitus fore warned is forear1ned.
p1ima iacie (L.), on the first view~

p1!mum mobile the main spring the first impulse~


primus inte:r pares first among his peers.

nrior tempore prior yure first in ti1ne, first in


- right ; fi.1st co1ne first served.
.

urobitas Iaudatur et alget honesty is praised and
- left tq.sta1ve.

pro bono publico (L.), for the publio benefit.


pro tanto (L.}, for so much
_
pro tepore (L.), fo1 the time being.
pro fornia (L.); for- the for111's sake.
pro rata in proportion. .
pro re nata for a special b11siness.
pro salute animae for .the health of the sotil.
.{1nantum mutatus ab 1110 ! (L.), ho\v much ohangei
from what he \Vas ! .
.
quid novi what news?

.
quid nunc what.:r.iow ? .
'
. '

'

'

'

'

' -

-------------------------.
quid
proquo
one thing f61 anothe1:; .
.
.
'
qUI VIV0 \VhO goes there ?
.
.
- _-_. - .
.-quod di omen overtaut n1ay the;gods ave1t this.. '
'

'

,.

quod eart d~n1onst1andum \vhioh \Vas to. be p1oved.


quod scripsi sc1ipsi \vhan I have \vritten 1 r have

" -.
quos deus vult perdere, t11ius dementat who111 the
gods destory, give inad11ess first. -
quivive (Fr.), watchful., -.. .

quo vad1s (F1;), who go'es t11e1e ? - - -


ratson d'etre {Fr.). right to exist.
....
,
rara alt is (L ), a ia1e bird,: a prodigy.

reiigio loci (L.), ti1e reljgious spi1it of tl1e 'place ....


reductio ad absurdum (L.), ~ particuia1 case which
proves tl1e al1surdity ot a ga11eral ~tate111erit.
repoase, sil vcus plait; or n~ s.:v. P. (]fr.), reply if
.... v:otl \vill plea~e,- an anwer will oblige.

res augusta domi (L.), narrow ciroumstanoe_s at


-hon1e;.poverty. '
:
respice !inem (L.), look to the end.

roma locuta, .causa

:. -

~inita(L.),

Ro111e bas spol{en,

the

oause is ended.
': .-. -
sang iroid (Fr.), cold blood.
,
sans iacon (F1.), without etiqt1ette:

sartor 1esar.tus. (L~), the tailor ie-tai.loi:ed~ '
_satis verborllffi (L.). enot1gh of \Vords.
.
sauve qt!i peut (B'1.), sa\re l1i111self \V-ho ca11 .ueiyil
tul{e tl1e hindi11ost.


savoir viv1:.e (Fr.),- l\:110\vledge of i)olit'e life.
secuudum ordinem (L.), in order.
.
semper idern (L.), al\vayz1 the su.n1e.

sic transit gloria 111unrli (1.), so_1)asses a\vay earthly


glo1y.

similia ~imilibus curantu1 (-L.), like tl1ings are


ctirecl by 1ike.
.. -

.
silent leJ,es inter u1ma la\\'5 are 1:ilent i11 the n1idst
of

t'l.l'lliS . -

similis simill gandet lil;;:e 1'ojoices i11 like.


sinedie \'.ithot1t-s. day- beii1g a1J11ointe<.l .

slnequa 11on au
I

3g3

And PI1iases

w1;itten.

'

i!1dispe11siule: coi1fliti(>t1. .. ,_: .: . .

384

Foreign. Wor<Js

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

sivis pacem para helium

-----,.

..c-----.-.---:-

if. you wish ..peaoe p1e


pare for war.

..
. .
.. . . ; : .
sine ira et studio (L.), withol1t ill-will and withottt
favour.

.
. spero mellora (L.), 1 h.ope for better tl1ings. .
soi- disa11t (Fr.), self-appointed.
. .
. sotto voce (It )t in whisper. .
.
,
sponte SUa (L.), one's O\Vll accord. . . . .
status quo (L.), tt1e state in ...vhich. . -; '..
suavilor in modo (L.), gentle in ... n1anner,. :resolut6'
in deed.
. '

sub judice under consideration,


. '
"
sub paena under a penalty.
, sub rosa privately~
.
sui generls (L ), peot11iar. .
..
,summu:in bonum (L.): the chief good.. . .
' summum jus summa injuria the excess. of' justioe
. ._in the excess of .injustice. . . .
'
sunt. superis sua jura the gods have their. own
laws.
.
:
.
.
: . ,
. supp1esio veri .suppression of t1'1.1th.
. , .
tableux vivante (Fr.), dumb representations . livirig;
-pictures.
..
tabula 1osa clean tablet.

tache sans.tacl1e a work \vitbout stain.


tedium vitae \vea1iness of life.
.
. taiis paterqu~lis Yilins like fatl'ler lil\:e so11. ::
tant pis (F1 ), so iriuoh the \Vorse ..
,

of

'

tempura n1utantur, nos et mutamur in illis (IJ.};

tl1e titlies are ohangfd, and \Ve with them.


. .
tempus eda}' rerum (L ), ti1ne const1mer of things.:
tempus Iltgit (J..J. ), time. flies.
.
, . ,
te1ra incognita _(L.), an ttnkno\\n country. .
. tete a-tete (]'r.). co:p.fildential conversation.
timeo Danos et dona ferentes (L.), I fear tl1e Gre
eks, even \Vllen bringing gifts.

tot idem ver bis (L.), in just s.o 1nany words.


tour de force (Fr.), a feat of strength or skill.
tout le monde (Fr.}, all the world, everybody; .
tria 'juneta .in uno (L.), three in one.. .

'
A11d i)ltrases
. ' . , . .'

385

...
.. ..

ubi bone, ibi pat1ia ,(L.), where . it ,goes well with


n1e, there

is' my

fa1herland. .
.
'
ubique (L.), every where.: . . . . . . '
Ultima thute.(L.), tl1e utmost boundaryor.lin1it.
Ult1~a vires (L.), beyond one's power. . . . :'
.
\lade mecum (L.), a cqnstant companion~. ' ..
vallet de chambre.(Fr.), an attendant; a footman.
vae victis (L.), woe to the conquered.
....
veni, vidi, vi.Ci (L.), I .. came, I saw, .I conquered..
verbatim et litterratim (L.), word. for. word; and
.. Ietter for letter. .
.
~

ve1itas ordium parit (L.), trt1th begets hatred .


verbum
sapiente
sat
est
(L.),
a. word js enough for a

wise man.
. .
verba volant scrip ta manent words fly, .writings,
ren1ain.
.
.

vernon semper viret it is not always spring.. ~


via media (L.), the n1iddle path. . . . . , ..
vice versa tl1e te1111s being exchanged. ..
.. . :
vide ut sup1a see the preceding statement. .
viet armis (L.), by force and arms. :.. : , . : . .
vincit amor patrae patr1otisn1 prevails. . .. .
vincit veritas trtl.th conq11.ers. , . .
. .
.
virtus sempe1 vi1idis vi1tue is ever .green..
vis a vis face to face.
.
.
. .
vita brevis, ars lon&a (L.), life is short, art. is long.
viva ie~' ! (L.), long li\'e the king J ~ . . . .
viva vcce (1.}. by 01al testi1nony. . .
.
vive. vaieque ! (Fr.), life a11d health to you !
VOgUe la ga\ere ! ('l~'r.), GOil10 \Vhat 111ay J
vo1ente deo (L.), god \villi11g.
volte lace (Fr.), reve1sal of co11duot or policy.
vox populi, vox dei (L.), the voice of the people is
the voice of God.
.

' .

'

25

386

I clioniat ic' \V01{ls

-----------c----- -----.. .
.----- --------..
.
'

'

.'

Pairs of It:liomatic Nou11s.


,,

. '

'

_.\lpha and omega--beginning arid e11d.

'

Bag and baggage one's belonging:3...

Bow and a1rows.. .


Bread and butter nect:ssary food .
. Bread and cheese simple food.
Bread and milk.
. .
A fair field and no favo11r equa.l oppo1tunity.
Fire and sword. rapine. . . -
. . : ,
Through fire and water through. the most te11ibledifficulties.

Flesh and.blood the animal nature. .
Friend and foe.

Frost and snow.


Gods and goddesses.
.
.
.
.
Bound hand and foot securely bou11d .
. .
Hands and feet.
Over he~d and ears-deeply immersed.
Heart and so11l enthusiastioal},-.
Heaven and earth.
Hill a.nd dale.
Hole and corner.
Horse and cart
.
House and home.
,
.
. Houses a11d lands.
Judge and jury.
King and queen.
Kith and kin acquaintance ti11d relatio11s.
Knife and fork.
Lads and lasses.
Land and \vater.
Law and eq11ity principles of jl1stiue.
Life and lin1b.
J_.ife and soul the essential ftl.Ctor.
Light a11d ~bade.
For love 01 money.
1-Ia.le and female.
1'1an and beast.
Man c.111d wife.
'

'

'

'

'

Au(l
)

- -- --

-- - - --- -

1~11rases

.'

'

'

387
'

-- ---- - - - ------ -

------ --- ---

--

--

Maste1 and n1an.


Men and \vomen.
. .. '
.
Might a11d main all one's po\vel.".Mist1ess a11d tnaid.
..
Motl1er and ohild.
.
Part and llarcel inseparable fron1.
Pe11 and ink.
Pe11s aud paper.
Pins and needles tingling in nerves.
Pipe and tobaoco.
'Po\vder and shot.
Profit and los~,The quiolc and tl1e dead the living. and the Il<:in.
livi11g.

,Rack and ruin t1tter ruin.


..
Ra11tr and file common soldiers.
}?.hy111e and reason.
Root and branch radically.
Science and art.
sheep and goats.
.
'
Sin antl 111iser~r.
Skin a11d bone emaciated.
. .
;8011 and 11eir.

Stooks and shares assets .


;Stooks and stones inanimate objects.
.Stuff and nonsense rubbisl1 !

Bunl a11d s1i.bsta11ce pitl1.


Sun, moon ar1d stars
'
.Sword and shield.
-Tea. and uoffee.
'fi1ne and tide.
Tooth a11d nails witl1 11tmost effort.
To\Vn and oou11try.
Use a.11d abttse.
Use and \Vont. . ,
.
' .
Virtt1e and vioe. .
\Vatch u.nd \Val'd. gtiard.
Weal or woe.
Wear and tear-deterioration due to '\.1se of a. thi11g.
'\Vhi1J and s1>t1r inoitement.
'

'

'

'

388

Idioniatic W or els

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --------------
.

Wife and children.


. ..
.
' .
Wind and weather.
. . .
Pairs of Idiomatic Adjectives

.' .
Ancient and modern .
. . . ,

For better for worse acoepting all resi.1its.


"
Bright or dark
_.. . .

Cut and dried_ .. ready. for exeoutioi;l. :

Dead and gone

.. .
Drunk or sober
By fair means or foulFair and square- aboveboard.
Free and easy:__
Good or badGreat and small
.
,
.
Good, bad or indifferent what-ever it n1ay be;
..
High and dry abstract.
.
High and low people of all ranks~.
..
..
High and mighty arrogant.
..
' ..
Holy and happy

.
. .
.
. .
Kind and true..
Lame or lazy
..
.
.
.
The long and short substance.
.
.. .
- ..
:NI01e or less
.
.
.
Null and void not valid.
.
Past and present:Rich and poo1
..

.
.
Right and left in all directions.

Right and wrong


..
..
Rough and ready roughly efficient~
.
Rough a.11d smooth
:
Sbo1 t and s\veet
'.
.
Slow and stead-y
.

Slo\\" but s11re


.
. .
Through thiok and t11in all obstacles. .
..
Idiomatic verbs an<l nou11s i11 represc11ti11g cries ol
'\'-arious. a11ima1s.
-

.
Apes gibber. .
.
. Asses b:ray
Beu.rs growl'

'

'

<'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

----

. -- ..,...._. -

---

--- -

- ---------

--

--

---

--

- --

Bees hum

' '
Beetles drone

Birds sing, twitter


. .

Bulls bellow

Camels grunt
..
.
Cats n1e\v, purr
.
'. .
.
'
'
Cattle lo\v

Cooks crow
.. ' '
...
Co;vs low

.
C1ickets chiro

.
C1ows caw
.
. '
Dogs, yelp, bark, whine, gro\vl, h.o\vl, bay.
.
'
Doves coo
' '

Ducks quack

Eagles scream
. '
Ele1>hants trumpet
Flies buzz
.
. ... '
Foxes, yelp, bark
Frogs croak

Geese cackle, gabble, hiss


Goats bleat
.
.
Ha\vks scream
' .
Hens cackle, cluck
Horses neigh, snort, whinny
Hyenas 1au~11
"
''
Jackals howl
Kittens me\v
Lambs bleat
..
Larks sing, wa1ble
Lions roar

Mu.gpies chatter
. .
lviice squeak
'
1\'Ionl~eys chatter, gibber
Nightingales warble, sing
O\vls hoot, screech, scream
.
Oxen low. bellow

P:.l.1rots talk
Peafo\vl scream

Pigeo11s coo
Pigs grunt, squeal.
Puppies yelp.
.. .

'

'

"

'

'.

'

'

.Idiomatic Words

390

- - - - - ..- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Ravens croak.
Rooks
Sea.gulls scream.
Serpents hiss.
Sheep bleat.
Small birds ohirp, pipe, twitter.
Snakes hiss.
Sparrows chirp, twitter.
Swallows. twitter.
Swans cry.
Thrushes whistle.
Tigers growl, roa1.
Turkeys gobble.
Vultures scream.
Wolves howl, yell.
..

oaw.

''

'

. .'

' '

.'

'

..

lcliomatic Collec.tive 1Jl1rases

A herd of deer
A shoal of fish
A floe/; of geese
_4 flock of sheep
.4. brood of chickens
...4. shower of rain
Afalt of..snow
A sheaf of grain
_4. sheaf of wheat
A qu1 ver of arro\vs
A pacl' of wolves
A pack of hounds
.A litter-- of puppies
A regimetz t of soldiers
_4 stack of oorn
A stack of wood
A stack of arms
A pair: of shoes
A herd of swine
A swarni of locusts
A }light-of steps
A butzch-of keys
A bunch-of grapes

..
.

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

Si111ilc s
-

---

----

-~

--

. -- .

--

391

------ ----- ---- ----

A buuc/1,- of plantci.ins
A bouquet of flovers
A :~war"i of flies

. A hive of bees
A. tribe of Arabs
.A .fliglit of bi1ds
A s1tit of clothes
_4. h.erd of cattle
A drove of cattle
A

.A.
A
.A
A
A

'

'

~qztadrvti

of horse

crowd,-throng, multitued or co1icourse of people.


bi.tndlc-of bay
.
,
bu1zd/e-of sticks
g1oup of islands
cove11 of partridges

A se1i.es-of eve11ts
A 1iest or swarm of ants
A heap-er mass of ruins
.A. heap of stones or sand
A clu111p- or grove of trees
A cluster or galaxy of stars
_4 ga1ig-of labourers
:
_4. gang of tl1 i~ves or robbers
'
A chai1i of rhol1t}tai11s
.
...4. range-of hills or r11ol1ntains .
A group- of figures
A collection of relics or curiosities
A bev11 of 'vome11

'

Sl:\IILES

Bald as a coot.
Bitter as gall, as soot.
Black as ink, a,q coal, as crow.
Bl ind as ba.t, 3 beetle, a. mole.
Blitl1e as a bee, butterfly, la:rk~
Bold as brasst a lion.
Blunt as a. hed,..,.e
hook.
t:>
Brave as Alexander, a lion. , .
Bright as silver, day. noonday, the light.
Brittle as glass.

..

Si111iles ....

392 .

Brown as a ba:rry, mahogany..


Busy as a bee, a nailer.

'
Ohatcer like a jay.
. -. .

OhangeatJe as the moon, rnonkey, the \,;eatht-rcock~


Cheerf11l as a lark.
:: ' :
"
Clear as crystal.
,, :
Cold as ice, as a fog, as charity, n~arble,. stone.
.

Cool as a ouc11mber.
C11nning as a fox.
'
=.
C1oss. as tb e tongs, as two s_tioks.
.
Dark as pitch [pitch-dark],/niidnight.
Dead as a door nail, a herring.
. .
. .
Deaf as a post.
..
Dry as a bone, dust, rn1lmmy, sticl\:. :
Drt1nk as a fiddler, lord.

Dumb as a statue, post.

Easy as AB 0
.
..
"
Fair aH a lady, rose.

False as hell.
"

Fast as a hare, wind. . :


Fat as a pig, as a porpoise.; .
.
Fierce as a tige1, furie:;;
.

Firn1 as a rocl;:.
.

-~:,
.
Flat as a flounder, as a pancalte; board.
Fleet as the wind, as a iace horse, dee1..
'
Free as air, bird.
:
Fresh as a daisy, rose..
.
Gay as a lark.
Gaudy as a hL1tterfly, peacoc~~:
Gentle as a la1nb.

Good as gold.
. '
. '
Graceful as a S\van.
.
' '

Grasping as a 1nise1.
.
G1ave as a. juclge.
. . '.

Greedy as a dog, \vo]f;


-, .. . .. . :
Green as grass.

. ,
Gruft' as a bea1.
. .
..
Happy as a king.
. . . .
Hard as iron~ as a flint.

. ..
.
Ha.1mless as a dove.

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

' "

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

393

Similes
'

..

------~-

Heavy a~ lead.
Helpless as a babe.
.
Hoarse as a hog, as a raven.-.
Hollow as a drum.
.
.
Hot as fire, as an oven, as a ooal, pepper.
Hungry as a hunter, horse.
. Innocent a dove.

Large as life.
Light as a fAather, as day, air, thistle down.
Like as two beans, two drops of water, two peas.
Limp as a glove.
Loud as a thunde1.
.
Loo~e as a rope of sand.
rJ
Mad as a hatter, a march hare.
Merry as a pig, as a cricket.
Mild as lYioses, as milk.
'
Mute as a fish or mice.
Neat as \Vax, as a new pin.
Nimble as a squirrel.
.
Obstinate as a pig [pig-headed], mtl.le.
Old as the hills, as Methuselah.
Pale as a ghost, death.
Patier1t as Job; an ox.
Plain as a spike staff,
Playful as a kit~en, sqtl.irrel.
Plentiful as black berries,
Pl l.1mp us a partridge.
.
. _
Poor as a rat, as a church mot1se, as Job, Lazr1.ru~
Proud as Lt1cifer, peacock.
Quick as lightni11g, thougl1t.
Qt1iet as a lamb, n1ouse.
Rapicl as lightning.
.
.
"Red os blood, as a fox, a. rose a. brick, a ol1err,.
Regttlu.r as olocit work.
.
Rioh as Croesus. a jew.

Ripe as a cherry.
.
Ro11gl1 as a nttt-meg grater. -.. :

'

'

'

R:)tl.nd as an orange, a ball.


Rt1de as a.bear. _

Safe as the bank [of England] or the

stocks~

$94

Similes

'

--

,
-

---------- -- ---- -

--- ---

------ --

'

.
-

- - - --- ---- - - ---- - -- - - - - -

---

Savage as a bear, as !.\ tiger, as a bear \", ith a


sore-head.
. '
'
Sjlent as the grave, the stars.. . . Silly as a goose, a sheep. -
.
Slencler as thread, gos:-amer.

SI ippery. as. an eel. .


. ,
t>iok as a cat, a dog, a .horse, a toad.
Sharp as a needle, la11ce, razor. .
Sleep like a top.
Slow as a snail, as a tortoise..
Sly as a fox, as old boots.
Smooth as l1utter, oil, glass, velvet.
.
Soft as silk, as velvet, as soap.
Soltnd as a conch, as ra, bell.
Sour as vinegar, a~ verjuice.
.
Stare like a struck pig.
Steady as old time, a rock. . :
Stiff as a poker.
.
Still as death, the grave; a post, a statue.
Straight as an arrow.

.
Strong as iron,. as a horse, as brandy;
Stupid as a donkey.
.' Sure as a gun, as fate, as death, and taxes.
'
Surly as a bear.
S\veet as sugar, honey.
Swift as lightning, as.the wind, a~ an arro\v,
'l'all as a poplar, 111ay pole.
. ,
T~me a~ a chicken, a ba.re.

Thiok as hops, as a cable, hailstones.


Thin as a la.th, as a \Vhipping-post, \vafer.
Tight as a drum.

Tough as leather.
.
True as a Gospel, steel.
Ugly as a toad,- scarecrow.
U natable as wa1er.

Vain as a peaoook.
Warm as a toast, ..vool.
Weak as water, a baby.
Wet as a fish.
.- .
.
White as driven snow, as mil~ as . swan, as a sheet.
as chalk. . -_ . .

:
;.
1

'

'

'

--9V ,)

Similos in Rh Y1no

----------...,.--------------

Wise as a serpent, as ::>olo1no11. .


Yollo\V as a guine<~, as go!d., .a~ saffron.
Yielding as wax. . .

--~

'

Sll\llLES JN l'tH):'l\lE
'

. All tl1e sin1iles ll$G<l in the J~;nglish langll<\ge


~ut 111 ihyme a!i under :
.
as \Vet a::; a fish as dry as a bone ;
as live as a bird as dead as stone ;
a8 plurnp as a !)art ridge a::. poor as a. rat ;

as strong as a horse as \Veak as a oat ; .


as hard as a flint as soft as a mole ;
as \Vhite as a lily- as blaolc.as a coal ;
as. plain as a pike-stuff as rougl1 as a bea.r ;
as tight as a dru1n-as free as tlie air;
a.::; steady as time
uncertain as weather ;
as heavy o.s lead as light as a feather ;
as 11ot a8 an oven as cold as a fog.

as gay as a lark as siok as u. dog ;
as slO\V as tho tortoise as 8\Vift as the '\Vin d ;
as trl1e as the Gospel as false as mankind;
as tl1in as herring as fat as a pig.
a.s proud as a .peacock as blithe as grig;
as savage as tigers as mild as a dove;
as stiff as poker as lirnp as a. glove ;
as bl ind as a bat- as deaf as a. post ;
a.~ cool as ct.1cumber aswar111 as a toast ;
u.s flat as a flolt.nder as round as u. ball;
as blu11t as a hamn1er as sha1p as an awl ;

u.s ied as a f orret as safe as the stooks ;


u.s bold as a tl1ief as sl1y as a fox;
at> st1i1ight as an arro\v as orook'd a~ a UO\\. : .
us yello\v as saffroz1 as black as sloe ;
us brittle as glass as tougt1 a~ a g1istlo ;
tis neat as n1;s.'" nail as oleu.n a::i whistle ;
as. good as a feast--as h1d u.~ a \Vitol1 ; ,
us light <l.s is da)' as dark as is pitcl1 ;
as \Vido u.s a rivor~a:; deep as well ;
as still as u. .:nouso as lol!d as~~ bell ;

'

'

'

-- .

396

Prove1bs
'

. ...

..
~

as sure as a gun as true as the clock ;


. .
as fair as promise as firm as rook;
as brisk as a bee as .dull asa:hasa;
.
as full as a tiok as solid as b1ass ;
as Jean as grey hound as rioh as a Je\V;
and ter.i thousand sia:iil'es equally ne\v.
Choiee Anecdotes and Good Suyings, 117 a1d Lock& Co.
PROVER:&S
:
.
..
r\lpl1abet of Proverbs
.'.
.
A grai of prudenoe. is- worth a pound of craft.
Boasters . are. cousins
to liars.
.
Confe~sion of
. a fault makes half amends ..
Denying a; fault doubles it.
Envy ~hooteth at others and woundeth he1sel