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Health Unit Plan

Disease
Grade 6
North Middle School
Westfield, MA

Kelly Haines
Springfield College
Springfield, MA
April 2015-May 2015

Unit Outcomes

Unit Objective:

SWBAT identify differences between communicable and non-communicable


disease, reduce risk factors, identify common signs symptoms and treatments, compare
pathogens, and show concern toward an ill person(s) in the community.

Unit Outcomes

Reference
MA

Assessments

CF
Standards
by number

1. SWBAT Identify ways individuals can


reduce risk factors related to
communicable and chronic diseases.

8.5

Day 1:
1. Disease Classification Relay
2. Simon Snerdley Worksheet

1. Essential Questions:

3. Bizarre Brutus Worksheet

-What is the difference between


communicable and non-communicable
disease?

Day 5
1. Disease Test

-How do you reduce the risk of disease


(both communicable and noncommunicable)?
-How do you care for someone who is ill
without putting yourself at risk?

2. SWBAT Describe the importance of


early detection in the preventing the
progression of the disease.

8.6

Day 2:
1.Disease Information Sheet

2. Essential Questions:

2. Essential Question Exit Slip

-Why is it important to detect a disease


early?

Day 5:
1. Disease Test

-How do you detect and prevent the


progression of a disease?
3. SWBAT Explain the need to follow
prescribed health care procedures given
by parents and health care providers.

8.7

Day 3:
1. Name that Pathogen

3. Essential Questions:

2. Give Me Five

-What are the major differences between


pathogens? How do antibiotics treat
illness?

Day 5:

4. SWBAT Describe how to demonstrate


safe care and concern toward ill and
disabled persons in the family, school
and community.

1. Disease Test
8.8

Day 4:
1. Showing Concern through
Role Play

4. Essential Questions:

Day 5:

-How do you care for someone who is ill


without putting yourself at risk?

1. Disease Test

6th

Grade Disease Block Plan


Day 1-5
Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Focus: Communicable vs.


Non- communicable
Diseases, Reducing Risk
Factors

Focus: Signs and


Symptoms of Disease;
Treatments

Focus: Pathogens;
Antibiotics

Outcomes: SWBAT
Identify ways individuals
can reduce risk factors
related to communicable
and chronic diseases.

Outcomes: SWBAT
Describe the importance
of early detection in the
preventing the
progression of the
disease.

Essential Question:

Essential Question:

-What is the difference


between communicable
and non-communicable
disease?

-Why is it important to
detect a disease early?

-How do you reduce the


risk of disease (both
communicable and noncommunicable)?

-How do you detect and


prevent the progression of
a disease?
Supplies/Materials/Tec
hnology:

Outcomes: SWBAT
Explain the need to follow
prescribed health care
procedures given by
parents and health care
providers.
Essential Question:
-What are the major
differences between
pathogens? How do
antibiotics treat illness?
Supplies/Materials/Tec
hnology:
1. Pathogen Notes
2. Pathogen Signs

Supplies/Materials/Tec
hnology:

1. Disease Professional
Assignment Sheet

3. Disease Power point

1. Communicable/Noncommunicable diseases

2. Disease Articles (3) for


each Disease

4. Antibiotics Fact vs.


Myths

2. Disease Relay
Envelopes

3. Posters (6)

Learning activities
including

3. Simon Snerdley
Reading Passage/WS

5. Disease Information
Sheet

4. Markers

5. Bizarre Brutus Reading


Passage/WS

6. Essential Question Exit


Slip

Learning activities
including

Learning activities
including

pedagogical
strategies:

pedagogical
strategies :

1. Note TakingCommunicable vs Non


communicable and risk
factors

1. Jig Saw- Each group


will record signs,
symptoms and treatments
of their assigned disease.

pedagogical
strategies:
1. Think Pair ShareWhere do diseases come
from?
1. Note TakingStudents will take notes
on Pathogens and
antibiotics
2. Name that
Pathogen- Students will
work in groups and be
given a sign for each type

2. Disease Relay
-Students will be given an
envelope with 10 different
diseases inside of it
students will have to
classify the disease as
communicable or noncommunicable. Students
will work in groups to
determine which disease
is communicable or noncommunicable the goal of
this activity is to be the
first team with all of the
diseases in the correct
places.
3. Simon Snerdley
Reading and
Worksheet: The
worksheet includes a
reading passage followed
by a worksheet that
relates to communicable
disease and risk factors
involved with
communicable disease.
4. Bizarre Brutus
Reading and
Worksheet- Bizarre
Brutus reading and
worksheet highlights risk
factors associated with
non-communicable
diseases.
Assessment(s):
1. Communicable vs. NonCommunicable Team
Relay
2. Simon Snerdley
Worksheet
3. Bizarre Brutus
Worksheet

They will be given


materials to read on each
disease to help them to
gather information. The
groups will then present
their disease to the class.
2. Presentations- Each
group will present their
disease that they became
a professional on
students will take notes
for each disease that is
presented.
3. Essential Question
Exit Slip- Students will
answer the essential
questions on an exit slip.
Assessment(s):
1. Disease Information
Sheet
2. Essential Question Exit
Slip

of pathogen. Students will


hold up the sign for the
pathogen that they think
applies to that disease or
illness shown on the
power pointstudents will
be asked to justify the
answer. Students will
record correct answers on
their paper.
3. Antibiotics Fact vs
Myth- A statement will be
displayed on PowerPoint
and students will walk to
the side of the room that
they think applies to that
statement- TRUE or
FALSE. Each statement
will be discussed and the
accurate answer will be
presented.
4. Give Me FiveStudents will trace their
hand and give me five
facts that they learned
about antibiotics from the
fact vs. myth activity.
Assessment(s):
1. Name that Pathogen
2 Give Me Five

Day 4

Day 5

Focus: Caring for People


Who are Ill

Focus: Disease Test

Outcomes: SWBAT
Describe how to
demonstrate safe care and
concern toward ill and
disabled persons in the
family, school and
community.
Essential Question:
-How do you care for
someone who is ill without
putting yourself at risk?
Supplies/Materials/Techn
ology:
1. Illness Scenarios
2. Illness Scenario Solution
Worksheet
3. Jeopardy Game

Learning activities
including
pedagogical strategies:
1. Scenario Solutions Students will be given a

Outcomes: MACF
Standards 8.5, 8.6, 8.8
Supplies/Materials/Tec
hnology:
1. Disease Test
Learning activities
including
pedagogical
strategies:
1. Disease Teststudents will be given
class time to complete
the disease test.
Assessment(s):
1. Disease Test

disease scenario- as a
group they will have to
decide if the disease is
communicable or noncommunicable and decide
what they would do to
reduce risk factors for
themselves and others as
well as care for the ill
individual. Groups will be
given time to complete
their scenario solution
sheet and present their
scenario and solution to the
class.
2. Jeopardy Review for
Test
With remaining time
teacher will use jeopardy
game to review for test.
Assessment(s):
1. Illness Scenario Solution
Sheets

Health Grading Policy


Homework- 20%
Students are responsible for completing daily homework assignments. All homework
assignments that are given will be assessments or reinforcements of class content.
Homework will include a variety of different assignments some of which include involving
family members or individual work. To earn full credit for homework assignments
students are expected to return on the due date. Points will be deducted for late
assignments.

Tests- 25%

Tests will be given throughout the trimester to assess knowledge of content. Tests are a
traditional form of assessment that will be given for certain units. Students will be
notified at ahead of time before a test and will be expected to student to ensure their
success.

Projects- 25%
Projects will include both in class and out of class assignments. In most cases, students
will be given class time to complete projects. Students that do not complete projects in
class will be expected to finish projects outside of class. While completing projects
students are encouraged to show creativity while representing health content accurately
and appropriately.

Classroom Assignments/Participation- 30%


Classroom assignments will revolve around classroom activities. Students are expected
to complete all classroom assignments. Students are expected to be active listeners
during health class. Participation is encouraged, however students have the right to pass
if they do not feel comfortable sharing an opinion about a certain health topic.

Day 1: Disease Notes


Disease- an illness
Types of Disease:
1. Non-communicable- not caused by a pathogen
Results from:

o Hereditary Factors
o Diet
o Other Risk Factors
Smoking

Alcohol
Physical Inactivity
Stress

2. Communicable- caused by pathogen, passed from one


person to another
Reduce Risk Factors by:

o Good hygiene
o Washing food
o Dont share drinks
o Cough etiquette
o Getting enough sleep

Pathogen: a disease causing organism

Disease Relay
Students will have the following diseases in an envelope with a
short description of each disease. Using the information that they
just learned about they will have to create two different
classifications for these diseases and organize them so that they
fit into each category. Students will complete this activity in a relay
race format. They will work as a group to complete this activity.
The goal of this activity is to have the diseases in the correct
groups and to identify the differences between communicable and
non-communicable diseases.

Heart Disease
Plaque buildup thickens and stiffens artery walls, which can inhibit blood flow through your arteries to your
organs and tissues. Atherosclerosis is also the most common cause of cardiovascular disease. It can be
caused by correctable problems, such as an unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, being overweight and smoking.

Influenza (the Flu)


Flu: Causes. Three main types of influenza viruses cause the flu: Type A, Type B, and Type C. All three virus
types are spread in the same way: they leave an infected person's body in droplets whenever that person
coughs, sneezes, or puts their mouth on another object.

Cancer
Causes of cancer: include genetic factors; lifestyle factors such as tobacco use, diet, and physical activity;
and environmental exposures to different types of chemicals and radiation.

Chickenpox
The varicella-zoster virus causes chickenpox. Most cases occur through contact with an infected person.
The virus may be contagious several days before blisters appear, and it remains contagious until all blisters
have crusted over. It is spread through saliva, coughing, sneezing, and contact with blisters

Diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, the body no longer makes insulin because the body's own immune system has attacked
and destroyed the cells where insulin is made. The cause of this isn't entirely clear but it may include genetic
risk factors and environmental factors.

Strep Throat
The cause of strep throat is bacteria known as Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A
streptococcus. Streptococcal bacteria are highly contagious. They can spread through airborne droplets
when someone with the infection coughs or sneezes, or through shared food or drinks.

Asthma
Since asthma has a genetic origin and is a disease you are born with, passed down from generation to generation, the
question isnt really what causes asthma, but rather what causes asthma symptoms to appear? People with asthma
have inflamed airways which are super-sensitive to things which do not bother other people. These things are called
"triggers."

HIV/AIDS
HIV infection is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus. You can get HIV from contact with infected
blood or bodily fluids. Another common way of getting it is by sharing drug needles with someone who is
infected with HIV.

Alzheimers
Scientists believe that for most people, Alzheimer's disease results from a combination of genetic, lifestyle
and environmental factors that affect the brain over time.

Rabies
Rabies infection is caused by the rabies virus. The virus is spread through the saliva of infected animals.
Infected animals can spread the virus by biting another animal or a person. In rare cases, rabies can be
spread when infected saliva gets into an open wound or the mucous membranes, such as the mouth or eyes.

Disease Professional in Class Assignment


Directions: Work with your group members to become a
professional on your assigned disease. You will be given 3
resources to look at that will help you to become a professional.
Everyone in your group is expected to participate in researching
your disease. You can present your disease in any way that you
would like as long as you have some type of visual to go along
with you disease. Information that is required for your disease
includes:
1. Name of the Disease (1 point)

2. Communicable or non-communicable? (1 point)


3. How do you reduce your chances of getting the disease? (2
points)
4. Signs and Symptoms of Disease (2 points)
5. Treatments (2 points)
6. What happens if the disease is not treated? (2 points)

Diseases that will be covered:


1. Influenza
2. Lyme Disease
3. Athletes Foot
4. Alzheimers Disease
5. Lung Cancer
6. Coronary Artery Disease

Name: ____________________________
________

Period:

Disease Notes
Name:
Signs and Symptoms:

Communicable or Noncommunicable

Treatments:

Reducing Risk Factors:

Name:
Signs and Symptoms:

Communicable or Noncommunicable:

Treatments:

Reducing Risk Factors:

Name:
Signs and Symptoms:

Communicable or Noncommunicable

Treatments:

Reducing Risk Factors:

Name:
Signs and Symptoms:

Communicable or Noncommunicable

Treatments:

Reducing Risk Factors:

Name:
Signs and Symptoms:

Communicable or Noncommunicable

Treatments:

Reducing Risk Factors:

Name:
Signs and Symptoms:

Communicable or Noncommunicable

Treatments:

Reducing Risk Factors:

Name: _____________________________

Period: __________

Exit Slip
Directions: Based upon the presentations that you have seen today, please answer the
following questions.
1. Why is it important to detect a disease early?

2. How do you detect and prevent the progression of a disease?

Name: _____________________________

Period: __________

Exit Slip
Directions: Based upon the presentations that you have seen today, please answer the
following questions.
1. Why is it important to detect a disease early?

2. How do you detect and prevent the progression of a disease?

Pathogen Notes
Pathogen: a disease causing agent
Types of Pathogens:
1. Bacteria- can be treated with
antibiotics
Examples include: strep throat, lyme disease,
whooping cough
2. Virus- smallest pathogen that cannot be cured
Examples include: Chickenpox, Flu, Common Cold
3. Fungi- ring warm, athletes foot, and warts
How are pathogens spread?
Indirect Contact
Direct Contact
- Non-living things:
- Touching
o Kleenex
- Coughing
- Sneezing
o Desk surface
- Animal
o Cell Phone
- Food
o Ground
- Water
o Door handle
- Insects
Body Defenses: ways our bodies try to eliminate pathogens
Examples: (Will use body map to show and explain body defenses)

Pain
Cilia
Sweat
Saliva
White Blood Cells
Skin
Bleeding
Stomach Acid
Urine

Name that Pathogen!

Disease Classification Activity


Directions: For the following scenarios hold up the pathogen that you

think applies. Make sure your group agrees on before you choose
your final answers.
1. Sara got the flu shot this year but still came down with the flu. The
pathogen that causes the flu has the ability to alter itself. It is constantly
changing which is why the flu shot is not guaranteed to stop this pathogen.
The worst part about having the flu is that Saras doctor said that she has to
let the flu run its course. There is not medication that he can give her to
treat her illness.
A: Virus

2. Jose woke up with a cough, runny nose, inflamed eyes, sore throat, fever
and a red, blotchy skin rash. He never had the measles vaccine when he
was a baby. Joses doctor told him to take fever reducers such as Tylenol,
Motrin or Advil but cannot prescribe him anything to treat the Measles.
A: Virus

3. Michael just came back from West Africa where he was volunteering at a
childrens hospital. Many of the children at the hospital had Ebola. Two
weeks after he arrived back in the states he had a fever, headache, muscle
pain, diarrhea, and was vomiting often. His doctor diagnosed him to have
the disease. They hospitalized Michael but could not treat his disease.
Michael survived the disease but it took him a month and a half to
completely recover from the disease.
A: Virus
4. Gary has been hiking the Appalachian Trail for the past 2.5 weeks. It has
been raining for a week and a half straight, and Gary has become sick of
hiking in his soggy boots. When he took his boots off to dry his feet he
noticed that his toenails had turned yellow and were cracking. His toenails
dont hurt but he has never had this problem before.
A: Fungal

5. Dalton is a gymnast and spends 4 hours a day at the gym. He noticed


that he has a red ring of small blisters on his arm. The ring started to
become very itchy so he went to the doctor. The doctor told Dalton that he
had Tinea and gave him cream to apply to make the rash go away.
A: Fungal
6. Katrinas throat has been bothering her for a week now. She has a fever
of 101 degrees, has trouble swallowing and has white spots on towards the
back of her throat. She went to see her doctor and was told that she has
Strep Throat. She was given antibiotics to treat this infection.
A: Bacterial
7. Samantha made hamburgers for dinner that were very raw. A few hours
later she started vomiting and had diarrhea. Samantha thinks that she has
food poisoning from the hamburgers that she had for dinner.
A: Bacterial
8. Alex was playing soccer in his backyard and stepped on a rusty nail. The
nail poked through his skin. His mom checked his medical records and
realized that his tetanus shot was not up to date. She brought Alex to the
Doctor, where the Doctor gave Alex and his Mom a choice of an injection
that would prevent him from getting the disease or a pill that he could take
orally.
A: Bacterial

Pathogen Cards

VIRUS

BACTER
IA

FUNGU
S

Antibiotics Facts and Myths


Directions: The following statements will be displayed on
PowerPoint. Students will walk to the right side of the room
if they think it is a fact, students will walk to left side of the
room if they think it is a myth.
1. Antibiotics treat bacterial, viral and fungal infections.
FALSE
Antibiotics, which have been around for 70 years, have no
effect on viruses like those that cause a cold and or the flu
-- and taking them for viruses may do more harm than
good. Doing so can make the bacteria change, which

makes antibiotics less likely to work. Thats called


resistance. Antibiotics treat bacterial, viral and fungal
infections.
2. You always need antibiotics for ear infections, sinus
infections and strep throat. FALSE
Strep throat is caused by bacteria. You can be sure you
have it only after a lab test.
A sinus infection, also called sinusitis, is almost always
caused by a virus or by irritation from the air. The infection
gets better on its own without antibiotics. Although its
rare, some sinus infections are caused by bacteria. If your
symptoms last for more than 10 days after you see a
doctor, schedule a follow-up.
Ear infections can also be caused by a virus or bacteria.
They may get better without antibiotics. Doctors consider
several things when deciding whether to use them,
including the person's age and how sick the person is. They
may decide to wait a couple of days to see if symptoms go
away.
3. Antibacterial cleansers may make germs stronger. TRUE
Some studies suggest triclosan, which is in many
antibacterial soaps and cleansers, may lead to changes in
bacteria that make antibiotics less effective in fighting
them. The FDA wants companies that make these soaps to
show more proof that they work. The agency says there is
no evidence that these soaps are better at preventing
illness than plain soap and water.

4. Its okay to stop taking prescribed antibiotics once you


start to feel better. FALSE
Take antibiotics exactly as prescribed, do not skip doses,
and finish them all. If you stop too soon, some bacteria
may survive and make you sick again
5. Animals can play a role in antibiotics not working in
humans. TRUE
Livestock that get antibiotics can develop resistant
bacteria in their bodies, which are then in the meat we eat.
When you dont cook or handle the meat right, the bacteria
can spread to humans. Fertilizer and water used on crops
we eat can also spread bacteria. The FDA says it is phasing
out the use of antibiotics, except those prescribed by a
veterinarian, in animals raised for food.
6. Its okay to take antibiotics prescribed to someone else.
FALSE
Someone elses antibiotic may not be the right one for your
illness. Taking the wrong medicine may make it take longer
for you to get better -- and could even make you get
worse.
7. Its good to save left over antibiotics for the next time
that you are sick. FALSE
Some patients try to save on drug costs by stockpiling
medication they did not take during an illness - thinking
they can simply take it next time they get sick. But
medications -especially liquids - can lose their potency
over time. What's more, the leftover medication might not

work against your latest illness and could actually make it


worse. Of course, if antibiotics are taken appropriately,
there shouldn't be any leftover medication.
8. Antibiotics are always effective. FALSE
If symptoms persist after you've completed a course of
antibiotics, alert your doctor. There's a chance the germs
that made you sick were caused by germs that are
resistant to the antibiotic you took. You might need an
alternative

Name: ________________________

Period: ________

Give Me Five

Directions: Trace your hand below and give me five facts (one
on each finger) that you learned about antibiotics from the fact vs.
myth activity.

Role Play Scenarios

Directions: Each group will be given one of the following


scenarios, in their group they will discuss the best solution to the
scenario to reduce the chances of illness and help the person who
is ill. Then the group will act out the scenario in the front of the
class to display their solution. After each role play the class will
discuss the groups choice and why or why not it was a healthy
choice.
***During group discussion we will address and talk about the
Good Samaritan Law, what it means and why it is important.
1. At pick-up basketball one afternoon one of your best friend
Chuck is elbowed in the nose by a teammate. Before you know it
there is blood everywhere including on your shirt. Chucks nose is
gushing blood. He does not have any tissues and all of the other
basketball players run away from Chuck in fear that they will get
blood on themselves. What do you do??
2. While walking around the neighborhood on a Saturday
afternoon with your friends Sarah, Ellie and Kayla, you see an
elderly man lying on the side of the road. You look at the man and
it looks as though he is unconscious. You and your friends walk
over to the man and he is not breathing. Kayla is certified in CPR
from a babysitting course that she took over the summer and has
a CPR face mask on her key chain. What do you do?? **Discus
Good Samaritan Law
3. You are on a school bus for field trip. Pedro, one of your closest
friends who is sitting next to you explains that he does not feel
well. He starts to get very pale and all of a sudden holds his hand
up to his mouth. Pedro vomits in the aisle of the bus and the vomit
streams down the aisle. Everyone on the bus starts to scream and
Pedro is extremely embarrassed. You feel so sorry for Pedro. What
do you do??

4. You and a friend Michelle are babysitting for a neighbor. Your


neighbor has 3 kids which is why you have Michelle with you, as a
helper. Jack who is 3 years old and the middle child. He
accidentally bumped into the coffee table which has a glass vase
on it. The glass vase falls to the ground and shatters. You run over
to Jack to take him away from the glass and you see that his foot is
bleeding all over the living room floor. He is screaming and crying.
What do you do?
5. Your Mom has been sick all week. She is constantly coughing
and has not been able to sleep at night. You keep asking her if she
is okay and she always explains that it is just a cold. Your mom
does everything in the house. She makes breakfast, lunch and
dinner and is constantly in the kitchen. She also does the laundry,
and spends time driving you and your two sisters around town.
What do you do to take care of your mom and reduce you and
your sisters chances of getting this cold?

Jeopardy Review Game Questions


Points

Communicable
NonCommunicable

Pathogens

Disease
Professional
s

Caring for
Someone
Who is Ill

Miscellaneo
us

100

This type of disease


not caused by a
pathogen.

A disease
causing
organism.

Alzheimers is
which type of
disease

What type of
pathogen can
an antibiotic
cure?

200

This type of disease


is caused by a
pathogen and can
be passed from one
person to another.
Please give an
example of this type
of disease.

How can
bacterial
infection be
fought?

How do you
reduce your
chances of
contracting
Athletes Foot?

300

HIV/AIDS is an
example of which
type of disease.

Give two
examples of a
fungal
infection.

Identify 3 ways
you can reduce
your chances
of contracting
Influenza?

400

To reduce risk
factors of this type
of disease you can:
use proper coughing
etiquette, never
share drinks, and
wash your hands
often.

Define virus,
give an
example of a
disease that is
caused by a
virus and
identify how it
can be cured.

What
happens in
the body
when an
individual has
HIV? What
does the

Give an
example of
one way
that you can
reduce the
risk of
indirect
contact with
a pathogen?
Give two
examples of
a way that
you can
reduce your
chances of
direct
contact with
a pathogen?
What is
most
important to
keep in
mind when
caring for
others?
Why is it
important to
take
appropriate
precautions
when
someone is
bleeding?

True or False: It
is okay to stop
taking your
antibiotics
once you start
to feel better.

Name two
ways that you
could contract
the HIV virus.

True or False:
Antibacterial
cleansers
may make
germs
stronger.
Explain why?

disease turn
into?
500

Define heredity.
Which type of
disease does it
influence? Please
give an example.

Identify two
ways you can
come in
contact with a
pathogen and
give two
examples for
each of these
ways.

Identify each of
the disease
during the
diseases
presentations
and identify if
they are
communicable
of noncommunicable.

Name: _____________________________

What is the
Good
Samaritan
Law?

Why can
Animals play
a role in
antibiotics
not working?

Period: ________

Disease Test
Directions: Identify each disease as communicable (C) or noncommunicable (N).
1._______ Heart Disease
2. ______ Lung Cancer
3. _______ Alzhiemers
4. _______ Strep Throat
5. ________ Athletes Foot
6. ________ HIV/AIDS
7. ________ Influenza
8. ________ Asthma

Fill in the Blanks

Direct Contact
Virus

Disease

Communicable
Pathogen

Non-communicable

HIV

Fungi
Indirect Contact

Skin

9. AIDS is caused by _______________________.


10. A _____________________ is a illness.
11. ______________________ is a disease causing organism.
12. The largest organ and one of our bodies defenses is call the
______________________.
13. The smallest pathogen is a ________________________.
14. _________________________ causes Athletes foot.
15. Pathogens can be spread through ________________________
(touching, coughing, sneezing, animals, insects, water etc.).
16. _________________________ diseases are caused by pathogens
and can be passed from one person to another.
17. Pathogens are spread by ___________________________. Examples
include tissues, doorknobs, desk surfaces, combs, etc.
18 . A persons heredity, diet or other risk factors (smoking,
substance abuse) cause a ______________________________ disease.

Multiple Choice

_________19. The following are all examples of ways that you can
contract the HIV/AIDS virus.
a. Blood to blood contact with HIV infected blood.
b. Using the same needle as someone who is infected with HIV
c. Exchange of bodily fluids during sexual contact with someone
who has HIV
d. All of the above
_________20. What type of pathogen can antibiotics fight off:
a. Virus
b. Fungus
c. Bacteria
d. All pathogens

_________21. Heredity can impact whether or not you contract this


type of disease.
a. Communicable
b. Non-communicable
c. Viral
d. Bacterial
_________22. Which of the following is NOT an example of a body
defense.
a. Sweating
b. A vaccine
c. White Blood Cells
d. Stomach Acid
_________23. Lung cancer is contracted by exposure to:

a. Bacteria
b. Smoking
c. Secondhand Smoke
d. Both b and c
_________24. Symptoms of Influenza include the all of the following
EXCEPT:
a. Fever
b. Memory loss
c. Muscle aches or body aches
d. Sore Throat
_________25. When caring for someone who is ill (with a
communicable disease) it is most important to:
a. Make sure the person who is ill is comfortable.
b. Provide the individual with lots of fluids.
c. Tell the person that they will be okay.
d. Look out for yourself by reducing risk factors of getting sick.

Short Answer
Name 4 body defenses and explain how these body defenses can
fight off disease.

Name 3 ways you can reduce risk factors of contracting and


communicable disease.

Name 3 ways you can reduce risk factors of contracting a noncommunicable disease.

Why is it important to detect a disease early?

Bonus: What is the Good Samaritan Law?

Results of Assessment

Overall, my assessments proved to be valid and reliable and


measured student learning appropriately. My assessments included
both formal and informal as well as traditional and non-traditional.
Some of the assessments used throughout the Disease unit included a
Communicable vs. Non-communicable activity, Simon Snerdley
worksheet, Disease projects, Disease Note taking sheets, Disease
Project exit Slips, Name that Pathogen activity, Give Me Five and finally
a unit test. The large variety of assessments was both beneficial to me
as well as my students. Having a variety of assessment throughout a
unit is extremely important because it allows students to show their
strengths and content knowledge in different ways.
The two assessments that I chose to display in my unit plan as a
sample of student work are the Disease Project Exit Slip and the Give
Me Five True Statements. Both of these assessments were used to
wrap up a lesson. After looking through all student work all students
were able to identify what I wanted them to on the assessment. Some
students identified more than others, however each student did report
the bare minimum that I wanted them to.
Assessment is derived from objectives. It is important to make
sure that the assessment matches the content objectives. My
assessments did match my content objectives, which enabled me to
see if students accomplished the objectives for each lesson as well as
the unit outcomes.
In conclusion, the assessment throughout this unit accurately
measured students learning based upon the student performance
outcomes. All forms of assessment seemed to valid and reliable based
upon students responses and results. Furthermore, the variety of

assessments included throughout the unit gave students ample


opportunities to display their knowledge of content through different
mediums.

SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE HEALTH LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


Name: Kelly Haines

Date: April 13, 2015

School: North Middle School

Grade: 6

Class/Time: 49 Minutes

Class size: 17

Lesson Number: 1

Unit/Theme: Disease Unit


Lesson Focus: Communicable vs. NonCommunicable Disease/Reducing Risk Factors
Objectives (must be measurable, use action verbs and include elements of success)
Cite appropriate standards from MA Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
SWBAT Identify ways individuals can reduce risk factors related to communicable
and chronic diseases. (MACF 8.5)
Essential Question:
-What is the difference between communicable and non-communicable disease?
-How do you reduce the risk of disease (both communicable and noncommunicable)?
Materials/Supplies/Lesson Preparation
1. Communicable vs. Non-Communicable Notes
2. Reducing Risk Factors Notes
3. Disease Relay
4. Simon Snerdly Reading/WS
References/Resources (include books, articles, websites, etc.)
"The NCD Alliance Putting Non-communicable Diseases on the Global Agenda."
Cancer. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Apr. 2015. <http://www.ncdalliance.org/node/40>.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, 17 Nov. 2011. Web. 04 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/infectious/>.

Transition: Students will enter the room and sit at their desk. Students will be
welcomed to class and the first student to enter the class will be asked to hand out
the name plates. (2 min)
Introduction: (3 min)

State objectives
o Identify ways to reduce risk factor related to communicable and noncommunicable diseases
o Essential Question: What is the difference between communicable and
non-communicable diseases? How do you reduce the risk of disease?

State agenda
o Attendance
o Disease Notes
o Disease Relay
o Simon Snerdly Reading/Worksheet
1 Attendance (2 min)
Housekeeping Reminders: -Collect HW
-Late work can be turned into F period basket
Transition: Students will take out notebooks and/or loose leaf paper.
2. Disease Notes (15 min)
Day 1: Disease Notes
Disease- an illness
Types of Disease:
1. Non-communicable- not caused by a pathogen

Results from:
o Hereditary Factors
o Diet
o Other Risk Factors
Smoking
Alcohol
Physical Inactivity
Stress

2. Communicable- caused by pathogen, passed from one person to another

Reduce Risk Factors by:


o Good hygiene
o Washing food

o
o
o

Dont share drinks


Cough etiquette
Getting enough sleep

Pathogen: a disease causing organism


Extensions: Students will be asked in question form to check for previous
knowledge on diseases.
Accommodations: Have a copy of the notes for students with IEPs.
Transition: Each group of students will be given and Expo marker for their group
students will label one desk with a C for Communicable and one desk with an N for
non-communicable. Disease relay envelopes will be placed on the center table.
3. Disease Relay (15 min) (Cooperative Activity)
Students will be asked to sort the disease cards. Each card has a brief description,
based upon that description students will be asked to decide whether the disease Is
communicable or non-communicable.
The Following Diseases will Be Discussed:
Heart Disease
Plaque buildup thickens and stiffens artery walls, which can inhibit blood flow
through your arteries to your organs and tissues. Atherosclerosis is also the most
common cause of cardiovascular disease. It can be caused by correctable
problems, such as an unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, being overweight and
smoking.
Influenza (the Flu)
Flu: Causes. Three main types of influenza viruses cause the flu: Type A, Type B,
and Type C. All three virus types are spread in the same way: they leave an infected
person's body in droplets whenever that person coughs, sneezes, or puts their
mouth on another object.
Cancer
Causes of cancer: include genetic factors; lifestyle factors such as tobacco use,
diet, and physical activity; and environmental exposures to different types of
chemicals and radiation.
Chickenpox
The varicella-zoster virus causes chickenpox. Most cases occur through contact
with an infected person. The virus may be contagious several days before blisters

appear, and it remains contagious until all blisters have crusted over. It is spread
through saliva, coughing, sneezing, and contact with blisters
Diabetes
In type 1 diabetes, the body no longer makes insulin because the body's own
immune system has attacked and destroyed the cells where insulin is made. The
cause of this isn't entirely clear but it may include genetic risk factors and
environmental factors.
Strep Throat
The cause of strep throat is bacteria known as Streptococcus pyogenes, also
known as group A streptococcus. Streptococcal bacteria are highly contagious.
They can spread through airborne droplets when someone with the infection coughs
or sneezes, or through shared food or drinks.
Asthma
Since asthma has a genetic origin and is a disease you are born with, passed down
from generation to generation, the question isnt really what causes asthma, but
rather what causes asthma symptoms to appear? People with asthma have
inflamed airways which are super-sensitive to things which do not bother other
people. These things are called "triggers."
HIV/AIDS
HIV infection is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus. You can get HIV
from contact with infected blood or bodily fluids. Another common way of getting it
is by sharing drug needles with someone who is infected with HIV.
Alzheimers
Scientists believe that for most people, Alzheimer's disease results from a
combination of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that affect the brain
over time.
Rabies
Rabies infection is caused by the rabies virus. The virus is spread through the
saliva of infected animals. Infected animals can spread the virus by biting another
animal or a person. In rare cases, rabies can be spread when infected saliva gets
into an open wound or the mucous membranes, such as the mouth or eyes.
-

After students have been given adequate time to identify the disease
students will:
o Read the description aloud to the class

o
o

Identify what helped them to decide what type of disease the disease
is
Identify ways to reduce risk factors of that particular disease

Accommodations: Student will be placed in cooperative groups where they will


work together and use each other as resources.
Transition: Students will be asked to put all supplies back into their envelops and
one person from each group will be asked to bring the envelope to the front of the
room.
4. Simon Snerdly Worksheet
Students will be given a Simon Snerdly reading and worksheet to complete as the
final assessment.
Students will work independently on the assignment.
Extensions: Students will write the Simon Snerdly story in a way that would
reduces others risk factors for contracting that disease.
Accommodations: Students will be given highlighted copies of the Simon Snerdly
Reading to identify key information for students who have trouble processing the
story.
Homework: If students do not finish Simon Snerdly Assessment in class they will
work on it for homework.
List Assessment(s) 1. Disease Relay
2. Simon Snerdly Worksheet
Notes/Reflection (to be completed right after you finish teaching a particular lesson)
What did you accomplish? How much did the students learn? What would you
leave the same and what might you change in the future to improve this lesson?
The Simon Snerdly Reading/Worksheet was completed for homework. Students did
not have time to complete during class. The Disease Relay Race was very engaging
for students they enjoyed working with their groups to complete the relay. It is
important to address the importance of being a contributing group member or team
member before completing the activity so that students understand that their
participation is valued.

SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE HEALTH LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


Name: Kelly Haines

Date: April 14, 2015

School: North Middle School

Grade: 6

Class/Time: 49 Minutes
Unit/Theme: Disease Unit

Class size: 17

Lesson Number: 2
Lesson Focus: Signs and Symptoms

Objectives (must be measurable, use action verbs and include elements of success)
Cite appropriate standards from MA Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
Outcomes:
SWBAT Describe the importance of early detection with in the preventing the
progression of the disease with 100% accuracy after disease professional
presentations on an Exit Slip Assessment. (MACF 8.6)
Essential Question:
-Why is it important to detect a disease early?
-How do you detect and prevent the progression of a disease?
Materials/Supplies/Lesson Preparation
1. Disease Professional Assignment Sheet
2. Disease Articles (3) for each Disease
3. Posters (6)

4. Markers
5. Disease Information Sheet
6. Essential Question Exit Slip
References/Resources (include books, articles, websites, etc.)
"The NCD Alliance Putting Non-communicable Diseases on the Global Agenda."
Cancer. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Apr. 2015. <http://www.ncdalliance.org/node/40>.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, 17 Nov. 2011. Web. 04 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/infectious/>.
Transition: Students will enter the room and sit at their desk. Students will be
welcomed to class and the first student to enter the class will be asked to hand out
the name plates. (2 min)
Introduction: (3 min)

State objectives
o Describe the importance of early detection and prevention of disease.
o Essential Questions: -Why is it important to detect a disease early?
How do you detect and prevent the progression of a disease?
State agenda
o Attendance Questions (Based upon notes and previous activities)
o Jig Saw Activity
o Presentations
o Essential Question Exit Slip
2 Attendance (2 min)
Housekeeping Reminders: -Collect HW
-Late work can be turned into F period basket
Attendance Questions:
Define a communicable disease in your own words.
What is an example of a communicable disease?
Define non-communicable disease in your own words.
What is an example of a non-communicable disease?
How does heredity influence your future health in terms of disease?
Is the flu communicable or non-communicable?

What is a pathogen?
Is cancer communicable or non-communicable?
Is Rabies communicable or non-communicable?
What is proper coughing etiquette?
How does having good hygiene relate to staying healthy in terms of disease?
If you exercise it can reduce your risk of contracting which type of disease?
If you eat healthy is can reduce your risk of contracting which type of disease?
If you do not share drinks with others it can reduce your risk of contracting which
type of disease?
If you wash your fruits and vegetables it can reduce your risk of contracting which
type of disease?
In your opinion what is the number one way of reducing your own risk of contracting
an non-communicable disease?
In your opinion what is the number one way of reducing your own risk of contracting
a non-communicable disease?
2. Jig Saw (20 min) (Cooperative Group Activity)
Students will be informed with the following information:
Disease Professional in Class Assignment
Directions: Work with your group members to become a professional on your
assigned disease. You will be given 3 resources to look at that will help you to
become a professional. Everyone in your group is expected to participate in
researching your disease. You can present your disease in any way that you would
like as long as you have some type of visual to go along with you disease.
Information that is required for your disease includes:
1. Name of the Disease (1 point)
2. Communicable or non-communicable? (1 point)
3. How do you reduce your chances of getting the disease? (2 points)
4. Signs and Symptoms of Disease (2 points)
5. Treatments (2 points)
6. What happens if the disease is not treated? (2 points)

Diseases that will be covered:


1. Influenza
2. Athletes Foot
3. Alzheimers Disease
4. Lung Cancer
5. Coronary Artery Disease
Extensions: On your group poster draw a picture that represents your disease in
some way.
Accommodations: Students will be given highlighters to identify key information;
they also will be encouraged to use other resources such as textbooks or
dictionaries to identify unknown information.
3. Presentations (15 min)
Each group will be asked to give a 3-5 minute presentation displaying the
information they learned from becoming a professional on their disease.
-As presentations are given each student will be asked to complete a graphic
organizer on the presentations of the experts.
Accommodations: A copy of a graphic organizer will be provided to students who
may have missed something.
4. Exit Slip (3 min)
Upon the students finishing their presentations. Students will be asked to complete
an exit slip answering the essential question.
Transition: Students will hand the teacher their exit slip on their way out.
List Assessment(s) 1. Disease Information Sheet
2. Essential Question Exit Slip
Notes/Reflection (to be completed right after you finish teaching a particular lesson)
What did you accomplish? How much did the students learn? What would you
leave the same and what might you change in the future to improve this lesson?
This lesson worked very well because students were very engaged and invested in
the information that they presented to the class. One thing that I could have done
to make this project more effective was to have students find their own resources.
Printing out resources for the students limited them as far as the amount of

information that could be added to these presentations. It is amazing what students


can do when you give them the power to create their own master piece.

SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE HEALTH LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


Name: Kelly Haines

Date: April 14, 2015

School: North Middle School

Grade: 6

Class/Time: 49 Minutes
Unit/Theme: Disease Unit

Class size: 17

Lesson Number: 2
Lesson Focus: Signs and Symptoms

Objectives (must be measurable, use action verbs and include elements of success)
Cite appropriate standards from MA Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
Outcomes: SWBAT Describe the importance of early detection in the preventing
the progression of the disease. (MACF 8.6)
Essential Question:
-Why is it important to detect a disease early?
-How do you detect and prevent the progression of a disease?
Materials/Supplies/Lesson Preparation
1. Disease Professional Assignment Sheet
2. Disease Articles (3) for each Disease
3. Posters (6)

4. Markers
5. Disease Information Sheet
6. Essential Question Exit Slip
References/Resources (include books, articles, websites, etc.)
"The NCD Alliance Putting Non-communicable Diseases on the Global Agenda."
Cancer. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Apr. 2015. <http://www.ncdalliance.org/node/40>.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, 17 Nov. 2011. Web. 04 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/infectious/>.
Transition: Students will enter the room and sit at their desk. Students will be
welcomed to class and the first student to enter the class will be asked to hand out
the name plates. (2 min)
Introduction: (3 min)

State objectives
o Describe the importance of early detection and prevention of disease.
o Essential Questions: -Why is it important to detect a disease early?
How do you detect and prevent the progression of a disease?
State agenda
o Attendance Questions (Based upon notes and previous activities)
o Jig Saw Activity
o Presentations
o Essential Question Exit Slip
3 Attendance (2 min)
Housekeeping Reminders: -Collect HW
-Late work can be turned into F period basket
Attendance Questions:
Define a communicable disease in your own words.
What is an example of a communicable disease?
Define non-communicable disease in your own words.
What is an example of a non-communicable disease?
How does heredity influence your future health in terms of disease?
Is the flu communicable or non-communicable?

What is a pathogen?
Is cancer communicable or non-communicable?
Is Rabies communicable or non-communicable?
What is proper coughing etiquette?
How does having good hygiene relate to staying healthy in terms of disease?
If you exercise it can reduce your risk of contracting which type of disease?
If you eat healthy is can reduce your risk of contracting which type of disease?
If you do not share drinks with others it can reduce your risk of contracting which
type of disease?
If you wash your fruits and vegetables it can reduce your risk of contracting which
type of disease?
In your opinion what is the number one way of reducing your own risk of contracting
an non-communicable disease?
In your opinion what is the number one way of reducing your own risk of contracting
a non-communicable disease?
2. Jig Saw (20 min) (Cooperative Group Activity)
Students will be informed with the following information:
Disease Professional in Class Assignment
Directions: Work with your group members to become a professional on your
assigned disease. You will be given 3 resources to look at that will help you to
become a professional. Everyone in your group is expected to participate in
researching your disease. You can present your disease in any way that you would
like as long as you have some type of visual to go along with you disease.
Information that is required for your disease includes:
1. Name of the Disease (1 point)
2. Communicable or non-communicable? (1 point)
3. How do you reduce your chances of getting the disease? (2 points)
4. Signs and Symptoms of Disease (2 points)
5. Treatments (2 points)
6. What happens if the disease is not treated? (2 points)

Diseases that will be covered:


1. Influenza
2. Athletes Foot
3. Alzheimers Disease
4. Lung Cancer
5. Coronary Artery Disease
Extensions: On your group poster draw a picture that represents your disease in
some way.
Accommodations: Students will be given highlighters to identify key information;
they also will be encouraged to use other resources such as textbooks or
dictionaries to identify unknown information.
3. Presentations (15 min)
Each group will be asked to give a 3-5 minute presentation displaying the
information they learned from becoming a professional on their disease.
-As presentations are given each student will be asked to complete a graphic
organizer on the presentations of the experts.
Accommodations: A copy of a graphic organizer will be provided to students who
may have missed something.
4. Exit Slip (3 min)
Upon the students finishing their presentations. Students will be asked to complete
an exit slip answering the essential question.
Transition: Students will hand the teacher their exit slip on their way out.
List Assessment(s) 1. Disease Information Sheet
2. Essential Question Exit Slip
Notes/Reflection (to be completed right after you finish teaching a particular lesson)
What did you accomplish? How much did the students learn? What would you
leave the same and what might you change in the future to improve this lesson?
I was very surprised with the quality of the Disease Jigsaw Projects. What I realized
from this was that when you give students high expectations they will perform up to
those high expectations. The students were very thorough with their disease
presentations. What I did not realize when creating this lesson was that these
presentations took a lot longer than planned to complete. Students needed an extra

day when creating their Disease Projects. It also took another whole class period to
present these projects. In the future I think it would be more beneficial to be a little
bit stricter with the time that I give students to complete the project.

SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE HEALTH LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


Name: Kelly Haines

Date: April 28, 2015

School: North Middle School

Grade: 6

Class/Time: 49 Minutes
Unit/Theme: Disease Unit
Defenses/Antibiotics

Class size: 17

Lesson Number: 3
Lesson Focus: Pathogens/Body

Objectives (must be measurable, use action verbs and include elements of success)
Cite appropriate standards from MA Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
Focus: Pathogens; Antibiotics
Outcomes:
SWBAT Explain the need to follow prescribed health care procedures given by
parents and health care providers by giving 5 facts about Antibiotics on a Give Me
Five Assessment (MACF 8.7)
Essential Question:

-What are the major differences between pathogens? How do our bodies help us to
defend from pathogens? How do antibiotics treat illness?
Supplies/Materials/Technology:
1. Pathogen Notes
2. Pathogen Signs
3. Disease Power point
4. Body Map Materials Papers
5. Markers
References/Resources (include books, articles, websites, etc.)
"The NCD Alliance Putting Non-communicable Diseases on the Global Agenda."
Cancer. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Apr. 2015. <http://www.ncdalliance.org/node/40>.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, 17 Nov. 2011. Web. 04 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/infectious/>.
Learning activities including pedagogical strategies:
Transition: Students will entire the roomand find their seat.
Introductions

State Objectives: Understand the need to follow appropriate health care


procedures
o Know how and why we get diseases
o Know what the body does defend off pathogens
o Understand how antibiotics work and affect the
body
State Agenda
1. Think Pair Share- Essential Questions
2. Note Taking
3. Name that Pathogen
3. Body Map Defense Drawing/Notes
5. Anti-Biotic Myths Verses Facts

1. Think Pair Share


What are the major differences between pathogens?
How do our bodies help us to defend from pathogens?

How do antibiotics treat illness?


1. Note Taking- Students will take notes on Pathogens and antibiotics

Pathogen Notes
Pathogen: a disease causing agent
Types of Pathogens:
1. Bacteria- cause disease by
releasing a toxin-- can be treated
with antibiotics (there are good bacteria-that do not
cause infection)
Examples include: strep throat, lyme disease, whooping
cough
2. Virus- take over a cell and produce more viruses take
over other cells, smallest pathogen that cannot be cured
Examples include: Chickenpox, Flu, Common Cold
3. Fungi- obtain food from organic matter
including plants, animals and or human tissue
Examples: Ring warm, athletes foot, and warts
How are pathogens spread?
Indirect Contact
Direct Contact
- Non-living things:
- Touching
o Kleenex
- Coughing
- Sneezing
o Desk surface
- Animal
o Cell Phone
- Food
o Ground
- Water
o Door handle
- Insects
Transition: The teacher will pass out signs to represent each pathogen for each
group.

2. Name that Pathogen- Students will work in groups and be given a sign for
each type of pathogen. Students will hold up the sign for the pathogen that they
think applies to that disease or illness shown on the power pointstudents will be
asked to justify the answer. Students will record correct answers on their paper.

Name that Pathogen!


Disease Classification Activity
Directions: For the following scenarios hold up the pathogen

that you think applies. Make sure your group agrees on


before you choose your final answers.
1. Sara got the flu shot this year but still came down with the flu.
The pathogen that causes the flu has the ability to alter itself. It is
constantly changing which is why the flu shot is not guaranteed to
stop this pathogen. The worst part about having the flu is that
Saras doctor said that she has to let the flu run its course. There
is not medication that he can give her to treat her illness.
A: Virus

2. Jose woke up with a cough, runny nose, inflamed eyes, sore


throat, fever and a red, blotchy skin rash. He never had the
measles vaccine when he was a baby. Joses doctor told him to
take fever reducers such as Tylenol, Motrin or Advil but cannot
prescribe him anything to treat the Measles.
A: Virus

3. Michael just came back from West Africa where he was


volunteering at a childrens hospital. Many of the children at the
hospital had Ebola. Two weeks after he arrived back in the states
he had a fever, headache, muscle pain, diarrhea, and was
vomiting often. His doctor diagnosed him to have the disease.
They hospitalized Michael but could not treat his disease. Michael

survived the disease but it took him a month and a half to


completely recover from the disease.
A: Virus
4. Gary has been hiking the Appalachian Trail for the past 2.5
weeks. It has been raining for a week and a half straight, and
Gary has become sick of hiking in his soggy boots. When he took
his boots off to dry his feet he noticed that his toenails had turned
yellow and were cracking. His toenails dont hurt but he has never
had this problem before.
A: Fungal

5. Dalton is a gymnast and spends 4 hours a day at the gym. He


noticed that he has a red ring of small blisters on his arm. The
ring started to become very itchy so he went to the doctor. The
doctor told Dalton that he had Tinea and gave him cream to apply
to make the rash go away.
A: Fungal
6. Katrinas throat has been bothering her for a week now. She
has a fever of 101 degrees, has trouble swallowing and has white
spots on towards the back of her throat. She went to see her
doctor and was told that she has Strep Throat. She was given
antibiotics to treat this infection.
A: Bacterial
7. Samantha made hamburgers for dinner that were very raw. A
few hours later she started vomiting and had diarrhea. Samantha
thinks that she has food poisoning from the hamburgers that she
had for dinner.
A: Bacterial

8. Alex was playing soccer in his backyard and stepped on a rusty


nail. The nail poked through his skin. His mom checked his
medical records and realized that his tetanus shot was not up to
date. She brought Alex to the Doctor, where the Doctor gave Alex
and his Mom a choice of an injection that would prevent him from
getting the disease or a pill that he could take orally.
A: Bacterial
3. Antibiotics Fact vs Myth- A statement will be displayed on PowerPoint and
students will walk to the side of the room that they think applies to that statementTRUE or FALSE. Each statement will be discussed and the accurate answer will be
presented.

1. Antibiotics treat bacterial, viral and fungal infections.


Antibiotics, which have been around for 70 years, have no effect on viruses
like those that cause a cold and or the flu -- and taking them for viruses may
do more harm than good. Doing so can make the bacteria change, which
makes antibiotics less likely to work. Thats called resistance. Antibiotics
treat bacterial, viral and fungal infections.
2. You always need antibiotics for ear infections, sinus infections and steep
throat. FALSE
Strep throat is caused by bacteria. You can be sure you have it only after a
lab test.
A sinus infection, also called sinusitis, is almost always caused by a virus or
by irritation from the air. The infection gets better on its own without
antibiotics. Although its rare, some sinus infections are caused by bacteria.
If your symptoms last for more than 10 days after you see a doctor, schedule
a follow-up.
Ear infections can also be caused by a virus or bacteria. They may get better
without antibiotics. Doctors consider several things when deciding whether
to use them, including the person's age and how sick the person is. They
may decide to wait a couple of days to see if symptoms go away.
3. Antibacterial cleansers may make germs stronger. TRUE
Some studies suggest triclosan, which is in many antibacterial soaps and
cleansers, may lead to changes in bacteria that make antibiotics less

effective in fighting them. The FDA wants companies that make these soaps
to show more proof that they work. The agency says there is no evidence
that these soaps are better at preventing illness than plain soap and water.
4. Its okay to stop taking prescribed antibiotics once you start to feel better.
FALSE
Take antibiotics exactly as prescribed, do not skip doses, and finish them all.
If you stop too soon, some bacteria may survive and make you sick again
5. Animals can play a role in antibiotics not working in humans. TRUE
Livestock that get antibiotics can develop resistant bacteria in their bodies,
which are then in the meat we eat. When you dont cook or handle the meat
right, the bacteria can spread to humans. Fertilizer and water used on crops
we eat can also spread bacteria. The FDA says it is phasing out the use of
antibiotics, except those prescribed by a veterinarian, in animals raised for
food.
6. Its okay to take antibiotics prescribed to someone else. FALSE
Someone elses antibiotic may not be the right one for your illness. Taking
the wrong medicine may make it take longer for you to get better -- and
could even make you get worse.
7. Its good to save left over antibiotics for the next time that you are sick.
FALSE
Some patients try to save on drug costs by stockpiling medication they did
not take during an illness - thinking they can simply take it next time they
get sick. But medications -especially liquids - can lose their potency over
time. What's more, the leftover medication might not work against your
latest illness and could actually make it worse. Of course, if antibiotics are
taken appropriately, there shouldn't be any leftover medication.
8. Antibiotics are always effective. FALSE
If symptoms persist after you've completed a course of antibiotics, alert your
doctor. There's a chance the germs that made you sick were caused by
germs that are resistant to the antibiotic you took. You might need an
alternative

4. Body Defense Map Drawing/Notes

Body Defenses: ways our bodies try to eliminate pathogens


Immunity: a resistance to a disease
2 Types of Immunity:
Passive Immunity: you are vaccinated against a disease
Vaccine: dead or weakened pathogens are
orally/injected into the body antibodies will be produced by body.
Active Immunity: acquired by having had the disease
-Students will brainstorm in their group how does your body fight
off disease write down answers on a sheet of paper.
-On the board there will be a picture of a blank body- students will
draw answers that they get on the body.
Examples: (Will use body map to show and explain body
defenses)

Pain
Cilia
Sweat
Saliva
White Blood Cells
Skin
Bleeding
Stomach Acid
Urine

4. Give Me Five- Students will trace their hand and give me five facts that they
learned about antibiotics from the fact vs. myth activity.
List Assessment(s) 1. Name that Pathogen
2. Give Me Five

Notes/Reflection (to be completed right after you finish teaching a particular lesson)
What did you accomplish? How much did the students learn? What would you
leave the same and what might you change in the future to improve this lesson?
The first half of this lesson plan which was focused on Pathogens took a whole class
to complete. I would say that first half of this lesson was one of the best lessons
that I have ever taught. The students were engaged throughout the entire time and
the informal assessment was very effective in terms of checking for students
understanding of the content. In terms of modifications made to the lesson plan the
only thing that I would change would be to shorten the lesson and not try to include
so much information for the next time that I teach it.

SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE HEALTH LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


Name: Kelly Haines

Date: April 30, 2015

School: North Middle School

Grade: 6

Class/Time: 49 Minutes
Unit/Theme: Disease Unit
Someone with an Illness

Class size: 17

Lesson Number: 4
Lesson Focus: Antibiotics/Caring for

Objectives (must be measurable, use action verbs and include elements of success)
Cite appropriate standards from MA Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
SWBAT Explain the need to follow prescribed health care procedures given by
parents and health care providers by identifying antibiotic truths and why it is
important to know these true statements on the Give Me Five Assessment. (MACF
8.7)
SWBAT Describe how to demonstrate safe care and concern toward ill and disabled
persons in the family, school and community by identifying appropriate with
supporting evidence for that care during certain scenarios . (MACF 8.8)
Essential Question:
Why is it important to understand the facts about antibiotics?
How do we care for people who are ill while reducing our own risk of contracting
that disease?
Supplies/Materials/Technology:

Pathogen Review Questions


Antibiotics True or False Power point
Antibiotic Fact Sheet
Give Me Five Assessment
Disease Scenarios
Disease Worksheet
True or False Signs

References/Resources (include books, articles, websites, etc.)


"The NCD Alliance Putting Non-communicable Diseases on the Global Agenda."
Cancer. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Apr. 2015. <http://www.ncdalliance.org/node/40>.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, 17 Nov. 2011. Web. 04 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/infectious/>.
Learning activities including pedagogical strategies:
Transition: Students will enter the room and find their seat.
Introductions

Housekeeping: (1 min)
o Test Postponed
o Letters to Self-due Friday
State Objectives: Understand the need to follow appropriate health care
procedures
o Explain the need to follow appropriate health care procedure given by
parents and doctors
Give Me Five Assessment
o Describe how to care for others in the community who have a disease
and reduce your own risk factors at the same time.
Scenario Worksheet
State Agenda
1. Pathogen Review
2. Pre-assessment
3. Antibiotic True or False
o Give Me Five Assessment
4. Disease Scenarios
o Group Worksheet Assessment

1. Review Questions/Attendance: (5 min)


1. What is the smallest pathogen? (Virus)
2. What type of pathogen releases a toxin? (Bacteria)
3. This type of pathogen obtains food from organic matter? (Fungus)
4. Strep throat is caused by this which of pathogen? (Bacteria)
5. The common cold is caused by which type of pathogen? (Virus)
6. Athletes foot is caused by which type of pathogen? (Fungus)
7. Touching a desk surface with pathogens on it is an example of which type of
contact? (Indirect)
8. When someone coughs on you it is a form of direct or indirect contact? (Direct)

9. Coming in contact with an animal that carries a pathogen is a form of direct or


indirect contact? (Direct)
10. Taking a gulp of pathogen filled water is an example of direct or indirect
contact? (Direct)
11. You have this type of immunity if you are vaccinated against a certain disease?
(Passive Immunity)
12. When you have certain diseases you acquire this type of immunity? (Active
Immunity)
13. This body defense alerts the body. (Pain)
14. This acts as a barrier between pathogens and the inside of the body. (Skin)
15. This destroys bacteria in food and/or waste when inside your stomach.
(Stomach Acid)
16. These types of cells can find and kill pathogens. (White Blood Cells)
17. This breaks down bacteria inside your mouth. (Bacteria)
18. This helps to maintain body temperature . (Sweat)
19. This flushes out pathogens from the bladder . (Urine)
20. These wash away pathogens from the eyes. (Tears)
Extensions/Accommodations: Students can choose to pass when they get an
attendance questions.
Transition: Students will be instructed to flip over their paper on their desk.
2. Pre-assessment Think-Share- Write- (5 min)
Students will discuss with their group:

Why is it important to understand the facts about antibiotics?

Students will then write down their answer on their paper (under-before True or
False)
Once students have written down their answer they will flip their paper over to
signal that they are down.
Extensions: Write answer down in their own words, and come back to answer
down on Give Me Five Assessment and come back to assessment once they have
completed the Antibiotic Myth vs. Fact to see if they would change or add anything.

Accommodations: Direct students to the visual that is posted on the board


students can feel free to consult group members.
Transition: The teacher will explain Antibiotic Myth vs. Fact. Myth and Fact signs
will be identified on either side of the room.
3. Antibiotics TRUE or FALSE (20 min)
A statement will be displayed on PowerPoint and students will walk to the side of the
room that they think applies to that statement- TRUE or FALSE . Each statement will
be discussed and the accurate answer will be presented.

Extensions: Students can be asked to correct the statement to make it true.


Accommodations: Students will be given a copy of myths and facts- that
identifies facts and which statements are myths.
-Students will complete the Give Me Five Assessment and revisit their preassessment
4. Disease Scenario- What Would You Do? (10 min)
The teacher will handout a copy of disease scenarios to students. Each group will
be assigned a certain scenario. Their job is to read that scenario as a group come up
with a solution. When creating the solution students will need to identify support for
why they chose that solution on their Disease Scenario Solution Worksheet.
Extensions: If students finish coming up with a solution for their scenario they will
be encouraged to become familiar with other scenariosand think about what they
would do.
Accommodations: Students will be encouraged to work with group members who
will provide feedback and help students to work through the scenario.
Teacher will discuss the Good Samaritan Law during this activity.
-

Students will read their scenario allowed under each scenario- they will write
down the solution and why that group chose that solution.

Transition: Students will be instructed to hand in their group copy of their solution
to their scenario.
5. Closure: (5 min)
Essential Question Review:
-Why is important to understand the facts about antibiotics?

-How do we care for people who are ill while reducing our own risk of contracting
that disease?
List Assessment(s)

1. Give Me Five

2. Disease Scenario Solution Group Worksheet


Notes/Reflection (to be completed right after you finish teaching a particular lesson)
What did you accomplish? How much did the students learn? What would you
leave the same and what might you change in the future to improve this lesson?
This lesson did not go as well as planned. Based off of the Give Me Five assessment,
the students did learn a lot. The group disease scenarios had to be pushed to
another day. There was a little off task behavior during the antibiotic activity. Some
students were chatting during the activity. If I was to teach this lesson again, I would
move it along a little quicker. Students were not fully engaged which I believe is a
result of me moving too slow.

Works Cited
"The NCD Alliance Putting Non-communicable Diseases on the Global Agenda."
Cancer. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Apr. 2015. <http://www.ncdalliance.org/node/40>.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, 17 Nov. 2011. Web. 04 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/infectious/>.
"Diseases and Conditions." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, 23 Apr. 2015. Web. 26 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.cdc.gov/diseasesconditions/>.

"Prevention." Prevention. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Apr. 2015.


<http://hes.ucfsd.org/gclaypo/commdise/prevent.html>.
Meeks, Linda Brower., and Philip Heit. Comprehensive School Health Education:
Totally Awesome Strategies for Teaching Health. Blacklick, OH: MeeksHeit Pub.,
1992. Print.