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LOADING FIRMWARE FROM OPERATING SYSTEM :

# /usr/bin/unzip [patch_id].zip
# ./sysfwdownload [image].pkg
# shutdown -i0 -g0 y

stop /SYS
set /SYS keyswitch_state=normal

On systems that run ilom you can switch to alom compatibility mode by running these
commands on the system controller:
cd /SP/users/SC_User_Name
set cli_mode=alom
Log in to alom using password changetin
# ./sysfwdownload u xxx.pkg
-u option automatically performs these tasks
Downloads the system firmware image.
Power downs the host
Updates the firmware
Resets the system controller
Powers the host again.
ldm V ( find the version of ldom manager)
Control & I/O Domain Setup

Initial Server State

In the servers initial state, a single control domain owns all of the system resources including CPU threads,
MAUs, memory, and PCI buses. The control domain is also referred to as the primary domain.
Verify the servers initial state using the ldm list command. Youll note that a single domain primary owns 128
virtual CPUs (threads) and 64 GB of memory
# ldm list
NAME STATE FLAGS CONS VCPU MEMORY UTIL UPTIME
primary active -n-c-- SP 128 65312M 0.2% 3d 15h 41m

Create a Virtual Disk Server


The vdisk infrastructure comprises two components with a common interface:
Virtual disk client (vdc) driver, which resides in the logical domain and provides standard block device access to applications executing in
that domain.
Virtual disk server (vds) driver, which resides in the service domain and applies vdisk requests to the corresponding raw disk, file, or disk
volume exported by it.

The virtual disk can be based upon several device types, including:
An entire physical disk, which could also be a storage partition presented by a
SAN device, sometimes referred to as a logical unit number (LUN)
Single slice of a disk or LUN
Disk image file on a file system (such as UFS or ZFS)
Disk volumes (ZFS, SVM, VxVM)
The virtual disk service primary-vds0 will support disk I/O in the guest domain; actual sources of data will be attached to it later.
# ldm add-vdiskserver primary-vds0 primary

Create a Virtual Switch

The virtual network infrastructure comprises two components:


Virtual network (vnet) device implements a virtual Ethernet device and communicates with other vnet devices in the system using the virtual
network switch.
Virtual network switch (vsw) is a layer-2 network switch that connects the virtual network devices to the external network and also switches
packets between them.
Use the ifconfig command to determine the name of the physical network device through which the primary domain communicates to the
network. In this example, the device is nxge0.
Now use the knowledge of that interface to create a virtual switch primary-vsw0 that is connected to the physical interface.
# ldm add-vswitch net-dev=nxge0 primary-vsw0 primary

Create a Virtual Console Device

A virtual console device allows the control and I/O domain to connect to the console port of the guest domain. When connecting to the guests
console, you will use the command telnet localhost port, where port is in the range of 5000-5100 that the virtual console device will assign.
# ldm add-vconscon port-range=5000-5100 primary-vcc0 primary

Commands to free CPU, MAU & memory resources

The freed resources are stored in free pool & it can be allocated to guest domains.
Note : Changes take place once the primary domain is rebooted.

LDOM SLICING
Service domain: Will provide virtual device services to other domains & will have to process any virtual I/O for domains it is
servicing. 2 cpu cores & 2GB Memory.
I/O Domain : minimum 1 cpu cores & min. 1Gb for running oracle solaris / min. 2GB if it is run as service domain also. If I/O domain
have several io devices then the no. of cores should be increased.4GB memory per I/O device.
Control Domain: minimum 1 cpu core & memory same as IO domain. It is basically the IO domain.
Cryptographic unit : one for each core assigned to Control domain.
Virtual cpus can be added or removed without stopping, restarting or interrupting the domain.Does not support dynamic
reconfiguration of memory.From oracle vm server 2.0 dynamic assignment of memory is allowed.

1.

Assigning core to control Domain


Primary# ldm set-core 2 primary[Remove core # ldm remove-core 1 primary]

2.

Assign cryptographic (MAU) resources to control domain


# ldm set-mau 2 primary
Assigning memory to control domain
Primary# ldm set-memory 2G primary
Checking whether the resources are assigned properly to the control Domain
Primary# ldm list-constraints primary
Check whether primary domain is configured with cpu whole cores & a cpu cap.
# ldm list o resmgmt primary

3.
4.
5.
6.

Listing the cpu cores assigned to the primary domain


# ldm list o core primary

7.

List all the server resources


# ldm list-devices a

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

14.
15.
16.
17.

List the resources bound to control domain.


# ldm list-bindings primary
Generate a long listing of primary domain
ldm list-domain l primary
List the virtual services configured in control domain
# ldm list-services
Add a virtual disk service named primary-vds0 to the primary domain
# ldm add-vdiskserver primary-vds0 primary
Add a virtual console service named primary-vcc0 with port range 5000-5100 to primary domain
# ldm add-vconscon port-range=5000-5100 primary-vcc0 primary
Add a virtual network switch primary-vsw0 to primary domain. Bind this virtual network switch to network
interface nxge0.
# ldm add-vswitch net-dev=nxge0 primary-vsw0 primary[virtual switch connects virtual network devices
to external network]
List the services
# ldm list-services primary
List the logical domain configuration stored on the system controller
# ldm list-spconfig [remove spconfig # ldm remove-spconfig config_name]
Save the new config. config_initial to the system controller
# ldm add-spconfig config_initial
# ldm list-spconfig
Generate the long listing of the primary domain to check whether configuration was done correctly
# ldm list-domain l primary

Configure Virtual Switch As Primary Network


18. Ifconfig a
19. Unplumb the current primary network nxge0
# ifconfig nxge0 unplumb
20. Plumb the virtual switch vsw0
# ifconfig vsw0 plumb
21. # ifconfig vsw0 192.168.0.200 netmask 255.255.255.0 broadcast + up
22. # mv /etc/hostname.nxge0 /etc/hostname.vsw0

Enable The Virtual Network Terminal Server


Vntsd provides access to the virtual console for each guest domain.If it is disabled telnet to virtual console
will not work.
23. Check the status of vntsd daemon
# svcs l vntsd
24. # svcadm enable vntsd

Export a ZFS Volume As a Virtual Disk


25. Create ZFS pool
# zfs create ldom_disk_pool c1t2d0s1 c1t3d0s6
26. Create a ZFS 40GB volume
# zfs create V 40gb ldom_disk_pool/vol1
# zfs list
27. Add /dev/zvol/dsk/ldom_disk_pool/vol1 device to control domain disk service.Name the virtual disk service
zvol.
# ldm add-vdiskserverdevice /dev/zvol/dsk/ldom_disk_pool/vol1 zvol1@primary-vds0

Create Guest Domains


28. List all the devices available in the server for creating the guest domains
# ldm list-devices a
29. Create guest domain ldom1
# ldm add-domain ldom1
30. Add 8 cores to ldom1
# ldm add-core 8 ldom1
31. Add 32Gb to ldom1
# ldm add-memory 32G ldom1
32. List the bindings of ldom1
# ldm list-bindings ldom1

33. Add a virtual network interface vnet0 to ldom1. Bind vnet0 to the virtual switch primary-vsw0 & assign
mac address to it.
# ldm add-vnet mac-addr=00:14:4F:FC:XX:01 vnet0 primary-vsw0 ldom1
34. Assign zvol1 disk to lom1.Name it zvdisk1
# ldm add-vdisk vdisk1 zvol1@primary-vds0 ldom1
primary# ldm set-var auto-boot\?=true ldg1
primary# ldm set-var boot-device=vdisk1 ldg1
primary# ldm bind-domain ldg1
primary# ldm list-domain ldg1
NAME
STATE FLAGS CONS VCPU MEMORY UTIL UPTIME
ldg1
bound ----- 5000 4 2G

$ ssh admin@controldom.domain
$ telnet localhost 5000
primary# ldm start-domain ldg1

The following example shows how to restore a single domain. First, you restore the ldg1 domain from the XML file. Then, you bind and restart
the ldg1 domain that you restored.
# ldm add-domain -i ldg1.xml
# ldm bind ldg1
# ldm start ldg1

Restore the Factory Default Configuration From the Service Processor


If you remove the Logical Domains Manager before restoring the factory default configuration, you can restore the factory default configuration
from the service processor.
1.

Restore the factory default configuration from the service processor.

-> set /HOST/bootmode config=factory-default


2. Powercycle the system to load the factory default configuration.
reset /SYS

How to Save Domain Configurations


This procedure shows how to save a domain configuration for a single domain or for all the domains on a system.

Save a domain configuration for one or more domains.


o To save the configuration for a single domain, create an XML file containing the
domain's constraints.
# ldm list-constraints -x ldom >ldom.xml
The following example shows how to create an XML file, ldg1.xml, which contains the ldg1 domain's constraints:

# ldm list-constraints -x ldg1 >ldg1.xml


To save the configurations for all the domains on a system, create an XML file
containing the constraints for all domains.
# ldm list-constraints -x >file.xml

The following example shows how to create an XML file, config.xml, which contains the constraints for all the
domains on a system:
# ldm list-constraints -x >config.xml

Restore a Domain Configuration From an XML File (ldm add-domain)


Instead of this procedure, you can use the ldm init-system command to restore domain configurations from an XML file. See Restore a
Domain Configuration From an XML File (ldm init-system).
1.

Create the domain by using the XML file that you created as input.

2.

# ldm add-domain -i ldom.xml


Bind the domain.

3.

# ldm bind-domain ldom


Start the domain.
# ldm start-domain ldom

Example 11-1 Restoring a Single Domain From an XML File


The following example shows how to restore a single domain. First, you restore the ldg1 domain from the XML file. Then, you bind and restart
the ldg1 domain that you restored.
# ldm add-domain -i ldg1.xml
# ldm bind ldg1
# ldm start ldg1
Restore a Domain Configuration From an XML File (ldm init-system)
This procedure explains how to use the ldm init-system command with an XML file to re-create a previously saved configuration. The
XML file describes one or more domain configurations. The XML file can be created by running the ldm ls-constraints -x command.
The ldm init-system command is expected to be run in the factory-default configuration, but it can restore any configuration from
an XML file. The primary domain is reconfigured as specified in the file, and any non-primary domains that have configurations in the XML
file are reconfigured but left inactive.
Instead of this procedure, you can use the ldm add-domain command to restore a single domain configuration from an XML file. See Restore
a Domain Configuration From an XML File (ldm add-domain).
1.
2.

Log in to the primary domain.


Verify that the system is in the factory-default configuration.

3.

primary# ldm list-config | grep "factory-default"


factory-default [current]
If the system is not in the factory-default configuration, see Restore the Factory Default Configuration.

4.

Become superuser or assume an equivalent role.


Roles contain authorizations and privileged commands. For more information about roles, see Configuring RBAC (Task Map) in
System Administration Guide: Security Services.

5.

Restore the domain configuration or configurations from the XML file.


# ldm init-system [-rs] -i filename.xml

The -r option reboots the primary domain after the configuration. If you do not specify the -r option, you must perform the reboot
manually. The -s option restores only the virtual services configuration (vds, vcc, and vsw) and might be able to be performed
without having to reboot.
Example 11-2 Restoring Domains From XML Configuration Files
The following examples show how to use the ldm init-system command to restore the primary domain and all the domains on a system
from the factory-default configuration.

Restore the primary domain. The -r option is used to reboot the primary domain after the configuration completes. The
primary.xml file contains the XML domain configuration that you saved at an earlier time.
primary# ldm init-system -r -i primary.xml

Restore all the domains on a system. Restore the domains on the system to the configurations in the config.xml XML file. The
config.xml file contains the XML domain configurations that you saved at an earlier time. The primary domain is restarted
automatically by the ldm init-system command. Any other domains are restored, but not bound and restarted.
# ldm init-system -r -i config.xml
After the system reboots, the following commands bind and restart the ldg1 and ldg2 domains:
#
#
#
#

ldm
ldm
ldm
ldm

bind ldg1
start ldg1
bind ldg2
start ldg2

Specify the device to be exported by the virtual disk server as a virtual disk to the guest domain.
You can export a physical disk, disk slice, volumes, or file as a block device. The following examples show a physical disk and a file.

Physical Disk Example.

The first example adds a physical disk with these specifics.

primary# ldm add-vdsdev /dev/dsk/c2t1d0s2 vol1@primary-vds0

Where:

/dev/dsk/c2t1d0s2 is the path name of the actual physical device. When adding a device, the path name must be
paired with the device name.

vol1 is a unique name you must specify for the device being added to the virtual disk server. The volume name must be
unique to this virtual disk server instance, because this name is exported by this virtual disk server to the clients for adding.
When adding a device, the volume name must be paired with the path name of the actual device.

primary-vds0 is the name of the virtual disk server to which to add this device.

File Example.

This second example is exporting a file as a block device.

primary# ldm add-vdsdev backend vol1@primary-vds0

Where:

backend is the path name of the actual file exported as a block device. When adding a device, the backend must be paired
with the device name.

vol1 is a unique name you must specify for the device being added to the virtual disk server. The volume name must be
unique to this virtual disk server instance, because this name is exported by this virtual disk server to the clients for adding.
When adding a device, the volume name must be paired with the path name of the actual device.

primary-vds0 is the name of the virtual disk server to which to add this device.

Add a virtual disk to the guest domain.


The following example adds a virtual disk to the guest domain ldg1 .

primary# ldm add-vdisk vdisk1 vol1@primary-vds0 ldg1


Where:

vdisk1 is the name of the virtual disk.

primary-vds0 is the name of the existing virtual disk server to which to connect.

vol1 is the name of the existing volume to which to connect.

Note
The virtual disks are generic block devices that are associated with different types of physical devices, volumes, or files. A virtual disk is not
synonymous with a SCSI disk and, therefore, excludes the target ID in the disk label. Virtual disks in a logical domain have the following format:
cNdNsN, where cN is the virtual controller, dN is the virtual disk number, and sN is the slice.

Set auto-boot and boot-device variables for the guest domain.


The first example command sets auto-boot\? to true for guest domain ldg1 .

primary# ldm set-var auto-boot\?=true ldg1


The second example command sets boot-device to vdisk for the guest domain ldg1 .

primary# ldm set-var boot-device=vdisk1 ldg1

Bind resources to the guest domain ldg1

and then list the domain to verify that it is bound.

primary# ldm bind-domain ldg1


primary# ldm list-domain ldg1
NAME
STATE
FLAGS CONS
ldg1
bound
----- 5000

VCPU MEMORY
4
2G

UTIL

UPTIME

To find the console port of the guest domain, you can look at the output of the preceding list-domain subcommand.
You can see under the heading Cons that logical domain guest 1 (ldg1) has its console output bound to port 5000.

Connect to the console of a guest domain from another terminal by logging into
the control domain and connecting directly to the console port on the local host.

$ ssh admin@controldom.domain
$ telnet localhost 5000
Start the guest domain ldg1.

primary# ldm start-domain ldg1

root@sun:~# ldm ls-io


NAME
---pci_0
pci_1
pci_2
pci_3
/SYS/MB/PCIE1
/SYS/MB/SASHBA0
/SYS/MB/NET0
/SYS/MB/PCIE5
/SYS/MB/PCIE6
/SYS/MB/PCIE7
/SYS/MB/PCIE2
/SYS/MB/PCIE3
/SYS/MB/PCIE4
/SYS/MB/PCIE8
/SYS/MB/SASHBA1
/SYS/MB/NET2
/SYS/MB/NET0/IOVNET.PF0
/SYS/MB/NET0/IOVNET.PF1
/SYS/MB/NET2/IOVNET.PF0
/SYS/MB/NET2/IOVNET.PF1

TYPE
---BUS
BUS
BUS
BUS
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PCIE
PF
PF
PF
PF

BUS
--pci_0
pci_1
pci_2
pci_3
pci_0
pci_0
pci_0
pci_1
pci_1
pci_1
pci_2
pci_2
pci_2
pci_3
pci_3
pci_3
pci_0
pci_0
pci_3
pci_3

DOMAIN
-----primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary
primary

STATUS
------

EMP
OCC
OCC
EMP
EMP
EMP
EMP
OCC
EMP
EMP
OCC
OCC

The output of this command will of course vary greatly, depending on the type of system you have. The above example is from a T5-2. As you
can see, there are several types of IO resources. Specifically, there are

BUS
This is a whole PCI bus, which means everything controlled by a single PCI control unit, also called a PCI root complex. It typically
contains several PCI slots and possibly some end point devices like SAS or network controllers.
PCIE
This is either a single PCIe slot. In that case, it's name corresponds to the slot number you will find imprinted on the system chassis.
It is controlled by a root complex listed in the "BUS" column. In the above example, you can see that some slots are empty, while
others are occupied. Or it is an endpoint device like a SAS HBA or network controller. An example would be "/SYS/MB/SASHBA0"
or "/SYS/MB/NET2". Both of these typically control more than one actual device, so for example, SASHBA0 would control 4
internal disks and NET2 would control 2 internal network ports.
PF
This is a SR-IOV Physical Function - usually an endpoint device like a network port which is capable of PCI virtualization. We will
cover SR-IOV in a later section of this blog.

All of these devices are available for assignment. Right now, they are all owned by the primary domain. We will now release some of them from
the primary domain and assign them to a different domain. Unfortunately, this is not a dynamic operation, so we will have to reboot the control
domain (more precisely, the affected domains) once to complete this.

root@sun:~# ldm start-reconf primary


root@sun:~# ldm rm-io pci_3 primary
root@sun:~# reboot
[ wait for the system to come back up ]
root@sun:~# ldm add-io pci_3 mars
root@sun:~# ldm bind mars
With the removal of pci_3, we also removed PCIE8, SYSBHA1 and NET1 from the primary domain and added all three to mars. Mars will now
have direct, exclusive access to all the disks controlled by SASHBA1, all the network ports on NET1 and whatever we chose to install in PCIe
slot 8. Since in this particular example, mars has access to internal disk and network, it can boot and communicate using these internal devices.
It does not depend on the primary domain for any of this. Once started, we could actually shut down the primary domain. (Note that the primary
is usually the home of vntsd, the console service. While we don't need this for running or rebooting mars, we do need it in case mars falls back to
OBP or single-user.)
Mars now owns its own PCIe root complex. Because of this, we call mars a root domain.
Add cdrom to ldom1
35. # cdrw l
# ldm add-vdiskserverdevice /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s2 cdrom@primary-vds0
# ldm add-vdisk cdrom1 cdrom@primary-vds0 oraldom
36. Set the autoboot variable of ldom1 to false
# ldm set-variable autoboot\?=false ldom1
37. Bind all the resources that you have configured to ldom1
# ldm bind-domain ldom1
38. # ldm list-domain
39. List the constraints of ldom1 in machine readable form
# ldm list-constraints p ldom1
40. Create a backup configuration file /ldom1.xml
# ldm list-constraints x ldom1 > /ldom1.xml
Note : This xml file can be used to restore the configuration of ldom1 using the below command
# ldm bind-domain i ldom1.xml
41. Start ldom1
# ldm start-domain ldom1
42. Generate a long lising of the domains in the system
# ldm list-domain l
43. # telnet localhost 5000
Export the CD or DVD diskdevice as a full disk.
primary#ldm add-vdsdev /dev/dsk/c1t0d0s2 cdrom@primary-vds0
Assign the exported CD orDVD to the guest domain.
The following shows how to assign the exported CD or DVD to domain
ldg1
:
primary#ldm add-vdisk cdrom cdrom@primary-vds0 ldg1
#
#
#
#

ldm
ldm
ldm
ldm

add-vdsdev /export/images/sol-10-u8-ga-sparc-dvd.iso dvd-iso@primary-vds0


add-vdisk s10-dvd dvd-iso@primary-vds0 oraldom
bind-domain oraldom
start-domain oraldom

# telnet localhost 5002


Ok devalias
cdrom
zvdisk1
vnet2
vnet1
vnet0
net
disk
virtual-console
name

/virtual-devices@100/channel-devices@200/disk@1
/virtual-devices@100/channel-devices@200/disk@0
/virtual-devices@100/channel-devices@200/network@2
/virtual-devices@100/channel-devices@200/network@1
/virtual-devices@100/channel-devices@200/network@0
/virtual-devices@100/channel-devices@200/network@0
/virtual-devices@100/channel-devices@200/disk@0
/virtual-devices/console@1
aliases

# ldm set-variable boot-device="disk cdrom:f" oraldom

Use proper shutdown procedures


Shutdown & unbind all non-I/O domains.
# ldm stop guest1
# ldm unbind guest1
# shutdown i5 g0 y

Removing Guest Domain


# ldm stop guest1
LDom guest1 stopped
# ldm unbind-domain guest1
# ldm destroy guest1

Removing logical domain software

If you wish to restore your server to its original state, not running any logical domains, you can execute the following sequence of commands.
# ldm rm-config my-initial
# ldm stop-domain -a
LDom guest1 stopped
# ldm unbind-domain guest1
# ldm destroy guest1
# ldm set-config factory-default
# svcadm disable ldmd
# svcadm disable vntsd
# pkgrm SUNWldm
# shutdown -i5 -g0 -y
If you have enabled networking between the control domain and guests, you may have to manually restore the previous hostname files (for
example /etc/hostname.nxge0) and remove the hostname files that plumbed virtual switches into the control domain (for example
/etc/hostname.vsw0).
MaximizingVirtualNetworkPerformance
You can achieve high transfer rates for guest and external networks and for guest-to-guest
communications when you configure your platform and the domains as described in this
section. The virtual network stack introduces support for large segment offload (LSO), which
produces high TCP performance without requiring the use of jumbo frames
Oracle Solaris OS requirements.
Ensure that the service domain and guest domain run the
following Oracle Solaris OS versions:
Service domain.
At least the Oracle Solaris 11.1.9.0.0 OS or the Oracle Solaris 10 OS with
the 150031-03 patch.

Guest domain.
At least the Oracle Solaris 11.1.9.0.0 OS or the Oracle Solaris 10 OS with
the 150031-03 patch.

CPU and memory requirements.


Ensure that you assign sufficient CPU and memory
resources to the service domain and the guest domains.

Service domain.
Because the service domain acts as a data proxy for the guest domains,
assign at least 2 CPU cores and at least 4 Gbytes of memory to the service domain.

Guest domain.
Configure each guest domain to be able to drive at least 10-Gbps
performance. Assign at least 2 CPU cores and at least 4 Gbytes of memory to each guest
domain.
ConfiguringYourDomainstoMaximizethe
PerformanceofYourVirtualNetwork

10

In previous versions of Oracle VM Server for SPARC and the Oracle Solaris OS, you could
improve your network performance by configuring jumbo frames. This configuration is no
longer required and unless required for another reason, using the standard MTU value of 1500
for your service and guest domains is best.
To achieve the improved networking performance, set the
extended-mapin-space property to on for the service domain and the guest domains, which is the default setting for the Oracle VM
Server for SPARC 3.1 software and supported system firmware.
primary#
ldm set-domain extended-mapin-space=on
domain-name
To check the extended-mapin-space property value, run the following command:
primary#
ldm ls l domain-name |grep extended-mapin
extended-mapin-space=on
Note
A change to the extended-mapin-space property value triggers a delayed reconfiguration on the primary domain. This situation
requires a primary domain reboot. You also must first stop the guest domains before you change this property value.
You can add a virtual switch to a domain, set options for a virtual switch, and remove a virtual
switch by using the ldm add-vsw, ldm set-vsw, and ldm rm-vsw commands, respectively. See the ldm (1M) man page
see page 193 of oracle VM Server for sparc admin doc

1. Login to control Domain and list the current configuration file.


-bash-3.2# ldm list-spconfig
factory-default
config_new [current]
-bash-3.2#
2.To take the complete LDOM configuration backup,use below command.
# ldm list-constraints -x >config.xml
3.You can also take the configuration backup for specific LDOM,
# ldm list-constraints -x ldom_name > ldom_name.xml
How to restore the system to factory default ?
1. Login to the control domain console and remove the spconfig profile.
bash-3.2# ldm ls-spconfig
factory-default
config_new [current]
bash-3.2# ldm remove-spconfig config_new
bash-3.2# ldm ls-spconfig
factory-default [next poweron]
bash-3.2#
2.Power cycle the server to take the changes effect.
bash-3.2# init 5
bash-3.2# svc.startd: The system is coming down. Please wait.
svc.startd: 101 system services are now being stopped.
Feb 18 10:00:49 sol10-11 syslogd: going down on signal 15
svc.startd: The system is down.
syncing file systems... done
Serial console stopped.
-> show /SYS

11

Properties:
type = Host System
ipmi_name = /SYS
keyswitch_state = Normal
product_name = T5140
product_part_number = 4613802-42
product_serial_number = FML1015013
product_manufacturer = SUN MICROSYSTEMS
fault_state = Faulted
power_state = Off
-> start /SYS
Are you sure you want to start /SYS (y/n)? y
Starting /SYS
->
-> start /SP/console
Are you sure you want to start /SP/console (y/n)? y
Serial console started.

To stop, type #.

Done
0:0:0>Master CPU Tests Basic....Done
0:0:0>Init MMU.....
0:0:0>L2 Tests....Done
0:0:0>Extended CPU Tests....Done
0:0:0>Scrub Memory....Done
0:0:0>Functional CPU Tests....Done
sol10-11 console login:
3. Login to the system and see whether factory default settings has been restored or not .
sol10-11 console login: root
Password:
Feb 18 10:10:58 sol10-11 login: ROOT LOGIN /dev/console
Last login: Tue Feb 18 01:19:27 on console
Oracle Corporation
SunOS 5.10
Generic Patch
January 2005
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-bash-3.2#
-bash-3.2# ldm list-spconfig
factory-default [current]
-bash-3.2#
Restoring the sp-config :
1.Once the system has restored to the factory default,then you can restore the system backup using the XML files which we have created. Login
to the control domain and restore it.
# ldm init-system -i config.xml
# ldm add-spconfig unixarencfg1
# ldm list-spconfig
factory-default
unixarenacfg1 (current)
2.To restore the specific ldom/primary domain configuration
# ldm init-system -i ldom_name.xml
# ldm add-spconfig unixarencfg2
# ldm list-spconfig
factory-default
unixarenacfg1
unixarenacfg2 (current)
3.To restore only the virtual service,
# ldm init-system -s -i filename.xml

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-bash-3.2# ldm list-spconfig


factory-default
unixarenacfg1
unixarenacfg2[active on Reboot]
-bash-3.2# ldm add-spconfig unixarencfg3
-bash-3.2# ldm list-spconfig
factory-default
unixarenacfg1
unixarenacfg2
unixarenacfg2 (current)
The old configuration copies can be removed using ldm remove-spconfig profile_name . If you make any small changes on LDOM
configuration, you must create a new profile to save it.Otherwise you may loose the new changes after the system power cycle.
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