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Gartner's Hype Cycle Special Report for 2014


Published: 6 August 2014

Analyst(s): Betsy Burton, David A. Willis

The 2014 Gartner Hype Cycle Special Report evaluates the market
promotion and perception of value for over 2,000 technologies, services and
trends in 119 areas. Here, we explore the impact of the megatrends
affecting Hype Cycles and profiles across all research areas.

Analysis
The Hype Cycle is a decision aid that will help boards, executive teams, business managers, CIOs,
IT leaders, and IT professionals discuss and rationalize the technology and service investment
choices in front of them (see "Understanding Gartner's Hype Cycles"). In addition, Hype Cycles can
be an invaluable tool to help technology and service providers make effective product planning and
marketing decisions (see "Tech Go-to-Market: Using Gartner Hype Cycles to Refine Technology
Marketing Strategies and Tactics").
What technologies, services and disciplines should you be adopting or not? Which options are
ready for mainstream adoption, with low risk? What others have yet to be evolved by market
feedback and incremental improvement? Are there some things you can use to really lead your
industry? If you are a follower, how fast must you move to keep pace? Hype Cycles help
organizations determine the appropriate time for them to invest in a technology or service based on
their business needs and risk tolerance, rather than based on the market perception and promotion
of value. Organizations that use the Hype Cycle to inform strategic investment decisions will see
better opportunities in the era of digital business.

Research Highlights
Gartner's 2014 Hype Cycle Special Report provides strategists and planners with an evaluation of
the market promotion and perception of value, business benefit, adoption rate and future direction
of over 2,000 technologies, grouped into 119 distinct areas. In addition, this Hype Cycle top view is
specifically focused on exploring the driving megatrends that are impacting some of the fastestmoving profiles (technologies, services and disciplines), the most popular Hype Cycles and the new
Hype Cycles we're introducing this year.

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Most Significant Profile Changes


This report tells a story of how technologies, services and strategies evolve from market hype and
excitement of value to becoming a mainstream part of business and IT. It also illustrates how the
opportunities for first-mover advantage narrow as an innovation rapidly progresses. Ten percent of
the profiles are considered transformational to business, and another 40% are considered high
impact. Many of these profiles are moving at very high rates, so we are devoting attention to those
that are entering the picture and accelerating.
This year, we analyzed the changes in all the Hype Cycle profiles across all of Gartner's 2013 to
2014 Hype Cycles, based on position, time to plateau, rating and adoption rate. Our goal was to
find common themes and trends by looking at the technology, service and discipline profiles that
moved significantly year over year.
To accomplish this, we first identified the profiles that had changed significantly. We then rated
them based on their degree of change (movement up or down the curve, over the peak and through
the trough), and then we grouped the profiles based on the driving force (i.e., the base trends that
were causing change).
We found that the four Nexus of Forces (social, mobile, cloud and information) were highly
correlated with the profiles that had changed most significantly on the peak portion of the Hype
Cycle. We also discovered that digital business and the Internet of Things (IoT) were starting to have
an impact, especially at earlier stages of the Hype Cycle (see Figure 1).

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Figure 1. Megatrends Driving Significant Profile Shifts

expectations
Big Data

Payment and
Digital
Business
Peak of
Inflated
Expectations

Innovation
Trigger

Trough of
Disillusionment

Slope of Enlightenment

Plateau of
Productivity

time
Source: Gartner (August 2014)

It is worth noting that the Hype Cycle focuses on newly emerging technologies as they move into
mainstream adoption. Leaving the Hype Cycle does not mean that the technology is being
sunsetted; in fact, it may hit a strong period of growth in the mass market. However, the strongest
advantage to early adopters and fast-followers is when the technology is still on the Hype Cycle.
(For details on the later phases of adoption, including when technologies should be retired, see
Gartner's various Market Clocks and "Understanding Gartner's IT Market Clocks, 2012.")

Fast Movers From Trigger Toward Peak Are Driven by Analytics, Internet, of Things, and
Mobile Infrastructure
The first group of profiles we consider are those that were moving quickly from a trigger position in
2013 to a peak or even post-peak position in 2014. The topics that are accelerating toward the peak
are important for clients to understand, because vendors, stakeholders and peers are likely to bring
them up in discussions and feature them in marketing materials and product road maps. Venture

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capital investment flows typically accelerate at this phase. Clients should stay informed about why a
technology, service or discipline is being hyped, but it is even more important to understand its
stage of maturity, business benefit and adoption rate all of which can help clients make their own
determinations regarding if, when and how they will invest in these areas.
When we sought to identify the drivers for the movement of profiles along the Hype Cycle from
trigger to peak, "mobile" and "analytics" emerged as the two forces that had a large impact:

IoT and Operational Technologies Technologies that operate upon the physical world are a
key component of the digital business opportunity. Not surprisingly, many of these technologies
may be new to IT, but they are expected to be high impact and even transformational. These
technologies and strategies are often industry-specific, such as advanced metering
infrastructure, IT/OT convergence in manufacturing or in-vehicle networks for automobiles.

Mobile Infrastructure Mobile is rapidly becoming the primary vehicle for business
applications. Organizations can reach more users in more situations than in previous computing
eras, which is creating vast opportunities for business moments. The pervasiveness of devices
among consumers and within enterprises (see "Hype Cycle for Mobile Device Technologies,
2014"), and the increasing interest in mobile applications (see "Hype Cycle for Mobile
Applications and Development, 2014"), makes the rapid upward movement of technologies for
supporting and managing mobility expected. The Hype Cycle shows key mobile infrastructure
enablers on the horizon and moving rapidly, like 5G wireless, the Diameter protocol, and
heterogeneous networking.

Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) Looking further across the Hype Cycle, another
interesting example is EMM suites, which moved 16 positions, from the trigger midpoint to
beyond the peak, due to the rapid adoption of mobile technology in enterprises, and the
correspondingly rapid realization that organizations need to protect data in the mobile
environment (see the "Hype Cycle for Wireless Networking Infrastructure, 2014").

Analytics IoT and mobility will drive more data into the enterprise, and analytics will be an
essential ingredient. This is evident in several profiles that are moving quickly toward the peak.
For example, business analytics PaaS (baPaaS) the delivery of analytics capabilities and
tools as a service moved up 12 positions, from right above the trigger point to just below the
peak (see "Hype Cycle for Software as a Service, 2014"). Another example is IT/OT
convergence and alignment, which moved nine positions, from trigger midpoint to below the
peak. IT/OT convergence is the growing use of standard IT technologies in OT vendors'
products, and IT/OT alignment is the organizational response to these changes. The movement
of this profile is particularly interesting because it shows that, while mobile, cloud and big data
are all driving trends. The primary driver in bringing the two worlds together is the need to use
analytics from diverse data to improve decision making across the supply chain (see "Hype
Cycle for Leaders of Manufacturing Strategies, 2014").

Fast Up-and-Coming Movers Toward the Peak Are Fueled by Digital Business and
Payments
Digital business is transformational, as such, several related profiles are quickly moving from on or
near the Hype Cycle trigger to the trigger midpoint. Clients may not be hearing a lot about these
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technologies, services or disciplines today, but they will start hearing more hype as the profiles
rapidly move up the curve. For example, acquiring convergence solutions and dashboards, which
are used to aggregate and integrate payment methods and loyalty programs into a single platform,
moved up from the trigger to trigger midpoint in just one year. This offers an example of a profile
whose movement has been fueled by new kinds of payment services needed to compete with
digital businesses. Acquiring convergence solutions and dashboards provides the ability for the
merchants to customize their services based on current demand, and accept solutions more
aligned with their commercial needs (see "Hype Cycle for Payment Innovations, 2014").
Another example is infonomics the valuation, accounting, treatment and reporting of information
as a core asset of the business which moved seven positions from just above the trigger to
trigger midpoint. This up-and-coming profile is driven, not only by the need to understand the value
on information in relation to its transactional and/or customer interaction context, but also by the
value of reputation information in a digital currency world, which is akin to the value of money itself,
and how this affects new business designs in the digital world (see "Hype Cycle for the Future of
Money, 2014").
Retail 3D printing is another profile that moved seven positions, from above the trigger to the trigger
midpoint. Retail 3D printing encompasses the use of a device to create physical objects from digital
models to provide custom-designed stock items made available through the retail supply chain. The
demand for this type of custom manufacturing reflects two increasingly important retail trends:
consumers' expectations of stock availability and their desire for personalized and customized
products, services and shopping experiences. The tremendous hype around digital 3D printing is
being fueled by numerous stories in the mainstream media, including the use of 3D printers to
"manufacture" a variety of products, including food items and in surgical reconstruction operations.
Of note is the placement of the digital business profile itself, right below the Peak of Inflated
Expectations. This is due to the number of organizations claiming to have a digital business
strategy. In Gartner's 2013 CEO survey, 57% of respondents reported that they have a digital
strategy that is either integral to or aligned with their business strategy. Even though the execution
lags far behind the hype, these significant movers may offer evidence that the focus on digital
business is driving the hype around related technologies, services and disciplines (see "Hype Cycle
for Enterprise Architecture, 2014," "Hype Cycle for Operational Technology, 2014" and "Hype Cycle
for Digital Workplace, 2014").

Big Data Moves Over the Peak


Two profiles that moved dramatically through the peak are focused on dealing with increasingly
large and complex sets of data: big data and eventually consistent data management. Big data
which shifted seven positions from right before the peak to moving toward the trough is about
high-volume, high-velocity and highly varied information assets that demand cost-effective,
innovative forms of information processing to support enhanced insight and decision making. While
interest in big data remains undiminished, it has moved beyond the peak because the market has
settled into a reasonable set of approaches, and the new technologies and practices are additive to
existing solutions ("Hype Cycle for Big Data, 2014"). Eventually, consistent data management a
data consistency approach for supporting complex, global-case and Web-scale applications that

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must deliver short transaction times and provide nonstop availability moved 17 positions through
the peak to almost the peak-trough midpoint (see "Hype Cycle for Application Architecture, 2014").
This movement by no means signifies a lack of interest in the ability to support, manage, access or
leverage information. Take this example: The transformational technology of operational in-memory
DBMS moved eight full positions in a single year. This is indeed infrastructure, but it is specifically
tailored to helping make better decisions. The rapid and big shifts of big data topics over the peak,
coupled with the rapid and big shifts of analytics moving toward the peak, suggest that the hype
and interest in information and data is shifting from supporting and managing "big data" to actually
using information and data to make business decisions.

Cloud and Social Are Big Movers, Moving Beyond the Peak
Two of the key Nexus of Forces, cloud and social, are the driving forces that moved several profiles
over or beyond the peak. They are being rapidly adopted and will become more essential
capabilities over time, to the point where they will have mainstream impact. By highlighting some
rapidly changing profiles that are moving toward the Trough of Disillusionment, we hope to help
clients understand why they are hearing or about to hear negative messages, which will alert them
to the necessity of attaining a balanced understanding of the strengths and challenges associated
with the technology, service or discipline that is moving into the trough.
Social
Many profiles associated with engagement initiatives aka "social" computing impacts are still
climbing the Hype Cycle curve toward the peak, such as social capital, social employee recognition
systems and social magazines. In most cases, their movements were small, just one or two
positions. However, social displayed several significant shifts in position on the slope toward the
trough, and even through the trough. This movement toward the trough is primarily occurring due to
the realization by users and vendors that achieving business outcomes and value with social is
more difficult than originally expected. The social "big movers'" rapid movement toward the trough
indicates that social technologies, services and disciplines are becoming the norm and part of the
fabric of other innovations, such as digital business.
One of the big movers is external peer-to-peer communities virtual places for collaboration
among people and organizations in the market ecosystem outside of the enterprise. We moved this
profile 12 positions into the trough because most buyers in the market have put their pursuit of
external community solutions on hold while they concentrate on applications that assist with CRM
over popular social media. However, we expect this profile to move rapidly toward the plateau due
to the consistent, reliable cost savings in customer service and marketing associated with external
communities.
Another big mover is social procurement tools application features that mimic the capabilities of
social websites which shifted nine positions to beyond the peak (see "Hype Cycle for
Procurement, 2014"). In most cases, these solutions have failed to deliver enough value to persuade
end users to abandon email as the primary means of collaborating and sharing. This is similar to the
path followed by social network analysis tools, which are used to analyze relationship patterns
among people. Social network analysis shifted six positions toward the trough because of the
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difficulty of collecting relevant, reliable networking data, and because the analysis is highly
conceptual and it is hard to translate the information collected into practical actions (see "Hype
Cycle for Content and Social Analytics, 2014"). In addition, several profiles that focused on social
consumers and media fell down toward the trough and, in some cases, through the trough,
including social gaming (see "Hype Cycle for Consumer Services and Mobile Applications, 2014"),
social gaming ad networks (see "Hype Cycle for Consumer Goods, 2014"), socialcasting (see "Hype
Cycle for Social Software, 2014"), social TV (see "Hype Cycle for Digital Marketing, 2014") and
social profiles (see "Hype Cycle for Digital Workplace, 2014").
Cloud
As with social, many cloud profiles continue to climb the Hype Cycle curve toward the peak,
including cloud access security, cloud application development services and cloud integration
platform services. In addition, some of the significant cloud profiles, such as cloud computing,
private cloud computing, and hybrid cloud, are moving over the peak or moving toward the trough
(see "Hype Cycle for Cloud Computing, 2014").
Mobile cloud experienced one of the most dramatic shifts, moving from pre-peak to trough. "Mobile
cloud" refers to the use of cloud services to provide scalability and flexible delivery, and to support
information sharing between many different devices. Cloud services and mobile are naturally
aligned. A key example is with the rapid evolution of cloud mobile back-end services, which provide
scale, security, and integration to support the coming tide of mobile applications.
Another profile, hybrid cloud, moved 10 positions, directly from the peak to the peak-trough
midpoint. "Hybrid cloud" refers to the coordinated use of cloud services across isolation and
provider boundaries among public, private and community service providers, or between internal
and external cloud services. What differentiates hybrid cloud from other cloud services is that it
implies significant integration or coordination between the internal and external environments at the
data, process, management or security layers. While we continue to see the business benefit of
hybrid cloud as transformational, clients should not be surprised to hear about its limitations due to
its immaturity and the complexity of setting it up in operational form.
Another example of a profile that has made a dramatic shift is the personal cloud, which we define
as an individual's collection of digital content, services and apps, which are seamlessly accessible
across any device. The personal cloud profile moved nine positions, from just past the peak to
peak-trough midpoint, mostly because such clouds are largely used for storage and syncing, rather
than adding significant richness to intelligent services. Another example, cloud service brokers
which refers to the role and business model in which a company or other entity adds value to one or
more cloud services on behalf of one or more consumers of that service moved six positions,
which took it over the peak. This movement reflects the shift among users from general interest to
pragmatic implementations and the associated challenges of assuming the CSB role. (For more
information on these profiles, see "Hype Cycle for Cloud Computing, 2014.")
A critical take-away from this section is for clients to understand that, while we are finding big
moves in both cloud and social profiles toward the trough, as they naturally evolve and move
toward maturity, both of these trends and their associated technologies, services and disciplines

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are quickly becoming engrained into the fabric of business and IT. By 2016, use of cloud and social
will be so pervasive that 60% of organizations will not consider them as a significant factor, in and
of themselves, when making investment decisions. Use of cloud and social will be the expected
norm, but not a differentiated factor in themselves. Clearly the impact that cloud and social have on
enabling organizations to run their operations more efficiently, drive new capabilities, serve
customers and partners effectively, and respond to disruptive threats and opportunities in the
market more rapidly will remain critically important to organizations. However, as social and cloud
technologies, services and disciplines emerge toward the Plateau of Productivity, the focus will be
more on how they are applied to address business needs and opportunities, and less on the
innovations themselves.

Movement Toward the Plateau of Productivity


Unlike the other segments of the Hype Cycle, our analysis of the profiles moving from the posttrough segment toward the plateau did not uncover any significant trends. Nor were there many big
movers in this segment that shifted more than three to four positions. This may illustrate the lessdramatic and more gradual nature of the shift toward the plateau than either the slope toward the
peak, or the slope toward the trough. This curve included profiles from across the Hype Cycles,
including database encryption (see "Hype Cycle for Data and Collaboration Security, 2014"), headup displays (see "Hype Cycle for Vehicle-Centric Information and Communication Technology
(Vehicle ICT), 2014"), Web-oriented architecture (see "Hype Cycle for Application Development,
2014"), IT infrastructure utility (see "Hype Cycle for Virtualization, 2014") and software as a service
(see "Hype Cycle for Platform as a Service (PaaS), 2014").
This analysis of the major trends impacting the fast and dramatically shifting profiles confirms the
interest and impact in both the Nexus of Forces (social, mobile, information and cloud) and digital
business (see "Agenda Overview for Digital Business, 2014").

Popular Hype Cycles


The Hype Cycles that generally draw some of the highest readership among Gartner clients all
acknowledge in one way or another that existing business models even those that were born of
the Internet and e-business eras have begun to be disrupted by the advent of digitalization. In
addition to analyzing the megatrends that are affecting fast-moving profiles, we analyze the trends
impacting the most popular Hype Cycles.
"Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2014": Exploring What Will Impact Your Business
and Beyond
This Hype Cycle is a must-read for CTOs, CIOs, enterprise architects, IT strategists, change agents
and innovation managers, because it charts many of the technologies, services and concepts that
will serve as the triggers to enabling the evolution and transformation of business models and
designs. Specifically, this year's emerging technologies Hype Cycle is focused on the emerging
technologies that will have the highest impact on organizations that are moving toward digital
marketing, digital business and autonomous computing. Digital marketing focuses on new and
more sophisticated ways to reach consumers, who are more willing to participate in marketing

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efforts to gain greater social connection, or product and service value. Digital business focuses on
the convergence of people, business and things. "Autonomous" focuses on the ability to leverage
technologies that provide human-like or human-replacing capabilities. This year's Hype Cycle is
particularly exciting because it explores the emerging technologies that IT leaders should follow not
only to gauge the effects on their current organization, customers or partners, but for their more farreaching effects on organizations beyond the bounds of their industry.
"Hype Cycle for IT Operations Management, 2014" Reflects Dual-Speed IT Operations
This Hype Cycle is particularly relevant to CIOs and IT leaders who are seeking to review their IT
operations portfolio and update for future investments. This Hype Cycle reflects the dual-speed or
bimodal operations emerging in many IT organizations that are seeking to meet the need to operate
IT at two speeds: one to support reliable and steadfast ITOM processes and technologies, and
another to support the operations management of new and innovative technologies. More than a
third of the profiles continue to be represented in the Trough of Disillusionment; most of these are
gradually moving toward the plateau. But several profiles placed on the Innovation Trigger are
composed of technologies, process frameworks, and approaches to managing emerging
applications and supporting infrastructure (e.g., DevOps, ValueOps, social IT management, and
application release automation). This duality is unsurprising, as the influences on the profiles in the
Hype Cycle include cloud and agile development projects, particularly for the delivery of
applications and services, and by the Nexus of Forces of social, mobile and cloud, which help IT
operations enable flexible styles of computing and user experiences.
"Hype Cycle for Big Data, 2014" Dramatically Illustrates a Shift Toward Reality and the
Pragmatic Use of Big Data
This exciting Hype Cycle illustrates the dramatic overall shift of big data over the Peak of Inflated
Expectations, which aligns with our analysis of the big-mover profiles. In addition, this Hype Cycle
predicts and analyzes the causes and implications of the movement of big data into the Trough of
Disillusionment. This does not imply that all profiles related to big data are moving to the trough;
rather, the adoption of big data technologies, services and disciples has increased and has resulted
in their first successes and failures; hence, the profiles have passed over the peak of hype. This
Hype Cycle also predicts the rapid and "brutal" shift into the Trough of Disillusionment and the
emergence of robust and enterprise-ready solutions and implementations. This Hype Cycle is a
must-read for CIOs and IT leaders, particularly if they need to stay informed about the evolution of
big data and the emergence of analytics, which is also reflected on the "Hype Cycle for Business
Intelligence and Analytics, 2014." This Hype Cycle puts in context the increasingly pragmatic views
of organizations as they focus less on definitions and reaching a conceptual understanding than on
how to get business value from big data, how to create a big data strategy, and how to exploit
analytics, data science and security to achieve productivity.
"Hype Cycle for Cloud Computing, 2014" Explores the Continued High Impact of Cloud
Services, Despite a Degree of Fatigue
Since most enterprises and consumers are using some cloud services, this Hype Cycle is important
for both users and vendors. It discusses how cloud one of the most hyped terms in the history of

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IT is continuing to change buying behaviors and influencing other megatrends, such as mobile,
digital business and big data. By highlighting the diversity of cloud technologies, services and
disciplines, and how they are evolving, this Hype Cycle helps clients put into perspective the "cloud
washing" by vendors, who continue to jump on the cloud bandwagon with anything they can label
"cloud." While users may be experiencing a bit of "cloud fatigue" due to media news on outages
and to questions about security and privacy, cloud has become pervasive and will continue to
evolve to provide agility and innovation, which is critical for supporting current business operations,
as well as for doing digital business.
"Hype Cycle for the Internet of Things, 2014" Explores the Rapidly Evolving Impact of IoT on
Our Businesses, Customers, Industries and Ecosystems
Anyone interested in understanding or supporting digital business should read this Hype Cycle,
particularly COOs, CIOs, CTOs, digital marketers, strategic planners and enterprise architects. The
IoT Hype Cycle represents many of the emerging technologies and standards that are enabling
digital business. IT leaders, regardless of industry, size or region, should not ignore this trend
because they feel that their primary focus is on "enterprise" systems. IoT is becoming a vibrant part
of our, our customers' and our partners' business and IT landscape. This Hype Cycle is particularly
interesting because it explores the impact of IoT on public- and industry-sector organizations, as
well as business-centric and customer-centric organizations. Lastly, it provides links to several
related and equally interesting Hype Cycles, such as "Hype Cycle for Smart City Technologies and
Solutions, 2014," "Hype Cycle for Vehicle-Centric Information and Communication Technology
(Vehicle ICT), 2014" and "Hype Cycle for Operational Technology, 2014."

Most Significant Report Changes


This year, we have introduced several new and exciting Hype Cycles that are closely linked to many
of the megatrends we touched on. For example, the Hype Cycles for smart machines, the digital
workplace, 3D printing and the connected home are all related to the development of digital
business. The new Hype Cycles for mobile applications and development, enterprise mobile
security, and advanced analytics and data science are directly connected to the Nexus of Forces of
mobile and information. The "Hype Cycle for Advanced Analytics and Data Science, 2014" also
reflects the trend toward using information for more effective decision making, which we noted
earlier in our analysis of the big movers. The new Hype Cycles for the 2014 Special Report are:

"Hype Cycle for Smart Machines, 2014." Smart machines are an emerging super-class of
technologies that can perform a wide variety of tasks. Gartner has predicted that smart
machines will constitute one of the most disruptive eras of technology innovation.

"Hype Cycle for Digital Workplace, 2014." This Hype Cycle focuses on the changing nature of
work, consumerization and the necessity of increasing employee engagement and agility. Done
well, the digital workplace delivers a more social, mobile, accessible and data-driven work
environment that is better able to exploit changing business conditions.

"Hype Cycle for Mobile Applications and Development, 2014." The digital enterprise is
increasingly a mobile enterprise. The near-ubiquitous availability of adequate bandwidth and the

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rapid increase of smartphone and tablet adoption have made mobility one of the top priorities
for CIOs, who require insight into the relative evolution of mobile applications and tools.

"Hype Cycle for Advanced Analytics and Data Science, 2014." The use cases for advanced
analytics and the skill sets required to push them forward differ radically from the established
"Hype Cycle for Business Intelligence and Analytics, 2014," and have helped create the role of
the data scientist, who understands the mathematics of data and how to extract meaning or
knowledge.

"Hype Cycle for 3D Printing, 2014." 3D printing is not one monolithic technology it is a
complex ecosystem of software, hardware and materials, requiring enterprises to begin their
consideration of technology and services with a particular end in mind.

"Hype Cycle for the Connected Home, 2014." The connected home is networked to enable the
interconnection of devices, services and apps, providing a connected experience for the
household and people in it, and enabling individuals to control and monitor the home remotely.
This Hype Cycle helps technology vendors and enterprises understand the range and maturity
of technologies, solutions and products that make up the connected home.

"Hype Cycle for Enterprise Mobile Security, 2014." Because of the immaturity of the technology,
secure enterprise mobility must be broken down into a series of smaller problems and
addressed with varied technologies. Use this Hype Cycle to understand your options and to
track technology maturity.

"Hype Cycle for SMBs, 2014." Gartner has intentionally limited the technologies aggregated into
this Hype Cycle to those that can help the majority of SMBs overcome their most significant
challenges, improve operational effectiveness, and enhance business outcomes.

"Hype Cycle for Digital Insurance, 2014." Digital insurance refers to the impact of new and
emerging trends and technologies, such as big data or social media, on the insurance value
chain, which will include shifting the fundamental insurer business model to support radically
new products and services.

"Hype Cycle for Upstream Oil and Gas Technologies, 2014." To keep abreast of the wide
variety of digital technologies, processes and methods related to the rapidly evolving energy
market, CIOs in the upstream oil and gas industries must move quickly to establish
collaborative governance and flexible integration architectures.

"Hype Cycle for Project and Portfolio Management, 2014." The interconnectedness of today's
business world makes it that much harder to manage individual projects and control a portfolio
of investments in projects and programs.

"Hype Cycle for Consumer Engagement With Healthcare and Wellness, 2014." This new Hype
Cycle reflects an increasing interest in a consumer-centric view of healthcare, the more active
role consumers are taking in healthcare, and the blurring and interwoven role that healthcare
organizations are playing in consumer engagement, consumer experience, telemedicine and
related initiatives.

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"Hype Cycle for Communications Service Provider Digital Services Enablement, 2014." The
behaviors and skills that CSPs have mastered for legacy IT could hinder their success in the
rapidly digitalizing communication services value chain. To take advantage of potential new
digital service opportunities, many CSPs will need to transform their internal IT from a businessonly support function into an enabler of customer-facing services.

The following Hype Cycles were renamed or split this year to reflect changes and expansions in
their market domain and our coverage:

The "Hype Cycle for Supply Chain Execution, 2013" has been renamed as the "Hype Cycle for
Supply Chain Execution Technologies, 2014."

The "Hype Cycle for Financial Services Payment Systems, 2013" has been renamed as the
"Hype Cycle for Payment Innovations, 2014."

The "Hype Cycle for Open Banking, 2013" has been renamed as the "Hype Cycle for Open
Banking APIs, Apps and App Stores, 2014."

The "Hype Cycle for Smart Government, 2013" has been renamed as the "Hype Cycle for
Digital Government, 2014."

The "Hype Cycle for E-commerce, 2013" has been renamed as the "Hype Cycle for Digital
Commerce, 2014."

The "Hype Cycle for Wireless Devices, Software and Services, 2013" has been refocused to
concentrate on mobile software and services, removing most hardware and application
development topics, which are already addressed in other Hype Cycles, and has been renamed
as the "Hype Cycle for Mobile Software and Services, 2014."

The "Hype Cycle for Analytic Applications, 2013" and the "Hype Cycle for Performance
Management, 2013" have been reorganized and split into the "Hype Cycle for Customer
Analytic Applications, 2014" and the "Hype Cycle for Back-Office Analytic Applications, 2014."

The following Hype Cycles from 2013 are not included in 2014:

"Hype Cycle for Consumer Technologies, 2013" Consumer technologies has been
discontinued as a distinct Hype Cycle and is covered, instead, in other relevant Hype Cycles,
including consumer devices and mobile device technologies.

"Hype Cycle for Strategic Business Capabilities, 2013" The highly strategic nature of topics
covered in this Hype Cycle means that they may take as long as 25 to 30 years to move through
the cycle. Often there is little change in their position year over year. Hereafter, Gartner will
issue this Hype Cycle biennially, rather than annually.

"Hype Cycle for Cloud Services Brokerage, 2013" We are not updating this Hype Cycle this
year and are reviewing whether it will be discontinued. For current information on these
technologies, see "Hype Cycle for Cloud Computing, 2014."

"Hype Cycle for Real-Time Infrastructure, 2013" We have discontinued our separate
coverage of RTI because the technology has sufficiently progressed such that its components

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appear on other Hype Cycles, including cloud computing, IT operations management and
virtualization.

"Hype Cycle for Automotive Demand Chain and Supply Chain Technologies, 2013" We are
not updating this Hype Cycle because we will be refocusing it during 2015. For other related
industry coverage, see "Hype Cycle for Vehicle-Centric Information and Communication
Technology (Vehicle ICT), 2014."

2014 Technology and Application Hype Cycles


Technology and application Hype Cycles provide a snapshot of core technologies,
communications, application development and business applications. The "Hype Cycle for
Emerging Technologies, 2014" provides a view of highly hyped and high-impact trends and
technologies from across IT. Regional Hype Cycles highlight the particular areas of activity within
the various geographies, including where the region is ahead of or lagging the global average. Hype
Cycles in this area include:

"Hype Cycle for 3D Printing, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Application Architecture, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Application Development, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Application Infrastructure, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Application Security, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Back-Office Analytics Applications, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Business Intelligence and Analytics, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Business Process Management, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Communications Service Provider Digital Services Enablement, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for the Connected Home, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Consumer Devices, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Consumer Market Research, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Consumer Services and Mobile Applications, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Contact Center Infrastructure, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Content and Social Analytics, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for CRM Customer Service and Customer Engagement, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for CRM Marketing Applications, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for CRM Sales, 2014"

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"Hype Cycle for Customer Analytic Applications, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Digital Marketing, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Digital Workplace, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Digital Commerce, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Embedded Software and Systems, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for ERP, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Green IT, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Human Capital Management Software, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for In-Memory Computing, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for the Internet of Things, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Mobile Applications and Development, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Mobile Device Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Networking and Communications, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Open-Source Software, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Operational Technology, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Photovoltaic Solar Energy, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Semiconductors and Electronics Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Server Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Smart City Technologies and Solutions, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Smart Grid Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Smart Machines, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Social Software, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Storage Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Sustainability, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Unified Communications and Collaboration, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Web Computing, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Wireless Networking Infrastructure, 2014"

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2014 Information and IT Services Hype Cycles


Information and IT services Hype Cycles examine topics relating to the management and security of
information and content, and to the management and sourcing of IT operations and services. Hype
Cycles in this area include:

"Hype Cycle for Advanced Analytics and Data Science, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Big Data, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Business Continuity Management and IT Disaster Recovery Management,
2014"

"Hype Cycle for Cloud Computing, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Cloud Security, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Content Management, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Data and Collaboration Security, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Data Center Power and Cooling Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Enterprise Architecture, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Enterprise Information Management, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Enterprise Mobile Security, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Governance, Risk and Compliance Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Identity and Access Management Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Imaging and Print Services, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Information Infrastructure, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Infrastructure Protection, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for IT Infrastructure and Outsourcing Services, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for IT Operations Management, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Legal and Regulatory Information Governance, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Multienterprise Solutions, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Platform as a Service (PaaS), 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Privacy, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Procurement and Sourcing Solutions, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Project and Portfolio Management, 2014"

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"Hype Cycle for Software as a Service, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Virtualization, 2014"

2014 Industry Hype Cycles


In addition to the cross-industry positioning featured in the technology and application, and
information and IT services Hype Cycles, industry Hype Cycles show how technologies may be at
different levels of maturity and adoption in different industries. Industry Hype Cycles also feature
technologies and trends unique to that specific industry. Hype Cycles in this area include:

"Hype Cycle for Advertising, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Automotive Electronics, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Bank Operations Innovation, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Communications Service Provider Infrastructure, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Communications Service Provider Operations, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Consumer Engagement With Healthcare and Wellness, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Consumer Goods, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Digital Banking, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Digital Government, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Digital Insurance, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Discrete Manufacturing and PLM, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Education, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Emerging Energy Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for the Future of Money, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Healthcare Payers, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Healthcare Provider Applications, Analytics and Systems, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Healthcare Provider Technologies and Standards, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Leaders of Manufacturing Strategies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Life Insurance, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Life Sciences, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Media and Entertainment, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Open Banking APIs, Apps and App Stores, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for P&C Insurance, 2014"

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"Hype Cycle for Payment Innovations, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Process Manufacturing and PLM, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Retail Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Small and Midsize Businesses, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Supply Chain Execution Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Telemedicine, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for the Telecommunications Industry, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Upstream Oil and Gas Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Utility Industry IT and Business Processes, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Utility Industry Operational Technologies, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Vehicle-Centric Information and Communication Technology (Vehicle ICT),
2014"

2014 Geographic Hype Cycles

"Hype Cycle for Green IT and Sustainability in China, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Green IT and Sustainability in India, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for ICT in Africa, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for ICT in China, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for ICT in India, 2014"

Innovation Insights
Innovation Insights provide an overview of the status, business impact, IT impact, future direction
and other key analyses about selected high-impact technologies and trends from the Hype Cycles.
Innovation Insight documents published in 2014 include:

"Innovation Insight: Exploiting Cloud Services to Improve and Transform Your Supply Chain
Innovation"

"Innovation Insight: Smart City Aligns Technology Innovation and Citizen Inclusion"

"Innovation Insight: Smart Fabric Innovations Weave Efficiency Into the Workforce"

"Innovation Insight: Neurobusiness Validates Behavioral Sciences as a Transformational


Business Discipline"

"Innovation Insight: Indoor Location Technologies The Looming Battle Between Bluetooth,
Wi-Fi and Other Wireless Technologies"

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"Innovation Insight: Digital Business Innovation Disrupts Risk and Security Management"

"Innovation Insight: Digital Business Innovation Risk Will Bring About the Rise of the Digital Risk
Officer"

Hype Cycles to Be Published in August/September


The following Hype Cycles will be published in the late August/September time frame:

"Hype Cycle for Application Services, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Business Process Services and Outsourcing, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for IT Service Continuity Management, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Human-Computer Interaction, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Mobile Software and Services, 2014"

"Hype Cycle for Supply Chain Planning, 2014"

Also, be sure to see our "Toolkit: My Hype Cycle, 2014" due out in October 2014.

Recommended Reading
Some documents may not be available as part of your current Gartner subscription.
"Understanding Gartner's Hype Cycles"
"Driving the STREET Process for Emerging Technology and Innovation Adoption"
"Understanding Gartner's IT Market Clocks, 2012"
J. Fenn and M. Raskino, "Mastering the Hype Cycle: How to Choose the Right Innovation at the
Right Time," Harvard Business School Press, 2008
More on This Topic
This is part of an in-depth collection of research. See the collection:

2014 IT Market Clocks: Planning Your Strategic Portfolios for the Digital Business

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