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Running Head: COMPREHENSIBLE INPUT

Comprehensible Input, Interaction, and Output


EDU 642 Understanding & Teaching English Language

Running Head: COMPREHENSIBLE INPUT

Comprehensible Input, Interaction, and Output


In an English language learning classroom, comprehensible input and
output is an important factor in the students ability to learn. This means the
students are able to understand what is occurring within the classroom, even if
they do not understand the teacher word for word (Pruitt, 2009). When students
receive input from an instructor, it actually benefits them to learn new words, so
when a teacher uses words they do not understand in context; it helps the
students identify new vocabulary words. Teachers can use this strategy by
providing familiar context and background information to the students. Offering
cues such as visual cues, or words they are already familiar with will help
teachers develop this strategy (Teacher Vision, 2013).
In this activity, the target audience will be of high school aged students.
These students have been in class together all semester and have become
comfortable with one another. The students enjoy interacting and being social,
so this activity is perfect for them. The standards being addressed will be for the
students to answer open ended questions and document them. This will allow
students to build a better vocabulary, while having fun interacting and learning
more about their peers (Myers, 2011).
During the pre-teaching session, the teacher will discuss some of the
vocabulary words, and some of the students favorite things to do outside of
school. Teachers will warm up the class with a group discussion centered on this
topic. Then, the students will be divided into groups.

Running Head: COMPREHENSIBLE INPUT

The activity in the lesson plan involves collective interviews. Students will
be placed into groups as small or large as necessary as deemed by the
instructor. Students will be given questions written on paper by the teacher to
ask their peers, and their peers will respond in a detailed or creative way. This
activity has the potential to be silly, which is fine as long as the students give
appropriate answers. The questions asked will be on a variety of subjects chosen
by the instructor, and will apply to the students level of knowledge.
The formative assessment will be based on group participation. The
students must prove to the teacher and to the group that they understand the
comprehensive input, and are able to provide comprehensive output. The
students will be evaluated on their active participation and grasp of the
conversations.
Collective Interviews
Subject/Course: ELL
Topic: Comprehensive Input/Output
Level: High School
Lesson Duration: 1 hour
Materials/Equipment:

Interview Questions

Paper

Pens or Pencils

Lesson Objectives:

Running Head: COMPREHENSIBLE INPUT

Students will interact with one another as a group. They will be able to tell
others about themselves, and ask questions to identify information about others.
They will develop a new vocabulary in the English language, and will be able to
learn about their peers.
Summary of Tasks/Actions:
Students will be divided into groups. Each group will be given an open
ended question to ask one another. They will interview others using the questions
given to them, and the other student will answer the questions. The students will
document this and the teacher will review. The teacher will ask the students to
turn the question into superlatives. For example, the class will determine what
group had the best answers, or who had the most creative situation. Students
are free to get lively and be creative, while obtaining a new vocabulary.

Running Head: COMPREHENSIBLE INPUT

References
Myers, A.G. (2011). 25 Ways To Find or Create Comprehensible Input. Retrieved
from http://www.everydaylanguagelearner.com/2011/06/02/24-ways-tofind-or-create-comprehensible-input/
Pruitt, K. (2009). Increasing Comprehensible Input in Vocabulary Instruction.
Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/rkpruitt1/increasingcomprehensible-input-in-vocabulary-instruction
Teacher Vision. (2013) What Is Comprehensible Input? Retrieved from
https://www.teachervision.com/learning-disabilities/bilingualeducation/10260.html