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Military

aircraft

of the

world

tFyiKnr

W8&^w>&fmim

., compilation

by CHARLES M. GILSON

Soviet section by

BILL SWEETMAN

The existence of Foxbat D, an advanced intercepter version of the MiG-25, is revealed in this year's survey of the world's military aircraft. At a time when Soviet developments are very much in the news (the Vtol Forger made its debut in July 1976, when Kiev sailed into the Mediterranean), we also re-examine Backfire' s roles and capabilities . More tha n 100 military aircraft, ranging from primary trainers to strategic bombers, are listed in this exclusive survey. Nearly all are in current production, the main criterion for inclusion. There are, however, a number of out- of-production types remaining in service which are the subject of significant modernisation work. Also included are some major projects and competitive aircraft which have yet to sell or enter service, with lesser developments usually mentioned under the parent type. Licence-built types are entered under the actual manufacturer. An asterisk after the type's name in the text indicates that dimensional and performance data can be found in earlier surveys, though not necessarily in last year's, which was published on March 6. At the small end of the scale in particular there is a very large number of quasi- military aircraft, some of which are described separ- ately in other Flight annuals. Our aim here has been to describe only those aircraft designed specifically for military use or which have entered service pri- marily with military air arms. There are also difficul- ties with transport and VIP aircraft, and wherever possible we have tried to indicate whether a type is used truly for military purposes or by Governments

on quasi-military tasks. Nearly all the information and data on Western aircraft have been supplied by the manufacturers themselves, although the Flight slide-rule has been used on a few occasions and some estimates have been made. This last observation is of course particularly applicable to the section on Soviet aircraft, which again contains a great deal of new information on the latest combat types.

INDEX Both the development histories and the data tables have been compiled by country of manufacture or design in the order France, International, United Kingdom, United States of America, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Other Nations. Manufacturers are listed alphabetically within these groups.

France International United Kingdom

United States of America

Union of Soviet Republics Other Nations

Socialist

Develop-

Data

ment

Page

Page

546

554

547

554

548

554

553

556

580

576

591

578

MILITARY AIRCRAFT OF THE WORLD

France

DASSAULT-BREGUET Atlantic Production of the Mk 1 maritime recce and anti- submarine Atlantic ceased in late 1973, having been shared

among France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and Italy as members of the Secbat consortium. The last aircraft was delivered in 1974. Dassault's M4 proposal is based on sub- stantially the same airframe and aircraft systems as those of the Mk 1 but with completely new weapon systems. Exist-

ing R-R Tyne 21 engines would be retained . The new weapon

and detection systems would use digital processing through- out. Equipment would include two inertial navigation systems. Doppler and Omega. Emphasis would be placed on survey, surface-analysis and long-range anti-surface capabilities. Pressure on the French defence budget has however slowed development very considerably.

France 34; West Germany 20; Italy 18; Netherlands

8; Pakistan 3.

Super Etendard The first prototype, converted from an Etendard IV, flew for the first time in October 1974 and initially flight-tested the unreheated Snecma Atar 8K50 engine. The second prototype, also flying with an 8K50, was designated. the weapon-system test vehicle, while number

three was an Etendard IV with the Super Etendard wing (double-slotted flap and leading-edge slat). Primary sensor of

the new equipment fit is a Thomson-CSF Electronique Marcel

Dassault Agave X-band monopulse radar. This has a claimed air-to-air detection range of 22 n.m. and its other modes include air-to-air search and target designation, either to a gunsight or the active homing head of an anti-ship missile; ground mapping; automatic air-to-air and air-to-sea tracking; and air-to-air, air-to-sea and air-to-ground ranging. The Thomson-CSF head-up display is used in association with a Singer-Kearfott UNI-40/UAT-40 (SK-2602) inertial navigation and weapon-aiming system built under licence by Sagem.

Operators:

Th e first productio n Supe r Etendar d is du e t o fly in September 1977 and the first of about 70-80 for fleet air cover, strike against surface ships and land targets, and photo- reconnaissance, should enter service next year. The aircraft will replace Etendard IVMs aboard the carriers Clemenceau and Foch and are expected to remain operational until aboul

1992.

Operators: France 30 on firm order, up to 80 required.

Mirage III/5 Well over 1,300 of the Mirage series have been

bought by 19 countries, the current production version of the

III being the E model, which first flew in April 1961. Main

Mirage III variants include the IIIC intercepter, IIIB two-seat version of the C, the HIE family of multi-role aircraft, the IIIBE/D two-seat versions of the E family, the IIIR/RD reconnaissance aircraft with five cameras in the nose, and the HIS, operational in Switzerland with Hughes radar and Falcon missiles. The basic nav-attack system consists of Thomson-CSF Cyrano II radar with Tacan and Doppler for navigation coupled to nav and bombing computers and an automatic gunsight. In Israeli aircraft the bombing computer is probably the Rafael Mahat. Some late-model export Mirage Ills are believed to be powered by the Snecma Atar 9K50. particularly those in South Africa.

The Mirage 5 is a ground-attack derivative of the HIE. It normally carries a simple Aida II range-only radar, an additional HOgal of fuel and has extended stores-carrying capacity. Peruvian aircraft have been refitted with the Litton LN-33 inertial platform.

.-Mirage III: Abu Dhabi 4 IIIAD; Argentina 12 IIIEA,

Australi a 100 IIIO, 16 IIIDO; Brazil 12 IIIEBR, 4

IIIDBR; Egypt 38 IIIB-E/5; Israel approx 50 IIIC/BJ; France

one OCU with IIIC/B/BE, two sqns IIIC, eight sqns HIE, thre e sqns IIIR/RD, with total of 526 Mirages purchased; Lebanon

10 IIIEL, 1 IIIBL; Libya 30 HIE, 10 IIIB, 10 IIIR; Pakistan 25

13 IIIRP, 5 IIIDP; South Africa 16 IIIEZ, 16 IIICZ, 8

HIRZ, 13 IIIDZ, 3 IHBZ; Spain 24 IIIEE, 6 HIDE; Switzerland

Operators

2 IIIDA;

IIIEP,

36 HIS, 16 IIIRS, 3 IIIBS; Venezuela

Mirage 5: Abu Dhabi 12 5AD, 2 5DAD, 1 5RAD ordered; Belgium 63 5BA, 27 5BR, 16 5BD; Colombia 14 5COA, 2 5COR,

2 5COD; Egypt (see Mirage III entry); France 50 5F; Gabon

6; Libya 60 5D/DE/DD/DR; Pakistan 28 5PA; Peru 20 5P, 2 5DP; Venezuela 4 5V, 2 5DV; Zaire 14 5M, 3 5DM.

9 IIIEV.

FLIGHT

International,

5 March

1977

Mirage F.l Becoming the mainstay air-defence aircraft for the French Air Force and selling well for export. First flight was in December 1966. All current aircraft are powered by the Snecma Atar 9K50. The first and second wings of French aircraft are operational and a third has received its first squadron, all these units with the F.IC intercepter/air-defence aircraft. Deliveries to overseas customers began in early 1975. Production is shared by Dassault among Aerospatiale, the Belgian companies Sabca and Fairey (the latter building rear fuselage sections for all F.ls ordered) and Casa in Spain. In addition to the basic F.IC, F.1A ground-attack aeroplanes (with different avionics, ranging radar and more fuel capacity) are being built for South Africa, which may also eventually build the type under licence. Also entering produc- tion is the F.IB two-seat advanced training and tactical variant, and being offered is the F.1E, which Dassault describes as an F.IC "with increased attack capability." Primary sensor is the Thomson-CSF Cyrano IV monopulse radar, which gives an 80 per cent detection-range improve- ment over the Cyrano II of the Mirage III. A manually selected target is tracked automatically while the pilot transfers his attention to the Thomson-CSF electromechanical head-up display. Operation of the weapons is either manual or automatic, with the fire-control computer giving the pilot firing clearance or issuing commands to the weapons. More advanced versions of the radar, with moving-target indica- tion and air-to-surface modes, are on offer.

40

F.ICG; Iraq 23 on order ?; Kuwait 18 F.IC, 2 F.IB; Libya 16 F.1AD. 16 F.1ED, 6 F.1BD; Morocco 25 on order, 50 on option ?; South Africa 32 F.IAZ, 16 F.ICZ; Spain 15 F.ICE, 18

on option. Dassault does not confirm Egyptian or Iraqi orders, claims 358 firm sales (including one unnamed custo- mer ) and 175 options.

Operators:

Egypt 44 on order

?; Franc e

105 F.IC; Greece

Dassault-Breguet

Mirage

F.ICs of the French Air Force

Delta Mirage 2000 The Mirage 2000 was selected in December 1975 by the French Government as the future combat aircraft for the French Air Force. Although it reverts to the delta wing of the original Mirages, it is an entirely new design and will be powered by a single Snecma M53 of about 22,0001b thrust in its eventual -7 production version. The early-standard engine (M53-5) will produce about 19,8001b thrust. The Mirage 2000, due to enter service in 1982, has been initially specified as a multi-role aircraft with definite emphasis on air defence/air superiority, but with provision for ground-attack capability. The first aircraft will equip air-defence squadrons but two further batches are envisaged, one of single-seaters for reconnaissance and ground attack and one of two-seaters for operational training; the latter will have the air-defence weapon system. Three prototypes are planned, the first to fly in 1978. Extensive use of titanium will allow high Mach numbers

to be achieved (considerably more than Mach 2-2) as well as

contributing to structural weight reductions needed to obtain overall thrust:weigh t ratio s in excess of 1:1 a t comba t weight. Gross weight in the interception configuration, with two Matra Super 530 missiles, will be about 22,0001b. The wing is com-

pletely different from that of the Mirage III, with quite

different camber and a thickened root which will allow both

a lighter structure and more space for fuel. There are full-

span leading-edge droop surfaces and trailing-edge elevons, all using boron and carbon fibres. The rudder will also be of composite structure. Fuel capacity will be about the same as that of an F.l (950gal), endurance equal or superior to that of the F.l in all circumstances and patrol endurance three times that of the Mirage III. For attack missions, the Mirage 2000 will b e abl e t o tak e off i n abou t 4,000ft wit h 11,0001b of external weapons on nine hardpoints, according to one

FLIGHT International,

-5 March

1977

unofficial French report. The flying-control system of the aircraft will be entirely electrically signalled, and will be based on a Sfena system which has already undergone initial flight trials in a Mirage IIIB. The Mirage 2000 weapon system is to be based on a multi- mode forward-looking X-band pulse-Doppler radar with a design detection range of 100km (54 n.m.). Thomson-CSF is responsible for developing the equipment from a test set which has an antenna diameter of 22-5in and which was designed to give a range of 50 n.m. or so. A head-up display will be supplemented by a large head-down CRT display. Principal air-to-air armament will be 30mm Defa cannon, Matra Magic dogfight missiles and medium-range Super 530s.

France's

nationalised

Some 40 per

cent

of

production

work

may

go

to

Aerospatiale.

Operators:

France 250-300 required.

International

AEROSPATIALE C.160 Transall The final and 169th Franco-German Transall in the first production run was delivered in March 1973, apparently bringing to an end this early European col- laborative transport programme. The requirement for work, for more Transalls for the French Air Force, and the possibility of export sales have however combined to start a relaunch. Though not all the details have been finally settled, the two countries would again collaborate on a 50-50 basis although there would be only a single final-assembly line, at Aerospatiale Toulouse. Operators: France 48 (plus 4 in Aeropostale service); West Germany 89; South Africa 9; Turkey 20.

DASSAULT-BREGUET/DORNIER Alpha Jet Selected by the French and West German Govern- ments in July 1970. Four prototypes have been built, the first flying in October 1973, but one has been lost in an accident. France's requirement is for a basic and advanced trainer, Germany's also for close air support and battlefield reconnaissance. Belgium confirmed its order for a version it designates Alpha Jet IB (training role) in September 1975. Basically, Dassault-Breguet manufactures the centre and front fuselage while Dornier makes the wings, empennage and rear fuselage—Sabca in Belgium is also taking part in production. The first production-standard aircraft is due to fly in October 1977 and the first delivery to a French squadron is planned for July 1, 1978. The Luftwaffe should receive its first operational Alpha Jet on October 1, 1978. The initial batch order is for 56 aircraft for France and 84 for Germany, plus 420 Snecma Larzac engines. Production should reach nine/month in 1979. The German Alpha Jet will have an attitude and heading reference system based on the Lear Siegler AHRS 6000 unit fitted to the Fairchild A-10. The French Thomson-CSF' Bodenseewerke reflector sight will be replaced in the Luft- waffe aircraft by a Kaiser/VDO KM808 sight and head-up display. This unit has air-to-air and air-to-surface modes as well as displaying navigation and landing-approach informa- tion.

Belgium 16 IB on order, 17 on option; France 200

Operators:

required; West Germany 200 required.

JUGOSLAVIA/ ROMANIA Orao/IAR.93 First photographs of this light attack aircraft became available in 1975, although development by Soko in Jugoslavia (which has leadership in this collaborative project) and various concerns in Romania had been going on since 1971. First flight took place in August 1974 and two or three prototypes are believed to have been built, with up to nine pre-series aircraft. The first production-standard Orao was du e t o fly in November 1976 bu t it is though t tha t structural- weight and other problems have slowed development considerably. The first production batch is nevertheless believed to be nearly 40 aircraft. One unofficial report says that a subsequent version of the aircraft is planned with afterburnin g R-R Viper turbojets . Relatively little is known about the type's systems except that a number, in addition to the Viper 632 engines, come from Rritain and France—the undercarriage is by Messier- Hispano; Fairey Hydraulics and Graviner are suppliers. The gunsight and bombing computer are expected to be Swedish. Operators: Jugoslavia up to 200 required; Romania about 80 required initially.

547

PANAVIA Tornado The first prototype Tornado multi-role combat aircraft (ex-MRCA) made its maiden flight from Manching in West Germany on August 14, 1974, and ther e are now ten aircraft which have flown from the three flight-test centres in Germany, Britain and Italy. The last prototype, P.09, and the first pre-series aircraft, P.l l (P.10 being a structural-test airframe), both flew on February 5 this year; P.12 is due to fly imminently (see also feature article, this issue) and the remainin g four pre-series Tornados should all fly in 1977. Prototype P.05, which suffered a very hard landing early in 1976, is being repaired but will probably not fly again until

1978. By the end of 1976, Tornado prototypes had made almost

700 flights and Government test pilots from all three paren t countries had flown them.

On July 29, 1976, the three Governments signed a Memorandum of Understanding authorising the production

of 809 aircraft for the thre e air forces and the German Navy.

Contracts with industry were signed the same day and Panavia was contracted to produce an initial batch of 40 with options covering a further 765. Four pre-series aircraft will be converted to production standard, making the total of 809. The first delivery, to the German Navy, will be made in early

1979. Production per annum is not to exceed 46 for Britain,

44 for West Germany and 18 for Italy; at no stage will deliveries to Germany exceed four a month and all that

country's aircraft will have been delivered by mid-1987. This schedule takes account of Britain's 1974 announcement that

it wished to slow down the planned rate of deliveries to the

Royal Air Force. Texas Instruments is developing the multi-mode forward- looking and terrain-following radar for the common interdictor-strike (IDS) version of Tornado and has received its first production contract for the equipment. The main nav-attack computer is a Litef (German Litton) Spirit 3, on which Smiths Industries is collaborating, and the inertial navigation system is supplied by Ferranti. This last company is also responsible for the laser ranger and marked-target receiver, in association with Eltro and Selenia. The head-up display is by Smiths, assisted by Teldix and OMI, while Elettronica supplies the warning radar and a Marconi/ Plessey/Decca team produces passive ECM equipment. The nominal maximum weapon load of the IDS Tornado (18,0001b with very considerably reduced internal fuel) would be carried on three tandem twin pylons under the fuselage, two tandem inboard wing pylons and two single outboard wing pylons. Weapons specified for carriage include various conventional bombs, cluster weapons, AS.30, Martel and Kormoran, and many others are suitable. Italian Tornados,

which will have air superiority among their roles, are likely

to be armed with the Selenia Aspide missile, loosely based on

the US Sparrow. On March 4, 1976, the British Government announced that full-scale development of the UK-only Air-Defence Variant (ADV) of Tornado had been authorised. The aircraft will have aerodynamic refinements such as semi-recessed missile

positions and by 1982 it is likely tha t uprated versions of the Turbo-Union RB.199, producing 17,0001b or more thrust, will be available. Internal fuel capacity is to be increased by perhaps as much as 200gal by way of a 3ft fuselage stretch immediately aft of the rear cockpit. ADV patrol requirements

or four

ADV development aircraft are planned, with the first already- being built; prototype A.01 is due to fly in 1979.

Although about 80 per cent common by component with the IDS Tornado, the ADV will have a new air-intercept radar being developed jointly by Marconi-Elliott and Ferranti. and called Foxhunter. Proof-of-principle trials in a Canberra are almost complete and the equipment may be sufficiently advanced to be installed in the first development aircraft when it flies. Foxhunter will be able to track a number of targets simultaneously and will almost certainly also have

a multi-shot capability. Armament will be a mixture of Sky-

flash medium-range and probably AIM-9L Super Sidewinder dogfight missiles. Basic unit production cost of the IDS Tornado in September 1976 prices is £6-34 million; the equivalent figure for the ADV is £7-72 million. These costs include provision for possible modifications during production and certain other contingencies, but not for the recovery of research and development costs, which Germany estimated at end-1975 prices would total DM8 billion (nearly £2 billion at current exchange rates). Estimates of non-recurring production costs have not been made available. The real increase in unit cost since inception of the programme amounts to 40 per cent.

Operators: Britain 385 total required, approx 165 ADV; Italy

call for up to 2hr loiter 1 at a range of 500 n.m. Three

100

required ; West Germany 324 required , 211 for air force,

113

for

navy.

548

MILITARY AIRCRAFT OF THE WORLD

SEPECAT Jaguar The French Air Force has two fully operational wings, at St Dizier and Toul-Rosieres, flying Ermodel two-seaters and A-model single-seaters. In the UK, the RAF has two squadrons at Coltishall and one working up in the reconnaissance role. At RAF Briiggen in Germany, three squadrons are fully operational and deliveries for a fourth have started. At RAF Laarbruch a second reconnaissance unit is operational. Mean- while, the Operational Conversion Unit at Lossiemouth has about 50 aircraft, of which about half are B-model two-seaters. Combined production rate at Dassault-Breguet and BAC is about eight a month. The British and French versions differ primarily in their nav-attack systems, the former being digital-inertial (Marconi- Elliott Navwass) and the latter being Doppler-analogue and twin-gyro platform. The first S-model RAF single-seaters are receiving the Ferranti laser ranger and marked-target seeker

which fits into the chisel nose. The B Jaguar, which has neither the laser nor the radar warning receiver of the S aircraft, nevertheless maintains virtually the same operational capability as the single-seater and most forms of attack can be carried out from the rear seat, where the occupant is provided with the same Smiths head-up display as the front- seat pilot. The export Jaguar International first came into the news in November 1975 as B.34 made a sales trip round the Middle East. The aircraft has the same basic airframe but is powered by two RT. 172-26 Adours which produce 8,6001b of thrust each (with reheat, Mach 0-9 at sea level). Take-off performance is improved by about 10 per cent and sustained g capability by about 25 per cent. Deliveries of the first Jaguar Inter- nationals to Ecuador have started. Also on offer for export are the Thomson-CSF/EMD Agave radar as fitted to the Super Etendard (q.D.), which would make the type particularly suitable for carrying anti-ship missiles such as AM.39 Exocet, Kormoran or Harpoon, and various night or bad-weather sensors such as low-light-level television or forward-looking infra-red. Combined cursive and raster head-up displays and helmet-mounted sights are also under study for possible application to Jaguar, while Matra Magic missiles have already been flight-tested and successfully fired from overwing pylons. Future studies centre on a fighter Jaguar powered by much uprated RT.172-58 Adours or Turbo Union RB.199s. Operators: Britain 202 on order (more tha n 190 delivered); Ecuado r 12 on order ; Franc e 200 ordere d (mor e tha n 115 delivered); Oman 12 on order.

United Kingdom

BRITISH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION Strikemaster Multi-purpose pilot and weapons trainer, attack and reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Jet Provost. JP and Strikemaster have sold to nine air forces other than the RAF; four have re-ordered on ten occasions. Operators: Ecuador 16; Kenya 6; Kuwait 12; New Zealand 16; Oman 24; Saudi Arabia 46; Singapore 16. In all cases figure is for aircraft delivered; those delivered to South Yemen (4) and to Sudan (5) believed no longer operational.

FAIREY BRITTEN-NORMAN Defender/Islander Variants of the BN2 series of aircraft for Coin, patrol, casevac, FAC, transport, SAR, crew training, etc. The Defender was first shown at the Paris Air Show in

FLIGHT International, 5 March 1977

^*-f€lr

_

1971 and has since sold with para-military Islanders in considerable numbers. Production is at Bembridge, IoW, at Gosselies in Belgium and in Romania. Philippine production is due to start shortly. The Defender can be fitted with a variety of avionics according to role requirement, while the BN2 series can be fitted with other equipment such as skis, reconnaissance and geophysical systems as well as ordnance. The search radar selected for the proposed Maritime Defender is th e Bendix RDR 1300, but other systems are accepted as being suitable. Operators: Abu Dhabi 4; Belgium 12; Ghana 8; Guyana 8; Hong Kong 1; India 5; Iraq 2; Israel 8-10; Jamaica 2; Malagasy 1; Mauretania 4; Oman 8; Panama 2; Philippines 10+; Qatar 1; Rhodesia 2; Rwanda 1. Government operators include Brazil, Egypt, Lesotho, Liberia, Mexico, Nigeria, Thai- land, Turkey, Zaire and Zambia.

HAWKER SIDDELEY Andover/Military HS.748 Andover is variant of the HS.748 with raised tail and rear loading door. Production is complete. Military versions of the HS.748 continue in production with wide rear freight door which can be opened in flight for paratroop supply dropping. Accommodation is for up to 58 troops. Developments include the Coastguarder coastal-patrol and surveillance aeroplane, primary role equipment for which is the MEL Marec II radar. The antenna is mounted under the forward fuselage and detection rang e is 200 n.m. or so under ideal conditions. Navigation equipment includes Doppler, Decca TANS and Marconi VLF Omega. Dinghies and other rescue equipment can be ejected through a chute in the fuselage. Patrol endurance has been improved by increasing internal fuel capacity from l,440gal to 2,190gal. Operators: Argentina 1 748; Australia 12 748; Brunei 1 748; Belgium 3 748; Brazil 12 748; Colombia 3 748; Ecuador 5 748; India 62 748; Nepal 1 748; New Zealand 10 Andover; South Korea 2 748; Thailand 2 748; Zambia 1 748. Britain has 7 748 and 12 Andover still in service.

Buccaneer One Fleet Air Arm squadron continues to operate the strike/reconnaissance Buccaneer S.2, embarked aboard HMS Ark Royal. Five squadrons and an Operational Con- version Unit form important parts of RAF Strike Command and RAF Germany. Ex-S.2s were modified to S.2A standard with avionic and equipment changes and the S.2B with the bomb-bay-door fuel tank and strengthened undercarriage has provision for the Martel missile. Ultimately all RAF Buccaneers will probably be configured thus. Production will be completed in mid-1977. A small number of aircraft will be equipped with the Westinghouse Pave Spike TV and laser pod. Operators: Britain 100+ ; South Africa 9.

Harrier/AV-8A/Sea Harrier The world's first operational fixed-wing V/Stol aircraft, the Harrier is now in service with the RAF, the US Marine Corps, where it is designated AV-8A, and the Spanish Navy, which calls it the Matador. The 21,5001b-thrust Rolls-Royce Pegasus Mk 103 now powers all Harriers. Spanish aircraft, the first of which was delivered to the USA for crew training in late 1975, are equipped to AV-8A standard. The RAF's Harriers all have the analogue Ferranti Inas (Inertial Navigation and Attack System) but the USMC, with its different role, has dispensed with this equipment. Informa- tion is presented to the pilot on a Smiths head-up display. Sidewinder is carried as standard self-defence armament on USMC and Spanish Navy aircraft and its use is being con- sidered for the RAF, whose aircraft are currently being retro- fitted with laser ranger and marked-target seeker equipment.

FLIGHT International, 5 March 1977

MILITARY AIRCRAFT OF THE WORLD

The major British development of the Harrier is the Royal Navy's FRS.l Sea Harrier, 24 of which are being bought for deployment aboard the Service's new class of anti-submarine/ through-deck cruisers. The whole programme also involves a standard T.4 Harrier (for land-based training) and two Hunter T.8Ms carrying the entire nav-attack system of the FRS.l. The Hunters are for development trials and, from 1980, for Service pilot training. The first development Sea Harrier (there are no prototypes) is due to fly in the third quarter of 1977. Powerplant for the aircraft is the Pegasus Mk 104, a "navalised" version of th e Mk 103 which produces the same thrust.

Designed to lift its maximum military load of fuel and ordnance from a 500ft deck run with 30kt wind over deck, the Sea Harrier will carry a Ferranti Blue Fox X-band air-to-air and air-to-surface radar with dual monopulse capability and frequency agility selectable by the pilot. A Ferranti heading and attitude reference system derived from the Inas platform is coupled with Doppler and replaces the Inas itself. A Smiths head-up display with a combined cursive and raster display will be used. The length of the Sea Harrier, with its new radar nose and cockpit raised by lOin or so, is 47ft 7in, or 42ft 3in with the radome folded for storage. Aft of the cockpit, the structure is substantially the same as that of the standard RAF aircraft, with the more forward e.g. necessitating use of the two- seater's stronger and heavier rear-end structure. The base of th e fin is also slightly modified to accommodate a small change in tailplane incidence designed to counteract suck- down effects in partially jet-borne flight. The advanced version of th e Harrier known as th e AV-8B is described under McDonnell Douglas, the US licensee. Operators: Britain 109 GR.3 and T.4, 24 GR.3 and 24 FRS.l on order; Spain 8 AV-8A and TAV-8A, plus 5 on order; USA

110 AV-8A and TAV-8A.

Hawk The Hawk transonic trainer/ground-attack aircraft made it first flight in August 1974 and was demonstrated immediately afterwards at the Farnborough Air Show. Since then the six development aircraft (there were no prototypes as such) have completed the trials programme, including gun-firing and release of all the weapons required by the Royal Air Force, and spinning clearance. The first two Hawks were handed over to th e customer on November 4, 1976, and pilot training should begin in earnest this summer. The manufacturer is building up to a peak RAF production rate of four a month, which should be achieved late this year or in early 1978. All bu t one of th e 176 aircraft on RAF orde r will be delivered to the Service, with Hawker Siddeley retain- ing one (the only pre-production aircraft) for continuing trials and demonstration purposes. A single private-venture demonstration Hawk has also been built. Export interest in both the trainer and ground-attack versions continues and the first customer, Finland, signed a letter of intent to purchase in October 1976, expected to lead to a firm contract this summer. The initial batch will be 30 aircraft bu t the interest is in about 50. Deliveries are due to start in 1979. Hawker Siddeley has built a forward-fuselage mock-up of a single-seat Hawk derivative, in which at least Egypt was at one time expressing interest. Operators: Britain 175 on order; Finland up to 50 planned.

Nimrod Developed as a Shackleton replacement in the maritime reconnaissance and anti-submarine roles, Nimrod MR.ls equip five RAF squadrons and an Operational Con- version Unit. This strength is planned to be reduced in 1978 or slightly earlier when one squadron is to be recalled from Malta. Three R.ls are operated by an electronic recon- naissance squadron. The Phase 2 electronic and acoustic equipment update continues at a relatively slow pace and should result in the first MR.2 being delivered back to th e RAF towards the end

of 1977 or in early 1978. The MR.l's Marconi-Elliott 920B digital computer in the central tactical system is being replaced with a 920 ATC unit with its 96K-word store poten- tially expandable up to 256K words. The EMI Searchwater air-to-surface radar is being installed, with data processing being handled by a Ferranti FM 1600D computer. The new Marconi-Elliott AQS-901 acoustic system is based on two more

920 ATC computers.

The Nimrod AEW (airborne early warning) study has continued to be funded to provide a fall-back should Nato countries fail to agree on a common purchase of Boeing E-3As. A development aircraft (based on a Comet airframe with one of the two radar antennas installed in a nose

553

radome) is due to fly in May or June. If this solution were adopted by the UK, 11 airframes would be available for conversion to AEW configuration. These would come from the MR aircraft being withdrawn from Malta plus a few of the eight extra aircraft ordered in 1973 for employment reasons and now in "limbo" at HSA Woodford. Operator: Britain 46 MR.1/2, 3 R.l.

SCOTTISH AVIATION Bulldog Military primary trainer version of and developed considerably from original Beagle Pup, taken over by Scottish on liquidation of th e company. Production model is Series 120 with increased weight limits for aerobatics compared with Series 100. Full firing trials have been completed with Sneb 68mm rockets from Matra launchers. Stores dropping has been demonstrated. Aircraft operational in Sweden with Bofors Bantam wire-guided missiles. Current production rate up to seven a month.

14;

Lebanon 6; Malaysia 15; Nigeria 20; Sweden 78.

Jetstream Twenty-six multi-engine pilot-training Jetstreams were ordered by the RAF but were mostly delivered straight into storage. One was lost in an accident. The majority are now being delivered to Royal Navy standard for Sea King observer training, the remainder being retained for the RAF MEPT role. Operators: Britain 25 (RAF 9, RN 16).

Operators:

Britain

130;

Ghana

13;

Jordan

13;

Kenya

SHORT BROTHERS Skyvan Series 3M developed as military version of the civil Skyvan. The basic aircraft can be equipped with a range of options according to role, such as troop, vehicle or freight transport, paratroop/supply dropping, casevac, border and coastal patrol, and aircrew training. Several Skyvans are employed in geophysical/photographic survey and a number ar e fitted with special avionics, such as Doppler, for search and rescue. Operators: Argentina 5; Austria 2; Ecuador 1; Ghana 6; Indonesia 3; Mauretania 2; Nepal 2; Oman 15; Singapore 6; Thailand 3; Venezuela 1; Yemen 2.

United States of America

BEECHORAFT C-12A The C-12A is a modification of the T-tail, pressurised Super King Air. Deliveries to the US Army and Air Force began in July 1975. Military-specification cockpit and exterior lighting are used. The 90 aircraft under production contract are expected to be stationed at 32 locations in 25 countries, and Beech has worldwide service and parts-support responsi- bility for these aircraft. Operator:' USA 90 delivered or on order.

T-34C Turbo Mentor The US Navy has now ordered the T-34C

trainer into production, with contracts currently calling for

116 aircraft out of a planned total of 278. First production

aircraft, delivered in late 1976, are now in USN reliability and maintainability testing. Equipment includes UHF com- munications, Tacan, VOR/DME with provision for RNav, and

dual transponders in a Collins package. An angle-of-attack system is provided for training in Navy-style approaches. Operators: Ecuador 14 on order; Morocco 12 on order; USA

278 planned.

T-44A In May 1976 the US Navy declared Beech the winner of a competition for a new, off-the-shelf multi-engined advanced trainer, the type proposed being a military version of the turboprop pressurised King Air 90. The initial produc- tion contract is for 15 aircraft, with deliveries starting in a month or two and continuing up to October. Options in the contract provide for the purchase of 56 more aircraft and five years of logistic support by the contractor. Operators: USA 71 planned.

BOEING

B-52 Stratofortress

Main

versions

still in

service

are

B-52D

(170 built), which bore th e brun t of Vietnam bombing;

(89);

B-52F

provision

B-52G

(193),

incorporating

a

wet

wing

and

+-

*-

page 560

MILITARY AIRCRAFT OF THE WORLD

*

Manufacturer/

Role

Powerplant

Crew

Span

Type

Power/thrust

Length

 

Height

Wing area

(gross)

FRANCE

DASSAULT-BREGUET

Atlantic

Maritime

2

x R-R Tyne

12

119ft 1in

patrol

6,100 e.h.p.

104ft 2in 37ft 2in' 1,295 sq ft

Super Etendard

Carrier-

1

x Snecma

1

31ft 6in

based fighter

Atar 8K50

47ft

 

11,0001b

12ft 8in

 

307

sq ft

Mirage HIE

Fighter-bomber,

1

x Snecma

1

27ft

recce

Atar 9C

49ft 2in

 

13,7001b with

14ft 8in

A/B

 

375

sq f t

Optional SEPR

 

rocket motors

3,3001b

 

Mirage F.1C

All-weather

1

x Snecma

1

27ft 8in

intercepter

Atar 9K50

49ft 7in

 

15,8731b with

14ft 8in

A/B

 

269-1 sqft

INTERNATIONAL

 

DASSAULT-BREGUET/DORNIER

Alpha Jet

Trainer/

2

x Snecma

2

29ft 11 in

light attack

Turbomeca

40ft 4in

 

Larzac 04

13ft 9in

29601b

 

188-4 sqf t

JUGOSLAVIA-ROMANIA

 

Orao/IAR-93

Light attack

2

x R-R/Fiat

1

24ft 10in

fighter

Viper 632

42ft 4in

 

4,000lb

 

12ft 5in

 

195

s q f t

PANAVIA

Tornado

Multi-role

2

x Turbo-

2

28ft 2in-

combat

Union

 

45ft 7£in

aircraft

RB.199-34R

 

54ft 10in

 

14,5001b with

18ft 8in

A/B

 

SEPECAT

Jaguar S

Tactical

2

x R-R/

1

28ft 6in

;

-

support

Turbomeca

50ft 11in

 

Adour

16ft

ii n

7,380lb with A/B

260

sq ft

TRANSALL

C-160

Transport

2

x R-R Tyne

2

131ft 3in

 

6,100 e.h.p.

106ft 6in

UNITED KINGDOM

 

40ft 7in 1,723 sq ft

BRITISH AIRCRAFT

CORPORATION

 

Strikemaster

Strike-recce/

1

x

R-R

1/2

36ft 11 in

trainer

Viper 535

38ft 8|in

 

3,4101b

 

10ft

 

213-7 sq ft

BRITTEN-NORMAN

Defender/Islander

Multi-role

2

x Lycomin g

1/2

53ft

light aircraft

IO-540

 

35ft 8in

 

300 h.p.

 

13ft 9in

337 sq f t

Empty weight

Max speed

Time to height/

 

Max T/O weight

S.I.

 

s.l. rate of

Wing loading

Max speed

climb

at altitude

Service ceiling

Economic

 

cruise speed

35,1001b

95,9001b

350kt

 

30,000ft

74lb/sq ft

(VNE)

 

300kt

(max T/O wt)

 

13,8001b

650kt

 

19,700ft/min

25,0001b

M=1 +

50,000ft

(normal mission)

(36,000ft)

(approx)

82-5lb/sq ft

15,5401b

750kt

 

6min 55sec

30,2001b

1,270kt

(50,000ft, M = 1-8)

 

56lb/sq ft at

M=2-2

56,000ft

combat weight

(39,500ft)

(M = 1-8)

M

=0 9

75,000ft +

(36,000ft)

(with rocket motor)

16,3141b

M

= 1-2

7min 30sec

33,5201b

M

= 2 2

(40,000ft, M=2)

 

90lb/sq ft at combat weight

65,000ft

1

• •

 

r

7,3751b

540kt

 

7min

15,9701b

M

= 0-85

(30,000ft)

84lb/sq ft

46,000ft

9,5001b

M

= 0-9

17,000ft/min

19,8501b

M

= 0-95

42,000ft

100lb/sq ft

25,000lb

M

=

M 5

(no fuel)

M=2-2

50,000ft+

45,000lb

M=0-6

(wings

 

(estimated)

forward)

 

15,8001b

729kt

 

2min 30sec

34,0001b

(max T/O wt)

(30,000ft,

130lb/sq ft

M

= 1-4

reheat)

(36,000ft)

45,000ft

63,400ft

1,440ft/min

112,4351b

320kt

 

(max T/O wt)

 

65-25lb/sq ft

(16,000ft)

27,900ft

245kt

 

I

I

(20,000ft)

 
 

•II

5,9171b

390kt

 

8min 45sec

11,5001b

(50% fuel, clean)

(30,000ft,

54lb/sq ft

410kt

 

internal fuel,

 

(50% fuel, clean,

2 crew)

20,000ft)

5,250ft/min

4,1061b

157kt

 

1,110ft/min

(equipped)

148kt

19,300ft

6,6001b

(cruise, 7,000ft,

(absolute)

6,9501b

75% power)

(overload)

100kt

 

19-6lb/sq ft

(patrol, 2,000ft,

 

45% power)

FLIGHT

International,

T/O run

Landing

run

(role/weight)

4,925ft

(ISA, to 35ft) max T/ 0 wt)

2,295ft

(max T/O wt)

1,640ft

(max landing wt)

4,000ft

(25,000lb)

2,295ft

1,475ft

(25,355lb)

1,640ft

(18,7401b)

1,600ft

(11,0001b)

1,950ft

(8,250lb)

3,000ft

3,500ft

3,000ft

(clean)

2,800ft

(27,500lb,

approx)

2,880ft

(4,0001b warload)

1,550ft

(normal weight)

2,600ft

(max T/O wt)

1,160ft

(97,450lb)

3,500ft

(to 50ft, 11,5001b)

4,250ft

(from 50ft,

11,2501b aborted

sortie)

1,100ft

(to 50ft)

960ft

from 50ft)

5 March

1977

555

Max range*

Internal

Armament—

Max

Remarks

Combat

fuel

Total external

payload

radius

Auxiliary

Internal

(role/profile/

fuel

Hardpoints

weight)

4,854 n.m. 18hr (max

4,619gal

4 x AS missiles Bay for bombs,

Nato specification for Neptune replacement. International development including Fokker, Dornier, Fairey, Sabca, FN

endurance,

depth charges,

and Aeritalia. Standard weapons include AS.37, and AM.39

patrol at 169kt)

rockets, torpedoes

is planned.

4

1,800 n.m. + *

870gal

5,000lb

Under development to replace Etendard IVM. To be capable

350

n.m.

2

x 290gal

2

x 30mm

(low-level, clean)

cannon

 

5

 

733gal

9,0001b

647

(range, ground

attack)

n.m.

miles

(3,5201b load,

lo-lo)

400

2

x 374gal

2

x 30mm cannon

and

5

1

x 286gal

950gal

8,8201b

3 x 265gal

2 x 30mm

cannon + 2 wingtip

5

of "buddy" refuelling. Standard armament will include AM.39 Exocet; cannon are Defa.

Basic French Air Force version. Seven other variants,

including two-seaters. Armament in FAF includes, as else-

where, R.530, Sidewinder, R.550, AS.20, AS.30, AS.37; Shafrir in Israel, Falcon in Switzerland. Cannon are Defa. IMI-improved Defa in Israeli IIICs. Also 19 sub-variants of Mirage 5 for export, including two-seaters.

Production

version for

French Air

Force. Armament

will

eventually include Super 530, R.550. Cannon are Defa.

1,450 n.m.

280

(hi-lo-hi,

4,520lb load

n.m.

3,350lb

2

550lb

x

4,960lb

5

Figures basically for attack version. French armament includes 1 x 30mm Defa cannon on fuselage point, Mauser selected for Germany-

200 n.m.

(hi-lo-hi,

4,000lb load)

675gal

4,500lb

x 30m m cannon

2

4

Joint Jugoslav-Romanian light fighter-bomber development to replace Jastreb and Galeb. All dimensions and perform- ance figures estimated. Two-seat and reheated versions expected.

n.m.

(hi-lo-hi,

5,000lb load,

estimated)

500

10,0001b

x 330gal

on Inboard

2

wing stations

18,0001b

2

cannon

3

+

x 27mm

fuselage 4 on wings

Variable geometry. See text for more details of UK-only air-defence variant. Cannon are Mauser. Armament will include XJ521, Kormoran, Aspide, AJ.168 (and possibly AS.37) Martel, BL755, etc. Weights and performance esti- mated.

290

(internal fuel,

lo-lo-lo)

760

(external fuel,

hi-lo-hi)

n.m.

n.m.

2,805 n.m.

2,460 n.m.

(range with

17,6401b payload

reserves)

1,200 n.m.

(1,5001b, 2001b

fuel reserves)

215

(3,000lb weapons,

reserves, hi-lo-hi)

n.m.

924gal

3

x 264gal

10,0001b

2

cannon

30mm

x

RAF strike version. French Air Force equivalent (A) similar but with less comprehensive avionics. Also two tandem-seat versions: E (French) and B (British). B has single 30mm

 

5

+

provision

for 2 overwing pylons)

cannon only. Jaguar International has uprated Adours. British cannon Aden, French Defa.

3,625gal

35,275 Initial production complete, new batch entering production. Some French Air Force aircraft planned as air-refuelling tankers, others to have receptacles only.

270gal

3,000lb

 

Developed fro m BA C

145 (Je t Provos t T.5) .

48gal

tip tanks, x 75gal and x 50gal underwing

2

2

2 x

2 x 7-62mm

machine guns

8

1,497 n.m. (aux fuel, no reserves)

n.m.

326

(range with

max payload

stores)

163gal

x

2

56gal

2,300lb

4 +

aux fuel

2 for

• A n asterisk in this column denotes air-refueiling capability.

2,4941b Performance figures all in ISA with pylons, no stores. Armament can include twin 762mm gun pods, Matra rocket

packs, GP bombs up to 5001b; up to four sideways-firing LMGs.

 

FLIGHT International,

S March

1977

UNITE D

KINGDO M

continued

Manufacturer/

Role

,

Powerplant

Crew

Span

 

Empty

weight

Max

speed

Tim e to height/

Typ e

Power/thrust

Length

 

Max T/ O

weight

S.I.

s.l. rate of

 

Height

Wing

loading

Max

speed

climb

Wing

area

at altitude

Service ceiling

(gross)

 

Economic

 

cruise speed

HAWKE R

SIDDELE Y

 

Buccaneer

S.2A/B

Low-level

 

2

x

R-R

 

2

44ft

600kt

 

strike

Spey

 

63ft Sin

 

62,0001b

(clean)

40,000ft

 
 

11,2551b

 

16ft 3in

120-5lb/sq ft

M

0-95

(estimated)

 

514

7 sq

ft

HS.748

Transport

 

2

x

R-R

 

2

98ft 6in

 

25,5171b

 

1,420ft/min

 

Dart 535-2

67ft

46,5001b

(38,000lb)

 

2,280 e.h.p.

24ft 10in

 

57

3lb/sq ft

244M

 

25,000ft

 

811

sq

ft

(15,000ft)

 

Harrier GR.3

Ground attack/

 

1

x

R-R

 

1

25ft 3in

 

12,3001b

640kt

+

2min 30sec

close support/

Pegasu s

Mk 103

45ft 6in

(basic operating,

M

= 1-2+

(40,000ft, VTO)

recce,

21,5001b

11ft 6in

with crew)

(dive)

 

45,000ft

 

V/Stol

201

sq

ft

25,0001b+

M

= 0

96

 

125lb/sq ft

(level)

(jnax)

 

Sea

Harrier

Shipborne

 

1

x

R-R

 

1

25ft 3in

 

Not

less

Not less

 

FRS.1

fighter/recce/

Pegasu s

Mk 104

47ft 7in

 

25,0001b +

than GR.3

than GR.3

strike, V/Stol

21,5001b

12ft 2in

125lb/sq ft

 
 

210

s q

ft

(max)

Haw k

Trainer/

1

x

R-R/

 

1/2

30ft 10in

 

8,0401b

538kt TA S

8,900ft/min

 

ground

attack

Turbomeca

39ft

2{in

(zero fuel,

TMN = 0 88

(S.I.,

ISA ,

 

Adou r 151

(incl. probe)

two crew)

(level, 30,000ft)

60% fuel)

 

5,340lb

 

13ft 5in

 

17,0971b

TMN=1-1/570kt

48,500ft

 

180

sq

ft

(5,6001b stores)

EAS (dive)

(50% fuel)

 

95-2lb/sqft

M

« 0

86

(max)

 

Nimrod

MR.1

Maritime

4

<

R-R

 

12

114ft 10in

 

86,0001b

reconnaissance

 

Spey 250

 

126ft 9in

192,0001b

500kt

 

 

12,1401b

29ft 8|in

(overload)

(ISA

+20° C)

 

2,121 sq

ft

90

5lb/sq ft

425kt

 

(ISA

+20° C)

200kt (patrol)

 

SCOTTIS H

AVIATIO N

 

Bulldo g Srs 120

Trainer

1

x

Lycoming

1/2

33ft

1,4301b

130M

 

1,034ft/min

 
 

IO-360 or

 

23ft 3in

 

2,3501b

 

16,000 ft

AEIO-360

8ft1Hi n

18-2lb/sq ft

105kt

 

200

h.p.

129

sq

ft

(4,000ft)

 

Jetstream

Light transport

 

2

x

Turbomeca

2

52ft

7,683lb

2,500ft/min

 
 

Asfazou

XVI

47ft 1±in

 

12,5661 b

243kt

 

26,000ft

996

e.s.h.p.

 

17ft

5ii n

46

3lb/sq ft

(max cruise,

 
 

271

3 sq

ft

(12,000ft)

 

234kt

 

(15,000ft)

 

SHOR T

BRO S

 

S k yvan 3M

Transport

 

2

x

Garrett

1/2

64ft 11 in

 

7,4001b

168kt

 

1,530ft/min

 
 

AiResearch

40ft

1 in

13,7001b

176kt

(13,7001b)

TPE 331-2-201A

15ft

36

7lb/sq ft

(10,000ft max

22,300ft

715

s.h.p.

 

373

sq

ft

cont. power)

 
 

169kt

 

(10,000ft)

 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 

BEECHCRAF T

 

C-12A

Light

2

x

P

i

W

2

54ft 6in

 

7,722lb

230kt

 

2,450ft/min

 

transport

PT6A-38

 

43tt 10in

12,5001b

259kt

31,000ft

 

750

s.h.p.

15ft 5in

41-3lb/sq ft

(30,000ft)

 
 

303

sq

ft

221 kt

 

T-34C Turbo

Trainer

1

x

P 4

W

1/2

33ft 6in

2,940lb

185kt

 

1,400ft/min

 

Mentor

PT6A-25

 

28ft 8iin

4,300lb

226kt

30,000ft+

 

Flat-rated to 400 s.h.p.

 

9ft 10in 179-9 sq ft

23-9lb/sq ft

(17,500ft)

 

T-44A

Trainer

2

x

P 4

W

2

50ft 3in

 

6,246lb

1,955ft/min

 
 

PT6A-34B

 

35ft 6in

10,1001b

240kt

 

29,500ft

750

s.h.p.

14ft 3in

34-4lb/sq ft

(15,000ft)

 

Flat-rated

 

294

sq

ft

219kt

 

t o 550 s.h.p.

 

(16,000ft,

 

8,365lb, max)

FLIGHT International, .5 March 1977

557

T/ O rurr

Max range*

Internal

Landing

Combat

fuel

 

run

radius

Auxiliary

(role/weight)

(role/profile/

fuel

 

weight)

 

3,800ft

*

1,560gal

(56,0001b)

2,000 n.m .

1 x 425gal,

3,150ft

(typical strike

1 x 440gal

(35,000lb)

range with in -

(bomb bay door)

flight refuelling)

and/or

 

2

x 430gal

2,000ft

1,790 n.m.

1,440gal

(40,000lb)

(20% reserves)

 

1,060ft

690

n.m.

(40,000lb)

(9,000lb payload,

 

20% reserves)

STO under

1,700 n.m.*

5,0561b

1,200ft (land).

150

n.m.

2

y 330gal

(600ft T/ O

roll,

 

500ft (deck) Recovery V L

4,500lb

payload)

500ft

1,700 n.m.*

5,0561b

(deck)

380

n.m.

2

x 330gal

Recovery

V L

(1,200ft

T/ O roll,

 
 

3,000lb

payload)

1,800ftt

1,669 n.m.

365gal

(S.I., ISA ,

(2

x

100gal

2

x

100gal

10,8271b)

aux. tanks)

 

1,600ft

520

n.m.

(5% fuel remaining

(3,0001b load ,

 

+ 10min loiter

2

x

100galtanks

at s.l.).

hi-lo-hi, reserves)

 

4,800ft

5,000 n.m .

10,730gal

(177,5001b,

1,936gal

ISA, s.l.)

(up to six

5,300ft

weapon-bay

(120,0001b,

tanks)

ISA, s.l.)

900ft

540

n.m.

32gal

 

500ft

(no

reserves)

1,945 ft

1,250 n.m.

384gal

(45 min

reserve)

580

n.m.

293gal

1 I

 

(150kt, 45min

(provision

reserves)

for 4 aux.

 

tanks internally, raising capacity to 390gal)

2,820ft

2,050 miles

386gal

(to 50ft)

(with aux.

158gal

2,514ft

fuel)

 

(from 50ft)

1,270ft

795 n.m.

125

US ga l

(Stol)

(25,000ft)

 

1,800ft

193kt, reserves)

(from 50ft,

no reverse)

2,024ft

1,195 miles

384gal

(to 50ft)

(25,000ft)

2,110ft

(from 50ft,

no reverse)

Armament-

Max

Total external

payload

Internal

Hard points

12,0001b

Bombs, fuel

_

or recce packs

up t o 4,0001b

4

12,8891b

(freight

version)

Remarks

"Buddy" tanker role, max fuel capacity 2,815gal

Empty weight includes all fixed fittings. Rear freight door can

be opened in flight for paratroop/supply drop. Maximum

aperture 8ft 9in y 5ft 8in. Optional overload gross weight.

8,000lb

5 +

cannon

2

x

8,000lb

30mm

 

 

5 +

2

x 30mm

cannon

5,600lb

 

 

5

-

 

ASMS

 

Variety of

bombs, mines,

depth charges,

torpedoes

2

4

(optional)

-

_

station

can carry 2

same capability in equipment an d warload, is 56ft long

13,7501b, ma x T/ O weigh t i s

USMC

AV-8As

carry Sidewinders. Centre fuselage

x

30mm Aden cannon pack. Two-seat T.4 has

overall, empty weigh t (2 crew)

26,000lb + , max wing loading 130lb/sq ft+ .

Multi-mode radar in nose. Armament also to include Side-

winder, as on AV-8A, and as yet undecided air-to-surface

guided weapons.

Fuselage hardpoint carries 30mm Aden gun pack (optional).

RAF trainer has provision for fuselage station and only tw o

inboard wing pylons; tw o outboard pylons extra on export version.

t

figures

factored for safe student operation.

Practical,

no t

minimum ,

airfield

performance ;

13,5001b

Full back-up crew can be carried, or up to 45 passengers in

(max dis-

trooping conversion. Armament includes AS.12.

posable)

920lb

Developed from civi

Pup.

Armed

missiles.

version

can carry

rocket

pods or wire-guided

4 r 883lb

RAF

multi-engine pilot

trainer,

RN

also

now

taking

delivery.

5,200lb

All military safes for export.

Personnel-transport modification of T-tall, pressurised Super King Air.

1,2001b

4

Turboprop version of original Mentor. Armament optional (such as for Pave Coin). Beech claims gross weight can be

increased above 4,3001b by amount equal to external load.

Advanced trainer version of King Air 90 for USN.

*An asterisk in this column denotes air-refuelling capability.

558

FLIGHT International

5 March l$77

MILITARY

AIRCRAFT OF THE WORLD

 

UNITE D

STATE S

continued

Manufacturer/

Role

 

Powerplant

Crew

Span

 

Empty weight

Max

speed

Tim e to height/

Typ e

Power/thrust

Length

Max T/ O

weight

s.l.

s.l. rate of

 

Height

Wing loading

Max

speed

climb

Wing

area

at altitude

Service ceiling

(gross)

 

Economic

 

cruise speed

BOEING

E-3A

Awac s

Airborne

4

x

P

i

W

4

145ft 11in

172,0001b

warning

and

TF33-P-100/100A

(+miss -

153ft

 

(zero-fuel)

40,000ft

control

21,0001b

 

ion crew

42ft 6in

325,0001b

M

05- 0

7

 

2,892 sq ft

112lb/sq ft

E-4B

AABNC P

Command

4

x

GE

 

3

195ft 8in

 

M=0-93

 

post

F103-100

(-(-miss-

231ft 4in

775,000lb

M=-0-99

 

40,000ft+

 

52,500lb

 

ion crew

63ft 6in

141lb/sq ft

M

= 0

82-

 

5,500 sq ft

0

85

YC-14

AMS T

Stol transport

2

x

GE

 

2

129ft

 

118,0001b

350kt

 

6,350ft/min

 

F103

 

131ft 8in

 

214,0001b

438kt

(Stol wt)

51,0001b

 

48ft 4in

 

(at2-5g)

390kt

45,000ft

 

1,762 sq

ft

262,0001b

(TAS)

 
 

(at 2g)

149lb/sq ft

CESSN A

A-37B

Dragonfly

Counter-

2

x

GE

 

2

35ft 10*in

6,172lb

6,990ft/min

insurgency

J85-17A

 

29ft 3in

14,0001b

440kt

 

41,765ft

 

2,850lb

 

8ft 10*in 183-9 sq ft

76lb/sq ft

(16,000ft)

 

(max wt)

FAIRCHIL D

INDUSTRIE S

 

A-10A

Close

support

2

x

GE

 

"

1

57ft 6in

 

20,9831b

400kt

 

7,000ft/min

 

TF34-100

 

53ft 4in

47,2001b

400kt

44,500ft

9,065lb

 

14ft 8in

93lb/sq ft

(clean)

 
 

506

sq

ft

300kt

 

AU-23A

Counter-

1

x

Garrett

1/2

49ft 8in

 

1,500ft/min

Peacemaker

insurgency

TPE331

 

36ft 10in

 

6,1001b

152kt

 

22,800ft

650 s.h.p.

 

12ft 3in

 

19-7lb/sq ft

142kt

 
 

310

sq

ft

GENERAL

DYNAMIC S

 

F-16A

Air

combat

1

x

P4 W

1

32ft 10in

 

14,0621b

M

» 1

2

fighter

F100-PW-100(3)

(with

AAMs )

33,0001b

 

M

= 2

60,000ft+

 

23,800lb with A/ B

47ft 7iin

 

110lb/sq ft

M-

0-9

 

(ISA, s.l., static)

16ft 5in

 
 

300

sq

ft

F-111E

Fighter-bomber

2

x

P

i

W

2

32ft-63ft

 

47,000lb

M-1- 2

 
 

TF30-P-3

 

73ft 6in

 

(approx)

M

» 2

5

60,000ft+

18,5001b

17ft

91,5001b

with

A/B

 

GRUMMA N

 

A-6E Intruder

Carrier-

2

x

P

i

W

2

53ft

25,7401b

563kt

 

8,000ft/mln

 

based attack

J52-P-8A/B

54ft 7in

58,6001b

(clean)

 

44,700ft

 

9,3001b

 

16ft 2in

(catapult

(clean)

 

528-9 sq ft

launch)

414kt

 
 

110

8lb/s q ft

(max cruise)

 

E-2C

Hawkey e

Airborne

2

x

Allison

5

80ft 7in

 

37,6781b

warning

T56-A-425

 

57ft 7in

51,5691b

325kt

 

30,800ft

and control

4,910 e.s.h.p.

 

18ft 4in

73 7lb/sq ft

(51,5691b)

 

(51,5691b)

 

700

sq

ft

269kt

 

F-14A

Tomca t

Fleet defence

2

x

P

i

W

2

38ft 2in—

37,5001b

M =

1-2

fighter

TF30-P-412A

64ft ni n

 

72,0001b

M-2-3 4

 

60,000ft+

 

20,900lb

 

62ft

87lb/sq ft

(max design)

with

A/B

16ft

(0-86 thrust-

 
 

565

sq

ft

to-weight ratio)

LOCKHEE D

 

C-5A

Galaxy

Transport

4

x

GE

 

6

222ft 9in

337,9391b

350kt

 

1,650ft/min

 

TF39-1A

 

247ft 10in

(basic operating)

480kt

(max T/O wt)

41,1001b

65ft 1|in

769,0001b

(max T/O wt)

30,000ft

 

6,200 sq ft

(for2-25g)

450kt

 

(max T/O wt)

 

124lb/sqft(max)

(max T/O wt)

C-130H

Hercules

Transport

4

x

Allison

4

132ft 7in

 

75,934lb

270kt

 

1,980ft/min

 

T56-A-15

 

97ft 9in

 

(equipped)

330kt

(155,0001b)

4,508 e.h.p.

 

38ft

175,0001b-

(155,0001b)

 

30,000ft

 

1,745 sq

ft

(overload)

295kt

 

(155,0001b)

 

100-3lb/sq ft

(155,0001b)

 

i ;

L

i

f LIGHT

International,

5 March

1977

559

 

T / O

run

Max

range*

Landing

Combat

run

radius

(role/weight)

(role/profile/

J

weight)

*

 

8,050ft

(to 50ft, max

1

T/O wt)

3,700ft

(250,0001b)

 

12hr

(unrefuelled

endurance)

 

1,100ft

2,680 n.m.

1,400ft

(ferry)

(Stol wt)

500

n.m.

 

(3g, 40,000lb

payload)

*

 

1,740ft

4,150ft

399

n.m.

(14,0001b)

(range with

 

max payload,

incl. 4,1001b

of weapons)

 

1,370ft

2,700 n.m.*

(4

x

500lb

250

n.m.

Internal

Armament—

Max

Remarks

fuel

 

Total

external

payload

Auxiliary

Internal

fuel

 

Hardpoints

24,000 US gal

35,000lb

Westinghouse

surveillance

radar

mounted

on

modified

 

-

(mission

Boeing 707.

 

avionics)

331,5651b

 

First two aircraft were JT9D-powered, designated E-4A. Eventual buy of six planned.

 

-

62,7001b

 

69,000lb

Two prototypes, fly-off competition with McDonnell

Douglas

 

(2-5g)

YC-15.

 

-

37,000lb

 

(at 3g)

27,000lb

(Stol)

507 US gal

5,680lb

Modified from T-37 trainer.

 

4

x

100 US gal

1

x

7-62mm

 

Minigun

 

8

10,7001b

17,0001b

28,000lb

Armament

includes

Maverick.

Cannon

is

General

Electric

3 x

aux. tanks

1 x

30mm

GAU-8/A , 1,350 round s of ammunition .

|

bombs)

 

(range with

 

cannon

 

1,280ft

9,5001b of weapons

11

(4

x

500lb

bombs)

1

9hr loiter)

515ft

 

485 n.m.

142gal

1,9901b

 

Militarised version of PilatusTurbo-Porter.builtunderlicence

(max wt)

 

2 x 42gal

 

and re-engined. Armament can include single side-firing

295ft

 

5

20mm cannon or 7-62mm Miniguns.

 

(max wt)

 

Less than

 

2,400 n.m.*

6,934lb

15,2001b

Winner of USAF Air Combat Fighter fly-off. Eight develop-

2,500ft

500 n.m.

2 x

under-

(reduced

internal

ment aircraft being built. Two-seater has approx 5,800lb

(max-radius

(CAP

mission)

wing, 1

x

fuel)

internal fuel. Standard armament is Sidewinder. Air-to-

mission wt)

under-fueslage

1

x

20mm

surface weapons to include Maverick and, for overseas

Less than

 

tanks

 

cannon

 

customers , Harpoon . Cannon is Vulcan , 515 round s of

2,500ft

 

7 +

2 wingtip

ammunition.

 

Less than

 

3,750 n.m.*

 

28,000lb

 

F-111A, E, D models basically similar. F-111F has P-100

3,000ft

1,500 n.m.

 

-

1 x

20mm

engines, 25% more thrust. Sram armament. FB-111 A strategic

Less than

(hi-lo-hi)

 

cannon,

 

bomber has greater thrust, 7ft greater-span wings, approxi-

3,000ft

 

2

x

750lb bombs

mately 110,0001b gross weight and a total warload of 37,5001b.

 

8

 

*

2,500ft

 

15,9401b

18,0001b

 

Basically similar to A-6A but much more advanced avionics.

(clean, to 50ft)

 

321

n.m.

4

x

under-

EA-6B Prowler variant 3ft 4in longer, has 4 crew and very

2,530ft

 

(8,2601b

win g (8,0201b)

5

advanced electronic countermeasures equipment. Arma-

(clean, from 50ft)

payload, hi-

Centreline

ment includes Shrike, Bullpup, Standard ARM, Rockeye and

lo-hi; 1hr