You are on page 1of 108

w

·~

ON THE AIR:
Broadcasting' s
secret frequencies

q_ \

Your
Bible for
Shortwave
Listening
Worldwide
' ' Passport is probably the only
accessory you'll eve r need for your radio.''
-Popular Mechanics

This latest and expanded edition of North America's leading g uide to shortwave listening is now
available throughout the US and Canada. It's all new,
it's all shortwave, and it's the fastest-growing publication in the field.
The 1989 Passport to World Band Radio covers
shortwave listening from nearly every conceivable
angle: by frequency, by country .. . and, new
for 1989, an hour-by-hour guide to favorite programs in English . For DXing, there are Passport's
exclusive Blue Pages, which provide you with a
myriad of details for every transmitter known to be
on the air.
No other publication comes close. Everything you
want is there-at a glance.
There's also a wealth of articles on everything
from reception conditions to tuning in Air Force One

to how world band radio saved an American engineer's life in Iran.
There's more. Larry Magne's acclaimed annual
test reports-now a Passport exclusive - cover the latest in world band portables and shortwave communications receivers. Fully ninety models are rigorously
lab tested and evaluated by a panel of experienced
listeners. Nothing is held back. The Buyer's Guide
even evaluates the latest in antennas and enhanced
fidelity.
At electronics dealers and bookstores everywhere. See why-in only four years-Passport has
surpassed all others to become the publication of
choice for tens of thousands of listeners worldwide.
Passport to World Band Radio
Box 300A
Penn's Park, PA 18943

October 1988

Vol. 7, No. 10

Broadcasting's
Secret Frequencies

6

by John F. combs

Turn the tables on the media and listen in on th eir behind-the-scenes
communications for the real sto1y! John Combs tells you how.

Ben says, "To get the
real dirt first, listen to
your radio!" - p.6

Picking up Pitcairn

10

by John Boston

The saga of Mutinv on the nountv continues as the mutineers' descendants
struggle to maintain life on the tiny, isolated island.

Indonesia's Unexplored
Broadcasting Maze by 1a1an Kebon

Subrata

14

There was a time when trying to tune in Latin American stations was
considered the ultim ate thrill. Today, DX'ers are turning to another
cha llenge: Indonesia.

Shortwave Wildcards

by Curtis Hengson

17

Spies. Stations Allegedly backed by the CIA. Places where murder is more
common than mosquito bites. Shortwave's "wild cards" refuse to be
categorized.

Tower for the Duke
Unexplored territory Indonesia's broadcasting maze - p. 14
Take the mystery out of
buying that new
receiver - p.38
History - today's and
yesterday's - at DavisMonthan Air Force
Base - p.40
A 1.8 to 30 MHz
tunable receiver preamp
to build - p.94

a story by Wayne Mishler

20

DEPARTMENTS
Letters
Communi cations
Shortwave Il road cas ting
Utility World
Scanning the Nation
What's New?
Uncle Skip's Corner
The Federal Fi le
Plane Ta lk
O n th e Ham llands
The QSL Report
Reading RTTY
Satelli te TV
Domestic Broadcasting
Outer Limits

MONITORING TIMES (ISSN 0889-5341) is published monthly for $18
per year by Grove Enterprises, Inc., PO Box 98. Brasstown, NC 20902
(ph.1 -704-837-9200). Second class postage paid at Brasstown, NC,
and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Monitoring Times, PO Box 98, Brasstown, NC 28902.

3
4

24

28
32
36
38
40
42

44
46
..p

48
50

-.,

llelow 500 kl lz
Cons ume r Electro nics
Progra m Review
Program G uide
foreq ucn cy Secti on
Magne Tests ...
Scan ner Equipment
DeMaw's Workbench
Experimenter's Workshop
An tenna Topics
"Ask Bob"
Stock Excha nge
Convention Calendar
Clos ing Com ments

54

56
58
59

65
88
90
92

94
96

98
102
103

104

~-

ON THE COVER: T oday Show's weat herman Willard
Scott on l ocat i on . While he's in front of the camera,
radios arc buzzing be hind th e sce nes. Above, top ph oto:
Willard hams i t up as l3cn Franklin (Photos courtesy Nl3C
Today Sh o1v)

Inside this Issue •

For most people, one
of the news med ia's least endearing habits is its relentless
poking through other people's business. The media grilling of
Vice Presidential candidate Da n Quayle tu rned a lot of people
off late this past su mmer. So what if you could somehow turn
the tables on the media? Get a chance to sec them without
their make-up on, as it were? •
John ComlJs, who last
wrote in Monito1ing Tim es about the exciting world of TV
DX ing, this month turns his attention on the media. As usua l,
John's got lots of great frequencies to · monitor. So get the
scan ner ready and tune in the media with Broadcasting's Secret
Frequencies.

NITORING
TIMES
Pub I ished by
Grove Enterprises

Publi.s her
Bob Grove; WA4PYQ

Managing Editor
Larry Miller

Technical Editor
Ike Kerschner

Frequency Manager
Greg Jordan


Over on the shortwave side of th e
house, a lot of DXcrs arc lllrning away from
Latins as their primary target. A lack of
coopera tion on the part of the broadcasters
-- so me report response rates to their
recept ion report s as low as 15 percent -- lrns
gotten a lot of people to tu rn their antennas
from south to west -- west to Indonesia.
Herc is a la nd so strange with so many
places as yet still untouched, that the Cluistian Science Monitor said it "serves to remind
you that ou ter space is not the only place left for explorers." Indonesia n Jalan Kei>on
Su bra ta, along wi th number of radio's best DXcrs, tries to piece together a port rait of
what is ofte n called the world's largest - and most Byzanti ne -- govcrnmcnt-0\vned
broadcasting system.

a


Will iam Poundstone, in his book, Bigger Secrels, tc11s an
unusual ta lc: ham radio operators arc reporting cont acts with a
South Pacific-based amateur opera tor who c ~ lls himself M artin
Brandcaux. Brandcaux, speculates Poundstone, is none other
than recl usive actor Marlon Brando, who is said to be
broadcast ing from his South Pacific paradise hide-out. OK. So
it's hardly a story that will make the hair tu rn up on the back of
your neck like an episode of the T1vilig!t1 Zone. But it docs
point out some of the unu sual things you can fi nd on the
shortwave ba nds. •
Like, fo r instance, T om Christian
(picti.1rccl) -- a direct descendant of the H.M.S. Bounty mutineer of the same name. John
Boston takes you on a trip to C hristian's home of Pitcairn Island and tells you how you
can hea r -- o r make contact with -- this piece of history.

Larry M;ignc, havi ng completed the new 1989 edit ion of the populnr I'asspo1t to

Wadel Band Radio book, is now wk ing a well-deserved brcnk in the sou th of Frnncc. But

before he left , Larry dug up a pair of special bnrgains for readers of MT. Two nationallykn own radios have been discontinued and -- if you look closely -- you'll h:ivc the chance
to pick up yet a nother bargain fro m Pa nasonic. Magnc, the man who originated the
shortwave cql1ip111cnt review almost two decades ago -- there arc imit::it ors but none as
good -- hns the dctoi ls.
t
I n fact, Monit01ing Times has the latest on vi rtu ally all
types of radio monit oring, fro m longwavc to shortwave to signals that come from space.
It's no won der that Mo11i101i11g Tim es is the fastest-growing full-spectrum
communications magazi ne in America. Join us fo r another look at the world's most
fasci nating .medium!

2

Octoher 1988

MON!TO IUNG T IMES

Design and Production
Rachel Baughn

Subscriber Services
Linda Newton

Advertising and
Dealerships
Judy Grove

Contributing Editors
Reading RTIY
Jack Albert
Unc le Skip's Corn er
· T.J. Arey, WB2GHA
Pl ane Talk
Jean Baker
DeMaw's Workbench
Doug QeMaw
Shortwave Broadcasting
Glenn Hauser
High Seas
James R. Hay
Federa l File
Dave Jones
Scanning Report
Bob .Kay
On the Ham Bands
Ike Kerschner, N31K
Magna Tests ...
Lawrence Magne
Adventures in the Clarke Belt
Ken Reitz
Outer Limits
Dr. John Santosuooso
Program Review
Program Guide
Kannon Shanmugam
Antenna Topics
W. Clem Small, KR 6A, CET
Domestic Broadcasting
Paul Swearingen
Shortwave Broadcast Loggings
QSL Corner
Gayle Van Horn
Util ity World
Larry Van Horn
Scanner Equipment
Larry Wiland

LETTERS

fantastic 'well done' to all the pedpl~
who made it possible for this bit Of
history to take place."

Editor's Preface
Sev.e ral years ago, I answered a
letter from a radib. Iistener in Indfa.
Nothing unusual about that. Three
ry10nths passe d . .And suddenly, the
mailbag was fil led with letters ffoin
lndia. Some wan ted radios; many
others .cash .and still others,
pornographic magazines.
Dozens of women wrote, too.
Many presented themselves as
prospective brides (not surprisingly,
all pointed out they were avid radio
enthusiasts) and sent along pictures
of themselves s.t anding in front of
their modest huts.
At first I tried to answer all of
them. But when it became apparent
that the flood of mail wa!f 1ncreasing
instead of subsiding, I finally gave
up. In the end, over 1,000 le tters
arrived here from t he subcontinent.
Apparently, . that firs·t : letter writer
sold my address to a nationallyd istributed Indian pen-pal magazine.
Whi le the volume of letters
was unusual, such requests are not.
We ge t them all the time at
Monitoring Times. Few, if any, make
it into the pages of the magazine.
You see, if we print these requests
for cash, we somehow give them
credibility -- something we carinot
prove they deserve.
Such is the case with a letter
from Radio Dublin Limited. But this
time we relented. R ad io Dublin Limited is the parent organization for
Radio . Dublin International, often
referred to as . "Ireland's qtiasiofficial shortwave broadcast outlet."
Perhaps you've had the chance to
hear them on 6910 kHz.
R.D ublin Requests Help
"This year," says Eamon
Cooke, the station's director,
"marks the 22nd anniversary of
Rad io Dublin. It also marks the first
time we're asking for help from our
listene rs.
"Soon the Irish authorities will
be issuing licenses to the many stations currently in operation. These
licenses will be for AM and FM

Caribbean Calling

operation but not shortwave. Radio
Dublin has been the only operator of
a 24 hour-a-day shortwave service.
To secure a license for . continued
operation will undoubtedly involve
courtroom battles wit h the authorities and much expense. We also
hope to increase our vower so that
you can receive us better in the
United States.
"Perhaps Monitoring Times
readers could donate some thing
small to .our fund to improve our
shortwave service. Any donation will
help."
·
·
While, as is usually the case,
we can't specifically e ndorse Radio
Dublin's . request for · financial
assistance, we did, because of the
station's long track record, decide to
present it for your consideration.
Their address, should you choose to
help, is P.O. Box 2077, Dublin 8,
Ireland.

,; A group of contest veterans"
is how Danny Eskenazi K7SS,
qescribes the group seeking to break
the world record this year in the CQ
Worldwide DX contest. The group,
led by AI6V, will be on DXpedition
to Aruba (a new separate country),
formerly. a part of the Netherlands
Antilles. They will use the call P40V
for the October 29-30th event.
If you're a shortwave listener
and want to hear some real pile-ups
on the ham bands, give them . a
listen. In thi s case, the P40V team is
hoping to talk with at least 18,000
different hams in 48 hours. As you
might imagine, these things often
get pre tty crazy.
The Aruba Dxpedition wil l be
active on all bands -- 160 through 10
-- simultaneously. That's 1.8 to 2,3.5
to 4, 7 to 7.3, 14 to 14.35, 21to21.45
and 28 to 29.7. Lower side band predominates on the latter three
ranges; upper sideband on the
former three.

Johnny Reb with a Handheld

Getting a Legge Up

Another anniversary celebrated this year was that of the Civil
War battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Reade r Ron Bruckman
KMD3GJ of H ampstead, Maryland,
attended the three-day reenactmen t
of the ba ttle, some six miles southwest of the fight's actual location.
Amateur radio, said Ron, played an
important part in the ceremonies.
"Ham operators were stationed at the battle site and we re
walking around with their portables,
assisting those who needed help on
those hot, dry days. I know I was
monitoring 147.33 MHz on my HX1000 and if it wasn't for the
directions I heard, I probably would
still be sitting in the six-mile backup. U sing my ham radio, I got in the
back way wit h no wait at all! A

Roger Legge is back! That
might not mea n a lot to you, but to
shortwave listeners with an in terest
in Soviet DX ing, it's a gift from God .
Roger publishes the UHN USSR
High Frequency Broadcast Ne1vsletter
and it's one of the biggest bargains
in shortwave: eight issues fo r three
-- no typo -- dollars. The publication
is irregular but when it does come
out, it's packed with information on
all Soviet shortwave broadcasts,
inclu ding Kiev, Vil nius and so forth
-- alo ng with transm itter sites.
Check it out. Roger's add ress is P.O.
Box 214A, Etlan, VA 22719.

MONITORING TIMES

[More •LelLers• on page 100]

October 1988

3

COMMUNICATIONS

of signalling products, .· the total
amount of spectrum space requested
to be restricted or off-limits to Part
15 devices came to 4220.95 MHz or
85% of the available spectrum
between 10 and 5000 MHz.

Bar Code Radio

Restrict Unrestricted
Part-15 Device Bands
So you're listening to sho rtwave
and there, coming out of the speaker
along with the BBC is the sou nd of a
neighbor's baby crying. Or maybe
you're a ham a nd your conve rsation
becomes inte rtwined with that of
someone usi ng a nearby cordless
phone. These and li terally hundreds
of other possibilities may come to be
if a current FCC Notice of Proposed
Rule Making (NPRM) comes to pass.
Fortunately, however, strong opposi tion has developed.
The NPRM currently proposes
"unrestricted operation on most frequencies" of radio signal em itting
devices like cordless phones, baby
monitors, remote-control toys, as
well as "unintentiona l" emitters such
as computers and receiving equipment and so forth. These devices are
commonly known as "Pa rt 15
devices."
The bands in which they may
operate under the NPRM include
13.553-1 3.567, 26.96-28.00, 40.6640.70, 902-928, 2400-2483.5 and
5725-5975 MHz (the first two be ing
in the shortwave bands) and 24.024.25 G Hz. The American Radio
Relay Le ague (ARRL) called such
products "The ultimate in interference poten tial, because co-channel
operation s in residential areas, in
close proximity to amateur stations,
is proposed."
Everyone, of course, had strong
objections to allowing P art 15
devices to operate on their portion of
the radio spectrum.
Jn fact,
according to Linear Corp., a maker

October 1988

Modern technology has come to
the rescue of department store
clerks. Where stock inventory
control used to be a labor-intensive
pain in the pen, it can now be fully
automated by reading between the
lines of a bar code.
Yes, that perplexing little cluster
of parallel lines such as these from
the cover of Monitoring Times does
more than make a cash register ring;
when read by an optical pen and
transmi tted by radio, the data bits
can alert the store owner to a barrage
of information about the products on
his shelf.
A recent glance at the portable
system in our local Wa(-Mart store
revealed a light pen coupled to a
compute r which was, in turn,
connected to a · Maxon hand-held
transceiver. A quick snap of the
battery compartment lid revealed the
frequency: 467.875 MHz.
FCC records show a cluster of
low power frequencies available in
this part of the spectrum for a variety
of business applications. Jn fact,
every 25 ki lohertz from 467.750
through 467.925 is available for this
type of use.
Looking through business license
applications, we would suspect that
quite a number of chain stores are
going this route. Many clusters of low
power 467 MHz frequenc ies are
being assigned to these major stores
nationwide.

74654
06

8

MONITORING TIMES

I

Your Own TV Show
You have a great concept for a
TV show. But maybe it's somethiilg
that wouldn't fly on network TV.
Now what? Is there a fairy godmother for sucli bright idea?
The answer is an encouraging,
"yes." Her name is the Corporation
for Public Broadcasting (CPB) -~ or
more specifically, the CPB TV program fund -- and she's actually
looking for TV shows that probably
would not make it without special
help.
"Anybody can be considered,"
says CPB's ac ting program fund
director; Gene Katt. "The criteria is
the idea" al though TV experience
does help. Shows that are chosen are ·
seen nationally
PublicTelevision.
"Jn the past, individual shows or
series have gotten around $25,000 or
less," says Katt; "but we may move
that up and make it fewer shows with
more money." Three rounds of
solicitations a re scheduled each year.
For more information, write to:
Open Sol icitation Round, CPB TV
Program Fund, 1111 16th St. N.W.,
Washington, DC 20036. Ask to be
put on the mailing list for their newsletter.
Anyone in fo r a TV shOw on
radio monitoring?

on

Stereo TV Sales Up
Although growth in the sales of
color TVs to dealers was flat during
the su mmer (compared to the same
period in 1987), all was not doom
and gloom.
According to the Electronics
Indu stries Association's Consumer
E lectronics Gro up, sales of color sets
feat uring
built-in
MTS stereo
decoders increased 22.8 percent for
the year-to-date compared to like
periods in 1987.

Hard Line on
Satellite Unscrambling
In what Federal Communications
TechNews editor Benjamin Cobb
calls "the latest e isode of one of the

COMMUNICATIONS

eran Wireless Operators Association
most bizarre stories in the history of Radio Shack Enters:
for his outstanding service to radio
consumer electronics," the FCC Harn M'.lrket
_.
:
.
:
·
·
·
.
··
/:T:U-:~-···.~
. </))' ·(:':
. cofuffibnicatioris.
announced that it is stepping up
A licensed amateur since 1920
enforcement against equipment that
A franchise manager from Texas
(WAlSPM), Don held a commercial
defeats General Instrument Corp.'s reports that Radio S hack . plans to
VideoCipher T.l (VC II) scrambler.
release shortly a ten~meter ham first class radio operator's license
The unit is used to make signals transceiver to sell' in the $280 price when he went to sea as a shipboard
unusable to television receive-only range. It will probably be sim ilar (if radio operator, and was honored
(TYRO) earth stations.
not identical) to the l.Jpid~n HR25i0 with . the coveted Knight Officer
T VRO owners purchase the VC reviewed in this month's: ·MT.
.·. ., Order of Merit from the Italian govIf un its for $300-$400. They then are
If the product is suc:cessful, we ernment for hiS work with the Italian
Radio Maritime Medical Se rvice.
supposed to pay subscription fees to may expect to see Tandy enter into
A member of the FCC Industry
the purveyors of sc rambled program- the two-meter market . later. Their
ming. However, the VC JI, acco rding emphasis· on ham radio began with Advisory committee, Don was also a
to Cobb, "has b een extensively comthe Novice Enhancement package life member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
promised." Sixty to seventy percent las t year and the recently organized
of the estimated o ne million units in Tandy Radio · Amateu( <Club for · (IEEE), a fe ll ow of the Radio Club
operation are believed to be employees.
·•
· ·· of America and president of the
Society of Wireless Pioneers.
unscrambling programs without per.
•·
. .
Even
in
ret irement,
Don
mission.
General Instruments has already Donald K . l)eNeuf, WAlSPM, , · .remained devoted to human itarian
····· : .
. .····· . causes· as a volunteer ambulance
successfull y prosecuted some "TV '1906 - 1988 : ..:.
driver fo r his community. His many
pirates" and the FCC is sending
warning to 19 vendors thought to be
Readers and pioneers of radio contributions will be long remem marke ting ill egal VC II technology. · communications .Were sagde.n ed \ py berc~d and deeply ap preciated.
the death of DofrdeNeiif;>afreqUent
Credits: Christian Science Monitor,
contributor to Monitoring :Times and
Israel Radio
a talented radi6 historian; . A former Federal Communications TechNews,
Trims Foreign Languages
preside nt of P~es~ \Virele~~~Po11 VI~$ . Jerusalem Post
a recipient of the Marcoifi'Memodal
With the exce ption of English Gold Medal of Honor from the Vet~
and French, foreign language program s are to be re moved from all
day-time slots on Israel's domestic
radio. The new policy took effect
over the summe r.
According to Victor Grajewski,
head of Israel Rael io's external services and broadcasts for immigrants,
programs intended fo r new immi\\
1)
gra nts are not as effective in the daytim e hours as they are at night.
Israel Radio broadcasts in 12 lanSOUTHBURY. CONN. Q(i488
::::.•
·~
guages, including Yiddish, Moroccan
L~T. tl 29' 23·· w
I.O N. 73" OR' ~··N
I/
.
.
,)
Arabic (Mugrabi) and Ladino, which
Donald K. deNeuf. Box :329
together with Hebrew are regarded
as the traditional la nguages of the
Jewish people.
As fo r broadcasts overseas, "easy
He brew" has bee n dropped from the
schedu le and was replaced with
Yiddish.
Uzi Narkiss, the director of the
World Zionist Organ ization's Informatio n Departme nt -- which helps
finance these programs -- said he "I shudder at leaving ',a vacuum on some of the hist01y of past
telecommunications!" Don DeNeuf made sure we wouldn't forget.
knew nothing about it.

191·
. ·. ,. .

WA1SPM
0

MONITORING TIMES

Octo ber 1988

5

13~()adcastina~s

~ec~et
-=~equencies

Behind the scenes at your
local radio and TV stations
.mcricans spend countless hours with

~their radios and TVs. Some of the
programming encountered is witty, informative, or uplifting; so me of it is mindless
pab lum. When you encoun ter the latter,
turn on your scanner and enjoy th e action
behind the scenes!
The accompa nying table summarizes the
Broadcast Auxiliary (BA) frequencies.
These are used by radio and TV stat ions for
a myriad of purposes. They range from the
upper reaches of 25 MHz to 26 MHz (available on most shortwave radios) to the 160,
450 and 455 MHz ranges. Let's take a look
at what you might hear.

What's to Hear?

+

Newsgathering Operations: News
means big business and big bucks these
days! Newscasts are a major in come source
for local TV stat ions, and many a failing
AM radio stat ion has been saved by opting
for a n all-news/talk format. On many TV
stat ions, newscasts arc th e only locallyproduced live progra mming.
On the broadcast auxiliary frequencies, you
ca n hear reporters being dispatched to the
scene of breaking news stories, interviews
being set up with local figures, a nd
p hotographers rushing to get th at dramatic
eye-popping video th at keeps ratings high .
News he licopters can also be heard communicating wit h the studio. In a way, you

October 1988

You may not always hear all the details of a
brea king news story being discussed. After
all, news is a very competitive business and
stat ions in the same market make a point of
monitoring each others' news frequencies.
The stat ion with a m ajor "scoop" will
naturally be reluctant to reveal too much
over the radio.
This competitive spirit can produce some
rather humorous tra nsmissions. You may
sometimes hear rival stations taking verbal
shots at each other over the air, knowing
fu ll well that the target of their goodnatured sarcasm is liste ning in!

by John F. Combs

6

can hear the six o'clock news taking shape
as the day goes on.

MONITORING TIMES

+

Remote Radio Broadcasts: Another of
the more common uses of the 13A
frequencies is for live radio remotes. The
next time your favorite DJ goes "on
location" at a car dealership, shopping mall,
or county fair, put your scanner into
"search" mode and find th at remote
frequency!
Listening to the frequency being used as a
link between the remote site and th e station
ca n be very entert aining, since the mikes
tend to stay open even when the remote is
not actually on-the-air. You might hear the
off-air comments of a bored DJ, or the offhand remarks of kibbitzers and passers-by.

+

TV "Live Shots": TV stations use the BA
frequencies fo r their live remotes, too. You
can hear engineers setting up and adjusting
the equipment, producers discussing the
shot with production perso nn el, and the
director coordinating the whole thing
during the broadcast.

Some stations also use these frequencies
for the IFB (Interactive FeedBack) -- the
combination of Jive program audio and
director's cues heard by on-cam era talent
through their little earphones. (Others use
telephone hook-ups for the IFB where
practicable.)
Some of the most interesting listening
comes when a "Jive shot" doesn't quite go
according t o p lan! Loca lly, I have heard
sta tions weathering such disast e rs as losing
power at the remote site 30 seconds before
air time, having all but one camera fail
during a live speech by President Reagan,
and having th e r emote transmitter "fried"
by a nearby lightning st rike during a golf
tou rnament!

+

Traffic Reports: Those who commute to
work during rush hour are grateful for
those live. helicopter traffic reports! As
conditions approach gridlock, knowing of
an upcoming accident or other obstruction
can save valuable time on the roa d.

Traffic 'copters use IlA frequencies to relay
their reports back to the studios. In some
larger cit ies, an independent organization
may provide traffic reports to several stations on the same frequency, under a name
like "Metro Traffic" or "Traffic Watch."
Usually, the traffic fr equency is two-way,
and you may hear th e chopper pilot and station DJ engaging in banter and chit-chat
between traffic reports. Quite frequently,
these little conve rsations become rather
raunchy, and can be far more amusing than
anything yo u'll hear over the station itself!
On a more practical note, raw informat ion
about accidents and traffic jams is often fed
to the station some time before the actual
report is broadcast. For the mobile scanner
monitor, those p recious extra minutes could
mean the difference between arriving at
work on time and sitting immobile for half
an hour!
Other uses for these frequencies include
such things as studio-t o-transmitte r links
(STLs), paging, au topat ch facilities (less
common in this age of the cellular phone),
telemetry, and point-to-point feeds.

Types of Systems
From much listening and discussion with
other monitors, I have determined that the
vast majority of radio systems used on these
frequen cies a re either repeatcred or
straight simplex; two-frequency dup lex
operat ions are rarely heard. Many stations
find that locating the base antenna high on
their transmitting tower enab les them to
cover the area on simplex. (This is bad for
the monitor as the mobile units won't be
heard unless they are within a few miles.)
Others find that the increased coverage and
reliabil ity of repeaters is wort h the price.
Stations that serve several widely-dispersed
cit ies may use multiple repeater sites.
Stations in sma ller markets (or with sma ller
operations) tend to have one or two frequ encies that are used for everything.
Larger operations may include as many as
four to six diffe rent frequ encie s, assign ing
separate channels to production, engineering, o r news.

'f(;•

• • •.

::;;)

);..

You Can _Hearthe •Big Boys· Too!
The major radio and TV network s use the
same bands of frequencies for their own
productions and day-to-day opera ti ons. If
you are fortunate enough to live in a city
where network bureaus or stu dios arc
located, this adds to the listening fun.
Network remotes make use of these
frequencies, too. Even a relatively simple
remote, such as NBC weatherm a n Willard
Scott's visit to the Shrimp Festival in
Fernandina Beach, Florida (sec photo),
may require a dozen or more network
personnel to make it come off smoothly.
And how do th ey communicate? Why, by
radio, of course.

When network TV personalities
like NBC's popular
"Today" show weatherman
Willard Scott
come to town,
normally vacant
BA frequencies
may become active.

So, to keep abreast of all the activity
"behind the cameras" in your area , start
searching the broadcast media frequencies
to see which are active. Th en if the
networks come to town for a sporting event
or major news story, start scanning those
normally vacant BA frequencies. You just
might hear a CBS News producer
frantically looking for Dan Rather!
The fr eque nci es in th e 25-26 MHz range
are rarely used these days. In addition to
the following assignments, many STLs
operate in the 942-952 range. In rcpcatered
operations, the input is usually in th e 455
MHz area and the output on a corresponding frequency 5 MHz lower, but this
is somet imes reversed.

lvlONITORING T IMES

October 1988

7

26.11
26. 13
26.15
26.17
26.19
26.21
26.23
26.25
26.27
26.29
26.31
26.33
26.35
26.37
26.39
26.41
26.43
26.45
26.47

Radio stations
use BA frequencies
to relay live remotes
back to the studios.

161.64
161.67
161.7
161.73
161.76
(All frequencies in Milz)

25.87
25.91
25.95
25.99
26.03
26.07
26.09

450.05
450.0875
450.l
450.1125
450.1375
450.J 5
450.1625

-

h.
'

A live TV remote is
a complicated affair.
Production and
engineering personnel
make extensive use of
BA frequencies
for communication
and coordination.

8

Octoher 1988

MONITOR ING TIMES

455.05
455.0875
455.l
455.1125
455.1375
455.15
455.1625

166.25

170.15

450.1875
450.2
450.2125
450.2375
450.25
450.2625
450.2875
450.3
450.3125
450.3375
450.35
450.3625
450.3875
450.4
450.4125
450.4375
450.45
450.4625
450.4875
450.5
450.5125
450.5375
450.55
450.5625
450.5875
450.6
450.6 125
450.65
450.7
450.75
450.8
450.85
450.9
450.925

455.1875
455.2
455.2125
455.2375
455.25
455.2625
455.2875
455.3
455.3 125
455.3375
455.35
455.3625
455.3875
455.4
455.4 125
455.4375
455.45
455.4625
455.4875
455.5
455.5125
455.5375
455.55
455.5625
455.5825
455.6
455.6125
455.65
455.7
455.75
455.8
455.85
455.9
455.925

§]

·NP.O.
ational
Tower ComPan3'
Box 15417 Shawnee Mission, KS. 66215
Hours 8:30-5: 00 M-F

Ro H N
25G
25AG2 & 3
25AG4
45G
4!>AG3 & 4
55G
M200
BX·JO
BX-48

BX·56
BX·64
HBX·40
HBX ·48

FREE BASE STUBS WITH
EACH BX SERIES TOWER

HCBX·40
HCBX·48

10· section
1O mast 2 o o
•O sell SUOPO'h"g 16 SG 't '

I

48 sell supporting 6 SQ fl
~6 sell supporting 16 SQ fl
64 sell supporting I6 SQ fl I
40 sell supporling 110 sq tr I
-18 sell supportmg tO sq It I
56'sell supporting tO SQ It
.10 sell supporting It 8 SQ It
-t8 sell supporting [ t8 so It
GUY WIRE SPECIAL •
500 galvanrzed 7 wane
500 galvamzeo 7 s1r.1no

I

*

3/16EHS
114EHS

H Y G A IN/TE L EX ANTENNAS

HF ANTENNAS
Trib•nds
IH3JRS
3 element 'Junior Tnunocrorrd
H·5MK2S
~ element 'Thunderbrrd
Th2MK3S
2 elemeo1 Thunderorrd '
Th7DXS
7 elemerl Thunderoird
EXP l t.
E.-cplmer 1.: tr1band oeam
OK710
30/ 40 M conv Exo t4
Monoband
'long
Jann· 3 element 10 mt·
103BAS
Long Jonn 5 element l O mu
105BAS
155BAS
'long John 5 element t~ mtr
4 eremert 20 meter
2C4BAS
205BAS
Long John 5 elemeot 20 mtr
Discoverer rotary dipole 30/•0mtr
7·1S
D1scove1er 2 elem 40 me1er beam
7·2S
7·3S
converts 7-2 S 10 3 elem beam
Mulliband Verticals
t8HTS
'Hy· lower 10 tnru 80 me1ers
14RM0
rool ml krl lor 12 AVO l4AVO and
181<TV/ WB ..
18VS
base loaded. 10 1nru 80 mmrs
12AVOS
trap vert1ca1 10 tnru 20 me ters
1'AVO/WBS 1rap ver11ca1 10 thru 40 melers
18AVT/ VIBS trap vertical 10 thru 80 me ters
Muttiband Ooublel s
18TD
portable tape dipole 10·80 meters
26DOS
trap ooublel 40 ana 80 meters
5BDOS
trap double! 10 lhru 80 meters
VHF ANTENNAS
B••ms & V•~icols

23BS
2;Bs
6<BS
V· 2S
V·3S
V·4S
GPG2A
• RI J4GRI
t-Bl44GRI
1-B i.S-H,t:.G
81186

SJO 00

;so oo

$221 00
$461 00
$20? 00
S537 00
$365 00
$91 00

SIB 00
$156 00
S240 00
$299 90
$408 00
$16000
$379 00
S238 00
S!>02 00
$4? 00
$3!> 00

S56 OD
$76 00
$17300

S29 50
S•2 00

lerr11e ta•um to r 10

ao rttre~s

~
INF5 .... $89 .90

Z45 ..... $99.90

AC Powerea l URBO SCAN' •
pre·progfarrrreCl ov state 10
r~ceive d!'1J 1 ~·:>e ol 00:1ce
1·ans'Tl1ss on pus •,·e aric
wealher scans a: ~O C"1Jfl~e1s
t:er second d1g1ta! c1sp1di 1n·
slanl weatl'ler

programmable.
4'.>
prep•ogrammed channels
searc11 o· scan a arm c:oc;
poo·1ty permanen1 memory
bae<up. ch lockoul scan ae1ay
AC/ DC with bolh cords

TS1 .
.
S199.90
Same excepl 3!> channels 11
oano

TS2
. . ... S269.90
75 Cn 12 band wi 800MHz.
AC/ DC

10 sphl
rranscerve. SSB. CW AM FM
orogrammable scanmng . fully
au1oma11c noose bl•nker 2 3/8~.
~1og· ammed

n;,w i1c

s:io oo

$76 00
S!>• 00
SS ! 00
S61 00
S78 00

$77 00
S!>9 00

sn oo

$23 00

e•!e rna
7·;. w1..9

complete Oscar Ltnl<. system

$169 00

.C..3

3 e1emen1 tnoand oea'Tl
I & 10 f,' Hz ado on · ·I lor .\3
7&
MHz aaa on ° 1; ror ,\.:
18 elemen1 2 mtr 28 8 oocmer
10 12. IJ.20 me<er vertical
<1 e1emen1 tribana oeam
40· IO mtr vertical
80 10 mlr venrcal
2 mtr Ringo Range•·
450 l.IHz Rongo Ranger

$15200
$2Jfi co

Ai4-1 ' l

JJI! MHz

;.1.H-11
A147-22
At4<!-10T
Al4• ·201
215WB
2206
230WB
32· 19

11 eemen1 1.:s-1.:a ~.1 11, oeam
22 eement Po\·,er Pac.i.i=r
10 eiement 2 mir ·oscar
?O element 2 ml r ·osc,11
1 ~ element 2 mu 'Boomer
t 7 element FM 'Boomer'
144- 148MHz. 30 elemen1
19 elenenl 2 mtr Boomer
24 element Boome1
4 e1eme01 10 mu S·iwa: .. er

J2~B

10-JCO

11 ele VHf

.s e'ement '5 mH

15-i!CO
20-<CO

S"'Y'''d:"l.er

• element 14 MHz S•y•·1•l· e·

R OTORS

Alliance
Alliance
TELEX
TELEX
IELEX
I ELEX
CABL E

(2·18 & 6 271
12·16 & 6·201

ss· oo

s· ~~ oo
S20·> JO

$34,1 00
$94 50
$111 00
S39 25
$39 ?5
SoO SO
$~0. '

s·.: · 75
s~• oo

Sii 50

$8 1 00
$101 75
S216 00
$101 75
$8' 00
$12-l 7'.J
$1J )Q-0
S310 )()

::~~

1180

40 10 nur vertical
80· 10 mtr vert•cal
6 bano trap venrcal

Si9 00
$10500
$124 00

ft073 {10 7 so II I
U110
AR40 IV 3 so !I
CO<!>ll [8 5 sa It I
HAM IV 115 sq II I
I ?X 120 sq II I

s10J 00
5,7 00
CAL
CALI
CALL
CAI I

4080 per 1001
4090 · oer 1001

~g~~ ~~1~,:br~~u ~!~11~~·~08er

1

1001

RG8U Low loss 100~• oonced 1• s~ ec
88% 11n ccope• o•a1cea sne1IC per 1001

~

soeMe'
3 8H

$239.90

-tel'\

S'll~

Loe OX

.. a• ..t:l e 11 c gain

Migr i..0:1 lone ~r; . . Po\
1um1na1eo S Rf S.'.'i:t .,..e;e•
C"·

1 sc: •t:·:.. -1ri rn1c

77-250 .. $99.90

POWER MAX ElR 1unrng
.:0% 'T'Ore sens1t1\1I)' LEO
oar meie· SWR \·a.•1ao1e Rf.
9,w1 m.c qa1n instant Cn 9 &
\'I

19 M.. 1

ta9.. ._,._

~~
Euro s1~"a sqcelco llB. MIL
"''' & Rf 1M S Rf LEO
m!':e· ·,. R'< :._~o s ns:ar.:
Ch 9 & ·q 011C · '•ront p..,"lel
PA mooe

PR0640E~129 . 90

Moore 4'1 ISSB ~II & llB. Orm
S'h ;ICh. R~ ATT sw1tcn. H1 cut
n-rc g• " PA : 2 segment l ED
me1er fX tR X & SWR LEO·s
cla~1!1er

control

20 Channel 10
band . p11or11y.
channe l lockoul.
scan
delay
automa1 1c
souelch. LCD
display. program·
mable. track 1un·
mg. direct chan·
nel
access.
rechagable nrcad
oanery pack w11h
charger I acapter

40 Ch 12 band. 800 MHz, arrcrall &
weather. priortly, 1rack tuning. scan
delay. auto search direct cnanne1
access au10 squelch channe l
lockoul ACIOC

J

/r:::17I;
BC145XL ... .. $92.90

16 Ch 10 bane. programmable. 2
d1g11 LED. p110111y. rev1ew. 011ec1 Ch
access. track luning. burll·rn delay.
memory backup . Ch lockout .
weather AC/ DC

BC760XLT $279.90
100 Ch 12 band w/ 800MHz,
wea1her & a11crall. ba se/
mobile. prio11ty. Ch lockoul.
aulo search. delay. program·
mable. memory lock. DC

10 than. 10 band HANO HELD
100 Ch 11 oand hand held wiballery
200 Ch 12 bano. 600MHl. hana held
16 ch 11 band aircrall
40 Ch. 11 bano. aircrall & weather AC/DC.
t 6 Ch 10 band mobile
100 Ch 11 oand mobile•. programmable

S11' 90

s199 90
S279
S1 54
SI 79
S99
$219

90
00
90
90
90

Modtl 49SA · 49 MHz. FM 2-WAY RADIO
tlancs tree opera11on. voice ac11vatea
transmit up 10 111 mile Ba11er1es op11ona
modtl 498 .
.. .... .... $34.95
same learures as 49SA excepl uses .. AA ..
nrcad ba11e11es and comes wrlh banery
charger

ASTATIC
0104 SILVER EAGLE .
$ 6 9.9 0
Chrome plated base station amateur m1c1opnone
Factory wired 10 be easily convened to elecuonic or
~~':fura~Po~a1ron A01us1able garn lor optimum
ETS0104SE
... : ... $ 99 .9 0
llEW. same as aoa1e wrlh end ol 1ransm1s1on Roger
Beeo

RADAR DETECTORS
UNIDEN
RD500 ....... . ... ... . .......... $69.90
Dual conversion superhet. crly/ hwy. LED's. audible alarm. compact

RD9 . .... . ....... .. ........... $11 4.90

2 power coros ua·:el case. dual conversion suoerhet. c11ythwy auo101e
& LEO alerts m1111 s11e

R07 . ...... .... . ..... . ...... . .. $79.90
Dual conve rsion superhet. m1m size LED' s. audible alert

RD9XL .. . .... . . ..... . . . ... . .. . $149.90

Superhel w/lwo power cords carry case. City/Hwy. mm1 s11e

TALKER ..... ..... .... . .. .. .. .. $169.90

Record your own message up 10 8 sec long. selectable audio alerts. C1·
ly/ Hwy X & K oano carry cast w11n 2 cords

BEL
XKR100 . ............ . .......... $43.90

LED alell. tone alert. X & K bana. oasn/ vrsar

TENNA PHASE Ill POWER SUPPLIES 976 . . . ... .... Vector 3 .......... $159.95
PS3

S15.90
Outout · 3 8\1 DC J 3mo cons~ant !J a.mo .
Su'Q! e ev·cn r o.p· OJO prctec: on"· in
s1aii1 auro reset · ...1s.e pro1ec1eo
PS4
S19.90
fo-ly regulJIPO. IJ 8 VQC J a"'PS con
:>tarn w ith SLl'l'}e pro1Pc:1on o..,. e,10..10 pro
rect1on wiin'>t.1n1 aulo rc~el
PS7
..
. S24.90
Fully ·egul.it1·u i amo cons lcUll . 10 clll1P surge caoac11y
PS12
S3UO
tu1.1 •egu'ilh:C ·oam:>eons1Jnt • 3 alTlp surge e·ectron 1c o. . enoad
protec: or .., msl.,'11 .1u10 reset
PS20
S64.90
Fully reguiareo ' ' .rro surge capac•ty 13 8 voe. 20 amo cons

rant

w11~ mf'ler

PS25
.S79.90
Regulateo.:. 111•1vnr 2~ Amo CO()Sldnl 27 amo surge instant au!o
rest:i. Ouir me1e1 tor cuireni & \IOlt.lge
PS35
S99.90

so J"

uom tO to

Same dS .1~'

.t' t'h_ ~~ • 3 ~
" j vols

NEW TR l·BANO. ( . K & Ka. sequenlial l[d s & c1lyi h1ghway scllrng

876 ....... ... VECTOR .. . . . . .. .. $94.90
GAas aroot s seouen11a1 LEO. C11y / Hwy audio alert

847 ......... .... ........ . . ... $139.90

EXPRESS REMOf E X & K Dano Superne1 2·way lrlrer. LED & auOrble
a1er1s

MAXON
RD2A . .

. ...... ... . . . .... $46.90

Superhet X & K band auo101e & visual alert crly/hrghway selling

RD3 ..... . ............... . . .. . . $59.90
Long range ou at con\'ers1on. X & K oano LED's. aud1b!e a1er1
conuol. ant1ta1s1rg c11y1nwy dash/visor

w / ~olume

RD21 .... ... . ... . ......... . . .. . $54.90
Mins size. au dible & visual alert. omni-polarity guard. dash/ visor

so 18
so 3!>
so 17

$31 00

BC70XLT
$159 .90

BC800 XLT . $249 .9 0

Pf,

unlden®

PR0530E. $79.90

B.c2.aJu:.D.I"

MAXON ....$26 .95

1ac;

77-2028 . $79.90

..,
BC55XLI
BCIOOXLI
6C200Xl T
BCl75XL
6C210XLI
BC560XLT
BC580XLI

n;~l

E1ewon1c 1un1nr.
s 1.

! 8' 00

HUSTLER A NTENNAS

46IV
5BTV
6BTV

. .

~IDLAN D®

1n~taf'\t

Soand

·o

"'°"' .o

uniden

CUS H CR AFT A NTEN N AS

~743

I QQO.
· o··

25 WA IT tO ·~ere• Transceiver all
mode ape1.J110n . ruc.klJI mu111 func·
'ion LCD meter heQJency 'ock
lUIO s~uelch llB R< ga.n. PA.

$89 00

AOP· 1

J..744
'216XL
R4
A4S
AV4
AV5
ARX2B
ARX4506

i.s I i.t '· . :.

I

.9 .9 "'"'

$349.00

AR350 0

$23 1 00

ven.cal

:::::

="Q6\
o····

~o

J,FS

Y•Wa\e

45 Channel 7 band w/a1rcralt .

RANGER

·o mere• IR/.\SCEIVER. 25 wall

can be

Sl 39 00
$7 1 00
$13900

S2J

2 meter 1.: element oean1
4 e1emen1 6 meter oeam
cohnear gain ven1ca1 t 38· t 7t. MHz
cohnear gain 11ert1cat 220 MHz
cohnear gain verl!ca l 430 4 70 MHz
Dase. 2 mtr ground plane 3 oB
VHF & UHF Mobilu
lrgerglass 2 mtr 6aB gain 318·24 ml
•t1Banaer 2rrw 6oB gain 3, e-2' mt
HyBancer 2 mete·

I
~
:~~

HA2510 .

2 melef 3 element oeam

OS CAR LINK ANTENNA
70cm. 435 MHz
Complete Oscar lonk sys1em

215S
2t8S

S73 50
S13300
$136 00
$166 !>0
$13 !>O
$196 00
$750 00
5334 ~O
$431 ~
$226 50
$308 00
$392 JO
$28• 50
$384 JO

2 me1er ) element beam

2 meter 8 e ement oeam

23BS
214BS

unlden~

$56 JO
$66 00

10 section
mOdel 2 <Jr 3 rop sec1ton
model 4 t:ip sec tion
10· section
metJel 3 or 4 100 sec11on

I

H8X·56

913-888-8864

Price Sub ec· 10 Chan e W11hou1 Nolice

amp con'l:anr 37 amp surge ad1ustao1e

R025 . .... .... .. . ..... . .... . . . . $89.90
Deluxe mini. same as aoove with seQuCnhal LED's

RDXL .... .. . .. . ..... ... . ...... $129.90
CORDLESS X & K banes an11 lalsrng sequen11al LED's auOrble alert

city /h wy oa1k/mute switch with carry case

Picking up Pitcairn
by John Boston

J

ust about everyone knows that you can
tune in spies and smugglers on your
shortwave radio. It's the sort o f thing that
fires the imagination and adds to the mystery of sho rtwave radio. That so rt of thing,
however, pales in comparison when you
realize that you ca n also hear Tom Christi an, direct descendant of Bounty mutineer
Fletcher Christian, operating a ham radio
station from lone ly P itca irn Island. It's a
tough catch but well worth the effort to
hear this b it of history.
Pitcairn Island, about 1,350 miles eastsoutheast of T ahiti and halfway between
New Zea la nd a nd the Americas, is one of
the sma llest inhabited isla nds in t he world.

Size-wise it amou nts to a mere 1,120 acres
and measures approximately two miles by
one mile. Actually, it's the top of a volca no
and, like an iceberg only the tip shows
above the ocean's surface.
Pitcairn was inhabited by Polynesians ce nturies ago and was first discovered by Europeans in 1767 when a son of one Majo r
Pitcairn of the British marines spotted it
but was unable to make a land ing due to the
pounding surf.
The story of the Bounty, however, is bette r
known: how Fletcher Christian and others
in the crew of HMS Bounty mutini ed , set
Captain Bligh and 18 others adrift, t hen

sai led to Tahiti. How relations with the
Tahitians sou red so Christia n and nine
other crew members p lus six Tahitian men
and women set sail to look for a place to
live. How after two months at sea they
checked Pitcairn -- la rgely in desperatio n -and landed there in Janu ary 1790.

Stripped
The Bou nty was stripped o f everything
wh ich might p rove of any use, grounded
and burned to prevent its being sighted by
any p assi ng ships. There followed a long
struggle and the bu ilding of a small se tt lement. During th ose early yea rs the
Tahitians were more slaves than partners.

• • UDOH 11. U,, PAIPAA l D av
Ot:PL Of lANDI, M INIS• lURVlVI - SUVA, f lJt 1111

....

o. . ".

PITCAIRN ISLAND
SC Alt: IN <"llAINS
10

0

10

10

JO

~~~...-.
·----~--~---~=-

....,,.c.. uh • C-

,.

I
H,,,.,...Sr•M

llN 111ru 11 tc '" "' '·
HI I

10

October 1988

MON ITORING TIMES

l lJI

Four o r five years passed before the settle rs
bega n to rea lly accept th eir iso lated situat ion. By then, though, Christian ha d died
and o nly fo ur o f the o riginal crew were left.
Illn ess, a su ic ide and a killing in selfdcfense had, by 1799, left o nly John Adams
from th e originn l crew.
Adams did muc h to establis h a rela tively
so lid commun ity which lived largely by the
Ch urch of England's Book of Common
Praye r. The sma ll communi ty of Adamstow n is n:im e d after him .

Making Contact
In 1808 ::in America n sniling captain spotted
Pitcairn and two British Nava l vessels
stopped t he re in 1814. The · captains, th o ugh
they knew these were fugitives. were so
impressed by what had been accompl ishcd
they decid ed t o leave well e nough alone a nd
mnd e no arrests. From t hen on, more and
more ships called, often bringing ratio ns
and gifts.

with t o urists seeking souvenirs. Even with
souve nir sa les,
th ough, the island's
economy didn't b egin to improve a ll that
much until it got into the postage sta mp
business in 1940.

betwee n 16 and 60 must spend a ce rt ain
amount of time, regu larly, on p ubl ic works,
which often means main ten ance work on
the island's boats.

Passenger liners stopped ca lling in 1968, so
t he eco nomy today, in addition to sta mps,
rests on souvenir sales by mai l, donations of
money a nd supp li es (a lot of help co m es
from ham operators), fi s hing and subsiste nce agriculture. The la nd is bu sh and
g rassland, the forest having beeJl used up
long ago.

(380 half d ays per year) for all between 5
nnd 15. T he Church of England gave way to
the Seventh Day Adve ntists in 1887. After

Education includes compulsory schooling

Pit ca irn is administered by the British High
Commissio ner in New Zealand wh o a lso
hold s the title "Govern or of Pitca irn."
There is a fu ll local government (the co nst itut ion has been changed several t imes)
which is handled by a p artly appo in ted and
partly clecr ~d Is la nd Council. All men

As the years went by, th o ugh, Adams
became more and mo re concerned about
the island's ability to su pport the community. He was iii t he process of a rranging
for a move when he di ed in 1829. The move
di d eventually happen a couple of yea rs
later when 1he islanders emigrated to T:ihiti
bu t it proved t o be an unlrnppy decision .
They m issed home. l\lany became ill. Six
month s a fte r leaving Pitcairn they were
back home.

t he island ers had received Seve nt h Day
Adventi st liter.atu re for several years they
allowed a missionary to come to t he island
in 1886 and ado pted t he re ligi o n t he following year.
As o f 1981 the populat io n was j ust 54
peop le. Ju st before World War Two it had
peak ed at 233 but, than ks to emigration
(largely t o New Zeala nd) it had dropped to
86 by 1963. The islanders speak a localized
pidgin that mixes English and Tahi t ia n.

v ·

People
Mo~
DLtJMs 30 NU/
so it Wa~re on Pitca',. ~STSTm:JR~ - .
'lliEIR 4 AP"
A man named Joshua Hill governed the
Alli
"1th th
.... n look P~ - ~·
-UL 1988
isl ande rs for a brief time in 1832 and
" 0 ll8st th
e ai-rival
fo rwai;-d

"•isce11a e 1tellls t
of our
to l'ecei
proved something o f a dictator. The CapJoi- i-ou~Y :i-.1ntingh~t Wei-e land llllpply Ship
Pa r c els fc:tain of the HMS Fly drew up th e first
:s:;;etnei- :20 nai:idito~!f:les : So ~n;as one Ges e ACT 6 on ;;,~: abl'oad an
Pitcairn constitution in 1838 and the isla nd
.inae~dha.cds o ~e
nor ovez-au 1dent are ~etaei-, the
• i l 24th . d
w:is incorporated in to the 13ritish Empire.
- lr'e pi-!~!ved ~ :!!-etbo.T to .,,
s , such nec!s:~: no 0 1?:t2!,lllised end ..,
0 ...
ate "
.....,e that "''a G
... 1 nd ..h .
·.r l'e
..... was
;,ii th ··OW :nany lllod the t'oU:Bt:~tnei- 420 ~ t the new
qUJ.si t es "'if.laced
Dy 1856 the population had grown to 194
!'e<Jdy the old mod efs have be f.i.guz.e nUzzJ b s sel"Vice .GESTST!IE;R No
n
0
peo ple and there:. was, agai n, fe:.i r th:H the
Efi-ee!' this a.ad ~~IZ:oved ::: lhl'oduced ~ of our
finally ~F:L .:130 had
0 nclUd d
· I
I

aJ:-li
e lllont~ ,
e st0
n ee Gd t
lZIOdel
1s ant couldn t suppo rt t hnt many. So,
ed b ; r in the
•u.y i ssu r ei-ooc and e etner 42 • , doesn•t ; •
emigr:ition w:.is tried again. this time to
headi-;~.i.1'..g oro.~~t~ the Vess 1 • es ot Hisceu:J:; n.ew a~~e b
lldicNorfolk Island. Still, though, t here were
~d been ~;:;er paper - ~~- the s:;t e Bow Sea"~r
~ Pr~:1t ~d
those who missed lwrne and l wo vcars lat e r
pa;%rhave :ri~;.i.fd :tor q~.i ~ne Year~; P Includ~~ 0 uston Via P
i-ou ble
five P i1c:Jirn families to1;,ilin 0cr 43 11cople !hat •s llllno!l·Plies :e~,. rtehached
soo e tioe r:nndti~ o:t~4}sts carg0 :.Oe~ ti.ad ·a - ·
w i-e

e y
• 3o
.i.t i
-~ ce 11
- e both ""·::.v_
.:.d<t0
re turned . Jus t ill 1ime, t oo, for th ey foullc~
i- happy qu.1i-ed are elar , Nisce ~th a aew 8 now a _anlr· Thes
lettei.
.
.
.

P en•·f
....... any
.Or int1
"' .i. e:e to e supo1, F
the rcnch JUst setthllg Ill, havlllg bel1cved
·
•,,. of event Product:t.o ng lllach:t.
biow th. -es
.
_
a 1lnd
n sh 0 ,,,~ ne and
at
t I1e 1sl:.ind :ibandoned.
conti-:i.bu·ti
"'-LU t:iow
<llllple
ons to k. - Ali
· eep the

'7{:e

:i

1

::a

f

Supported by Hams
T he opening of the Panama Canal in 1914
put Pitcairn rig ht in t he line ofa direct s hipping run to New Zealand so the islan ders
began 10 welcome a ship a week , comple te
M O NJTORI NG TIM ES

October 1988

11

BETIY CHRISTIAN

PO Box l

ltl1CAJRN llLAMD · SOUTH PACIFIC

/

1

1.,...

1••,...

~_ _ ..__..A11~ --~~~~>t-,,_-~!!'IH~

11 . .

V~6YL
DA.Tl

TO RADIO

CONFIRMING OUR QSO

lJ OE _

CMT

_

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ PS E/ TNX QSL

li's d iffic ult to say how far A da mstown is
fro m the sea since the map of Pitca irn is
me.isurcd in "clwins" The settleme nt has
abou t 70 buildings but many belonged to
for mer residents and arc in some di srepa ir.
T he public square fea1u rcs the courthouse
and one of the origin<il I3ounty :i nchors. The
church has th l.! 13ounty 13ible 011 permanen t
lo:in from the Connecticu t Hi storical
Socic1y. The dispensary, library and post
o ffice all sha re thl.! s;i mc building.
Th e
two
p:-tge
Pitcairn
/lfisccfla11y
newspaper had a distribu1ion of 750 copies
(as of I 9S I) and t h:it includ ed mai lings 10
22 countrie~ and 3S U.S . slates.

PITCAIRN ISLAND

VR6TC
To _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __

confirm ing SSS / CW QSO o"--"IH•

a t_ _ _ _ __ GMT on1_ _ _ _ _ _ Roport _ _ _ _ _ _ __

TOM CHRISTIAN
P. 0 . BOX 1-ADA.MSTOWN
SOUTH PACIF IC

Station ZBP
on the Air

T uning in
Tom Christian

Th e Pi1c:11rn commercia l rndio si:itio n is
Z l31', opera ted by Tom Ch ri stian who has
been the i~land's radio officer si nce 1958.
The station is loc:11ed pcrh:1ps a third of a
milc inland. :11 a place called T aro Ground.
A New Zeal:rnd radio enthusiast dona ted a
small transmitter in 1936.

T o m Christia n can be heard 011 the amateur
rad io bands if you listen often eno ugh. His
call is VR6TC. Try as early as 0100 an d as
la te as 0600 on various 20 met e r frequ en cies, in cluding 14 .180 and 14.234. It 's a good
idea to keep an ca r on t he various amateur
networks t hat specialize in covering Pacific
area ham DX news and activity. One such is
the Pacific Net schcdulccl at 0200 on 14.313
and 0500 on 14.314 as well as other times.

Regu lar ..:nmmunic:11 inns wit h th e Navy
Office in \Vt!llington were established in
19-.W and further improvemen ts in th e facil111e' were made in 19-l-l wit h a co mplete
rebu ilding of 1he station in 1962.
ZBP ha, been ltiggcd b~· scvcrn l U.S. DXers
over the past CtHqJlc of years. Although the
station has bc·cn reported as late as 0200 it
>ecn1' to h:1vc a schedule t ha1 begins
muund 1900 UTC. Reported frequency
usage in..:ludc:. 15.520, 15.7 1S. 18.-107, a nd
18.710 on USB.

12

Octol>er 1988

VR6TC isn 't 1hc only ham on Pitcairn.
C hristian 's wife, Betty, is VR6YL. Irma
C hristian , VR6 !D, has a regular schedule
with KG61SL on Mondays and Thurscl:iys at
L700 on cit her 21.305, 2 1.280, or 21.295.
Kari Young, VR6KY, has been monit ored
around 2030 o n 21.287 and 2100 on 21.3-10.
Kay 13rown , VR6KB, is anoth e r ham 011
Pitcairn.
Actually there arc two more Pi1 cairn calls
but they arc hel d by no n res id e nt s. Of
course. hams arc o n the air largely on a

MONITORING T ll\IES

Amateur radio
operators Tom and
Betty Christian
keep regular
contact with other
hams and Tom
operates
commercial station

ZBP.

ca1ch-as-catch-can basis ~o t imcs and frequencies vary widely and 1hcrc m:iy be
times of 110 ac1 ivi1y <i t a ll. S1ill, <i li11lc sincere effort should bring in one o r two and
perhaps C\'Cn all the Pitcairn hams.
Rc<.1ders in te rcs1ed in lea rning more about
the island, as well as hearing 1rans111issions
from it, should t ry t o obta in a copy of the
book, The Guide to l'itcaim (4 th edition.
1982), about 55.00. pu blished by 1hc 13ritish
Consul General in Auckland, New Zealand .
h's full of interesting photos, facts, his1ory
a nd othe r informatio n abou1 1hc island and
1hc people who so capture our imagina1ions.

Thanks IO Dr. Charles Moser, W6/IS, "Afr.
Pitcairn lslr111d," 11'/10 has done a grea t deal
01·er 1he pas/ t•l'C111y years to 01ga11 izc s11ppo11
for '/'0111 Christian mu/ his ho111 s1otio11, for
pmvidi11g pic111res and 01hcr 111atc1iols for
this article.

•d

UnI

e
n
000, 000

@

$12,
SCanner Sale

Unide n Corpo r ation of A merica h a s pur·
c hased the con sumer p roducts l ine o f Regency Electron ics In c. fo r $ 12,000 ,000. T o
cele brate this p u rc h ase, we' re hav ing our
large st scann e r sale in history! U s e the
cou pon in this ad f o r b ig sav ings. Hurry ... otter
ends Dece mber 3 1, 1988.

***MONEYSAVING COUPON***
Ger special savin gs on the scan ners
fisted in this coupon. Th is co upon must
be i ncluded with you r prepaid orde'
Credit ca rds. personal checks and ouan·
tity discoun ts are excluded /rom this
offer. Offer valid only on p repaid orders
malled dir ectly to Comm unications Electronics Inc, P.O. Box 1045-Dept. UN/11,
Ann Arbor, Mlchlgan 48 106· 1045 U.SA
Coup on expires Dece mb er 3 1, 1988.
Coupon may no1be used in conj un ction
with any other offer from CE/. Coupon
may be photocopied. Add S9.00 for shipping in the continental U.SA
Rege ncy TS2·T ... ... .. . $ 2 59.95
Regency INF1·T . .. .... . $ 119.95
Regency IN F5·T .. . ...... . S 79 .95
Regency R1 0 90·T....... $ 114.95
Regency UC1 0 2 ·T ...... $ 109.95
Regency RH606B·T... .. $ 419 .95
Regency RH256B· T .. . .. $ 294 .95
Bearcat 200XLT·T ...... $ 249. 9 5
Baarcat 100XLT·T . ..... $ 184.95
Bearcat BOO XLT· T . .. . . . $249. 95
Unlden TALKER·T ...... $ 179.95

*** *VALUABLE COUPON* ** *

NEW! BearcatV 760XLT· T
L ist price $ 4 99.9 5 / CE price $244.95/ SPECIAL

12-S.nd, 100 Cha n nel • Crt•tallH• • AC/DC
Frequencyra nge:29·54, 118· 174, 406·512, 806·956 MHz.
Excludes 823 9875·849.0125 and 868.9875·894.0125 MHz.
The Bearcat 760XLT has 100 programmable chan·
nels o rg anize d as five channel banks for easy use.
and 12 ba nds o f covera g e inc luding the 8 0 0 MHz.
band. The Bearcat 760XLT mounts n eatly under
the d ash and c onnec t s directly to fuse b lock or
battery. The unit a lso h as an A C adaptor, fli p down
stand and tele scopic a nte nna for desk top use. 6·
5/16" W x 1%" H x 7'lis" D. Model BC 590XLT·Tis
a similar version withou t the 800 MHz. band fo r
o nly $194.9 5 .
squelch option now available.

cress
SALE! Regency® TS2·T

List price $ 499.95/ CE price $ 269.95/ SPECIAL

12-Band, 75 Channel• Cry• talle•• •AC/DC
Frequencyrange:29·54, t 18· 175, 406·512, 806·950 MHz.
The Regency TS2 scanne r lets you monitor Military,
Space Satellites, Governme nt, Ra ilroad ,
Justice De partm e nt, State Department, Fish &
Game , Immigration, Marine, Po lice and Fire Depart·
ments, Ae ronautic al AM band, Paramedics, Am·
ateur Radio, pl u s thousands of ot he r ra dio frequencies most scanners can't pick up. The Regency
TS2 features n ew 40 c hannel per second Turbo
Sca n ~ so y ou wont m iss any of the action. Model
TS1 ·T is a 35 channe l version of this radio without
the 800 MHz. b a nd a nd c ost s only $ 199.9 5 .

Regency® RH256B·T
List price $ 799.95/CE price $299.95/ SPECIAL

1tl Channel • :Zts Watt Tran•ce /nr • Prlorltr

The Regency RH256 8 is a sixteen-channel VHF land
m obile transceiver designed to cover a ny frequency
between 150 to 162 MHz. Since this radi o is
syn thesized , no e xpen s ive cryst als are n eeded t o
store up to 16 fr eQuencies w ithout battery backup.
All radios come w ith CTC SS to ne and scanning
capabilities. A monit or a nd nighVd ay switch Is a lso
standard. This transceiver e ven has a priority tune·
lion The RH 256 makes an ideal radio for any police
o r fire department volunteer because of its low cost
and h igh pe rform ance. A 60 Watt VHF 150· 162
MHz. version called t he RH606B-T is available
fo r $42 9.9 5 . A UHF 15 watt, 16 c ha nnel versio n o f
this radio called the RU156B·T is also available
and covers 450·482 MHz. but the cost is $454.95.

***Un/den CB Radios ***

The Un/den line ol Citizens Band Radio transceivers is
styled to compliment other mobile audio eQulpment.
Uniden CB radios are so reli able that t hey have a two
year li mited warranty. From the feature packed PRO
81 OE to the 31 OE handheld, there Is no better Cit izens
Band radio on the market today.
PR0310E·T Un/den 40 Ch. Ponable/ Mobile CB .. . S83.95
PR0330E·T Un/den 40 Ch. Remote mount CB . .. S t 04.95
PR0500D-T Un/den 40 Channel CB Mobile .. ... .. $38.95
NINJA-T PR03 10E with recharg eable battery pack.S99.95
810-T 1.2V AA Ni-cad battery for Ninja (set of 10).. . S20.95
KARATE· T Uni den 40 channel rescue radio .... .. . S53.95
PR~10 X L·T Un/don 40 channel CB Mobile....... $38.95
PR05 20XL· T Unldon 40 channel CB Mobile.. .... . $56.95
PR0540E·T Un/den 40 channel CB Mobile .... .. . . $97.95
PR0840E·T Un/den40channelSSBCB Mobile .. . $137.95
PR0710E·T Un /den 40 channel CB Base .. .. .... St 19.95
PR0810E·T Un /den 40 channel SSB CB Base ... s 174.95

***Un/den Radar Detectors***

Buy the finest Uniden radar detectors from CEI today.
TALKER·T Un /den talking radar detector ......... $ 184.95
RD7·T Unlden visor mount radar delector .. . .. . . . . $99.95
RD9·T Unldon "Pessport" size ra der detector .. .. $114.95
RD9 XL·T Un iden "micro" size radar detector ..... S 144.95
RD25·T Uniden visor mount radar detector . . .. . ... $54.95
RD500-T Uniden visor mount radar detector. . . . . . . $74.9 5

Bearcat® 200XLT·T

List price $509.95/ CE price $254.95/ SPECIAL
12-B•nd, :ZOO Ch•nn•I • 800 llH11. Hendhe/d
a.•rch • Limit • Hold • Prlorltr • Lockout
Frequency range: 29·54, 118·1 74, 406·5 12, 806·956 MHz.
Excludes 823.98 75·849.0 r 25 and 868.98 75·894 .0 r 25 MHz.
The Bearcat 200XL T sets a new standard for ha ndheld scan ners in p e rforma nce and dependability.
This full featured unit has 2 0 0 prog ramm able
c h a nne ls w ith 10 scannin g banks a nd 12 b a nd
c overage. If you w ant a very similar model without
the 8 0 0 MHz. band and 10 0 channels, o rd e r the
BC 1 OOXLT· T for only $189.95. Includes antenna
carrying case w ith belt loo p , ni·c ad battery pack,
AC adapt e r and earpho ne. Order your scanner now.

* * * Facs imile Machine•& Pho ne•***

If you need an excellent facsimile machine. CEI has me
full feat ured Faxtel 3300 fax by Pactel at a special price.
FAX3300-T Pactel Fax machine w•lh phone . . . $1 ,099 95
XE750· T Unidon Cordless Phone with speaker . S99.95

* **Extende d S erv i ce Contract

***

If you purchase a scanner, CB. radar detector or cordless
phone from any store in the U.S or Canada within the last 30
days, you c an g el up t o three years of ex t ended service
con tract from Warron toch. This serv ice ext ension plan begins
afte r the manufacturer's wa rran ty expires. Warrantech will
perform all necessary labor and will not charge for return
shipping. Ext ended servtee contract s are not refundable and
apply o nly t o the ong1nal purc haser A two year extended con·
tract o n a mobile or ba se scanner 1s$29.99 and three years is

$39.99. For handhold scanners. 2 years is $59.99 and 3
years ls S79.99. Forradardetectors. two years 1s$29.99 For
CB radios. 2 years 1s S39.99. For cordless phones, 3 years •S
$34.99. Order your extended seNlce contract today

OTHER RADIOS AND ACC ESSORIES
BC55XLT·T 8earcar t O channel scanner
. St 14.95
BC70XLT·T Boarcat 20 channel scanner . .
. . $159.95
BC175XLT·T Bearcat 16 channel scanner
. $156.95
R1090-T Regency 45 ch annel scanner
.
S 119.95
UC102·T Regency VHF 2 ch. 1 Watt transceover .. $1 t4.95
BPSS· T Regency 16 amp reg. power supply
S 179.95
MA549-T Dro~in charger tor HX t 200 & HX 1500 . $59 95
MA51a-T Wall charger for HX1500 scanner
.. $ t 4.95
MA553·T Carrying case for HXt 500 scanner . .. .. $ 14.95
MA917·T N•Ced bauery pack 1or HX1000/ 1200 . $39.95
BP205·T Ni·Cadbatt. pack for BC200/ BC100XLT $49.95
B8·T 1.2 V AA Ni·Cad batteries fset ol e1ghfl
$ t 7.95
FBE·T Frequency Directory l or Eastern U.S.A. . . . St 4.95
FBW·T Frequency Directory for Western U.S.A. . . $14.95
ASD-T Air Scan Directory.... . . . . . . .
. $14.95
SRF·T Survival Radio Frequency Directory .
$14.95
TSG-T " TopSecref" Registry ot US Govt. Freq. . $14.95
TTC·T Tune in on l elephone calls .. .. .. .
$1 4.95
CBH·T Big CB Handbool\/AM/FM/ Freeband .
. St 4.95
TIC·T Techniques for Intercepting Comm.. .
$14.95
RAF· T Reitroed frequency directory .......... . . . $ 14.95
EEC· T Embassy & Espionage Communications . St 4.95
CIE·T Coven lntelligencl Elect. Eavesdropping . . $1 4.95
MFF·T Midwest Federal Frequency directory . . .. . S14.95
A8(). T Magnet mount mobile scanner antenna ... $35.95

Bearcat® BOO XLT· T
Lisi price$549.95/CE prlce$259.95/SPECIAL

1:Z·S.nd, 40 Channel • No-crt•t•I •canner
Priority control • •earch/Scan • AC/DC
Bands: 29·54, 118· t 74, 406·51 2, 806·91 2 MHz.
The Unid en 800XLT receives40 channels in two bank.s.
Scans 15 channel s per second. Size 9 v.'' x 4 'h" x 12'12."
If you do not need the 800 MHz. band, a similar model
called !he BC 21 OXLT· T is available for S 178.95.

Bearcat® 145XL-T
Lis t p ri c e $189.95/CE price $94.95/SPECIAL

10-S.nd, 1tl Channel • No-cryatal •canner
Priority control • We ather •••rch • AC/DC
Bands: 29·54, 136·1 74, 406·51 2 MHz.
The Bearca1 145XL is a 16 channel, programmable
scanner covering ten frequency bands. The unit features
a built·ln d elay function that adds a three second delay
o n all cha nnels to prevent missed transmissions. A
mobile version c alle d the BC560XLT·T featuring pfr
ority, weather search, c hannel lockout and more Is
available for $94.95. CEl's package price includes
mobile mounting bracket a nd mobile Power cord.

Regency® Informant'" Scanners
Frequency coverage: 35·54, 136· 174, 406·51 2 MHz.
T he new Regency Info r mant scanners c ove r virtu·
ally all t he standard po lice, fire, emergency and
weathe r l r eQuenc ies. The INF1 ·Tis ideal for truck·
ers a nd is only $ 129.95. For base station us e. the
INF5·T is $84.9 5 . Order your scanner today.

NEW! President® HR2510-T
List p rice $499.95/ CE price $239.95/SPECIA L

10 llete r llobll• T,.n•cehfer • Digital VFO
Full Band Cotrerage • All-llode Operation
S.clcllt llquld oey•t•I dl•play • Auto .,,uelch
RIT • Preprogrammed 10 KH1t. Channel•

Frequency Coverage: 28.0000 MHz. to 29.6999 MHz.
The President HR2 510 Mobile 10 Meter Transceiver
made b y Uniden, s ets a new standard in amateur
radio communications. Fully Featured-The HR251 O
has every1hing that you need. Up to 25 Watt PEP
USB/LS B and 2 5 Watt CW mode. Noise Blanker.
PA m o de. Dig ita l VFO. Built-in S/ RF/ MOD/ SWR
meter. Channel switch o n t he microphone, and
much more! The H R251 O lets you operate AM, FM,
USS. LSB or CW. The digitally synthesized freQuen·
cy control give s you maximum stability and you
may c hoose either pre-programmed 1O KHz. channel ste p s, or use the built·in VFO for steps dow n to
100 Hz. There's also RIT (Receiver Increme ntal
Tuning) to give you perfectly tune d s ignals. With
re ceive scanning, you can scan 50 c hannels in any
o ne o f fo ur band segments to find out whe re the
actio n is. Orde r your HR2510 from CEI today.

BC760XLT
600 MHz.
mobile scanner

SPECIAU

A70-T Base station scanner antenna .. ..
. .... S35.95
A500-T 10 & 11 Meler - 500 Watt antenna . . .. $38.95
A1300·T 25 MHz.- 1.3 GHz Oiscone antenna... .. $ 109.95
USAMM·T Mag mount VHF ant. w/ 12· cable
.. . S39.95
S35.95
USAK·T ~ .. hole mount VHF ant w/ t 7' cable
USAK45o-T ¥." hole mount UHF ant. w/ 17' cable
$35.95
Add $4.00 shipping lor all accessories ordered et the same time.
Add $9.00 shipping per radio end $4.00 per an1enne.

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE
To get th • t• •te•t d e ll.,•rr from CEI of any scanner.
send or phone your order directly to our Scanner
Dist ribution Cente r~ Michigan residents please add 4%
sales tax or supply your tax I. 0. number. Wri tten pur·
chase orders are accepted from approved government
agencies and most well rated firms at a t O'lo surcharge
for net 10 bi lling. All sa les are subject to availability.
acceptance and verification. All sales on accessories
are final. Prices. terms and specifications are subject to
change wilhout notice. All prices are in U.S. dollars. Out
o f stock items will be placed o n backorder automatically
unless CEI is instruc ted differently. A $5 .00 additional
handling fee w ill be charged for all orders with a
merc handise total under $50.00. Shipments are F.0. B.
CEI warehouse in Ann Arbor. Michigan No COD's.
Most items listed have a manufacture r's warranty. Free
copies of warranties on these products are available
by writing to CEI. Non-certified checks require bank
clearance. Not responsible for typographical errors.
Mall orders to: Communic atio ns Elec tron·
ics~ Box 10 4 5, Ann A r bor, M ichigan 48106
U. S .A. Add $ 9.00 per scann er for U. P.S . g round
s hip p ing a nd h and li ng in the contine ntal U.S .A .
Fo r Canada, Pue rto Rico, Hawaii, Alaska, o r
APO/ FPO delivery, shi ppi ng charges a r e t h ree
t im es con t in e ntal U.S . rates. If you have a
D isco v er, V is a, Am erican Ex p r ess o r Master
Card, you m ay call a nd place a credit c a r d o rder.
5 % surcharge for billing to Am e r ican Express.
O rder t oll·fre e in t he U.S. Dial 800· USA- SCAN.
In Canada, d ia l 800-221 ·3475. FA X anytime,
d ial 3 13·971 · 6000. If you a re outside the U .S.
o r in Mic h igan d i a l 3 1 3 ·973·8888. O rder toda y.
Scanner Distribution Center· and CEI logos are trademarks of Co mmunications Electronics Inc.
Sale dates 10/ 15/88 - 12/3 1/88
AD • 110188·T
Copyrtght e 1988 Communlcollons Ele<:tronlca Inc.

For credit card orders call

1·800-USA·SCAN

-~OMMUNICATIONS
. .ELECTRONICS INC.
Consumer Products Divisi on
P.O. Box 1045 D Ann Arbor. Mlchlgan 48 106·t045 U.S.A.
For orders c all 3 13·973·88BB o r FAX 313·971·6000

A hazy look at INDONESIA~s
unexplored broadcasting maze
by Jalan Kebon Subrata ·

S

panning some two million square miles
of ocean, most of Indo nesia remains
effectively off limits to a ll bu t the most stubborn fore ign t ravelers.
Michael Rockefeller, who visited the
archipelago some 25 years ago, disappeare d in
I 961, reportedly t he victin1 of ca nnibalism .
More recent explorers, such as the Brit ish
team of Lawrence a nd Lorne Blair, survived
but faced the dangerous and the unusual at
every step of the way. The trip was, says
L o rne, "years of adve nture th rough a land of
. waking dreams."
This is a place inhabited by the T oraja
tribe, a people who believe their ancestors
descended fro m the skies in starships; of. the
cannibalistic Asmats and th e "dream wanderers" of Borneo, wh o navigate trance-like
without the use of stars or maps.
"Dynamo Jack," an ethnic Chinese who
the Blair brot hers met in Java , was said to be
able to emit elect ric shock fro m his ha nds like
a n eel -- a talent he says derive d fr om Taoist
teachings. After heari ng about t he fe at for
years, the Dlairs finally persuaded hinl to go
o n camera. He ignited a newspaper wit hout a

match. Indeed, in t his la nd of flesh-eat ing
Komodo lizards, deadly Moluccan blue-ringed
octopus and tusk-size nose ornaments, technolog ical cu lture seems to evaporate the furl he r cast you go.

contribute to and improve the nation's culture
as well as promote intern ational understanding, friendship and cultural exchange."

Complex Land: Complex Radio

On t he international level, R adio
Republik Ind onesia offers t he difficul t-tohcar Voice of I ndonesia on shortwave.
(Check the frequency section for correct
times.) T he "Song of the Coconut Islands"
laun ches broadcasts in English as well us
Arabic, Bahasa Malaysia, Chinese, French,
German, Indonesian, .J apanese, Spanish and
Thai. The t rnnsmillcrs arc o nly moderately
powered - 100 kw -- by today's 500 kw stand ards.
But internati onal service is the least of ·
RR l's problems. I nformation fro m the stations themselves has been known to differ not
only on major points bu t even in the wny a
network is spelled. From here it all goes
downhill into a quagmire of "ycs's", "m:iybc's"
and "I 'm not surc's" -- with the "I'm not surc's"
leading the pack.

Indo nesia is a land truly kept obscure -even from itself - by a formidable array of
legal, geographic and linguist ic barriers. The
government knows this. And in an effort to
breech these barriers, they have turned to
radio.
Radio R epublik Indonesia (RR!) has as
its task t he unenviable job of linking t he
13,000 island nation toget her. The result is an
incredibly co mplex, even ByL:a nt ine network
of statio ns that is, by all accounts, the l::irgest
government-owned broadcasting system in the
world.
We say "Byzantine" because few p<.:oplc,
even among I ndonesian broadcasters t hemsclves, seem to know exact ly how their system
is structured. As Senio r I ndo nesian DXcr
John Bryant says, "It's not ent irely rational."
In a ny case, it docs have a clear missio n: "to

S~anding

Big Voice Weakly Heard

in front of the R_RI s~udios (left to right) announcer Rosiana, Mr. Yon Maryono, Head of Programmes
Tmeke R_oron. representmg listeners from Jakarta, and Rina Amahorseya, a member of Radio Listeners Club
Indonesia. Right photo: An announcer for RPO in West Java .

14

October 1988

MONITORING TIMES

A·. Sample Log From RRI Nusantara I Jakarta
Freq.

at

2450 kHz
3277 kHz at
4774 kHz at
6045
7270
9680
11770
11865

kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz

at
at
at
at
at

2158-1720 UTC (Programme Kota)
2200-0100 (Sun 'ti! 0500), 1000-1720 UTC (Programme Khusus)
2200-0100 (Programme Khusus), Sun 0100-0200 (Programme Kllusus)
0800-1500 (Prgr Khusus/Prgr Nasional), 1500-1720 UTC (Prgr Nasional)
2200-0100 (S un 'til 0500), 1000~1720 UTC (Prgr. Nasional)
2200-0100, 0500-1720 (Sun 2200-1720 UTC)Prgr. Nasional
2200-0100, 0500-1720 (Sun 2200-1720 UTC) Prgr. Nasional
2200-0100, 0500-0800, 1000-1720 UTC (Prgr. Nasiona l)
2200-0100, 0500-0800, 1000-1720 UTC (Prgr. Nasiona l)

.

The National Program
Radio Republik Indonesia produces a
nutional program (Progra m 1) that runs three
times a day at 2200-0100 (Sundays unt il 0800),
0500-0800, and 1000-1705 UTC on 2307, 3277,
6045, 7270, 9680 and 11865 kHz as well as
some AM and FM frequencies. News is carried at the top of each hour.
RRI's programs for a total of 1080 hours
a week -- a good deal of it music. But its main
objectives are to give unbiased news, to ref1ect
Indonesian opinion and project Indonesian
life, culture and developments in science and
industry. News bulletins, current affairs programs, political commentaries and topical
magazine programs form the main part of the
output. The result is often very "VOA-ish"
with such fare as 'The Family Planning Hour"
not uncommon. Almost all of the regional stations carry these programs.
So-called "Special" programs run from
0100-0200 and sometimes from 0800-1500
UTC on 4774 kHz plus FM. The same
channel also relays Program 1 for its 22000100 UTC broadcast. A separate metropolitan
program runs 24 hours a day on 2405 kHz. All
of this comprises but level one of the three
main RRI levels of stat ion.

The Regional Maze
In addit ion to the national service, there
arc also five different N11m11tara or networks.
Each of these, numbered one through five, is
designed for a different region of the country.
For example, RRI Nusantara Satu ("1") is
located in Medan and covers Sumatcra. RRI
Nusantara Dua ("2") is based in Yogyakarta
and covers Jawa and Bali; RRI Nusantara
Tiga ("3") is in Banjarmasin and broadcasts
fo r Kalima ntan; RRI Empat ("4") transmits
from Ujung Pandang for Sulawesi and Nusa
Tcnggara and RRI Lima ("5") is in J ayapura,
broadcasting for Maluku and Irian Jaya.

Mixing It Up:
Changing Frequencies
Twice each day it is necessary to change
the operating frequency of the transmitters.

Like all shortwave broadcasts, RRI's are
rcf1ectcd off the ionosphere and ionospheric
conditions vary according to the time of day.
The frequency cha nges take a little over a
minute and across the islands, receivers are
retuned. The time for the change-overs is 8:00
am and 5:00 pm local time.

and for the rest of the time they relay programs, like national news, from RR I's
national service. Local newsrooms take care
of news of interest to the city they arc broadcasting from. Still, each is free to choose its
own program policy within the framework of
the RRI's general policies.

Tingkat One's and Two's

Operator? Give me RDP
Tingkat Dua

The next level of stations are generally
called called Radio Pemerintah Daerah
Tingkat Satu or RPDT-1. These are stations
designed for provincial - much like our states
-- coverage and usually identify as RPDT 1
plus the name of the province.
The lowest level in the chain a re the
RPDT 2s -- Radio Pemerintah Daerah
Tingkat Dua. These stations generally serve
counties or cities. There are generally six or
seven "counties" within each province. In
some cases, the word "kabupaten" is added to
or substituted for Tingkat. Doth indicate
"dist rict."
The RPD (Radio Pemerinta h Daerah)
or local government stations began in 1966. At
present there are 110 of them, all of which arc
in D.I. Acch, North Sumatera, Riau Islands,
West Java, Central Java, East Java, Nusa
Tenggara Eastern, West Kalimantan, South
Kalimantan and Maluku Islands. As with all
RPD radio services, the local stations arc
financed by the government.
RPD local stations provide local
programs for between 10 and 14 hours a day

Recently more time on RDP local stations has been given to consumer problems
a nd there has been greater use of "phone-in"
programs. Herc, members of the community
a re given the opportu nity to express their
views - which are generally considered as
better suited to local rather than national
radio (RRI). Stations located in areas with
signi ficant ethnic minorities provide special
programs for them, very often in their own
languages.
Education programs also form an
important part of locally produced material
and each station has a n education producer
responsible fo r programs of adult and continuing education.

Advertising Accepted
Each station has a local radio advisory
cou ncil and an education sub-committee.
In some areas, RPD stations have
encouraged the formati on of local chamber
orchestras. One station even organized a

Local
programming is
determined by
a board of
editors such as
this one: from
left, Sugijono,
Marsudi,
Mohamad
Barly, Sukarno.

MON ITORING TIMES

October 1988

15

Station

Time (UTC)

F.requency (kHz)

Power kw

RPDK Deli Serdang
RPDT2K Asahan
RPDT2K Langkat
RPDT2K Karo
RPDK Labuhan
RPDT2 Tembllahan
RPDT2 Bengkatts
RPDKM Sukabumt
RPDK Clan jur
RPDK Lebak
RPDK Serang
RPDKM Bogor
RPDK Karwang
RPDK Subang
RPDK Cirebon
RPDK Kuntngan
RPDK Ciamls
RPDK Taslkmataya
RPDK Garut
RPDK Pandeglang
RPDK Bekasl
RPDT2K Purwakarta
RPO Sturada lndramayu
RPDT1 Jawa Timur, Surabaya
RPDKM Probollnggo
RPDK Lumajang I
RPDK . LumaJang II
RPDKM Lumajang
RPDK Jember
RPDK Banyuwangt
RPDK Kedirl
RPOK Blitar
RPDKM Blltar
RPDK Bangkalang
RPO Khusus Rebolsast Pemerlntah
RPO Slnga Nnllara Raja
RPD. Glanjar
RPO Klungkung
RPO Karang Asem
RPOK Sumllawa
RPOK Sima
RPDK Lombok n mur
RPDK Lombok Tengah
RPDK Ende
RPDT2K T.T.S. Sae
RPDK Sambas

2255-0500,
2255-0500,
2255-0500,
2255-0500,
2255-0555,
2255-0455,
2255-0455,
2255-0455,
2300-0500,
2300-0500,
2300·0500,
2300-0500,
2255-0455,
2255-0500,
2200-0500,
2200·0500,
2200-0500,
2200·0500,
2200-0500,
2255·0455,
2200·0455,
2200-0455,
2255·0500,
2200·0155,
2200-0155.
2230·0455,
2200·0455,
2200·0155,
2155·0455,
2155·0455,
2155·0455,
2155·0455,
2155-0455,
2155-0455,
2155-1710
2200-0500,
2255·04 55,
2255·0500,
2255·0500,
2255·0500,
2255·0555,
2255-0455,
2255·04 55,
2200-0400,
2155-0400,
2100·0400,

3993
3325
4255
4166
3985
3750
3500
2522
2325
3385
3102
2480
3305 parallel MW 1475
3725
2415
2485.5 and 4000
2315
3920
4000. 1562.5
3330
2405
4265
2527
3050
2475
3402
2830
3167
3214
3573
4105
4087.5
3800
2325
4598
2336
3200
2400
2540
3775
3422
3102
3560
2695.5
2500
3400

0.175
0. 15
0.1
0. 1
0.125
0.1
0.1
1
0.5
0.375
1
0.6
0.5
1.5
0.5
0.3
0.5
0.5
0.3
0.5
0.75
0.3
0.1
1.5
0.75
0.3
0.3
0.5
0.1
0.25
0.25
0.25
1
0.25
1.5
0.75
0.75
0.75
0.075
0.075
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.5
0.3
0.25

brass ba nd cha mpionship!
More a nd m o re, comme rcials arc
finding their way onto Indo nesia's a irwaves.
Heaviest concentra tions arc fo un d a t the
lower rungs of t he broadcasting maze b ut
adve rtisement, a lt ho ug h ra re , ca n even b e
h eard o n the natio nal service (RRI).
Under th e terms of its License and
Agreement, RPDs m ay not, w it hout consent
o f the Home Secretary, broadcast any commercial advertisem e nt or sp onsore d program.
The broadcasting of advertisements during
RPD transmissions is governed by the Indep e ndent Broadcasting Authority Act, which
prohibits the sponsoring of programs by
advert isers, but a llows th e program compa nies
to sell time for advertising. Advertisement
m ay b e inserted at the b eginn ing or end of
programs or du r ing "n atural breaks" in t he
programs.
T hey must be cle arly disting uisha b le as

16

October 1988

0600· 1600
0600· 1700
0600· 1700
0555· 1710
0655-1655
0555·1655
0555-1655
0500-1700
0600-1600
0600-1700
0600·1700
0600·1700
0555-1655
0600-1715
0600· 171 0
0600-1715
0600-171 5
0600-1 715
0600·1715
0555· 1715
0555-1655
0555· 1655
0600· 1600
0455-171 5
0455-1715
0555· 1710
0555-1715
0455-1700
0555-1710
0555-1710
0555-1 715
0555·1700
0500-1700
0500· 1710
0555-1705
0555-1655
0555-1705
0600· 1700
0600-1700
0655· 1700
0555-1655
0555· 1655
0500· 1555
0500-1555
0500· 1500

such and b e recognizably separate fro m the
programs a nd the time given to them must not
b e so great as to clc trn ct from the \'aluc of the
programs a s a medium of infnrm :ninn. cdurnt ion o r e nt e rta inment. The amount l)f a d vertisi ng o n RPO stat ions r:1ngL'S from a n
average of five minutes to eight minutes on
h our.
The indc p c n d<.:nt RPD st:1 1i ons arc norm a lly limited to a maximum o r t<.:n minutes of
advertising e ach hou r .

Legal Pirates?
H erc again is where I ndll ncsian broadcasting gets h azy. There arc also a number of
amatir o r p irate stations o n the air . Slimctimcs
referred to as "indcpendcm" they arc
prin1a rily on AM and Flvf but some arc
thoug ht to inhabit the shortw:ivc ba nds as
well.
MONITORI NG TIMES

Figuring It Out
Having some trouble keeping up with
::i ll o f the T i ngkats ::in d RRs? Don' t feel ba d.
You're no t a lone. Not only d ocs the
Indo nesia n system of broadca sting boggle the
average -- a n d even sop hist icated DXcr - the
average Ind o nesian is no differe nt .
Don't b e discouraged, though . S pin the
dial a nd try fo r some of these e lus ive yet
catch::iblc, fasc inating yet frustrati ng, tiny lilllc
bit of the world's la rgest government-owned
b roadcast ing system . At least th ere's one good
thing about it --you don't have to w o rry about
tvfoluccan blue-ringed octopus.

ShortW'ave W

I

I
d

c
a

r
d
s

hether you ch oose to count t hem based
o n fr eque ncy o r stu dio local ions or programming source or trans mit ter sites or
by their individu a l transmill c rs, the re
are, at any give n time , a nywhere from
1,000 to several thou sa nd shortwave
broadcasters operating aro uncl the globe.
And e a ch one, in some s ma ll way, is
unique. Something about each of th ese
stations makes it one of a ki nd, just
like snowflakes -- or hum an bein gs, for
that ma tter.
And yet there arc a n in dete rm inate
number of these shortwave sta tion s
which are, for vario us reaso ns, "more"
unique than oth e rs -- sta ti o ns w hich arc
unusu al in some special way.
A sk any dozen shortwave liste ners 10
put together a list of te n such stations
and chances arc pretty good you'd e nd
up with a dozen lists whi ch have little
in common. N ot to be deterred und just
for the fun of it , we've put toget he r ou r
own list. Each sta ti o n on it is unusua l

in some way and none have qu ite the
same claim to fame. He rc's ou r
J\1011i1o!i11g Times list of shortwave
wi ldcards:

Spies in the Towers
People who make a nigh tly check fo r
spies hiding under the bed raise their
eyebrows every ti me t hey t une in Costa
R ica's Radio l mpacto. T his well-heard,
lice nsed, commercial broadcaster doe sn't
seem to air any commercials, yet it can
afford to operate an AM statio n an d
two shortwave tra nsm itte rs . It pu mps out
a lot of anti- N icaragua, a nti-C uba programming. It's said the station, in suburba n San J ose, has m o re t han its sha re
of security present and conspiracy fans
have rea l questions about who really
ru ns t his station.
Haven't heard it? Check 6150 o r 5030
t hey say, "You ca n' t

by Curtis Bengson

MONITORI NG TI M ES

Oc1obcr 1988

17

Bomber's Target

One in a Hundred Tries

Before George Otis and his High
There a rc always a few stat ion s that arc
Adve ntu re Mini str ies put KVOH on the
highly positioned on the easy-to-h ear
air in California they had severa l years
scale. When it comes to QSLing them,
however, the indicator nicks about the
of highly inte rest ing shortwave broadcast
experience with the Voice of Hope,
same distance in the opposite direction .
operating from Lebanon, act ually within
or these, the one with probably the
sight of the bo rde r
longest easy /diffiof Israel. The stacult history is
The Voice of Hope in Southern Radiodiffu sio n
t ion survived
Lebanon has been threatened T elevision
num erous threats
Ivoiricnne, the govagai nst it and t he
and bombed but it continues_
devout coul d easily
e rn ment sta tion in
th e Ivory Coast
sec th e ha nd of
God p rotect ing the station. A coup le of
(Cote D'Ivoire).
years ago that ha nd sl ipped and a
According to o ld r ecords, that was th e
bomber got the studios, destroying the
case eve n 20 or 30 yea rs ago w hen
facility, ki lli ng a nd wou n di ng person nel.
Radio Abidjan could be quite easily
Nonetheless, the station cli ngs tenaheard on 4940 with 0600 sign on. A nd
ciously to its mission of peace a nd can
it's st ill th e case today, even wit h a
somet imes be tuned in around 0300 or
newish 500 kilowatt t ransmitter a nd easy
late r on 6280. Signals are usually poo r,
recept ion from 0555 sign o n o n 6015
and 1900 to 0000 on 11920 in F re nch
howeve r, t hough the programs a re usually in Engl ish.
and loca l la nguages.

Broadcaster or Utility?
Radio Kiriba ti, the governm e nt-run sta- ·
tion in the islands of t he same name,
probab ly doesn ' t sec it se lf as unusua l,
but it is in the eyes (or cars) of DXcrs.
Shortwave broadcast DXc rs cla im the
stat io n is a broadcaster w hile ut ility specialists in sist it qual ifies as a "utc."
T hat's because the shortwave trans missions arc in upper sideband a nd generally co nsidere d to be a "feeder" out let
intende d to be picked up and relayed on
one of the outer islands, whi ch makes it
a utility. There's also eviden ce that t he
feed is simply picked up on a radio a nd
fe d ove r loudspeake rs which , to the
SWilC DXc r, m akes it a broadcaster as
wel l.
T here tend to be long st retches when
Radio Kiri bati is not heard very we ll in
the U. S. bu t a t this writing the 10 kw
station is being heard pretty regulurly
from its sign-on just before 0600 on
14802, in English a nd Ki riba t i. It's using
USB, do n't fo rget.

18

Oc1ober 1988

places as R aba t, Casabla nca a nd
M a rrakech . But it s ma in offi ce is in
T angier, which was once a n in te rnat ional
city a nd is st ill co nsidered as a sepa ra te
radio cou ntry by ma ny SWLs . It s shortwave t ra nsmitte r is at a p lace called
Nado r which is located in what used to
be Spa ni sh Morocco. It 's still coun ted as
such for cou ntry counting by so me.
To furt her inte rn ationa lize things the re
is a lso a n offi ce in P aris. Radio McdiUn is a fair ly easy catch on 95 75 runni ng in F rench and A rabic to a roun d
2045 UTC closing.

Murder, Inc.
E quator ia l G u inea was, fo r several yea rs,
a pl ace whi ch, if yo u could go there
(though no sane person wou ld want to),
you might well ne,·er co me back.
Murder was virt ually at government
ministry leve l und over several yea rs the
p opul ation's stan da rd o f living was
reduced about as fa r as it is possible to
go.

Oh, the station does reply now a nd th e n
-- at a guess to
Perhaps it's a meaone out of every
Go to Equatorial Guinea and you sure of how ba d
50 or 100 reports - but no one has
might never come back. Up until th ings were that the
qu ite learned t he
a few years ago, murder was new govern ment
turned to commerkey to how to
practically a hobby in this African cia lizing its shortwr ite one of the
nation - until Radio Africa came wave stat ion in the
lucky lett e rs. P uton
the air.
hopes of making a
ting a nice spin on
littl e m oney! What
the whole affair is
was t he Malabo
the fa ct that th e
na tio nal station beca me "Radio Africa"
station has had the same QSL card all
with slots o f comme rcial re ligious time
this time, comp lete with "SWL" in la rge
offere d fo r sale.
letters on the face of the card! Bu t j ust
try an d get an answer o n the first
The station is represent ed by Pierce
attempt. Some DXers haven't succeeded
Int e rnational Communica ti ons, 10201
eve n after 20 tries!
T orre Avenue, Suite 320, Cupertin o CA
950 14. You can tune in on broadcasts
by gro ups as va ried as th e A ssemblies of
Split Personality Station
Yawch (which ru ns its own sho rt wave
statio n, WM LK) t o the Lu theran
Further nort h in Africa there is a staR eforma ti on H our. Radio A fri ca is on
t ion which, if the people involved
9553 (slightly va r iable) a nd best hea rd
t hought about it, could easi ly end up
aro un d 1700 a nd late r.
wit h a severe ident ity crisi s. Radio
Mediterra nee International might already
have a spli t personality in that it is
pa rtly a government operation and partly A Deepening Mystery
a commercial one.
Beyo nd th e gove rnme nt' s Bu rma Broa dcast ing Service in R angoon, t here is a
Nominally located in Morocco, it has
rathe r cloudy mil itary broadcasting sit uaFM stat ions in such spicy-sounding
MON ITOR ING TI MES

tion which shortwave listeners a re still
trying to pi ece together. A coupl e of
years ago word su rfaced about a
Burmese Defense Force station o n 5060,
operating at Taunggyi in Shan Stat e.
Th e n a power increase and apparent frequency shift enabled U .S. listeners to
hear the station o n 6570.
Or did it? Lat er wo rd indicated that th e
6570 statio n is at Maymyo, some miles
north of the town of Mandalay. 5060 is
reported to still be in use, although no
one seems to know whether th ere is still
a transm itter at Taunggyi or not. In
eithe r event, no address is known for
either one and no one has yet been able
to get a re port through , much less an
answer with, p erhaps, some cla rifying
inform at ion.

Chinese River Radio
Back to Asia for the last one on the
list. The deve lop ment and increase in
broadcasting activity in the People's
Republic of China is one reflect ion of
the drastic changes th ere since fvfao left
the scene. One o f the newer Chinese
broadcasters is still anot her voi ce aimed
at estranged T aiwan. Th e Voice of
Pujiang, based in Shanghai, broadcasts
to natives of Shanghai who are now in
Taiwan. The station takes its na me from
the Huangpu River which run s through
Shanghai and has been on the a ir si nce
early in 1988.
Many U .S. DXcrs have picked this one
up around local su nrise run nin g on three
parallel frequencies: 3280, 3990 and 4950
with programs in Mandarin and the local
Shanghai dialect.

include any pirate broadcasters or clandcstines s ince, by the ir very natu re, they
arc more unusual than the average
shortwave broadcaster. To a lesser
degree the same holds true fo r the very
low power one and two perso n broadcasters in South America, so they were
also left ou t of consideration.
Despite disqua lifying t hose t hree types
there were probably numerous othe r
examples which would well qualify as
broadcasters having a diffe rent twist
about them. Stations have different h isto ries, purposes and backers a nd perhaps in our rush to log th e next one we
need to stop and appreciate the unique
flavor of each one we log.

Breaking Thai Law
In Thailand only Radio Tha ilan d, the
official government station is allowed to
operate on shortwave {Thai TV an d
Th ai Meteorological stations went off
shortwave a number of years ago). Now
it seems the Royal Palace is breaking
the law. There has long been a medium
wave radio station broadcasting fro m the
palace grounds and "O r Sor" has been
reported on shortwave a few times in
the past yea r or so. Aussie DXers have
monitored this between 0900 and 1200
on 6148 but it ha sn't been heard by
anyone in North America that we know
of.

So there is ou r list of shortwave broadcasters which, fo r variou s reaso ns, are
more unusual than most. We didn't

Few listeners get a QSL
out of Abidjan the first
time_ Most have to make
many attempts.

Well, if anyone can break a law or two
and get away wi th it, perhaps those in
the palace are the ones.

The Newest
O ne of the shortwave wildcards isn't
even on th e air yet! Not as th is is
written, anyway. When it does come on
the air, WWCR in Tennessee will be the
newest in a six year parade of broadcasts comi ng on the air from th e U .S.
or its possession s. But it won't qualify as
a wildcard for very long -- only ' til the
next U.S.-based shortwave stat ion comes
along and takes over cl aim to being the
newest. After that, WWCR will be just
another shortwave station. Check ou t
7520 and 15690 kHz.
MONITORING TIMES

October 1988

11)

Will the residents of Smithville sit still for a stranger to raise the first
private radio tower in town? The typically mundane city council
meeting suddenly comes alive with opposition to

An Antenna Tower for the Duke
by Wayne Mishler

A

typi ca l city counci l meeti ng it was
not. The no rmally quiet hall r oared
with voices blending in simultaneous conversatio n. The smell of ladies' perfume,
men's cologne, and t obacco smoke hung in
th e stale ai r like fragrant smog. Early fall
finery loomed under the fl uorescent
lighting like flowe rs at a funeral.

T o say the least, it was the largest
crowd that Gertrude Simpleto n had ever
seen at the Smithville city counci l meeting.
S he should know. Gerty, as she was called
by the few peop le who were on casual
speaking terms wi th her, never missed a
council meeting. Whatever topic ca me up,
Ge rty was there to pass judgment on it.
Among other things, her outb ursts kept the
counci lmen awake. She was a fixtur e a t the
meet ings, and always occupied her favorite
front row sca t which over the years had
expanded to fit her large frame.
But tonight as Gerty waddled into city
ha ll to occupy her usua l sca t, it was taken.
In fact , as near as Ge rty cou ld tell, all of the
scats were taken except for t hrce at the
head table which were reserved for council
officia ls who ha d not yet a rrive d.
Somewhat in fluenced by the size of
the crowd, Gerty swayed as gracefully as
possible down the center isle a nd stood in
front of th e one man she figure d would give
he r his scat.

said in the most feminine voice that she
could manage.
"Eve nin' sister Gertrude," the Reverend replied.
"What brings you out to the council
meetin' tonight, Reverend ?" Gerty asked.
"The obvious, I guess. The whole town
is talking, you know... "
"Of course I
know," Gerty interrupted. She gla nced
toward the dignified
stranger who sat
quietly
and
obscurely on the
back row. "It is my
civic duty to keep up
with things that
happen in this town ,
you know. But I
sure ly am su rprised to find all these scats
taken." There was an obvious hint in he r
voice and a n insistent grin on her round
face.

October 1988

"Is this seat taken," the Reverend
asked.
"No."

The Reverend sat down. "l am the
Reverend Samuel Smallbody," he said.

"You want to put up
a tower? Why would
you want to do a
fool thing like that?

11

"Duke
Attcrhcrry," repl ied the
stranger. Th e two
men shook hands.
"You ' re new in
town, aren' t you?"
asked the Reverend.
"Relat ively so,"
the Duke said.

"I've read a hout you . Welcome to
Smithville. We're honored."
The Duke smiled. "T hank you," he
said.

"O h my, where are my ma nn ers" H erc,
please take my seat," the Reve rend said,
re luctantly rising to his feet. Gerty
squeezed into the folding scat, which
creaked unde r her 320 pounds. "Thank
you," she said.

At that moment, th e mayor and two
councilme n entered the room, lau ghing
about someth ing that had happened in the
hallway. They glanced at the Duke, and
then wa lked to the head table and sat down
in the vacant reserved scats.

"Certainly," replied th e Reverend.
The mayor tapped the microphone to

"Evcnin' Reverend Smal lbody," she
20

T aking his leave, the Reverend
peered across the audience in search of
anothe r scat, and found two -- one on
either side of the stranger on the back row.

MONITORING TIMES

sec if it was working. It was. "Aa rrumph."
He cleared his throat to speak.
"Pleased to sec you all taking such an
inte rest in your town's affairs tonight," he
said, looking over the huge crowd. "And the
usual good even ing to you, Gert ru de."
The audience laughed.
"Looks like we have only one item to
discuss tonight : an applicatio n by a Mr.
Duke Atterberry to erect a 50 foot radio
tower in the back yard of his residence," the
mayor announced. "Now, Mr. Atterberry,
why on earth do you wan t to do a fool thing
like that?" asked the mayor.
Murmurs fr om the audience r ose in
crescendo as the Duke slowly stood to his
feet and walked with poise to the front of
the room. H e was a ta ll, sle nder, graying
ma n in his fifties, with closely-trimmed
bea rd and receding hairline. His attire and
manner were those of a man of means,
authority, and co nfidence. He faced the
council members, then t urned and faced the
audience which by now was so loud th at he
co uld not speak over the din.
The mayo r rapped a gave l on the
table. "Mr. Atterberry has the fl oor," he
said.
The Duke spoke with a faint but
unmistakable Eng lis h acce nt. "Tha nk you,
Mr. M ayor ... ladies and gentle me n. I'll get
right to th e p oint. My reason for
wanting ... rather, for needing the tower is

that I am a serious amateu r r ad io operator
and shortwave listener and th e towe r will
e nable me to estab li sh radio co mmuni cations with other radi o stations aroun d the
world.
"Yeah, like with the Sovie ts," ye lled a n
old man in bib overalls. "I heard about how
he listens to them Moscow sta tions and
Russian satell ites," the old ma n to ld the
a udience. "Sounds downright un a merica n
to me. "
"Yes, I do monit or R a dio Moscow
a long with other stations in all part s of t he
world. This gives me a broade r aware ness
of. .." The Duke was not allowed to fin ish his
th ought.
"And what abo ut them sa tellites?" the
old man interrupted.
"Well, I don 't actu a lly li ste n to Ru ssian sa tellit es. They tra ns mit most ly in
code ... "
"Ha! I knew it. Code. Before we know
it this he re town will be the espi onage capital of the U.S.A. N osiree Mayo r. I'm fl at
aga inst this stranger and his ra dio and h is
tower," the old man yell ed.
The audi e nce roared in si mult a neo us
comment. The mayo r rapped his govcl.
An elderly Judy sroo d a nd raised the
question of safe ty."! live next doo r to M r.
Att erberry a nd quite fr a nkly 1 a m afra id
t hat his tower will fall on my ho use or worse
MON ITORIN G T IMES

yet, o n me ," sh e said in a qu iet voice.
Sa fety is one of my wo rries, too," t he
mayor sai d.
Th e Duke pulle d b ack the j acket of
h is three-piece suit an d placed his han ds in
h is pockets. He sp oke with a cnlm, eve n
to ne. "T he t ower is enginee red to withstan d
vio lent windsto rms . Insta llat ion will of
co urse be done to the sat isfacti on of city
e ngi neers. It wi ll be set in co ncrete, bol ted
to my house, an d supported by cabl es so
t hat it cann ot possibly fa ll. T he a nt e nnas o n
t he t owe r wil l not overhang a nyo ne e lse's
propert y," the Du ke explain ed .
"But w hat about t he chi ldre n who
come into you r ya rd a nd touc h it," objected
a nother lady. "Won't t hey be e lect rocuted
o r so met hi ng?"
"The towe r wil l be grounded . It will
ca rry no e lectricity," the Du ke explain ed.
Anoth er ma n stood up a nd sp oke. "I
lived next door to a guy w ith a radio tra nsmitt e r once," he sa id , "And all I ever ha d
w as t ro ub le as soo n as he put up hi s
an tenna . I swea r, t he TV we nt bana nas and
th e w ife 's foo d mixer stopped wo rkin ' an d
my ki d 's ele ctri c train ran slowe r."
As la ughter quieted to a low roar, the
D uke ope ned his mouth to respond , bu t
Gerty, wit h grcu t exert ion, stood up a nd
took the floor in he r usua l ma nn er. "You
people nrc abou t as farsighte d as a mo le in
a coa l-bin at mid night," she sa id .

October 1988

21

"I know everybody in Smit hville and I
know that nobody has a radio tower in their
yard. And we should be more afraid of that
fact than anything else. We need radio
operators like Mr. Atterberry here. Why,
him and that radio towe r could save this
town ."
"Maybe you'd like to explain that," the
mayor sa id.
An eloquent voice from the back row
came to Gerty's rescue. "The re is someth ing
th at needs to be said," the Reverend
Smallbody interjected.
With the characteristic flair of a n
orato r, the Reverend told ahout a newspaper article that he had read recently. It
was a story about a distant town about the
size of Smithvill e that had been ravaged by
a pre-dawn tornado. The storm struck at 3
a.m. with surprise a nd with deadly force,
laying down oak trees and power lines and
ripping homes apart like they were made of
paper.

The scene at dawn was one of confus ion and desperation. Dozens of homes
were demolished. Communicatio ns lines
were down. Some residents wandered in
shock; others wept in hysteria. And,
trapped under the weight of a collapsed
roof, two-year-old Angie Christense n lay
bleeding.
Rescue workers freed Angie within
minutes. Ilut her troubles were far from
over. Angie needed immediate medical
care. The town's only medical facility had
been dest royed by the storm. It was a twohou r ambulance rid e to an emergency
center that could help Angie. The town
doctor feared she would not live that long.
There was an emergency helicopter at
the medical center, but no way to get a message to its dispatcher.

Me a nwhile, an amateur radio operator whose equipment was damaged but
workable was setting up an emergency
station, powered by a portable generator.
As he worked, a neighbor drove to police
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i"j headquarters with news that emergency
commu nications would be available by
amateur radio in minutes.

WHY

DO SCANNER OPERATORS
SPEND $150 TO $800 FOR
THEIR EQUIPMENT AND FOR
THE MOST PART ARE NOT
HAPPY WITH THE RESULT?
THE WEAK LINK IS THE
ANTENNA!
Now everyone can have
antennas like the
professionals but at a
hobby price.
IF YOU WANT TO HEAR THE
PROS, USTEN UKE A PRO.

Send $.50 for full line
antenna catalog to:

OHIO RADIO R&D
,
5421 Hickory Ct.
Lewisb urg, OH
5/8 Wave
Over
45338

1

The town doctor accompanied the
neighb o r back to where the stat io n was
going up. As they arrived, the radio operato r was goi ng on the air. HF propagation
was not good, but there were some early
risers rag-chewing on 75 meters. The radio
operator broke in with a request for emergency assistance.
The nearest of the two hams was
transmitting from a town about 700 miles
away from the medical center to which
little Angie needed to be flown. He cleared
the frequency fo r traffic, p laced a lo ngdistance telephone call to the medical
center, and patched the call through his
transceiver so the center's admitting physician was able to speak directly to the doctor
at the disaster scene. Within minutes, a
medically-equipped helicopter was en
route.
The am ateur rad io operator's transmissi ons were the firs t news of th e tragedy
to reach the outside world. A nearby short wave li stener heard the transm issions and
notifi ed the Red Cross and a loca l television news station.
Soon the Red Cross had set up emergency shelters and additional communication links. The TV station aired a news

Hallwave

22

October 1988

MONITORING TIMES

bulletin on the town's p light, a nd solicit ed
volunteers and donatio ns.
T he amateur radio operator stayed on
the air, handling emerge ncy radio traffic
between concerned relatives and town
residen ts. F or severa l hours, his was t he
o nly source o f two-way communications in
town. And then his ea rphones crackled with
the greatest news of all: Jillie Angie was
doing well and was out of danger at the
medical center.
"That radio operator's home was
destroyed by the storm," the Reverend said.
"He recen tly moved to Smithville. And I
think he deserves mo re cons iderat ion than
he has received here tonJght."
When the R everend ha d finished
speaking, the citizens of Smithville were
silent. Some were crying.
Finally, the mayo r spoke. "Are we
ready for a vote'!"
The council members nodded.
Afterward, as the crowd left city ha ll ,
severa l residents gathered around the
Duke. Some we re amazed that an ordinary
citizen could monitor forei gn radio broadcasts. They cou ld not be lieve that shortwave radios wou ld pi ck up U .S. and fore ign
military communications. They were
enthralled at the Duke's explanation of how
he predicted Russian intelligence and military activity by monitorin g and plotting the
track an d altitude o f that na tion's military
satellites.
Gerty tol d o f her infatua tion with
scanners. "I've got three of 'cm," she said,
"and they're always on. They lull me to
sleep at night. Kinda keeps me up wit h the
local goings-on, if you know what I mean."
The group laughed.
"I am in terested in monitoring religious foreign broadcasts," lhe Reverend
sa id.
"You arc all invit e d to my house," the
Duke said. ''I'll s how you my stat ion, and let
you sa mple what it feels like to have the
entire world at your fingertips. It's my way
of say ing th anks for helping me to get lhc
tower a pproved tonight," he added.
The three of them left city hall
toge ther, walking toward a coffee shop, and
talking about the fascina tio n of radio.

Discover Why Grove Is

The SWL's 'Monitoring Marketplace'
Yes , Grove Enterprises is your
one-stop shop for the world 's finest
listening gear, publications and
accessories -- all at the bargain
prices for which we are famous. As
publishers of Monitoring Times and
manufacturers of performance
boosting equipment and antennas,
we also carry the best name-brand
shortwave receivers -- names like
JRC, . ICOM, Kenwood, and Sony.
We are committed to giving you
prompt, courteous service and
individualized attention. In fact,
quality and great service are our
trademarks at Grove, where your
total satisfaction is guaranteed!

Read Monito ring Times
Your foremost guide to authoritative
listening throughout the radio spectrum,
Monito ring Tim es brings you 104 pag es of
late-breaking information on every aspect of
radio monitoring. Our popular amateur rad io
column is loaded with up-to-the minute news
and timely tips for the new ham. Each
monthly isstle features inside reports by the
industry's top writers; accurate schedules of
internatio nal broadcasters; announcements
of new equipment ·and accessories; profiles of government, military, police
and fire networks; and exclusive home projects for the experimenter.
Order your subscription today: only S18 per year in the U.S.; $26 per year
in Canada and foreign suscriptions. For a sample issue, send $2 (foreign send
6 IRC's). All orders should be sent to address at bottom of page.

Antennas/ Accessories
Shortwave Receivers
· The new Japan Radio Company
NRD525 (right) is the ultimate receiver.
Its g reat features include 200 memory
channels which store both frequency
and mode, passband tuning and notch
filter for precise targeting of interference, an optional VHF/ UHF
converter, and many other excellent options (Order RCV1, Only
$1169 plus shipping) .
The !COM R-71A (left) and
R-5000
are
excellent
Kenwood
receivers
with
the
most-desired
features: memory channels, effective
noise-blankers and notch filters, and
excellent sensitivity and selectivity. These are world-class receivers!
(/COM, ord e; RCV6, Only $839; Kenwood, order RCV7, Only $809. 95·
shipping extra.)
The Sony ICF-2010 (right) is a fullfeatured shortwave portable with
frequency coverage of 150 kHz-30
MHz, plus the commercial FM band
and aircraft band! 32-channel memory,
synchronous detection and much
more! (Order RCV2, Only $338 plus
shipping.)

The Grove Skywire is a h igh
performance, low cost shortwave/
lo ngwave anten na designed for
total 100 kHz-30 M Hz receptio n
w ithou t the gaps fou nd in more
expensive trap antennas.
The 66-foot Skywire can also be used for high performance all-band transmitti ng when used with a transmatch.
Includes pre-measured stranded copper wire, porcelain
end insulators, custom center insulator for your PL-259 coax
connection, and fu ll instructions. (Order ANT-2, Only s19
p l us $2.00 UPS; $3 U.S. Mail P.P.; $4 Canada Air P. P.)
The addition of the Grove Minituner (right, center)
to your o utdoor antenna will allow signal peaking to
perfection, as well as eli minate i ntermodulation on
you r general coverage receiver.
(Order TUN-3, Only s49 plus $2.00
UPS; $3 U.S. Mail P.P. ; $4 Canada
Air P.P.)
Ou r "Hidden Antenna" system
is yo ur key to exci ting shortwave reception without an
outside antenna. This 66-inch flexible wi re antenna
(left) can be tucked i n a corner and is designed to be
used with the Grove PRE-3 Power An t (below, right).
(Order ANT-6, Only S9.95 with PRE-3, Only s49 p lus
$2.00 UPS; $3 U.S. Mail P.P.; $4 Canada Air P.P.)

Make checks payable to
MT (for magazine) or
Grove (for products)

Grove Enterprises/Monitoring Times
140G Dog Branch Road • Brasstown, N.C. 28902
Phone (704) 837-9200; or toll-free (MC & Visa orders only) 1-800-438-8155

~
~'t
.-:.·

.:·~

ShortW'ave Broadcasting

..·; .. tJllfro..., ..
0

:r . lll••Vti>f)l(~:~I .

1.~·'ov,,. ., "\I f,
loo onHrlt.

1
'"'"'JL.,l,,f

'-OupON

------

'"' 1 ,."'4r7~Z~~sc

,'~~~~ •. .._,.,h,t,';:::~,., ,"" uu ::::;:,~o.,., 1, ~ P.. ~. u

c

.11

I/'::.:;.- ·:"· . . ,... .... '· "·· ........
I . . . ;;~·:·. . t~-...::::= -- . :-r~~:-:~;:;:. _.. . ;
r>o.lctu;i, ,,..

11111o,,,,, 1 11

1.,,,,.,.,

"'1u1 ,0 " "

n.~.~.::'.:

~.:·.~:·

Glenn Hauser
Box 1684 - MT
Enid, OK 73702

IRCs: Internat ional Reply Coupons ( IRCs) seem like the
perfect solut ion to the problem of pre-paying return postage fro m
anot her cou n try. You buy the m ar your post office, and recipients
exdiangc t hem for local stamps at their post office.
Despite t he fact that almost every country in the world is a
member of the U niversal Postal Union , IRCs, in p ractice, arc not
honored in many countries. Th is is especially true in remote a reas
-- o u t of ignorance, inefficiency, or to prevent any hint of foreign
exchange between individuals.
Fo r example, JR Cs can nei the r be bought nor exchanged in
Guatemala. Some German DXcrs visit ing Radio Tczulutla d id the
director a favor by co nverting JOO of them into d o llars (Danish
SW C lubs l nt ernat ional). I RCS arc supposed to be stocked at all
post o ffices in T ha ila nd, as well, but they provoked only curious
stares at a branch office near Chiang i\·lni (David Vicars, WDXC
Con tact).
Arthu r Cushen, w riting in the American Shortwave Listener's
C lub b ullet in, repo rts that lRCs were decreed invulid by t he
military government of Peru in 1985 . Yet H enrik Klcmctz of
Sweden reported on Radio Netherlands' Media NcflVork t hat he
bought and exchanged IRCs in Lima as recently as August of
1987. Klcmctz docs say, however, t hat it is very diffi cult to
excha nge t he m outside capital cities. Radio Tropical anachcd o ne
to the envelope ra th er tha n stamps!
Even if accep ted, IRCs arc anyt hing but a bargain. In the U.S.,
th ey now sell for USS.95 ce lll s. By definition, one of them will be
exchanged for stumps to mail the lightest (measured in grams -usua lly less th an half a n ounce) leucr back to the issuing cou lll ry
by surface ma il. As a result, you might lrnve to supply as many as
six to pny for an airmail reply.
Snvvy QSL collectors sk ip t he IRCs and instead purchnsc
appropriate foreign stamps in the proper amoullls from a dealer
(or t rade with pen pals) . So me major broadcasters send t heir
monito rs I RCs. Those who re..:cive them find it more economical
to treat them like currency, never cashing the m in but using them
to pay for foreign DX publications with prices quoted in IRCs.
St ill, fo r those who appreciate the traditio n a nd convenience of
IR Cs, we have so me tips. T hey cost only USS.85 cents or so if
you buy them from Canad a at CANSl.05 (Canada Post Corp.,
Antigonish , NS B2G 2R8. i\Iajor credit cards accepted. Allow six
weeks fo r delivery.) Note, however, that one order of IRCs from
Canada Post a rrived wit hou t t he necessary postmarks on t heir left
half.
Ir you're willi ng to wait for up to eight weeks for delivery,
I RCs are also available from the Philatelic Centre, Hong Kong
Post O ffi ce, 2 Con naught Pl., Hong Kong. Major credit cards are
accepted b ut you must ud d H KS3 for shipping (Gerry Bishop,
Niceville FL, Wodcl of Radio) . If you holiday in Greece, pick up
some for just 70 d rach mas (Riccardo Rosa ti, WDXC Contact) .
Austria: A poll conducted fo r the BI3C also rated 13 ot her
stat ions amo ng U.S. listeners. A stou ndi ngly, Au stria came in
fourth a ft e r RC I, 1313C and Moscow, and tied with H avana. That's
far a hea d of Radio Netherlands and Voice o f Germany, bot h o f
which have more hours in Engl is h, more frequencies und even
relay t ransmit ters than Aust rin. This must spcnk volumes for the
quali ty of Rndio Austria In ternational programming. Listen for
you rself at I 130 UTC on 15450 k Hz, 0030 on 9875 and 0-130 on
60 15. T imes may shift an hour later fr om September 25
2 -l

Oc1obcr 1988

(Frequencies via Robe rt E. Thomas, £3riclgcport, CT).
Now A ustria is negot iating wit h Canada for a relay exchange.
Brazil: Radio Cultura do Para, 5044.8 kHz, features a
confused DJ Saturday and Sunday mornings until 0700. Your / ,ate
Night Pal is confused abou t what to do and wha t d ay it is, giving
away maca ro ni and pluyi ng music like "I'm a Lener Carrier in
Love" (all in Portuguese). (Carlos Coimbra, T oronto, DX
Liste11i11g Digest).
Burkina Faso: If you hear Japanese lessons on a Friday at
2130 UTC on 48 15, don't get excited; it 's only Ougadougou,
react ivated (l3ob Padula, RC! SWL Diges1).
Costa Rica: Radio Golfito says it is not only on 1600 kHz
but also 6150 -·both with I kw of power (H'orld Radio TV
l!a11dbook via DSWCJ). Unheard, must be planned for the future.
Radio for Peace I nternational's revised schedu le: f\londayFriday 1800-2400 on 21555, Tuesday-Saturday 0100-1000 on 13660,
repeat ing 3-hour progra m blocks, including our World of Radio,
Monday at 1800, T uesday 2300, Wcdnesduy 0300, 0600, 0900,
2000, F riday 2100, Saturday 0100, 0-100 and 0700, all approximate.
Stay runcd Friday, Saturday and Monday for RFPl's own mailbag.
Cuba [non}: While the U.S. government endorses
Catholicism by broadcasting masses to Cuba on Rndio Man i, the
Je hovah's Wit nesses arc far more oppressed in Cuba. Now,
clandestine La Voz d e C l D broadcasts La Atalaya ("Watchtower")
daily around 1050 and 2210 UTC on 99.JO kHz. (One hour lutcr
from Octobe r 10 after DST.)
Germany, West: Voice of Germany planned to rest ru ct ure
it s English progra mm ing as o f September 25. Now there's less
difference between English services broadcast to different target
areas (via Kra ig Krist, DXLD).
Guam: l\licroncsia 's pl:ins for dome~t ic shortwave arc on
indefinite hold, so the next best t hing is a new program o n KSDA
ca lled Micronesia Snapshots , Saturdays al 2100-2115 on 15125
kHz. Ir's no t clear whether they mean UTC Saturday, or local
Saturday which would be UTC Friday (Gerry Bishop, Review of
/11te111a1io11al /Jroadcasting).
Hong Kong: Rad io TV Hong Knng hus been test ing on
shortwuve 9685 kH z arouj nd 0700- 1600 UTC in E nglish and
Chinese. There's also announcements in Vietnamese discouraging
approaching boat-people. It 's the old 2-kw trans miucr
occasionally active on 39.JO kHz. £3cst in Australia 0800-1300 when
t he re's BBC news in E nglis h, first heard by Craig Seager (Bob
Padula, OAM, Australia11 DX Ne ws). Unfortunately, t he frequency
is already jammed and there's heavy ndjacent channe l
interference.
Indonesia: The two old East German-made transmiu crs of
Voice of Indo nesia arc in such poor s hape t hat t hey can only p ut
out 30 to 50 kw instead of JOO on 11790 and 15150, both variable
(Alfred Heinis, via Lim Kong Jin, Mal aysia). But a new 250kilowau unit has been put into service in western Sumatra, to
reach Europe bcuer, including Englis h rctimed from 1500-1600 to
2000-2100 on 7125 kHz (David Foster, OzDX). The change,
however, is no help in North America.
Italy: It a lian Radio Reluy Service is a serious project hoping
to attract program-t ime buyers who can't afford the 250 kw R:ic.lio
Trans-Europe in Portugal. Though power is a modest 5 bv, with
careful inginecring they hope to cover most of Western Europe
with a decent signal, SSl3 plu s carrier, and sophisticated fi lte ring

MON ITOR I NG Tll\I ES

ShortW'ave Broadcasting
to vary audio bandwidth. Target date is the first weekend in
October, local day and evening on the 7, 9, and 13 MHz bands.
IRRS will be DXcr-fricndly with QSLs (Andy Sennitt, RNMN).
Japan: Contrary to previous reports, there is no sign of any
shortwave activity from Far East Network (Chuck Boehnke and
Richard E. Wood, Hawaii). From October 29, Radio Japan via
Canada will make another two-hou r shift instead of the one hour
you would expect when DST ends -- at 0300-0400 on 5960 kHz
(Bru ce M acG ibbon, DX Spread).
Netherlands: Program previews from Radio Net herlands:
Wednesdays fr om October 5; an eight-part docu me ntary coproduccd with ABC about Dutch influence on the development
of Australia. Research File, Monday, October 31 is about the
science behind weat her forecasting (Dick Rush ands Carl Mann,
RIB).
Netherlands Antilles: Trans World R adio hopes to start a
new DX program from lat e fall. The 15-minut c program, to be
broadcast in the evenings, will be call ed Bonnin! Wavele11g1h and
will be hosted by Chuck Roswell (Sheldon Harvey, PQ, DXLD).
New Zealand: Radio New Zealand is again in danger of
going off shortwave (Arthur Cushen, via C hris Hambly, Alice
Springs, DXS). Meanwhile, the schedule until October 29 is: 1830211 5 on 12045 and 15115 kHz; 2345-0145 (0145-0330
Saturday/Sunday), 0330-0730 on 17705 and 15150 kH z; 1000-1205
on 6100 on 9850 kHz.
Papua New Guinea: Several provincial stat ions are
changing frequency so that a ll of the new 10-kilowatt t ra nsmitte rs
are spaced at least 15 kHz apart. Since there is not e nough room
fo r all of t hem on 90 meters, some arc moving to 120. The new
lineup is: 2410 Wabag, 2435 Kimbe, 2450 Mt. Hagen, 2465
Lorcngau, 2490 Kundiawa, 3205 Vanimo, 3220 Lae, 3245 Kerema,
3260 Madag, 3275 Mcndi, 3290 P ort Moresby, 3305, Daru , 3320,
Kieta, 3335 Wewak, 3345 Popondetta, 3365 Alotau, 3380 Rabau l,
3395 Goroka, 3905 Kavieng.
Each week, a different stat ion tests its new transmitter as an
engineer makes the rounds: September 22-27 Lae, Septe mber 290ctobcr 3 Kundiawa, October 6-11 Mt. H agen, October 13-19
Wabag, O ctober 2 1-27 Madang, October 29-Novcmbcr 7 Wewak.
Meanwhile, regul ar transmissions have been reduced so as to
close at 1300 instead of 1400 UTC (Godron Darlin, OzDX and

ADXN).

Peru: Mario Vargas Llosa, known to DXcrs for his radioambicnce novel, "Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter," is a likely
candidate for p resident in 1990 (Don Moore, fine 11111i11g).
Radio Nor-O rie nt al, 5272 kHz, was dest royed by fire in June.
The owner has been contacting DXcrs who wrote for QS Ls,
asking them for a $50.00 contribution to rebuild (Julian
Anderson, Argentina, Radio Nuevo Mundo).
Radio 1550, la Nucva Voz dcl Centro (NYC) tells th e Wodd
Radio TV lla11dbook that it is adding shortwave on 4800, 1 h.·w, in
Pio Pata at J000-0600 UTC. Unheard so it mu st be a fu ture plan
(Finn Krone, DSWC!).
Seychelles: 1313C's new Indian Ocea n relay was schedu led
to go imo fu ll opera tions on September 25th. He rc's the
schedule: 0300-0400 on 9600, 0300-0500 on 11 750, 0400-0630 on
15420, 0500-0630 and 0900-1400 on 17885, 0900-1600 on 15420,
1645-2300 on 6005 and 7185 kHz (Andy Sennit t, RNMN). Beware:
these sa me frequencies are used by other Bl3C sites.
Sierra Leone: SLBS heard on 5980 fro m 0630 UTC in
vernacula r, 0652 in E nglish, 0700 news in English unt il off at 0710
or 0715, best when BBC is missing from 5975 kHz (Al Q uaglieri,
Albany, NY SPEEDX).

Sweden: Radio Sweden's new schedule fr om September 25
shows 15345 and 17860 at 1400, 9695, 11705 and 11950 at 0230 -no English at 2100 anymore but at 2230 in stead for Africa and
Latin America on 11925 kHz (Bruce MacGibbon, DXS) .
Switzerland: Monthly broadcasts from the Red Cross are
scheduled on UTC Tuesdays and Fridays September 27 and 30,
N ovember 1 and 4, at 0310-0327 on 6135, 9725, 9885, 12035 kHz
(via Bill Dvorak, Wisconsin).
Tahiti: Radi o Tahiti is using 9752 regu larly, very good carrier
level but very low modulation, 35 to 40 percent, around 0900
lITC. Other frequencies arc poor with much interference;
mediumwave (AM) 738 kHz often good ' (Chuck Boehnke,
Keaau, Hawaii)
Turkey: Voice of Turkey should now be one hour Inter, at
2300 and 0400 UTC on 9445. Features aft er the news for the
fourth qu arter a rc: Monday, A1111e11ia11 File. Tuesday, A1a111rk,
Turkish Album. Wcdnesay, Lei/er-box. Thursday, VDT Mmking i1s
50th A1111iversmy, Whal do you k11olV aboul T11rkey. Friday,
Archi1ec1 Si11an, Fmme. Saturday, Ou1look, DX, From 1iukey wi1h
Love. Sunday, Dwe//e1~· of Anatolia Through lhe Ages, Twkish
Pa11ora111a (Kra ig Krist, DXLD).
Correction to September: 0640, not 9460; the English news is
only on FM, not shortwave.
UKOGBANI: Jn addit ion to regular sports programs, Bl3C
has special Olympic report s at 0430, 0940, 1330 and 1945 UTC.
Not only that, but at 0300 UTC, there's the daily Sounds Olympic
on special frequencies 6175, 9510 and 12095 only. So1111ds Oly111pic
provides commenta ri es on the best action plus light music (IU/J).
Big programmi ng changes are in store from October 28:
probably a n expa nsion to news hours and the start of a split into
two separate World Services.
USA: Voice of A merica is considering closing down t he
Bethany, O hio, site whe n AFRTS goes off the air on September
25th. Radio Marti, Voz de la OEA a nd a few VOA services could
be transferred to G reenvi lle. (Robert Jones, OzDX).
WWCR, Nashvi lle, now plans to begi n testing at the end of
December a nd go on the air January 2. Surely th e "final delay,"
they say (Bru ce MacGibbon, DXLD) .
From early August, WWV replaced its propagat ion information
at :18 past the hour with an apology pleadi ng equ ipment
problems; you can phone them instead (at any time except
weekends?) at (303) 497-3235. Sometimes the apology was
missing, too.
Fortunately, you can hear WWV's propagation predictions via
some of ou r broadcasts on Radio Ca nada Intcrnational's SWL
DigesJ and Wodd of Radio on WRNO, now schedul ed T hursday
at 2300 on 13760 kHz, UTC Friday at 0030 on 7355, Saturday
0300 on 6 185, Satu rday 2330 on 13760, Sunday 2030 on 15420.
Catch the cnrlicst broadcast in case late r ones arc pre-empted for
footba ll. When DST ends the last Su nday in October, times will
shift one hour la1cr, and barring any further changes, frequencies
would be 7355, 7355, 6185, 7355 and 13760 respectively.
USSR: If music from Moscow makes you want to buy Soviet
records, he re arc some sou rces: Ukrainska Knyha, 962 Bloor St.
West, T oront o, O ntario (416) 534-7551 (also sells Soviet
shortwave rad ios); Troyka , 799 College St., Toronto ( 416) 5356692; a nd Cana n, Inc., 377 Geary St., San Francisco, CA (Peter
a nd Lidia Krochmaluk, North York, Ont., Canada)
Read much more from Glenn Hauser in Review of lnlernalional Broadcaslinq
and/or OXLlstenlng Digest; samples $2 each. 10·issue subscriptions $21, or both
for $40 (Rates to USA. Canada. Mexico; US funds on a US bank or postal money
order). to the address In the masthead.

MONITORING TIMES

October 1988

25

ShortW'ave Broadcasting
Broadcast Loggings

0217 UTC on 9885

Let other readers knoiv iv/lat you 're enjoying.
Send your loggings to Gayle Van I/om
160 Lester Dri11e, Orange Park, FL 32073

0230 UTC on 4910

English broadcast unless oth e1wise in dicated.

0235 UTC

Switzerland : Swiss Radio lnlernallonat. Interesting feature on the first
Swiss railway system. (George Neff, Tampa, FL)
Honduras: La Vaz de la Mosqultla. Spanish and English. Religious
programming and campeslno music to 0248 UTC. Lady w ith news, ID,
and gospel hymns. (Harold Frodge, Midland, Ml)
on 4845
Brazil: Radio Naclonal·Manaus. Portuguese. Male announcer w ith clear
·Naciona1· IDs and newscast at 0312 UTC. Fair audio level tonight.
(Frank Mierzwinski, Mt. Penn, PA)

0005 UTC on 11790
United States: AFRTS. Red Sox/Yankees baseball game. Station heard
under Russian transmission from Kiev on !his frequency. Also heard on
parallel frequency of 6030 kHz. (Bob Fraser, Cohasset. MA) Get that
OSL card now... ··ed.

0256 UTC on 17760
Turkey: Voice of Turkey. Interval signal and piano music. Station ID,
frequency sched ule, and International news. (Stan Mayo, Westbrook,
ME)

0015 UTC on 11800
Italy: A.Al. International news and national story on exporting Italian
wines to Canada. (Bob Fraser, Cohasset, MA)

0257 UTC

o n 7200
Somalia: Radio Mogadishu. Somali. Signing on w ith Interval signal and
Somalia national anthem. Gooel signal but buried by VOA at 0300 UTC.
(Doug Waller. Bay Village, OH)

001 8 UTC o n 6090
Luxembourgh: Radio Luxembourgh. Local record store commercial and
rock music from David Bowie and Rolling Stones. Listener phone-In for
music request of British pop hits. Music from Madonna and automotive
products commercial. (Greg Humphries, Long Beach , CA) great detalls!
Let's have more reports like this! ··ed.

0027 UTC on 11910
Hungary: Radio Budapest. Trumpet Interval signal and Engttsh sign-on.
10, frequency scnedule, and national news on the Hungarian Socialist
Part y. (Tom Sullivan, New Orleans. LA)

0100 UTC o n 15425
Sri Lanka: Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corp. (SLBC). Pop music program
and several station IDs. Heavy Interference from Radio Moscow. (Doug
Waller, Bay Vi llage, OH)

0115 UTC on 9875
Austria: Radio Austria International. Classical music, station ID, and
music from the 30s. (Leslie Edwards, Doylestown . PA)

0310 UTC

o n 4976
Uganda: Radio Uganda. Gospel choral music for Ugandan Sunday
morning . National and local Kampala news with ID. (Joseph A
Johnson, Savannah, GA)

0340 UTC

on 11810
Seychelles: Far East Broadcasting Assoc. (FEBA). Swahili. Rellglous
music and lnsplrattonal message. ·FEBA. ID at 0340 UTC and African
choral muslc.-eel.

0350 UTC on 4845
Guatemala: Radio K'ekchl. Spanish. Terrific marimba music at tune-In
followed by station ID and religious music. (Joseph A J ohnson.
Savannah, GA)

0400 UTC

on 4820
Honduras: La Voz Evangellca. Spanish. Religious music and station ID
as · La Voz Evangellca, Ho nd uras. · Stati on interference from Afri can
station. Radio Bot swana. (Frank Mierzwinski, Mt. Penn, PA)

0145 UTC on 4805
Braztt: Radio Dlffusora do Amazonas. Portuguese. Friendl y chat
between announcers, follwed by Portuguese pop vocals. Station IDs
and frequency schedule . Faded by 0203 UTC. (Frank Mierzwinski, Ml.
Penn, PA)

0150 UTC

o n 4649
Bolivia: Radio Santa Ana. Spanish. Traditional Andean music of Bolivia,
and brief station ID. Signal very poor to 0205 tune out. (Larry Van Ho rn,
Orange Park, FL)

0150 UTC

o n 4895
Colombia: La voz def Rio Arauca. Spanish. Time check at tune-In with
commercial s lor Caracas merchants. Great Columbian sal sa music and
020 1 UTC ID. (Joseph A Johnson, Savannah, GA)

0409 UTC

o n 17685
Israel: Kol Israel. Discussion on heallh and inlernallonal sport s scores.
Israeli weather report and 04 13 ID. (Stan Mayo, Westbrook, ME)

0438 UTC on 3300
Guatemala: Radio Cullurat. North Ameri can easy-listening music and
station ID at 0445 UTC. Heavy mor se cooe Interference. (Frank
Mierzwinski, Mt. Penn, PA)

0500 UTC on 15150
New Zeal and: Radio New Zeal and. Pop m usi c program, time tips and
station ID. (Stan Mayo, Westbrook, ME)

0500 UTC on 5288
Chad: Radio Mondou. French. Station sign-on r outine with very weak
signal. News type reports until 0508 UTC. followed by native African
music. (Doug Waller, Bay Village, OH)

0157 UTC

on 17770
Oman: Radio Oman. Arabic. Flute Interval signal and sign-on ID. Koran
recitations, and Arabic music. (Bill Traister, Covington, TN)

0158 UTC

o n 9475
Egypt: Radio Cairo. Time tones and ID for English service. Egyptian
music, station frequ ency schedule, and discussion on the Koran. (Biii
Traister, Covington, TN)

0555 UTC on 14802 USD
Kiribati: Radio Kiribati. Station sign-on with news from London at 0600
UTC and l ocal news at 06 10 UTC. M usical program at 0620 UTC. (Doug
S. Waller, Bay Village, OH)

0600 UTC on 6165

0205 UTC on 4805
Brazil: Raello ttallala. Portuguese. Station faele·ln following sign-off of
Raello Ollluslon oo Amazonas at 0203 UTC . Chat from announcers and
clear station ID as ·Rad io ttattaia· at 021 1 UTC. (Frank Mierzwinski, Mt.
Penn, PA)

Netherlands Antilles: Radio Netherlands relay. Media Network program
on solar fl ares and the results of shortwave fade outs. (James Kline,
Santa Monica. CA)

0635 UTC on 4845
Mauritania: ORTV de Maurltanie. Arabic. Koran recitations anel
traditional Islamic music. Station ID and newscast at 0700 UTC. (Rod
Pear son, St. Augustine, FL)

0207 UTC o n 11710
Argentina: RAE. National news of Argentina on economics,
unemployment, anel po litics. Parallel frequency 9690 kHz conslelerably
weaker and m ixing w ith Radi o Moscow. (Tom Sullivan, New Orleans.
LA)
on 11785
Germany-GOA: Radio Berlin International. National news on
agrlcullural oevelopmenl s, federal assistance to Vietnam lor hospital
construction, and chlldren:s choral music. (Tom Sullivan, New Orleans,
LA)

0701 UTC on 9545
Solomon Islands: Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corp. (SIBC). Native
Island music, local area commercials and station ID. (James Kline,
Santa Monica, CA)

0215 UTC

26

October 1988

0858 UTC on 4965

MON ITORI NG TIMES

Brazil: Radio Alvorada. Portuguese. Lively Brazilian sambas. Station ID
at 0900 UTC, local lime checks, and morning program announcements.

ShortW'ave Broadcasting
0920 UTC on 4821
Peru : Radio Atahualpa. Spanish. Station break for ·canned" ID and time
check, followed by beautiful Peruvian music.

I 008 UTC on 9735
Paraguay: Radio Naclo nal de Paraguay. Spanish. Latin music program
and clear ID. Considerable Interference from BBC on 9740. (James
Kline. Sanla Mo nica, CA)

1040 UTC on 12200
China : CPBS-2. Chinese. American Music Hour featuring oldies such as
Mr. Sandman and Moon Ri ver. Brief Chinese announcem ents between
music selections. (James Kline. Santa Monica, CA)

1115 UTC on 15455
China: Radio Beijing. Station ID and Int erview with Dr. Henry Kissinger
regarding maj or economics and the f utu re of China. (Stan Mayo,
Weslb rooK, M E)

11 50 UTC on 15505
Kuwait: Radio Kuwait. Arabic. Speci al programming beamed to Europe.
Arabic music selections wilh singing and 1200 UTC ID. (Frank
Mierzwinski. Mt. Penn. PA)

.1211 UTC on 17575
Madagascar: Radio Netherlands relay. Station ID and program Images
on parks and gardens of Scotland. (Slan Mayo, Westbrook, ME)

1230 UTC on 6120
Canada: Radio Japan relay. Japan Travelog wllh report on the national
parks of Japan. (Bob Fraser, Cohasset, MA)

1230 UTC on 9580
Australia: Radio Australia. Communicator prog ram and news on Rupert
Murdoch's "Sky-Cnannel" satelllle TV system. (Bob Fraser. Cohasset,
MA)

1312 UTC on 15310
Norway: Radio Norway International. Brief report o n sighting of a Loch
Ness ty pe monster In a Norwegian lake. (Bob Fraser, Cohassc l, MA)

1344 UTC on 15575
South Korea: Radio Korea. Lellers fr om International listeners and
station ID. (Loy w . Lee. Richm ond. KY)

1558 UTC on 11635
Clandestine: La Voz del CID. Spanish. Po lilical speeches and ID as
·esla es Radio Camilo Cienfuegos. Cadena Radio. La Voz del CID."
Easy-listening mu sic past 1600 UTC. (Harold Frodge, Mid land, Ml)

1700 UTC on 15500
USSR: Radio Moscow. African service wilh news and African Mall Bag
and weekend In Moscow· programs. usual anti-American and South
African slant to comm entaries. (Jack Kellner, Ho no lulu, HI)

1730 UTC on 11930
United States: Radio Marti. Spanish. Natio nal news and Latin music.
Soap operas for Cuban listeners. (Edouard S. Provencher. Biddefo rd ,
ME)

1822 UTC on 21485
Liberia: Voice of America. Commentary on lhe U.S./ U SSR relations.
"VOA" ID at 1830 UTC and newscast at 183 1 UTC. (Frank Mierzwinski.
Ml. Penn, PA)

2000 UTC on 11820
Qatar: Oalar Broadcasting Service (OBS) . Arabic. Time signal with
slalion ID as · oa1ar min al- Doha.· Closing newscast at 2005 and "Al Doha" ID. Arabic music and di scussion. (Stephen J. Price, Conemaug h,
PA)

2020 UTC on 9553
Equatorial Guinea : Radio Nacional. Usual religious programming In
English by man. No IDs. but little question this Is Radio Naclonal. (Doug
Waller. Bay Village, OH)

2058 UTC on 7110
Malla: Radio Medlterran. Gospel music and religious sermon. Station
sign-off at 2 115 UTC, and request fo r listener's reception reports. (Rod
Pearso n. St. Augustine. FL)

2 159 UTC

O il

15365

Canary Isl ands: Radio Exterior de Espana. Spanish. Orchestra music
and political speech. IDs at 2217 and 2238 UTC, followed by Mail Bag
snow with l etlers from Peru and Australian listeners. (Leslie Edward s,
Doyleslown. PA)

2245 UTC on kl5300
Unlled States: WCS N. Business report on foreclosures. classical
Hungarian music, and "Lellerbox· program. (George Neff. Tampa, FL)

2250 UTC on 11720
Canada: CBC NO S. Phone-In prog ram on the rights of the Canadian
Indians. Heard also on parallel frequency of 9625 kHz. (Bob Fraser.
Cohassel. MA)

2258 UTC on 11955
Bulgaria : Radi o Sofia. Slallon ID and news on Soviet/ Bulgarian joint
space mission. DX program on tuni ng receivers , and Instrumental
music. (Leslie Edwards, Doylestown. PA)

2315 UTC on 9915
United Kingdom: BBC-World Service. Station feature. From the
Weeklies press review U.S./ USSR relations. (Bob Fraser, Cohasset,
MA)

2330 UTC on 9960
Clandestine : Radio Calman. Spanish. Stat ion IDs and Latin music
selectio ns. (Edouard S. Provencher. Biddeford, ME)

2349 UTC on 7065
Albania: Radio Tirana. Fo lk music and commentary on Canadian and
Albanian relations in trade and cult ure. Classical music and eight nol e
Interval signal. (Leslie Edwards. Doylestown. PA)

MONITO RIN G T IMES

October I 988

27

Utility World
Larry Van Horn
160 Lester Drive
Orange Park, FL 32073

To the Rescue!

T o say that utility
monitoring can be exciting listening has
to be an understatement. Nowhere is this
more evident than monitoring a disaster
at sea. Two of our Utility World reporters
this month tell their stories of disaster at
sea as t hey heard it on their shortwave
radios.
Mark Widerstrom in H ousto n, Texas,
writes, "l wanted to write to your readers of a
major rescue I picked up on the U.S. Coast
Guard cha nnels on shortwave. They were
searching for an island hopper aircraft which
went down in the wate r close to San Ju an,
Puerto Rico. The aircraft was a twin engine
plane capable of carrying 20 people.
"ft seems the plane disappeared from radar
and a sea rch was started. A Canadian warship,
The Napagon, and a Coast Guard helicopter were
in the area. H e lo aircraft, number 1715, dropped a
data marker buoy (DMB) which reports drift and marine information to data receivers. The DMB was transmitting on 242.65 MHz.
"After the DMD units were dropped, the Canadian warship
checked his radar fo r blips of vessels or from the plane. The warship started a search pattern while calling San Juan Coast Guard
communication station on marine VHF channel 21 and 5696 kHz.
'This search lasted on into the night. This was o ne example of
a n armchair rescue you just couldn't sit back and relax on ."
Everyone o n that plane was rescued, but our second story by
Guy Delia in C hicopee, M assachu setts, doesn't have the same
happy ending. He monitored t he rece nt oil drilling rig disaster in
the North Sea off the coast of Scotland.
Guy first heard of the disaster on a Navy MARS channel
14470.0. One U.S. Naval Vessel set up a phone patch to the U.S.
Coast Guard to a rescue coordinator in Scotland. The following is
whut he heard.
Naval vessel: "We are in receipt of S.O.S. for oil platform fire.
We ca n respond with five helicopters if needed."
Rescue Coordinator: "We request the help and it would be
appreciated. What type of aircraft do you have to assist in
rescue">"
Naval Vesse l: "We have SH3 F he los available. What is the
status of the rescue?"
Rescue Coordinator: 'There has been an explosion on an oil
platform rig. 220 people on the rig; only 40 have been recovered.
H elos on scene now."
Naval Vessel: "Our ETA is 0500 local time to assist. What HF
freque ncy for t he rescue is being used?"
Rescue Coordinator: "Monitor 5680.0 with Rescue Commander.
He is on the scene now."
Guy the n tunes into 5680.0 kHz and describes what he heard.
"Ma ny helicopters and ships were on this frequency spott inff
lifeboats, fire and many casualties. The Naval vessel was mon~
itored discussing w ith the Rescue Commander the sh ip's ETA and
how many aircraft to launch. A head count was undcnvay a nd the
helos were asking about the number of litters on each craft. There
was a BBC helo o n the scene, but its involvement in the rescue or
repo rt ing over the air was not known."
Calls possibly heard in such a n exchange might be the USS
ll ayler (DD-997) , ca llsign NR\VH, with a phone patch to the U.S.
Coast Guard New York to the R escue Coordinator in Edinburgh,
Scot land.
I would like to thank Mark and Guy for sharing their fine

28

October 1988

MONITORING TIM ES

reports with our readers a nd this is just a couple of examples of
the excitement to be heard in the world of utility mo nitoring.

Airline Airways Station Profile
William J arrett in Knoxville, Tennessee, recently rece ived a nice
letter verification from the South Africa n Airways Station in
Johann~sbu rg._The ~ta_tion enclosed a fact sheet on the history of
the station which Wilham wanted to share with Mo11itori11g Times
readers.
Our station callsign was ZUR but later changed to simply
Spri ngbok Johannesburg as we arc known today. The station
was first established June 28, 1956. After some initi al teethino
0
prohle1~1s and the outfiu ing of some outdated equ ipment, we
can claim as early as November 1957 to have direct continuous telegraphic communications with SAA aircraft
t hroughout its entire route structure.
This was a uni que feat ure in the civil avia tion world and
SAA gained worldwide recognition as a resu lt.
With the advent of jet aircra ft in 1960, and advances in
radio technology, the radio statio n purchased single sideband
equipment and was the first airline in the wo rld to use this
revolu tionary method of radio communication. The first tests
were carrie d ou t between June 21 and July 31, 1961, with outstanding results.
Sta rting in 1962, ZUR now ha d co ntinuous voice communication with all SAA aircraft throughout its entire ro ute
structure.
Th us o n August 21, 1963, when the last of the N o rth
African states pro hibited SAA from overflying their territory,
SAA was equipped with a highly efficient and flexible communications system, which enabled reliable communications
between headquart ers and flights affected by this last minute
ban. On August 22, 1963, SAA changed its route structure to
Europe without cancellation of a single service. Th is feat
could not have been accomplished without the aid of direct
communications.
Since those early days, numerous other airl ines have
approached SAA requesting information, and then establishing similar radio stations to ours.
Durin~ 1?81 and 1_984 ~pringb?k Joha nn~sburg was severely
st r uc~ six .11mes by hghtmng. This resulted m equipment
dctcnura t10n to such an extent that the whole station had to
be replaced.
T oday, Spri n&bo~ J ohannesburg is the long distance operationa l commurucat1o n (LDOC) centre of South African Airways. We utilize seven frequencies on a 24 hour basis. These
frequencies arc as fo llows: (all in kHz) 3013, 5532, 8933,
11354, 1 333~ 17925, 21943.
There arc ten Raca l receivers and two 10 kilowatt transmitters with a T CI Model 540 o mni-ga in ant enna plus two (Off
0
periodic antennas.
The station will verify correct recept io n reports if sent to the
following address:
Office of the Chief D irecto r
(Flight Operations)
South African Airways
P.O. Jan Smut s Airport
1627 Johannesburg
Republic of Sou th Africa
A big Ute World "thnnk you" to William J arrett for submitt ino
0
this infornrntion o n Springbok Joha nnesburg.

Utility World
Iranian airliner)

In Orbit Over MARS?

14441.S kll z

Well, maybe not literally but Andy Gordon in West Hartford,
Connecticut, is definitely one of the most committed navy and
navy MARS mon itors in the country. A ndy says that his radio
hobby has rewarded him several times.
"I have l?een invited aboard the USS Mobile Bay, USS Kidd,
USS America, USS Germantown, USS San Jacinto, USS Simpson,
and the USS Edson to name a few."
T his month A ndy has sent in some excellent interc;epts that not
only represent the more active channels in use, but give a good
representation of the ships that can be monitored. The frequen cies Andy monitors are probably the best chance a listener wi ll
have of working and verifying navy ships. On most navy channels,
the ships use tact ical callsigns which change frequently to preclude
identification of the ship being monitored. Andy uses two
receivers, a Sony 2010 and the J apan Radio NRD-515.
2716.0 Navy Ha rbor Common Cha nnel
NAOD-USS Sierra (AD-18)
NCAA·USS Carr (FFG-52)
NCOl·USS Ainsworth (FF-1090)
NDIK-USS Miller (FF-1091)

Working Charleslon Navy Tug Conlrol
Working Charleslon Navy Tug Control
Working Norfolk Tug Control
Working Newport Port Control (was
answered by Navy Tug Santaquin
YTB-824 (most unusual)
NDWO-USS Detroit (AOE-4)
Calling Mayport Tug Control
Working Norfolk Tug Control
NEGX-USS Fulton (AS-11 )
NEOB-USS Vulcan (AA·5)
Working Norfolk Tug Control
NEWZ·USS Deyo (DD-989)
Working Newport Port Control
NGHX-USS Wainwright (CG-28)
Working Charleston Tug Control
NHAR·USNS Sealift China Sea (T·AOT-170) Working the USS Canisteo (AO·
99)-NJVJ
Working New York Port Conlrol
NIDC-USS Valdez (FF-1096)
Working Norfolk Tug Control
NJAC-USS San Jacinlo (CG-56)
Working Newport Port Control
NJLK-USS Kauffman (FFG-59)
Working Norfolk Tug Conlrol
NJPX-USS Nassau (LHA·4)
Calling Alameda Port Control
NKIN·USS California (CGN-36)
Working 'OHM' (Queen's Harbor
NKIY-USS Saltish (SSN-681)
Master) Halifax, Nova Scotia
NNJH-USNS Joshua Humphreys (T·A0·188 Working Norfolk Tug Control
(new oiler)
NNTR-USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) Working USS Canisteo (A0·99)·
NJVJ
NOAL-USS Atfay (MS0-511)
Working USS Edson (DD-946)
NTGS·USS Spartanburg City (LST-1 192) Working Little Creek Harbor Control
NTMV-USS Patterson (FF-1061)
Working Newport Port Control
NXSF-USS Edenton (ATS-1)
Working Little Creek Tug Control
NZBl·USS McCloy (FF-1038)
Working Navy Bermuda Control

In years past the navy had a high seas, official-type, business
radio telephone network called NORATS. This.abbreviation was
later changed to ICSB, and during the early 1980s, became known
as CSS (ICSB is st ill sometimes heard). Andy has sent some
examples of the ships heard on a common ICSB channel 4066.l.
ICSil Ship Cha nnel 1-4066.1
NAHM·USS Guam (LPH·9)
Working Norfolk ICSB
NANT· USS Antietam (CG-54)
Working San Diego CSS·1
NCVV-USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70)
Working San Diego CSS·1
working Norfolk lCSB
NIJA·USS Coral Sea (CV-43)
NLVO-USS South Carolina (CGN-37) Working Norfolk ICSB
NNUL·USS Constellallon (CV-64) Working San Diego CSS-1
NTJZ-USS Wiiiiam H Standley (CG-32) Working San Diego CSS-1
NUSA·USS America (CV-66)
Working Norfolk ICSB
Calling NAVCAMSLANT and Norfolk
USS Oklahoma City (SSN·723)
ICSB (Note: this sub had not yel been
commissioned.)

Finally, the third way to hea r Navy ships in the clear is by listening to navy MARS channels. For the most part navy l\1ARS
operators are amateur radio operators and understand reccp1ion
reports and verification requests. The following is a representative
list of recent MARS traffic.
13826.0 kHz
NN NOCHS-USS

Vincennes (CG-49/NVIN (Ship that shot down the

NNNOCBG·USS
NNNOCNB-USS
NNNOCNH-USS
NNNOCOD·USS
NNNOCOZ·USS
NNNOCTO·USS
NNNOCUl·USS
NNNOCUR·USS
NNNOCZD·USS
NNNOCZV·USS
NNNONZK-USS
NNNONZO·USS

Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58)/NSBA (Ship thal hit mine
In Persian Gulf)
Juneau (LPD·10)/NROP
New Jersey (BB-62)/ NJZV
Dewey (DDG·45)/NOHW
Forrestal (CV-59)/NJVF
O'Brien (00-975)/NECG
Hermilage (LSD-34)/NRVF
Savannah (AOR-4)/ NFJF
Conyngham (DDG-17)/NHLT
Hayler (DD·997)/NRWH
Vreeland (FF-1068)/NMAP
Coral Sea (CV·43)/NIJA

14467.0 kHz
NNNOCOA·USS
NNNOCSE-USS
NNNOCUO-USS
NNNOCVB-USS

Raleigh (LPD·1)/NEDO
Elmer Mongomery (FF-1082)/ NOJH
Frank Cable (AS-40)/NGXO
Dahlgren (DDG-43)/NJZU

14477.0 kHz
NNNOCOG·USNS Chauvenet (T·AGS-29)/ NYGG
Spruance (D0-963)/NDOV
NNNOCUO·USS
NNNOCYH·USS
Fahrlon (FFG-22)/NFGF
NNNONAP·USS
Milwaukee (AOR·1)/ NLDL

14818.S kHz
NNNOCLF-USS
NNNOCLL·USS

Valley Forge (CG·50)/NVFP
O"Callahan (FF-1051)/ NZKI

Thanks to Andy Gordon for his unique insight into this aspect
of t he Utility World.

In the Mailbag
Rick Ma1thews in Vancouver, British Colombia, has sent along
a follow-up to the July column's "unknown network" mystery. Rick
says stations WNIM867 /WNHI785 are Southwestern Bell stations
and WNFf417 is Bell Communications. He further states that
they have a number of HF frequencies such as: 2194, 3155, 4438,
5005, 6763, 7300.
Since 6803 did not appear in his listing, Rick says it is probably
a new frequency. Rick and several others also sent a correction
concerning the aircraft callsign Speedbi rd. It should read British
Airways instead of BOAC which was changed several years ago.
The 9118-G PA4 mystery has also been solved. It is P ortishead
Radio, England, a nd Rick says they arc also on 17426 kHz using
t·he callsign GPA6.
One last item from our neighbor to the north, Rick says concerning my 3366 kHz logging .several months ago; the frequency is
assigned to ships in the Atlantic/North Sea areas by the Norwegian government. Tirnnks for the valuable information Rick and
be sure to check in often!
Tim Ames recently wrote to me nt ion a n interesting frequency
used on the western missile test range out of Vandenberg AFB,
California. Tim writes, "On the days when they have lau nches off
Vandenberg, they have the Navy out there warning ships to stay
away from the missile fir ing area. I stumbled onto the HF control
frequcn<.y. It is 5080 kHz USB and I listened to a NOAA ship
check in wi1h frontier control on that frequency."
The navy ships and helicopters check in with the control station
on this frequency and then go on to other frequencies. If they
have any problems they a lways contact each other on 5080. This
cha nnel is usually active right on into a launch and then disappears. Tha nks for the inte resting frequency, Tim.
Anoth er Tim, T im Tromp, might have stumbled on another
Fede ral Highway Administration freque ncy. Tim heard WWJ40
working WWJ74 in USI3 around 2307 o n 7420 kHz. Tim said both
stations we nt to channel "F3" at 2312. On another occasion Tim
hear \V\VJ45 at 0021 in USB on 7420. On this occasion the station switched to Channel "F7." V ery interesting T im, and if you
or any other Ute World readers catch any of these WWJ stations,
be sure to drop us a line.

MONITORfNG TIMES

October 1988

29

Utility Loggings
Abb reviat ions used in this column

6760.0
6761.0

All 1i111es UTC, Jreq11e11cies i11 kilolrenz. All voice 1ra11s111issio11s are
H11glislr 1111/ess ollre11vise 1101cd.
AM
Ano
cw

FAX
FEC
ID

Amplitude modulation
SITOR
Morse code
Facsimile
Forward error correction
Identification

ISB
LSB
ATTY
UNID
USB

Independent sideband
Lower sideband
Radloteletype
Unidentified
Upper sideband

6800.0
6802.0

6840.0
2716.0

307 1.0
3253.0
4128.1
4235.0
4263.2
5320.0
5550.0

5598.0
56t6.0

5696.0
58 10.0
5650.0
6257.9
626 1.9

6430.0
6460.0
6506.4
6509.5
6693.0
6715.0

6731.0
6736.0
6753.0

6756.0

30

USS Trippe (FF-1075) working Newport Port Control In USB at 1355.
USS Yellowstone (AD-41) working Newport Port Control in USB al
1228. (W > J > Batlles. East Kingston. NH) Welcome aboard W.J. Nice to
see you back-ed.
Sam 86972 working "Andy" (Andrews AFB) in USB at 0145. (W.J.
Sallies, East Kingston. NH)
USCGC Thunder Bay (WTGB·108) working coast guard group Boston
in USB at 111 3 wilh a SAR mission. (W.J. Battles, East Kingston. NH)
AlrcraM N601 P working WLO wilh phone patch traffic un USB at 1321.
(W.J. Battles. East Kingston. NH) Real odd one here!!·ed.
VAi-Vancouver CG Radio with CW traffic al 2338. (Tom Roach, San
Jose. CA) Welcome back to lhe column. Tom-ed.
ZLO-lrlrangl Naval Radio, New Zealand, wilh an AR DE CW marker at
0950. (Jim Boehm. San Antonio. TX) Welcome back to the column. Bill·
ed.
NIK, USCG Radio Boston. Massachusetts. transmitting an International
Ice Palrol bulletin In CW at 0050. (Sam Ricks, Philadelphia, PA) Glad to
see a return visll. Sam. Please report often-ed.
VARIG 810 working New York In USB at 0643 reporting over Zandery
(Surinam) With an estimate for Cabo Rojo at 0850 and ETA Miami of
1025. (Cabo Rojo is a reporting point over the Dominican Republic)
(Garle Halstead, St. Albans. WV) ThankS for the logs. Garle. nice to see
you back·ed.
Pan American "Clipper 202· working San Juan In USB at 0630 reporting
0•1er Adams (International Airport on Barbados.) (Garle Halstead. St.
Albans, WV)
Aeroradlo ATC Gander Newfoundland, working navy Lima 45 In USB at
0157. Alrcrafl requesting Gander relay position report to New York.
(Trevor SJanley. Flagslaff. AZ)) Welcome back lo the column. Trevored.
CG 1493 (HH3F AlrcraM) working COMSTA Boston In USB at 1851
reporting #2 engine out (later landed safely). (W.J. Sallies, East
Kingslon, NH)
Female Spanish four digll numbers station at 0330 (Wednesday UTC)
parallel lo 6810. (Bill Cantrell, Haslet, TX) Welcome back l o the column,
Bill. Thanks for the logs·ed.
Halifax Mllllary (Canada) working Port St. Jean In USB al 2349. (W.J.
Batlles, East Kingston. NH)
UNSU·Sovlel Cargo Ship Velizh wllh position and weather report to
Leningrad via CLJ, Havana Morflol Radio at 0015. Transmitting RTTY
50 baud/ 170 Hz shiM. (Sam Ricks. Philadelphia. PA)
UBRA·Soviet RO/RO Container Ship Astrakhan wilh cargo plan Jn
English/Spanish to URD Leningrad Radio at 0115. Enroute to Havana
and Sanliago, Cuba. Transmilling ATTY at 50 baud/ 170 Hz shift. (Sam
Ricks. Philadelphia. PA)
CFH·Marlllme Command Radio Halifax. Nova Scotia, al 0242 In CW
with a CO marker tape. (Tom Roach. San Jose, CA)
UKA·Vladlvoslok Radio. USSR heard wilh CW traffic for Severoural'sk.
(Tom Roach. San Jose. CA)
NMN·CG COMSTA Portsmouth, Virginia, working USCGC Victoria al
0225 In USB. (Trevor Stanley, Flagslatt, AZ)
KVH (Allant1c Marine Genier). Virginia, working Echo Whiskey talking
aboul problems with salelllle Jracker In USB at 1410. (W.J. Batlles. Easl
Kingslon. NH)
USCG 1503 (C-130) working St. John's Military In USB. Requesting
radio guard at 123 1. (W.J. Ballles. Easl Kingston. NH)
Sam 86972 working Andrews with phone patch lo Shannon Ops In
r~ference 10 the champagne glasses In USB at 2156. (W.J. Ballles, East
Kingston, NH)Andrews working Sam 24126 al 0011 In LSB (W.J.
Ballles, EasJ Kingston, NH)
"Andy" working Sam 31681 and 31682 In USB at 2159. (W.J. Sallies,
Easl Kingston, NH)
Ascol 4793 working Architect (Royal Air Force Great Britain) in USB at
0508. (W.J. Ballles, East Kingston. NH)
VXA-EdmonJon Military, Alberta. in USB reading weather reports from
Quebec Cily, North Bay. Trenton, Ollawa and Duncanville at 0020.
(Fraser Bonnell, Kellering, OH) Welcome to the column. Fraser. Please
report oflen·ed.
Navy 51 1 working Andrews wilh patch traffic in LSB at 1925. (W.J.

October 1988

MONITORING TlMES

7450.0
7495.0
7530.0
8101.0
8299.0

8344.4
8410.0
8436.0
8502.0
8555.0
8544.0

8558.4

6570.0

8609.2
8825.0
8843.0

8864.0
8891.0
8964.0
8989.0
8993.0

Sallies. East Kington, NH)
271 working Andy wllh a patch to Moose Tag In LSB at 1215. (W.J.
Battles, East Kingston, NH)
KISRA 52 with phone patch traffic to BlackWater Control bvla Hibiscus
In USB mode al 01 23. Sent lien 5 "Sllrep· slluatlon report. USAF·SAC
Quebec channel. (Sam RlckS, Philadelphia, PA)
HJFJ-33 working EdgewOOd wilh a phone patch to Port City Control
requesting weather for Pease AFB at 0151 In USB. (W.J. Ballles, East
Kingston, NH)
"ZERO" ancl "ONE" In USB voice then RTTY at 1401 . (No idea who this
could be). {W.J. Battles, East Kingston, NH) Interesting, I am at a loss,
any Ideas out there??-ed.
Female Spanish four digit numbers station at 0215 {Thursday). Also
heard a D CW beacon under the numbers station (Frank Mierzwinski,
Mt. Penn, PA) Welcome to the Utility World, Frank. Please report oftened.
Female Spanish four digit numbers station at 0249 (Monday) with
Interference for a whistler. (Biii Cantrell. Haslet. TX)
Female Spanish five dlgil numbers station al 0800 (Wednesday)
parallel 8190. (Bill Canlrell, Haslet, TX)
Female Spanish five digit numbers slallon heard al 0405 (Saturday).
(Bill Cantrell. Haslet. TX)
Female Spanish five dlgll numbers station at 0700 (Wednesday) wilh
Allenclon 893 0102. (Bill Cantrell. Haslet. TX) (Bill Cantrell, Haslel. TX).
Advantage calling Black Ant on SAC Alpha Papa In USB at 2354. (W.J.
Battles, East Kingston. NH)
UIDJ-Soviet Cargo Ship Krasnouralsk wilh cargo plan In
English/Spanish to URD Leningrad Radio at 2346. Enroute 10 Mariel,
Cuba. Transmilllng RTTY at 50 baud/170 Hz shift. (Sam Ricks.
Philadelphia, PA)
UOTV-Soviet Tanker Lenlno. with English traffic to Havana Mortlol
Radio CLJ al 0004. Transmilling RTTY al 50 baud/ 170 Hz shift. Enroute
to Santiago Cuba. (Sam RickS. Philadelphia, PA)
Female Spanish four digit number station with tune up at 0544
(Wednesday) broadcast at 0600. (Bill Cantrell, Haslet. TX)
UFH·Petropavlovsk Radio, USSR wilh CW !rattle at 0544. (Tom Roach.
San Jose. CA)
NIK, USCG Radio Boston, Massachusetts, transmllling an International
Ice Palrol bulletin In CW at 0050. (Sam Ricks. Philadelphia. PA)
UFN·Petropavlovsk Radio. USSR, heard with CW traffic at 0534. (Tom
Roach, San Jose. CA)
DZF-Manilla (BACOOR) Radio, Phllllplnes, In CW with allernate
markers: CO CO DE DZF MANILLA BACOOR RDO OSK CHN4 COM
8/11 lhenCO co DZF asw 8544 12828 ORJ TLX? Simulcast
8544/12828 _.. thought ORJ meant re strlcled to radiotelephone bul
used here w1lh TLX In a CW marker. Anyway, no frequency list needed
to ID this one. (Jim Boehm, San Anionic, TX) For ORJ my list shows 1
have ra diotelephone calls to book·ed.
KFS-San Francisco Radio. California, In CW at 0153 working 8LSV, a
Japanese vessel called "Shinhlmeraru· with a message from
Anchorage concerning Inspection on arrival. (Garle Halstead. St.
Albans. WV)
WNU-Slidell Radio, LA In CW al 0203 working the "White Arrow· wllh a
message emphasizing the washing of decks and Inspecting for any
dead Insects especially under hatch covers before reaching u.s.
territorial waters. (Garle Halstead, St. Albans, WV)
CLJ·Caibarien Radio, Cuba, in CW at 0543 working the Soviet vessel
UTFH. (Garie Halstead. St. Albans, WV)
SAM 60200 working Gander ATC In USB al 1635. (W.J. Ballles, East
Kingslon, NH)
Navy 50607 working Honolulu in USB at 0510. Honolulu advised he
had been calling on t11is frequency and 5574 since 0437. (Definitely
sounded ticked). (Garie Halstead, SL Albans. WV) Those navy guys
were probably thinking about their next liberty, Hi.·ed.
Soulh Pacific 11.9 working Nandi (Fiji) in USB at 0621 with a posilion
report. P1lo1 advised he would call again when on the g round in Pago
Pago. (Garie Halstead. St. Albans. WV)
Luflhansa 4275 working Cambridge Bay In USB al 0725 w1lh a position
report over 70 degrees west on Alfa Track (over Baffain Island above
the Artie Circle). (Garle Halstead. St. Albans. WV)
Rent-a-Cop working Hickam AFB, Hawaii, in USB at 0407 and Loring
AFB, ME working Music 88 wilh palch to Music Base at 1403 in USB.
(W.J. Ballles. East Kingston, NH)
McClellan AFB. California, working MAC · 177· aircraft requesting
aviation wealher for Norton AFB. California. at 0100 In USB. (Trevor
Stanley, Flagstaff. AZ)
Chlnaware calling MacDlll AFB In USB mode al 0100. Swllched to 90t8
USB and 11228 USB Jo transmit encrypted RTTY al 75 baud and MAC
950230, a C-141 with 39 passengers aboard calling MacDlll AFB.
Talking about a problem with #4 engine. Aircraft was diverted 10 Altus
AFB. Mode was USB al 0036. (Sam RickS, Philadelphia. PA)
U.S. Military aircrafl using callsign Bunk 25 heard working MacDill AFB
In USB at 0537 requesting a phone patch with Charleston Command
Post. Gave ETA for C11ar1eston as 0745. (Garle Halstead, SL Albans.
WV)

I

9007.0
9270.0
10780.0
11035.0
11055.0
1111 8.0
11120.0
11180.0
11195.0

11 2 14.0

11 228.0
11 246.0
11 288.0
11300.0
11 306.0

11 520.0
12135.0
12494.9

12497.9

12522.4

12523.9

12524.4

12595.0

12602.0
12606.0

12855.0
12859.0

Utility World

SAM 60200 v.orking Andrews In USB at 1447 (W.J. Battles. East
Kingston. NH)
Air Force Two working Andrews In USB at 1535 (This is a new freq for
m e). (W.J. Sallies, East Kington, NH) This Is F-292 Mus11c Star-ed.
Arla 4 working Cape Radio w1lh a radio chick in USB at 15 t 1 and MAC
601 96 w orking Antigua Control In USB at 1225. (W.J. Sallies, East
Kinston, NH)
Patina working Andrews AFB In USB at 2325. (W.J. Sallies, East
Kingston, NH) This Is F322 Mystic Star·ed.
"Andy" working UNID USAF unit. Andy chewed the UNID out for
stepping on patch with Timberwolf (VP Bush). Heard In USB at 0042.
(W.J. Sallies, East Kingston, NH)
Black Ant working Advantage In USB at 0014. (SAC-F315 Mustlc) (W.J.
Battles, East Kingston, NH)
Female Spanish hve digit numbers station at 0745 (Wednesday). (Bill
Cantrell, Haslet. TX)
SAM 60200 working Croughlon AFB, England, In USB at 1957. (W.J.
Sallies, East Kingston, NH)
Andrew s calling SAM 24127 In LSB at 0235 (this Is a new frequency).
(W.J. Sallies, East Kingston. NH) Interesting W.J., it definitely Is new.
Wonder what site this one belongs to. Since It Is LSB, probably part of
Mystic Star·ed.
Bandsaw Jullet working several units In reference to AWACS and Half
Quick ops In USB at 1355 (NORAD) and 1705 in USB hear Palimino
and Jullett In palch wilh Bandsaw Juliet via Trenton In reference to
cords for KL·43s needed. Also mentioned testing transmitter on
broadcast frequencies without using Hf fillers. (W.J. Salties, East
Kingston, NH)
MacDill AFB (Florida) working Diplomat In USB with a radio check at
1342. (W.J. Battles, East Kingston, NH)
Airevac 502 18 working MacDill AFB, Florida, with patch to Portsmouth,
Virginia, Hospital Emergency Room at 1931 in USB. (W.J. Sallies, East
Kingston, NH)
Bonnie Sue working Slingshot In USB at 153 1 (Anti-smuggler ops).
(W.J. Salties, East Kington, NH)
Air Alrique 625 working Khartoum In USB at 0424 with position report
and estimate for Oscar Bravo Della (El Obeid). (Garie Halstead, SI.
Albans. WV)
Easlern 4505 working Lima Radio In USB at 0617 reporting over
Montego BAy at 06 16 and est1mahng Alegre (Cuba's northern coast) at
0644. Aircraft repo rted a light chop with thunderstorms In the area.
Destination Miami. (Garie Halstead, SI. Albans, WV)
Female Spanish four digit numbers station at 0405 (Thursday) (Bill
Cantrell, Haslet. T X)
NAM·Norfolk Naval Radio. Virg inia. at 2220 In CW with a marine
weather bulletin al 18 WPM. (David Kimpton. Thunder Bay, Ontario)
Soviet icebreaker MoskVa with Radio Kriptogramma l o two Soviet
space flight tracking shipe Kosmonaul V. Komarov and Kosmonaul U.
Gagarin via UAT Moscow Radio al 0030. Transmitting RTTY at 50
baud/ 170 Hz shift. (Sam RickS, Philadelphia, PA)
UJEH· Sovlet Replenishment Tanker Vidnoye, also ldenlllied by
pendant number MN·0253, with coded aviation surface weather report
to Murmansk Radio at 0127. Transm itting RTTY at 50 baud/ 170 Hz
shift. Tanker assigned to the Soviet northern fishing fleet (SEVRYBA) to
refu el Soviet fishing trawlers at sea. (Sam RlckS, Philadelphia, PA)
UUVO-Sovlet Spaceflight Tracking Ship Kosmonaut Vladimir Komarov
with Russian traffic to UFB Odessa Radio at 0046. Enroute to Cueta,
Spanish Morocco port to transfer crew. Transmitting RTTY at 50
baud/ 170 Hz shift. Also monitored UPUl·SOvlet Hydromet weather
research ship Professor Vize with Russian traffic for URD Leningrad
Radio at 01 55. Enroute through Suez Canal from Singapore.
Transmitting RTTY at 50 baud/ 170 Hz shift. (Sam Ricks, Philadelphia,
PA)
UZZV-Sovlet Spaceflight Tracking Ship Kosmanaut G. Dobrovolskly
with Russian traffic to URD Leningrad Radio at 2346. Departed
Copenhagen enroute position off Togo. Transmitting RTTY at 50
baud/ 170 Hz shift. (Sam Ricks, Philadelphia, PA)
URWW-Soviet Polar Research and Supply Ship Nikhail Somov with
German traffic for UAT Moscow Radio at 0108. Departing Ham burg,
West Germany, transmitting RTTY at 50 baud/ 170 Hz shift. (Sam RickS,
Philadelphia. PA)
M/ V West Islands. CW callsign C4 IB of Cypriot registry heard In CW at
1449 working HPP-Panama Radio with a message for Serinaves
Panama. Message in Spanisl1 rel erred to a point on a nauflcal chart of
lslamorda (Florida Straits?) (Gane Halstead, St. Albans, WV)
Vessel with Belgian registry, CW callslgn ONBA in CW al 0605 working
3BA·Maurit1us Radio with an OBS message for Mel eo Maun11us. (Gane
Halstead, SI. aloans. WV)
Japanese vessel "Hauke·s Bay· callsign 7LBE heard working VIS in
Australia In CW at 0612 with a message lor Sydney. Gave pilots ETA al
0600 local lime on the 29th (approximately seven days out). (Garie
Halstead, St. Albans, WV)
UBF2·Leningrad Rad io, USSR. with a CW CO marker at 0102. (Tom
Roach, San Jose, CA)
SVD·Alhens Radio, Greece, In CW at 0642 calling the Bahamian vessel
"C6DV" (Garie Halsteadd, St. Albans, WV)

12870.0 UKA-Vladivosl ok Radio, USSR, heard al 0346 with CW tralflc. (Tom
Roach, San Jose, CA)
12916.5 OXZ·Lyngby Radio, Denmark, In CW working the Soviet vessel UFHM·
Motor Vessel Kapltan Yakovlev. The vessel's homeport Is Riga. Heard
at 062 1. (Garle Halstead, SI. Albans, WV)
12940.0 LZW-Varna Radio, Bulgari a, In CW at 0511 working the Bulgarian
vessel LZDB. (Garle Halstead, St. Albans. WV)
12994.0 VIP40-Perth Radio, Australla. In CW at 0554 working D8ZK, a vessel of
Korean registry called ·w est Junor1· with a message from the
harbormaster of the Port of Dampier. (Garle Halstead, St. albans. WV)
12954.0 CLS-Havana (lndustrla Pesquerra) Radio, Cuba, heard at 0 103 w ith a
CO CW marker. (Tom Roach, San Jose, CA)
12966.0 UFB-Odessa Radio, Ukrainian SSR In CW at 0543 with three messages
tor Soviet vessel Ugwl. Callup Is hand sent but tramc counds like high
speed tape. (Garia Halstead, St. Albans, WV) Not sure on the ship for
this one, Garia, not on any of my Soviet list. Any help on this one?·ed.
13000.0 UBE2-Petropavtovsk Radio, USSR, al 2200 with a CW traffic list and
m essages. (Tom Roach, San Jose. CA)
13055.0 UJ07-Kiev Radio, Ukraine, SSR In CW at 0332 listing traffic for "UGZM."
(Garia Halstead, St. Albans, WV)
13062.0 CLA-Havana (CoJlmar) Radio, Cuba. In CW at 0237 heard working a
Maltese vessel "9HR0 2." (Garia Halstead, St. Albans, WV)
131 59.7 UNID Spanish station In use wilh a fi ve tone sequence repeated twice
at 0325 followed by a Spanish voice announcement •• LPL in
Argentina? (Biii Cantrell, Haslet, TX) Probably-ed.
13244.0 SAM 60200 working LAJES AFB (Azores) with phone patch to
Croughton AFB. England. in USB at 1944. (W.J. Sallies, East Kingston.
NH)
MAC 67950 working Ascension Island Airways wilh phone patch at
1857 In USB. (W.J. Batlles, East Kington, NH)
13248.0 German Air Force 196 working DHM-91 (West Germany) In USB at
231 5. (W.J. Baffles, East Kington, NH)
13306.0 Aeroradlo ATC New York working United 196 In USB at 0312. Aircraft
gave a position report. (Trevor Stanley, Flagstaff. AZ)
13371.5 NGR·Naval Radio NEA Makrl, Greece, with a V CW marker at 01 20.
(David Kimpton, Thunder Bay, Ontari o)
13496.7 SPW-Warsaw Radio, Poland, with "DE SPW" In CW then ARO Idler at
16 12. Parallel 13602.5 (David Kimpton, Thunder Bay, Ontario)
14445. 1 VDH9-Alert NWT Canada In USB working phone patch with CIW608
and CIW301 at 0358. (Canada Forces Amateur Radio) (David Kimpton.
Thunder Bay, Ontario)
15000.0 BPM-XIAN, PRC Time Station w ith time pips and ID under
WWV/ WWVH. Heard ten BPMs In Morse Code followed by two voice
announcements at 0229. Also heard LOL·Buenos Aires, Argentina, time
station l<Wilh lime pips and Morse code ID under WWV/ WWVH at 0004.
(Stan Mayo, Westbrook, ME)
15024.0 COL. Havana Aerofl ot Radio transmitting In CW to RFNV Moscow
Aeroflot Radio regarding flight between Managua and Havana at 0000.
(Sam RickS, Philadelphia, PA)
COL, Havana Acrofl ot Radio passing cw flight Information at 1400.
(Tom Roach, San Jose, CA)
15621.0 ALFA calling COAM In CW at 211 5. COAM replies and authenticates
w ith 2121. Spanish message consists of vegetable list with a price and
dale. Cuban Navy? (Jim Boehm, San Antonio, TX) Probably, Bill, but
HDN Ecuadorian Naval reported here. COAM could have been a
routing Indicator that they use-ed.
15992.0 4UZ-United Nations Geneva. Swllzertand, with a RY test tape al 0349.
Transmitling RTTY at 75 baud/ 425 Hz shift/ reverse sense. (Sam RickS,
Philadelphia, PA)
16695.9 UHPN-Soviel Replenishment Tanker Unkuva with traffic for URB·2
Klalpeda Radio at 2259. Just fu eled a Cuban fishing trawler off Canada.
Transmitting RTTY at 50 baud/ 170 Hz shift. Tanker assigned to Soviet
Baffle fishing fleet Zapryba. (Sam RlckS, Philadelphia, PA)
17426.0 GPA6·London. England, with CW ID tape followed by high speed traffic
at 01 37. (David Kimpton, Thunder Bay, Ontario.
17992.0 DHM91 (West Germany) working German Air Force 21 and 573 on
Foxtrot Quebec (WWW) in USB at 1725. (W.J. Sallies. East Kingston,
NH)
18027.0 Air Force One working "Andy" (Andrews) with patch to Crown at 1944 in
USB. (W.J. Baffle s. East Kingston, NH)
18461.7 PCW1·Hague, Netherlands, with CW ID tape followed by 11tgh speed
traffic al 2328. (David Kimpton, Thunder Bay, Ontario)
18666.0 Pacman working Alias wilh patch traffic at 1748 in USB (DEA/ Customs)
W.J. Sallies, East Kingston, NH) and coast guard also-ed.
Alias working 421 and 61 O regarding supplies/sked al 204 7. Panther
working A/ C 1SA al 2055. All In USB. (David Kimpton. Thunder Bay,
Ontario)
18766.1 SCR sending ·vvv SCR" at Irregular Intervals In CW at 2100. (David
Kim pton, Thunder Bay, Ontario) Nothing on my list. Davld·ed.
20970.0 VXV9· CFARS Golan Heights, Syria, In USB with phone patch traffic into
Canada via CIW605 at 2046. (David Kimpton, Thunder Bay, Ontario)
21760.0 NRV·Navat Radio Agana. Guam, with a CW weather forecast for the
Indian Ocean al 1830. (David Kimpton, Thunder Bay, Ontario)
21764.0 RCV·Moscow Naval Radio calling UCBS then passed traffic al 18-20
WPM. (David Kimpton, Thunder Bay, Ontario)

MON ITORI NG TIMES

October 1988

31

The Scanning Report
Bob Kay
P.O. Box 173
Prospect l'nrk, PA 19076
la ter he was inside the burning struct u re. The steps leading
t o the second floor were righ t at t he entrance. Halfway up,
the stairs became engu lfed by dark, an gry, twisting colu11111s
of s111oke. "A stair.vay to hell," he thought as he took a
deep breath and despe rately tried to find doo r 2-B.

ENGU LFED
Outside, si rens pi e rced the small subu rban t own's silence
as fire app a ratus co nverged on th e scene from every
direction. When the first compa ny a rrived, the fire chief
imm ediately called in a second alarm on 46.380 MHz.
Water hoses we re unrolling from behind fire tru cks like
strands of twisted rope. Vehicle PA syste111s were activated
and the transmissions taking pl ace o n 46.480 (dispatch) an d
35.68 (rescue), could be heard by the large crowd that was
gathering on the sidewalk.
"Hey, chie f," a p o li ceman yelled, "we j ust got word that
someone ran into the building to rescue a baby."
"The ch ief gestured tha t he understood and the n pressed
the button o n hi s han d-h eld. "Station 8 to Stat io n 2." T he
transmission echoed between the buildings on the narrow
street.
"S tation 2," came t he reply.
"D o yo u have men in th e bui lding yet?"
"Negative."
"Get them in t here f::ist; police radio repo rt s that occu pan ts may be trapped!"
"Ten-four, Chief."
The chief o nce again pressed the mike bu t ton on his
hand-h e lei.
"Stat io n 8 to radio."
"Go ahead, Chief."
''1'111 going to need addit ional rescue uni ts and alert the
surrounding hospita ls of possible fire casualties."
He was lei su rely walking to lunch when he noticed the
thick black smok e billowing from the roof of the three
story building.
On a nearby law n a woman was desperately t rying to
free herself from t he restraining ar ms of two m en. "My
baby, my baby!" she yelled . As he ran up to her she
pleaded with him , "Please save 111y baby!"
"Where?" he aske d, in a cont ro lled, urgent t o ne.

'T en-four Chief. Do you want th e paramedics t here?"
"Send 111e al l yo u go t," was the chiefs reply.
T he dispatche r immediately called the hospi tal by land
line. Once the hospital had been alerted, it dispatched additi on al paramedics on J55.34 :tvl Hz.

BABY IN TllE Sl\IOKE

"Second floor, Apartme nt 2-13," she answered from
behind tear swelled eyes.

I nside on the second floor, he found A part111ent 1-13 and
3-13. B ut where was 2-13?

"You can't go in th e re buddy," one of the men shouted,
"the smoke is so thick it will choke you in se conds."

H e wen t back and looked aga in , his eyes were nearly
useless in the stinging smoke. T he re it was! The door
numbers had been removed, only the fa in t ou tl in e of where

He never hesitated nor considere d the clanger. Momen ts

32

October 1988

M O NITORING Tl l'v! ES

The Scanning Report
they once had been could be seen on the door.

remember saying.

Turning the k nob, he was relieved t o find thar ir was
unlocked. I nside, he desperately searched every room, but
nothing! Suddenly, he heard the faint sound of a baby
crying. Out where? The smoke was getting thicker by the
second a nd his eyes were hurting so much that he could
barely keep them open.

"He likes it so well," my wife continued, "that he quit
volunteering at the firehouse ."

Controlling his emotions, he stood perfectly still and listened. The sound seemed to be coming from a dresser.
Looking into the pa rtially open bottom drawer, he saw the
six month old infant.

"I can hear all the action, righ t from my living room,"
he anxiously announced. "In the middle of the night, when
the siren sounds, I just t urn on my scanner. I don't even
have to get out of bed."

Taking her into his arms, he knew that the next few
seconds would mean the d iffere nce between life and death.

Somehow, I can't he lp feeling responsible. With a critical
shortage of volunteers, some fire houses may be forced to
close and combine with othe rs. Volunteers arc despe rately
needed throughout the entire country.

Suddenly it wasn't so good. After talking t o him ove r
the phone, I learned that he had turned in his fou r week
old volunteer fireman's hat for a scanner radio.

If he was to save t he child, he would have to exit the
burning building from memory -- his eyes would be of no
use in the heavy smoke a nd fumes.

He had counted 18 steps o n t he way up to the seco nd
floor. Descend ing t he m , he discovered t hat the re was one
more step afte r the 18th -- he stumbled and fell against the
wall. The baby was ok, bu t the ai r had been forced from
his lungs. Running t owards the front doo r, he didn't stop
unti l he had carried the baby to the safety o f the front
lawn.
After collapsing, he was rushed t o the hospit al and
treated for smoke inhalution and a di slocated shoulder.
Approximately one month Inter, he was n dinner guest in
my home. Since only o ur wives had been friends, he and I
had never met. After dinner, we ret reatcd to my den and
he was fascinnted by my hobby of scanning. By late
evening, I remember him commenting to his wife that they
si mply had t o buy a scanne r.
Two weeks later, my wife casually remarked th a t my new
friend had ind eed purchnsed n scanner, 'That's good," I

Some wou ld argue that he probab ly wou ld have given up
o n volunteering anyway, regardless o f my influence. But
every now a nd then I can't help but wonder -- would th at
litt le infant have been rescued, if my fr iend had been sitting home, listening to his scanne r ... ?

Visiting the New Jersey State Police
Jeff Multer, of Gastonia, North Carolina, was recent ly in
New Jersey on business. During his brief stay, he visited the
Divisional Headquarters of the New J ersey State Police.
According to Jeff. there's a litt le known museum inside the
headquarcers building that displays the development of t he
NJSP communications system.
Jeff also says that the display showed a Motorola DVP
unit connected to an 800 f\Hfa handheld. A mistake? I
don't know.

Be Prepared
With winter nearly upon us, Donnie Lee Pardue, of
Sanford, North Carolina , rem inds everyone to be prepared
for inclement weather. Donnie suggests that we have back
up battery systems, along with complete frequeni:.y list s that
can be referenced in a manner of minutes.

,_
-

The staff here at MT also suggests that everyone make
one last check of their o utside antenna systems. It sure
beats climbing the roof in the dead of winter!

Chips Detector
I n a recent issue of Car & Diiver, an u nnamcd company
was advcrcising a scanner with a built in radar detector.
Apparently, the scanner contains an a larm th at is activated
by the use of a mobile extender. A mobile extender is
basically an amplifier t hat helps to boost the radio signa l of
both mobile and air units.

Don't let tuning in the action deter you from
where the~
participating in public service
action is to be found!

The ad reads, "The anti-aircraft weapon for highway
patrol planes and the only protection against all forms of
speed measurement."
Arc you skept ica l? Check this one out. Herc's the nrnnufactur cr's t'oll free number: 800-521-4211. I' ll be looking for-

MONITORI NG TIMES

October 1988

33

The Scanning Report
ward to see ing you r commen ts.

Talking Dirty

Flying with the U.S. Air Force

Les .tvlatson, he ad honcho of the excellent Nonh -casr
Sca1111i11g News bulletin, kn ows all the latest sca nning "dirt."
But, says Les, "if you want to hea r some real mud-slinging,
monitor the American Dredging Compny from Camden,
New Jersey, on 31.520."

Norm Pihale, of Northfield, Minnesota, sent nearly three
pages of confirmed USAF frequencies for his area. Here's a
partial listing:
228.7
235.9
236.6
241.0
243.0
255.4
257.8
299.1
311.0
318.4
32 1.2
364.2
372.2

NORAD Channel I/training
NORAD Weapons training
USAF ATC/OFFUIT AFB
ARMY "M iller T ower" Camp Ripley
"Guard Frequency"
Prim ary
USAF ATC/St. Paul, Duluth, Des Moines,
Foss, Waterloo
ARMY R eserve/St. Pau l
SAC In fligh t technical assistance
NORAD Ground stat ion at Fin land, MN
SAC Ground cont rolled inte rcept (GCI)
SAC Air intercept Cont rol (ATC)
SAC Pilot to dispatch

Anyone that would like to have the complete li sting, it 's
yours for a n SASE.

Good News for Meter Readers

Les has also found a rather lit1lc-kn ow n repe a ter for the
di stress frequency, Ma rine Channel 16. It's 171.3375. What's
neat abo ut it is th at the repeaters arc located on nearly all
the bridges spanning the Delaware River. That means communicati o ns can be heard from Baltimore all the way up to
Shinnccoke, New Yo rkl Plug th is one int o your scan ner
before all the wcckenders take their boats out o f the water
for th e year.
l\fcanwhile, we're happy to poin t out that NESN is now
up to 213 subscribers. If you live in the no rt heast and don't
get NESN , you don't know what you' re missing. Check it
out. Send $2.00 to Les M a tson at 212 West 13road St reet,
Paulsboro, New Jersey 08066.

Other Bulletins
Writing in the All Ohio Scanner Club's A111e1icn11
Sca1111 ergra111, Blai ne Brooks of Tucker, Georgia, has the
fo llowing frequencies for the Atlanta area:

When the Philadelphia Gas Works tried to install automated meter reading devices on it s customers' telephones,
opponent s successfully b locked the plan. Why? It was
deemed to be an invasion o f privacy t o send such information over the telephone lines.

166.000
418.225
164.650
165.2125
165.375
165.7875

Star Wars
The USSR ha s conducted research and may test a strong
radio frequency signal that cou ld interfere with or destroy
cri tical components of satellites by the early 1990s.

Examining the Med Channels
The FCC has decided to allow commercial compan ies to
become licensed in the Special Emergency Radio Service
(SERS). The change is expected to al leviate high st:i rt up
costs and to provide incentive to use the most advanced
communi cations equipmen t to save lives.
However, private users of the SERS system will not be
pe rmitted .to offe r MED services to a ny pa rty that is not
already e ligible to commu ni cate in t he SERS system.
So wh at docs all this mean to th e scanne r buff? Co mmercia l companies will be jumping on board the SERS
system with one idea in mind -- to turn a profit by providing a rad io controlled medical service. In th e long run,
that will produce more radio traffic on the MED channels
and more radio interference from ot he r local e mergency
services. Listening to the MED cha nn els during th is initial
ph ase-in period should prove interesting.

October 1988

IRS
IRS
U.S.
U.S.
U.S.
U.S.

Invest igat io n Operations
Operations
Secret Service
Secret Service M ikc
Secret Service Command Post
Secret Service Baker

A lot of these frequencies have also been confi rmed in
Ohio and surrounding states. So, as co lumn edito r Dave
Jones says, "do not despair if you program a nationwide
frequency into your receiver and hear nothing. Sooner or
later, it will show some act ivit y.
Blaine also shared some Secre t Service calls with readers
of Sca1111 ergra111, reve al ing that J ack Kemp was "Mat rix",
J esse Jackson , "Pontiac" and Michael Dukakis, "Saw H orse."
For more information on AOSC's bulletin, send a self
addressed, stamped envel ope to P.O. Box 2496, Springfield,
Ohio 45501.
The RCMA bulletin advises readers to Go West! In
Carson City, Nevada, try 161.67 for KKBC, FM 97.3's news
operations and 161.67 for KPTL, AM 1300. For more
information on the RCMA bulletin, write to Carol Ruth at
P.O. Box 542, S ilvcrado, CA 92676.

MONITORING TI MES

Make Someone's Day ...
Give a Monitoring Times gift
subscription!

"The Largest Dealer of Scanners in the World"

SCANNER WORLD, USA®
10 New Scotland Ave., Albany, NY 12208 518/436-9606

~~

e

~~~

Z60

60 Channel
Automatic Programmable Scanner
Includes Public Service and Aircraft Bands

Scanner World Special
-SCANNER WORLD EXCLUSIVE-

Features include simple programming
of the following f requency ranges: 30·50
MHz. 144·174 MHz, 440·512 MHz. Digital
display, priority, search. lockout, delay,
dim control, top mounted speaker, one
year factory warranty. Includes AC & DC
cord s, mobile mounting bracket , tele·

scopic antenna. All for only $164" plus
$7.00 shipping (optional extended war·
ranty: 3 years $39.99; 2 years $29.99.)
MX3000 Service Manual $5.00.

~, Qbr~ SR-15

s199.99

($7.00 shipping)
100 cnanne l oocket s1zeo nana- "'lelo

1

sca"lncr (6 Hx 1 Dx2 3 ~ W) . no crystal
portable scanner. 29 ·5-I MHz t t 8 ·
t 7 4MH z. 4 06·5 t2 MHz. bank scann ·
1ng bac kht LCD display au tomatic
search lock ou1 scan delay pr1or11y

5109.99
(p lus $7.00 shipping each)

w 1th1n a b and
Other features include scan delay. priority and a b right d im sw11ch to con trol the brightness of the 9 ·dig 1t
Vac uum·Fluorescenl d is play Th e Z 60 can be operated o n e ither 120VAC or 12 VDC In c ludes one year
w arran ty from Regenc y Electronics (o ptional 3 yr e xt ended warranty only $39 .99 g ive s yo u a to tal o l
4 y rs comple te w arran ty or 2 yr ex tended w arran ty only S 2 9 99. g ives y ou a total o t 3 y rs com plete
w arranty .)

UNI DEN

AC adap te1

charger ear phone and carry case op tional c 1gare 11e
lighter adapter • t 5MPC

S 1 2 99

BEARCAT 100.XLT Hand-llekl tOO Channel
. $198.911 f7 001
BEARCAT 70XLT Programmable Hand·Held '.
. 188.98 (6 .001
BEARCAT 55XLT Programmable Hand·Hekl .
. . 119.99 (5 .001
A0100U AC Adai>ierlChaf\Jer for 50 XU55XL T
12.95 ( • I
BP55Nl-CadBatteryPackfor50XL .''
t3.99 t • I
VC001 Cany CrM fOf 50XU56XLT
11.911 ( 7 00 I
PS001 Cigarette l rghler Adapl 8f 10< 50XU tOOXUtOOXL 12.95 ( • I
BEARCAT t40 ACProQrammallleScanner.
94.98 (5 001
BEARCAT 14$XL AC ProQrammaole Scanner
. 94.99 (5.001
BEARCAT t75XL AC D1g11at Scanner
. 158.911 (5.001
.. 219.98 ( 7 00)
REGENCY TS-1 Turbe Scan ACJDC
REGENCYTs.2Turt>oScan!KXJACIOC .
. . 299.99 (7 .00)
BEARCAT 210 XLT AC/OC Olgital Scanner
. 188.98 (7 .00)
BEARCAT 800 XLT ACJDC Dig1lal Scanner ..
. . 264.911 (7 00)
REGENCY HX·1500 Hanel-Held Scanner ... .
. 209.911 (7 00)
REGENCY MA-257 Clganilte coro for HX1000'1ZOO ... 18.911 (7 .00)
REGENCY MA-4117 Ni-cacl Battery f0t HX1000'1ZOO .. . 24.911 ( • I
REGENCY HX-CASE Hvy Leallt. case for HXlOOO'IZOO 19.98 ( • )
REGENCY MA·SG Drop in Chaf\ler tor HXtOOO'lZOO . . 74.9815 .00)
REGENCY MX.JOOOACIOC Digital Scanne< .
. . 164.98 17 .00)
REGENCY Z-30ACJDC Digital Scanne< ...
. .. 98.98 17 .001
REGENCY Z«I ACJDC Dig Ital Scanne<. .
. . 109.911 t7 .001
Mobllo Mounting Bracket for Z Scannero .. . , , . . . .. .. 5.99 I ' )
REGENCY RH·25e High Band Transceiver wlAnt. ... 329.98 (7 . 75)
REGENCY UC 102 HI-VHF Hand Transceover
, ... 119.911 (5 .50 )
REGENCY RH«lllB High Band Tran sceiYOr w/Ant. . . 4etl.98 17 ' 751
REGENCY RaOe ACJDC CryslaJ Scann8f .
. . 711.98 t 5.00)
REGENCY INF-3 AC tnformanl Reeeover .
.. 1311.98 t 7 .00)
REGENCY INF-5 AC Informant Receiver .
. 119.98 ( 7 .001
. . . 199.98 (7 .00)
COBRA SR15 tOOChannel Hand-Held ...
COBRA SR12 Digital Hand-Held Scanner. . . . , , ... . 188.98 (6 .501
COBRA SR10 Digital Hand-Held Scanner ... '.... . 124.911 (6 .00)
COBRA SR900 ACJDC Oigltal Scanne< .... .
. 104.98 (5. 00)
COBRA 511925 ACJDC Olgltal Scann8f . . , . ..... .. . 109.911 ( 7 .00)
Book '"Top Secre1 Registry of Gov'! FreQuency" 6th .. 14.911 (3 .00)
Book "Coven lnltlllgence, Electronic Eavnclropping" . &.95 ( • )
Book "8"1ty Bearclt FreQuency Dlreclory" .... , .. .. 14.95 ( ' )
Book "Ralf Scan Directory" . . . .. .. .
. .. 7.95 ( • I
Boole ··Air Scan Directory" . .. . . . . .
. . . 12.95 ( • I
RCO MRP· I Single Channel Hand·Hekl . .
. . . 38.911 (3. 00)
FANON MaHLU OCCrystal Scanner ...
. . 88.98 (5 .00)
FANON PSK·1 AC Adai> led for M8HLU . , . , .. . . ... . 12..811 ( • I
FOX BMP·1080 ACJDC Digital Scanner .. . ... '.' .. . 129.98 (5 .50)
FOX Mounting BrackollOf BMP· 1060 .... , , , ...... . . 9.911 ( • )
ANT·l Magnet Mount Mobile Scanner Antenna .
. 29.99 (3 .00)
ANT-8 Base Scanner Antenna w/50' cal>le . ...
. . 29.98 (3 .00)
REGENCY Cll-ONE CB Radio ..... , . .. .
. .... 34.911 (5. 00)

ON ar r
SWITCH

The Rege ncy Z·6 0 is a c om pac t, p rogram m able 60 c n an·
nel mu lti b and FM m onito r receiv er fo r u se a t
home or o n the road ft is double conversion super h e terod yne use d to re c e ive the n arrow ban d FM
communocat1ons in the amateur. public safe ty and b usiness bands 30·50. 118· 136 144·17 4 and 440· 512
MHz S ize 10'<""Wx 2 · 7 18'"Hx8·3' 8 '"D
Sophisticated m icroprocess·con trolled c ircui try ehm1nat cs the n eed t o r crys tal s, in s tead . t h e treque n·
c y fo r each c h annel is programm ed through the numbered ke y b o ard s imilar l o 1he o ne used o n a tele·
pho n e A '"beep'" ac kno wledg es cont act e ac h tim e a ke y i s to u c hed The Z 60 scans appro xi mat ely 15
channels pe· sec ond
Any comb1nal ion o f c h an nels ca n be s c anned aut oma ticall y o r the u n11 c a n b e se t o n manual for con·
tinuou s monolorin g o f any one c nannel In add1t1on. th e search function locates unknown freque n c ies

key lock plus much more lncluaes wbbe1 antenna
rec har geable No-Cad batlery p acll

SQUELC H
CON TROl

Optional Accessories:
Cigarette Lighter Plug RGMPC . ' 4.95
Z Mobile Bracket - Special . .. ' 5.99

s1 99. 99

($7

COBRA

BC-600 XLT

SR-925

$109.99

co shipping)

Digital Prog r a mmable 100 Channel Scanner
OC 600 XL 1 CO..,('!~ 111(• 1ol:o.-.. .r1 l f'CQdC'!'l'tt'S /'I r,.: ~ H/
1 18 I I .! ' .4H : .:Q(, " 1 ,· M H.' f'.(>ii!UfC~ :0111; , l '-> /l' :._I
t ~ 'f> \'J • 1 ~ 8 t'1 · l J ~ 0 ::.~ 1'1 CCi,1, ;"OO',I , 1 • •r-.,:1\
t'J,1 • uo

crdnne11cc ~ :1,.1 1

0,1.,..,

~..:a.. ttr~ ~ C'f oc ~

ACX

cora~

!C·C~l.O:lC
~l.,'t.>'lTld
,..c.;l.• •1; :irt~ · \.~r
one 'w"Cdl t.1riory w .tr1ari1., SCtt fCf'I l"!•'"CI t:11rr'"'
11a1.:.• 1uri111; St:h·CC' sea ·c.n nc.;.ii111· • ~re
nroqrammer: lr(>Cu('nc·l.'!. by p,jsf~ng . 1 s•nOI\.' t1u~l·;•1 ' Ct
POhCC' l1' C ('nlt'r(;C'nt;y
H·fCfd' l
\'. Cil!OCf
-'fll'.1 1TI,l r1ne
':!('1v1ccs Plus ('.oC Clu !.•vC o p11on:t l lca:ure ~ never ,1v.w,1t}lf' on

PQ h t.?f

suO:>·~ca

1<;1

ess

.iny scanner oelo1l · First is an RF 1ccc1... e flm1>11!1('1 fo r
ooos11ng wc,1 ... s1gn.1IS f ()f only 524 99 plus a ClCSS :onf'
ooard is ava ta:>te 101 only S59 99 to ma11.c tn1s IN' nu~o,.,
o,,,. scanner ,1va·SablC " the USA O:>honat c.garell1• lig'1ter

pluQ • 600MPC S J 99

BEARCAT BC-950XLT
Sam e features as BC·600 XLT but also
rec e ives 800·954mhz

5

249.99 ($7.00 shipping)

20 CHANNEL HANO·HELD SCANNER
Small ~1ze 6"Hll 1 Ox2 J• VJ tu ! 01g tat 1eadout :>r.onty
searcn cnJnf'el 10cko1..11. scan delay ke1 ·oc~ C·Jvers

29 ~ .smriz

136 17-imn1

406

512mhz Package includes rubber an1enna recnargeat:ite

N1 Cao oauery pack. ACaoaptcr1cnarge1 , ana ca11y c,1 ~e
SPECIAL
PACKAGE OEAL

$1 6 9 9 9

(plus S 7 00 stuoptng eacn J
o .g1till programmable 16 channel AC/DC rnot>ilc/base Wltn

raised bunon keyboar d tor easy p1oyrf'rnm1ng of th e to11ow1ng
heQuenc1· ranqes 29 S• mhz t 18 t 74mh1 406·5 t 2mhz
Covehng a.rcralt. maune. police l -1e weatner ua1ns put>ltc
se1v1ce pus mucn more FeatJre\ ncluoe d:gital display
pr1or11y (,can delay. weather but1on channel tockoul.
sea1ch scan speed. automatic SQuelcn memory oackup
one yea1 tacto•y warranty ex1erna1~peaker tack . tExtended
warranty 2 yc:us extra ' 29 99. 3 ycaro.., e>ttril •39 99 )

ORDERING INFORMATION
Call (518) 43&9606 to place orders by phone or mail orders
to Scann~' World, 10 N ew Scotland Av . A lbany. NY 12208.
0 f Oefs W1 11 t>e sh1poed same day rece1veo by United Parcel
Service Scannet World accepts VISA. M asterCard (COO
stupm ents Cy Un11ea Parcel will be tor cash or certified
checks on ly) M ail orders w ith pers onat or business
checks w 1U be held 4 weeks tor bank clearance. Orders
w•th casn1ers c hecks o r m oney orders shipped same day
received Prices . spec1hcations and 1crms sub ject to

~~~~nY!c~~~'g~,t ~~~r nn°c!:~~· 1~~~cn~~ a~~,f~et;f ~~~.k A~

BEARCAT 70XLT
1111 o.·Hg lrecuenc1es

SCANNER WORLD SPECIAL

~

shipments a1e F 0 .8 . Sc•nner World warehOuse in Albany,
NY We arc not respon sible for 1ypog rapt11cal e rrors. All
m erchandise c ame s lull manulactu rers warranty . Bid Proposals and Purchase orders accepted from Government

~~e~1,~~~~0~~~/1~e;:1~~u5,:;;1'~~~~d~~ ~u~~~
sales la" My claim s must oe made w1lh1n 7 days ol mer
chand 1sc receipt

($ 6 00 ;npp ng
eochJ

SHIPPING CHARGES

SCANNER WORK EXCLUSIVE

UNIDEN BEARCAT BC205XLT
5259.99

(7.00 shipping each)

0tott.M~200~1'omnd-""'dP011&:M~ -• •lh
~ lot .... ~remtM'IQ ot
lollowlf'Q tr•
QWtley ,.f'lgltt ~MM.r. 11a.115M.Ht. Q.612M H.L 8Cle«IOMH.t.

in.

.... . , tNttoft

, . .. ' ". ~ $cMI o.w,.

"""""°"' bKll:llO. '9Y p.t _,...DIM•
' "'""'

l&QUIG crysl.ll dbOleJ. c'*"* klcJlou•, lO rw....ry

c~

0 •'9Ct c,_,,... .ce.u . Milom111c tMrCI\ t 1t11 one ~ l 11C1cwy ... .,
,.,..1y, 10'""°'11y~t. N•-Gaclb9tt....,D«'-ACaCiAC119fl'C f'\At'g91' .
"9 1IO'e !\ltlClet .,,,..,,.. ~ c.- w aJlll W'W::tuotiO SU • ••

l 11"18Wr1~--·o.p llT' Ni;I\ fl)o~ ··~ 2 , , "'-".,,"'
" " " l yr 1uenoea •M!Wtly

m""

(') Add (S) per scanner. and $3.00• lor all accessories
ordered at same time C 0 .0 shi pments w ill be charged
an a<JcM1ona1 S3 50 per pac"-<J gc Full 1nsurarce is riclcded
1n sn1pp.ng cnar9e s All orders tire sh pped by UMed
Pa1c e1 ScNice Sh1p p1ng c hafges are tor conune n1a1 USA
only Outside of continental USA. ask IOI stu~ping chc\rge
per scanner

Scanner World, USA®
10 New Scotla nd Ave. , Albany, NY 12208
(518) 436-9606
Most or ders Shipped Same Day Received!

W'hat's neW'?
The Pocket Guide to
Railroad Radio
Frequencies - 1989

VHF/UHF
Aircraft Directory

By Bruce K. Heald

I nte rested in ai rcraft monitoring?
This is the most enjoyable directory we
have ever seen, packed with anecdotes by
the author {who insists on anonymity) compiled over years of professional aeronautical communications and experiences.

Ou r cover article in the July 1988 issue
drew conside rab le attention among railroad
bu ffs.
Appropriately,
Bruce
H eald's
popular a nd com prehensive di rectory of
railroad frequencies is now available as a
brand new, considerably expanded edition.

This expanded second edition now
includes HF aeronautical listings as well as
ai r show frequencies, sports nying, commercial airlines, traffic reporting, military
and special purpose communications across
the U nited States, Canada and Mexico.

Arranged alphabetically by every railroad in the Un ited States as well as the
majority of Canadia n lines, list ings include
frequencies o f ya rds and term inals,
repeaters and handie-talkies.
M ass tran sit authorities (subways,
trollies and elevated) are also included in
this new edit ion and a fr eque ncy crossrefcrcnce allows the user to select unknown
licensees heard on a particula r frequency.
Although the titl e "Pocket Guide ..." is
sti ll maint ained, this edition would require
a rather large pocket. Still , it ca n be folded
for the veteran rail rider who wants to tuck
the missal into his back pocket. The pages
are printed in two columns, widely spaced
at th e center, to allow for such an
exped ie ncy.

(60 pages, 8- 1/2" x 11", staple bound;
S9.95 includ ing postage from Bruce K.
Hea ld, 6886 Jefferson St., North Branch,
M I 48461. Ph one 3 13-688-3952)

Tune in on
Telephone Calls
by Tom Kneitel, K2AES
Very little notice was given mobile
telephones until th e Electronic Communicat io ns Privacy Act (ECPA) of 1986 made
it unlawful to listen to them. Now, hardly an
issue of MT or Popular Co111111w1icatio11s
goes buy without some reference to this service, and PopCom's editor, Tom Kneitel,
has just released a book detailing how to
eavesdrop o n ca ll ers!
So what goes on over these frequen cies? The same thing that goes on over
wireline telephones, and our prurient interests hop e to hear some really juicy stu ff -the stu ff that Tom titillates the prospective

36

October 1988

reader with in his news release:
"They a rgue, revea l personal and
bu siness secrets, plan felonies, make
legal and illegal deals, buy stocks, make
investment s, offer/accept bribes/kickbacks, deal drugs, brag, lie, get
en gaged/divo rced, accuse one a nothe r
of cheating, conduct lurid or illicit
romances, get hired/fired, get into and
out of jams, gripe about money woes,
engage in highly ch arged family hassles,
ridicule co-workers a nd neighbors, make
indecent proposals, gossip, and more ."
Correctly, Kneitcl points out that few
of these radiotelephone users have the
sligh test suspicion that their deepest secrets
arc being purveyed over th e air.vaves for
miles, yet there they are, and here is a book
telling you just whe re to tune co hear them.
Emphasizing frequency allocations in
the U.S. and Canada, Tune In prese nts complete frequency lists for ship-to-shore , airto-ground and land mobile telephone services from "HF {shortwave) through UHF
(cellular). Cross-referenced by city and
state, the book is a directory of radiotelephone services across the con tinent.
And fort hose conscience-ridden mon itors who would like to own a copy but don't
want to be stigmatized as voyeurs, you can
always use the book as th e consumma te
guide on where llQ.l to list en !

(160 pages, 6" x 9", perfect bound
so ftc over; Sl2.95 plus $2 shipping from
CRl3 Research, PO Box 56, Commack, NY
11725)

MONITORING TIMES

List ings are by service and location
and, whi le not exhaustive in content, is a
comprehensive representation of the major
frequencies likely to be encountered by recreation a l monitors. An excellent va lue for
aircraft buffs.
(147 pages, 8-1/2" x .J l", p last ic ring
b inder; Sl4.95 from DC Enterprises, 7887
Brandy Circle, Colorado Springs, CO
80920)

VHf / UHf

••
••

••
••
••

I

~ \r craH {)\rector~
$14.95
\nc\udin9
ihunde rbirds
Air Shows
iratfiC Watch
parachutin9

u NI coM
Refuellln9
ARiC center

I

The ARRL
Antenna Book
Fifteenth Edition
With kit building and homebrew projects at an all-time low, many experimenters
and radio enthusiasts lament t ha t the re is

AUDIO TAPE FOR SECURITY
not hing c reat ive left fo r t he individual to do. Not so. Antenna
expe rime ntatio n is o ne a rea w here vi rtu ally any instal lat ion ca n
shine with improveme nt.
Whethe r you are a lice nsed ham, scanner listener, SWL o r
rad io expe rim e nter, the new edit ion of t he ARR L Antenna B ook
has a wealth of information of value t o you . Since its ea rly days of
about 200 pages, t he girth and substance of the handy handbook
have expanded dra matically.
I nterested in basic antenna theory? The first three chapters
will fill you in on the fundamentals. What arc the types of antennas
from which t o ch oose? H ave a look a t chapter 4, details of specific
antennas in chapters 5 through 20, and hardw::irc notes in chapters
21 and 22.
R adio wave propagat io n, fec d lines and testing procedures
occupy the remainder of the book with an excellent biography of
anten na-re lated articles p reviously published in QST magazine
included.
Alt hough the Antenna Book is sla nt ed t oward transmitting on
a ma teur radio frequencies, it must be re membered that the basic
principles of anten na design ho ld fo r bot h t ransm itting a nd
r eceiving, and m easureme nts for fr eque ncy ranges ou tside the ham
bands can be scal ed fr om the data given.
(733 page, 8- 1/ 2" x 11 ", p erfect bound soft covc r; $18 fro m the
American R adio R elay League, N ewington, CT 06111)

Newnes
Radio Amateur and
Listener's Pocket Book

ELECTRONIC EAVESDROPPING
IN AMERICA

* Just rduut4! A 6Q.minute audio casscne presented by the instructor of the
Texas A & M University .. Electronic Eavesdropping Countermeaswcs"
seminar.

* A no-nonsense look at buWiig and wiretapping technology; how the pubLic

gets eavesdropping equipment- legally; tape recorders; "hot" telephones;
carrier current and "free space" transmiaers; infinity ll1lnSl1liners: parabolics
and other microphones; infrartd; lasers; allJ!cks against cordless and cellular
phones; eavesdropping Jaw: and more.

* Learn the difference between good and bad countermeasures and about the

effectiveness o( certain iransmiaer detectors; slll\·eillancc receivers: spectrum
analyurs; telephone analyurs: time domain reflectometers; and non-linear
junction detectors.

* This
tape belongs in the home or
otrice or every secwily-ronscious

American. Prepared by the instructor
ri the highly acclaimed " E lttD"Onic
Eavesdropping Count.a-muuures"
suninlu regularly taught at the Law
Enfon:ement and Security Training
Division. Texas A & M University,
Texas Enl'Jneering Extension Service.

* Scoojust
$16. 95 including
shipping
handlini
and

to:

ACM Security
P.O. Box 402t

Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878

(301) 977-4129
(Sorry! No Cndit C....U)

ELECTRONIC
EAVESDROPPI NG
IN AM ERICA
AC M TECHNICAL SEMINARS

c 1988 Theodore N. Swill

Eavesdropping
in America
by Theodore N. Swift

by Steve Money G3FZX
P rofessionally illustrated and p rinted, th is cute pocket ha ndbook is in tended as a q ui ck looku p refe re nce fo r radio enthusiasts
of all pe rsuasions, inclu d ing h ams a nd SW Ls. Si nce the wo rk was
intende d fo r B ritish r eadership, amateur radio bands a nd operating rules a nd regu lat ions a re of little interest to North American
hobbyists.
However , there is eno ugh additio nal info rmation of a genera l
nature t o be universally appealing. Data tables o n international
frequency a llocat io ns, emission designato rs, ASC II code, ship to
shore frequ encies, satell ite band p l::ins, electro nic comp o ne nt symbols, world t ime zones, electrical formulas and call sign designatio ns are quite handy.
Perhaps most useful from an instructiona l sta nd po int is a n
illustrated g lossary of technical terms, expa nded to show the ru dimen ts of facsim ile, radiotcletype, packet radio, antennas and m uch
mo re. Very interesti ng lit tle book.
(160 pages, 3 - 1/2" x 7", perfect bound hardcover; 517.95 from
CRC P ress, 2000 Corpora te B lvd NW, I3oca Raton , FL 33431)

To have yo11r new prod11ct or book considered for revie1v in l'donit01ing
Times, send ii to Edito1; 140 Dog Branch Road, Bmsstown, NC 28902.

In tereste d in bugging? Most scanner e nthusiasts arc and, in
this age of information gathering, a working knowledge of e lectronic survei llance and countermeasures can be very useful.
T ed Swift is an instructo r of electronic countermeasu res
(ECM) at Texas A&M Un ive rsity as well as a professional in t he
fie ld. His narrat ive tape is qu ite thorough in its assigned task to
inform the listener of the various techniques -- as well as their limita ti ons -- used t o gather info rmation surreptitiously.
T he tape is n ot intended as a quickie course fo r wiretappers;
rather, its inten t is to infor m the listener of the techniques which
may be used aga inst him -- body a nd r oom bugs, wiretaps, tracking
transmitters, parabolic microp hones, infrared t ransmit te rs, rem ote
recording devices and more.
In d ustrial espionage is a profitable "research" tool used by
many big businesses to gain a ma rketing advantage. Listening in o n
board-room conferences can provide considerable advantage to
t he adversarial company.
H ave you heard any unusual clicks on yo ur te lephone lately?
Have you see n any unusual vehicles parked in you r neighborhood?
Rat her tha n becoming paranoid, it might not be a bad idea to learn
how you might be bugged. Swift's t a pe teaches this very well.
(C-60, narrat ive; 514.95 plus $2 shipping from ACM Security, P.O.
I3ox 4021 , Gaithersburg, MD 20878; phone 301-977-4129)

MONJTORING TIMES

§]

October I 988

37

uncle ski p's corner

T.J. ·skip• Arey WB2GHA
P.O. B ox 644

Wote1ford Works, NJ 08089

Hail to the Chief!
Very soo n the peop le of th e United States
of America will choose their next preside nt
of th e Uni ted States. This is a hallowed
respo nsibi lit y tha t really shou ld require a
great dea l of th ought and research. After
a ll , o nce the die is cast ''Th e Prez" is with u s
for a minimum of fou r years. H e can lead
fo r as long as eight yea rs. Eve r not ice how
some oft hcse g uys begin t o wea r on us after
abo ut the sixth year''

Get to the point, Skip! I
T he poin t is that, when we pick a president
(or even somet hing less earth-shaking such
as a car) we have to look at t he long haul.
The same goes for picking the right
rece iver. Very few people a rc well heeled
enough to bu y a new radio every few
mo nth s j ust to suit th e ir latest liste ning
habits. When you think of it, we probably
keep o ur receivers about as long as we keep
o ur presid e nt s: Fou r years if they arc okay
and eight if we re a lly like them . So it would
seem that we would wa nt t o arm o urselves
with the best informatio n we can before
shel ling ou t our hard earned cash. Afte r all
have you ever t ricd to impeach a radio?

So, with out further babbling... Drum roll
please'!!

UNCLE SKIP'S GUIDE
TO RECEIVER PURCHASING
Back in the "Good O ld Days" you could
pretty mu ch count on the "Three S"' method
of p icking radios. Sensit ivity, se le ct ivity,
and stabi lity were all you rcully had to go
on. You looked fo r the best figures in these
areas and th en bough t the most bang for
your buck. Mode rn equi pment throws us a
few more curves but nothing you can't
handle, Bunkcy. Let's go through it by the
numbers.

Sensitivity
Not to be confused with all th a t hugging in
h ot t ubs th at went on in the sixties,
sensit ivity is just a receiver's ability t o hear
weak signals. You wi ll usua lly find this
expressed in microvolts. This figure is
refere nced to 10 dB to account for atmosphe ric noise and no ise generated within
the receiver itself.
When you look at a radio's spec sheet you
might sec someth ing li ke Sensitivity

••••••• •• •
••••••
••••• •• •
•••••••
•••••
••
••••
••
••••••
••••••• •• •••

No one would decide to buy a piece of equipment as complex as this
!com IC-781 without doing a great deal of homework first.

38

October 1988

MONITORING TIMES

S + N /N a t 10 dB. Bet ter receivers will have
t he sensitivity fi gures listed for the vario us
ba nds and modes. If yo u get weak in the
knees thinking about a ll that math and electro nics, rc lux. Just co mpare the fi gures of
the radio s in you r pri ce range and look for
the lowest nu mber. An excellent figure
would be less than 0.5 mi crovolts
through ou t th e s ho rtwave spectrum. L ook
fo r figures less th a n 1.0 microvolt for most
VHF and UHF scanners.

Selectivity
Thi s is your how well your rad io let s you
hear what you wan t to hear whi le elim i·
nating everyth ing else that tries to get into
your headphones. With this figure, you
have to pay atten ti on to what you arc t rying
t o hear t o determine what bandwi dt h you
will need . Let's take AM fo r instance. The
rad io in the ki tchen that Mom uses t o t une
in he r t a lk shows is probably set up fo r 8 -10
kHz bandwidth ·- fine for th at purpose.
H owever, to get any DXING done you arc
going t o look for selectivity between 4-6
kHz bandwidth .
For SSB monitoring you need even more
selectivity. So you need a figure of a bit less
t han 3 kHz. If you arc going t o go digging
o ut CW signals on 40 mete rs on a Saturday
night, you are going to want se lectivity
upward s of .5 kH z .
Seri ous code folks have 250 Hz (.25 kHz)
fil ters in th e ir receivers. But you couldn't
understand the ann o uncer o n nnc with
o nl y 250 Hz o f bandwidth so you will be
looking fo r a receiver wit h several p ositio ns
o n the ba ndwidt h dial.
This is where th e buye r has to bewa re '!!
Many higher pri ced radios o nly come with
one or two filters installed, so if you need
additional filters to suit yo ur listenin g pleasu re you arc going to have t o figu re t hem
int o you r price. Remember, high qualiry fi lte rs can so metim es cost about one hun dred
dollars a pop.
Selectivity fig ures a rc usually re fe renced to
a n ulti111ate rejection figure, most often -6
dB and -60 dB. The ratio between the
bandwidth m easured at -6 and -60 dB is
known as the sh ape factor. A 1:1 ratio
w o uld be idea l but you arc not lik ely t o see
it. (Not unlike t he e lu sive 1:1 SWR ratio
CBc rs a rc always dreaming of.) Look for

HF / VHF / UHF
AIRCRAFT DIRECTORY
USA/ Ca.na.da./r-1e:><:1 c:o

1. Air Tr affic Contro l
Civil and Military ATC Faci lities
ARTC Center Remote Site• and Proquenc1••
Control Tower and Approach/ Oepar~r• Channe l•

2. Blue Angels and Thunderbirds

the best ratio under 1:3 and you won't be far wrong.

Air Show Frequencies
What You Will Hear During Maneuver• ·

Stability

3. Military Flight O"perations

We tend to b e sm ug about stab ility in our solid state world. Older
tube type equipment was prone to drift off frequency due to the
heat generated within the receiver. Yet even high quality solid
state equipment can exhibit drift of plus or minus 300 Hz during
the first hou r of operat ion. Not noticeable to all bu t the most
exacting broadcast listener, but remember the CW operator with
the 250 Hz filter? He would lose track of his entire signal.

Special Purpoee Channels
Re t uell1nQ Tracks. Are•• and Frequencies
Jlee t Area Control - Ott Shore Air to Air Activi ty

4. World Wide HF Channels
ARIHC and World Wide HJ ATC Channels
Mili t ary Hr Prequencies and Location•

5. Monitoring Techniques
Selec ting and Ordering Mapa / Charts
Tip• tor Listening at the Airport and at Home

6. Emergencies
Row to Catch !mergencie• 1n Pro9re••
Key Word• &nd Phr•••• Alerting Yo u to !aer gecc1e•

Dynamic Range
This is a very practical point. Dynamic range is a radio's ability to
hear weak signa ls in the presence of strong signals generated
nearby. Poor dynamic range is generally the cause of overloading.
The biggest problem with figuring out the dynamic range is that it
can be computed several ways. Look fo r a Blocking Dynamic Range
in the area of 100 dB if you can find it.

Readout

7. Other Avi a tion Activities
Parachute J\lmping
Police Helicopter Operation•
Traffic Watch Procedur e•
PAA and HTSB Accident Inveatigation Channels

8. War Stories and Much Mo re
Moments of Kwaor and Horror

D C Enterprises
7887 Brandy Ci rc le
Colo Sps, Co 80920

It is fairly simple to figur e out that digital is better than analog
readout. My only warning would be that, theoretically, you might
$14.95
find that a particular analog readout rig might have better per148 page• of text and rrequencies. Compiled and written by &
pilot/controller with 3~ years experience.
fo rmance figu res than its digital counterpart in a p articular price
range. Those digital readouts do cost some port ion of the overall
manufacturing cost.
'-----------------------------If you find this to be the case, remember that old timers got along
just fine without digital readout for years. Having said that, most
folks will probably opt for the convenience and accuracy that digital readout provides.

you have exhausted the many fine purveyors of radio products you
may find withi n the pages of Moniton"ng Times.

Accessories

Old Uncle Skip is very pa rtial to used equipment. You can get a lot
of radio for your money by ut ilizing the used market. But you can
also dredge up a lot of headaches. We will discuss used radios at
length in future columns. However, my best advice to a person just
starting out in the monitoring hobby is to st ick with new or newer
equ ipment until you have learned your way around. Yc,ry few
"Hamfcst Specials" come with a 90 day warranty aga inst problems.
Also, used gear often requires a great deal more care and feeding.

If you have paid attention to all of the above you have narrowed
the choices in your particular price range down to two or three
receivers. Now you "count the buttons."

How many featu res docs each receiver provide? Separate RF and
AF gain contro ls are usefu l. Is there an AGC switch? How many
bandwidth positions are provided? How about a notch filter? Is
there a built-in attenuator? I s the headp hone jack on the front,
side or back? It never hurts to figure out if the knobs arc arranged
in a logical sequence. S-meters arc a nice feature. Many modern
rigs have a built-in clock.

Otherness
Once you have decided what to purchase you must then figure out
where. You can find radios for monitoring almost anything in many
discount elect ronics out lets these days. The problem is the guy
trying to sell you the radio very seld om knows anything about it. A
wise listener will choose to buy his or her equipment from a
reputable and experienced monit oring source. The primary advantage li es in the level of technical expertise the hobby-specific sales
operation can provide even an inexperienced listener.

A Word About Used Gear

Finally, don't ru sh in to things. The more effort you put out now the
greater your enjoyment will be when you purchase your equipment.
Larry Magnc has published extensive RD/ White Papers on many
currently popular rece ivers used by shortwave listeners. These arc
comprehensive la bo rat o ry examinatio ns that leave little doubt as
to quality of all the popular equipment out in radioland. A
complete li st of avai lable papers can be had for an SASE to
Publications In form atio n, International Broadcast ing se·rviccs
Limited, I3ox 300, Penns Park, PA 18943 USA.
Of course, one of the most up to the minute resources for most
radio info rm ation is MT. So stick around, pal. Knowledge is
power!!!
·

It would be smart to shy away fr om the loca l discount store u ntil
MONITORING TIMES

October 1988

39

federal file

Dave Jones
430 Gamor Drive
Suffield, OJ/ 44260

Davis-Monthan Air Force Base
Davis-Monthan A ir Force Base (DMAFB) the operation of the Titan silos for fixed comhas maintained a presence in southern Arizona municati ons between the silo and DtvlAFB.
since World War 11. Back then, a trip to Tucson The silos were still in operation when the
meant "taking a ride into town." In the microfiche fi les were compiled and released by
intervening years, however, the city of Tucson the government.
A lso some of the VHF LB frequencies may
has grown and it s sout heast border now reaches
have been associated with silo operations at the
the edge of the base.
DMAFB is a TAC (Tactical Air Com mand) Little Rock AFB. Personnel utilized UHF frebase with the primary operation of training quencies for commun ications in and around
Air Force pilots and maintenance of their the silos.
Fairch ild A- 10 Thunderbolt aircraft. DMAFB
The identifiers utilized by the security police
also hosts the Aircraft Mai ntenance and and law enforcement units arc standa rd as with
Reservation Center (AtvlARC) 4lst Electronic other USAF installations. The base police units
Combat Squadron (The only Department of were ident ified as "Police X" with the base staDefense agcnc.y that has a positive cash flow!) tion identifying as "Control." The security
a nd the U.S. Customs Service Aviation Branch. police used two tactical calls -- Alpha and
Up until the early 1980s, DMAFBwas also host Whiskey, with the base identifying as "Security
to Strategic Air Command Titan M issile opera- Police" -- and perform their du ties at all base
gates as well as on the flight line and around the
tions .
DMAFB is home for the 836th AD (A ir base perimeter.
Division) and the 333rd, 357th and 358th
T he base police handle normal law enforceTFTSs (Tact ical Fighter Training Squadrons). ment functio ns such as radar traffic enforceSeveral other support organizations also reside ment and the handling of domestic
on the base includ ing an FAA installation.
disturbances. The base police assist the security
police at the main gates of the base at peak
Where to tune
times with the checking of vehicle and/or personnel idemification documentation.
Table 1 lists con firmed DMAFB nonThe various aircraft (AC) maintenance nets
aircraft frequencies with unconfirmed addi- handle the communica tions between flight line
tional frequen cies presented at the end of the maintenance crews and their respective shops,
table. The frequen cies of 138.075, 138.165 and or other fl ight line units or the tower. All
138.175 have been previously confirmed as OSI vehicles that operate on the active Oight line or
(Office of Special Investigations) channels at runways must have the capability to co mmuother AF bases. Several of the 400 MHz fre- nicate directly with the tower. The maintenance
quencies listed as unconfirmed are links or net on 148.475 appeared to be a catch-all as
fixed repeaters that were probably in use with multiple users were monitored. "Lancer" AGE
(Air G round E quipment) units, flight line
supervisors, Recovery Units (utilized during an
air crash) and Navigat ion repair un its were all
monitored here.

USAF Titan missile silo
HF Christmas tree antenna
40

October 1988

Approaching Craft

The aircraft on approach may be assigned a
special frequency for approach control as was
mo nitored on 359.300. When one A-10 on
approach had to shut down a n engine (A-lOs
have two), the pilot was told to switch from
318.100 to 359.300 -- the frequency on which
the A-10 was guided in for a safe landing. The
com mander's net a lso becomes active whenever an in-flight emergency occurs, fo llowing
the event from declaration until the time when
the aircraft is cleared of the active runway.
Table 2 lists the confirmed aircraft frequencies utilized at DtvlAFB with additional
unconfirmed frequencies at the e nd of the
table. M ilitary aircraft were monitored on all
three of the major military frequency groups VHF LB, VHF and UHF 225-400. Since
DMAFB is a training base, I expected a wide
variety of com munications in the various AF
frequency operating ranges. The VHF LB
NBFM (Narrow Band FM) frequ encies were
always monitored during air-to-air contacts
while on tra ining fl ights.
The frequency of 41.45 carried the "Fox"
channel designator. The VHF 138 MHz frequencies were utilized by A-lOs in the AM
mode while on the flight line or taxiways,
main ly wit h requests fo r departures a nd
squawk codes. The A-10 command post fo r
training operations is on 139.700 AM wit h both
ai rcraft and grou nd units being heard. Air-toair training communications were also monitored on 142.200 AM in addition to the VHF
LB frequencies. A-10 tactical calls heard were
"Phantom XX" and "Iron XX." The 4lst ECS
utilize modified C-130s that carry an EC-130
designator. The EC-130s utilize a tactical call
of "Brady XX."
T he UHF 225-400 monitoring yielded an
Crash and Rescue
interesting catch on 364.200. The frequency is
listed as USAF at Mount Lemmon (refer to last
The crash and rescue frequency of 173.5875 issue's Federal File) for aircraft. Radio traffic
was quite active considering the amount of was monitored that appeared to be between
training flights occurring. Whenever an air- two base stations with transmissions that
craft has a problem in-flight, such as high sounded like those heard on a command post
engine oil temperature, a n in-flight emergency channel. Several refere nces were made to a
is declared.
"Whiskey Surveillance." All communications
The aircraft declaring the emergency will were in the AM mode.
usually transmit it on the command post or
operations channel on UHF. The CP or opera- Old Planes Never Die
tions will immediately notify the crash/rescue
The AMARC is quite interesting facility
personnel who respond with the necessary
equipment and person nel. Rescue and crash where the government stores military aircraft
vehicles arc usually positioned near the center in the open desert. They come fr om all
of the runway on the flightline or taxiway. A branches of the military as well as ot her
unit or two may also set up at each end of the government agencies like the U.S. Coast
Guard. The aircraft generally are models that
runway.
have been replaced by newer models or

MONITORING TI MES

TABLE 1
138.925
139.650
148.185
148.300
148.450
148.475

>

· 148~50Q::: :

Digital data transmissions
DTMF (tones)
358th TFTS Maintenance Net, 'Lobos·
355th CAM
AC Maintenance nei
AC Malnte~ance net, multiple users
: A-10 AC
. .Malnte·nance .

148.545 >
Input to commander's net .
149.175 ·· :.::. A·10 AC Maintenance, 'Thunderbolt'
149.225
Refueling
149.550R
Commander's net output
150.325
AGE
163.000
Security police
16j.5875
Civil engineers . .
Base police ·:
164.9875 .·
165.1 625 :·
AMARC yard operations
AMARC. Admlnlsirative and yard operations
165. 1875
Taxf/motor pool (?) ·.·
173.4375
173.5875
Fire/crash/ rescue
407,350
Paging
407.425 .
User not Identified
.
. .
The following
unconfirmed frequencies for OMAFB that are listed. In the gov·
ernment microfiche files formerly sold .by Grove Enterprises. ·

:> ·

aie

5.

3~.675,

:J;a.~25 (AM

138,165, 1.38.175'.
30.S5, 32.45: 36'. i 3k56, '38.30, 41.90, i
. and . FM, 140.400, 141 .575, 141.625, 141.750,· 141.900, 14Ul25; '
143.425, 143.760, 143.800 (AM), 143.880, 143.925, 148.065, 148.095,
148.455, 148.515, · 148.550, 149.150, 149.250, 149.310. 149.535,
150,350, 163.4875, 407.375, 407.400. 407.450, 407.475, 413.000.
413.125, 413.175, 413.200, 413.300 and 413.375.

142.575,
148.245.
150.150,
413.050,

upgrades. Once delivered to the desert, the aircraft are prepared for
storage by covering the cockpits and other open ings with a material to
reflect the heat.
AMA RC is analogous to an automotive junk yard - when a part is
needed to keep an existing aircraft flight ready, th e part is removed from
a plane in storage. Also many of the aircraft at AMARC can be
rej uvenated and made ready to fly again in case of war or an emergency.
AMARC operations can be monitored on 165.1625 and 165.1875.

Tum those hours of searchin g for secret frequen cies over to
the Remote Com pu ter Scanning Syste m· . The RCSS runs
on any Macintosh . and gives you complete monitoring a nd
a utomatic logging of all signal activity found by your
R- 7000' . You're no longer limited by the buil t-in freque ncy
s torage. search. and selections provided by ICOM ·. Why
waste lime spin n ing dials when the RCSS can do it for you?
• Discover new frequencies and record their activity
• Scan un limited banks of frequencies
• Search designated frequency ranges; activities arc
a u tomatically recorded
• Automated statistical frequency log maintained
• Import/Export in forma tion between the built-in
database and most Macintosh databases
• Customized versions available
Complete System including Interface, Software
and Manual for only $189.95 • Dealer Inquiries Invited

Call or Write for More Infonnation
and Customized Versions
System s and Software International. Ltd .
4639 Timber Ridge Drive • Dumfries, VA 2 2026
_ _;
W,,:

(703) 680-3559
• H-7 IA \'erston nvaUahk soon

TABLE 2
A-10s:
Training operatlons·NBFM
Training operations-AM
Helicopter operallons·NBFM

Cold War M useum
Southern Arizona is also the home of the Pima Air Museum and the
Green Va lley Titan M issile Museum. Each is an interesting and
informative stop for the military /scanner enthusiast.
The Titan Missile Museum is one of a kind - all other of the 54 T itan
sites have been dismantled and destroyed. An actu al HF "Christmas
Tree" antenna is still at the Titan silo site which is set up as it was w hen
operational. The area around the antenna was fenced off with high level
RF warning signs posted. Each morning the a reas had to be cleared of
animals that wandered into it during the previous day lest they be fried by
the high-powered radio signals.
The Pima Air Museum (Tucson) has on loan a variety of aircraft from
AMARC including the presidential aircraft utilized by Presidents
Kennedy and Johnson. A four engine Douglas VC-118A "Liftmaster"
that was used to ge t Presidents Kennedy and J ohnson to the base (they
were unable to accommodate the larger Boeing 707s), are on display.
The President's cabin had a Hallicrafters all band radio mounted directly
next to the Chief Executive's chair and desk. The press section of the aircraft utilized a Hallicrafters "Sky Champion" HF transceiver for communicat ions with ground stat ions.
The next Federal File column will discuss GWEN (Ground Wave
Emergency Network) and the fo llowing column will present a highlight
of military UHF aircraft communications from the northern east coast.

IE!]

- VISA

UHF AC:
239.800
253.500
270.100
271.300
275.800
276.600
283.700
286.200
292.500
'29.4.700
297.200
318.100
320.100
339.100
341.500
351.400
359.300
361.500
364.200
372.200
379.400
390.800
393.000

34.55, 34.60, 34.95, 36.45, 36.00, 40.80 and
41.45.
138.050, 138.1 00, 138.200, 138.250. 138.300,
138.500, 139. 700 and 142.200.
32.85 (air-to-air) and 34.60

FAA FAC
Approach/departure (AO)
ATIS ' X·Ray•
Final approach
Tower/dispatch·squak assignments
AC/Land base station. A·10 operations
AZ ANG AC to dispatch
AC
AC
FAA Tucson FAC
ATC during training exercises
Final approach
Tucson ATIS
AO
A·lO AC·to·AC during range operations
AC
FAA Used on emergency approaches
AC/Land base station. 358th TFTS operatfons
Unidentified-refer to text
Dispatch. pilot/tower
AC
FAA Tucson final approach
FAA A/D

Unconfirmed OMAFB UHF AC frequencies: 259.400, 266.200, 268.100, 271.900,
286.400, 289.300. 308.800, 314.300, 321.200. 347.200, 358.200, 361 .600, and
381.300.

MONITORING TUvlES

October 1988

41

plane talk

Jean Baker, KIN9DD
213 W. Troy Ave. 4C
Indianapolis, I N 46228

Answering the Mail
In this mon th 's column we'll a nswer the
most frequent ly asked questio ns from
readers.

The International Phonetic Alphabet
A B -

S ELCA LS
Jim C . recently a sked us to include some
informat ion abou t SELCALS, to wh ich he
hea rs constan t reference while monitor ing
the VHF and H F aero b:i nds.
When aeronautica l cn route ground stations need to contact a night, they ut ilize a
system known as "Select ive Calling" -better kn own as SE LCAL. Herc's how it
wo rks:
Eac h aircraft which
is SE LCAL
equipped has a p rimary and a backup
rece1v1ng unir. Every unit is supposed 10
h:ive its own fou r-l clle r code by which a
ground stat ion operato r can signal the night
deck c rew th at so meone wants to co ntact
th em. As one wag descr ibed it, "It's like
tellin g a pilot to pick up th e pho ne! "
When th e opera tor activates a part icular
aircraft's SE LCA L code, an audible signa l
(a ch im e) is received on th e night deck, and
a ligh t fla shes on a receiving panel. Ai rline
company stations, aero na utical cn ro ute
gro un d station s, and others w it h the proper
1rnnsmi11ing equipment c:in contact ai rcraft

c0E F G H I J K L M N •

0 p -

0
R
S
T
u

ALFA (Al-fa)
BRAVO (Bra-vo)
Charlie (Char-lie)
DELTA (Oel-lah)
ECHO (Eck-oh}
FOXTROT (Foks-trot)
GOLF (Golf)
HOTEL (Hoh-tell)
INDIA (In-dee-ah)
JULIET (Joo-lee-ell)
KILO (Kee-low)
LIMA (Lee-mah)
MIKE (Mike)
NOVEMBER (No-vem-ber)
OSCAR (Oss-cah)
PAPA (Pah-pah)

-

vW X y -

z-

QUEBEC (Keh-beck)
ROMEO (Row-me-oh)
SIERRA (See-air-ah)
TANGO (Tang-go)
UNIFORM (You-nee-form. or Oo·nee·form)
VICTOR (Vlck-tah)
WHISKEY (Wiss·key)
X-RAY (EckS-ray)
YANKEE (Yang-Key)
ZULU (Zoo-loo)

Numbers one through zero:
1 - ONE (Wun)
6 - SIX (Six)
2 - TWO (Too)
7 - SEVEN (Sev-en)
3 - THREE (Tree)
8 - EIGHT (All)
9 - NINE (Nin-er)
4 - FOUR (Fow·er)
5 - FIVE (Fife)
0 - ZERO (Zee-row)

who have SELCAL receivers o n bot h HF
and VHF. H oweve r, A ir Traffic Control
facilities -- as we know them he re in the
United States -- do not co nt act a ircraft by
SELCA LLing them.
The portion of th e VHF aero band
where you can hear fl ig hts being
SE LCAL Led is where the compa ny stations

ClllM!

and aero c nrout c stati ons arc allocated
fr equencies -- 128.825-132.000 MH z. On
HF, you can monito r grou nd stat ions
SELCALL ing nights on all of the civilian
int ernat io na l aero co mmunications bands.
Most airlin es not in co untri es under
communist co ntrol use SELCAL.
Although each SE LCAL ai rborne unit is
purported to have its own SELCAL code
w hi ch is unique to that particular unit,
occasio nally it happens that two a ircraft
will have t he sa me SELCAL code. Then t he
confusion begi ns!
Very fre que nt ly, you' ll hear a pilot
a sking a ground station operator fo r a
SE LCA L check when he gives a positio n
repo rt. T he International Phoneti c A lphabet is used to spell out each let te r in a
SELCAL code. For in stance, a SELCAL
code could be made up of the le tters HM K

w.

\JP9ES\ EOUIPt..'ENl CENTER Ui

SELCAL Equipment on

a Boeing 747

The SELCAL "chime" unit is located on the flight engineer's desk panel.
The SELCAL receiving equipment itself is located beween the captain
and the first officer's seats with other radio gear.
42

Oc1obcr 1988

MONITOR IN G TIMES

In that case, the pi lot wo uld request that
the ground station operator would give him
a SELCAL check o n "H o te l, Mike, Kilo,
Whiskey. Below in T able 1, the co mple te
Int ernational Phonetic A lphabet is spelled
out. Also , sec the diagram of a SE LCAL
unit aboard a 747.
O ne of t he adva ntages of SELCA L units
is that if a n aircraft is equipped with a
receiving unit , the pilots d o n't have to wear
th ei r headsets throug ho ut a night in case a
statio n on the ground is trying 10 cont act
th em by voice. Those headsets ca n ge t qu ite
cu m bersome duri ng a t ra nsocean ic nig ht of
six hours or more!
The International Phone! ic Alphabe t is
used to avoid confusion a nd mi sunder-

standing in aviation, military, amateur
radio, and others who use radio transmissions on a regular basis. Although English
is the international language of aviat ion,
the way it is spoken -- plus the many and
varied accents of the international aviation
commun ity
makes spoken English
difficult to understand by everyone involved
without a uniform method of pronunciation. This is why the International Phonetic
Alphabet is utilized.

Rainbow Radio
By popular demand, we're aga in
repeating the address of Rainbow Radio for
those of you who want to send in reception
reports of their transmissions.
RA INBOW RADIO
Polestar Communications, Ltd.
Post Office Box 2280
Morinville, Alberta
TOG !PO
Ca nada
For those of you who arc unfamiliar with
Rainbow Radio, they are an LDOC (Long
Distance Ope rationa l Control) aero cnroute ground station. Working mostly with
Canadian Airlines and charter ou tfits, they
receive departure reports on fueling, passenger counts, maintenance status, and
other data from pilots to be passed on to
their company bases, set up phone patches,
and handle other types of ground/
air/ground transmissions.
If you're sending a reception report to
Rainbow Radio -- or any other station in
hopes of receiving a QSL, please remember
to se nd return postage. Make it in the form
of an International Reply Coupon if it is to
a stati o n outside of the country in which
you live; or, you can purchase mint stamps
for just about any country from a dealer.
If your report is going to a domesti c station, it is still a wise move to include return
postage. Many statio n managers arc not
familiar with reception reports and arc
inclined to throw them away. However, the
inclusion of return postage will motivate
them to at least make a stab at sendin g a
ve rification leltcr back to you.
Speaking of reception reports and
QSLs: Many newcomers to our hobby -especia lly those who also have an int erest in
shortwave broadcast monitoring or amateur
radio -- are surprised to find out that it's
very possible to obtain verification letters
and QSL cards as a resu lt of monitoring th e
aero bands. Howeve r, there are some differences that are worth talking about here
in regard to sending reception repo rt s to
aero comms facilities as opposed to sending
th em to shortwave broadcast stations.

In the next insta llment of "Plane T a lk,"
we'll look at how to send reception
reports to aero communication stations -both ground and airborne -- which can
result in QSL cards from the recipient.

Oceanic Reporting Points
Robert Lawrence, Dean W., and Henry
Burk have asked "Plane Talk" about the
reporting points over the Atlantic which
they've heard pilots mention when they give
position reports to ground station operators.
The reporting points with names (i.e.
ROLEY, SMELT, TARGA, etc.) a re usually those close to land masses; further out
over the ocean, reporting points are given
as coordinates (latitudc/longtitude) and
not ordinarily given names.
Here are some of the reporting points
which you may hear when pilots give their
positions over North Atlantic/Caribbean
routes. Remember that these arc close to
various land ma sses:
BACUS:
BO URS:
CHAMP:
CORAN:
DANER:
DEENO:
ELBOW:
ELKAS:
FLANN:

KRAFT:
LEA RS:
TOOMS:

34°26N/73°51 w
24°59N/71°1sw
37°31N/71°41 W
32°0JN/73°36W
35°16N/69°04W
20°31N/67°2sw
26°25N /76°43 W
27°28N/73019W
38°20N /69°57W
23°30N/67°43W
28°30N/71°27W
23°00N/69°45W

Cambridge Airadio (Box 3154, Silver
Spring, MD 20901) has some excellent
route charts available fo r a very nominal
charge, with which you ca n follow flights
across both the Atlant ic and the North
Pacific. These charts show reporting point
names and coord inates as well.
This writer has spent many interesting
hours following nights from departure
point to their destinations with these
charts. Once you become accustomed to
using them (and they're really sclfexp lanatory), you'll wonder how you monito red international flights without them!

MT Reader On-Deck
MT reader, Bill Wolf (KA2 EE V) took a
well-earned vacation to St. Petersburg,
Florida. When he and his wife boarded
their flight at Newark International, he
asked one of the flight atte ndants if the
crew would object to his taking pictures of
the flight deck. He reports that the next
th ing he knew, he was beckoned right in by
the captain, who not only allowed him to
take pictures, but in turn, snapped one of
Bill seated right in his (the captain's) clwir!
Herc's the proof of his adventure
(below). As Bill said in his let tcr, "This is
really a fabu lous way for a n aero communications buff to kick off a vacation'"
That's all for this tim e. Remember, in
the next installment, we'll discuss reception
rep orts and QSLs. 73 and out.

Bill Wolf, KA2EEV, tries out the captain's seat in a Boeing 727 (Photo
courtesy Bill Wolf)
MON ITORING T IMES

October 1988

on the ham bands

Ike Kerschner, N3/K
R.D. 1, Box 181-A
K1111k!etow11 , PA 18058

The President

No, we are not talking about the ruckus
goi ng o n in th e po lit ica l nrcna! In this case
'The President" is n new ham transceiver from
(of all folks) U11ide11. In fact, you may have
noticed an adveniscmclll fo r this 10 meter rio
0
cnllcd, ''The President HR2510".
T he ad -- run by a firm called Commu nication Electronics, reads: "10 Meter Mobile
Tran sceiver - Digital VFO - Full Band Coverage - All Mode Operation - 13acklit liquid
crystal displ<Jy - Auto Squelch - RIT Preprogrammed 10 kHz. Channels - 25 watts
output." Extra intriguing was the price of
5239.95. IL was too much for me to resist. Off
wen t my check and before long I had this
dandy little rig delivered to the door (photo
J).
After a quick look at th e instruction
manual, "The President" was connected to the
shack J 2 volt supply and J cleme nt yagi. When
th e unit was turned on the LCD lit up and
noise filled the room -- enough audio (4 walls)
to satisfy even my old tin cars.
I scanned up and down the band using
the scan buttons on the mike. Scan steps arc
in JO kHz increments which I consider too
lurgc, but you ca n get an idcu of band activ ity.
There is a span comrol that a ll ows you to
change the VFO tuning increments from 10
kHz to 1 kHz or 100 Hz; however there is no
way to make the unit scan in other than 10

October 1988

kH z steps.
When in the scan mode the frequency
range is divided into four bands, 28 to 28.49,
28.5 to 28.99, 29 to 29.49 and 29.5 to 29.7. T o
go fro m one band to anot her in the scan
mo de you must hit the band switch to
advance to the next range . When using the
VFO the range is 28 to 29.7 continuous.
The left side of the liquid crystal d isplay
has a portion ma rked meter. This is a bar
graph type of meter. Its functions are controlled by a button on the fro nt panel. P ush
the butron and the meter will cycle through
power out, modulation, signal strength and
SWR modes. It's an excellent feature and it's
easy to operate and read.
Also on the front panel arc controls for
mode, frequency lock, squelch, R IT (receiver
incremental tuning), RF gain, mike gain, noise
blanker, dim switch (which reduces the brightness of the crystal d isplay), a band switch (4
bands from 28,000 to 29,970, VFO knob,
on/off volume, Beep (tu rns on cou rtesy beep)
and a PA switch that turns rig into publ ic
address system.
On the rear panel you'l l fi nd a n S0-239
for anten na connection, a power connector
and the accessory con necto r. The key, external
speaker a nd PA speaker arc connected at the
accessory socket.
SSB and CW signals are easy to copy
and several QSO's o n SSB were made in short
order. Within the week, this little rig had produced SSB and FM QSO's throughout North
and South America. C W is a blast with this
little rig, too, and one afternoon I heard
seve ral loud CW sigs a nd proceeded to work
three Z L stations in a row as well as PY CX
LU and OA.
,
'

MON ITO RI NG TfMES

EXCELLENT CONSTRUCIION
The next step was to remove the rig
from its cabinet and take a close look at the
internals (see photo 2 & 3). Uniden did an
excellent job constructi ng this rig. The neat
layout a nd high qua lity asse mbly is very
impressive. The mechanical construction is
quite solid and shou ld stand up well in a
mobile environment.
Uniden claims 25 watt CW output, the
Bi rd Watt meter read 28 walls at 28.5 MH z
into a 50 ohm d ummy load on CW. AM gave
us a tad over 12 wall s (manual states 10) a nd
FM prod uced the sa me 12+ watts at 29.6

MHz.
C laimed sensitivity is .25 microvolts for
a 10 dB S/N and test results showed the unit
to be right on the money -- a .1 microvolt
signal produced a very rcaclablc signa l.
Switching to FM mode we found a somewhat
different story with the unit requiring about .7
microvolts (claimed sensitivity is .5 microvolts) to achieve a 20 dB S/ N.
As with most rigs of this type "The President" is capable or expanded frequency coverage. It is a simple matter to expa nd the
range from 26 to 29,999. To do so simply lift
pins 34 and 35 of the microprocessor above
ground and connect to + 5 volts throun0 h a 10
k resistor.
Take a look at photo three; You will sec
two white arrows, the one on che left indicates
the common tic point of pins 34 and 35 (to
ground). Use an xacto knife to cut the copper
fo il at this point and solder a lOk resistor from
this point (the side with pins 34 and JS) to the
positive side of the five volt regul ntor (white
arrow on right in photo 3). Now the rig covers
everything between 26 and 29.999 1\IHz.
Remember though, it is illegal 10
transmit with this unit o n any frequencies ou t-

side of the ten meter a mateur band!
T he inst ruction manual included with
this unit is VCI)' good, easy to read and understand. Even a new novice won't have trouble
getting this unit o n the air in sho rt order.
Also in the package with "The President" is a mobile mount a nd all t he required
hardware to put the unit in you r car, boat or
plane (What, you don't have a plane?). What
a deal'
Do I like "The P resident'"! You bet! The
only features I wou ld like to sec on this rig
wou ld be a repeate r off-set to e nable repeater
operation on FM. And it would be nice if the
CW switch-over speed were faster than one
second. One modifi cation I made to mine was
to fill the indicator spots o n the knobs with
white plasti c model paint; because I fo und it
difficult to sec what position t hey were at even
in norma l room light.
A
t S239.95• t his litt le rio0 is one bio

0
bargai n! It's avai lable fro m Communications
Elect ronics at 1-800-USA-SCAN.

220 MHz
On August 4, 1988 the FCC announced
reall ocat io n of the 220 to 222 M Hz. portion of
the amat eur band to the Land M obile service.
In spite of strong oppositio n by the A merican
Rad io Relay League (ARRL), ot her amateu r
groups a nd the U .S. Congress, the FCC
deemed t he move to be in the public interest.
The ARRL continues to oppose the
reall ocatio n an d will pursue a ll available
mea ns to reverse the act ion.
. Too often we a mateurs arc comp lacent
wit h our lot and fai l to realize the im portance
of such actions. Even if we do not use 220 we
arc still affected by this decisio n. Such moves,
when successful, set us up fo r furt he r cuts on
other bands in the futu re.
With the advent of Novice enhancement
111ore and more people a rc entering the hobby
each month. Th is growt h in numbers will
P.lace increasing demand on ex isti ng frequencies. A lready ma ny areas of the count!)' have
used ull th e ava ilable repeater pa irs on 2
meters. How lo ng will it be u nt il we need
those re:i llocatcd 2 1v1Hz?

OSCAR 13
OSCAR 13 went in to opera tio n th is
summer and alt hol1gh some minor problems
to exist -- notably in mode L -- ovcrall thinos
arc going well. AMSTAT-DL (German~)
revised uplink power requ irements by 3.8 dB
(28.8 dl3W o r 757 W E IRP). However
o bservers in t he U .S. report a JO dB perfo rmance defi cit. T ests made in the U.S.
indicate the uplink requireme nt to be 38 dBW
which turns out to be 9.2 dl3 poorer t han even
the revised DL Mode specs.
Jn spite of t he report ed Mode L

problem a mateurs have been using AO 13
with excellent results on all available modes.

Amateur Credit Cards?
T he ARRL Board of D irectors
endorsed a n a ffinity credit ca rd progra m. The
card will be made available to interested
League me mbers, half of the de rived funds
will be allocated to a fund for the defense of
amateur freque ncies (good idea?).

Ex-W3UQW

~
IF YOU BUY, SELL OR COLLECT
OLD RADIOS, YOU NEED...

ANTIQUE RADIO CLASSIFIED
Antique Radio's Largest-Circulation
Monthly Magazine
Articles - Classifieds ·Ads for Parts & Services
A lso: Early TV, Ham Equip., Books,
Telegraph, 40's & SO's Radios & more ...
Free 20-word ad each month. Don 't miss out/
Free Sample. 6-Month Trial - $11 .
1-Year: $19 ($28 by 1st Class). Foreign. Write.

A.R.C., P.O. Box 2·P4, Carlisle, MA 01741

Lawrence Kaczma rczyk of Maha noy
City, Pennsylvania, has had his 1986 applica- ' - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -tion '.o r Adva nced Class license designated for info rmation write Gordon West Radio
hea ring. Kaczmarczyk surrendered his ham School, 2414 College Drive, Costa M esa, CA
ticket in 1985 a fter the FCC started license 92629 or phon e (714)549-5000.
revocation proceedings against him for
intentional ja mming, transmission of music, Improving Your Code Speed
broadcasting and unidentifie d communicaAbout a year ago this colu mn featu red
tions.
In a p lea barga in a rrange111ent, the FCC my favore d techn ique for lca rn in11 ?v1orse
agreed to accept an application fro m him in code. Since then, many of you have \~rittcn to
comment abo~1 t your success at !co rning the
one year for routine relicensing providing
code and passmg the exam. However a fa irly
there were no violations in the int erim. H owl::irge number of folks seem to have trouble
ever, th ree mont hs late r the FCC said he was
getting past ten words per minu te or so. T here
mo nitored o n three different occasions again
intentiona lly cau sing harmful interfe rence to is a way a round this prob lem if you arc willing
to make the effo rt.
rad io commun ications. A hea ring has been
A lmost all of us who want to improve
schedu led to determine whether the applicant
is qualified to become a n a mateur service our code speed hit a plateau. We sit in fro nt
of the receiver copying WlA W nightly but get
licensee (via W5YI Rep011).
almost not hing above 10 wpm , never mind
tl)'ing 13 o r 15! N ow here is the secret.
Theory for the
Stop copyi ng the 5 and 10 wpm practice
Visually Impaired
sessio ns. Copy o nly the 15, 20 and 25 (and yes
T he Gordon West Radio School has 30 and 35) wp m practice runs even thouoh
recent ly int roduced a code a nd Novice voice copy is only five o r ten perce nt. It really
class thCOI)' cou rse specifically fo r the visually works. After just a few sessions of this yo u
impa ired beginne r. T wo ste reo, long-play, will fi nd the 15 wpm run to be a sna p. T ry it,
audio cassettes train the visually impaired to fo r t l~c next two weeks. Do not t ry to copy
pass the Novice entry-level code exa mination. anything below 15 wpm. Don't even listen to
T he tapes contain all lett ers, numbers, punc- t he slower speeds. It works! When you oet
tuation marks and procedu ral signa ls a nd a t hat upgrade write, and tell me how well it
sa mp le C W exam to prepare the applicant. worked fo r you .
The 302 Novice class test qu estio ns are
also covered in deta il o n two addi tio na l cassette tapes. Eve!)' q uestion is discussed with
easy-to-remember comments about the
questions plus a thorough understandi ng of
the correct a nswer. Incorrect a nswe rs a re also
reviewed so the applicant bcucr understands
what the 30 qu estio n exam will be like.
The tapes a lso contain instru ctions to
the volunteer exa miners that will administer
th e test.
Cassette theol)' cou rses a rc ava ilable fo r
the fo llowing upgrades:
Technician - E lement 3A
Genera l - E le ment 38
Advanced - Element 4A
Extra - Element 4B
Each course is $19.95. For mo re

MONITOR ING TIMES

Jamboree on the Air
October 15 a nd 16 will sec thousan ds of
Boy Scouts on t he air d uring the ir :rnnual
'_'Ja ~1.borcc o n the A ir". You ca n participate by
mv1tmg your loca l troop or cub p<ick to you r
sta tio n to ta lk with the many Scoutino0 stations
that will be active.
T ho usands of st"ations fr om <ill over the
world wi ll be active d uri ng this weekend and
you.ngstc rs the earth over will have an opport unity to talk to one a not her a nd cxcha noe
0
ideas. W hy don't you le nd a hand?
Freque ncies are CW - 3590, 7030, 14070,
21140 and 28190; -Phone- 3940, 7290, 14290,
21360 and 28350. Packet, RTTY, SSTV and
ATV operation is also planned.
73 de N31K

EJ

Octobr:r 1988

45

the qsl

Gayle Van Horn
60 Lester Drive
Orange Park, FL 32073
P ira te:
Rad io Garbanzo, 74 15 kl-lz. f'ull dala statio n lcllcr
and nole from verilicalion signer, Fearless FrcdProgra m D irecto r. Received in 45 days for mi ni
sta mps, and an English receptio n re po rt. Stat ion
add ress: 5074 Hilo, I Iawaii, 96720. (Steven J.
Rogovich, Virginia De ach, VA)

Puerto Rico:
NMR-U.S. Coast Gunrd Rad io Station-San Juan. Full
data feller with gold Coast Guard seal. Vcrilic.11ion
signer, Raymond Gypp-Masler Chief Radioman,
Execulive Officer. Received in 14 days for U.S. mini
stamps (returned with reply), and an English
reception repon. S1a1ion address: P.O. Dox S-2029,
San Juan, P uc no !Uco, 00903. (Lany Van Ilorn,
Orange Park, FL)

RMS.Queen El iza beth II:
GBTI. f'u ll data prepared card, color postcard of the
"QEII" a nd a peronal feller from verifica tion signer,
Phil E. Williams-lbd io Officer. Received in 30 days
for one !RC anll an English reception report. Stal ion
address: Rl\IS-Qucen E lizabeth II, Alln: Chief Radio
Operator, c/o Cunard/NAC Lines, 555 Fifth Ave.,
New York, N.Y. 10017. (Larry Van Horn, Orange
Par k, FL)

Seychell es:

Anguilla:
The O H"ibbenn Deacon -AM-1610 kl lz. Full da ta colo r
studio card. Verification signer, Garet h H odgc1'\ lanag.cr. Received in 90 days fo r one !RC, and a n
Englbh reception report. Station address: P.O. Boe
690. Anguilla, Drilish Wcsl Indies.

Bel ize:
lhdio fklizc, 3285 kHz. L1rcc full dnln Dclize map
card. Verificatio n signer. C hie f Dro adcasling Officer.
Received in 30 days for o ne IRC and an English
receptio n repo11. Station address: P.O. Dox 89, llelizc
City, Belize, C.A. (Rod Pearso n, St. Augustine, FL)

Uolivia:
R:idio Panamcricana, 6105 kHz . F ull d:11a South
J\me rkan map c.1rd a nd persona l lc ller from
vcrilication s igne r. Daniel Sanchez Rocha-Sub.
Director. Rece ived in 20 days for mini slamps, one
U.S. dollar, and a Spanish rcccplion rcpo11. Station
adJress: Cajon 5263, L1 Paz. Dolivia. (J'om Sullivan,
New O rleans. LA)

Ca nada:
CUI IT-TV-Channel 3. Full data statio n card, CBC
emblem s ticker. and prepared lc llcr. Verilication
signer, B. Vandcn•oai1-Secreta1y. Received in 7 days
fnr nn English reception repo11. Statio n ndi.l ress: P.O.
Box 3000, I la lifax, Nova Scotia, 133J -3E9, Canada.
(L1n y Van I lorn, Orange Par k, FL)

Canada:
Radio Canada l nlcrnatio nal, 9755 kl lz. Full daln
• Annive1~aiy· cari.l. and slat io n progrnm sched ule.
Received in 14 days for an English receptio n repo rt.
S1a1i1)1l aJdress: P.O . Dox 6000, ~fontreal, Canada
I-!3C 3A8 (!'lilt Traister. Covington, TN)

l\fars ha ll ls l:inds:
WSZO, 4940 kl lz. Full data QSL on slalion
lcllerhead. Verification signer, Peter Boon-Manager.
Received in eighl months for a English receptio n
report. Slalion Address: Dept. of Interio r and Outer
Is land Affairs, Majuro, Marshall Is lands. (Douglas S.
Waller, llay Village, OH)

Mex ico:
Radio Educacion, 6185 kHz. Pa11ial dala QSL o n
station lellerhead, and studio photo. Verification
signer, Gustavo Carreno L., Sub. Di rector ·r c·cnico.

Rece ived in 46 days via registered mail for mini
stamps, :rnd a Spanish rcceplio n rcpo 11. Sl.:,tion
address: Angel Urraza 622, Col. def Valle, C.1'.0.
3100, Mexico, Dislrilo Federal. ( llod Pearson, SI.
Augustine, FL)

Mozambi que:
Rad io Mozam bique, 3210 kI-lz. Full dala world map
card, without verilicnlion s igner. Received in 25 days
for

mini

stamps,

and

a

Po11ugucsc

reception

report.Sta tio n address: Caixa Posta l 594, M:ipulo,
Mozambique. (Bill Traister, Covington, TN)

New Zea la nd:
R ad io New Zea land l nlernalio na l, 15150 kllz. Full
dala scenery postcard, blue station pennanl, and
program schcllule. Verification signer, Rud i I Iii!.
Received in 30 days for t hree IRCs, a nd an E nglish
receptio n repo rt. Station address: P.O. 13ox 2092.
We llingto n, New Zealand. (Tom Sullivan, New
Orleans. LA)

Norway:

Cu ba:
Rad io Rcbeldc, 5025 kHz. Full data QSL on station
lcttcrhcall. pennant. and Stickel'. VcrHication signer,

Jorge Luis ~fas Zabala. Received in 85 days for a
Spanish receptio n repo n. Statio n add ress: Apa11ado
6277. La Habana 6 C uba. (Joseph A. Johnson,
Sava nna h. G A)

De nma rk:
ll:idio Denm:Hk, 15165 kHz. Full llata art card.
Vcrilication signer, Dcude Daug. Received in 60 days
fo r o ne I RC and an English rcce pl ion repo11. Sia Iion
addres-= S lw11wave-Dep1.. Rallio housc. DK-1999,
Fredc1 iksberg. Denmark. (ell.)

Egyp t:
R:1d i1> Cairo, 9475 kHz. Full llala Egyptia n "i'vlosque·
without vcrilica ti o n signer. Rcccivct! in 52
d;1y' for one lllC and an Eng lis h receptio n report.
S tatio n address: P.O. Do x 1186, Cairo, Egypt. ( Bill
Traister. Covingto n. TN)
j)ll~tc;inJ,

Ga hon:
Swill f(;1d in lnlernalio na l relay, 98 t0 kllz. f'u ll dala
studio card, witho ut verilicalion signer.

·s1u·
-t6

Received in 130 days fo r a n English recept io n repo11.
Statio n address: G incomellisl r 1, 3000 Bern 15,
Switzerland, (Tom Sullivan, New Orleans, LA)

October 1988

Radio Norway. 153 10 kHz. Full data · wooden
Church" card, statio n slic ker, and progra m schedule,
without verification s igner. Re ceived in 30 days for .1n
E nglish reception repo11. Station allJress: N-03-10,
Oslo 3, No nvay. (Joseph A. Johnso n. Savan nah, GA)

Pa pua New G uinea:
(13ouganvillc Province) Radio No11h Solo mons, 3325
kl lz. Full dala QSL on "N13C" station lellerhead.
Verification signe r, C. Talei. Received in 89 da ys fo r
mint st:-imps, and ~m E nglish reception rcpo11. S1alion

adi.lrcss: P.O. Box 140, Kavieng. New Irela nd
Province, Papua l'ew Guine.1. (Ro i.I Pearso n. SI.
Augustine. FL)

Paragua y:
Radio Nacio n:il, 9735 kl Iz. Panial data QSL o n
statio n lellerhead, and travel brochure. Verilication
signer, C1rlos Montaner, Jefe T ecnico. lleceivcd in
123 days for mini stamps, and a Spa nis h rc-ccpt io n
krepo rt. Slalion ni.ldress: O liva y AlberJi 6 to piso,
M.O.P.C., As uncion. l'arnguay. (Bi ll T rab1er,
Covington, T N)

MON I TOR I NG TIMES

Far East Droadcasling Assoc, (FEDA), 11870 kllz.
Partial dala yellow map card. Ve rificat ion signer,
Pearl Mclcalfc-QSL Secretary, Received in 95 days
for 1wo IRCs a ml an E nglish reception repo11. Station
address: Dox 321, Unio n Va le, Vicloria, Mahe,
Seychelles, A fr ica. (Tom Sulliva n, New O rleans, I.A)

South Afri ca :
South Africa n Ai1ways LDOC. Pa1iial data QSL on
airline lellerhead. Verificatio n signer C.I-1.Z.
Dooysen-Assl. Manager Flig ht Control Communications. Rccived in 60 days for an English receptio n
report. s1,11 ion addres.s: Office of lhe Chief Director
(Flight Operations), South African Airways, P.O. Jan
Smuis Airport, 1627 Joha nnesburg, Rep. of South
Africa. (William Jarrell, Knoxville, TN)

Spa nis h Morocco:
Radio Medi Un, 9575 kl lz. Full data stalion c.1rll wilh
schedule, and s licker, wilho ul verification sig ne r.
Received in 152 days for one !RC and a French
reception repo11. S1.11 ion address: Doile Postal 2055,
T anger, Morocco. (Greg l lumph ries, Long Beach,

CA)

Sweden:
Radio Sweden Internat io nal. 9645 kl lz. Full dala
·Annivcrs:uy·

c:in.J,

without

vcrificntion

signer.

Received in 18 days for an English reception report.
Station adllrcss: S-105 10 Stockholm, Sweden, (ed.)

Ta nza ni :i :
Radio Tanzan ia. 9685 kl-lz. Full data yellow and blue
A frican map card. Verific.1lion signer, Director of
Broadrnsling. Received in 45 days fo r two IRCs, and
an English recep tio n re po11. Slal ion add ress: P.O. Bo x
9191, Dar Es Salaam, Tan7~1 nia. (ed.)

United Arab Em irates:
(Abu Dha bi) Voice of lhe UAE. 11865 kHz. Full data
color scenery folder card and program schedule.
Verification s igne r, Station Directo r. Received in 30
days for two IRCs and an E nglish recept ion report.
Station address: P.O. Dox 63, Abu Dha bi. United
Arab Emirates. (Rod Pearso n. SI. Augustine, FL)

USSR:
(Ukraine SSR) Radio Moscow. 7180 kl-lz via
Simferopol s ite. F ull data postcard of Len in Libra1y,
without verificat io n s igner. Received in 40 days for an
E nglish recept ion report. (Greg Hu mph ries, Long
Deach, CA)

Va nua tu:
Radio V.1nua1u, 7260 kHz. F ull dala "Slit Go ng• card,
witho ut ve ri tica tion signer. Received in 29 days aller
mini stamps, a nd two f'rench follow -up reception
repo11s. Total l ime repo rt o ulslanding was eighteen
months. S1a1ion address: P.O. Box 49, Po n Vila,
Republic o f Vanautu. (Rod Pearson, SI. Augus tine,

f'L)

Venezuela:
Rallio Rumbos, 9660 kl lz. Full dala color scenc1y
postcard, without vcrilicat ion signer. Received in 72
days afler mini stamps, a nd a Spanish reception
rcpm1. Slalion add ress: Apa11ado 2618, 0 1rac11s
1010A, Venezuela. ( Dill Traister, Covington, TN)

reading rtty

Jack Albert
203 York Place
Ne1v Le11ox, IL 60451

Something Strange, Book 2
Last month I posted a query about a
st ra nge signal that I copied o n 5.049 MHz.
These signal s were also heard on 7.8233
MHz at 0615 UTC and 14.5937 MHz at
0220 UTC. Each consisted of eight
musical tones. Two of th e tones a rc VNFSK
(Very Narrow Shi ft Keying) with a 20 H z
sh ift and arc situ ated about l kHz lower in
frequency. It appea rs to be a sync hronous
clock th at cha nges every 50 mi ll iseconds (10
H z). I believe th e six higher tones are
parallel data.
As I mentioned before, thi s may be th e
new Mark V J P iccalo system which is
d<.:scri bcd in the Radio Teletype Code Book
by Joerg Kl ingcn fu ss. If anyone has
in formation on t hese st range tones, please
drop me a line. My address is 203 York
Place, New L enox, Illinois 60451. If you
hear so mething str ange on t he ba nds, let
me kn ow a nd I' ll publish yo ur findings so
snmeonc ca n identify it.

FAX Facts
The popu lar trend in "Radio Modem"
tec hnology is the introduct ion of the "all
mode" unit. AEA introduced th e PK-232 a
few years ago a nd last year they added the
facsimile mode. If you already own a PK232 without FAX, AEA offers an upgrade
package. T hree other ma nufacturers of
RTTY gear introduced an al l mode TNC
wh ich ca n receive facsimi le. The Kantronics
KAM, KPC-4, KPC-2, KPC-2400 a nd the
KPC-1 all have the ability to copy WEFAX
pictures.
If you own a ny of the above unit s, you
can have th e m up-gra ded at a nomin al cost
($19.95 to $29.95). They also have a computer program ava ilable called "MAXFAX"
which I believe is PC compat ible only. This
allows th e PC user to display the pictures
on th e screen or print it out. Contact
Kant ronics for details on which computers
o r what print ers ca n be used.
lv!FJ also boasts that th eir new "M ULTl
MODE" unit ca n copy FAX as well as SSTV
(Slow Scan TV). SSTV is very similar to
FAX and is used by Ham Radio O perators
fo r sendi ng video pi ct ures on the LF and
Hf bands. for more information, contact
the manufacturer for a free catalog. One
last piece or new equipment is the M7000,
recently int rod uced by Universal SW.

What the FEC is SITOR?
In previou s issues of Mo11itoi111g Tim es, l
ment io ned that the re arc ot her forms of
RTTY. These a rc SITOR, FEC a nd TOM,
to na me a few, and a re a ll sp in-offs of the

standard Baudot RTTY . FEC (Forward
Error Correction) is actually a form of
SlTOR and is used fo r sending bulletins or
an "All Ca ll" mode. Ham s, for exa mple, use
FEC to establish a contact a nd the n they
switch to SlTOR which is characterized by
the chirp-chirp-chirp sound .
SITOR is also used by ships at sea
because of an error co rrecti on scheme that
is built into the S!TOR signa l that can provid e e rror-free communication. There is
also a S lTOR mode L or "Listen" mode.
Mode L allows other receivi ng stat io ns to
eavesdrop on the sender. This is the mode
that you will use.
Herc's how the SITOR wo rks. Let's say
we' re talking on a CB radio a nd I tell you
something. You can't copy very well so you
say "what" or "say again." Then I repeat
wh at I sa id. If you don' t copy a second t ime,
you'll have to say "what" agai n and I'll have
to repeat it. Th is wi ll go on over and over
agai n until you can copy every word correctly. SITOR works in the same fash ion.
The first chi rp sound comes from the
sender (me). If the receiver (you) copies t he
data correctly, he ch irps back (in co mput er
talk) an "OK". But if th<.: copy is poor, the
receiver can detect a bad character because
of the special built-in error detection error
scheme. Then th e receiver chirps back
"what" a nd the sender repeats the data.
1.:;~1Pe.

When you encounter a SITOR signal,
you will hear what sounds like two chirpin g
birds. This is the sound of the two stations
transmitting back and forth, exchanging
data and ack nowledging, or ARQs (another
way of saying what). Sometimes the oth<.:r
station can't be hea rd because of propagation. Then you will hea r a chirp, a pause
and t hen a nother chi rp.
Yo u ca n copy SITOR on the marine
bands at 6.5, 8.7 and 13.l MHz. The AEA
PK-232 can "auto set" itself to copy S lTOR
using the "signal" command. If you are
using a software package (with the
Commodore 64 computer) like "Ham text"
or "SWL Text," you' ll have to use Mode "L"
and tune in the signa l as if it were RTTY.
FEC sounds a lot like RTTY with one
exception. The data appears to be a constant st ream of characters with no breaks or
pauses ( that is, the beepi ng sound is continuous) . RTTY, on the ot her hand, can
have periods whereby only one rnne is sen t
fo r a few seconds. FEC can also be heard
on the marine bands and is use d for sen ding
weather informat ion and news bulletins to
ships at sea.
F igu re 1 is a print-out I copied several
months ago. I ' m tell ing you, RTTY
becomes a n exciting hobby when you snag
one lik e this! We'll see ya next month!

~

zczc

[I

•.3..\G l -88-" ! :7 : C1: X GF .:IN - 88-«::<:; I l
L~ W ENF0RCEMENT SUSPECT VSL LOO~OU T ON VSL T ON Y~
~ . EP[C L/ 0 CG88-1: a 6 f NOTAL I
8 . TECS . 8870:3456:.45MC CNOTAL>
QM ON 04t 288 DEA S/ A WIDENER, MIAMI FD, REQUE STED A 9 0 DAY ,
CATEGORY : SUSPECT VESSEL LOOKOUT ON :
SUPJ DESC~P : TONYA
S UBJ TYPE : B TECS
TECS dB - VESSEL ENTRY :
ARME D .:.IND DANGEROUS : N
NON-COMMER·CJAL
NAM E : TONYA
HOMEPORT-C ITY : COA TZACOALCOS CNTRY: MX
ACCESS CODE: Q
STATUS : S J
CG 08 / VSL /SEUS
AL IASES : OPS OFO 1:.4/VSL : ::
RE MARf .S : DEA INFO IN DI CAT ES VSL MAY SMUGGLE COCAINE I NTO SELIS .
CATE GORY : LO EX PS 0 51 288 . PLS CON TACT EP IC UPON S I GHT I NG OR WITH
ADDTNL I NFO FTS 8-654-61:3 / COMM 9 23 TERAYPPPM
LOOI .OUT LVL : W
VESSEL DATA :
DESCRP -TYPE : GEN CARGO
LENGTH: QYR
BEAM : WY
YEAR: 197 4
MI SC NBRS : CGBB - 0 ::85
TYPE : LE
0 5 1:88
TYPE : XX
: . NOT J<=ICAT ;ON: SUGGES T USCG DIST UN i TS NOT I F Y OP COMMANDER :
REOUEST DIST COMMANDERS NO TI FY EP IC F TS : IA570-6000/COMM 9t55 22-6 t ::: AUTOVON : 4 576 3777 .
EM TH I S LOO~OUT I S DEACTIVA TE ON 051:88 .
LM S MTTH , DU TY WATCH COMMENDER
EPIC - 0095 1
BT
11 :87'.:
NNNN
I NT QSL IZ XX f<Vf<

Fig. 1

(Text edited for p11blicatio11)

MONITORING TIMES

Octo ber 1988

47

satellite tv -

Ken Reitz

adventures in the Clarke belt .

Route 5, Box I 56/1
Louisa, VA 23093

The World of S C P C
Since the beginning of commercial radios in
the 1920s, network headquarters have "fed"
their affiliates via a system of lelcrhone lines.
This lumbering dinosau r (and smart source of
revenue fo r Ma 13cll) was "state of the art" fo r
over 50 years. Then came the satellite. Geosynchronous orbit communications satellites were
to the future of network radio what the atom
bomb was to global warfa re.
13cfore sa tellite distribution, radio networks
had been asked to make do with a very
unsat isfactory set of orerating parameters.
Limited affiliate access meant la nd lines had to
reach from roin t A to point B. Low fidelity
audio was unfit for music transmission.
Hamstrung phone companies often were
unable to provide extra li nes or mobilize quick
enough for a fast-breaking news sit uatio n. And
finally, there were the ever-increasing rates
which monorolies find so dear.
All the bonds that kert broadcast networks
hobb ling along unde r 1920s technology were
pulverized in the hi-tech explosion oft he 1970s.
Satellite delivered network broadcasting
answers to all of the above problems. The only
question left was which of the ava ilable technologies would best serve network needs.

What in the world is SCPC?

ulated/Single Cha nnel Per Carrier (FM/
SCPC).
Incidentally, FM/SCPC evenlllally beat out
the original SCPC which was Single Sideband/Single Channel Per Carrier (SSB/
SCPC). Also, to get a stereo signal up on the
bird, a service simrly uplinks the left channel
on oneSCPC transmitter and the right channel
on the other.

Foreign News on Satellite
Scfvice

Satcllitc{T~

Time (EDT)

RAI

Saleem F2. 20
Weststar W4, 24
Galaxy G2, 11
Anlk 01, 20

1:45/p.m.
1:00/p.m.
4:30/p.m.
9:00/ p.m.

BBC

ITN
CBC

Note: The above are regularly scheduled but many
others Including newscasts from France and other
capitals of Europe can crop up just about anywllere.
Homebrew FM/SCPC
The best bets are for G2, 11 : F2, 21 and 24. Spanish
The home TYRO cxrcrimentcr will language newscasts can be found on W4, 18; S1, 16;
G1, 6; and G1, 20.
encounter a problem right away in trying to '---- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - '
tune SCPC signals. First, you r receiver is TV band radio.
designed to lock on to a video carrier in order to
tune the audio subcarriers. But SCPC has no The SCPC Receiver
video carrier present and, anyway, SCPC sigThere arc basically three 1ypes of radios to
nals aren't in the audio subcarrier band. How use as SCPC receivers:
can you tune them? It's actually rretty simrle.
IIJ A rrogrammable scanner carable of
Satellite signals hit you r dish in the 4 GHz tuning to 20 MHz on eit her side of the IF (usuband and arc converted clown into a usable ally 70 MHz, though there arc nonst andn rd IF
intermediate frequ ency (IF) via a clowncon- frequencies used by some TVRO receiver
vcrter. In older units, the signal from the low manufacturers) or capable of tuning the 950noise amplifier (LNA) passes to a separate 1450 MHz direct from the downconvcrtcr.
clownconvcrter which has an IF ou tput of 70 Advantages here arc precise quart z synthcMHz which goes to you r receive r to be tuned. sized tuning with digital read-out for reference.
In newer systems the sigrrnl from the low The big disadvantage is price. Expect to ray as
noise block downconverter (LNB) sends a set much for you r SCPC receiver as you did for
of frequencies from, typically, 950-1450 MHz to your entire TVRO system: $400 to $1200. 13ut
the receiver to be tuned. On the back of these watch out! Your satellite system may induce an
receivers is a 70 MHz second IF loop which you irritating and irradicable hum in the SCPC
can tune for SCPC signals.
aud io.
Study the accompanying block diagrams to
~The TV ba nd radio which tunes T V chanfind out which method for tuningSCPC is best, ncls 2_6. Advantage: price. Most discount
given your receiver and downconvcrtcr co nstorcs sell them cheap ( Radio Shack's
figuration.
Portavision 40 sells for S39.95). Disadvantages:
You'll notice that in each of the illustrations Sloppy analog tuning. You'll never know where
a TV band radio or programmable scanner is you ?re without a digital frequency display and
actually doing the tuning. Note, too, th at unless narrowband SCPC signa ls ofte n need very fi ne
you are using a second 70 MHz IF loop configu.
adjustments in tuning separate signals.
rat ion the splitters illustrated should have a DC Another disadvnntage is that the TV band
block on one leg so that the DC power to the tuner cuts off the lower portion of the SCPC
downconvertcr won't end up in your scanner or freqlicncy band.

In domestic satellites which have video, the
audio rortion of the program is uplinked simultancously on a subcarrier of the video. Dut what
if a serv ice, say, National Public Radio, has no
vidco to uplink with the audio? Well, they could
rnkc ove rt he rest of t he audio subcarricr band.
Yes, but the folks who do the uplink ing
(called common carriers) want a rrcmium price
for those frequencies and anyway, NPR needs
more frequencies than are available on one
trnnspondcr's aud io subcarrie r ba nd. T hey
would have to be on severa l transponders and
thm would complicate things for each affiliate.
On top of that, everything sent ur on that
transrondcr has to be sent via that .---------------------------~
one common carrier which might be
-.:-v ~..., 0 ,....1>'<:>
located in Sinkhole, MO, ,vhich isn't
s(....:~Nli1'..
very convenient 10 1heir downtown
l>ll>o '-.. ] cow~""""•«<sR
Washington studios.
y
7ow.....
T\IRO "'-E<.E\'IER.
What if NPR could uplink its own
FM carrier from its own facilities on a
e.""11>~-o
ransrondcr, say num be r 3, on a sat cl~c...:-.:l,.,."°"-(1o"'"t.loo?")
'
~-,o-\4\~0~"\t...
_
lite th at wasn't already J·ammcd with
~RO ~''VG.11:.
video, say Wcststar 4? They could use
a very narrow band carrier and put
lots of separate feeds on one transponder. In fact, some of the bigger
;1ffiliatcs cou ld urlink their own carrier and th e network cou ld be interactive. Network act ivities could come
and go and all be indcrendent of each
other. \Veil , that's Frequency Mod-

1

48

I.NB)}

October 1988

BTV

MONITORING TIMES

~

3 A hybrid T V band radio. This
unit is the sarnc as #2 cxccpc it's been
modified to accert 75 ohm "F" conncctors directly <ind its tuning lrns
been spread to catch that lower part
of the band that was missing. Disaclvantages:
the same bogus ana log
.
.
tu111ng 1s at work here but the rrice is
right (about $90 ·00 ).

Bugs In Your SCPC
There are more than a few rroblcms which can plague you while you
set up for SCPC. Herc are a few:
IIJ That hum mentioned earlier. No
matter what you use as an SCPC

A D V A N C E D

receiver, you may get the hum. I t will be all over the band a nd it will prevent you from enjoying any SCPC reception. Some satellite receivers
appear to be worse offenders tha n ot he rs. Unidcn and Drake models
(wit h 70 MHz loop) will work well without any hum.
~ Drift ing away. I n earlier days the low ticket home dish
downconvc rtcrs, when applied t o
reception, would drifr wildly
cnusing the listener t o constantly adj ust the tuning t o keep listening.
Newer high grade LNBs arc much less prone to drifting. Keeping your
downcon\'erter on 24 hours/day helps keep it stable, too. If your system
produces clear
signals but exhibits a lot of drift, try a better grade
(lower noise temperature) LNB. Your video will look better, too!
Right away when you first tune in SCPC signals you'll notice somcthino missino about the audio. The reason is that your scanner or T V
band radio i~ not designed for high fideli ty output and that the original
SCPC has been comp ressed at the uplink by a 2:1 or3:1 rat io. A commercial receiver will have an expansion circuit th rough which the signal will
pa ss a nd be restored to its original state.
This "compandi ng" is clone to conserve bandwidth on the transp o nde~ ,
while not sacrificing fidelity. Unfortunate ly, t he home TYRO cxp:nmemcr will have to sacrifice fi delity. It is possible to simulate expans10n
by routing t he audio from your SCPC receiver to a graphic e~ualizcr and
thence t o a stereo amplifie r. Turn the stereo simulat o r switch on and
your audio will he very listenablc.
Next month I' ll roam the Cla rke belt wit h you and point out the best
places to tune in t his lesser known aspect of satellite TV.
Right now it's ...

-SEEKER.:m

sere

sere

QI

BACK TO BASICS

-SEEKER- tm The complete system which makes
your Commodore computer a nd ICOM R-71 a
sophisticated monitoring station. EASY to use ...
UNEQUALED in performance.
A FEW OF SEEKER 'stm FEATURES:
NEW "VCR -like" program
recording. You choose day,
time ancffrequencies.

INSTANTLY DISPLAYS
broadcaster time and frequency schedules.

UNATTENDED recorder control In six scanning modes.

ADVANCED FEATURES explained in our FREE literature.

STORES, DESCRIBES ,
PRINTS , and SCANS
hundreds of frequencies.

SELECTS the strongest signal from multiple alternate frequencies.

Send for FREE
brochure or include
$15 (refunded on
P.Urchase) for demo
i:lisk and Owner's
Manuals, to ...

Post Office Box 9145-G

AF SYSTEMS

Waukegan, llllnols 60079-9145

United States of America
Last month I gave a brief overview of a typica l TVRO system whi ch
included the dish, mount, actuator, and feedh o rn electronics. From that ' - - - -- -- -- -- - - - - - - -- -- - - - - -- point we begin this month's "13asics" wit h a look ar the cable which brings
t he signa l into th e house and carries receiver-issued comma nds to the The Heat Monster
Polarotor moto r and actuat o r.
T here arc, however, some drawbacks. One of the biggest problems
comes from all those heat-producing power supplies getting jammed
Cables
together in one cabinet. Add this design t o the fact that TVRO owners
In past years, deale rs had to bury PVC pipe in the ground between the like to stack receivers o n T Vs with VC Rs o r stick t hem a ll in a nice tighthouse and the dish to feed the various cables. T od ay, top quality dircct- fitt ing entertainment center a nd you have perfect conditions for thermal
burial cable makes this a less d reary job. Such cable usually comes in 100 overload and breakdown. What you don't want is the VCII module to
foot lc nnt hs wit h all connectors attached a nd is packed to be sold with break down forcing you to send your entire receiver away for several
the receiver. Good cable is critical so d o n't use fl ea-market specials and weeks.
don't rummage t hrough your junk box to patch together feedline. Buy
Buy a receiver without t he VCII module, as fi rst generation I RDs may
th e rea l th ing and be happy.
have more problems than the original stand-alone VCI I. If t hat breaks
down you'll still have a satellit e rece iver to watch the unscrambled chanThe Receiver
ne ls while your descrambler is being repa ired.
This is where you can lose your sensibility. Receivers range from the
Make sure your receiver is Ku compat ible. With t he proper fccdhorn
functional and modest to the electronically glitzy and downright a nd additional Ku LNB you'll be all set for the future. Avoid receivers
immodest . The trend in receivers is toward consolidation. In the bcgin- wit h remote controls that can't perform all the fu nctions on the front
nina one bouaht a receiver which tu ned the 24 transponders by a click
panel of this receiver. 13ig hand-held remote controls are less of a nuisto;·rotary kn~b in the front panel. There would be a switch to cha nge
sance than inadequate RCs. Hope to find a receiver that's "user friend ly,"
polarity, a swit ch to change fr o m 6.8 MHz to 6.2 audio (both were mono)
easi ly progra mmed and without a bewildering contro l panel.
and a power swit ch. That was it! No LEDs, no LCD display panels, no I R
And, fin ally, d on't believe everyt hing you hear from dealers or read in
remote control, ste reo (o r vi rtually a nyt hing else we now take fo r
TVRO magazines (including this <lrticlc). The more sources of informagranted). Late r if you got tired of a ha nd crank to move the dish, you
t io n you ca n muster the less you'll regret your system purchase.
could add o n an actuator.
The actuator co nt rol and power su pply had t heir own ho using and SCPC Notes
wou ld sit next to th e receiver. St ill later, if you want ed stereo you could
Heil Lid. sells a converted TV band radio which works very nicely for SCPC recep·
add on a stereo processor with its own controls which would sit next to
tlon. They also have more information on the subjecl as well as new and used sal ellile
the receiver. Eve n lat er with t he advent of scra mbling you would need a TV sysl em s al very reasonable prices for dO·il-yourselfers. Wril e them al: Heil, Lid.. 112
VidcoCiphcr II which (you guessed it) would sit next to the receiver. Th is Heil Drive. Marissa. IL 62257.
The World Satellite Almanac has a very thorough l1sling of all lransponders wllh
got to be quite an assemblage, not to ment ion a wiring nightmare.
SCPC channels. Be sure to get the latest edition. Write: MLE. Inc.. P.O. Box 159.
Receiver manufa cturers decided it would be best to combine the Winier
Beach, FL 3297 1.
whole mess into one IR or UHF controlled unit. They ca lled it the I RD
(integrated rece iver decoder) a nd it 's a pretty good idea. There's less
clu tter a round and it 's a ll controlled fr om one ha nd held re mote control.
MONITORING T IMES

October 1988

domestic broadcasting

Paul Swearingen
3132 SE J111i11g/iam

Topeka, KS 66605

Summer Wrap-up
Summer E -ski p for FM and especially
T V DXers t his season seems to h ave bee n
bette r than du ring several past seasons.
Ch ris Hu lse, of Eugene, Oregon, wrote to
say that he received KTVK-3 Phoenix,
KOTA-3 Rap id City, KEYT-3 Sa nta
Ba rbara, and others, including some in
Spanish, this past summer. He wondered if
folks at the other end of the skip pauern
were also receiving DX: "Do the folks in
Mexico get Oregon DX, for instance?"
That's qui te possible, Ch ris, and it has
happened several times before. DXers in
one club, WTFDA, compare loggings in
t heir mon th ly bu lleti n, and q u it e often they
log reciprocal DX from opposite ends of an
E-skip path. This could indicate p redictable
atmosphe ric conditions along the bounce
path .

No Known Cause
should reiterate that no one has
definitely discove red the exact cause of Eskip reflections of low band VHF TV signa ls and FM signals, but I've found that
quite often a lnrge, active weather system
can hera ld possible E-skip conditions and
signa ls from t he opposite side of the system.
For example, I logged KREM-2 from
Spokane one night at 9 p.m. When 1
checked The Weather Channel on cable, I
found that there was a large, sca tte red
weather system over the Rockies.
I also pulled in stations from Salt Lake
City and Las Vegas that evening. T he next
afternoon, conditions seemed to be shifting
to t he south, as I picked up KNAZ-2 from
Flagstaff and KVOA-4 from T ucso n. A
directional anten na usually helps only in
nulli ng out unwan ted signals, by the way,
bu t I'm lucky in hav ing only weak s ignals t o
contend with on channels 2 a nd 3 in
Topeka.
In the morning on the twenty-seven th , I
managed to bag CBFT-2 Mont rea l, which
conveniently had linkup problems and aired
a test pattern for several minutes. But by
afternoon, with thunderstorms over New
Mexico and Texas, the western stations
were rolling in and KUTV-2 a nd KTVX-4
Salt Lake City were mine for the taking. At
4 p.m. XEW-2 Mexico City popped in. All
were photographed, with a lea f-shu tter
ra ngefinder camera, at 1/30th, f/11, at
about three fee t, on 400 ISO black-a ndwhite film.

so

October 1988

TV and FM DX Still Possible

Loma Road, Grass Valley, California
95945, an d te ll C huck that you saw it in

Although E -skip conditions seem to
peak during the early summer months when
thunderstorms are most active, don't stop
checki ng channel 2 just because the weathe r
is getting cooler. Spectacular E-skip and
tropo conditions (for UHF channels) can
prevail any time of the year, with a secondary peak coming in December.

Mo11i101i11g Times.

And the 1986 Thanksgiving week tropo
opening across the northern U.S. is now
legendary. So include a sweep of TV channe ls in your DXing act iviti es d uri ng the fall
a nd winter ahead.

Tuning the Soviet FM Bands
Duncan R.L. Hawk inns, G8KN F, of
M ilton Keynes, E ngland, was ki nd e nough
to forward the address of a manufacturer
who might be able to supply equipment for
the Finn ish DXer who earlier wrote to say
th at he was attempting to DX the USSR
FM ba nds. He n oted that the 4M amateur
band which has opened up to V H F (non Morse) amateurs has increased the availabi lity of antennas in the UK.
Keynes suggests Sa ndpi per Comm u nications, Pentwyn House, Penya rd, Llwydcoed,
Abe rda re, Mid-Glam, CF44 OTU, United
Kingdom. Duncan a lso ment ioned that
packet rad io has really taken off in the U K,
using the UOSAT Oscar gateway, plus
144.650 as a principle frequency in/out.
Duncan's not doing too bad at AM
DXi ng, either. On AM he is able to pick up
CJ YQ St. Johns, Newfoundland, WYDE
Bi rmingham, Alabama, WZAP Boston, and
WBIX J acksonville, F lorida at his QTH.
Tha nks for yo ur s uggestions, Du nca n!

Crystal Radio Kits
At last , someone is now manufacturing
qua li ty crystal rad io kits. Chuck Graham,
K6KDZ, who is stationed at McClellan
AFB in Californ ia had built homcbrew
crystal sets and restored antique radios for
35 years and decided that a ready source of
kits was needed. After a sea rch for quality
components he is offering two kits, one an
inexpensive kit using newer components,
and a second kit, using more au the ntic components, such as a fancier wood b ase, brass
hardware, and a ca t wh isker-type detector.
For more information, watch for his ads
or write to Regeneration Radio Co., Casa
MONITORING TIMES

Loop Contest
I didn't receive a s ma ny p lans fo r loop
an tennas as I had hoped -- alth ough Ken
Kuzenski, whose request for loop plans
sparked the contest , wrote to say that he
had completed a loop of his own but was
t oo busy with graduation from LSU, getting
married, and moving to North C a rolina to
spend much time on DX or drawing up
p lans. Gosh, why not, hi ?! But t he winner
p rovided perhaps the simplest and easiest
loop plan that I've seen ... so simple that I
really don't need to provide a diagram.
And the winne r.. . Martin Blaise of
H ouston, Texas. Marty testified that it
especially helps him with his weak
daytimers on his DX-440 and helps him pull
in great country and western music at night
on stations wit h which he had problems
before.

Simple Plan
Marty's loop is essentially a 50-foot
piece of stranded, insulated wire which he 's
mounted on his wall with push-pins (I'd
suggest #22 o r #18 wire), mak ing it easy to
move and change from an omnidirectional
(runn ing aroun d the room under the
ceiling) or directional (mounted on one
wall).

If he wanted to null ou t a certain station, he would erect the antenna broadside
to the signal, and for a deeper null he
would add more turns of wire. He runs each
end of the wire to 58 A/U foam coax, which
is attached to an adapter runni ng into the
DX-440 antenna j ack.
The total cost was Sl6 or so, and Marty
gives credit to Madison Electronics for
helping him with the project a nd for suggestions. Your NRC Log Book will be in
the mail, Marty, and congrats for taking the
time to sit down and describe you r project.

AM: Looking Up
A satellite hookup between two 50 kW
AM stations may be the sta rt of a technique
which could effect a turnaround in
declini ng AM rad io listene rship. D ave
Nemo's "Road Gang Show," heard on
WWL-870 from midnight to 5 a.m., has
been targeted to truckers. When WWL

Sophisticated Monitoring Equipment From Universal
D Universal M-7000 Multi-Mode Converter

~~~~~IJ~~tl~~?~~tI~~J@~1t~~:~;l~: In1~~1nTfI
No computer required. 115/230

VAC

Universal M-7000 Introductory
·Standard M-7000 ······························
· With Real Time Clock Option ..........
·With Video FAX Option ..................
· With Clock & Video FAX Option ....
Shipping/I landling (USA) ................

50/60

Pricing:
S 999.oo
SI 059.00
SI 089.00
SI 129.00
S 11.00

11z .

+ Ylorsc Code
Too many features to list + Bau<lot R'ITY
here! Please write for full + Variabl~ Uaudot
+ Bit Inverted Baudot
M-7000 information.
Prices and specifications +ASCII Lo/Iii/Var
+ Sitor Mode A & B
arc subject to change.
+ ARQ 2&4 (TD'.\1)

D Info-Tech M-800 FAX Unit
111e Info-Tech M- 800 is the affordable solution for listeners desiring hi gh resolution
facsimile. This compact device converts
audio from your shortwave or satellite rece iver and prints it lo your compatible dot

+ VFT Modes (FD~1)
+ Packet AX.25
+ f-AX AM/f-M
+Russian 3S Cyrill ic
+ Literal Mode
+ Databit '.\1ode
+ Low & High Tone

+ Diversity Reception
+ Automatic Tuning
+ Video+l'rint Squelch
+MS!, UOS, ATC
+ Self Diagnostics
+ Remote Tem1inal
+ User Prgm. Sci-Cats

· FULL CATALOG AVAILABLE ·
Universal offers a big shonwavc catalog covering all types of sw cquipmcm including receivers, antennas , RTrY & FAX equipment plus
books and accessories. Send SI or 3 JRC's.

u~r~t;;~;tfi.&tii~~·'. ~

matrix printer. Handles all standard speeds i.-.N!IJl"ltll~---1!!'9..~~
and IOCs. Performs AM or FM detection, 1280 Aida Drive Dept. MT
positive, or negative, L-R o r R-L. Auto or P.•flll•ll"ll....lllllW!~"'lll~
Reynoldsburg, Ohio 43068
Manual. Now features logging line and opllSA·~.· . Phon~~ - 614 866-4267
Cration from 110 VAC 60 Hz or 12 voe.
.:::..·c:,_. FAX: ·· · · .61~ 866-2339
'li'}.{J'VI:.1/SAf. •• Servi119 !JVu{io 'Entfi.usia.sts Si11ce.1942
On sale on ly! $299.00 (+$7 UPS)

•-llillliliiilii•---------..iil

began to fade as their rigs moved out of the
station's reception area, they had to sea rch
for anothe r Country and Western show.
Now, however, KRVN-880 has broadcast
Ncmo's show across the western U .S., clear
to the coa st.
The signal is delayed a micro-second so
that the program is actually synchron ized
o n the stations, which are adjacent on the
dial. KR VN had been sign ing off at 11 p.m .
but was licen sed for full-lime operation.
I can sec all sorts of possible nationwide combos: How about KV00-1170
Tulsa and W.J.JD-1160 Chicago? KOMA1520 Oklahoma City and WCKY-1530
Cincinna ti ? WSM -650 and KTNN-660,
which would bla st the Grand 01' Opry clear
t o New Zeala nd o n a goo d night! Or WLS890 and WCBS-880, which could be the
seco nd half of a four-station linkup literally
blanketing the country, for special broadcasts, as suggested by KRVN's directo r of
engineering, Vern Killi o n.

FCC Interested
The FCC see ms to b e encouraging such
a patlern of "nationwide" stations, as it has
issued one prelimi nary plan in which
nati o nwide lice nses could be issued fo r one
of the new 1605- 1705 kHz channels, which
the
Internat iona l
Telecommu nications

Union proposed to be open as of July 1,
1990.
The ITU allocated even-numbered
channels through 1700 to the U.S. within
330 kilometers of the Canadi a n and
Mexican borders, at a restriction of l kW
with a quarter-wave antenna, and beyond
that distance up to 10 kW on all channels.
The FCC, which acknowledged that there
has been "considerable demand for broadcast facilities" in the new band, was asking
for comments as to whether or not the new
spectrum should be open to all on equal
term s or whether one or more channels
shou ld be reserved for certain types of
applicants, as well as whether or not TI S
stations cu rrently on 1610 kHz sho uld be
moved to 1700 kHz.

technical standards observed a nd d ocumen ted; and sha red-t ime operations
encouraged by licensing on ly the follo wing
progra mming: no rebroadcasting of programs already available loca lly, no audio
netwo rk affiliation pe rmitted, except for
t ranscribed programs, and no use of co mmercial pre- recorded music of over 60
seco nds in duration. Advertising would be
permiued, of course.
I th ink we'd see an immediate im p rovement in the quality of community progra mming as these stat io ns wou ld have to seek
o ut groups to provide local programs,
which could include anything from high
school sports to musica l events ro churches
to meetings to forums o n community problems. Anyone else agree with me?

Community Broadcasters
About three years ago I suggested that
p art of the band be turned over to com- ..-- - - - - - - - - - -- -- - - - - - ,
munity broadcaste rs on a temporary basis, We arc son)' to repon this will be Paul
with minimum standards enforced by both S1veari11ge11 's last m onth as editor of
local bodies and the F CC. I still feel that "Domestic Broaclcasring." Paul has been
local, community broadcasters shou Id pl ay with Mo11itoii11g Times since May 1984 when
a part in the new band.
he stmted 0111 as editor of rhe "Club Comer"
col11111n. Ile b,•cn111e editor of the AM Dxing
I wou ld aga in propose that one or more column ll'ith the introduction of the new
frequencies be turned over lo local broad- [(lb/oid fonnat in July 1986. Good luck and
casters with the following standards: 1 kW good DX, Paul.
max imum power, nondircctio nal ; minimum ' - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - '
MON ITORING TIMES

October 1988

51

outer limits

D r_ John Santosuosso
P.O. Box 1116

Highland City, FL 33846

The Voice of Tomorrow
North America's most controversial pirate
in recent years has been the Voice of
Tom orrow, which features wha t is essentially racist programming. La te breaking
news is that VOT hns rece ntly bee n heard
arou nd 1430 on a new freq uency, 15039.5.
We understand the re may also be some new
deve lopments in rega rd to t his sta tion in
the nea r fu t ure. 1f so, we will do our best to
kee p you up to ela te .

Angola

Numbers, Maybe?

We once pu blished a cla ndest in c telet ype
schedule in th is col umn. Recently we
rece ived a copy of one of these tra nsmissions from Fl orida' s J oc Pal kov ic. A portion
of it is reproduced here. What J oe monitored was a t ransmi ssion o f the Kwach a
News Press (KUP), wh ich is affiliated with
th e
anti-M a rxist
UN ITA movemen t:
UNlTA opposes the government of Angola.

J ohn Demmitt w rites to tell us t hat CNN
reported t ha t an American se rvicema n
informed Congress that USAF pla nes had
been used to transport drugs to the U.S.
fr om Central America. Appa rently the
matter first came to the attent ion of Congress as the resu lt of a decoded radio message sent to a C o ngressm an . The story a lso
appeared on a n NBC news feed but was not
used on NBC' s evening news. Interesting
and much food for speculati on!

Equatorial Guinea
R ecently we reported that the government
sta tion at tv1alabo on 6250 was to receive a
new tran smitte r from Pierce Co mmunicati ons. Hopefully that will resulL in power
increase a nd easier logging. We have now
been advised th a t Pierce will verify reception reports for anot her (but not Malabo)
Equatorial Guinea radio service. This is
R adio Africa, or wha t is sometimes called
the Internationa l Service o f Eq uatorial
Guinea.
R epo rt s can be sen t to Pierce I ntcrnationa l
Co mmunicat ions,
Inc.,
1020J
Torre
Avenue, Su ite 230, Cupertino, Ca lifornia
950J4. Retu rn p ostage wou ld be appreciated. If you want to clo it t he hard way, send
your report to R ad io Africa, P.O. Ilox 851,
Malabo, Equatorial Gu inea.
H owever, direct replies from Equato rial
Guinea fo r any of th e cou ntry's stati o ns arc
not very easy to obtain. The latest schedule
we have fo r Radio Africa is J 700 to 2200
UTC on 9553 kHz.

Joe reports that most days conditions are
not that good, but if you arc persistent you
may eventually get so me decent copy. Probably the best time to try would be at 2300 on
7310 kHz.

Before leaving the subject of encrypt e d
transmissions, we shou ld note a report
received from D ave White of Maine. H e
has been m onitoring 4624 kHz. He has
heard the German time and marine
weather station FZU on this frequen cy.
However, he also reports hearing a woman
announcer on 4624 at 0048 UTC with t he
I D "Victor Lima Bravo Two." T here was no
message othe r than the continuously
repeated ID.

Things We Would
Li ke to Know Department
As far as we do know, Albania is the only
cou ntry in the entire world which has
officially declared itself an a t heist state. So
why are broadcasts from Vatican R ad io in
th e Albanian la nguage a t 0330 and 1730 in
the clear while those in Ilul ga ri un a t 0315
and 1715 are j a mm e d?
If you want to hear for yo urse lf, the 03 15
and 0330 transmi ssions can easily be monitored on 6248 kH z. And if you have read
this far, you kn ow tha t the "Outer Limits"
covers anything we think may interest you,
not just pirates and clan dest in cs!

"Now verifying"--Radio Africa via Pierce Communications. (Right) A clandestine teletype from Kwacha
News Press.

o-:._~

Meanwhile KKN39, the a ll eged Sta te
Department sta tion, has ended its mysterio us round-the-clock CW trans missions
on 4956.

Th e Great Cuban-American
Radio War
It continues. R ecent ly on severa l night s
C ub a has had speci a l extended broadcasts
o f its R ad io Taino (Tour Radio) service
ru nning as late as 1100 p.m. EDT. The

~r111r-r

.... U~GT
50
2 <0 R UOS ~SJ AGC - PGMCl E
ILlT-"l'Y Ol'E~ATICNS ><A S DI SCLOSED .
THE Cd SF-... TC H S..:.YS TH.!.T Ll..i iT~ FORCES .:.!TACKED MPL;.o~ GUOOH

BAT7.:.LI CN SIT~T E!:' B!:TWEEN t:'<t<(.,_ Ar<t> C.:.BEU. IN WHI CH S EVEN MPLo'\
SO l t• : ERS WE RE f.:ILLEC A'll! <.L T . GEDRC.E ANTM'<I G TA f:EN PRISON(~.
IN · S I E PROJ l"~E . MF'L<o FGRC E~ SC>NICNED BETWEEN LCJ-IG OTJ AN (•
M&.:.L '" CHICJ1E<D WEKE .:.TT<.C f:Et• .:.NC• E I GKT OF ITS SOU>IERS WERE KI L LE D.
! H THE $.AME f"',TTLE, Sl> ..... 4 ~ RIFL E i ANv E I GKT RPGB~ SHE lLS WE RE
~EIZE~.

ME....w11LE. It- ....,.. L<WGE P<;:J.'!NCE . - 2~ YE:AP - G:..t. MPL"' SGLD IE F
OEn::TEC· T( LNIT- FORcE~. kE TO:..C· OUF' (.()Rl< E$F'[)~[>EHT T~T HE
RECAPS
ED JN :oe:. TOl~~. HPU. F R(t• HI!. lL L AGE: It.: HUAMBC• .
NN.,';-. C'!..1 0;-.-se tUP NEW~ AGE't.JC Y .
HA~

RADIO AFRICA BROADCASTS EVERY DAY
TO 1 1:00 PM ON 9555 DIZ 31 METER BAND.

•oRc I BL )
~uP

FOR MORE INFORMJ\TION AND A PROGRAM SCHEDULE
PLEASE WRITE :
RADIO AFRICA
C/O PIERCE INTERNATIONhL COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
10 20 1 TORR£ AVE., S UITE 320
CUPE RTI NO, CALIFORNIA 95014 0 51.

52

October 1988

o~o~ee

w.:.:.

4 1 1,'88

SE;. F\EFLt$AL 14~ J •.JLi..E:t1 • • • OC£ • . . LMST ,
;... w~ .. ~1 ~(1 .., : ;;.. OHF\EE-M(r..:T ... -C·L ( E..:.eY - GIR!.. ~VE: PEEN klLL[(1 MNO
j)-,(Ji; E. 1C\ t...'L( S£: :::::, AT n;:: t·JE::'. t.f:M(
u . . S.:.Pu...;. AP.E .... ~lTU.::,.T ( (J

E("7WE£11

~c-~.::,c1 -""'~· ~=- 1.

:1 J

1... u£· ~

- CAPIT;:.L OF° MCtt. LE:' PPC!..' I NCE. .

(°1"'1L(· r1JC:. T"'""7 ~ ~"' l:• Et .l)Fi£~> .:.s.
~;r: L• RN1f E 111 -~ BSI l;PE., FWOBEi Ei!:"T
FJ(JfNC· THE ~"1( E!( "' CL E~,.. JCl"'I T H£ 'v' lCTJH J1,.1(JfTH FC.. J>.

u;-: ~ =

us : Ne. .

MONITORING T IM ES

~(1

Et((N

broadcasts attracted enough attention to make the front page of
the Miami Jlcrald and caused interference to several American
stations. l n addition to Tai no, some of the earlier broadcasts
featured programs from the R ad io Progreso Network.
High power transmiu e rs, capable of up to 500 kw we re used I t's
possible th a t for some broadcasts, the maximum power may have
been used. However, in keeping with past such broadcasts 200 to
300 kw seems more likely. As is typical, the frequencies of 1160 and
1040 med ium wave were used , but this time C uba a lso transmitted
on 830 kHz some evenings. The 830 transmissions were monitored
here in centra l Florida at local leve l and could be heard easily on
the smallest radios.
Demmitt, who has followed th e Cuban radi o situat ion closely for
quite some t ime, adds the following in formation. It appears th at
the State Department had reached so me sort of agreement with
the Cuba n govern m ent.
Cuba would be permitted one clear frequency (probably 1040) provided it did not relay any programming from the USSR (which it
has done on 1040). In re turn the United States would "to ne down"
Radio Marti, drop pla ns for a TV version of Radio Marti, and
crack down o n anti-Castro pirates operating in Florida. The highpower Cuban broadcasts were the resu lt of Cuban displ easure over
lack of action on the above agreemen t.

HOW DO YOU GET AJOB
WITHOUT EXPERIENCE?
AND HOW DO YOU GET
EXPERIENCE
WITHOUT AJOB?
Most young people have
one answer to this problem.
They avoid it until they' re out of
college. nut they could he getting solid work experi ence whi le
they're still in college. Wit h
your company's help. And ours.
We're Co-op Education. A
nationwide program that helps
college students get real jobs
for real pay. while they're gett ing
an edu<:ation.
But we can't do it without
you. Those real jobs have to

come from real companies.
Like yours.
for more informa tion on
how you can participate in
this valuable program, write
Co-op Education, Box 775E,
Bustou, MA O:ll 15.
Not only wi ll you be giving
stude11ts a chance to earn
money and pick up the most
valuable kind of knowledge,
you'll he givi11g yourselves
a chance to pick up the most
valuable kind of employee.

Co-op Education.
) (;u l:.JI II .t hllllll' wh...:11 } H\l l \l tl I ,, dq.~H.'l:

This writ er had also heard talk of possible government action
agai nst the pirates. However, if such pl ans ever did exist they
appear to have been dropped. M ea nwhile American broadcasters
have protested th e proposed TV version of Mart i, fearing Cuba
would retal iate with radio interference. They a lso claim the highallitude balloon which would be used to transm it the television
signal would be an aviation haza rd.
The Miami l/crald further reports that Cuban agen ts attempted to
compromise security at the Ameri ca n interests section in Habana .
Among other things, this led to an investigat ion by the Nat io nal
Security Agency. This in turn has fed spe cu lation that perhaps
communications or cryptologica l e'!'i\.iipment may have had to be
removed . And some people think radio only involves news, music,
sports, and weather!

Great Britain
A final item from John Demmitt states that an additional half
million pounds will be spent for equipment to monitor radio
pirates in Great Britain. Those caughc will not be able to secure
licenses when they are made ava ilable to the public in 1989. The
government claims it does not want the piraces to have an unfair
advantage in building up an audience before licenses are granted.
That's it for another month. Your comments, suggestions, and contributi o ns a re a lways welcome. All letters with a return address w ill
be acknowledged.

DON'T MAKE THEM
GUESS ... I

· ·i

TELL THEM YOU READ ABOUT IT
IN MONITORING TIMES

Advertisers want to know.

MONITORING T IMES

October 1988

53

belOW'

soo khz

Joe Woodlock
P.O. Box 98
NC 28902

Bmssro 1v11 ,

Finding a Voice
Beacons represent the vast majority of
transmissions in the low frequency a rea.
The number of interna t iona l broadcaste rs is
in t he dozens. Omega stations even less.
The re may be a couple of hundred coastal
stations using t he low frequen ci es, but o nly
a ha ndful can be heard at any one liste ning
post. On the other hand , the re are over
3,500 low frequency beacons in the Unit ed
Sta tes a nd Canada. Several hundred arc
wi thin ra nge of almost any receive r on the
North American continent.

Weather Stations
D ocs th is mean that one is fo rced into listen ing to code to hea r anyth ing in low fre que ncies? No! At least, not yet. Alt hough
t he numbers are dwind ling, there arc still
some voice weather stations ope rati ng
within t he range of almost everyone.
A few years back there were quit e a few
continuous T WEB (T ranscribed Weathe r
Broadcasts) beacons operati ng in t he U .S.
a nd bot h cont inuous and scheduled weathe r
broadcast beacons in Canada. All of these
operate wit h both a CW identifier and the
voice broadcasts on the same frequency.
One ca n hea r the voice detailing the
wea th e r with a somewha t fain t CW s igna l in
the background.
If th e CW sig na l is t oo fa in t, identificat io n
of t he beaco n has to be based on the fli ght
routes described. If the rou tes are in
Nevada and you are t uned to 254, it is probable t lrnt you are hearing SPK in Reno.
Today, you can sometimes identify it from
the freq uency, because there are fewer and
fewer freq uencies where two or more
T WEB statio ns operat e.

Declining Numbers
Th e number of U.S. weat her broadcasts has
decli ned sporadically and gradually in
recent years. The la test officia l notification
of elimi nated broadcasts includes Atla nta
(266/IlR), Wichi ta (332/ fC) and St . Louis
(338/LM). Canada, on the other hand,
made a majo r e limin ation about a year ago.
fn t he United States, only five beacons st ill
include wcat her transmi ssions and these are
conti nuou s broadcasts. There arc no longer
any schedu lcd wcat her broadcasts on Canadian beacons.

of voice from both countries. Try some of
these from your a rea and some of t hose
fu rt her away as well. T he ones marked with
an asterisk a re often reported from some
rat her good distances.
Even some of these may be gone by now.
Among those that may have dropped voice
broadcasts in recent months arc 254/ ILJ,
305/RO, 335/LUK, 350/RG, 379/GKQ
and 391/CM.
The fact that you don't hear the vo ice
doesn't necessarily mean th at it has been
dropped, however. Ch icago (350/ME) and
its Milwa ukee sa te lli te (242/GM) were off
the ai r fo r a coup le of weeks last winte r,
possibly test ing react ion to droppi ng the
broadcasts. Other beacons have a lso shut
down at t imcs, usu a lly for ma intenance or
repairs.

October 1988

194
206
218

230
236
242
245
248
251
254

266

Special Opportunity

305

Ma ny of the voice capabi lity beacons
operate al 200 to 400 watt powe r. When
voice is eliminated, they usually continue at
the same power for some ti me. But t hey are
sending only the CW ident ifier. This usua lly r.csuhs in t he CW signals bei ng heard
at much greater distances t ha n was the
voice.
Th e Florida beaco ns t ha t dropped voice
have been heard as CW signals in the
middle of t he country almost regula rly.
Even if the voice is gone, you may have a
better t han average chance to at least log
the identifier of these beacons.
You may have heard about future pl a ns to
expand t he broadcast b and frequencies to
above 1700 ki lohertz. This wou ldn't see m
to have anyth ing to do with the frequencies
below th e broadcast band. Ilu t it doc s. Fo r
many years there have be en aviation beaco ns operat ing in the 1600-1800 kHz frequencies. N ow they are being forced to
move.
One of the best known, or a t least most frequently reported, was RAD/1613 from
Rab inal, Guatema la. It h as moved to 313
kHz. When the beacon changed frequencies, t he ID was changed from RAB to
RNB . Now the ID has been changed aga in,
thi s time to RBN . If you used to hear RAB
on 1613, you can try for it as Rl3N on 313.
But it sure won't be as easy to log now.

326
332
335
338
34 1
344

350
353
359
362
365

371
375

379

382
391
394
400
413

TUK•

Nant ucket MA
Galveston TX
Red Lake ONT
BI
Bismarck ND
ILT
Albuquerque NM
SH
Shreveport LA
GNI"' Grand Isle LA
El Paso TX
EL
Milwau kee WI
GM
FS
Sioux Fa lls SD
WG"'
Winnepeg MAN
AM
Amarillo TX
ILJ
Springfield MO
SPK
Reno NV
Minneapolis !\IN
MS
Roswell NM
RO
Midland TX
MA
PQO
Phoenix AZ
YQK Kenora ONT
SQQ
Santa M onica CA
Cincinnati OH
LUK
P BT
Red Bluff CA
RYN Tu cson AZ
ORB
O rr MN
CL
Cleveland OH
FCH
Fresno CA
LNT
Mill inocket ME
YC
Calgary ALTA
ME
Chicago JL
RG
Okla homa City OK
JN
rmernat iona l Falls, MN
DO
Kansas Ci ty MO
EZB
Oakland CA
AA
F argo ND
Ft. Wort h TX
FT"'
TV
Traverse City MI
Great Falls MT
GT
OW
Tulsa OK
ELM* Elmira NY
Staunton VA
SH
Duluth MN
DL
GKQ
Newark NJ
LQ
Boston MA
MOG l\fontague CA
CM
Columbus OH
ENZ
Nogales AZ
CI
Saute Ste. Marie MI
YHD Dryden ONT

GLS•
RL

5!] ,__~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Figure 1 is a list ing of wha t is left in th e way
54

Fig. 1
Voice Transmissions
from Canada and U.S.

MONITORING TIMES

..

11!

EEB THE NATION'S #1 SWL SUPPLIER
ORDERS 800-368-3270

-

~1 ~1

~lf!!llil!IJ

EEB's all new 1989 SWL Catalog Is on Its way. Hopefully, you are on our mall llst and wlll receive a copy by 1
November, If you have not received your copy by 1 November, write or call for your "FREE" copy (In U.S.A.),
CANADA $1.00, all others $3.00 AIRMAIL.

t.

~
-

'
"-"

--

- ,. - r
........

.._/

. -.

R71A Thi s Is our best seller. !COM R71 A has all the
feature s one expects In a world cl ass receiver. A ll
mOde AM, SSB, CW, RTIY, FM (OPT). Complete COY·
erage .1 to 30 MHz. 3 Fiiier positions, direct keyboard
entry. 32 memory channels, PLL tuning In 10 Hz steps
for exact frequency. Many ICOM options plus EEB
high performance package. (CALL)
ICR71A $849.00 + St2UPS
R7000 There Is nothing to compare with the R7000
under $12,000. Thia ls the most sophisticated V/UHF .
receiver ever offered to the public. No wonder Its our
best selling V/UHF receiver. All mode AM, SSB, CW,
FMW, FMN - 25 to 2000 MHz (20 kHz to 2 GHz w/NOVEX FC7100), direct keyboard entry, 99 memory channels, lull scan, memory scan, program scan, priority
scan, many !COM options plus EEB options and high
performance package deal. (CALL)
ICR7000 $1019.00 + S12 UPS

.

.. ._.

...
, . ,.

···:..~

,,.

~;--

-

.

.

,.

.

The KENWOOD RSOOO Is the new high performance receiver from the leader In communications
technology. Designed with the highest performance
standards In mind, the KENWOOD R5000 will bring
you all the excitement of shortwave listening ! 150
kHz to 30 MHz. 100 memories. Keyboard ent ry. AM,
FM, USBILSB, CW, FSK. VHF 100.174 Opt VC20.
R5000 NEW LOWER PRICE $799.95 + StO UPS
The KENWOOD R2000 Is an Innovative all-mode receiver with a host of features to enhance the excitement o f listening to stations around the world. 150
kHz to 30 MHz. 10 memories. AM, FM, SSS, CW. VH F
118-174 MHz opt VC10.
R2000 $629.95 + $10 UPS
A hlgh-<:lasa, general
coverage receiver wllh
expandability looking to
the future. The NRD-525
will changeyourshack In·
to a new unlvarsel 0.09
MHz to 34 MHz. Pass band shift. 200 memories. Direct
keyboard entry. AM, FM, CW, SSB, RTIY, SSB. Notch
lllter. V/UHF converter option.
NR0525 S1179.00 + St2UPS
The Satellll a50 Inter·
national Is the ultimate In
German crafted portable
radios. Along with excellent audio performance
the Satelllt 650 also has
many fine features. 510 kHz to 29.999 MHz. 24 nour
clock/calendar. 3 Bandwidths. 60 Memories. AM, FM,
SSB, CW. Keyboard Entry. PLL Control. Nlcad Battery
Option.
Satelllt 650 $995 .00 + $12 UPS
The Satellll 400, with Its rounded comers and
smooth IInos Is the obvious "style leader" In personal
portables. Beautifully crafted, this portable covers all
shortwave bands plus MW and FM. It's unexcelled au·
dlo will surprise you I SW 1.612·30 MHz. LW, 148-353
kHz. FM 87.5-108 MHz. MW 513-1611 kHz. 24 Mem·
orles. Keyboard Entry. SW 1.612-30 MHz.
Satelllt 400 $399.95 + S6 UPS

-

EEB
-

YAESU now offers the
fin est receiver In the fa·
moua FAG series. The
FR08800 offers function·
allty and operating con·
venlence for the serious
shortwave listener. t 50 kHz to 29.999 MHz. Direct Keyboard entry. Dual Clocks/Timers. Wide/Narrow Fiiter.
12 Memories. AM, SSB, CW, FM. VHF 118-174 MHz
option.
FRG8800 $ 649.95 + $10 UPS
VHF/UHF General Cov·
erage
Receiver. The
YAESU FRG9e00 Is an all
mode scanning receiver
with many outstanding
features. Covers: 60-905
MHz. 100 Memories. Keyboard Entry. SSB, FM, AM.
FM/Wide & Narrow. 7 Digit Readout. Video option.
FRG9600 $529.95 + S6 UPS

... ~
ICF2010

ICF2003

ICFSW1S.

ICF2010 Is the market leader of portables, our best
selling portable. Full coverage.. 15 to 30 MHz, FM 76108 MHz, Air Band 116-138 MHz. AM, FM, CW, SSB.
Sync Detection. 32 Memories. Keyboard Entry. Many
Features.
· ICF2010$~9.95 + $6UPS
ICF2003 delivers most performance of all portables
In the mid-size class. .153-30 MHz. AW, CW, SSB. 76108 MHz FM. 10 Memories. Keyboard Entry. Paper·
back book size. Optional AC Adapter.
ICF2003 $259.95 + S4 UPS
ICFSW1S. The newest In miniaturization only 2 "4 • x
4'1a·. Tests show It as best of sub-<:ompact size, has
Its own case wllh, active antenna, world AC Power
Pack, head Phone, SWL Book, Travel with the "SYS·
TEM" or Just the Radio, Complete coverage to 30 MHz
FM 88-108. Keyboard Entry. LCD ReadouUClock.
They're going fast I
ICFSW1S $299.95 + S4 UPS
ICF7601. A late version of the famous 7600. AM·FM
Allmajorshortwavebands.ICF7061 $139.95 + S4UPS
ICF7700. 15 Memories. All SW Bands 90 thru 11 MT.
ICF7700 $239.95 + S4 UPS
Digital LCD freq/clock.
ICF4920. A favorite with the travelers. Shirt pocket
size. PW 2 AA.
ICF4920 $99.95 + S4 UPS

PANASONIC wi th/FREE STAND
RF860 Top of the line portable .155-30 MHz coverage. 38
Memories. Scan, Rotary Tuning. Direct Keyboard Entry.
Clock/Timer. Optional AC
Adapter.
RFB~ $249.95 + S4 UPS
RFB-40. Full coverage. AM, FM, SW. 27 Memories. Di·
rect Keyboard Entry. Auto scan, digital readout. Optional AC Adapter.
RFMO 1189.95 + S4 UPS
RF820. AM, FM, LW, SW Coverage. Double super het·
erodyne for Image relectlon. Ear phone and carrying
RFB20 $119.95 + S4 UPS
case Included.
RF810. Smallest non-digital. Shirt pocket size. 8
Bands - The Traveler's Friend. Optional AC Adapter.
RF810 $89.95 + S4 UPS
TOSHIBA RPF·11. 11 Bands.
AM, FM, 9 SW. One o f our
leading portables. Easy push
buttons for band select. Travel lock. "S" Meter. Optional
AC Adapter TAC85 $13.95.
RPF11 $89.95 + S4 UPS

---

Orders: 800-368-3270
· Equ1pmen
·
t Ban k
El ectromc
516A Mill SI. NE, Vienna, VA 22180

SANGEAN with/FREE STAND
ATS803A. So much HITECH In
one package, a super value. Cov- - - -....- .....
ers all SW Bands. Tunes .150-30
MHz + FM 88-108. 9 Memories
Auto Scan. Keyboard Entry.
Stereo w/Headset or Line output.
AC Adapter Included.
ATS803A S18U5 + S4 UPS
S0789. Slightly larger than SONY ICF4920 same COV·
erage plus stereo w/headset. Power 3AA.
S0789 $69.95 + S4 UPS
DIPLOMAT 4950. SAME AS SG789.
CLOSE OUT $49.95 + S4 UPS
MS101. All new mini set similar to Panasonic RFB10.
9 Band, AM, FM, 7SW, Band spread for easy tuning,
stereo w/headset, 3 AA. Optional AC Adapter.
MS101 $79.95 + S4 UPS
MS103. Same as MS101 , 9 SW Bands.
MS103199.95 + S4 UPS

02999. Excellent per·
former, great sound (2
SPK) and other HITECH
features make this a
value packed radio . .146·
26.1 MHz FM 88-108. Kay·
board entry. 16 Memories. Multl·mode AM, CW, SSB,
FM, Scan. 12124 Hour clock. Loads more.
02999 $299.95 + S8 UPS
. 02935. Rated best value
In a portable (IBS). Covers
alt SW Banda.. 148-26.1
MHz. 9 Memories. AM,
FM, CW, SSB. Keyboard Entry.
02935 $179.95 + S5 UPS
01 835. This unit Is one of the finest In It' s class. 9 SW
Bands. AM, FM, LW. Slide controls. Carrying pouch.
01635 $79.95 + S4 UPS

ANTENNAS
DATONO AD370. HF .1-30 MHz outdoor active, rated
•1 by IBS Test labs. Dlpolewhlps cancel some manmade noise.
AD370 $129.95 + S4 UPS
SONY AN1. HF . t-30 MHz outdoor active. Our • t
Seller lor3 years. Antenna hardware control box 40 ft .
cable.
AN1 $79.95 + S6 UPS
EAVESDROPPER. Outdoor passive trapped dipole. 9
SW Bands. 43 It. long. 100 It. lead. Everything you
need.
SWL $59.95 + S4 UPS
SWLC. Same as above, you furnish coax cable. 25 •·
S10,50'·S16, 100 '-S26 +
SWLCS59.95 + S4UPS
EAVESDROPPER SLOPER. Rated among the best by
IBS..5-1.6 best. AM, DX, 2·26 MHz SW. You provide
coax as above.
SWLS $49.95 + S4 UPS
ALPHADELTASLOPER
DXSWLS89.95 +SS UPS
TPA. Indoor/Active ..2-30 MHz up to 20 DB Ge.In. PreSelector can reduce Interference. 9VDC Optional AC
Adapter.
TPA $74.95
MFJ1024. Indoor/Active. Many features same as
above. 9VDC Optional AC Adapter. MFJ102A $79.95

NOVEX NEW PRODUCTS
CRIS 6000. Computer Radio Interface System. The ul·
tlmate HITECH computer (IBM PC) system for con·
trol, logging, scanning, spectrum analysis. Using
m ost current radio s. Free CRIS Newsletter(CALL).
CRIS R7000 $349.95 + S6 UPS
SOU eooo. Spectrum Display Unit. Perfect mate to
ICOM R7000. 10 MHz sweep allows you to see up &
down the band for activity on a 3 Inch CRT. Free SOU
Flyer (CALL).
SDU8000 $595.00 + S8 UPS
RACKMOUNT. Novex RM Serles Rackmount hard·
ware for most popular radios ICOM, KENWOOD,
YAESU receivers and t ransceivers.
RM1100$79.95 + S5UPS

Local & tech info
103.935.3350
1Just m1nutoslrom Washlngton.oc1

consumer electronics

Jock Elliott
P.O. Box 98
NC 28902

Brass/011111,

Can't Remember?

•••

Buy a Memory!

Granted, th is is not as slick as a fully in tegrated computer database
that might also be used to co nt rol your rig, but the pocket data
bank costs only $79.95. If you want to know more, ask your local
Radio Shack store .

Another nifty idea
It happens inevit ab ly to anyone who has a C B radio in t he car:
you're d rivi ng along, chatting with someone, and as you turn a
corner, you find that you have wrapped the microphone cord
around the steering co lumn . A m inor ann oyance, to be su re , but
one tha t has b een e lim inated forever by the folks a t Cobra .
Cobra's new M ode l 33 PLUS CB radio features a co rdless in frared
micropho ne. The mike sits in a recha rging cradle until you p ick it
up. Then just push-to-ta lk as yo u normally wou ld . The cordless
microphone has a line-of-sight range of ab o ut six feet. L ook Ma,
no cord!
There is provis io n for a trad iti o na l, co rded microphone, but why
b other?

Whatzamattcr? Y ou r favorite DX receiver has no memories? You
love your Drake R -7, Kenwo od R-1000, Sony 6800W, whathavcyou,
but it has no capacity to recall frequenc ie s·> Is that you r problem,
bu nkie ?

The 40-channcl, AM-only, Model 33 PLUS includes a three color
bar-grap h signal st rengt h meter, up/down elect ro nic tuni ng, a nd a
channel 9 pushbutt on. For those of you who normally operate in
the noisy cab of a van, pick- up, or 18-whcclcr, the Model 33 PLUS
is capable of cranking out seven wa t ts o f audio. Suggested retail is
5239.95, and for more info, contact Cobra Consumer E lectronics
Group, 6500 West Cortland St ., Chicago, I llinois 60635, or call 312889-8870.

Well, th ere's hope a t last , without having to resort to a large,
expen sive, and o ft e n electrically noisy personal compute r. Ra di o
Shack has j ust issued it s new cata log to the press, and in it there is
a gadget that just might help.
Called the "D igi tal Appo intment Calendar/Data Bank" (stock
numb er EC-3 L9, ca talog nu mbcr 65-932), it is an electronic not ebook, calend ar, a nd ca lculato r capable of storing more than 32,000
chara cters. C losed up, th e pocket data bank measures 3" x 5" x
5/8". Open it up, a nd you'll se c an a lpha keyboard, a calcu lator
keypad, a nd an LCD screen capab le of disp laying six lines.
Powered by long-life lith ium batteries, this pocket secretary will
store up to 1100 appo intme nts anytim e fr om now until the yea r
2099. It will a lso store a nd ret rieve t he names, addresses, an d
phon e num bers of up to 1500 of yo ur closest friends. In additi on,
th e re is room for up to 1500 brief memos for quick reca ll.
"Swell," you say, "but wha t doc s t his have to do with my venerable
Drake R- 7'?
The answer is: everythi ng! You could use this pocket memory bank
to store and recall you r favorite frequencies a t the touch of a
bu tto n, to keep tra ck of which stations you have QSLcd and when,
to create a ti ckler file that prods yo u to send out confirmation
rem inder le tt ers, and tll keep track of all those key names and
addresses that you have accumulated over t he years .

56

October 1988

Quick, Watson,
A Trend is Afoot!
There is a t rend afoot of which I heartily approve: more a nd more
manufacturers are a nnouncing CB radios with built-in weat her
rad ios.
NOAA's weather stations in the 162 MHz FM band arc one of
life's g reatly un de rrated pleasures. T hey offe r all weather, all the
tim e, without commercials, straight from the horse's mou th -- the
National Weather Service. T he information they provide is tremcn-

MONITORING TI MES

dously useful. Somet imes it is even entertaining. The wea ther stations near the ocean offer a wealth of nautical-type information
t hat you won't get from the st;it ions inland. In my hou se hold, we
a lways mak e sure a we at her ra dio is availa ble, on the road or at
ho me.
CB m anu fuctu rers have now recog nized th e value of weather
radios an d nre building th e capability to receive NOAA weath e r
station s into 40 cha nnel AM t ransceive rs. Uniden offers the PC43
Marine CI3 with weather capnbility, Cobra has the Model 31 PLUS
mob ile with built-in weather, a nd now two other makers have
entered the fra y.
Midland
recently
an nounced
th e
Model
77-162,
a
mobile
40-channc l
AM CB with all three
weather
channels,
in stant
access
to
channels 9 and 19,
and a mylar speaker - making it, in the
words of the Midland
handout,
"suit ab le
for marine and offroacl use." Suggested retail price of the Model 77-162 is S2l9.95.
For a dditiLrn a l informat ion, contact Midland Internati ona l, Consumer Communicat ions Division, 1690 North Topping, Kansas
Ci ty, Missouri 64 l 20 .
Radio S hnck has com e up with a new and interesting wrink le in the
CB/wcnt hcr rnclio ga me. With the new catalog, Radio S hack is
introdu cing a 40- ch:rnncl emergency radio that inclu des the three
weath e r channe ls , a snap- o n buttery pack (8 AA batt e ries), a magnet ic m ount a nt e nna, and a cigarette lig hter plug-in. The whole
works stores in u pla st ic cnsc yo u can sl ide under the scat or stick in
the tru nk. Altho ug h I haven't held this radio in my hands, it looks
as if, with th e a dditi o n o f a "rubber ducky" antenna, it cou ld be
used a s a walkie-talkie . The pri ce of the TRC-475 is $89.95. Sec
your local Shack fo r det a ils .

Tired of driving awards?
If you occasi o nally receive driving awards for excessive velocit y,
i.e., yo u speed and get caught at it, Cobra has updated its
Trapshoot c r radar detector wit h the Pro I II model. It has extended
range, increased capabilities to reject fa lse signals, a rugged
extruded nltim inum cnsc, nnd dun! side-firin g speakers that nrc
loud e nough to be hea rd in any tru ck o r RV. There are even illuminated col la rs on the controls for eas ie r o pe ration after da rk.
Suggested retail: $229.95. Alternat ively, you could slow down.

New York state is t rying to pass a law makin g it ill ega l to use rada r
detectors in commercia l vehicles. RADAR (the Radi o Association
Dcfcncling Airwavc Rights, Inc.) , the indu stry g roup which defends
th e use of detectors, is ba sing its defense on the no tion th a t the
1934 Co mmunications Act g uaranrccs a ll c itize ns th e right to
rece ive any a nd all radio signa ls. Int e resting, no''

What goes on here
department
Nok ia-Mobira sent out a news
release ann ou ncing the M -1 0,
"an
econom ically
price d
mob ile cellular phone," but no
price was incl uded in the press
information. I ca lled ; it's 5900
retail. I man aged to control
my urge to s nap one up at such
a b a rgain basement expense. I
guess I just don't know
"economically priced" w hen I
see it. N o kia-Mobira can be
reached at 2300 Tall Pines Drive, Suite 100, Largo, Florida 3464 1,
o r phone 8 13-536-5553.
Meanwhil e , in its lat est catalog, Radio Shack has int ro duced the
CT-101, a mobil e ce llul ar phone for S799. Inqu ire at Radio S hack.
Until nex t time , if you want to share yo ur favorite discovery or pct
peeve in t he world of consumer electronics, wri te to me c/o

Mo11iton"11g Times.

M ON ITO RIN G TIMES

Ouobcr 1988

57

Your Guide to Shortwave Listenin

in October

Program Review
From Current Affairs to the Theatre
OUTLOOK

****

So-called "magazine" programs a rc
becom ing increasingly prevalent on
shortwave, as stations replace normal
programs with m o re flexible (albeit
theme-l ess) ones. Tl is refreshing to find
one wh ich can hold the li stener's attention as we ll as th e BBC's Owlook docs.

seems to suggest that the reports arc
whatever is sub mitt ed by the correspondents, not necessa rily breaking news.
A lso, the correspondent reports are
often long an d dry, occasionally making
it tough t o pay at ten ti on to the program.
Still, the material prese nted is in fo rmative and usually attract ive enough to hold
listene rs' altention.

Outlook is a mix of current affairs and
features of general inte rest. A perfect
example is a recen t show which discussed
the discovery or a planet outside the
solar system, nnd t hen fo llowed th at with
a feature o n a parti cipatory ci rcus
outside Lon don!
All t ransmissions except the 1400 broadcast begin with a one-minute news su mmary, which is excellent if a b it too co ncise. (The 1400 transmi ssion has five
m in utes of news preceding the act ual
program). The various broadcasts are of
different length s as well: the 1400 broadcast is 45 minutes, the 1900 broadcast is
39 minutes, and the 0100 broadcast is 30
minutes . The sho rtness of the 0100
broadcast docs not affect the overall program quality, though.
The program has regular features as well,
including a curious world-wide weather
forecast. Jn this short spot, a listener can
hear abou t the drought in the cent ra l
regions of North Ameri ca, or learn of the
monso ons in n ort hern Jn dia. This is one
of t he most fascinating p arts of the program.

The format is quite differe nt from that of
0111/ook (reviewed above). Instead of
featuring
co nversatio n
between
a
presenter and an int erviewee as Owlook
docs, News/inc features correspondent
submissio ns with little or no discussion.
This often leaves qu esti o ns unanswered.

Ne1vsli11e

afte r a rather lcngt hy absence.
Two teams of actors compete on the
show, hosted by Sheila H ancock. Unlike
American game shows, poin ts can be
earned not just by a nswerin g the
questions, . but also by telling amusing
anecdotes or giving information connected with the question.
Typ ical cjttestions include t he followin g:
Why is it unlucky to wear green on stage?
How many play titles can you think of
which include place names? Why
shouldn't MacBcth be mentioned ins ide
a theater? Which classic play was
described by a critic as "an open drain; a
loathsome sore unbandagcd"?

ranks
decicleclly
average,
perhaps a bit above average, a mong news
feature programs t oday. Still, it is
reli able and unbiased, and for t hat
reason a worthy produc1ion .

Listeners will find that they quickly lose
t rack of the score. Winning th e game is
unimportant; co nse quently, a ll involved
have an enjoyable 1ime, as do listen ers to
this program.

(Radio Netherlan ds, six times weekly,
Mondays to Saturdays: 0405, 0635, 0735,

0330, rep 1430; Wednesday: 1030.)

(BBC World Service, weekly, S unday:

0835, 1035, 1135, 1435, 1635, 1835, 2035;
Tuesdays to Sundays: 0235, 0535.)

PROMPT!
The BBC
delightful
theatrical
The show

****

produces some of the most
quiz shows o n the a ir, and the
quiz Pro111p1! is no exception.
returned to the air last month

If you have comments o n a pnrticular
program which you've heard on short wave, we invite you to send them LO
Ka1111011 Sha1111wga111 at th e address on
page 59. Program ratings arc keyed to
the chart following his address.

Presenters Hugh Sykes, John Tidm a rsh,
· and Colin Hamilt o n do a commendable
. job of tying the va ri ous features toget her,
and a lso do very go od interviews.
Overall, 0111/ook is an enjoyable way to
spend 30 ... o r 39 ...or 45 minutes of your
time.
(BBC World Service, five t imes weekly,
Mondays to Fridays:
1400, 1900;
Tuesdays to Saturdays: 0100.)

NEWSLINE

***

Radio Neth er lands produces many wellknown
progra ms,
includi ng Media
Network and I fappy S1a1io11. Perhaps less
famous is th e cu rrent affairs and analysis
program Ncwsli11e.
The subjects of the reports often do not
parallel th e subjects of RN's news broadcast, which precedes Ne1vsli11e. This

58

October 1988

'

I

~.c:.,.

The BBC's Outlook team (left to right): editor Alistair Lack, British
reporter Nancy Wise, presenter Colin Hamilton, presenter John
Tidmarsh, and British reporter John Thompson.
MONITORING TIMES

Your Guide to Shortwave Listening in October

How to Use This Section
This is your daily guide to the programs
being broadcast on the international
bands. Wherever possible, actual advance
program details for the listed stations arc
included. To use this section, simply look
up the day on which you arc listening,
check the time, and decide which p rogram
interests you. Then go to the frequency
section i.n order to locate the frequency of
the station/ program on the dial.
All days are in UTC. Keep in mind that the
new UTC day begins at 0000 UTC.
Therefore. if you arc listening to the
shortwave at 8:01 PM [EDT] on your local
Thursd:iy night, that's equal to 0001 UTC
and therefore Fiiday UTC.
We invite readers LO submit information
and reviews about their favorite programs.
These must be in UTC day and time and
can be sent to program manager Kannon
Shanmugam.
We a lso invite broadcast statio ns to submit
advance program details for publication in
Mo11i101i11g Times. Copy deadline is the 1st
of the month preceding publication [e.g.,
details for programs to be broadcast in
November must be received by Kannan
Shanmugam by October 1st.] Information
can be FAXcd via 1-704-837-2216 and
should indicate clearly that it is to be
submi1tcd to the Mo11i10Ji11g Times
program guide.

Program Manager:
Kannon Shanmugam
4412 Turnberry Drive
Lawrence, KS 66046
Key to Program Rat ings:
....... - outstanding
**'"'• - excellent
'""'* - good
....
- fair

- don't waste your time
BBC - BBC, London, England
KYOI - KYOI, Saipan
RAI - Radio Austria Int'!, Vienna
RCI - Radio Canada Int'!, Montreal
WCSN - WCSN, Boston, Massachusetts

Sunday
2nd, 9th, 16th, 23rd, 30th
0000
0000
0008
0009
0015
0030

BBC: World News
RCI: News
RCI: SWL Digest (SW radio)
BBC: News about Britain
BBC: Radio Newsreel
BBC: Puccini and His World [ex

2nd: Play of the Week)
BBC: News Summary
BBC: Play of the Weck
BBC: World News
BBC: British Press Review
BBC: A Choice of Verse
SRI: Swiss Shortwave Merry-GoRound (SW radio)
0230 BBC: The Ken Bruce Show (music
mix and entertainment news)
0300 BBC: World News
0309 BBC: News about Britain
0315 BBC: From Our Own Correspondent
- • 0 • - Good in-depth news
s tories.
0330 BBC: Prompt! - •• 0 - Delightful
theatrical quiz show, loaded with
anecdotes. [ex 23rd, 30th: Just A
M inute)
0400 BBC: Newsdesk
0430 BBC: English Songsmiths [ex 2nd:
Sporlsworld (at the O lympics)]
0445 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0450 BBC: Financial Review
0500 BBC: World News
0509 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0530 BBC: Lyrics and Lyricists
0545 BBC: Letter from America - ••• 0
- Alistair Cooke's distinctly British
view of America.
0600 BBC: Newsdesk
0630 BBC: Jazz for the Asking
0700 BBC: World News
0709 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0730 BBC: From Our Own Correspondent
- • • • • (see Sun 0315)
0745 BBC: Words
0750 BBC: Waveguide - •• - DX
program geared toward neophyte
listeners.
0800 BBC: World News
0809 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0815 BBC: The Pleasure's Yours
(classical music requests)
0900 BBC: World News
0909 BBC: British Press Review
0915 BBC: Science in Action
0940 BBC: Sportsworld [2nd only}
0945 BBC: Americans i.n Europe [ex 2nd]
1000 BBC: News Summary
1001 BBC: Shon Story
1015 BBC: Classical Record Review
1030 BBC: Religious Service
1100 BBC: World News
1109 BBC: News about Britain
1115 BBC: From Our Own Correspondent
- •••• (see Sun 0315)
I 130 BBC: Puccini and His World [ex
2nd: Play of the Weck]
1200 BBC: News Summary
120 1 BBC: Play of the Weck
1300 BB C: World News
1300 RCI: Sunday Morning
1309 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
mag azine)
0100
0101
0200
0209
0215
0215

MON ITORING TJMES

1330 BBC: Sports Roundup
1345 BBC: The Tony Myatt Request
Show
1400 BBC: News Summary
1401 BBC: The Tony Myatt Request
Show, continued
1430 BBC: Prompt! (see Sun
0330) [ex 23rd: Just a Minute]
1500 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1515 BBC: Concert Hall [ex 2nd:
Sportsworld (al the Olympics))
1600 BBC: World News
1609 BBC: News about Britain
1615 BBC: Latin Americans [ex 23rd:
Rescuing the Rhine]
1645 BBC: Lener From America - •••••
(see Sun 0545)
1700 BBC: World News
1709 BBC: Commentary
1715 BBC: Jazz for the Asking
1745 BBC: Sports Roundup
1800 BBC: Newsdcsk
1830 BBC: Raffles [2nd, 9th]; Hancock's
Half-Hour [16th); Round the Home
[23rd)
1900 BBC: News Summary
1901 BBC: Classical Record Review [ex
2nd: From Raj to Rajiv]
1915 BBC: An Artist or Nothing [9th];
Just Williams [1 6th); The National
Brass Band Championships 1988
[23rd]
1945 BBC: Sportsworld [2nd only]
2000 BBC: World News
2009 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
2030 BBC: Sunday Half-Hour (religious
feature)
2100 BBC: News Summary
2101 BBC: Short Story
2115 BBC: The Pleasure's Yours
(classical music requests)
2200 BBC: World News
2209 BBC: A Choice of Verse
2225 BBC: Book Choice
2230 BBC: Financial Review
2240 BBC: Reflections (religion)
2245 BBC: Sports Roundup
2300 BBC: World News
2309 BBC: Commentary
23 15 BBC: Letter From America - • • ** •
(see Sun 0545)
2330 BBC: A Green and Pleasant Land

••**

Monday
3rd, 10th, 17th, 24th, 31st
0000
0009
0015
0030
0 100
010 1

BBC: World News
BBC: News about Britain
BBC: Radio Newsreel
BBC: Religious Service
BBC: News Summary
BBC: From Raj LO Rajiv [3rd]; An
Artist or Nothing [10th); Just
Williams [17th]; The National
Brass Band Champ ionships 1988
[24 th]

Oclober 1988

59

Your Guide to Shortwave Listening in October
0200
0209
0215
0230
0300
0309
0315

BBC: World News
BBC: British Press Review
BBC: Peebles' Choice (music)
BBC : Science in Action
BBC: World News
BBC: News about Britain
BBC: Good Books - **"'* Detailed opinions on specific
books.
0330 BBC: Anything Goes (odd
recordings)
0400 BBC: Ncwsdcsk
0430 BBC: Malgudi Days (stories about
rural India)
0445 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0450 BBC: Waveguide - ** (sec Sun
0750)
0500 BBC: World News
0509 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0530 BBC: Nature Notebook
0545 BBC: Recording Of The Weck
0600 BBC: Newsdesk
0630 BBC: A Green and Pleasant Land
0700 BBC: World News
-0709 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0730 BBC: Latin Americans [ex 24th:
Rescuing the Rhine]
0800 BBC: World News
0809 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0815 BBC: Malgudi Days (stories about
rural India) [ex 3 lst]
0830 BBC: Anything Goes (odd
recordings)
0900 BBC: World News
0909 BBC: British Press Review
0915 BBC: Good Books - **** (sec
Mon 0315)
0930 BBC: Financial News
0940 BBC: Sports Roundup
0945 BBC: Peebles' Choice (mus ic)
1000 BBC: News Summary
1001 BBC: A Green and Pleasant Land
1030 BBC: The Vintage Chart Show
1100 BBC: World News
1109 BBC: News about Britain
11 15 BBC: Health Matters
1130 BBC: The Ken Bruce Show (music
mix wi th entertainmen t news)
1200 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1215 BBC: Raffles (drama) [3rd and
10th]; Hancock's Half-Hour [17th];
Round the Home [24th]
1245 BBC: Sports Roundup
1300 BBC: World News
1309 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
1330 BBC: Anything Goes (odd
recordings)
1400 BBC: World News
1405 BBC: Outlook - **** - A very
good magazine-formal program.
1500 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1515 BBC: A Green and Pleasant Land
1545 BBC: Engl ish Songsmiths
1600 BBC: World News
1609 BBC: News about Britain

60

Oc10 /ier 1988

1615 BBC: Americans in Europe
1630 BBC: Lyrics and Lyricists
1645 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
1700 BBC: World News
1709 BBC: Commentary
1715 BBC: New Music
1745 BBC: Sports Roundup
1800 BBC: Newsdesk
1830 BBC: Multitrack 1: Top 20 - ****
- Interesting British pop trends
here.
1900 BBC: News Summary
1901 BBC: Outlook - **** (see Mon
1405)
1939 BBC: Stock Market Report
1945 BBC: Peebles' Choice (music)
2000 BBC: World News
2001 KYOI and WCSN: News
2006 KYOI and WCSN: News Focus
2009 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
2030 BBC: Sports International (feature)
2030 KYOI and WCSN: News
2033 KYOI and WCSN: Monitor Forum
(social commentary and the arts)
2045 KYOI and WCSN: Music Program
2100 BBC: News Summary
2101 BBC: Network UK (feature)
2101 KYOI and WCSN: News
2106 KYOI and WCSN: Letterbox
2115 BBC: Language Extra [3rd, 10th];
Turning Point [17th, 24th]
2115 KYOI and WCSN: Kaleidoscope
(news features)
2130 BBC: The Vintage Chart Show
2130 KYOI and WCSN: News
2135 KYOI and WCSN: Conversations
(discussion)
2200 BBC: World News
2201 KYOI and WCSN: News
2206 KYOI and WCSN: News Focus
2209 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
2230 BBC: Financial News
2230 KYOI and WCSN: News
2233 KYOI and WCSN: Monitor Forum
(social commentary and the arts)
2240 BBC: Reflections (religion)
2245 BBC: Sports Roundup
2245 KYOI and WCSN: Music Program
2300 BBC: World News
230 1 KYOI and WCSN: News
2306 KYOI and WCSN: Letterbox
2309 BBC: Commentary
23 15 BBC: Mastering Photography
23 15 KYOI and WCSN: Kaleidoscope
(news features)
2330 BBC: Multitrack 1: Top 20 - ****
(sec Mon 1830)
2330 KYOJ and WCSN: News
2335 KYOI and WCSN: Conversations
(discussion)

Tuesday
4th, 11th, 18t h, 25th

0000 BBC: World News
MONITORING TIMES

0009
0015
0030
0 100
0101

BBC: News about Britain
BBC: Radio Newsreel
BBC: New Music
BBC: News Summary
BBC: Outlook - **** (see Mon
1405)
0130 BBC: Short Story
0 145 BBC: Language Extra [4th, 11th];
Turning Point [18th, 25th]
0200 BBC: World News
0209 BBC: British Press Review
0215 BBC: Network UK (feature)
0230 BBC: Sports International (feature)
0300 BBC: World News
0309 BBC: News about Britain
0315 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0330 BBC: John Peel (progressive rock
music)
0400 BBC: Newsdcsk
0430 BBC: The Spinners and Friends
0445 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0450 BBC: Financial News
0500 BBC: World News
0509 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0530 BBC: New Ideas
0540 BBC: Book Choice
0545 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0600 BBC: Ncwsdcsk
0630 BBC: Celluloid Rock (rock music
in the movies)
0700 BBC: World News
0709 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0730 BBC: Language Extra [4th, 11th];
Turning Point [18th, 25th]
0745 BBC: Network UK (feature)
0800 BBC: World News
0809 BBC: Reflections (religion)
08 15 BBC: Tech Talk .
0830 BBC: New Music
0900 BBC: World News
0909 BBC: British Press Review
0915 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0930 BBC: Financial News
0940 BBC: Sports Roundup
0945 BBC: English Songsmiths
1000 BBC: News Summary
1001 BBC: Discovery (science)
I 030 BBC: Sports International (feature)
1100 BBC: World News
1109 BBC: News about Britain
1115 BBC: Waveguide - ** (sec Sun
0750)
1125 BBC: Book Choice
11 JO BBC: C itizens - **** - innovative
serial with travails of five fictional
Britons.
1200 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1215 BBC: Multitrack 1: Top 20 - ****
(sec Mon 1830)
1245 BBC: Sports Roundup
1300 BBC: World News
1309 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)

Your Guide to Shortwave Listening in October
1330
1345
1400
1405

BBC: Network UK (feature)
BBC: Recording Of The Weck
BBC: World News
BBC: Outlook - •••• (sec Mon
1405)
1445 BBC: The Spinners and Friends
1500 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1515 BBC: A Jolly Good Show (rock
music)
1600 BBC: World News
1609 BBC: News about Britain
1615 BBC: Omnibus (topical featu re)
1645 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
1700 BBC: World News
1709 BBC: Commentary
1715 BBC: Citizens - •••• (sec Tue
1130)
1745 BBC: Sports Roundup
1800 BBC: Ncwsdcsk
1830 BBC: Development '88
1900 BBC: News Summary
1901 BBC: Outlook - •••• (see Mon
1405)
1939 BBC: Stock Market Report
1945 BBC: Report On Religion - •••• News on modem religion.
2000 BBC: World News
2001 KYOI and WCSN: News
2006 KYOI and WCSN: News Focus
2009 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
2030 BBC: Meridian (arts feature)
2030 KYOI and WCSN: News
2033 KYOI and WCSN: Monitor Forum
(social commentary and the arts)
2045 KYOI and WCSN: Music Program
2100 BBC: News Summary
2101 BBC: Katherine Mansfield Stories
2101 KYOI and WCSN: News
2106 KYOI and WCSN: LetLerbox
2115 BBC: Juste Plain Madness
2115 KYOI and WCSN: Kaleidoscope
(news features)
2130 BBC: Latin Americans [ex 25th:
Rescuing the Rhine]
2130 KYOI and WCSN: News
2200 BBC: World News
2209 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
2225 BBC: Book Choice
2230 BBC: Financial News
2240 BBC: RcOcctions (religion)
2245 BBC: Sports Roundup
2300 BBC: World News
2309 BBC: Commentary
23 15 BBC: Concert Hall

Wednesday
5th, 12th, 19th, 26th

0000
0001
0006
0009
0015
0030

BBC: World News
WCSN: News
WCSN: News Focus
BBC: News about Britain
BBC: Radio Newsreel
BBC: Omnibus (topical feature)

0030 WCSN: News
0033 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
0045 WCSN: Music Program
0100 BBC: News Summary
0101 BBC: Outlook - •••• (see Mon
1405)
0101 WCSN: News
0106 WCSN: Leuerbox
0115 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
0130 BBC: Report On Religion - ••••
(see Tue 1945)
0130 WCSN: News
0135 WCSN: Conversations (discussion)
0145 BBC: Country Style - ** - British
country music?
0200 BBC: World News
0201 WCSN: News
0206 WCSN: News Focus
0209 BBC: British Press Review
0215 BBC: Lyrics and Lyricists
0230 BBC: Citizens - **** (see Tue
1130)
0230 WCSN: News
0233 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the ans)
0245 WCSN: Music Program
0300 BBC: World News
0301 WCSN: News
0306 WCSN: Leuerbox
0309 BBC: News about Britain
0315 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0315 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
0330 BBC: Discovery (science)
0330 WCSN: News
0335 WCSN: Conversations (discussion)
0400 BBC: Newsdesk
0401 WCSN: News
0406 WCSN: News Focus
0430 BBC: Katherine Mansfield Stories
0430 WCSN: News
0433 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the ans)
0445 BBC: ReOections (religion)
0445 WCSN: Music Program
0450 BBC: Financial News
0500 BBC: World News
0501 WCSN: News
0506 WCSN: Leuerbox
0509 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0515 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
0530 BBC: Report On Religion - ****
(see Tue 1945)
0530 WCSN: News
0535 WCSN: Conversations (discussion)
0545 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0600 BBC: Newsdesk
0601 WCSN: News
0606 WCSN: News Focus
0630 BBC: Meridian (arts feature)
0630 WCSN: News
MONITORING TIMES

0633 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
0645 WCSN: Music Program
0700 BBC: World News
0701 WCSN: News
0706 WCSN: Leuerbox
0709 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0715 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
0730 BBC: Development '88
0730 WCSN: News
0735 WCSN: Conversations (discussion)
0800 BBC: World News
0809 BBC: ReOcctions (religion)
0815 BBC: Classical Record Review
0830 BBC: Rames (drama) [5th, 12th] ;
Hancock's Half-Hour [19th]; Around
the Home [26th]
0900 BBC: World News
0909 BBC: British Press Review
09 15 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0930 BBC: Financial News
0940 BBC: Sports Roundup
0945 BBC: Jazz Scene UK [5th, 19th];
Folk in Britain [12th, 26th]
1000 BBC: News Summary
1001 BBC: Omnibus (topical feature)
JOO! KYOI: News
1006 KYOI: News Focus
1030 BBC: Prompt! - **** (sec Sun
0330) [ex 26th: Just a Minute]
1030 KYOl: News
1033 KYOI: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
1045 KYOI: Music Program
I JOO BBC: World News
1101 KYOl: News
11 06 KYOl: Leuerbox
1109 BBC: News about Britain
1115 BBC: Katherine Mansfield Stories
I I 15 KYOl: Kaleidoscope (news features)
11 30 BBC: Meridian (arts feature)
11 30 KYOI: News
11 35 KYOl: Conversations (discussion)
1200 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1201 KYOl: News
1206 KYOI: News Focus
1215 BBC: Smith and Son
I 225 BBC: The Farming World
I 230 KYOl: News
1233 KYOI: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
1245 BBC: Sports Roundup
1245 KYOl: Music Program
1300 BBC: World News
1301 KYOI: News
1306 KYOl: Lellerbox
1309 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
1315 KYOl: Kaleidoscope (news features)
1330 BBC: Development '88
1330 KYOl: News
1335 KYOl: Conversations (discussion)
1400 BBC: World News
1405 BBC: Outlook - **** (see Mon

Oc1obcr 1988

61

Your Guide to Shortwave Listening in October
1405)
1445 BBC: Report On Religion - ••••
(see Tue 1945)
1500 BBC: Radio Newsreel
151 5 BBC: Mastering Photography
1530 BBC: After Henry [5th, 12th]; The
Million Pound Radio Show [19th,
26th]
1600 BBC: World News
1601 WCSN: News
1606 WCSN: News Focus
1609 BBC: News about Britain
1615 BBC: Celluloid Rock (rock music
in the movies)
1630 WCSN: News
1633 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
1645 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
1645 WCSN: Music Program
1700 BBC: World News
1701 WCSN: News
1706 WCSN: Letterbox
1709 BBC: Commentary
1715 BBC: Society Today
1715 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
1730 BBC: New Ideas
1730 WCSN: News
1735 WCSN: Conversations (discussion)
1740 BBC: Book Choice
1745 BBC: Sports Roundup
1800 BBC: Newsdcsk
1801 WCSN: News
1806 WCSN: News Focus
1830 BBC: Multitrack 2 - • 0 - Pop
music and news.
1830 WCSN: News
1833 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
1845 WCSN: Music Program
1900 BBC: News Summary
1901 BBC: O utlook - •••• (see Mon
1405)
1901 WCSN: News
1906 WCSN: Letterbox
191 5 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
fealurcs)
1930 WCSN: News
1935 WCSN: Conversations (discussion)
1939 BBC: Stock Market Report
1945 BBC: Good Books - •••• (see
Mon 0315)
2000 BBC: World News
2001 KYOI and WCSN: News
2006 KYOI and WCSN: News Focus
2009 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
2030 BBC: Assignment
2030 KYOI and WCSN: News
2033 KYOI and WCSN: Monitor Forum
(social commentary and the arts)
2045 KYOI and WCSN: Music Program
2100 BBC: News Summary
2101 BBC: Network UK (feature)
2101 KYOI and WCSN: News
2 106 KYOI and WCSN: Letterbox
62

Octoher 1988

2115 BBC: Celluloid Rock (rock music
in the movies) [ex 19th:
Sportsworld (World Cup soccer
qualifying matches)]
2115 KYOI and WCSN: Kaleidoscope
(news features)
2130 KYOI and WCSN: News
2135 KYOI and WCSN: Conversations
(discussion)
2145 BBC: Recording Of The Weck [ex
19th]
2200 BBC: World News
2201 KYOI and WCSN: News
2206 KYOI and WCSN: News Focus
2209 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
2230 BBC: Financial News
2230 KYOI and WCSN: News
2233 KYOI and WCSN: Monitor Forum
(social commentary and the arts)
2240 BBC: Reflections (religion)
2245 BBC: Sports Roundup
2245 KYOI and WCSN: Music Program
2300 BBC: World News
2301 KYOI and WCSN: News
2306 KYOI and WCSN: Letterbox
2309 BBC: Commentary
2315 BBC: Write On... (letters)
2315 KYOI and WCSN: Kaleidoscope
(news features)
2330 BBC: Mullitrack 2 - ••• (see Wed
1830)
2330 KYOI and WCSN: News
2335 KYOI and WCSN: Conversations
(discussion)

Thursday
6th, 13th, 20th, 27t h
0000
0001
0006
0009
0015
0030

BBC: World News
WCSN: News
WCSN: News Focus
BBC: News about Britain
BBC: Radio Newsreel
BBC: After Henry [6th, 13th]; The
Million Pound Radio Show [20th,
27th)
0030 WCSN: News
0033 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
0045 WCSN: Music Program
0100 BBC: News Summary
0101 BBC: Outlook - •••• (see Mon
1405)
0101 WCSN: News
0106 WCSN: Letterbox
0115 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
0130 BBC: Waveguide - ** (sec Sun
0750)
0130 WCSN: News
0135 WCSN: Young Ideas (program for
teenagers)
0140 BBC: Book Choice
0145 BBC: Society Today
0200 BBC: World News
0201 WCSN: News
MONITORING T IMES

0206
0209
0215
0230
0230
0233

WCSN: News Focus
BBC: British Press Review
BBC: Network UK (feature)
BBC: Assignment
WCSN: News
WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
0245 WCSN: Music Program
0300 BBC: World News
0301 WCSN: News
0306 WCSN: Letterbox
0309 BBC: News about Britain
0315 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0315 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
0330 BBC: Latin Americans [ex 27th:
Rescuing the Rhine]
0330 WCSN: News
0335 WCSN: Young Ideas (program for
teenagers)
0400 BBC: Newsdesk
0401 WCSN: News
0406 WCSN: News Focus
0430 BBC: Classical Record Review (ex
20th: Sportsworld]
0430 WCSN: News
0433 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
0445 BBC: Reflections (reli gion)
0445 WCSN: Music Program
0450 BBC: Financial News
0500 BBC: World News
0501 WCSN: News
0506 WCSN: Letterbox
0509 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0515 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
0530 BBC: Peebles' Choice (music)
0530 WCSN: News
0535 WCSN: Young Ideas (program for
teenagers)
0545 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0600 BBC: Newsdcsk
0601 WCSN: News
0606 WCSN: News Focus
0630 BBC: Smith and Son
0630 WCSN: News
0633 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
0640 BBC: The Farming World
0645 WCSN: Music Program
0700 BBC: World News
0701 WCSN: News
0706 WCSN: Letterbox
0709 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0715 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
feat ures)
0730 BBC: Jus te Plain Madness
0730 WCSN: News
0735 WCSN: Young Ideas (program for
teenagers)
0745 BBC: Network UK (feature)
0800 BBC: World News

Your Guide to Shortwave Listening in October
0809 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0815 BBC: Country Style - •• (see Wed
0145) (ex 20th: Sportsworld]
0830 BBC: John Peel (progressive rock
music)
0900 BBC: World News
0909 BBC: British Press Review
0915 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0930 BBC: Financial News
0940 BBC: Sports Roundup
0945 BBC: Society Today
1000 BBC: News Summary
1001 BBC: Assignment
1001 KYOI: News
1006 KYOI: News Focus
1030 BBC: After Henry [6th, !3rd]; The
Million Pound Radio Show [20th,
27th]
1030 KYOI: News
1033 KYOI: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
1045 KYOI: Music Program
1100 BBC: World News
1101 KYOI: News
1106 KYOI: Lcuerbox
1109 BBC: News about Britain
1115 BBC: New Ideas
1115 KYOI: Kaleidoscope (news features)
1125 BBC: Book Choice
1130 BBC: Citizens - •••• (sec Tue
1130)
1130 KYOI: News
1135 KYOI: Young Ideas (program for
teenagers)
1200 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1201 i<.YOI: News
1206 KYOI: News Focus
1215 BBC: Multitrack 2 - ••• (see Wed
1830)
1230 KYOI: News
1233 KYOI: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
1245 BBC: Sports Roundup
1245 KYOI: Music Program
1300 BBC: World News
1301 KYOI: News
1306 KYOI: Letterbox
1309 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
1315 KYOI: Kaleidoscope (news features)
1330 BBC: Network UK (feature)
1330 KYOI: News
1335 KYOI: Young Ideas (program for
teenagers)
1345 BBC: Jazz Scene UK [6th, 20th];
Folk in Britain [13th, 29th]
1400 BBC: World News
1405 BBC: Outlook - •••• (see Mon
1405)
1445 BBC: Write On ... (lellers)
1500 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1515 BBC: The Pleasure's Yours
(classical music requests)
1600 BBC: World News
1606 WCSN: News Focus
1609 BBC: News about Britain

1615 BBC: Assignment
1630 WCSN: News
1633 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
1645 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
1645 WCSN: Music Program
1700 BBC: World News
1701 WCSN: News
1706 WCSN: Letterbox
1709 BBC: Commentary
1715 BBC: Citizens - • 0 • (see Tue
1130)
1715 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
1730 WCSN: News
1735 WCSN: Young Ideas (program for
teenagers)
1745 BBC: Sports Roundup
1800 BBC: Newsdesk
1801 WCSN: News
1806 WCSN: News Focus
1830 BBC: Discovery (science)
1830 WCSN: News
1833 WCSN: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
1845 WCSN: Music Program
1900 BBC: News Summary
1901 BBC: Outlook - •••• (sec Mon
1405)
1901 WCSN: News
1906 WCSN: Letterbox
1915 WCSN: Kaleidoscope (news
features)
1930 WCSN: News
1935 WCSN: Young Ideas (program for
teenagers)
1945 BBC: Here's Humph!
2000 BBC: World News
2001 KYOI and WCSN: News
2006 KYOI and WCSN: News Focus
2009 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
2030 BBC: Meridian
2030 KYOI and WCSN: News
2033 KYOI and WCSN: Monitor Forum
(social commentary and the arts)
2045 KYOI and WCSN: Music Program
2100 BBC: News Sununary
2101 BBC: Talking From ... (Northern
Ireland, Scotland, Wales)
2 101 KYOI and WCSN: News
2 106 KYOI and WCSN: Letterbox
2 115 BBC: A Jolly Good Show (rock
music)
21 15 KYOI and WCSN: Kaleidoscope
(news features)
2 130 KYOI and WCSN: News
2 135 KYOI and WCSN: Young Ideas
(program for teenagers)
2200 BBC: World News
2201 KYOI and WCSN: News
2206 KYOI and WCSN: News Focus
2209 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
2225 BBC: Book Choice
2230 BBC: Financial News
MONITORING T IMES

2230 KYOI and WCSN: News
2233 KYOI and WCSN: Monitor Forum
(social commentary and the arts)
2240 BBC: Reflections (religion)
2245 BBC: Sports Roundup
2245 KYOI and WCSN: Music Program
2300 BBC: World News
2301 KYOI and WCSN: News
2306 KYOI and WCSN: Letterbox
2309 BBC: Commentary
2315 BBC: Seven Seas
23 15 KYOI and WCSN: Kaleidoscope
(news features)
2330 BBC: Smith and Sons
2330 KYOI and WCSN: News
2335 KYOI and WCSN: Young Ideas
(program fo r teenagers)
2340 BBC: The Farming World

Fr iday
7th, 14th, 21th, 28th
0000
0009
0015
0030

BBC: World News
BBC: News about Britain
BBC: Radio Newsreel
BBC: Music Now (modern classical
music)
0100 BBC: News Summary
0101 BBC: Outlook - •••• (see Mon
1405)
0130 BBC: Jazz Scene UK [7th, 21st];
Folk in Britain [14th, 28th]
0145 BBC: Talking From ... (Northern
Ireland, Scotland, Wales)
0200 BBC: World News
0209 BBC: British Press Review
0215 BBC: Tech Talk
0230 BBC: Citizens - •••• (see Tue
1130)
0300 BBC: World News
0309 BBC: News about Britain
03 15 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0330 BBC: The Vintage Chart Show
0400 BBC: Newsdesk
0430 BBC: Country Style - •• (see Wed
0145)
0445 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0450 BBC: Financial News
0500 BBC: World News
0509 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0530 BBC: Mastering Photography
0545 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0600 BBC: Newsdesk
0630 BBC: Meridian (arts feature)
0700 BBC: World News
0709 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0730 BBC: Write On .. . (letters)
0745 BBC: Seven Seas
0800 BBC: World News
0809 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0815 BBC: The Spinners and Friends
0830 BBC: Music Now (modern classical
music)
October 1988

63

Your Guide to Shortwave Listening 1n October
0900 BBC: World News
0909 BBC: British Press Review

0915 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0930 BBC: Financial Ne ws
0940 BBC: Sports Roundup
0945 BBC: A Choice of Verse
1000 BBC: News Sununary
1001 BBC: Juste Plain Madness
1001 KYOI: News
1006 KYOI: News Focus
1030 BBC: Jazz for the Asking
1030 KYOI: News
1033 KYOI: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts)
1045 KYOI: Music Program
1100 BBC: World News
1106 KYOI: Letterbox
1109 BBC: News about Britain
1115 BBC: Talking From ... (N orthern
Irel and, Scotland, Wales)
1115 KYOI: Kaleidoscope (news features)
1130 BBC: Meridian (arts feature)
11 30 KYOI: News
1135 KYOI: World Link
1200 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1201 KYOI: News
1206 KYOI: News Focus
1215 BBC: Europe's World
1230 BBC: Business Matters
1233 KYOI: Monitor Forum (social
commentary and the arts )
1245 BBC: Sports Roundup
1300 BBC: World News
1301 KYOI: News
1309 BBC: Twenty-Fo ur Hours (news
magazine)
1330 BBC: John Peel (progressive rock
music)
1400 BBC: World News
1405 BBC: Outlook - **** (see Mon
1405)
1445 BBC: Nature Notebook
1500 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1515 BBC: From Raj to Rajiv [7th]; An
Artist or Nothing [1 4th]; Just
Williams [21st]; The National
Brass Band Championships 1988
[28th]
1600 BBC: World News
1609 BBC: News about Britain
1615 BBC: Science in Action
1645 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
1700 BBC: World News
1709 BBC: Commentary
1715 BBC : Music Now (modem classical
music)
1745 BBC: Sports Roundup
1800 BBC: Ncwsdesk
1830 BBC: Multitrack 3 - **** - Sarah
Ward presents innovative rock
music.
1900 BBC: News Sunun ary
1901 BBC: Outlook - **** (sec Mon
1405)
1939 BBC: Stock Market Report
Oclobcr 1988

1945 BBC: Personal View
2000 BBC: World News
2009 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
2030 BBC: Science in Action
2100 BBC: News Sununary
2101 BBC: Network UK (feature)
2115 BBC: Europe's World
2130 BBC: Business Matters
2145 BBC: Malgudi Days (stories about
rural India)
2200 BBC: World News
2209 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
2230 BBC: Financial News
2240 BBC: Reflections (religion)
2245 BBC: Sports Roundup
2300 BBC: World News
2309 BBC: Commentary
2315 BBC: From The Weeklies (press
review)
2330 BBC: Multitrack 3 - **** (see Fri
1830)

Saturday
1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd, 29th
0000
0009
0015
0030
0045
0100
0101

BBC: World News
BBC: News about Britain
BBC: Radio Newsreel
BBC: Personal View
BBC: Recording of the Week
BBC: News Summary
BBC: Outlook - **** (see Mon
1405)
0130 BBC: Juste Plain Madness
0145 BBC: Nature Notebook
0200 BBC: World News
0209 BBC: British Press Review
0215 BBC: Network UK (feature)
0230 BBC: People and Politics
0300 BBC: World News
0309 BBC: News about Britain
0315 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0330 BBC: Europe's World
0345 BBC: Business Matters
0400 BBC: Newsdesk
0430 BBC: Here's Humph! [ex 1st:
Sportsworld (at the Olympics)]
0445 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0450 BBC: Financial News
0500 BBC: World News
0509 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0530 BBC: Personal View
0545 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0600 BBC: Newsdesk
0630 BBC: Meridian (arts feature)
0700 BBC: World News
0709 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
0730 BBC: From The Weeklies (press
review)
0745 BBC: Network UK (feature)
0800 BBC: World News

MONlTOR rNG TIMES

0809 BBC: Reflections (religion)
0815 BBC: A Jolly Good Show (rock
music)
0900 BBC: World News
0909 BBC: British Press Review
0915 BBC: The World Today (news
feature)
0930 BBC: Financial News
0940 BBC: Sports Roundup
0945 BBC: Personal View [ex 1st:
Sportsworld (at the Olympics)]
1000 BBC: News Summary
1001 BBC: Here's Humph!
1015 BBC: Letter from America - *****
(see Sun 0545)
1030 BBC: People and Politics
1100 BBC: World News
1109 BBC: News about Britain
1115 BBC: Lyrics and Lyricists
1130 BBC: Meridian (arts feature)
11 30 RAI: Report from Austria
1200 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1215 BBC: Multitrack 3 - **** (see Fri
1830)
I 245 BBC: Sports Roundup
1300 BBC: World News
1309 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
1330 BBC: Network UK (feature) [ex 1st:
Sportsworld (at the Olympics)]
1345 BBC: Sportsworld
1400 BBC: News Summary
1401 BBC: Sportsworld
1500 BBC: Radio Newsreel
1515 BBC: Sportsworld
1600 BBC: World News
1609 BBC: News about Britain
1615 BBC: Sportsworld
1700 BBC: World News
1709 BBC: Words
I 715 BBC: The Ken Bruce Show (music
mix with entertainment news)
1745 BBC: Sports Roundup
1800 BBC: Newsdesk
1830 BBC: Puccini and His World [ex
1st: Play of the Week]
1900 BBC: News Summary
1901 BBC: Play of the Week
2000 BBC: World News
2009 BBC: Twenty-Four Hours (news
magazine)
2030 BBC: Meridian (arts feature)
2100 BBC: News Summary
2101 BBC: Americans in Europe
21 15 BBC: English Songsmiths [1st
only]
2130 BBC: People and Politics
2200 BBC: World News
2209 BBC: From Our Own Correspondent
- **** (see Sun 0315)
2225 BBC: Nature Notebook
2240 BBC: Reflections (religion)
2245 BBC: Sports Roundup
2300 BBC: World News
2309 BBC: Words
2315 BBC: The Tony Myatt Request
Show

frequencyI

MT _Mon itoring Team
>EAST COAST:

Greg Jordan,
Frequency Manager
1855-1 Franciscan Terrace
Winston-Salem, NC 27127

Joe Hanlon, PA
WEST COAST:
Bill Brinkley, CA
Dave Kammler, CA
0000 . UTC •.·:··: [8:00 PM EDT/5:00 PM PDT]
Voice of Kampuchea, Phnom-Penh
BBC, London, England

0000-0015
0000-0030
0000-0030
0000-0030
0000-0030
0000-0030
0000-0030
0000-0045
0000-0050
0000-0055
0000-0100
0000-0100

It's that time of year again, when it see111s the powers-that-be all see111
to conspire to make it d1ffiwlt for the SWL; Ti111e changes back from
Daylight Savings to Standard in the U.S. and a few other countries.
Some stations will change trans111i11ing schedufes with the season;
others never changed in the first place. As we switch our clocks back,
just use your common sense and cany on until the November issue
when th e dust should be settled and eve1ything should retum ... to
n 0 /711{1/ ?

. .. .. . .

LEGEND

foJ/~lgits bf

and

- ·-

. .

-. - - ..

S=SLinday
· M '= Monday
H=Thursday •• : F .; Friday ·

isn~

ri~ard

ih~re ail ..

/ If there
entry, the broadcasts are
daily. If, for example,
Is
entry of "M." the broadcast would be heard only on Mondays, An entry.. of.
.~ M.W,F" would m·ean Mondays, Wednesdays and Frictays only, "M'F'. •. would ·
mean Mondays through Fridays: "TEN" indicates a tentative schedule and 'TES'
a test transmission.
·
·
·· ·

freq~ency

cqntafnin~

[ML] after :a
indicates a multi-lingual transmission
: ·English-language programs.
· .
:
. . ·.·.: · ·. .. . . .
• •.•. :.. :•:
•* : T he last entry on a.line Is the frequency: Codes here include "SSB" which
• Indicates a Single : Sideband transmission, and ."V' for a frequency that
varies. [ML] ·atter ca.. frequency indicates a multi-lingual transmissiqn
containing .English-language programs.
·: · ..•.·•
: /

v after
frequency indicates that it varies
.
. .. . .
.•.·••· ..•.·..•
:. Nolatioils ofU SB and LSB (upper and lower sideband transmissions) usuaUy
· ·. refer only to the Individual frequency after which they . appear. . •..•••••·.····
•·: Listings . foUoweci by an : asierisk (') are for English · lessons and .do .hot •
. : contain regularly scheduled programming.
· '·- ..
.
We suggest .• that you. begin :'Nilh .· the tower . frequencies that •a station · IS
:broadcasting . on and work your way up the dial. Rememb.er I.hat there 1.s no :
· guarantee that a• station will be audible on any given day. Reception conditions
can change r apidly, though, and if it is not audible one night, it may welt be· on
ailolher. : ·
·· ··
· ·

a

'.

'

MONITORING TIMES

11 938
6005 6175 7325
9590 9915 11955
17710
11605 12080
11 730
11850
11950
15160
1 1715 15455
11790 15345
7215 9535
11 745 15110
9625

9910

HOW TO USE
THE PROPAGATION CHARTS

The)irst
an entry •.are -the bro,adc:ast
The second four digils ..represent the end
the statiori name
in the space tiei ween the end time
schedule; .
.

0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-0100
0000·0100

M

9693
5975
9515
120 95
9435
Kol Israel, Jerusalem
Radio Canada lnt'I, Montreal
9755
Radio Korea, Seoul, South Korea
15575
Radio Norway lnl'I, Oslo
9620
Radio Sofia, Bulgaria
9700
WINB. Red Lion, Pennsylvania
15145
Radio Pyongyang, North Korea
15115
Radio Beijing, PR China
9770
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
6030
All India Radio, New Delhi
6055
1 1715
CBC Northern Quebec Service
6195
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
6160
CBU, Vancouver, British Colombia
6160
CFCF, Montreal, Quebec
6005
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
6130
CHNS, Halifax. Nova Scotia
CKWX, Vancouver, British Colombia 6080
CFRB, Toronto, Ontario
6070
FEBC, Manila. Philippines
15445
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
3910
KSDA, Guam
151 25
KVOH, Rancho Simi, California
17775

Propagation charts can be an invaluable aid to the DXer in
determining which frequencies are likely to be open at a
given time. To use the propagation charts, choose th os e
for your location (the are divided into east coast, midwest
and west coast of North America). Then look for the one
most closely describing the geographic location of the
station you want to hear.
Once you've located the correct charts, look along the
horizontal axis of the graph fo r the time that you are
listening. Th e top line of the graph shows the Maximum
Useable Frequency [MUF] and the lower line the Lowest
Useable Frequency [LUF] as indicated on the vertical axis
of the graph.
While there are exceptions to every ru le (especially those
regarding shortwave listening), you should find the charts
helpful in determining the b est times to listen for particular
regions of the world. Good luck!

October 1988

65

frequency I
0000-01 00
0000-0100

KYOI, Salpan
Radio Auslralia, Melbourne

0000-0100
0000-0100
0000-01 00
0000-0100

Radio
Radio
Radio
Radio

Baghdad, Iraq
Havana Cuba
Luxembourg
Moscow. USSR

0000-0100
Radio New Zealand, Wellington
0000-0100
Radio for Peace, Costa Rica
0000-0100
Radio Thailand, Bangkok
0000-0100
SBC Radio One, Singapore
0000-01 00
Spanish Foreign Radio, Madrid
0000·0100 M·A Superpower KUSW, Ulah
0000-0100
Voice of America, Washington
0000-0100 T·A Voice of Nicaragua, Managua
0000-0100
WCSN, Boslon, Massachuse11s
0000-0100
WHRI, Noblesville, Indiana
0000-0100
WANO, New Orleans, Louisiana
0000-0100
WYFR, Oakland, California
0030-0045
BBC, London, England*
0030-0055 M·A BRT, Brussels, Belgium
0030-0100
BBC, London, England
0030-01 00
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
0030-0100
Radio Austria lnt'I, Vienna
0030-0100 M·A Radio Budapest, Hungary
Radio Canada lnt'I, Montreal
Radio Kiev. Ukrainian SSR

0030-0100
0030-0100
0030-0100
0035-0040
0045·0100
0045-0 100

SLBC, Colombo, Sri
All India Radio, New
Radio Berlin lnt'I, E.
Radio New Zealand,

A

Lanka
Delhi
Germany
Welllnglon

15405
15140 15160
15395 17750
6120
9655
6090
6170 7115
9530 9720
15150 17705
21555
9655 11 905
5010 5052
9630 11 880
15580
5995 6130
7280 9455
11580 11 695
6100
9850
9770 17630
13760
5950 9505
6195 7235
15435
9925 11695
5975 6005
7325 9515
12095 17710
9720 11775
9875
61 10 9520
11910 15160
5960 9755
7205 7400
11790
13645
6005 9720
3925 4660
6080 9730
15150 17705

25.00
20.00

. . ___. MUF :
· ·"·,.:.·:L·
rrrur . . . . . . . .,,.. .:. . . . ....
.••• j ••.• j . .. . c.. · ·•···· ~·· ·· ~···· ..... .; ....; .... j •..• ; •.•. ; ..

rl1ii_r[[l'Lr

15.00
10.00

;,
:

:

5.00

:

, ;

:

:

'

:

:

7170 7200
9775 9815
11740 15205

13695
9570 11820

6195
9590

11910 15155
9565

!

:

!

:

:

:

:

I

,:

- t - ~-'~

:

:

!

:

: :

:

4

8

October 1988

12 16 20 24

UTC

Por1 Moresby, Papua New Guinea

9635

9640

5960
6080

5985
6140

11780
9535
15110

9910

9855
17835 17845

6145

9565

15345
6175
9915

7325

11910 15155
15240 15320
17795

East Coast To

East Coast Ta

Eastern Eu rope

Middle East

30.00 ,..--,--,-.,..---:--..,........,---:--..---:---:--.,..,

Mu i ~ I ...

25.00 ···"·:·
L 'I"[LJ(F......:i ......... r
!--t--t
20.00
15.00

•·••t••••( · . . ·

·:··•· <• •"»••••

:' :I .

5.00

.

·j_:
,_ . . ·:::',,. . . . '.,,,_ . .
',

· ·· ·l·· · ·t•••• t • ••• C• • .. t·•

:I

. .

rr''iTT';TT ·'.
:rJA'Fcr: i [:+tJ

10.00 ····1····;·····;·····;

!

1

[9:00 PM EDT/ 6:00 PM PDT]

3295 4890
6020 6040
9520
0100-0110
Vatican Radio, Vatican Clly
6150 9605
0100-0115
All India Radio, New Delhi
6055 7215
11 715 11745
0 100-0120
RAI, Rome, llaly
9575 11800
0100-0130
Kol Israel, Jerusalem
7469 9435
0100-0130
Radio Berlin lnl'I, East Germany
6080 9730
0100-0130
Radio Japan, Tokyo
15280 17610
0100-0130
Laollan Nallonal Radio
"7113V
0100-0130 S,M WINB, Red Lion, Pennsylvania
15145
0100-0150
Deulsche Welle, West Germany
6040 6085
9735 11865
0100-0155
Radio Austria lnt'I, Vienna
9875
0100-0200
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
6030 1 1790
0100-0200
BBC, London, England
5975 6005
9515 9590
0100-0200
CBC Norlhern Quebec Service
6195 9625
0100-0200
CBN, SI. John's, Newfoundland
6160
0100·0200
CBU. Vancouver, British Colombia
6160
0100·0200
CFCF, Monlreal, Quebec
6005
0100·0200
CFCN, Calgary, Alberla
6030
0100·0200
CHNS, Halifax. Nova Scotia
6130
0100·0200
CKWX, Vancouver, Brillsh Colombia 6080
0100·0200
CFRB, Toronto, Onlario
6070
0100·0200
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
3910
0100-0200
FEBC, Manila, Philippines
15445
0100·0200
HCJB, Ouil o, Ecuador
9720 11 775
0100-0200 T·A KVOH. Rancho Simi, California
17775
0100-0200
KYOI, Salpan
15405
0100-0200
Radio Australia, Melbourne
15160 15180
15395 17715
17750

11 940

6175
9915

s

15145
6150 9605 11 780

MHz.

.." ::
"

'--"-~~~~~~~~~

0

66

:

I

:

····:····:····j-~-.f:. :·····l·····f ····~····! ····f\····,··
:

0.00

:

:
:
:

0 100-0103

7195
9890

7165
9765

Western Europe
30. 00 ,........,..-,-..,........,---,--.--.,--,--,--..,........,---,-,
. .

WINB, Red Lion, Pennsylvania
Valican Radio, Va1ican Clly

0100 UTC

East Coast Ta

MHz.

0048-0100
0050-0100

15240 15320
17795

···~····l··~·~·~-i~·:j··

25.00
20.00
15.00
10.00
5.00

0.00
0

4

8

MONITORING T IMES

12

UTC

16 20

24

0

4

8

12

16 20 24

UI C

frequency I
0100·0200
Radio Baghdad, Iraq
0100·0200 S.M Radio Canada lnl'I, Montreal
Radio Havana Cuba
0100·0200
Radio Japan. Tokyo
Ot00·0200
Racho Luxembourg
0100·0200
Radio Moscow. USSR
0100·0200
Radio
Radio
Raclio
Radio

Ot00·0200
0100·0200
0100·0200
0100·0200

Moscow World Service
New Zealand, Wellington
for Peace. Costa Rica
Prague. Czechoslovakia

0100·0200
Radio Thailand, Bangkok
SBC Radio One. Singapore
0100·0200
SLBC, Colombo. Sri Lanka
0100-0200
Spanish Foreign Radio, Madrid
Ot00·0200
0100·0200 T·S Superpower KUSW, Ulah
0 100·0200
Voice of America, Was111nglon
0100·0200
0100·0200
0100·0200
0 100·0200
0100·0200
0100·0200 T ·A
0130·0140 T·S
0130·0155
0130·0200

Voice of Indonesia, Jakarta
WCSN, Boston, Massachusetts
WHRt, Noblesville, Indiana
WRNO New Orleans, Louisiana
WYFR, Oakland, Cahfomla
WYFR Satellite Net. California
Voice of Greece, Alhens
Radio Austria lnl'I. Vienna
Radio Budapest. Hungary

0130·0200
0130·0200

Radio Veritas Asia, Philippines
WINB, Red Lion. Pennsylvania

s

I0200 UTC
0200·0215
0200·0225
0200·0230

MHz.

11775
5960
9655
5960
6090
6170
9530
17675
12045
13660
5930
9630
9655
5010
6005
9630
15560
5995
9815
9680
9850
7400
7355
5950
9505
7430
9675
6110
11910
15330
15145

0200·0230
Burma Bcasllng Service. Rangoon
0200·0230 s Radio Austria lnl'I. Vienna
0200·0230 W.A Radio Budapest. Hungary

11810
9755

7185
9875
6110 9520
9883 11910
Swiss Radio lnl'I. Berne
0200-0230
6135 9725
17730
0200·0245
Radio Berlin tny·t. E. Germany
6080 9730
Deutsche Welle, Wost Germany
0200·0250
7285 9690
0200-0250
Radio Bagllad. Iraq
11775 11610
Radio Bras. Brasilia. Brazil
11745v
0200·0250
0200·0255
Radio Bucharest, Romania
5990 6155
11830 11 940
0200·0255
RAE, Buenos Aires, Argenllna
9690 11 710
0200·0300
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
6030 11 790
0200·0300
CBC Northern Quebec Service
6195 9625
0200·0300
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
6160
0200·0300
CBU, Vancouver, British Colombia
6160
0200·0300
CFCF, Montreal, Quebec
6005
0200·0300
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
CFRB, Toronto. Onlario
0200-0300
6070
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scotia
0200·0300
6130
0200·0300
CKWX, Vancouver, British Colombia 6060
0200·0300
3910
(US) Far East Network. Tokyo
HCJB, Ouilo, Ecuador
0200·0300
9720 11 775
17865
KSDA. Guam
0200·0300
0200·0300 T·A KVOH, Rancho Simi. Cahforma
13695
KYOI, Saipan
0200·0300
17780
0200·0300
Radio Australia, Melbourne
15240 15320
0200-0300
Radio Cairo, Egypt
9475 9675
0200·0300
Radio Canada lnl'I. Montreal
9535 9755
0200·0300
Radio Havana Cuba
6140 9655
Radio Luxembourg
0200·0300
6090
Radio Moscow. USSR
0200·0300
6170 7115
7290 9530
9720 9890
0200·0300
Radio Moscow World Service
17675 17860
0200-0300
Radio Orlon, South Africa
3955
0200·0300
Radio for Peace. Costa Rica
13660
0200·0300 A Radio New Zealand, Wellington
15150 17705
0200·0300
Radio Polonia. Warsaw. Poland
6095 6135

11815 17810
71 15 7165
9600 9720
17850 17860
15150

7195
9890

6055 7345
9740 11990
11905
5052 11940
9720 15425
11880

9540

6130 9455 9775
11560 11 740 15205
11 790
9495

9420 11645
9520
15160
15365

9835

9863

[10:00 PM EDT/7:00 PM PDT]
Vatican Radio, Vallcan Cily
Kol Israel. Jerusalem
BBC, London, England

7125
7460
5975
94 10

9650
9435
6005
9515

9655
6175
9590

7325
9915

East Coast To

East Coast To

West Africa

Central Africa

MHz.

30.00

~-~----~..-.-,

25.00

· ·:++~&lrr 11···:· ·

20.00

.... r... _·····;· ·. :.........r··-r···,....,....,... .

20.00

...·! ....!·· · ·~···. ~-·.

15.00 ... i.... L...1. ... 1.. .. t... .L::-.~... l....i.... L._1.

15.00

····:····:····:····:·
:
:
:

' : . ' l:'l ; \,: :
I

10.00

•• •• j ••..

i-

:

:

'II:

:

..

;1

:

:

j

;

:

. . : f l .

.

I

0

4

8

12 16 20 24

UTC

MONITORING T IMES

:

.

:

:

;

!

;

,I

;
;

;

I

:

10.00

:
:

:
:

:
:

:
!
:
;

:

:
:

:
;

:
:

:

:
:

...:
:
t
!
:' :
!• ;
: ~ ....
:
: '
:
:

l ":./

0.00 -+-~
0

4

:

;

.

:

:

···:··
:
'

7165
9600
15425
17880

7195
9700

7145

7270

MUF : : ' . ' i
. ··r·;····r·:
: : . l : .
~

~

\

~

l '\

.

.
:'

:
:

:
:

:

:

:

:

.. )....!.... .'......... Jf.. ..l.\. ~.L.,j . . ]. .

10.00

:

:

+. !.
.

:

' · ' : r ' : ' :-. : : '

. , : ! I! . ! . ! '-J ! .

:

~

···!· ··· ~· -·· !··

15.00 ....,....;.... J... J... ,.) ....,....1.... ,....:...[ ..;.
:

12 16 20 24

UTC

11845 11940

.... (.... !· ··· -~ ··· +· .. ·?·· ·!····~····!····

:

···r····r····{····r····i····1··\····1··
f 1l ~~ !j li 1~ : !.~ ~ 1~

8

20.00

:

':

~

17795

30.00

;

1: ·~,

.

~
l 1: • .
····1····~·/1···r

:
;
:

~

15155

MHz.

: :

·! ..

.
...;·.. .·;· ....i .... ....!' ... .... :....·:..
~

15345

25.00 ·· ··r~·~t·~·~··uur· ·:···r· ··:····:

I
: '
:
:


r.···~ · · · :····: · ···:····: ·· · · .

.
.

5.00

' '

-~··· ·-:-... '!". '·~ ... ·~ ...

:

9570

)--+----'-

rl . :. T:
..

;

9510

East Africa

I I . : :__I ! ! : ~ .

:

~~ \ ~

II ; : l \

-~ -~ _l/ :

u·c"

:

••••C••••C••·•·:· ·· • 7 · ·•• t ••• •J ••• -> ••• •l•• •• l •••• C•· • t••••

0.00

;

"

M'

. . : l

·· ~· ···r-/r··· -~ ····~ .... ;. ···f.\.· ~. .. --~···· ·
:1

5.00

.

i~

. ' .
.f, i '
25.00 ··· -:-~·r
r'lu" · ·r..

11945

East Coast To

,--..,....-,--,.--,-~.,........,...~.,........,...~.,..,

30.00

9585 9835
15160
9885 12035

5.00 ·····'.···.:.··.,.:. ·· ..:.··I -~····~·· · -~··· ·i····l····-~, .. ~- ·· · ~· ·

_J/: ~ :!! : [ ' i !-.kl

0.00

:

0

i , :

4

8

:

:

:

12 16 20 24

UTC

Octobr:r 1988

67

frequencyI
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200·0300
0200-0300 T-S
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200-0300
0200-0300 T-S
0215·0220
0230-0240

Radio RSA. South Africa
Radio Thailand, Bangkok
SBC Radio One. Singapore
SLBC. Colombo. Sn Lanka
Superpower KU SW. Utah
Voice of America. Washington
Voice of Asia. Taiwan
Voice of Free China. Taiwan
Voice of Kenya. Nairobi
WCSN. Boston. Massachusetts
WINB. Red Lion. Pennsylvania
WHAi. Noblesville. Indiana
WANO. New Orleans. Louisiana
WYFR. Oakland. Califo rnia
WYFR Satellite Net. California
Radio Nepal. Kathmandu
Port Moresby. Papua New Guinea

0230·0245TWFS Radio Budapest, Hungary
0230-0245

Radio Pakistan, Islamabad

0230-0300

BBC. London. England

Radio Netherland, Hllversum
0230·0300
0230·0300 T-A Radio Portugal, Lisbon
Radio Sweden. Stockholm
Radio Ti rana, Albania
All India Radio. New Deihl

0230-0300
0230-0300
0240-0250

Radio Berlin lnl'I. E. Germany
Radio Korea. Seoul, South Korea

0245·0300
0245-0300

9525
9580
9655
5010
6005
11 695
5995
7285
5985
6045
9850
15145
7400
7355
5950
9505
5005
3925
6020
9520
6110
15160
7010
17660
5975
9410
6020
6060
9705
9695
7065
3905
5960
7195
11830
6080
7275

11815
9615
11905
5052
9720

15120
11730

0300 UTC

11940
15425

6130
9680

9495
9680

5960
6080

9520

9835 11910

5985
6140

11570 15115 15580
6005 6175 7325
9515 9915
6165 9590 9895
9600 9635 9680
11 840
17840 SSB
9760
4860 4880 4895
5990 6 11 0 6120
7295 9550 9610
11870 15305
9620 9730 11785
15375

East Coast To

30. 00

~-.,...-..,---,.....,...,...-,---.,.-.,.......,..--.,.-~

· · • " • • l •••• C•• •• C • •

~

• ~ - ••• ~ ·

15.00
10.00

,;

~

,' ~

:

,

; '~

5.00
0.00

68

9495

5930 7095
9625
6165 9590 9895
5975 6005 6155
6195 7325 9410
9915 12095
9675
15195 17810 17825
17705
6120
11785
11715
15455
6135
11815
9615
11730

9545

9605

11860 15180
7145
15120
11730
15435

7270

Central Asia

~~-~-~~-..,.---

MHz.

30.00

....---~-~-~-......,
:

:

-.

MUF ::

Tff qurt: · ··. . :·. ,. .

20.00 ............................ )...................L....... .

:

15.00

15.00

10.00

10.00

:

~

j

~

... ?-- .

:

:

:

1 1

:

j

:
:

\

~\

:

\

UTC

Octobcr 1988

·· ·· r···~····-:-···r · ···

,

~

8

17850 17860 17880

20.00

....

~ ~
l : 1
),.
t
,,
~
~
j
, • -:- •• • "=' . .. ... ••• ! • • . • •••• •....•. •. .

_ l.,'~

4

7195
9890

·~•····~····~ ··• ~ ~••••~••··!·•••

:

~

:

····;····: /!....i· · ·t··:- ····:····t····i····:·\···
o

7165
9700

25.00

....i .... ~ .....;/ ·..;.....:....;.....~ ... -~ ....~ ·\: ~- .... ~ .. ..
...,

15575
7115
9600

9855
9730 11785
7400 15455

25.00

:

30.00

9435
9620
7205

East Coast To

Indian Ocean

MHz.

25.00

20.00

7460
6080
7150
15145
13695
7275
6170
7290
15425
Radio Moscow World Service. USSR17675
0300·0400
11695
0300-0400 T-S Superpower KUSW. Utah
WHRI. Noblesville. Indiana
7400
0300-0400
WANO. New Orl eans. Louisiana
7355
0300·0400
0300·0400
WYFR. Oakland. Californi a
15170
WYFR Satellite Net. California
9505
0300-0400
Radio Pakistan, Islamabad
5090
0300-0307
0300·0310
CBC Northern Quebec Service
6195
6020
0300·0325
Radio Netherland, Hilversum
BBC. London. England
3955
0300·0330
6175
9515
9475
0300-0330
Radio Cairo. Egypt
0300-0330
11 870
Radio Japan. Tokyo
2 1610
15150
0300·0345 A Radio New Zealand, Wellington
0300·0350
6010
Deulsche Welle, West Germany
9700
Radio Beijing, PR China
0300-0355
9770
15290
Radio Polonia. Warsaw. Poland
6095
0300-0355
9525
0300-0356
9580
Radio RSA. South Alrica
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
6030
0300·0400
6160
CBN. St. John's. Newfoundland
0300·0400
CBU, Vancouver, British Colombia
0300-0400
6160
CFCF, Montreal. Quebec
6005
0300·0400

East Coast To

South Africa
MHz.

0300-0330
Kol Israel. Jerusalem
0300-0330
Radio Berlin lnl'I. E. Germany
Radio Kiev. Ukrainian SSA
0300-0330
0300-0330
WINB. Red Lion. Pennsylvania
0300-0400 T-A KVOH. Rancho Simi. California
Radio Korea (South). Seoul
0300·0400
Radio Moscow. USSR
0300-0400

9775 15205

7165
4890
6040

[11 :00 PM EDT/ 8:00 PM PDT]

16 20

~ \.

24

:

:1

...

: '·

: ,

5.00 .... 1:~. 1.... .ri ...~r .

5.00
0.00
0

4

8

MONITORING TIMES

12

UTC

16

20

24

: •

: 1

l
.'..._J,';....•....
:

;

' :

. ~... . .

~

j .. .... .... ... . .... , •.

I

:

;

,, j

;

~~

~:

~

l

l

:

:

: •

:1

:

:

:

!

\;

·

~

:

!\

:

0.00 '----'"_..;..._
. _;:_,_:'""--''--'-:__;:;........:..~---'--'---': '-"""--'
"
0 4 8 12 16 20 24

UTC

frequencyI
0300-0400
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
0300-0400
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scotia
0300-0400
CKWX, Vancouver, British Colombia
0300-0400
CFAB, Toronl o, Onlarlo
0300-0400
(US) Far East Network. Tokyo
0300-0400
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
0300-0400 T-A KVOH, Rancho Simi, California
0300-0400
KYOI, Saipan
0300-0400
La Vaz Evangelica. Honduras
0300-0400
Radio Australia, Melbourne
0300-0400
0300-0400
0300-0400

Radio for Peace, Costa Rica
Radio Havana Cuba
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia

0300-0400
0300-0400
0300-0400
0300-0400
0300-0400

Radio Thailand , Bangkok
SBC Radio One, Singapore
SLBC, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Trans World Radio, Bonalre
Voice of America, Washington

0300-0400
0300-0400
0300-0400
0300-0400
0300-0400
0310-0330
0313-0400

Voice of Free China. Taiwan
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
Voice of the Mediteranean
Voice of Nicaragua. Managua
WCS N, Boston, Massachusetts
Valican Radio, Vatican City
Radio France Int'!, Paris

0330-0340 S-F Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
0330-0400

BBC, London, England

0330-0400
0330-0400
0330·0400
0330-0400
0330-0400

Radio
Radio
Radio
Radio
Radio

MHz.

30.00

Berlin lnt'I, E. Germany
Finland, Helsinki
Tanzania, Dar es Salaam
Tirana, Albania
Sweden, Stockholm

11775 15155

15160 15240 15320
17715 17795
6140 9770
6055 7345
9740 11 990
11905
5052 11940
9720 15425

0400 UTC

7260

0400-0425
0400-0426
0400-0430

ML

5960
6060

5965
6140

5975 6005 6155
9410 9915 12095
6165 11750
11755
9500

South East Asia

Far East

,__.___._ MUF : :

. rrur··t·· . 1·· ..i· ..
~
~
20.00 ····1..··1· ........ 1..... ...l. ... . r· ..
i

.

~

:

-! .. ··•.. ··•.. ··

MHz.

... ; .. .. i .... ; .... ~ .... ~ ..

-r. "·- .; . . ;...;. · : . · : . . ~. . . . .!.

15.00 ·- ·j.... ;.... 7... .;. .... i ... l.... ,... T ... ;.. .

15.00
'

L

5.00

1

~:

:;

'

:, . f . 1. ~ ~ .

~ ,.-'~

~ I1

:

0.00
0

4

8

15.00

'

..

.

·· ·~ . . . , i . . . . . . .

MONITORING TIMES

16 20 24

6165
9510

11760
9720 15425
9725

:'

5.00

5.00

·•·

:I

:

:

.

:

~

I'!

..

: , :

:

:

"

I\.l.
:

: :

~
:'

8

otc

16 20 24

~
:

:

:

: l /j
,

:

l l
:
:

.

:

0

4

8

:

.

..··!· ...... -~··

.... ; ........ ,..

1:

, ;

j •• .; - +- ·'

0.00

4

.

···• l • ·•• l ·•· t t·· · ·l·•···:.•···:.O···>· • ·•> •••

;t

0

9685 12035

11785
15180
15105
11980
11710
11730 11790

10.00 .. ··~ .. ·'~· ...i·. · · ~· .. ·1··..t...·t,'·. ·~· ..

10.00

9570 11630

13700
11730
5975 6005 6155
7120 7160 7185
9915 12095 15070

;

t:

0.00

utc

5026
11 905
11905 15330
6165 11750

20.00

<

1~1 -,~,/~

··· t:·· .. :••"•.·····.··· .... . .,.......: ····:····:····:···"(,o ····,··
1:
..
:
:
.
:
..
:
.
:
,:
:
:
:
:
•:
:
.
~
:

4976
9655
9710
6125
4620
3345
6155
11940
9850
9580
3955
6195
9410
15420
4620
9650
6005
9684
6135
9535
151.
9620
15160
9445
9645
9690
6030

25.00

: '. ;
· ·· ~·

9420
15330
15160

.-----~-.,---,-,-r-:--r.-

~'.

. ':.: . .........: ....: ... ·;..........
: ::......... ':"..
10.00 .,.,. ..:: .........
:
:
. :
.

9610 11630
15305

Pacific
30.00

30.00

20.00 .... ;. ...j...

4660
11690
17705
9395
11905
13645

East Coast To

MHz.

25.00

-f .... !.. ··!

Radio Netherland. Hllversum
Radio RSA South Africa
BBC. London, England

0400-0430
La Vaz Evangelica, Honduras
0400-0430 M Radio Norway lnt'I, Oslo
0400-0430
SLBC, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Radio Tanzania, Dar es Salaam
0400-0430
0400·0430
Swiss Radio lnt'I, Berr:ie
0400-0430
Trans World Radio, Bonaire
0400-0430 S,M WINB, Red Lion. Pennsylvania
0400-0445
Radio Berlin lnt'I, E. Germany
0400·0450
Radio Pyongyang. North Korea
0400-0450
Voice of Turkey, Ankara
0400-0455
Radio Beijing, PR China
0400-0455
RAE. Buenos Aires. Argentina
0400-0500
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV

7175
9800 11670

15435 17690 21700

[12:00 AM EDT / 9:00 PM PDT]

0400-0405
Radio Uganda, Kampala
Radio Thailand, Bangkok
0400-0410
0400-0410
RAI, Rome, Italy
0400-0415
Radio Berlin lnt'I, E. Germany
0400·0420
Radio Botswana. Gabarone
0400·0420 T-S Radio Zambia. Lusaka
0400·0425
Radio Bucharest. Romania

9540

7170 7200
9550 11835
9660

7135
9790
11995
4890
6040

11940
15145
3905
11670
15150
7430
9710
11790

0335-0400
Radio New Zealand. Wellinglon
0340-0350 T-S Voice of Greece. AJhens
0350·0400
RAI, Rome. Italy
0350-0400
Radio Yerevan, Armenian SSA

East Coast To

25.00 ····:~-~~~~·
1

0330-0400
United Arab Emirates Radio
0330·0400 S,M WINB, Red Lion, Pennsylvania
0335-0340
All India Radio, New Delhi

East Coast To

~----.,.----...,..--.,---..,..-,

J

6030
6130
6060
6070
3910
9720
13695
17760
4620
11945
15395
13660
9655
5930
9630
9655
5010
6005
9535
6035
9525
5985
6045
9765
6100
9850
6150
3965
9550
11700
3925
6020
9520
3955
6195
6125
9635
9664
7065
1 1705

~

12

16 20 24

UTC

October 1988

69

frequency!
0400·0500
0400·0500
0400·0500
0400-0500
0400·0500
0400·0500
0400·0500
0400·0500
0400·0500
0400-0500
0400·0500
0400·0500
0400·0500

CBC Northern Quebec Service
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
CSU, Vancouvar, British Colombia
CFCF, Montreal , Quebec
CFCN. Calgary, Alberta
CHNS. Halifax. Nova Scotia
CKWX, Vancouver. British Colombia
CFRB, Toronto. Ontario
(US) Far Easl Network, Tokyo
FEBC. Manila. Philippines
HCJB. Quito. Ecuador
KYOI, Saipan
Radio Australia, Melbourne

0400·0500
0400-0500

Radio for Peace, Costa Rica
Radio Havan a Cuba

0400-0500

Radio Moscow. USSR

0400-0500
0400-0500
0400-0500
0400·0500 T-S
0400·0500

0400·0500
0400·0500
0400-0500
0400·0500
0400·0500
0400-0500
0425-0440
0430·0455
0430·0500

MHz.

30.00

Radio New Zealand, Welling ton
Radio Sofia, Bulgaria
SBC Radio One. Singapore
Superpower KUSW, Ulah
Voice of America. Washington

Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
Voice of lhe Mediterranean
WCSN, Boston. Massachusells
WHAi, Noblesville, Indiana
WANO. New Orleans, Louisiana
WYFR. Oakla nd, California
RAI, Rome, Italy
Radio Austria lnl'I. Vienna
BBC, London. England

6195
6160
6160
6005
6030
6130
6080
6070
3910
11 850
9720
17780
11910
15320
13660
5965
9770
6170
7390
11845
151 80
17850
15150
71 15
5010
9815
5995
7280
11925
6045
9765
9870
7355
6185
5950
5980
6155
3955
7120

0430-0500
0430-0500

Radio Tirana, Albania
0430·0500
0430·0500 S,M Trans World Radio, Bonalre
Trans World Radio, Swaziland
0430·0500
Voice o f Nigeria, Lagos
0430·0500
0432·0500 A. M FEBA. Seychelles
0445·0500
Radio Berlin lnl'I, East Germany

11 775 15155
11 945 15160 15240
17795

5052 11 940
7170 7200
9575 11835

ML
7400
9505 15566
7275 15330
9875 154 10
5975 6005
7185 9410

6195
9510

0500·0510
CBC Northern Quebec Service
0500-0510
Radio Lesotho, Maseru
0500·0510 M·A Radio Zambia, Lusaka
0500·0515
Deutsche Welle, West Germany
0500·0515
0500·0515
0500·0530 A
0 500-0530
0500-0530 M
0500-0530 S, M
0500-0530
0500·0550

GBC, Accra, Ghana
Vatican Radio, Vatican City
FEBA. Seychelles
Radio Berlin lnl'I. East Germany
Radio Norway lnl'I. Oslo
Trans Wortd Radio, Bonalre
Trans World Radio, Swaziland
Deutsche Welle, West Germany

0500-0555
0500·0600
0500-0600

Radio Beijin g. China
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
BBC, London. England

0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600

CBC Northern Que bec Service
CBU, Vancouver, British Colombia
CFCF, Montreal, Quebec
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
CHNS. Halifax. Nova Scotia

9625
6165
7225

9565 9765

15190
17820 (irr)
9620 1 1785
15310
5055
6120

7210
6130

South America

30.00

MHz.
~-..,.........,.-.,-...,---:---,-,.......,,,.-.,-...,...,

30.00

20.00

20.00

15.00 ... ;.... ;....t···.:. ....;...

15.00

-.~

.
:

:

10.00 ... ~- ... ~-··. +.
(

•:

·~~

~

j •• • " ' • C• • • •C·

~

~

October 1988

:

;1

~

..

c..

0.00 ~-~--------'
4
8 12 16 20 24
0

UTC

:

~

5.00 ....'i····
0. 00

..
:. :

!I

1:

:

..

.. .:· ...
.. :

~

.. .. .

....:.... '....:- ·~ ; .

:

:

~
:

, ;

~

.

4

8

MONITORING T IMES

..... ...... ....·..... : ....

~

,

16 20 24

UTC

~

5.00
0.00

,.. >
: .. ~,·-. :'_

~

.;. '•' .;,,, . '·O ... ·•.. ·' ~· .·· I· . . . ; .... ~ ..

fi ,'.~~
:1 :

:

':• ::
~
.: . \.,:-~

: .:
:1 .

:.

::

.
:

.

.

'

.

~

'

:
:

.

.

.

.... ····!· .. ·!··· -~···· +r· + ···+··-~· · ·-~· ··~· .. · ! ... , . .
~
. ~ ~
:
: :' :
. ~ ~ :.
~ ~ :
: : ·=
: •;
: ~ ,' ;;. .....,. ..............
. . ,. ................
~ ·~
..
........:,...............

..

\.

.

12

10.00

' :

L-.-'-__._.......___.__._~~~~.___._.

0

~-~---~--.....-......

15.00 ....

:'\

.
:
:'
·j ·...·;· ...•j• ... .~ '/ · ~ ... .;·· ... ~ ..... ... ·~ .... ~·\: 'i..
:

: ::
- ~-~-.;.-.;---!
.

.: "

1- .• ~

:

....:.....:.....:.... ·;··· '°f ~t'·i

10.00

:,-..:
"'
ll ~
. ~,' ~
_.~" •
.. . .. . i" .:',.\•.. ;•• ../;,. ":
. .

.
1,~

9635

11730 11790
5898 6195 7105
7185 9 410 9510
12095 15420 17120
9625

Central America/Caribbean

20.00

70

6195
4800
3345
7150
11 765
49 15
9645
15325
5965
11735
9535
3205
5960
9700
9690
6030
5975
7160
9580
6195
6160
6005
6030
6130

Australia & Malaysia

25.00

; i

17820 (irr)
11785

East Coast To

25.00

l ~

7205

East Coast To

MHz.

9765

11835

East Coast To

~------~~

' '· j

9750 11945
7225 9565

[1:00 AM EDT/ 10:00 PM PDT)

0500 UTC

7150 7165 7290
9600 9765 9890
12065 13645 13765
15415 15425 15455
17860 17880
17705

6035
9525
15205

11945 12095 15070

9655

6140

6035

BBC. London . England *
Deutsche Welle, West Germany

25.00

5.00

9580
15420
7210
7150
11765
9480
9535
3205
7255
15325
9620

9625

:1

'.I

.

::

:"' .:
=
' :
:
I

-+-t-1

:

'.. ~

1--....:.__.:__;,_..:..._.;___;__;_...;..._;'--'--'-~

0

4

8

12

UTC

16 20

24

frequencyI
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500-0600
0500·0600
0500-0600

CKWX. Vancouver, Brlllsh Colombia
CFRB, Toronto. Ontario
(U S) Far East Network, Tot<yo
FEBC, Manila, Philippines
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
KYOI, Saipan
Radio Australia. Melbourne
Radio for Peace, Cost Rica
Radio Havana Cuba
Radio Japan. Tot<yo
Radio Kuwait
Radio Moscow. USSR

0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500·0600
0500-0600
0500-0600
0500-0600

Radio New Zealand. Wellington
Radio Thailand, Bangkok
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
SBC Radio One, Singapore
Spanish Foreign Radio, Madrid
Superpower KUSW, Utah
Swaziland Commercial Radio
Voice of America, Washington

s
s
s

Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
0500·0600
Voice of the Nedilerannean
0500-0600
0500·0600 IRR Voice of Nicaragua, Managua
Voice of Nigeria. Lagos
0500·0600
0500-0600
WCSN, Boston, Massachusetts
0500-0600
WINB, Red Lion. Pennsylvania
0500-0600
WHRI, Noblesville. Indiana
0500-0600 M-A WMLK. Bethel. Pennsylvania
WRNO, New Orleans, Louisiana
0500-0600
0500-0600
WYFR. Okeechobee. Florida
0510·0520
Radio Botswana. Gaborone
0527·0600 F FEBA. Seychelles
BBC, London. England*
0530·0545
Radio Bucharest, Romania

0530·0555

MHz.

6080
6070
3910
11 850
6230 9720 11 775
17780
11 910 1 5160 15240
13660
5965 6035 9655
11870 178 10
15345
7290 7390 9600
9890 1 1845 12065
13645 15320 15465
15540 17880
151 50 17705
9655 11905
11080
5010 5052 11 940
9630
9815
6155 9705
5995 6035 7170
9575
6045
9765 ML
6100
7255 15120 15185
9870
151 45
7355 7400
9455
6185
5950 9520
3356 4820 7255
17820
3990 6050 6140
9750
9640 11840 11 940
15380 17720

Radio Finland, Helsinki
Radio Netherland, Hllvcrsum
Radio Tirana. Albania
Trans World Radio, Swaziland
UAE RAdio. United Arab Emirates
Ghana Broadcasting Corp., Accra
Voice of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur

0530-0600
0530·0600
0 530·0600
0530-0600
0530·0600
0 555·0 600
0 555·0600

17795
9770

[2:00 AM EDT/ 11 :00 PM PDT]

0600 UTC

9610
13605
15500

9435
3366
6165
61 85
6165
17820
7113
11 910
15315
17750
17795
Trans World Radio, Swaziland
6070
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
6045
6230
HCJB, Quito. Ecuador
Radio Berlin lnl'I, East Germany
5965
13610
4850
Radio Cameroon. Yaounde
Radio Pyongyang, Nor1h Korea
9530
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
6030
BBC, London, England
5975
9410
15070
CBC Northern Quebec Service
6 195
CBU. Vancouver. British Colombia
6160
CFCF, Montreat, Quebec
6005
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scotia
6130
CKWX, Vancouver, British Colombia 6080

Kot Israel, Jerusalem
0600·06 15
0600·0615
Radio Ghana. Accra
0600·0615 M·A Radio Zambia, Lusaka
Vatican Radio. Vatican Clly
0600·0620
Radio Netherlands. Htlversum
0600·0625
0 600·0630 F FEBA. Ma11e, Scyct1e11es
0600-0630
Laotian National Radio
0600-0630
Radio Australia, Melbourne

7280
0600·0630
0600·0630
0600·0645
0600-0645
0 600-0645
0600·0650
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600·0700
0600·0700
0600·0700
0600·0700
0600-0 700

7210
15340

s

Eastern Europe

MHz.

30.00

~----..,-------..,~

i MUF :
25.oo .... ·:i·rr·[ur·-r
. ·;. .1...r . ,,. ..,...,.

25.00

20.00 ...

20.00

20.00

15.00

15.00

15.00

10.00

10.00

5.00

, , MUF !. .

.

.

:

: .

~

~ ,... . ..,.:
. . . . :
:\ .
.
·1·..·r····r···? ··· ·r· ~/r·· · ····1··\1.. ·+·
~

.

:
:

.

:

.

:• :
:1 :
:
1:
1:
:

,

.

· ·· · C••·•C· • • • O:•· · · ·:O• •• •l •• • <l_. •. , .••• • • , .•

.

\

;~~l~~'

:

:

:

.

;

'

'~ - i -t- t - + /~

0.00
0

4

151 80
11790
7105 7150
9640 12095

Western Europe

~-x~ ·.rrrur T

.

15160
11 730
6195
9600
15280

West Coast

..

.... (. ... i ...

9720 11775
6115 9645 11 810

Midwest To

25.00

10.00

11 945 15 160 15240
15395 15425 17715

Midwest To

~--~-~--~

~

11605 12080
4915
7235
9645
9715

East Coast To

30.00

~

6120 9670 11715 15185
6165 97 15
7300
5055 72 10
15435 17775 21700
4915
6175 9750 15295

8

12

l'

:

!

UTC

MONITORING TIMES

.
='

.

:\
: •
: •

.

•:

·

.~

····t····t·· ··~ ·

·

20 24

:

:

0.00
16

. : : ..
···:·····.·····,1···
:
: ,,.;

5.00

5.00

, :
: 1 !

:

-t-/

'--"'--'--'--"--'-.....__"--'--'--'--"~

0

4

8

Jtc

16

20

24

0.00
0

4

8

UTC

October 1988

16

20 24

71

frequency=
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700

CFRB, Toronto, Ontari o
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
King of Hope, South Lebanon
KYOI, Saipan
Radio Havana Cuba
Radio Korea, Seoul, South Korea
Radio Kuwait
Radio Moscow, USSR

0600-0700
0600-0700 A,S
0600-0700 s
0600-0700
0600-0700 s
0600-0700
0600-0700

Radio New Zealand, Wellington
Radio Thailand. Bangkok
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
SBC Radio One, Singapore
Superpower KUSW. Utah
Trans World Radio Monte Carlo
Voice of America, Washington

0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0600-0700
0615-0630
0615-0630
0615-0700
0630-0700
0630-0655
0630-0655
0630-0700

Voice of Asia. Taiwan
Voice of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
Voice of the Mediterranean
Voice of Nigaria. Lagos
WCSN, Boston. Massachusetts
WHAi, Noblesville, Indiana
WMLK. Bethel, Pennsylvania
WANO. New Orleans. Louisiana
WYFR, Oakland, California
WYFR Satellite Net. California
Radio Canada lnt'I, Montreal
Vatican Radio. Vatican City
Deutsche Welle, West Germany
CPBS-1 , China•
Radio Austria lnt'I. Vienna
Radio Netherland. Hilversum
Radio Australia, Melbourne

M-A

T-S
M-F
M-A
A

6070
39 10
6215
17780
9525
6060
15345
7150
7300
11645
15500
12045
9655
11880
5010
6155
7105
5995
6125
7325
11915
7205
6175
9765
15185
9495
7365
9455
6185
9705
9520
15245
15190
11765
11330
6000
9895
11945
15395
17795

9570

7275

7195 7200 7290
7390 9765 11690
12050 12065 15320
15540
15150
11905

Ractio
Radio
Radio
Swiss

6080
7200
9540

6035
7170
9530
11925

0630-0700
0630-0700 AS
0645-0700
0645-0700
0645-0700
0645-0700 M-F
0645-0700

Trans Worlcl Radio, Swaziland
Voice o f Kenya, Nairobi
BBC, London. England •
HCJB. Quito. Ecuador
Radio Berlin lnl 'I. East Germany
Radio Canada Intl. Montreal
Radio Ghana, Accra

0645-0700

Radio Bucharest. Romania

0700 UTC

6095
7200
9550

Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

0700-0710

Radio Bucharest. Romania

7400

0700-0710
0700-0715
0700-0730

Radio Sierra Leone. Freetown
Radio Gl1ana (HS), Accra
BBC, London. England

11580

0700-0730
0700-0730

Burma Bcasting Service, Rangoon
Radio Australia, Melbourne

0700-0730
0700-0730
0700-0730
0700-0730
0700-0745
0700-0750
0700-0800
0700-0800

Radio Ber lin lnt'I, East Germany
Radio Bucharest, Romania
Radio New Zealand, Wellington
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
Radio Berlin lnt'I, East Ger many
Radio Pyongyang, North Korea
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
AWA, Forll, Italy

151 85 17875
15590 17605
15410
15240 15315
17715 17750

25.00

MUF! . .,,. . ,,...
. . . . . . . ..uurr

····i····; .... ,..

30.00

25.00

. . ~:.--- )~. -. -;~ . LUF
¥.µF :

25.00

15.00
....

0

72

4

.
utc 16
I :.

!\

0.00

8

Oc1ober 1988

!··"i··

;
?,

10.00

~

:

.. "':-.

:

."' ...

.... ... -:- ... -:-

.

-~ ·'~·;

....

15.00

:

:

I

:

:

· · ··~ · ··~·····~"" 1" ··~ · ··~· · ·· ! ··

4915
6195 7150 9410
9640 12095 15070
15160 15240 15395
17750
17080 21540 21645
15150
11810
17795

·! ····

····~, · ··f

:•

... (..

10.00

5.00

4

·· ·•···· ···-< · · ·<~·; ·«·

.-

-~- ~-/

0

. •• ; • . . • i

~

"

0.00

••

8

MON ITORING T IM ES

utc 16

. . t>n.J. . .

j... 1...

·~

~.-:_-=- -~\ \

ii.f\, :, L~_;......_, . . '\\. _-

5.00

\

-

0.00
20 24

. .j. ···~· ··)·· ..

. -:- .....

';

.L ... j ..•• .~··/;-

1

20 24

5985
6140

. . . . . . "!.

·• =
:

:
....•...
. !'."'....;.,: ..
,;

5960
6080

15250 15335 17790
21665

20.00 ...;....;.... ;. ... !... '...

~

. • j .. .•

4890
6040

Central Africa

,----.,.---,-..,.---,--.,.--=-:---,--,----,--,

15.00

11600
15250 15335 17790
21665

MHz.

30.00

20.00

7260 11945
9720 11775
17880 21540 21645

Midwest To

MHz.

20.00 -

5.00

s

West Afri ca

,.--...--~~---~--.-,

... i ...

3925
6020
9520
11940
17805
5980
3366
5975
9600
9730
9655
17715
15240
21600
12045
11 880
5965
15340
15265
7257

9750 15295

17730
13790
15550
6155
11930
15160
15425

7270 151 20
9500
6165 9535 12030
17570
6070 7210 9725

[3:00 AM EDT/ 12:00 AM PDT]

Midwest To

30.00

.. f... -~ ..+... -~

21600
6 135
7205
3985
15430
5055
7270
6150
6230
15240
15245
6130
11 705
11940
17805

0700-0703

Middle East

10.00

Bucharest, Romania
Polonia, Warsaw, Poland
Tirana. Albania
Radio lnl'I, Berne

5052 11940

Midwest To

MHz.

0630-0700
0630-0700
0630-0700
0630-0700

0

.

: I

~-~

4

·~

I

8

utc 16

20 24

frequencyI
0700·0600
0700-0600
0700-0600
0700-0600
0700-0600
0700-0000
0700-0600
0700-0600
0700-0800

CBU, Vancouver. British Colombia
6130
CFCF, Montreal, Quebec
6005
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scotia
6130
CKWX, Vancouver, British Columbia 6080
CFRB, Toronto, Ontario
6070
11630
ELWA. Monrovia. Liberia
(US) Far East Network. Tokyo
3910
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
6130
11925
0700-0800
King of Hope, Soulh Lebanon
6215
0700 0600
KYOI, Saipan
17760
0700-0800
Radio Ghana, Accra
6130
0700-0800
Radio Havana Cuba
9525
0700-0800
Radio Japan, Tokyo
5990
21695
0700-0800
Radio Korea, Seoul, South Korea
6060
0700-0800
Radio Kuwait
15345
0700-0600
Radio Moscow, USSR
7290
12050
0700-0800 A.
Radio Thailand, Bangkok
9655
0700-0800
SBC-1, Singapore
11940
0700-0600
Soloman Islands Broadcasting Corp 9545
0700-0600
Radio Moscow, USSR
7290
12050
6155
0700-0800 s Superpower KUSW, Ulah
0700-0800
Trans World Radio, Swaziland
6070
0700-0800
Voice of Free China, Taiwan
5965
0700-0600 A.
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
7270
6175
0700-0800
Voice of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
0700-0800
Voice of the Medtlerranean
9765
0700-0800
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
15120
0700-0800
WCSN, Boslon, Massachusetts
9495
0700-0600
7365
WHRI, Noblesville, Indiana
9455
0700-0600 M-A WMLK. Bethel, Pennsyvlania
7355
0700-0600
WYFR. Oakland. California
13670
0715-0730
Radio Korea, Seoul, Soulh Korea
0715-0730 M·A Vatican Radio, Valican City
11725
0715-0735 s FEBA, Mahe, Seychelles
15115
0720-0730 M-A Vatican Radio, Valican City
6246

s

9610

7300 9580 12010
13710 15135 15260

•••• , ••• • , •••• • ;.

• I •••• (••

15.00 ____ ,__

h :

):'!
j
i_I,
> ' :
.... ·.·...:. .-~ .:....:.....:.i.
1: •:
,.

'

0.00

_,

9725

·-?

0

9750 15295
ML
15185
7400
9520 9852-5
15575
151 90
17765
9645 11740

0fc 16

!vfONITORJNG TIMES

9725

7155
15235
9505

9740

5960
6080

5985
6140

7235
9715
9750 15295
9610 9745 11 635
15525
11835
17670
17765
9725
7355 9652.5
11630 15160 15160

30.00

. MUF:

, . MUF,

,-u·-·-F--.
25.00 ---- ----·----,--..
--~--; l'
'

25.00 - -- ·Fx~-~--4ur r

20.00

20.00

:

:

.

:

..\,.

.

20 24

2 1705
9535
9695

Indian Ocean

30.00

:.

:

--> .....

.,
"

0

4

~

· i\· ·j····~· ·

'.

:

·-r-··.; ....;....

·~ ····-:- ··· -:- ···~·

·~ · ··

; .... ~····

· ··· ~ "· ·1

.....

, :
.\:

.....:..... :....

.
10.00 ·----;-c

: : ,;-- .....~..

, •:

;'. i,'

j

: ':

:I }

5.00 -_-/-- --~-- ..).. ---:----f- - f -~J. .... --·-----~----,~·;'"

ili

0.00

i

.... i ..: .i .... ~.1. ......; .. ·> •• ··• .••

5.00

•• ••t • ••I ••

15.00
";

- ~-

: :: j, :

ii

8

15270
7110
11850
17705
9915
15360

Midwest To

MHz.

0.00
4

11755
6020
9675
15250
7230
11955

MHz.

=
: · ::
: •:

':

4890
6040

3925
6020
9520
0600-0605
Soloman Islands Broadcasting Corp 9545
0600-0615 M-A Radio Zambl:i, Lusaka
6165
0800-0825
Radio Netherland. Hllversum
9630
0800-0825
Voice of Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur
6175
0800-0830
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
6130
11 925
0600-0630
Radio Bangladesh. Dhaka
12030
Radio Tirana. Albania
0600-0630
9500
Voice of Islam. Pakislan
0600-0630
15525
0600-0635 s FEBA. Mahe, Seychelles
15325.
Trans World Radio, Swaziland
0600-0635
6070
WYFR. Oakland. California
0600-0645
6065
0600-0650
9530
Radio Pyongyang, North Korea

10.00 .... ____ ;_ -·jf -~ ---•:

[ ML]
11720
9560
60 10
96 10
15235
60 10
9640
9715
17640
6165
71 15
15355
6140
11 840
7345

0600-0805 M·F Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

15.00

- :_,_: ,h_; -"J:-' ·

Czecho~;ovakla

[ML]

[4:00 AM EDT/1:00 AM PDT]

0800 UTC

South Africa

·- - - MUF i
-;--.. ;----~·· cur·-~-···'···- =····= . ··;·--, . -

London. England•
London. England
Netherland, Hilversum
Prague, Czechoslovakia
Radio lnt'I, Berne
Free Europe, Munich•

Radio Prague,

0745-0800

7300 9580 12010
13710 15135 15260
11905

East Africa

25.00

5.00

w

Midwest To

~-------~

10.00

BBC,
BBC,
Radio
Radio
Swiss
Radio

Midwest To

30.00

20.00

0730-0745
0730-0600
0730-0800
0730-0800
0730-0800
0740-0750

7105
2310
2465
2325
9655
6120
5990
7205
11 935
3975
9600
9630
11665
3985
5985
11695
6050
9760
6055

0745-0800 M-F Radio Canada lnt'I, Monlreal

9570

s

MHz.

Trans World Radio, Monie Carlo
ABC, Alice Springs, Australia
ABC, Kalheri ne, Auslralia
ABC, Tennant Creek, Auslralia
Radio Auslralia, Melbourne
Radio Finland, Helsinki
All India Radio, New Delhi

9745 11835

15195 15235 17810
7275

0725-0600
0730-0000
0730-0600
0730-0600
0730-0600
0730-0600
0730-0735

:

;•

'

. • •'I·••' I·'~ .~ · ·

,

'l

8

Jtc 16

20 24

~~~~:~~~~~~

0

4

8

12. 16 20 24

UIC

October 1988

73

frequencyI
ABC.
ABC.
ABC.
BBC.

2310 (ML)
2485
2325 (ML)
9410 9640
15070 15360
CBN, SI. John's, Newfoundland
6160
0800·0900
0800·0900
CBU. Vancouver, Brll1sh Colombia
6160
CFCF, Monlreal. Quebec
0800·0900
6005
0800·0900
6030
CFCN, Calgary, Albel1a
0800·0900
6 130
CHNS. Halifax. Nova Scotia
CKWX, Vancouver. Brilish Colombia 6080
0800·0900
0800-0900
CFRB. Toronto. Ontario
6070
0800·0900
3910
(US) Far East Network, Tol<yo
0800·0900
King of Hope, South Lebanon
6215
0800-0900
KNLS. Anchor Point. Alaska
6150
11 805
0800-0900
KTWR. Guam
KYOI, Salpan
11 900
0800-0900
0800-0900
Radio Australia. Melbourne
5995 6080
9710 11 720
0800-0900
Radio Moscow. USSR
7290 11845
15135 15460
17880
0800·0900
Radio for Peace. Costa Rica
13660
0800-0900
SBC Radio One. Singapore
5010 5052
0800·0900 s Superpower KUSW. Utah
6135
0800·0900
Trans World Radio. Monie Carlo
7105
0800·0900
Voice of Indonesia, Jakal1a
11790 15105
0800-0900 A.S Voice of Kenya, Na irobi
7270
0800-0900
Voice or Nigarla. Lagos
7255 15185
0800·0900
WHRi, Noblesville, Indiana
7365 9620
WYFR, Oakland, California
0800·0900
6065 7365
0815·0830
Radio Austria lnl'I. Vienna
6155 11915
17870
0815·0845 M·F Voice of America. Washington DC
7175 9575
11915 15600
(ML)
0815·0900 A.S Radio Berlin lnl'I, East Germany
6040 7185
21540
All India Radio, New Deihl
0830-0840
5960 5990
6050 6065
0800·0900
0800·0900
0800·0900
0800·0900

Alice Springs, Australia
Katherine. Australia
Tennant Creek. Australia
London. England

s

Radio Austria lnl'I, Vienna
0830·0855
0830·0855 M·A Radio Netherland, Hilversum
0830·0900
Bhutan Bcasling Service, Thimpu
0830·0900
FEBC, Manila. Philippines
HCJB, Oullo, Ecuador
0830·0900
Radio Beijing. China
0830·0900
0830·0855
Radio Finland. Helsinki
0830·0900
Radio Netherland. Hilversum
0830-0900
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia
0830·0900
Radio Sofia, Bulgaria
0830·0900
Swiss Radio l nl'I, Berne

11860 12095
15400

9580

s

0630·0900
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
0840·0850 M·A Voice of Greece. Alhens
Radio Prague. Czechoslovakia
0645·0900
0850·0900
All India Radio. New Delhi

9655

13680 13710
17685 17850

7140 7160 7250
7295 9610 11 850
15250 17705
11 915 15410 15415

15350
9745
11 755
9560
2 1486
17840
11 720
9885

0900 UTC
0900·0905
0900·09 10

Africa No. 1, Gabon
All India Radio, New Delhi

0900·0910

Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

7200
5960
6050
7110
7250
11 850
3295
6020
9520
6548
11 695
11850

9620 11 580
15410 15415
9750 11 710
17715 21500
9730 21465
6010
6100

Voice of Lebanon, Beirut
0900·0910
0900·0925 M·F BAT, Brussels. Belgium
0900·0930
FEBC. Manila, Phili ppines

6020
6140

15200
5990 60 10 6020
6065 6100 6140
7140 7150 7160
7280 7295 9610
15235 15250 17705
4890 5960 5965
6040 6080 6140

15510
15350

Midwest To

Central Asia

South East Asia

Far East

MHz.

30.00 ............-------~

30.00 .--- - -- - -- -.....

=:
. *VF..,:. . ,'. . : '
--:--: ; lUF
: : l
l :
20.00 .... ··:· ·:··..-~-· ; : ,

25.00

! ... .! ... ,.... ,.

... .~- ~UF l .... .
··r-1UUf I

j

.. ....}.... ......... .... ' .. ..: ..

····:··..

13685 17830

[5:00 AM EDT/ 2:00 A M PDT]

Midwest To

~

21705

15630
7345 9505
5990 6010 6020
6065 6100 6140
7140 7150 7160
7280 7295 9610
15235 15250 17705

Midwest To

25.00

11925
15440
11 755

11940

MHz.

..

711 0
7280
15235
6155
9630
6035
11850
6130
9700
6120
9630
11 685
9700
9560
21695
15 120
9855
6055
5960
6050
7110
7250
11 850

l...

20.00 ···· ················ ·· ·I·· · ··i··· · ·~· ..·(··
..

15.00 ....

15.00

••• •.• -:- •• . -:- •.. ·? . .. ..

10.00
5.00

15.00

:'. I... . . . ~. . .!...) .........,....\... ...... ·.. :
.. : l r~ I J,·f ;..
5.00

10.00
1,. . .t . . .; _ . . . :
;, :
=,-r ~ . ~' = ·' .

.:

j

:

.

i

;

!

;.

:

. ':.

·~

: : . u f\

~--"---"--"--"---'--"--'-'

0

7-t

4

8

UTC

Oc1ober 1988

16 20 24

:

.~
. :

~

0.00

I

0

4

:

;:

8

MON ITORING TIMES

~ :' 1

, .•

10.00
:.

~

• • • : ·· •• : .... ~·· •••.... . ..... . . ·:· . ·1 : •••• : •• •

:t

0.00

~

:"

••• • ... • · •C· •··•>· ·· <····· • •· ·' '°" "'' I• •• I •• • • •• • • C• • • • C• • &. C• •

~

··••··· •··· ·· ··

.

5.00

:
:

UTC

0.00
16 20 24

..

:.

: \

:

~

•:

:

.

~

~/ ~

;,

.,

•• • • ; •••. ; •••• ~ .. . ~ • •• • ~ • •• . ; ••• ,~ •• •• ; \. .
:
.
: • ;
:
:
• !
:•

•• · I

1~

; ·- ~-·l
l ~~
~~~~~
· ~'~'~;~' ~:...._~~--'

0

4

8

12 16 20 24

UIC

frequencyI
0900·0930
0900·0930
0900·0930
0900·0930
0900·0930 A, s
0900·0950
0900·1000
0900·1000
0900-1000
0900·1000
0900·1000
0900·1000

s

0900·1000
0900-1000
0900-1000
0900-1000
0900- 1000
0900-1000
0900-1000
0900-1000
0900-1000
0900-1000
0900·1000
0900- 1000
0900·1000
0900· 1000
0900-1000
0900·1000
0900·1000
0900·1000
0900·1000
0900·1000
0900·1000
0900·1000
0900·1000

MHz.

30.00

s
s

KTWR. Agana. Guam
Nippon Broadcasllng Corp.
Radio Beijing, China
Radio Nelherland, Hllversum
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia
Deutsche Welle, West Germany

11 805
3925
9700 11 755
9630 21485
11685 17840
9720 15510
21680
ABC, Alice Springs. Australia
2310 [ML]
ABC, Kalhertne, Australia
2485
ABC. Tennant Creek, Australia
2325 [ML]
9670
Advenllst World Radio, Portugal
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
6030 9530
9410 9740
BBC, London, England
11860 11955
15400 15360
6005
CFCF, Montreal, Quebec
6030
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6130
CHNS, Halifax. Nova Scotia
CKWX, Vancouver, Brillsh Colombia 6080
6070
CFRB, Toronto, Ontario
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
3910
6130 9745
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
King of Hope, South Lebanon
6215
KNLS. AnchOr Point, Alaska
6150
11900
KYOI, Saipan
4450 6085
Radio Afghanistan, Kabul
5995 6080
Radio Australia. Melbourne
9710 9760
Radio Japan. Tokyo
11885
Radio Korea, Seoul. Soulh Korea
7550 13670
12055 13710
Radio Moscow, USSR
15460 17880
Radio for Peace, Costa Rica
135660
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia
6055 7345
Radio Tanzania, Oar es Salaam
7165
SBC Radio One. Singapore
5010 5052
Superpower KUSW, Utah
6135
Trans World Radio, Monte Carlo
7105
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
7270
Voice of Nigeria. Lagos
7255 15120

7180
7345

9725 11 955
9505

11785
9745
6085
11755

17765 21600
11 925
15435 17720
15440

[6:00 AM EDT / 3:00 AM PDT)

11925
1000-1030
1000-1030
1000-1030
1000-1030
1000-1030
1000-1030
1000·1030

15435 17720
9580 9655
11720 15415

15135 15295

9505 [ML]
11940

15185

1000-1030
1000·1030
1000·1045
1000-1055
1000·1100
1000·1100
1000·1100
1000·1100
1000·1 100
1000·1100

Deutsche Welle, West Germany
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
Radio Afghanistan, Kabul
Radio Beijing, China
Radio Norway lnl'I, Oslo
Radio Tanzania, Oar es Salaam
Swiss Radio lnt'I, Berne

s

Voice of Elhlopla, Addis Ababa
Voice of Vietnam, Hanoi
Radio Berlin lnt'I, East Germany
Trans World Radio, Monte Carlo
ABC, Alice Springs, Australia
ABC, Katherine. Australia
ABC, Perth, Australia
ABC, Tennant Creek, Australia
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
AJI India Radio, New Delhi

A

9735
6130
4450
9700
21705
7165
9560
21695
9560
12020
9665
7105
2310
2485
9610
2325
6030
11 860

9885 13685 17830

15010
21465 21540
[ML]

(ML)
9530 9700
11915 15130 15335

Central America/Caribbean

MHz.

30.00 ,.-,--,-..,--,--:---:--,.---,---,-..,---,--,-,

20.00

T~r~urrT··r··:·

·tJrrl . III~--·: · ·

f\
.
.
.
,
.
.
.
.
.
Y
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
, : h.LLV ! ! l . . .
t..

5.00 .... i....

L...;.....:....~l---'~~l'--~
l _,_
~ -'--'----'---'~'-'

4

1000 UTC

11755 15440
17795

Australia & Malaysia

, , MUF1 . : . , , .

0

9565
9750 11750
12095 15070
17790 18080

BBC, London, England*
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
KTWR, Guam
Radio Beijing, China
Radio Finland, Helsinki
Radio Sweden lnl'I, Stockholm
BBC, London. England*
Radio Prague. Czechoslovakia

Pacific

20.00 ····i·····~··· ~-····~·····f ····~····f ····~·· ·j····{· ···~·····;··

0.00

093().0945
0930· 1000
0930-1000
0930·1000
0930-1000
0930-1000
0945·1000
0945-1000 M·A

12015
5990 60 10 6020
6065 6 100 6140
7140 7160 7250
7295 9610 11850
15250 17705
11955

Midwest To

25.00

10.00

21705
17780 21650

9510
15495

Midwest To

·r·r·r

15.00

15440

7355
11580
9570
9615
5960
6050
71 10
7280
15235
9725
6160
11805
9700
15245
15390
5995
6055

Midwest To

~--~-----.......---.

25.00

0900·1000
WHRI, Noblesville, Indiana
WYFR, Oakland, California
0900·1000
0915·0930
Radio Korea. Seoul. South Korea
0915·0950 M·A Radio Ulan Bator, Mongolia
AJI India Radio, New Delhi
0930·0935

8

UTC

MONITORING TIMES

16 20 24

¥.~f...i....L...,.... L. .. :....i. .. :..

'....;.... L...

·-:-i UUF I I !
.. ...
... ... .... ....
.:- i : l : I !
(.

(

......:. ......:. ....;

;

,

1

f

:

;

;.

····:····r\:····f···:····i·· ·1 ····1····[

10.00

··. . . .1·· ·1\r . .

!.

f

~

:

20.00

l l ;- !- ~ !:' ~

5.00 ···· 1 ····{····~····\··:·····f··:.f~···!····j····j·····' ·····: ··
.: ..... : :: : :
: •:
1 l-1 ~ ~ 1
0.00 '--'--'--'---""---'--'----'-~-'---'--'-'
0 4 8 12. 16 20 24
:

25.00

15.00

i. . . . .rx··'.>+···!· .. :.
i

30.00

'

1 .

15.00

~

.

MHz.

:

UIC

:

10.00
5.00

:

0.00

0

4

8

Jrc 16

October 1988

20 24

75

frequencyi
17387
9740
15070
18080
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
6160
1000-1 100
6005
1000-1100
CFCF, Montreal, Quebec
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
1000-1 100
6130
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scotia
1000-11 00
1000-1100
CKWX, Vancouver, Brilish Colombia 6080
CFRB, Toronto. Ontario
6070
1000-1 100
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
3910
1000-1 100
11805
1000-1100
KTWR, Agana. Guam
11900
1000-1100
KYOI, Saipan
15435
1000-1100
Radio Alghanistan, Kabul
9580
1000-1100
Radio Australia, Melbourne
15135
Radio Moscow, USSR
1000-1 100
Radio New Zealand, Wellington
6100
1000-1100
1000-1100 s Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia
6055
1000-1100
SBC Radio One, Singapore
5010
1000-1 100 s Superpower KUSW, Utah
6135
Voice of America. Washington
5975
1000-1 100
7270
1000-1100
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
7255
1000-1 100
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
1000-1 100
WHRI, Noblesville, Indiana
7355
WYFR, Oakland, California
5950
1000-1 100
15606
1005-1010
Radio Pakistan. Islamabad
1030-1040
Voice of Asia. Taiwan
5980
BBC, London. England•
7180
1030-1100
6130
1030-1100
HCJB, Quito. Ecuador
1030-1040 M-F Radio Canada lnl'I, Montreal
5960
Radio Netherlands. Hilversum
1030-1100
6020
Radio
Tanzania,
Dar
es
Salaam
7165
1030-1 100 A,S
11835
1030-1 100
SLBC, Colombo, Sri Lanka
1030-1 100
UAE Radio, United Arab Emirates
15435
1030-1 100
Voice of America. Washington•
11 965
1040-1050 H Radio Free Europe, Munich•
5985
11895
1040-1050 M-A Voice of Greece, Alhens
11645
1045-1 100 s Radio Budapest, Hungary
7220
15160
BBC, London, England

1000-1100

MHz.

30.00

1100 UTC

17720
9770 15415
15460 17880
9540
7345 9505 [ML]
5052 11940
5985

6165

17660
9660
11925
9755
9675

9725

15120 17850 (ML]
17865 21605
71 15
15355
15630
9585
15220

9695

9725

9835 11910

;....

, 1::

..

7290
4890
6040

5960
6080

5985
6140

s

Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

4890
6040

5960
6080

5985
6140

11 00-11 15
1100-1120
1100-1125
1100-1130
1100-1 130
1100-1 130

Radio New Zealand, Welllngton
Radio Pakistan. Islamabad
Radio Netherland, Hllversum
BBC, London, England*
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
Kol Israel, Jerusalem

1100-1130
11 00-1130
11 00-1 130
1100-1130
11 00-1 130
1100-1130
1100-1130
1100-1150
1100-1155
1100-1200
1100-1200
1100-1 200
1100-1200
1100-1200
1100-1200

KTWR, Guam
Radio Japan, Tokyo
Radio Mozambique. Maputo
Radio Sweden lnl'I, Stockholm
SLBC, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Swiss Radio lnt'I, Berne
Voice of Vietnam, Hanoi
Radio Pyongyang, North Korea
Radio Beijing, China
ABC, Alice Springs, Australia
ABC, Katherine, Australia
ABC. Perth, Australia
ABC, Tennant Creek, Australia
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
BBC, London. England

1100-1200
1100-1200

CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
CFCF, Montreal, Quebec

9540
17760
9675
11925
11 700
17635
11 665
6120
11 818
9630
15120
15570
9732
9600

15485 15640
17685 21625
7210 17810
11835
21690
17850 [ML]
17830
11 735

[ML]

(ML]
9700 15430
6195 9510 9740
11775 12095 15070
15430 17790 18080

MHz.

30.00

MHz.
~---.....,.--.,........,---,---..,..--~

___.___. MUF'

25.00 ·--:-~·+-J··~ur~···

: '

:

"':,· .. ; .... : .... : ..
:

.. ::
'

:

:

: 1.

~ :' !

.

.

.

.

.

'. ' • .

• • • •C • • ••( • ••••> ·• ••:- • · •) . . . . I •••)• • • •l •• • •l• • • •C• • ••C••-"C• •

: :1
.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

.

:

.

:

20.00

15.00

; \

:

,•

.

.

:-t: MUF ! , l ~ , , ,
····r:·:r:·;··au
t--1···-:-··-r·
. :·· . r···r···:··
... .
..

:

. ... ; .. .. i . .. . ; .. . -~· ....~ .. ..~ ....; ....; ...; .. .. !, • ••• i .... ~: ..
:

25.00

:

: ":

:"

.

;·· '. . .;. . . . r. r·

30.00 ....-,---,--..,.--,----,-..,.--,----,-.,...--,----,-...,..,

~

:
' :
10.00 .... ~····~·· ·+.. ··~ · ··u···~ .. ·r····!· ··!· .. ·r-":1.... ~··

·;

10.00
5.00 ._.. ,.
'~

":

,__-~~--~~~---~·--~'----'~'--"---'--~~~~~

0

76

11 00-111 0

6090
3295
6020
9520
3295
6020
9520
6100
15606
6020
7120
6130
9385
15650
9820
5990
9525
6065
11835
13685
7430
6576
15455
2310
2485
9610
2325
6030
5965
1 1750
15400
6160
6005

Eastern Europe

15.00 .. ,,... ,.... ~ ..

0.00

Radio Pakistan, Islamabad
Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

Western Europe

20.00

.

A

South America

20.00

\. .

1100-1 105
1 100-1 105

West Coast To

:

j

9505

West Coast To

...-~---.,.----.,...,

.

7345

[7:00 AM EDT/ 4:00 AM PDT]

9590

15120
9510

6055
7105

Midwest To

... ;.... ;.... ;.... ~-.

5.00

1045-t 100 M-A Radio Prague. Czechoslovakia
1055-1 tOO s Trans World Radio, Monte Carlo

11 785
9750 11750 12095
15400 17705 17790

4

8

utc 16

October 1988

20 24

0

4

8

MONITORING TIMES

12 16 20 24

UTC

0

4

8

12 16 20 24

UTC

frequencyi
1100-1200
1100-1200
1100-1200
1100-1200
1100-1200
1100-1200
1100-1200

CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scotia
CKWX. Vancou ver, British Colombia
CFRB, Toronto. Ontario
(US) Far East Network. Tokyo
KYOI, Salpan
Radio Australia, Melbourne

1100-1200

Radio Moscow, USSR

1100-1200
1100-1200 A.S
1100-1200 s
1100-1200 s
11 00-1200

Radio RSA. South Africa
Radio Tanzania, Dar es Salaam
Radio Zambia. Lusaka
Superpower KUSW, Utah
Voice of America. Washington

1100-1200
1100-1200
1100-1200
1100-1200
11 10-11 20 M- F
1115-1 130
1115-1130
1115-1145
111 5·1200
11 30-1145 A

Voice of Asia. Taiwan
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
WHRI. Noblesville, Indiana
Radio Botswana, Gaborone
Radio Korea, Seoul, South Korea
Vatican Radio, Vatican City
Radio Nepal, Kathmandu
Trans Worl d Radio, Bonaire
Radio Budapest, Hungary

11 30-11 57
1130-1200
1130·1200
1130·1200
1130-1200

Radio Austria lnt'I, Vienna
Deutsche Welle, west Germany
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
Radio Japan, Tokyo
Radio Netherland. Hilversum

11 30-1200
1130-1200
1130-1200
1135-1 140

Radio Thailand, Bangkok
Radio Tirana. Albania
Voice of Islamic Republic Iran
All India Radio, New Delhi

1140-1145 M·A Vatican Radio. Vatican City
11 45-1200
BBC, London. England*

MHz.

30.00

6030
6130
6080
6070
3910
11 900
5995 7215
9710 9770
9600 13710
15335 15500
21590
7165
11880 (IRR)
6135
5975 5985
9760 11715
5980 7445
7270
7255 15120
7355 9510
4820 5955
11 740
17840 21485
5005
1181 5 15345
7220 9585
151 60 15220
13730 15320
15410 21600
11740
5990 6120
5995 9715
17605 21480
9655 11 905
9480 11855
11790
6065 7110
11850 15320
6248 9645
5995 7180

1145·1200
1145-1200

1200 UTC
9580 9645
11705 11800
15405 15460
15550

[8:00 AM EDT /5:00 AM PDT]

1200-1205 M-A Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
1200·1215
1200·1215
1200-1215
1200-1215
1200-1220
1200·1225
1200-1230
1200-1230
1200-1230
1200-1230

6165 9590
15160 15425

s

BBC, London, England*
Radio New Zealand. Wellington
Vatican Radio, Vatican City
Voice of Kampuchea, Phnom-Penh
Radio Buchares1, Romania
Radio Polonia. Warsaw, Poland
KFBS Salpan
Radio Austria lnl'I, Vienna
Radio Finland
Radio Netherland, Hitversum
Radio Somalia, Mogadishu
Radio Tashkent, Uzbek, USSR

1200-1230
1200-1230

7255

1200-1230
Radio Thailand. Bangkok
1200-1230
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
1200-1235 M·A Radio Ulan Bator. Mongolia
1200-1236
HCJB. Quito. Ecuador
1200·1250
Radio Pyongyang, North Korea
Radio Beijing, China
1200·1255

s

9835 11910

1200-1300
1200-1300
1200-1300
1200-1300
1200-1300
1200-1300

7210
15560 17575

9610

s

ABC. Alice Springs, Australia
ABC. Katherine, Australia
ABC, Tennant Creek, Australia
Adventist World Radio, Africa
(US) Nmed Forces Radio and TV
BBC, London, England

9675
1200·1300
1200·1300
1200-1300

11 740

9505

CBN. St. John's, Newfoundland
CFCF. Montreal. Quebec
CFCN. Calgary, Alberta

3295
6040
3915
6100
15190
9693
17720
6095
9830
6155
11 945
9715
21480
6095
5945
11 785
9655
11 880
9615
6075
9600
7335
9770
2310
2485
2325
17890
6030
9510
18080
6160
6005
6030

4890
6080
6065
9540
17865
11938
21665
7285
12025
9685
15400
15560

5960
6 140
7275

17575 17605

7275

9540

9555 11735
9530 9635 9665
11600 11 715 15455
[Ml]
[ML)
9700 15430
15070 17705 17790

Middle East

West Africa

Central Africa

30.00
25.00

20.00

20.00
.... j.... ;.. .. ;.... l. .. _...

15.00

..t" ..c · --~

10.00 ..... . , . .
'

... ..8.

:\ :

i

:

~

0.00 ~--'--~:·".'-'~--"'----'---.;..._.;_--'---'-:.......
: :-"'-'
0 4 8 12 16 20 24

UTC

MONITORING T IMES

... f::f

:1 ~&fii·•[··· ····i

...

·· ···~· · ·~ ···¥ ···r··

30.00
25.00

.... ;. ... .... ~.... :.. .. ..

...."'. :~

'~.

:

: •

5.00

MHz.

~----____,,......,..........,--,..--,-,

··ffl~Yf1 r!
:

20.00

10.00 .. ·I··. ( . . ··+···+· ..~ ... •· · ··)' • · · I

'. " ..

s.oo ""-t~l . -\~..L . . :-···.: f.]~.:t... - ·+·n--.\-

----~---,.......,...,

....;...

~.

-~· ....; ...,~. .

:

:

,;

: I! . .

':

:

. ; .... i . ...

:

!· ... : .... . ...;..... i
~

... ) ..

15.00

·· · ·r ·· ·:· · · · ~··

...

...

··· +

\j-··

I\

i ..1 .~ ... -~ .... i ....... c... c..•.

.

9600

11905
(IRR)
12015

West Coast To

MHz.

6020
9520

11915 15320

West Coast To

~~-~-~---.,-~.,.-.,

:: l

15255 17740
6055 7345

West Coast To

25.00

15.00

Radio Bangladesh. Dakha
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia

. . . ...
:
... :

10.00

:

,,

5.00

'-,: ' j ' \ ;:

0. 00

~-.i-- ..,

~ ; ;

L...:__;_-'---'_..l..'-'--"'---'--'-~~

0

4

8

12 16 20 24

UTC

0.00
0

4

8

12 16 20 24

UTC

October 1988

77

frequencyI
1200·1300
1200·1300
1200·1300
1200·1300
1200-1300
1200-1300
1200·1300

CHNS. Halifax. Nova Scotia
CKWX. Vancouver. British Colombia
CFRB. Toronto. Ontario
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
HCJB. Quito, Ecuador
KYOI, Salpan
Radio Australia. Melbourne

1200-1300
1200-1300

Radio Korea. Seoul. South Korea
Radio Moscow. USSR

Radio RSA. South Africa
1200-1300
1200-1300 A.S Radio Tanzania. Dar es Salaam
SBC Radio Ono, Si ngapore
1200·1300
1200·1300 s Superpower KUSW. Utah
Swiss Radio lnt'I. Bern
1200-1300
Trans World Radio. Bonalre
1200-1300
Trans Worlcl Radio, Sri Lanka
1200-1300
1200-1300
Voice of America, Washington
1200-1300
Voice of Kenya. Nairobi
Voice of Nigeria. Lagos
1200-1300
WCSN, Boston. Massachusetts
1200-1300
WHAi, Noblesville, Indiana
1200-1300
WYFR, Oakland, California
1200-1300
121 5-1245
Radio Korea, Seoul. South Korea
Radio Berlin lnt'I. East Germany
1215-1300
1215-1300
Radio Cairo. Egypt
1230-1235
All India Radio, New Deihl

1230-1300

BBC, London, England'

1230-1300
1230-1 300
1240-1250

Radio Bangladesh. Dhaka
Radio Sweden, Stockholm
Radio Free Europe. Munich'

M

1245-1255

Radio France lnt'I. Paris

1300 UTC
1300-1305

1300-1325
1300- 1325
1300-1330
1305-1330
1300-1330
1300-1330
1300·1330
1300·1330
1300·1330
1300·1330
1300·1330
1300·1332
1300- 1350
1300-1355
1300· 1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300· 1400
1300-1400
1300-1400
1300·1400
1300-1400

Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

3295
6020
9520
Radio Bucharest. Romania
9690
M· F Radio Finland. Helsinki
11945
BBC. London. England
9510
s Radio Austria lnl'I, Vienna
15320
Radio Cairo. Egypt
17595
Radio Canada lnt'I. Montreal
9625
Radio Ghana. Accra
4915
s Radio Norway lnt'I. Oslo
15310
Swiss Ractlo lnt'I, Berne
11965
Trans World Radio. Sri Lanka
11920
Voice of Kenya. Nairobi
7270
A.S Trans World Radio, Bonalre
11 815
Radio Pyongyang, North Korea
9325
11735
Radio Beijing. Cnina
11600
ABC, Allee Springs, Australia
2310
ABC, Katnerine. Australia
2485
ABC, Tennant Creek. Australia
2325
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
9700
CBC Northern Quebec SeNice
9625
CBN, St. Jonn·s. Newfoundland
6160
CBU, Vancouver. British Colombia
6160
CFCF, Montreal. Quebec
6005
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
CHNS, Halifax. Nova Scotia
6130
CKWX, Vancouver. British Colombia 6080
CFRB, Toronto, Ontario
6070
s ELWA. Monrovia, Liberia
11830
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
39 10
FEBC. Manila. Philippines
11850
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
11740
M·A KYOI, Salpan
11 900
Radio Australia. Melbourne
5995
9580

15345
9345

LUF

>....

!--· i ...

25.00

11755 15280 15455
(ML)
(ML)
15330 15430
11720

15115 17890
6060

6080

30.00 ,........,..-,--..,.--..,.--,-..,........,.-,--,

.... ; ; MUF1
~

~

. . ,. . .;. . :. . .i. . .;...:- . .,. . ,. . :. . ,. . :··

15.00 ....

15.00 ····=· ···;· ···~- ·~-· ·· r··r··· ~~· ··1 ··· ·~ ·... !··· ·! .. · · r·
:
:

,

:

1:
.;

i \ i ,! - .. ;

:
:

': , :

"

:

5.00

.. :

0.00

0.00
8

12

UTC

October 1988

16 20

24

: ..

'.i

~
:1

~

:

~
: '

: 1:

~ ~ ~ : ~

~

20.00 .. " ........,.....;.....!... .; ....;..

•• ; •. •• ~ - ••• c•.

..-.···~ .........; .. ·l... ·:·... ;.... ~-

15.00

.

····:··. 1····i/·;···-[··"1<·····~····f·· ..r.. · ·1··\:~·r·
.
. . ,.
...i.... !. ~,~~- ... H...l..tl. . t....i....i....!....1... \ ..
\ [ : . 1 1 :l ' 1 l . . .
...

5.00

--r-1 : .

~

.

£

, ,Tur·;
MUF!. . ,, . ,. .;. . ,.

... ;.. -7

25.00

-~-x~ T.[LJ f "T

20.00

10.00

7205

MHz.

i

10.00 ....

9600

9555

East Africa

20.00 ....

4

11 855 17820
7295

West Coast To

.... ~- .¥V:F..'. ....

5980
6140

11 940 15405 17720
15400
11 775 15070 17790

Indian Ocean

30.00

0

5960
6080

West Coast To

MHz.
- -:-~

4890
6040

South Africa

30.00

78

(9:00 AM EDT/6:00 AM PDT]

West Coast To

MHz.

25.00

6130
6080
6070
3910
11740 15115 17890
11900
6060 6080 7205 7215
9580 9710 9770 11800
15575
9600 9795 13710 15460
15500 17595
21590
7165
5010 5052 11940
9850
12030
11815 15345
11920
9760 11 715 15160 15425
7270
7255 15120
5980
5995 11790
5950 7355
7275 11740
15445 17775
17595 17675
3905 4800 4920 7280
9565 9615 11620 11735
15120
6125 7255 6195 9635
9660 11780 12040 15270
15390 15435 17695
15195 17710
15190 15430
5985 7115 9695 9725
11895 15355
11 670 17720

: ,~ 1

10.00

..

• •.. ;a.

..

. • .••.. .. •• . •. •. .

,",

: • :

'l :

5.00

,..

· · · ··· · ······~·•.;,;-.·

: ·'
i ,~
l: ,,' 1
.:
:

:

· · ··.· ·

..

;

1 .. ~-·

: . l: •.··:...,.,: ····:·: ····.·. ····.····
. :".


... .......... .... •
;·· · ·:··

C•

;

1

:

!

.

:

~

:

~

1 -~c_-_
~ :_:~;~ _ _!_ __

0

4

8

MONITORING TIMES

12 16 20 24

UTC

0

4

8

12

UTC

16 20 24

frequencyI
1300·1400
1300-1400

Radio Jordan. Amman
Radio Moscow, USSR

1300·1400 AS Radio Tanzania, Oar es Salaam
1300-1400
SBC Radio One, Singapore
1300-1400 s Superpower KUSW, Utah
1300-1400
Voice of America, Washington
1300·1400
Voice of Malaysia
1300-1400
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
WCSN. Boston, Massachusells
1300-1400
WHRI, Noblesville, Indiana
1300-1400
WYFR, Oakland, California
1300-1400
WYFR Satellite Net. California
1300·1400
Radio France lnl'I. Paris
1305-1315

Radio
Radio
Radio
BBC.

1315-1400
1330-1345
1330-1355
1330·1400

Berlin lnt'I, E. Germany
Korea, Seoul, South Korea
Austria lnl'I, Vienna
London, England

All India Radio, New Delhi
1330·1400
1330· 1400 M·A Bhutan Bcasting Service, Thlmpu
Laotian National Radio
1330·1400
Radio Canada lnl'I. Montreal
1330-1400
1330-1400
Radio Tashkent, Uzbek, USSR
1330·1400

Swiss Radio lnl'I, Berne

1330·1400
1330·1400
1330·1400
1330·1400
1332-1400
1345·1400

UAE Radio, United Nab Emirates
Voice of Islamic Republic Iran
Voice of Ken ya, Nairobi
Voice of Vietnam. Hanoi
Trans World Radio. Bonalre
Radio Berlin lnt'I. E. Germany

MHz.

30.00

A

9560
9600 9795 13710 15460
15500 17595
7165
5010 5052 11940
9850
611 0 9760 151 60 15425
7295
7255 15120
5980
5995 11790
5950 6105 9565 15215
9565
6175 9790 9805 11670
11845 15155 15195 15300
15315 15365 17620 17720
17850 21645
15240 17880 21465 21540
7275 11740
15320
17790 17885 12095 15070
21470
9545 10330 11810 15335
6035
7113
9625 11855 17820
5945 7275 9540 9600
11785
11695 13685 15135 15570
17830 21695
15435 17865 21605
9525 9685 9770
6100
9840 15010
11815 15345
9665 11705 11785 15170
15240

[10:00 AM EDT/6:00 AM PDT]

1400 UTC

21465 21540
15120
2310 [ML)
2325 [ML)
9665 11 705
15240
11 945 15400
Radio Finland. Helsinki
1400-1430
21700
1400-1 430 s Radio Norway lnl'I, Oslo
Radio Peace and Progress. USSR 17645 17765
1400-1430
Radio Polonia, Warsaw. Poland
6095 7285
1400-1430
Radio Sweden, Stockholm
15345 15390
1400·1430
1400-1430
9500 11 985
Radio Tirana, Albania
Voice of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa
9550 11710
1400-1430
15085
1400-1430
Voice of Republic of Iran
5985 7115
1400-1450 T Radio Free Europe, Munich*
11895 15355
1400-1 450
Radio Pyongyang. North Korea
6576 11735
1400-1455
Radio Beiji ng, China
11600 15165
1400-1500
2485
ABC. Katherine, Australia
1400-1500
ABC, Perth. Australia
9610
Adventist World Radio, Italy
7275
1400-1500
All India Radio, New Delhi
9545 11810
1400-1500
9700 15330
(US) Nmed Forces Radio and TV
1400·1500
5995 6195
BBC, London, England
1400·1500
9750 11750
15260 17705
21470
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
6160
1400·1500
CBC Northern Quebec Service
9625 11720
1400·1500
6160
1400· 1500 M·A CSU, Vancouver, British Colombia
6005
CFCF. Montreat, Quebec
1400-1500
CFCN, Calgary. Alberta
6030
1400- 1500
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scotia
6130
1400·1500
CKWX, Vancouver, Briti sh Colombia 6080
1400·1 500
1400-1500
CFRB, Toronto, Ontario
6070
1400-1500 s ELWA Monrovia, Liberia
11830
1400-1500
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
3910
Radio Berlin lnl'I, East Germany
Voice of Nigeria. Lagos
ABC, Alice Springs. Aus tralia
ABC, Tennant Creek, Australi a
Radio Berlin Int'!, E. Germany

1400-1415
1400-1427
1400-1430
1400-1430
1400-1430

West Coast To

Central Asia

South East Asia

Far East

: : MUF , ,

,

· uur·

MHz.

MHz.

25.00

. , , MUF: ! .
2s.oo ... -r-~+~r~ur =---·r-- . ....r........,....;..
1

30.00

30.00

.--...-~---~~-----.
;

25.00 ""

~·~ ~ ·~·f

20.00 ....

...-~....•;••.• .:•.... ~ ....:·....; .••. :..•• i ..•• ........... .

20.00 " ··..,.. ··r.. ·· •····t··· ~.....;....! ····l··.. ,. ·..;.

20.00 .......l"'T . . ,.....,....:- .

15.00

..'····+···r···i····;....;....:....:. ··

15.00

15.00

10.00

10.00

i· · ··; · ·· · :· · ··~· · ··

.

·l

.
?.

.

''

.

:

.

: ,'

.1..
5.00 ·~-r'..;.....f... .f ..:t·=·;l····b+··:\·· .. .1.1.
:; i
.' ..

.I

;.

0.00

~ ~

:

:

:

5.00

4

8

12

UTC

:

:

~

:

8

12 16 20 24

UTC

MONITORING TIMES

.

:

:

.

j

1

:;

...

\

. . t:

•••• I ••• ..... •<-·";,.~ · ·• •?• • •

-:

~

0.00
4

.

~

.

"i"·/·~r.~+·4·
,
.

:'

0

·rT. .,. l. ·:·. .;.

. ~ l . . ~ : . . l ~ ;
····;··· ~-· · ·!· ·· ·~· · · ·-;-···t····~ ·· ..;····: ... ~ ···· ~ ·· ··~··

,

"

16 20 24

.

5.00

'--'---'---'----------~~~

0

9725

15335
15430
7180 9740
12095 15070
17790 21710

West Coast To

:

:

7695

West Coast To

~~-~-~--___,

10.00

11785 15170

0

1:;

: ,v . .
1

:

•••·~••; I ~ •••· ~ ·• • •

.:

:
:

:1

:

:

:

!•

.

; ,

'-+ - f -?

::

:

:

.

'

I •••• I• •• • C• •

;

12

16 20 24

.October 1988

79

4

8

UTC

frequencyI
1400-1500
1400-1500
1400-1500
1400-1500
1400-1500
1400-1500

FEBC,
HCJB,
KNLS,
KYOI,
Radio

s

Manila. Phlhpprnes
Ouil o, Ecuador
Anchor Point, Alaska
Saipan
Australia, Melbourne

Radio Canada lnl'I. Montreal

1400-1500
1400-1500
1400- 1500
1400-1500

Radio
Radio
Radio
Radio

Japan, Tokyo
Jordan. Amman
Korea. Seoul
Moscow, USSR

1400-1500
1400-1500 A.S
1400-1500
1400-1500 s
1400-1500

Radio RSA South Africa
Radio Tanzania. Oar es Salaam
SBC Radio One. Singapore
Superpower KUSW, Ulah
Voice of Ameri ca. Washington

1400-1500
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
1400-1500
Voice of Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur
1400-1500
Voice o1 Nigeri a. Lagos
WCSN, Boslon, MassachuseUs
1400-1500
WHRI, Noblesv1ile, Indiana
1400-1500
1400-1500
WYFR, Oakland, California
1400-1500
WYFR Satellite Nel, California
141 5-1420
Radio Nepal, Kalhmandu
1430-1455 M-A BAT, Brussels. Belgium
1430-1500 F ABC, Alice Springs, Auslralia
1430-1500 F ABC. Tennant Creek. Australia
1430-1500
Burma Broadcas11ng Service
King of Hope, Southern Lebanon
1430-1500
1430- 1500
KTWR. Agana. Guam
1430-1500
Radio Australia, Melbourne
Radio Frnlancl, Helsinki
1430- 1500
1430-1500
Radio Netherl and, Hilversum
1430-1500
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia

s

Radio Yugoslavia, Belgrade

1430-1500

9670
11 740
9750
11900
5995
7205
9625
17820
9695
9560
9570
11840
15500
2 1590
71 65
5010
9850
9645
15205
6100
4950
7255
13760
9565
5950
13695
3230
15510
2310
2325
5985
6280
9780
6060
11 945
11 740
9605
15155
7240

1430-1 500
Voice of Turkey , Ankara
1445-1 500 M-A Radio Ulan Bator. Mongolia

11 850
1511 5 17890

6035 6060 6080
9580
11720 11955 15440
11815
9750 15575
13710 15135 15460
15530 17645 17860

5052 11 940
9760 11 920 15160
15425

7355
15215
5005
15590
[M L)
[M L)

9580
15400
13770
11685
17705
15240

9565

15560 17575
13715 15110
21 505
15415

Africa No. 1 , Gabon
Vatican Radio, Vatican City
FEBA Mahe, Seychelles
Radio Ulan Bator. Mongolia
Radio Bucharesl, Romania

7200 15200
11 960 15090 17870
15325
9575 15305
9510 9690 11 775
15250 15335
1500- 1525
Radio Netherland, Hilversum
11740 13770 15560
1500-1530
Radio Finland, Helsinki
11 755 151 85 17800
1500-1530 A,S Radio Tanzania, Oar es Salaam
7165
1500-1530
Radio Veri1as Asia, Philippines
9770 15215
1500- 1550
Deutsche Welle, West Germany
7225 9735 17765
21600
1500-1550
KTWR, Agana. Guam
9820
1500-1550
Radio Pyongyang, North Korea
6576 9325 9345
9977
1500-1555
Radio Beijing. China
11600 15165
1500-1600 F ABC, Alice Springs, AUs1ralia
2310 [ML)
1500-1600
ABC, Perth, Australia
96 10
1500-1600 F ABC. Tennant Creek, Aus1ral1a
2325 [ML)
1500-1600
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
9700 15330 15430
1500-1600
AWA, Alajuela, Cosla Rica
15460
1500-1600
BBC, London, England
9740 12095 15070
15400 17705 17790
17885 21710
1500-1600
Burma Broadcasting Service
5985
1500-1600
CBC Northern Quebec Service
9625 11 720
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
1500-1600
6160
1500-1600
CBU, Vancouver. British Colombia
6 160
1500-1600
CFCF, Montreal, Quebec
6005
1500-1600
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
1500-1600
6 130
CHNS. Halifax. Nova Scotia
1500-1600
CKWX, Vancouver, British Colombia 6080
1500-1600
CFRB. Toronto, Ontario
6070
1500- 1600 s ELWA Monrovia, Liberia
11830

.-.....---- ----r-_,..-,

20.00

20.00

;.....L........
·" r~~. ..~ .
.....
.
. ti :
: •:

15.00

;

~

:

l

':

:

~

.... ~....)· .. ~- . ..:,.
:

:

:•

:

i\ i
: '.
~ '. :

:

.....

1 ;

~

:

:;

:

~:

·i·--·i .... 1.... ,.... t . .:. . i. .T. i...

I

~

:

0

4

8

12

UTC

Octoher 1988

16 20 24

~

~

~

~

.

:

.

• :
~i

:

:

:

.
..

: :

-~\. -~· ... 'i'...
: • :

.

j ..

.; ....:... j ..

:'.. i

.

;,' :

.: :
:

1:

'

. •• 1

.. . '
.

.

i ,' !

·1·. ··~ .... ·;..

'--'-_:._~-~~~----'

4

8

MONITORJNG TIM ES

12

UTC

16

15260
17830

30.00

20.00

. ·i. ........("·r.............:....i. .... . i".. ,.... ".
:

- ~.

15.00

20 24

:

:

..;....~-=~. t.: ...~ .... ~· ...;..

t'..

10.00
5.00

:

.: :: , 1:: : ..:.. :
~ ~,' l i ~ \ ~ ~
. ' . .
.. ....:....:.........;.\ .. : , ,
~~

••.

; .' !
! ,' :
.

~/

.

••i

~

.

~

.

"

:

:\ ~
: : ·.:
: : ~

f··A· ··1··.. l · · · · ~· ··· ·;·· · ·:.... :..

·\· r · · ·~· · · · ·;.....;.....

:1 :

\ - ~- -{ ~

0

9640

MHz.

~

..
·!./1'···f...
i

.i i/ }

15135

25.CO

.

:

.

5.00 ..··~ ....~ ..··~·
0.00

:

•:

:
:; ';

:•

~ '.

:

...::.:,.' . .:...........
.::.....:.: ... :....1: ..
:

10.00

:

:

:

..

....;....;.....~····~· · . .

:

.;....[/ ...... i.... ;. ....

'
,'l l
..
. ,...
...
,. ,....... ..,..........
5.00 . .. ~.... ~. -·\··r· ····· •
j :
-- - - -·'
0.00 '--'-~-'---:

15.00

MUF.......
· :. ..~ ....;. .. i .... :.

... ;·~·_ ' ..~ ·j "~UI=,
:

17575

Central America/Caribbean

.30.00 .........,...-.,-...,.----:--.,..--,--,------,
25.00

11940

West Coast To

MHz.

25.00

80

1500-1505
1500-1510
1500-1515
1500- 1520
1500-1525

Australia & Malaysia

Pacific

MHz.

10.00

[11:00 AM EDT/7:00 AM PDT]

West Coast To

West Coast To

30.00

1500 UTC

15255
9575 15305

i:

·~ - ~ -.:- ~~)'

j
:

0.00 ~--------~
0

4

8 . 12

UTC

16

20

24

\

lfrequencyi
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600

(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
FEBC. Manila. Pl1il1ppines
HCJB. Ouilo, Ecuador
King of Hope. Southern Lebanon
KNLS. Anchor Point. Alaska
KSOA. Agal. Guam
KYOI, Saipan
Radio Australia, Melbourne

s

1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500· 1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500· 1600
1500·1600
1500· 1600
1500· 1600
1500· 1600
1500· 1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500·1600
1500· 1600
1515· 1600
1515· 1600
1530· 1545

s

s

1530· 1600
1530· 1600
1530-1600
1530-1600
1530· 1600
1530· 1600
1530· 1600
1530· 1600

Radio
Radio
Radio
Radio

3910
11 850
11 740 118 10 1511 5 17890
6280
9750
11 980
11 900
5995 6035 6060 6080
7205 72 15 9580
11 955 17820
9505 9695 11 8 15 21700
9560
11840 13710 15135 15530
15460 15500
9655 1 5125 17755 21590
5010 5052 11 940
9850
9575 9700 9760 15205
71 65 9560
11790 15150
6100
4950
7255 11770
13760
94 55 11 790
11965
5950 9535 11 830 15215
13695
11 865 15325
15240 17880
3905 3925 4860 6160
7 160 74 12 9545 9950
13715 15165
7245 9740 11 735
9684
9480 11835
17830 13685 21 630
5980 7445
15120
15055

Canada lnt'I, Montreal
Japan, Tokyo
Jordan, Amman
Moscow. USSR

Radio ASA. Sou1h Africa
SBC Radio One, Singapore
Superpower KU SW, Utah
Voice of America, Washington
Voice of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa
Voice of Indonesia, Jakarta
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
Voice of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
WCSN, Boston. Massachusetts
WHAi, Noblesville, Indiana
WANO. New Orleans, Louisiana
WYFA. Oakland, California
WYFA Satellite Net
FEBA. Mahe, Seychelles
Radio Berlin Int'!. East Germany
All India Radio. New Delhi
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia
Radio Saha, Bulgaria
Radio Tanzania. Dar es Salaam
Radio Tirana. Albania
Swiss Radio lnt'I, Berne
Voice of Asia, Taiwan
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
WYFA, OkeechOOee. Florida

West Coo st To

South America
MHz.

30.00

,....---___,---,---~-...,.......,,-,,-.,

25.oo ..

f·~ ·~ ~·~r~~fl..;. +... :........,....!..
.

:

:

'

.

:

20.00
15.00 ""i"'.;... ;...
:

-

.

;

:

:: ,:~.
: f :

:
:

:

:

:
•:
I

10.00 ....!····i····i.. ···:···t.r··r····r····?····j···· · ···~·:::··
i

;

).

. ~ T...
5.00 ....
\ lL.+ ...!.· ··-r.~·; ·n··~·····~····~··

0.00

j ••.•

···· ~··· ~-

·t-t-~ - f

L...:.,._..;,_..:,._.:__:_......;..._""--'-~-~

0

4

8

Jtc16

20

Vatican Radio. Vall can City
1545-1600
1550·1600 H·S KTWR, Agana. Guam

1600 UTC
1600·1610
1600·1 610
1600-1610
1600-1 625

1600-1630
1600-1630
1600· 1630
1600·1630
1600·1 630
1600-1630
1600-1 630
1600·1 630
1600·1630
1600· 1630
1600·1630
1600·1630
1600- 1645
1600-1645
1600- 1645
1600·1655
1600· 1700
1600·1700
1600·1700
1600·1700
1600·1700
1600-1700

1600-1700
1600· 1700
1600·1700
1600-1700
1600-1700
1600-1700
1600-1700
1600-1700
1600·1700
1600· 1700
1600·1700
1600·1700
1600·1 700
1600-1700
1600·1700
1600·1700
1600·1700
1600·1700

.
'

1540-1550 M·A Voice of Greece. l\lhens
1545·1600
Radio Berlin lnl'I. East Germany
1545·1600 M·F Radio Canada lnl'I. Montreal

24

1600-1700
1600· 1700
1600· 1700
1600·1700
1600·1700

1600·1700
1600· 1700
1600· 1700
1600·1700
1600-1700

MONITOR ING T IMES

9855
11 785
11915
15305
11 810
9780

I

j
11645
15170
11935
17820
151 20

15630
15255
15160 15325
17730

(12:00 PM EDT/ 9:00 AM PDT]

11865 15325
4800
5010 5052 11940
6055 7345 9605 11665
11685 11 990 15110 13715
15110 15165 17705 21505
ELWA. Monrovia. Lil)erla
11 830
Radio Berlin lnl'I. East Germany
11785 15170 15255
Radio Norway lnt'I, Oslo
15220 153 10
Radio Pakistan. Islamabad
7365 9465 9785 11615
11625 15125
Radio Polonia, Warsaw, Poland
6135 9540
M· F Radio Portugal, Lisbon
15245
Radio Sofia Bulgaria
7245 9560 11 735 15310
l~adio Sweden. Stockholm
6065 11 855
SLBC. Colombo. Sn Lanka
6075 9720
Trans Worlcl Radio. Swaziland
5055 9525
voice of Asia. Taiwan
5980 7445
Voice of Vietnam. Hanoi
9840 15010
H·A KTWA, Agana. Guam
9820
724 5 9535 11955
Radio Nac1onat Angola. Luanda
UAE Radio, U111ted Arab Emirates
11955 15320 15435 17865
Radio Be111ng, China
9570 11 600 11 715
F ABC, Alice Springs. Australia
2310 (ML)
ABC. Perth. Australia
9610
F ABC, Tennant Creek. Australia
2325 (ML)
(US) Armed Forces Raclio and TV
9700 15330 15430
AWR, Ala1ue1a. Costa Rica
15460
BOC, London. England
94 10 9740 11 750 11775
12095 15070 15260 15400
17880
CBC Northern Quebec Service
9625 11 720
CBN, SI. John's, Newfoundland
6160
CBU. Vancouver. Bnhsl1 Colombia
6 160
CFCF. Mont real. Quebec
6005
CFCN. Calgary. AJl)erta
6030
CHNS. I lallfax. Nova Scotia
6130
CKWX. Vancouver, Bnl1sh Colombia 6080
6070
CFRB. Toronto. Ontario
3910
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
I ICJB. Qu110. [Cuador
17890
Radio Australia. Melbourne
5995 6035 6060 6080
7205 7215 9580
Radio Bel)lng, C11111a
15130
Radio Canada lnt'I. Montreal
9555 9625 11720 11915
11955 15315 15440 17820
Radio France lnl'I. Paris
11 705 15360 17620
Radio Jordan. Amman
9560
Radio Korea, Seoul. South Korea
5985 9870
Radio Malawi, Blantyre
3380 5995
Radio Moscow, USSR
11 840 13680 15135 15460
15550
Radio n1yad11. Saudi Arabia
9705 9720
Radio RSA. South /\Inca
11890
Aaaio Tanzania. Dar es Salaam
9684
Superpower KUSW. Utah
9850
Voice of America. Washington, DC 9575 9645 9760 11920
15410 15445 15205 15580
15560 17820 17785 17870
WCSN, Boston, MA
2 1640
WHAi. Nob1esv111e. Indiana
15 105 21655
WANO. New Orleans. Louisiana
11965
WYFR, Oakland. California
5950 9535 11830 13695
15215 17612
Radio Zambia. Lusaka
9580
FEBA. Ma11e, Seyc11e11es
Radio Lesotho, Maseru
SBC Radio One. Singapore
Radio Prague. Czechoslovakia

s

s

s

Octo/)(:r 1988

81

frequency I
1615-1630 M.H Radio Budapesl, Hungary
1615-1630
1615-1700
1630-1700
1630-1700
1645- 1700

Voice of Vlelnam. Hanoi
Radio Berlin lnl'I. Easl Germany
Radio Nclherlands, Hilversum
RTM Morocco
Radio Canada 1n·1. Monlreal

1645-1700

Radio Korea. Seoul, Soulh Korea

i1100 UTC

7220
15160
10011
6115
6020
17595
9555
15325
7275

9585
15220

9835 11910

7295 9730
9540
17815
11915 11935 15315
17820
9870

[1 :00 PM EDT/ 10:00 AM PDT]

1700-1 705
Radio Uganda, Kampala
1700-1715 M-A Voice of Namibia (Angola)
1700-1725
Radio Budapesl, Hungary

4976 5026
11955
61 10 9585
15160
Radio Nelherland, Hilversum
6020 9590
1700-1725
Radio Auslralia, Melbourne
5995 6060
1700-1730
9580
Radio Japan, Tokyo
9505 11705
1700-1730
Radio Norway tnl'I, Oslo
1700-1730
15220 15310
1700-1730
.Radio Sweden lnl'I, Oslo
6065
1700-1730
Swiss Radio lnl'I. Berne
3985 6165
1700-1745
BBC. London. England
9410 9740
12095 15070
18080
Radio Pyongyang, Nor1h Korea
1700-1750
7290 9325
1700- 1755
Radio Beijing, China
9570 11600
1700·1800 F ABC, Alice Springs, Auslralia
2310 [ML)
ABC, Tennanl Creek, Auslralia
2325 [ML)
1700·1800
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
1700-1800
9700 15330
9625
AWR A/rtca. Gabon
1700-1800
CBC Nont1crn Quebec Service
9625 11720
1700-1800
CBN. SI. John's, Newfoundland
6160
1700·1800
6160
CBU. Vancouver, Brlllsh Colombia
1700-1800
CFCF, Monrreal. Quebec
1700-1800
6005
CFCN, Calgary. Alberta
1700·1800
6030
CHNS. Halifax. Nova Scolia
1700·1800
6130
CKWX. Vancouver, Bri11sh Colombia 6080
1700·1800
CFRB, Toronl o. Onlario
6070
1700·1800
(US) Far Easl Nelwork, Tokyo
3910
1700-1800
KCBI. Dallas. Texas
11735
1700-1800
1700·1800
11920
Radio Havana Cuba
Radio Jordan, Amman
1700·1800
9560
Radio Korea, Seoul, Soulh Korea
5975 9870
1700·1800
9553 (ML]
1700·1800 M·F Radio Malabo, Equalorial Guinea
Radio Moscow, USSR
9825 9875
1700·1800
12005 12015
15460 15550
1700-1800
9705 9720
Radio Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
1700·1800
Radio Tanzania, Oar es Salaam
9684
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
1700·1800
9580
RTM Morocco
1700-1800
17815
SBC Radio One. Singapore
5052 11 940
1700-1800
Superpower KUSW, Ulah
1700-1800
15225
1700·1800 AS Swazlland Commercial Radio
6155
1700·1800
Voice of A/rlca. Egypl
15255
Voice of America, washlnglon
1700- 1800
9575 11920
15445 15580
17800 17870
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
6100
1700·1800
Voice of Nigeria. Lagos
11770
1700·1800
21640
1700·1800
WCSN. Boslon. Massachusells
1700-1800
WHRI, Noblesville. Indiana
15105 21655
1700·1800
WINB, Red Lion. Pennsylvania
15295
WRNO. Louisiana
1700·1800
11965
1700-1800
WYFR Salellile Nel
13695
1700·1800
WYFR. Okeechobee. Florida
9535 11830
21525
1715-1745
BBC. London. England*
3975 6185
1718-1800
Radio Pakistan. Islamabad
6210 7835
1725·1740
7835v
Radio Suriname lnl'I. Paramibo
11 780 15150
1725-1800
Radio New Zealand. Wellingl on

s

Radio Auslralla, Melbourne

1730-1800
1730-1800
1730·1800
1730-1800
1734-1800
1745-1600

Radio Polonia. Warsaw, Poland
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia
Radio Yugoslavia, Belgrade
RAE, Buenos Aires, Argenllna
FEBA Mahe, Seychelles
BBC, London. England

1745·1800

SLBC, Colmbo, Sri Lanka

9535
11750 11 775
15260 15400
9640

9977

15430

11840 11950
11 995 15135

15205 15410
15600 17785

15170 15215
7165

1800 UTC
1800·1805
1800·1815
1800-1815

11815
2 1700

s

Octoher 1988

1730-1800

7205

s

82

1730·1755 M·A BRT, Brussels, Belgium
1730-1800
KNLS, Anchor Poinl, Alaska
1730·1755
Radio Bucharesl, Romania

9835 11910

6080

AJI India Radio, New Deihl

1730·1735

A

4840 4860 4920 6160
7412 9950
17595 21810
7355
7105 9530 9685 11790
11 940
5995 6035 6060 6080
7205 9580
6135 9540
13715 15165
5980 6100 7240 11735
15345
11 760
9515 9740 12095 15070
15260
11800

[2:00 PM EDT/11 :00 AM PDT)

11 940
9385 9640
3970 4750
5010
1800-1815
SLBC, Colombo. Sri Lanka
11 800
1800-1825 AS FEBA Mahe. Seychelles
11760
1800-1825
Radio Prague. Czechoslovakia
9605 11685
15110 21505
1800·1825
RAE. Buenos A/res, Argentina
15345
1800-1830
BBC. London, England
9740 11750
15400
1800-1830
Radio Bamako, Mall
4835 5995
1800-1830
Radio Berlin lnl'I. Easl Germ an y
6115 7260
1800·1830
Radio Mozambique. Maputo
3265 4855
1800-1830
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia
5930 7345
1800·1830
Voice of A/rica. Egypl
15255
1800-1830
9840 15010
Voice of Vielnam. Hanoi
1800- 1845
7215
Radio Abidjan, Ivory Coast
1800·1845
Trans World Radio, Swaziland
9525
1800-1850
Deulsche Welle, Wesl Germany
11785 13790
1800-1850
Radio Bras. Brasilia, Brazil
15265
1800·1856
Radio RSA South A/rica
17880
1800·1900 F ABC. Alice Springs, AUstralia
2310 (ML]
1800-1900 F ABC, Tennanl Creek. Auslraila
2325 (ML]
1800-1900
All India Radio, New Delhi
11935 15360
1800·1900
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
9700 15330
1800·1900
CBC Northern Quebec Service
9625 11720
1800-1900
6160
CBN, SI. John's, Newfoundland
1800·1900
CBU, Vancouver. Brlllsh Colombia
61 60
1800·1900
CFCF, Monlreal, Quebec
6005
1800· 1900
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
1800-1900
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scolla
6130
1800- 1900
CKWX, Vancouver, Brlllsh Colombia 6080
CFRB, Toronlo, Onl arlo
1800-1900
6070
(US) Far Easl Nelwork, Tokyo
3910
1800-1900
11735
1800-1900 AS KCBI, Dallas, Texas
1800-1900
KNLS, Anchor Polnl, Alaska
11650
KYOI, Salpan
1800·1900
9670
1800-1900
5995 6035
Radio Auslralla, Melbourne
7205 7215
1800·1900
15450 .
Radio Jamahiriya. Libya
Radio Kuwail, Kuwait
1800-1900
11665
Radio Malabo, Equalorial Guinea
1800-1900
9553v (M L]
Radio Moscow, USSR
1800-1900
9580 9825
11840 11 900
11995 12005
15135 15460
1800·1900
Radio New Zealand, Wettlnglon
11780 151 50
1800-1900
Radio Riyadh. Saudi Arabia
9705 9720
1800-1900
Radio Tanzania. Oar es Salaam
9684
1800·1900
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
9580
1800-1900 M·A Superpower KUSW, Utah
15225
1800-1900 AS Swaziland Commercial Radio
6155
1800·1900
Voice of America. Washington
9575 11920
15580 15600

MON ITOR ING Tltv!ES

SBC Radio One. Singapore
Kol Israel. Jerusalem
Radio Cameroon. Yaounde

9925 11585
4795 4850

11990 13715

12095 15070

s

9730
9618
13715

15135 17715

15430

6060
9580

6080

9875 11750
11930 11950
12030 12050
15475

154 10 15445
17785 17800

c:l:I

equency~
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
1800-1900
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
1800-1900
WCSN, Boston, Massachusetts
1800-1900
WHRI, Noblesville, Indiana
1800-1900
WIN B, Red Lion, Pennsylvania
1800-1900
1800-1900 S-F WMLK, Bethel, Pennsylvania
WRNO, New Orleans, Louisiana
1800-1900
WYFR, Oakland, California
1800-1900
WYFR
Radio
Radio
Radio

Salellite Net, California
Bangladesh, Dhaka
Austria lnt'I. Vienna
Polonia, Warsaw, Poland

Radio Korea. Seoul, South Korea
BRT Brussels, Belgium
BBC, London. England
Radio Berlin lnt'I. E. Germany
Radio Havana Cuba

17870
6100
11770
15390
15105
15295
9465
15420
9535
15170
13760
6240
5945
5995
9525
9870
5910
t2095
6115
11800

21485
15120

11830 13695 15215
15375
7505
6155 11825 12015
6135 7125 7285
11 840
15575
11 695
15070 15400
7260 9730

KBS

Radio Korea
o.,erse ai ~erv i<e
Korean Broodcoiting System

QSL cards are not the only items to be received from SW
broadcast stations -- They will also send banners, penants,
stickers, and other souvenirs. Here are a few from the
collection of regular contributor Michael Choleva of Euclid,
Ohio.

MONITORING TIMES

October 1988

83

frequency I
1830·1900
Radio Kuwait
1830·1900 MWF Radio Mozambique, Maputo
1830·1900
Radio Netherland, Hllversum
Radio Sofia, Bulgaria
1830·1900
Radio Sweden. Stockholm
1830·1900
1840·1850 M·A Voice of Greece, Athens
Radio Senegal. Dakar
1840-1900
1845-1855
Radio Nacional, Conakry, Guinea
1845-1900
All India Radio, New Delhi
1855·1900
Africa No. 1 , Gabon

11900 UTC

[3:00 PM EDT/ 12:00 PM PDT]

1900-1903
Africa No. 1, Gabon
1900·1903
Vatican Radio, Vatican Cily
1900·1915
Radio Bangladesh, Dhaka
1900·1915
Radio Tanzania, Dar es Salaam
Radio Netherland, Hllversum
1900-1925
Voice of Islamic Republic Iran
1900-1925
1900·1930 F ABC, Alice Springs, Australia
1900·1930 F ABC, Tennant Creek, Australia
1900-1930
Radio Afghanistan, Kabul
1900·1930
Radio Canada lnl'I. Montreal
1900-1930
Radio Japan. Tokyo
1900-1930 s Radio Norway lnl'I. Oslo
1900·1930 M·F Radio Portugal. Lisbon
1900·1930
Radio Sofia Bulgaria
Radio Yugoslavia. Belgrade
1900·1930
1900·1930
Voice of Vietnam, Hanoi
1900·1955
Radio Beijing, China
1900·2000
All India Radio, New Delhi
1900·2000
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
BBC, London, England
1900·2000
CBC Northern Quebec Service
1900·2000
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
1900-2000
1900-2000
CBU, Vancouver, British Colombia
C FCF, Montreal. Quebec
1900·2000
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
1900-2000
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scotia
1900-2000
CKWX. Vancouver, British Colombia
1900·2000
CFRB, Toronto, Ontario
1900-2000
1900-2000
(US) Far East Network. Tokyo
1900-2000
HCJB, Quito, Ecuador
1900-2000 A.S KCBI. Dallas. Texas
1900·2000
KNLS, Anchor Point. Alaska
1900-2000
KYOI, Saipan
1900-2000
Radio Algiers, Algeria
1900·2000
Radio Australia. Melbourne
Radio Ghana, Accra
1900-2000
1900-2000
Radio Havana Cuba
1900-2000
Radio Korea, Seoul, South Korea
1900-2000
Radio Kuwait. Kuwait
1900-2000 M-A Radio Malabo, Equatorial Guinea
1900-2000
Radio Moscow, USSR
1900-2000
Radio New Zealand, Wellington
1900-2000
Radio Prague. Czechoslovakia
1900-2000
Radio Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
1900-2000
Radio RSA. South Africa
1900-2000
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
1900-2000
Spanish Foreign Radio. Madrid
1900-2000 M-A Superpower KUSW. Ul ah
1900-2000 A.S Swaziland Commercial Radio
1900-2000
Trans World Radio Swaziland
1900-2000
Voice of America. Washington
1900-2000
1900-2000
1900-2000
1900-2000
1900-2000

84

11665
3265 4855 9618
6020 9540 17605 21685
7245 9560 11735 15310
15240
11645 12045 15630
4950
4833 4900 7125
7412 11620
4830 15475

Voice of Ethiopia. Addis Ababa
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
WCSN, Boston, Massachusetts
WHAi, Noblesville, Indiana

October 1988

15475
6190
6240
9684
6020
9695
2310
2325
7160
15260
9505
9590
11870
7245
5980
12020
6860
7412
9700
9410
9625
6160
6160
6005
6030
6130
6080
6070
39 10
11 790
11 735
11650
9670
9509
6035
7215
6130
11 800
9870
11665
9553
9580
12030
11780
5930
9705
5950
9580
9765
15225
6155
3205
9760
15445
17800
9595
6100
7255
15390
13760

7250
7505

9645

15175 17605 21685
[ML)
[ML)
9640
17820
11705
15220
15250
7155
7240
15010
9470
11620
15330
15400
11720

WINS, Red Lion, Pennsylvania
1900-2000
1900-2000 S-F WMLK, Belhel, Pennsylvania
1900-2000
WRNO, New Orleans, Louisiana
1900-2000
WYFR, Oakland, California
1900-2000
WYFR Satellite Net, California
1910-1920
Radio Botswana, Gaborone
1920·1930 M-A Voice of Greece, Athens
Radio Togo, Lome
1930-1940
1930-1955
BAT, Brussels, Belgium
ABC. Katherine. Australia
1930-2000
Radio Beijing, China
1930-2000
Radio Bucharest, Romania
1930-2000
Radio Budapest, Hungary
1930-2000
1930-2000 A. s
1930-2000
1930-2000 M·F
1930-2000
1930-2000
1930-2000
1935-1955
1940-2000 M-A
1945-2000
1950-2000

15310

2000 UTC

9700
9620

2000-2005 S-F

11935 15360
15430
12095 15070

2000-2005
2000-2010 M-A
2000-2010 A
2000-2010
2000·2015
2000-2015 M-A
2000-2015
2000-2025
2000-2025
2000-2030
2000-2030
2000-2030

15270 17590 17790

2000-2030
2000-2030 M-F
2000-2030
2000-2030
2000-2030
2000-2030
2000·2030
2000-2030
2000-2030
2000-2030
2000-2045

9685 15215 17745
6060 6080 7205
9580

15575
[ML]
9875 11 840 11 995
12050 151 35 15475
15150
7345
9720
7270 96 10
11790 15375 15395

11 760 15205 15410
15580 15600 17785
17870
11770
17830

2000-2050
2000-2056
2000-2 100 M-A
2000-2100
2000-2100 M-A
2000-2100
2000-2100

2000-2100
2000-2 t 00
2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2100

MONITORING TIMES

Radio Canada lnl'I. Montreal
Radio Finland, Helsinki
Radio Portugal. Lisbon
Radio Sofia Bulgaria
Voice of Republic of Iran
WINS, Red Lion. Pennsylvania
RAI, Rome. llaly
Radio Ulan Bal or. Mongolia
All India Radio. New Delhi
Valican Radio, Vatican Clly

15295
9465
15420
11580 15170 15175 15215
11830 13695
3356 4820
7430 9395 9425
5047
5910 9860 11695
2485
6955 7480 9440
7145 9690 9750 11940
6110 7220 9585 9835
11 910 15160
15260 17820
6120 9550 11755 151 85
9605 11740
9700 11720
9022 9770
15185
7275 7290 9575
9575 11870
9755 11860
6190 7250 9645

[4:00 PM EDT/1 :00 PM PDT]
Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

3295
6020
9520
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
3345
Vatican Radio, Vallcan Clly
6190
Radio Zambia. Lusaka
3345
6 100
Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
3220
Radio Togo, Lome
9575
Radio Ulan Bator, Mongolia
Trans World Radio, Swaziland
3205
Radio Beijing, China
6955
Radio Bucharest, Romania
5990
9690
KNLS, Anchor Point. Alaska
7355
Kol Israel, Jerusalem
11605
6035
Radio Australia, Melbourne
9620
Radio Berlin lnl'I. East Germany
9665
Radio Canada lnl'I, Montreal
15260
Radio Ghana, Nairobi
3366
Radio Kiev, Ukraine, USSR
6010
Radio Norway lnlernatlonal, Oslo
9590
Radio Polonia, Warsaw. Poland
7125
Radio Sofia. Bulgaria
7245
Swaziland Commercial Radio
6155
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
7255
9022
Voice of Republic of Iran
7412
All India Radio, New Delhi
11860
Radio Pyongyang, North Korea
6576
Radio RSA. South Africa
7270
2310
ABC, Allee Springs, Australia
ABC, Kalherine. Australia
2485
ABC. Tennant Creek, Australia
2325
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
9700
5975
BBC. London. England
9515
15400
CBC Northern Quebec Service
9625
CBN, St. John's. Newfoundland
6160
CSU, Vancouver, Brillsh Colombia
6160
CFCF, Montreal, Quebec
6005
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
CHNS, Halifax. Nova Scolla
6130
CKWX, Vancouver, British Colombia 6080
CFRB. Toronto, Ontario
6070

4890
6040

5960
6080

5985
6140

7480 9440
6105 7145
9750 11940

7195

6165
7250
6165
5047
11870

13625 15485 15592
7205 7215 9580
11920 15255
17820
4915
6090 6165 7170
15310
7145 9525
9560 11 735 15310

9770
9755
9345
9610
[ML]

99 10 11 620
9640

9977

[ML]
15330 15430
6005 6180 94 10
12095 15070 15260
17760
11720

frequencyi
2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2 100
2000-21 00 A.
2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2100

s

(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
Radio Kuwait, Kuwait
King of Hope, Sou111ern Lebanon
KCBI, Dallas. Texas
KYOI, Saipan
Radio Malabo, Equatorial Guinea
Radio Moscow. USSR

Radio New Zealand, Wellington
2000-2100
Radio for Peace, Costa Rica
2000-2100
Radio Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2000-2100
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
2000-2100
2000-2100 M-A Superpower KUSW, Utah
2000-2100
Voice of America, Washington

2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2100
2000-2100 S- F
2000-21 00
2000-2100

Voice of Turkey, Ankara
Voice of Nigeria, Lagos
WCSN, Boston, Massachusetts
WHRI, Noblesville, Indiana
WtNB, Red Lion, Pennsy lvania
WM LK. Bethel, Pennsylvania
WRNO, New Orleans, Louisiana
WYFR, Oakland, California

2000-21 00 M-A WYFR Satellite Net. California
2005-2100
Radio Damascus. Syria
2010-2100 A,S Voice of Kenya, Nairobi
2015-2100
ELWA. Monrovia, Liberia
2015-2 100
Radio Cairo, Egypt
RAI, Rome. Italy
2025-2045
Radio Polonia, Warsaw, Poland
2030-2055
Radio Australia. Melbourne
2030-2100
Radio Beijing, China
2030-2 100
Radio Korea, Seoul, South Korea
2030-2100
Radio Netherland, Hilversum
2030-2 100
2030-2100 M-F Radio Portugal, Lisbon
2030-2 100
Radio Tirana. Albania
2030-2100
Voice of Alrica. Cairo, Egypt
Voice of Vietnam, Hanoi
2030-2100
2040-2 100
Radio Havana Cuba
2045-2100
All India Radio, New Delhi
2045-2 100
2045-2100

i 2100

UTC

IBRA Radio, Malla
Vatican Radio, Vatican City

3910
11665
6280
11 735
9670
9553v
9580 9735
11950 12030
15135 15425
12050 151 50
21555
9705 9720
9580
15690
9760 11760
15445 15580
17800 17870
9825
11 770
15390
13760 17830
15295
9465
15420
11830 13695
15215 15440
13695
12085 15095
6100
11830
9900
7235 9575
6095 7285
9580 9620
6955 7480
11790
6480 7550
9540 9895
7155 9740
9480 11 835
15375
9840 12020
15230 15300
7412 9550
11715
6100
9625 11 700

9875 11 840
12050 13605
15475

15205 15410
15600 17785

15170 15175

9745

15575
11740 15560

Radio Damascus, Syri a
Radio Zambia, Lusaka
Vatican Radio, Vatican City
Voice of Kenya. Nairobi
IBRA Radio, Malla
Radio AUstrla tnl'I, Vienna
Radio Beijing, China

2100-2125
2100-2125
2100-2130

Radio Bucharest. Romania
Radio Netherland, Hilversum
Radio Budapest. Hungary

2100-2130

Radio Canada lnt'I, Montreal

2100-2130
21 00-2130
2100-2130
2100-2130
2100-2135
2100-2140
2100-2145
2100-2145

Radio Japan, Tokyo
Radio Korea, Seoul, South Korea
Radio Sweden. StockhOlm
Swiss Radio lnt'I. Berne
ELWA. Monrovia, Liberia
Radio Havana Cuba
Radio Cairo, Egypt
WYFR, Oakland. California

MONITORING TIMES

12085
3345
6190
6100
6100
5945
6955
11 790
5990
9540
611 0
11910
9555
17820
5965
6480
6065
9885
11830
11725
9670
11 830
15220

211 5-2130
2125-2155
2130-2 145
2130-2200
2130-2200
2130-2200 A,S

s

11 760 15120

15095
6165
7250

9645

6155
7480

9585
9440

6105
9895
7220
15160
6030
17875
7140
7550
11845
12035

2100·2200
2100-2200
2100-2200
2 100-2200
2103-2200
2110-2200
211 5-2200

9910 11620

[5:00 PM EDT/2:00 PM PDT]

2100-2105
2100-2105
2100-2110
2100-2110 A,S
2100-211 5
2100-2125
2100-2125

2100-2200
2100-2200
2100-2200
2100·2200
2100·2200
2100·2200
2100·2200
2100-2200
2100-2200
2100-2200
2100-2200
2100-2200
2100-2200
2100-2200
2100-2200

2100-2200
2100-2200 A.S
2100-2200 A,S
2100-2200
2100-2200 M-A
2100-2200
2100-2200

9710

9440

2100-2150
Deutsche Welle, West Germany
Radio Beijing, Cl1ina
2100-2155
2100-2200 M-A ABC, Alice Springs. Australia
ABC, Kat11erine, Australia
2100-2200
2100-2200 M-A ABC. Tennant Creek. Australia
2100-2200
All India Radio. New Delhi
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
2100-2200
BBC, London. England
2100-2200

2130-2200
2130-2200
2130-2200
2135-2150 S-F
2145-2200
9870
9745

2150-2200 M-F

7145 7195
11740 15560
9585 9835

2200 UTC

11945 15325

9650 9765
6860 94 70 9860
2310 [Ml)
2485
2325 (ML)
9550 9910 11620 11715
15330 15345 15430
3995 5975 6005 6 175
6180 7325 94 10 12095
15070 15260 15400 17760
CBC Nortt1ern Quebec Service
9625 11 720
6160
CBN, St. Jo11n·s. NeWfoundland
CBU, Vancouver. British Colombia
6160
CFCF, Montreal, OuelJec
6005
CFCN, Calgary, AllJerta
6030
CHNS, Halifax. Nova Scotia
6130
CKWX, Vancouver, British Colombia 6080
6070
CFRB, Toronto, Ontario
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
3910
6280
King of Hope, Southern Lebanon
KSDA. Agat. Guam
9465
KVOH, Rancho Simi, California
17775
KYOI, Saipan
9670
Radio Baghdad. Iraq
15230
Radio Moscow. USSR
9890 11 840 11 950 12050
13605 15405 15425 15475
15535 15560
Radio for Peace, Cosla Rica
21555
Radio MalalJo, Equatorial Guinea
9552.5
Radio Zambia. Lusaka
9580
Spanist1 Foreign Radio, Madrid
9765 11790
15690
Superpower KUSW, Utan
Voice of Africa. Cairo. Egypt
15375
Voice of America, Wast1ington
9760 11760 15205 15410
15445 15580 15600 17785
17800 17870
Voice of Nigeria. Lagos
15120
15390
WCSN. Boston. Massachusetts
WHRI. Noblesville. Indiana
13760 17830
WRNO, New Orleans. Louisiana
15420
WINB, Red Lion. Pennsylvania
15295
12085 15095
Radio Damascus. Syria
5975 7325 9410 9915
BBC. London, England
12095 15070 15260
Radio Yugoslavia, Belgrade
6100 9620
Radio Austria lnl'I. Vienna
9870
BBC, London. Eng land•
5965 7160
BBC, London. England*
6030 7230 9635
15270 17790
HCJB. Quito. Ecuador
Radio Canada ln'I, Montreal
6030 9555 11945 15325
17820 17875
Radio Sofia Bulgaria
7115 7155 9700 11720
9480
Radio Tirana. Albania
6190
Swiss Radio lnl'I, Berne
11830
ELWA. Monrovia, LilJeria
WYFR, Oakland. California
11 830 13695 15170 15566
17612 17845
ELWA. Monrovia. Liberia
11830

[5:00 PM EDT/3:00 PM PDT]

2200-2205 M-F ELWA Monrovia. Liberia
2200-2205
Radio Damascus, Syria
2200-2210 M-H Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

7280 17835
15575
15570

15300 15340
13695 15170 15175
15440 21525

Radio Sierra Leone, Freetown
2200-22 10
2200-2215 M-A ABC, Allee Springs, Australia
2200-2215 M-A ABC, Tennant Creek, Australia
2200-2215
BBC. London. England•
2200-2215 M-F Voice of America, Washington
BRT Brussels. Belgium
2200-2225
RAI, Rome. Italy
2200-2225

3993
12085
3925
6020
9520
5980
2310
2325
5965
9640
5910
5990

Octohcr 1988

11830
15095
4890
6040

5960
6080

5985
6140

(M L)
[ML)
7160
11740 15120
9925
9710 11800

85

frequencyI
6015 9615 11830
2485
9550 9910 11620
9625 11 720
6080 9730
6110 9585 9835
15160
2200-2230
Radio Moscow. USSR
7115 9490 9835
11790 11950 11840
12060 13605 15425
11 850 151 80
2200-2230 s Radio Norway lnl'I, Oslo
2200-2230
Radio Prague, Czechoslovakia
6055
7710 9900
2200-2245
Radio Cairo, Egypt
Radio Baghdad. Iraq
15230
2200-2250
RAE, Buenos Aires, Argnetina
11710 15345
2200-2255
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
6030 11790 15345
2200·2300
BBC, London, England
5975 6005 6175
2200-2300
7325 9410 9590
12095 15070 15260
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
6160
2200-2300
6160
CBU, Vancouver, Brillsh Colombia
2200-2300
2200-2300
6005
CFCF, Monrreal, Quebec
2200-2300
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
2200-2300
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scotia
6130
2200-2300
CKWX, Vancouver, Brilish Colombia 6080
2200·2300
CFRB, Toronto, Ontario
6070
3910
(US) Far East Network, Tokyo
2200-2300
2200-2300
King of Hope, Southern Lebanon
6280
KVOH, Rancho Simi, California
2200-2300
17775
KYOI, Salpan
15405
2200·2300
Radio Australia, Melbourne
15160 15240 15320
2200-2300
17795
Radio lor Peace. Costa Rica
21555
2200-2300
Radio Havana Cuba
2200-2300
7140
SBC Radio One, Singapore
2200-2300
5010 5052 11 940
15690
2200-2300 M·A Superpower KUSW. Utah
Voice of America. Washlnglon
2200·2300
15120 15185 15290
15320 17740 17820
Voice of Free China, Taiwan
2200-2300
15440 17845
2200·2300
WCSN, Boston, Massachuselts
15300
2200-2300
WHRI, Noblesville. Indiana
9770 17830
WINB, Red Lion, Pennsylvania
2200-2300
15185
WANO, New Orleans. Louisiana
2200-2300
13760
WYFR. Oakland. California
2200·2300
11830 151 70 15175
15566 21525
WYFR Satellite Nel. California
13695 15375
2200-2300
BBC, London. England*
2215-2230
11820 15390
2230-2300 A.S CBC Northern Quebec Service
9625 11720
2230-2300
Kol Israel. Jerusalem
11605 12080 13625
2230-2300
Radio Beijing, China
3985 6165
Radio Canada lnl'I, Montreal
2230-2300
11880 11945 15150
Radio Finland. Helslnkl
6120 11945 11755
2230-2300
Radio Jamahiriya. Libya
11815 15450
2230·2300
2230-2300
Radio Medlterran. Malla
6110
Radio Polonia, Warsaw. Poland
5995 6135 7125
2230·2300
Radio Sofia, Bulgaria
9700 11950
2230·2300
Radio Tirana. Albania
7215 9480
2230-2300
Radio Vilnius. umuanlan SSR
6100
2230-2300
All India Radio. Now Delhi
6055 7215 9535
2245-2300
1171 5 11745
2200-2225
2200-2230
2200-2230
2200-2230
2200-2230
2200-2230 T,F

12300 UTC

Valican Radio. Vallcan City
ABC. Kalherlne, AUslralia
All India Radio, New Delhi
CBC Northern Quebec Service
Radio Berlin lnl'I, East Germany
Radio Budapest. Hungary

11910
11675
12050
15560

15430
6180
9915

15395

15305

15220

2300-2330 M·A
2300-2345
2300-2345
2300·2345
2300-2350
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300·0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300·0000 M-F
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000
2300-0000

2300-0000
2300·0000
2300·0000
2300-0000
2315·2330
2315·0000

2320·2325 M·A
2330·0000
2330-0000
2330-0000
2330-0000
2335·2345 M·A
2345-0000
2348-0000

BBC, London. England

2300-2330 s
2300-2330 A.S
2300-2330
2300-2330
2300-2330

KGEI,
Radio
Radio
Radio
Radio

San Francisco, California
Canada lnl'I, Monrreal
Medllerran, Malla
Moscow World Service
Polonia. Warsaw

October 1988

Radio Sofia. Bulgaria
Radio Sweden. Slockholm
Radio Vilnius, Lilhusanian SSR

9700
9695
7205
13645
Superpower KUSW, Ulah
15580
Radio Berlin lnl'I, E. Germany
5965
WINB, Red Lion. Pennsylvania
15185
WYFR, Oakland, California
9505
15175
Voice of Turkey, Ankara
7135
All India Radio. New Delhi
6055
11715
(US) Armed Forces Radio and TV
6030
CBC Northern Quebec Service
6195
CBN, St. John's, Newfoundland
6160
CBU, Vancouver. British Colombia
6160
CFCF, Monrreal, Quebec
6005
CFCN, Calgary, Alberta
6030
CHNS, Halifax, Nova Scolla
6130
CKWX, Vancouver. Brillsh Colombia 6080
CFRB. Toronlo, Ontario
6070
(US) Far East Nelwork. Tokyo
3910
KVOH, Rancho Simi, California
17775
KYOI, Saipan
15405
Radio AUstralla, Melbourne
15160
17795
Radio Canada lnt'I, Montreal
5960
Radio for Peace, Costa Rica
21555
Radio Jamahiriya. Libya
11 815
Radio Japan, Tokyo
11 800
Radio Moscow. USSR
6170
9490
9890
Radio Thailand, Bangkok
9655
WCSN. Boslon, Massachusetls
15300
WHRI, Noblesville, Indiana
9770
WRNO, New Orleans. Louisiana
13760
BBC, London. England•
11820
BBC, London, England
5975
9515
15435
Radio Prague. Czechoslovakia
6055
Radio Korea. Seoul, South Korea
15575
Radio Tirana, Albania
6200
Voice of America. Washington. DC 17735
Voice of Vlelnam. Hanoi
9840
Voice of Greece. Alhens
9395
BBC, London. England•
3915
WINB. Red Lion, Pennsylvania
15145

11950
11705
7400

9640 11790

9730 11 965
11 830 11 855 13695
15375 21525
7160 9445 17760
7215 9535 9910
11745
11 790
9625

15240 15320 15395
9755
15450
151 95 17810
71 15 7195 7230
9530 9720 9765
15240
11905
17830
15390
6005
9590

6175 7325
9915 12095

9630
7065 9760V
17820
12020 15010
9425 11645
6080 7180 9580

17820
15400

7270

9910

(7:00 PM EDT/4:00 PM PDT]

2300-2315

86

11715

2300-2330
2300-2330
2300-2330

5975 6005 6175 6195
7325 9410 9515 9590
9915 12095 15070 15435
15280
5960 9755
6 t 10
7370 9490
5995 6135 7125 7270

MONlTORING TIMES

We'd like to feature 'l.QJJL special QSL 'sf Send us the
original and we'll have it copied and returned to you to
be used as space permits. Send to QSL editor, PO Box
98, Brasstown , NC 28902. Please allow four weeks for
return of QSLs.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Don't Miss a Single Issue!
U.S.

(mailed second class*) :

o

1 Year for $18
(12 issues)

o 2 Years for $34

o 3 Years for $50 (SAVE $4.00!)

(24 issues)

(36 issues)

Payment received by the 10th of the month will receive current issue. Back
issues, when available, can be purchased for $4.00 each (includes first
class mailing).
* If you prefer first class mail add $20. 00 per year.

Canada, Mexico and Overseas
o 1 Year $26.00

*

0

(mailed in an envelope second class *):

2 Years $50.00

o 3 Years $72.00

If you prefer air mail, please write for rates.

All foreign subscriptions must be paid by Visa, Mastercard, International,
Bank or Postal Money Order in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank.

NAME
ADDRESS
CITY

STATE

ZIP

Subscribe for a friend!
NAME

ADDRESS
CITY

STATE

ZIP

o Please send a gift card signed from

- - - - - - -- - -- - -- - PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY ORDER!

Mastercard and Visa accepted
0

MAST E R CARD

0

Mon th

Year

rn-rn

VISA

I I I I 1-1 I I I 1-1 .I I I 1- 1 I I I I
Reprints of articles available for $2 per reprint
plus self addressed stamped envelope.
Send name and month of article.

Make checks payable to:

MONITORING TIMES
140 Dog Branch Road
P.O. Box 98
Brasstown, NC 28902
1-704-837-9200

magne tests ...

Lawrence Magne
Editor-i11 -Chief
Passport to World Ba11d Radio

PANASONIC RF-B300
W o rl d Ban d Radi o is h aving an impo rta nt
ann iversary. E leven years ago, Pan aso ni c
in t roduced a very important portab le, the
RF-2800 (also so ld as the National DR-280.
Why all the hoopla over an eleve n yea r old
radio? The RF-B300 wa s the first successful
digital port ab le on the consumer mark et
and it helped change s ho rtwave listening
from something hardly anybody did to the
growing and popular pasti me it is today.

Basic Design
Goes Ba ck to 1977
The P anasonic RF-2800 is a hard se t for me
to forget, because it was whe n it c:ime out -back in 1977 -- that I had first started doin g
regular reviews of shortwave equipment.

88

Octo ber 1988

Nobody had been doing these ki nds of
reviews unti l th en -- partly, I suppose,
because there wasn't a whole lo t to review.
And what few sets there were -- Zenith
Transoceanics a nd th e like -- tended to perform poorly.
13ut the '2800 was different. Not o nly did it
boast a n accurate LED readout, it also had
double co nversio n to reduce image interference, two bandwidths for flexib le select1vuy, superior a udio a11d good FM
pc1fo1111a11ce. Gra nted, it was a bit large for
air trm·el, but o n o ne occasion I took a
'2800 o n a six-week trek through much of
Europe and the Middle East. The only
cl iffictil ty I had was that just about everyone
I ran int o -- cab drivers, waiters, fellow
pn ssengers, and th e like -- tried to buy it off
M ON ITO R I NG TIMES

me for much mo re th an what I paid for it!
Back then , I rated it as the best portable
available. The only serious criticism was
t hat both bandwidths were a bit wide. So, a
year and a half later Panaso nic took note
a nd replaced the '2800 with the RF-2900.
The two sets were all but identical, but the
'2900 had narrower ba ndwidt hs and a
fluorescent readout in p lace of LED's. The
new version was a great success and stayed
on the market for years.

'B300 Incorporates
Changes
More recently, the '2900 was superceded by
t he Pa nasonic RF-B300, sold in Asia as the
Nat io na l 8300. In many ways it's t he sa me

spinner on the main tu ning knob, whereas
the ' 8300 has only a finger detent.

set as the '2900, but the cabinet has been
redesign ed and some comrols changed. For
example, r eception of single-sideband
signals has been made m ore logical , which
is a plu s. Out the bass and treble con trols on
the '2900 have been replaced by a single
t o ne contrnl on the '8300, which is a step
backwards.

Another problem affecting the '2900 and
'8300 i s mediocre image rejection. The 2
MHz lF ca uses signals t o "repeat" 4 MHz
lower down, so a signal, say. on 7275 kHz
tends to reappea r at lower strength on 3275
kHz. O f co urse, if you're trying to listen to
3275 kHz, th is can be pretty frustrating.
Too, al th ough single-sideband reception is
more logical, it's not appreciably beuer ,
because th e se t tends to drift off frequency
so mewhat.

Otherwi se. th e sa me virtues and vices arc
evident. The vi rtues include good audio,
even with the chc:i pcn cd tone control, and
dual selectivity. There's also a dial light to
help with nighttime listening and a genuine
signal-strength meter.

Superior Construction
Out against this arc the earmarks of :i
receiver designed in another era. Alt hough
the '2800 was years ahead of its tim e when it
first came out, by now th e ba sic design is
getting a bit long in the tooth. For example,
there arc no programm able channel
memories or keypad tuning. Indeed, to tune
from one band to th e ot her requires
adjusting a switch, then pushing th e tuning
kn ob in for fast tuning, then pu l ling it back
out again for fine t uning. In th is regard, t he
'2900 was just a bi t handier, becau se i t had a

In some countries the Panasonic RF-8300
comes with a two-year warranty. This makes
sense, inasmuch as Pan asonic's world band
port ables arc usually better put together
than most. Dul still, the frequen cy-of-repair
record on the earlier '2800 and '2900
versions seems to have been above average.

Pick Up a Bargain

portable with superior audio. What makes
it particularly interesting i s th at, like its
'13600 sibling, it is being dropped from
Panason ic's line worldwide. In some countries, such as the US, there arc still a
number of samples in warehou ses, so it's
entirely possible that the '8300 will be
heavi ly di scounted between now and early
1989. The suggested retai l pri ce i n the US
is awfully steep -- 5299.95, with the dealer
cost being about two- thirds that amount.
So, if you can find it for substant ially under
dealer cost -- say, around 5150 or so -- you
could have yourself a r eal barga in.
The only thing that really compares with
the '8300 is the Magnavox 02935, which
sounds similar. Th e '2935 is currently
se lling for between 5180-200 at many outlets. Price aside, the main difference
between the '2935 and the Pana so nic RF8300 is that the '8300 is more of a t raditionalist's radio -- no computerized controls
and the like. Also, t he Panasonic has two
ban dwidths to t he '2935's one.

In all, th e RF-8300 is a frill-free wo r l d band

Available Soon!
tirif

The First Annual

~ ~mmcailt®OJJCP OOcaictiJOCID

Equipment Buyers Guide
The Active Ham's Complete Annual Referei:ice Master
This valuable new master directory and buyer's guide will serve
you day in and day out in searchi ng out new gear, comparing new
models, locating dealers near you and mail-order retailers around
the country. It'll help you buy more wisely wi th its mult i-reference
concept to help you wend your way through the buying maze.

COMPLETE PRODUCT INFORMATION
It's a sing le-vol ume source book of the latest Amateur Radio gear
all sectionalized by equipment type for easy reference by the
seasoned editorial staff of CO:
•Complete product descriptions.
•Technical specifications.
• Retail prices.
• Equipment photographs.
WHO'S WHO IN THE AMATEUR RADIO BUSINESS
It's a Buyer's Guide filled with the ki nd of support information
you 've always needed, but couldn't easily get: Dealer listings
state-by-state (including branches), names and calls for key person nel, top lines carried, whether or not trade·ins are accepted or
on-site repairs are made ... and so on.
BUYING TIPS FROM THE EXPERTS
Great articles on the in's and out 's of pu rchasing Amateur equip·
ment. The experts give you the inside scoop on everythin g from

antennas to transceivers to making your first packet contact ...
and lots more.
ORDER YOUR BUYER'S GUIDE TODAY!
Don't miss the singl e most valuable buying guide in the Amateur
Radio fi eld. Send only $3.95 today.
1--- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - '
YES, please send my copy of AMATEUR RADIO BUYER'S
I
GUIDE 1989 for only $3.95 postage paid.
Date

Number of Copies

Name

Call

Add ress
City
O Check

Card No.

State
0 MasterCard

ip ___
0 VISA
Expi res

Signature n><r,...,....,.,--.,....,..,...,.._..,..,..,,.---,.....,,,..,,.,.=-=-===-=r---(Slgnatu re required on all charge orders)
Mail to: CQ Communications, Inc.
MT
76 North Broadway, Hicksville, NY 11801

MONITORING TIMES

October 1988

89

scan ner equipment

Larry Wiland
292 S. Tuma Nd.
Yo1111gstow11,

Oii ././5 I 5

The Uniden/Bearcat
BC-560XLT/400 Scanner
A qu ality scann1:r fo r S!OO? So und s t oo
good t o be t rue, d oesn 't it ? Bu t t he n ew est
relea se f rom Uni d c n p roves th at it ca n be
d o n e a n d dnnc nicely.

T he set prese nts an extra o rdin a ri ly h and s ome a ppearan ce wit h it s d a rk g rey face a n d
black vinyl-coate d cabinet.

Sixteen in Fifteen
T he I3ea rcat BC -560 X LT a nd it s ide n tica l
tw in , the BC--I OOXLT , ar c the tw o la test
addi t io n s to the a lrea dy excel le nt lin e of
U ni dc n sca n ncrs. A r p a rent ly des ig ned t o
a ppe a l to th e "entry- level" sca nn e r crowd ,
t his little radio has many exc iting fea tu re s.
A n d it 's q u it e a b arga in fo r the p ri ce. In
fact, th e '560X LT actu a lly per fo r ms as we ll
as (a n d p oss ib ly bett e r th a n) ma ny ot h e r
sca n ne rs cost in g twi ce to t h ree tim es as
m u ch.

What Is It?
T he
13C- 560X LT
is a
16
ch a nne l
mob ile/base sca n ner fea tu ring a two d ig it,
red LED readout cha n n e l indi cat o r. I t's
h o u sed in a rugge d meta l ca se. I n clu d e d in
th e pack age is a t elescop ing w hi p a nt en na
( for base use sho uld th e owner de sire), a
mobil e power co rd. a n d mobile mo unt ing
b racke t.
But wait' Tha t's n o t al l 1 Th e '560 a lso h as
feat u res n ot u sually fo un d in sca n n ers in
this price range, such as insta n t w eather
ch annel recept ion (a t t he t o u ch o f a k ey), a
cha n ne l l priority fea tu re and a n L E D
cha n ne l lockou t indicato r. M easuri n g a
sc<i n t 5-1/2" x 6-7/8" x 1-3/4" in size, it ca n
eas ily be mounted in eve n t h e most
cra m ped co mpact ca r. Yo u 'l l proba b ly wa n t
t o find a p romi ne nt p lace fo r it , tho u g h.

..

f

i

!

90

..

-

BR..o.h.c.a±'
LOC~

Wf.

OV1 •

Ocro/Jcr 1988

T h e '560 scan s its 16 channel s at a rat e o f 15
p e r second. The b uilt-i n two se cond d e lay,
h owever, allows the scanner to "li nge r" o n
a ny active cha nne l lo ng enough to prev e nt
m issed rep lies to ra dio traffic found th e re.
A lso, a cap acit or-type m em o ry b ackup
al lows the ra d io Lo re t ain programmed
ch an ne ls fo r up to 60 days w it hout a b att ery.
Th e power re quire me nt is 13.8 v o lts de
w hi ch ca n be p rov ided by a n a ut o mo b ile's
elect rica l syste m or b y the use o r an
optio na l wall-mo u nt t ransform er.

Programming a Snap
P rog ram m ing the '560 is a sn ap . O ne me re ly
s teps to t h e cha nne l w h ere th e d esired fr equ e n cy is to be entered (either by s tepp ing
t hro u gh preceding channe ls ma n ua lly o r by
d irect e ntry o f the cha nnel n u mbe r in
question), enters the frequ e n cy by num b e rs,
p resses th e "E " ( e n ter) b u tt o n a nd, voil a!
T h e rema ining 15 chann els a rc, o f course,
prog ra mmed in the sa me fa s h ion.
T he '560 d oes n ot disp lay its co n tained fre que n cies by di rect fr e quen cy readout . Th a t
is, each ch a nnel is re p resent e d o n the two d ig it LED d isplay by its n u m b er. C h an n e l 1
re ad s a s "1", cha n n el 2 as "2", et c . Th e o p e ra t o r mu st remember wh ich chan ne ls co ntain w h a t freq u e ncies . Bu t with o nly 16

Ic

avail abl e
p rob le m .

slots,

this

pre sen ts

no

real

P rogramm ed freque n cies can be checke d
w it h the "review" bu tto n. After program m ing ea ch c ha nn e l ( or eve n a ll 16), one
me rely st eps to t he ch<Jnnel to b e checke d
a nd presses it. The f requency in that
ch a n ne l is the n d isplayed one digit a1 n t ime
wit h a "d;1s h" (- ) s ig nifying t he clcc.: i111al
b e twe e n MH z a n d k l-Tz rcnclou t. Fo r
example, review ing a progra 111 mccl rrequ c n c.y or 155. 130 via th e rev iew bu ttl)Jl
ca uses t h e sca nne r to rea d out a disp lay like
L 5 5 - I 3 0. A f't er showing the frequency
dig it b y digi t, t he c han nel n umber is aga in
di sp layed.
I nd iv id u a l c han n els can also be lockccl out
(skippe d). A sma ll red L ED t o t h e left of
th e freq ue ncy/channe l display inclicates
s u ch w hen locked 1)Ut chnnncls arc
rev iewed or manual ly stepped through.
Delay t ime o f the sca nn er (two seco nds) is
bu ilt in a t t he fac t ory nnd cannot be
altered. Th e d e lay is also for all channels
a n d can no t be changed or t urned on or o ff
o n a ny g iv e n cha n nel (as can be d une with
most sca nners). It docs not appear to b e an
a dve rse fea t ure, however, and is easily
"lived with."

In stant Weather
A n ice fea tu re of thi s scanne r is th e "instant
wea ther" provision. By me rely press ing one
k ey, t h e ra di o sca ns all Nationa l Weather
Se rvice freq u e nci es b etween I (>2.400 and
162.55 M Hz a n d au t omat ica lly f'incls the
on c(s) in use in your arcn. A second small
re d L ED 10 t he left o r t he chan n el numbe r
di sp lay indica tes w he n ! his fea ture is in use.
For those w h o w is h to moni tor one parti cular cha nn el o f int e rest , t he p riority fe;i t u re is j ust t h e t h ing. T h e main frequency of
int e rest is ent e red in tn channel I and when
t h e p ri o rity featu re is a ct ivated (by pus hing
a bu tt o n on t he scanner), channel I is "snmp led " o n ce every two seconds during t he
sca n n ing seque nce.

,_,

M ON ITOR IN G TIM ES

INTRODUCING HIBH PERFORMANCE
MONITOR, AMATEUR & CB RADIO PRODUCTS
LL.WM IPO.f imlfs, UC., l~ a mJnufac t m e r of amateur,
coomerclal end Hobby Radio product!> Jlich i nc lude
~ol j d-stotc linear
PQ!.IJer amplifiers and super l°"'
rc isc Ga{\s f'El prear.-plifers for SO l'llz, 11i4 i"llz, 220
t"Hz, 440 l'Hz and 800- 1200 Miz. Ccmncrci::ll models of
the PO'.lter amps and prearrps :ire available for the
Puh lic: Service and Land rr\obilc bands.
Our GaAs FE T
prcampli fie rs a r e grea t for Scaf'TIC'r EnU"usiastsl
I.de
3150 offer a HOT 10-dB Ga in, 1-cl3 Nf, JFET "in-line"
preampliflcr for Cltlzens Band transceivers. For rrorc
detailed information, please contact:

If any radio traffic appears there, ·the
scanne r automat ically "overrides" all other
t raffic and mo n itors channel l's traffic until
it ceases. After waiting a nother two seconds
(the scan delay time), the '560 begins
norma l scanning aga in until t raffic aga in
shows up there. The sequence is then
repeated (infinitely) unt il the priority feature is deactivated by pressing the priori ty
bu tto n a second time.

Uniden does, however, offer an opt ional
wall-mounted plug-in transformer under
their pa rt number AD-580U for around
$15 . But just about any 12 vo lt power converter with 350-500 mw capacity and a
p ositive "t ip polarity" on the standard
power connector plug will work. (You can
get one with a set of "universal adapters"
from Radio Shack for $10.95 or from Grove
for $9.95.)

Good Frequency Coverage

Other optional accessories available from - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - .
Uniden in clude a mobile an ten na (part
number BC-ATl) and extra whip antenna
Grove SR1000
(part number AT-034), just in case yours
Receiver Update
wears out.

13oth radios (t he BC-560XLT and th e
'400XLT) both possess very good frequency
coverage. In the low VHF band, coverage
ranges from 29 t o 54 MHz. I n the VHF high
band it 's from 136-174 MHz and in t he
UHF band, 406 to 512 M H z . A lso, add in
the auto weathe r range (162.400-162.550
MHz) and a lot of territory is covered.
The '560 does not lack in the audio departme nt eit he r. Boasting a very respectable
three watts of loudspeaker power, o ne is
hard-presse d to find many sit uations w here
t he 560 could not be hea rd -- perhaps not
when sta nding behind a jet ai rcraft idling
on a runway, or when standing in a building
under demolition, but not in too many
ot her situati ons! The audio is clean and
rea dable, too.
Because the radio was designed to be p rimarily a mobile un it, however, t he speaker
is mounted on the bott om of the cabin et.
As.a resu lt, when the unit is used as a base
station, the unit lays on its speaker,
effectively muting th e audio. A set of stickon rubbe r feet could remedy the problem.

Sensitivity
The se nsitivity of th e '560 is n othing short
of exce ll e nt. In a base environment, it e as ily
receives stations 40 to 50 miles away with
only its telescopic whip antenna. A ttaching
the '560 to a n outdoor antenn a increases
that range t o a degree comp arable to or
exceeding many $400 sca nners. Even weak
s ig nals (such as mobiles and ha ndi-talkies)
can ofte n be heard clea rly at great distances.

Overall Reaction
About t he only thing which might inhibit
someone from purchasing this otherwise
excellent scanner is its lack of a complete
frequency readout (previously described)
and t he fact that it has no "search"
capability. However, at $100.00 the '560 is a
bargain, no matter what.

The Last Word
If you want a n excellent, low-cost
mobile/base scanner, then this is th e one.
It performs right up there with t he more
expensive scann ers, and has a lot of features -- all well-designed and u seful.
Sensitivity is nothing short of excellent , a nd
one is hard-pressed to believe that th is
little gem has so many things "goi ng for it."

Fo r the beginner or the "seasoned"
scanner/monitoring enthusiast, the BC-560
has a lot to offer . It is a fine rad io and one
very much worth owning -- not to ment ion
BIG on p e rforma nce!

ee

9353 A C TIVJTY RD. STE. I • SAN DIE:GO, CA 92 1
TELEPHONE ( 010) !549~ 8!:3!'~ •TELEX 181747

A few months back MT ment ioned the
ongoing deve lopment of a sophisticated,
wide-frequericy-coverage receiver at the
Grove Enterprises lab. Many readers
continue to inquire as to the progress on
t his receiver.
W hile t he introduction da.te has been
moved back slightly (end of the year), ·
specifications continue to improve.
Covering 100 kHzclOOO MHz with no gaps
and including all-mode detection and
CRT spectrum display of all signals in a
·10 MHz bandwidth, the Grove SRlOOO
will also have 1024 memory channels to
store frequency and mode!
Grove t ells us they are st ill trying to keep
the p.rice low enough to serve serious
SWLs and scanne r enthusiasts as ·well as
the government and professional counter. measu res market. A complete clesctiption •··
will appear in th e Novernber Grove
catalog, but adva nce information is
available for a n SASE se nt to ·Grove
Ente rpri ses, PO Box 98, Brasstown, NC
28902.

(§I]L-___________________,

Tell the
world

you saw it in
Monitoring
Times !

The scanner, as ment ioned before, was
des igned primarily for mobile use, a nd
th e refore does not come with a power
supply to operate it in a base e nvironment.

MONITORING TIM ES

October 1988

91

demaW''s W'orkbench

Doug DeMaw
P.O. Box 98
Brassto 1v11, NC 28902

A Beginner's Look at

Transmitter Basics
I !ewe you eva expe1i111mted with tra11s111iller
cimits? Pedwps 110 111 is the 1i111e to 11y your
hnnd t1t ge11emti11g RF power. There is nothing
d!f]irnlt nho111 /i11ildi11g t1 s111all tm11s111ille1; nnd
the cost of such a project is 111i11i111nl if you are
1Pilli11g to ll'Ork tl'ith power le11els thm are less
tht111 a 11·a11 or /ll'O.
Lei's examine some fundamen tals that
may be applied to 1ransm i1ter d esign for low,
medium or high frequency. Although ma ny of
the principals we will discuss arc useful also at
VHF and UHF, there arc some design rules
1ha1 arc very special at 1hosc higher freq uencies. We will discuss 1hcm another time.
I chose 1hc A1\f broadcast bnnd in orde r to
provide a test frequency that is avai lable to all
persons: You do not n eed an FCC license to
opera te in the Al\ I band, provided you comply
with the stipulations set forth in Part 15 o f the
ru les. Notably, the ante nna (incl usive of the
feed line) cannot exceed 3 meters in length.
Also, the maxim um DC input power to the
last stage o f 1he I ra nsm ill c r co n not exceed 0.1
\V (JOOmw). Finally, you may not cause interference to any licensed A1\f broadcast
frequency.
Select a transmitti ng frequ ency that is not
apt 10 in1crkrc wi1h the reception o f local stations. !Jest resu ll s a rc usually obtained when
we use the high encl ( 1200 - 1600 kHz.)

How Far Can the Signal Carry?
My experience while using 100 mw o f de
inpu t power, inclica1cs J /4 of a mile is typical
for solid recepti on. But, I have copied it as far
as I /2 mile whe n using a good portable rad io.
The limiting factor is the short a ntenna. The 3
meter restrictio n limits the overall antenna
le ngt h to only LO fee t. Use of a load ing coi l in
the antenna is prohibited, since the wi re on
the coil mus1 be coun ted as a part of the
ovcrn ll anten na lengt h.

Uses for a 100-mw
BC-Band Transmitter
There arc some practical applications for a
transmitter of this type. For example, a modulato r can be added to permit the use of a
microphone. The transmitter ca n t hen be used
as a crib monit o r fo r a baby's room, as an
intercom (two unit s needed) or as a phono
tran smitter. The latt e r application would
enable you lo mo dulate the tra nsmitter with a
tape deck or turntable, perm itt ing you to
listen to your favorite music w hile working in
your garden or yard on a portable radio.
Our circuit example this month s hows how

92

October 1988

we may use a tone modulat or to generate
MCW (modulated continu ous wave) allowing
you to employ the tra nsmitter for code practice with a nearby friend.

Analyzing the Transmitter Circuft
F igure J shows the schematic d iagram of
ou r study project. 01 is the heart of the
system. This bipola r transistor o perates as a
Pil!rcc crystal osci llator. Yl is a crysta l for t he
frequency o f you r cho ice. It should be sclec1 ed
in accordance with the earlier discussion of
th is subject. Cl an d C2 arc feedback capacitors. They ensure oscillati o n of YI. C l may
be varied in va lue to assure reliable oscillation
of Yl.
Some crystals arc less active than others,
and this may requi re experimentation with the
value of Cl. You will find that C l values
between 27 and 100 pf arc typical fo r crystals
in the 1000-1600 kHz range.
Generally, the collector of a Pierce oscillator has an RF choke or a resisto r in place of
TI (Fig. 1). I use a broadband to ro idal transformer in th is part of the circuit. It allows me
to use a secondary winding to feed energy to
the base of the a mplifier transisto r, Q2. The
primary of Tl acts as an RF choke, since it is
not tuned to the operating frequ ency. 0 1 and
Q2 opera te continuously. The to ne modulator
is keyed instead of the RF stages.
A Class-C amplifier (02) follows the
crystal oscillator. A low-impedance secondary
winding is used o n Tl to provide a match
between the collector of 0 I and the b ase of
Q2. The 02 base p resents an impedance
b etween 10 and 25 o hms, depending upo n the
level of the base drive .
Y ou will note that RI is s hown in dashed
lines. It is an opt ional com ponent, and is used
only if 02 has a te nden cy to self-osci llate. Th e
ra nge of resistance values fo r Rt is between
10 and 33 ohms, typically. The smaller the
o hmic value of Rl the lower the output power
from Q2, since a greater p a rt of the driving
p ower fro m Q l is dissipated in RI. Use the
high est Rl value that ensures 02 stability.
The collecto r impedan ce of 02 at 70 mw is
1028 ohms. This is derived from Z( ohms) =
Vcc2/2Po, where Vee is the collector to
emitter voltage, and Po is the transm itter
output power. We have assumed an efficiency
of 70% for 02, which equates to
approximately 70 mw of ou tput power. The
collector o f Q2 is tapped toward the + 12-V
end of L1 in order to prevent the collector
load impeda nce from degrading t he Q of
tuned circu it C3/Ll. This aids the stage
efficiency and reduces h armonic ou tput
MONITORI NG TIMES

currents. T he 10-ohm series resistor at the
bottom end of Ll serves as a protect ive device
fo r 02. In the event therma l runaway or sclfoscillat ions sho u ld occu r causing Q2 to draw
excessive cu rrent, th e resistor will lim it the
current.
Note that the 3-mctcr-long antenna connects to the to p of L1 via a 0.1 uF blocking
capacitor. The la tter component prevents the
+ 12-V line fro m short-circu it ing, shou ld t he
a ntenna wi re come in contact wi th the circu it
ground. An other 0.1 uF cap acitor is present
between the top of LI and the stator of CJ.
This prevents short-circuiting the + 12- V line
should the ro to r and stator plates of C2 come
in contact with one another.
T he terminals to which jumper wire \V I is
con nected may be o pe ned for the pu rpose of
metering the de current taken by 02. You
may insert a mill ia mmeter at the Wl jumper
point. The collecto r current for 02 shou ld be
9.1 ma for 100 mw of de input p ower. This is
based o n 11 volts, collector to emi tter, at Q2
(there is a 1-V drop across the 10 oh m protective resistor).
In the event the current for 02 is low, add
a turn o f wire to the secondary of Tl. If the
current is too h igh for t he legal JOO mw power
level, remove a turn fro m the Tl secondary
winding. The drive to 02 may be increased or
decreased slightly in th is manner. You may
also reduce the drive to 02 by adding the
appropriate value of resistor to the circuit at
Rl.
C3 tunes Ll to resonance at 1he Y l crystal
frequency. D o this with the anten na connected to LI, as the 10 foot wire adds stray
capacitance t o t he C3/ LJ tank ci rcuit. Tune
for maximum out put power by monitoring the
signal wit h an AM receiver. There will be a
small dip (reduct io n) in Q2 collector cu rrent
when the tuned circuit is resonant. You may
use a de milli:immcter to determine resonance. Connect it in place o f jumper WI.
Ton~Modulator

Circuft

A 741 o p amp is used as a IOnl! oscilla1or.
It is labeled U J in F ig. 1. It generates a tone
of roughly 1000 Hz. The transmitter (Q 1 and
02) operate co ntinuously, but Ul is keyed on
a nd off to produ ce MCW. The keying is
accomplished by PNP switch 03. You can
elimi nate 03 and simply key the + 12-V line
to R2. This wi ll require that th e key jack be
isolated from the circuit ground with insulating washers.
The form of modulat ion used in Fig. l is
called base 111od11/atio11 . Normally, a sol idstate AM t ransmitter has the modulation

Fig. 1 -- Schem atic diagra111 of a 100-mw t ransmitter for use in
the standard AM broadcast band. Fixed-valu e capacitors are disc
ceram ic. Polarized capacitors are electrolytic o r tantalum.
Resisto rs are 1/4-W carbon-composit ion units. D eci mal-value
capacitors arc in uF. Others are in pF. K = 1000.
C1,C2.C4 •· see text.
C3·· Air variable capacitor or mica trimmer.
D1 •• Small-signal switching diode, 1 N914 or equiv.
J1 -· Two-circuit phone jack.
L1·· 82-uH Inductor. Use 90 turns of no. 28 enam. wire, ctosewound, on a 1
Inch piece of 3/ 4 inch PVC pipe.
R1 ·· See text.
T1·· Broadband toroidal transformer. Primary has 1 mH of Inductance. Use
44 turns of no. 28 enam. wire on an Amidon Assoc. (12033 Otsego St.,
N. Hollywood, CA 91607) FT-50-43 ferrite toroid. Secondary has 10
turns of no. 28 enam. wire over primary winding. Toroid core has 0.5
Inch OD and permeability of 850.
U1 ·· 8 pin DIP op amp, type 741.
W1 ·· Jumper wire.
Y1 ·· Fundamental crystal, surplus computer type, tor frequency of your
choice (see text).

C. I

•n

JI

applied to the collector circuit of the driver and PA stages.
Observe that Dl is in the audio line to the base of 02. It p asses
only the positive audio pulses while blocking the negative half of the
square-wave output fr om UL. This causes 02 to be fo rward-biased by
the posit ive audio pulse, causing upward swings of output power from
02. Modulation is applied across an audio indu ctor, T2 which is the
primary of a transistor radio audio-output transformer. The T2 primary winding provides a de return path for the secondary of T l, but it
prevents the audio pulses from being lost to ground at the cathode end
of 01. The center tap of the T2 primary and the secondary winding are
not used.
The modulation level from U l may be reduced by making C4
sma ller in value. It is possib le to use as litt le as O.luF of capacita nce at
C4, depending upon the exact output level from UL U se only enough
modulat ion to provide a clean, well modulated output signal from 02.
You may cha nge the pitch of the tone by experimenting with the value
of CS. Smalle r values provide a higher frequency.

M

C

; UI
1·_
"· ~
,
T oP

B E

) 1.1 (

c..srJ.o. t

TONE
Mo DuLl\Tol?

0

'Sc
AMP

DI
;J~f·

IL \/

~-4~-------+---~To

-+•"L~

;h
Tof'

:J,,,µF

MIC()-)

+ 11." L 1 ~ E

t
RI
IOI<

Voice Modulation May be Used

'B',.

"

+
:Zlop F

")

uI

1

<

""

.l. O, J
You can transmit music o r voice information by replaci ng Ul of
Fig. 1 with a circuit that is suited to use with a microphone o r tapedcck o utput. Fig. 2 illustrates the cha nges necessary.
Fig. 2 -- Schematic diagram that shows the changes to the fig. 1
In Fig. 2 I have shown part of Fig. 1 to indicate how the modulator
circuit for using voice or music transmissions. 03 of Fig. 1 is elimichangcs arc made. The keying transistor of Fig. 1 has been delet ed. An
natcd. Rl is a linear or audio taper carbon control. U 1 is a National
audio-amplifier IC, Ul, has replaced the op amp of Fig. 1. Rl of Fig. 2 Semiconductor Corp. Audio a111pl ifie r Ic, 8 pin D IP.
is th e a udio-gain control. It determines the modulation percentage of '---- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - '
the transmit ter. I t is adju sted for m inimu m received-signa l distortion,
You may use transistors o ther than 2N4400s fo r 01 and 02. F or
consistent with a high modu latio n percentage. A low-impedance example, 2N2222As arc good substitutes. Any NPN transistor t hat has
microphone (600-1000 ohms) or the output of a tape deck may be characteristics sim ilar to a 2N4400 o r 2N4401 will perform nicely in the
plugged into the m ike jack at the lower left of Fig. 2.
circuit of Fig. 1.
Construction Notes

Closing Remarks

This project can be built easi ly on perforated circuit board, o r you
may elect to use the one-shot board technique that we considered in
l:ist month's article. I suggest you build this circuit one stage at a time,
commencing with 0 1 of Fig. l. Get the oscillator running and checked
out, then add 02 and ensure that both stages are functioning correct ly.
The modul ator and keying circuit are added last. You can use the
dead-bug (TC on its back co nstruct ion method when wiring Ul. U se an
IC so cket for thi s purpose. This wi ll enable yo u to use the 741 or
LM386 later, for other projects.
All RF and component leads must be as short as practicable. Long
leads int roduce unwa nt ed st ray inductance, a nd thi s can cause low
stage gain and self oscilla tions.

This month we have exa min ed a simple type of t ra nsmitter as part
of your learning process. 13uild one of the circuits in th is article. You
will gain valu able experience, and have fun too. 13c sure to connect an
cart h ground to the circuit gro und; it will improve the signal coverage
D o not attempt to increase the range of this t ransmitter by using a
long ant enna or increasing power output. A long antenn a can't be
attached to Ll of Fig. 1 without ruining circuit performance. Also. any
violatio n of the FCC part 15 ru les will be discovered in short order,
and 'The M an" will be knocking at your door! Observe the FCC ru les
and have fun .

MONITO R I NG TI MES

October 1988

93

experimenter's W'Orkshop

1.8 to 30 MHz Tunable Receiver
RF Preamp
by D.A. Michael
This simple RF preamp will provide
selectivity and gain for your shortwave
receiver. T he gain is switchable so as not to
overload t he receiver it is connected to.
The frequency range cove red is 1.8 to 30
MHz in three bands.
I use it to boost the signal when using
my 300 foot Beverage receiving antenna. It
also comes in handy for boosting the gain
with some poorer antennas I have experiment ed with. lt cou ld be used with a small
loop an tenn a, too.
Sometimes th e ext ra se lectivity and
not the gain is more help. When using it
just fo r selectivity keep the gain switch on

low. I have even used it with a simple
homebrcw crystal diode det ector t o receive
some of t he st rongcr shortwave broadcast
stations.
The preamp can also be used as an
active antenna by hooki ng a sho rt wire or
whip to the binding post provided for th is
purpose. The wi re o r whip shou ld be less
than ten feet long a nd hooked direct ly to
t he post with no feed line. It is surprising
how many signals come in at very good
signa l levels this way.
Th e wire or wh ip and preamp should
be near a window if you live in un all metal
building. Do not have another antenna
hooked to the 50 ohm input when using it
as an active antenna. Likewise, remove the

wire or whip when using the 50 ohm input
to decrease noise pickup.
House the p ream p in a metal box
(photo 1). Note the ground leads of the
an tenna coupling coils are directly connected to the input jack ground (triangle
ground symbol). All other grounds arc
con nected to a small piece of cop.per circu it boa rd used to build t he ampl ifie r on.
I built my circuit using "ugly" point to
point wiring (see photo 2) where all the
ground points are soldered to the blank
copper and the other leads arc hanging in
a ir . I mo unted the antenna coils o n a small
rotary switch which is used as the band
switch (photo 3).

IN

FR.OIY\

ANT.

rl+1'2.V
100.11.

OUT
TO~X.

T SO- lo
IT

T 50-<c
S2.A

IDOi<.

13\N"DINC"l PosT
Fo~ v'£R. '< s 1~ 011.•
..::: 10' 1..J1fl..E. oR
w~,p

3N2.oLj

Gi2.~Gi l

ANT.

D );;:;ZS
Figure 1
Oc1ober 1988

MONITORING TIMES

THE ANT FARM
WANT A HIGH PERFORMANCE ANTENNA FOR YOUR
MONITORING POST OR HAM SHACK? DON'T HAVE ROOM FOR
A SUPER SIZE SKY WIRE?
YOU NEED A -SKY RAIDER- FROM THE ANT FARM
5 I FEET OF PERFORMANCE
ERECT AS A SLOPER OR
HORIZONTAL. OPERA TES FROM VLF TO 30 Mhz.
READ WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS SAY ABOUT THIS ANTENNA!
"My Sky Re1aer outperforms my w1noam in every woy et rer less cast
Thanks rare greet antenne. Char l es McC!esKy W9JLZ , We ll ston. OH"
··put the Sky Re1oer 1n my et\lc (heO ta cenO It e cit) ena 1t wanes greet
At l est I cen put out a Oecent signal on
meters Meny thanKS Boe Ul esk1
N3FHI Fage lsv1ll e, PA."

ao

Photo 1

"At las t I cen war1< ell cenos My oecKyero 1s only 50 r ee t ena your SKY
RA IOER Just f i ts. Outper fo rms trep sloper I heO ceen using. Fontesuc
ontenno. Tim Re1nnera KA 3RDB. Bethlenem. Pe·
ORDER YOUR SKY RA IOEll NOW - COST 15 ONL V $45.95 POST PAID
IN 46 STATES.)

F'ully assembled. no measuring. cutting er soldering required
Assembled from hlgh qualtty components - Hard drawn copper
wire . stainless steel hardware. weather prcof feed insulator
F'eed antenna with 50 or 75 ohm coax

THE ANT FARM
AD 1 BOX 181A
KUNKLETOWN, PA. 18058
Wr1te for cetelog

CORRECTION

Photo 2

Remem ber this schematic drawing from last month's article by Pete
H aas on installing 455 kHz fil ters? We made an error in reproducing
his diagra m, wh ich most o f you p robably caught. Below is t he corrected
versi on, wi th the arrow poi nting to the change.

.001

POS 9 i2VDC

DISC

D

()-l
s

.001
DISC
ECG 457
INPU T

'

XTAL
FIL1 Ef1

f-0

1.BK

.00 1
SILVER
MICA

.001
SILVER
MICA

OUTPU T

270

MEG 9· 12VDC

Photo 3

Pmjccts fo r Expcli111c11tcr's Workshop, while rePie 1vcd l>y o ur Technical
Edit01; arc su/m 1itted by recule1~· and remain expe1i111entof.

MONITOR ING TIMES

O c1obcr 1988

95

antenna topics

W. Clem Small, KR6A, GET
Rt. 1 Box 64A
Weybridge, VT 05753

Just what

IS

an antenna, anyway?

There a rc a variety of definitions to be
found for the t erm "antenn a," but l have yet
to se c an improvemen t over the o ne whi ch
reads, "An a nten na is a device for radiating
or receiving electro magnetic waves."

would receive signa ls from t he dipole better
than from the Yagi-Uda, a lthough a station
at point "Y" would receive mu ch stronge r
signals fr om the Yagi-Uda th a n from the
dip ole .

As I j ust implied, I like that definitio n . But
it is a very basic definition . It has to be so
tha t it will fit all antennas. But, sin ce it is so
basic and genera l, it doesn't tell us anyth ing
abou t the differences to be fou nd between
va rious a ntennas which do more than j ust
"radiate or re ceive." So, let's enlarge on the
ba sic definit ion of "an tenna" t his mo nt h,
a nd consider so m e of the oth e r things an
a nten na can do besides radiat ing and
receiv ing.

Selecting Among Stations
Without Tuning

Signal •Amplification·
O ne of the m ost useful things a n an tenna
c<1 n do is to "a mplify" the signal which it
receives or tra nsmits. Tha t's rig ht, some
antennas make t he signals which they
receive or trans mit stronger than th e sa me
signal would be with a comparison antenna
(u sually a halfwave dipole). Y es, this gain in
signa l st rcngt h ca n be had for j ust the cost
of a piece o f wire, properly arra nged . The
Bruce a rray, and the rhombic bea m arc
examples of wire an tenn as wh ich can yield
respectable levels of signa l ga in in this
fas hio n.
So metimes a b it more compl ic:itcd t han the
wi re beams arc t he co mpact beams, such as
the Yagi- Ud a. A three clement Yagi-Uda
bea m will give a gain of 8 dB, which is
approximately th e sa me as amplificatio n of
signa l stre ngth by a facto r of six. Such gai n
a nt e nnas are able to in cre ase the st rengt h
of s ignals which t hey receive by concentrati ng the radiation and recept ion of signal
stre ngth so that, in certain direct ions, the
sig na l is stronger t han th at of the compari son antenna! Th e Yagi-Uda's pattern is
s how n in Figure l I3.
Note tha t t he "signa l a mplifica tion" di s·
cussed above exists on ly in certa in
d irections from the a ntenna. In fac t, you
wi ll note that some directions lose in signal
strength as we shift from a dipo le to a YagiUda. Fo r instan ce, a st at io n al po int "X"

96

October 1988

If you wan t to select between the different
stations o n a band, you turn your receiver's
tuning knob, right? Well, most of the t im e
tha t's true. But, what of t he times when t he
two stations betwee n wh ic h you wa nt to
se lect arc o n exactly the sa me frequen cy?
Then, o f course, the tuning knob will not
separate the m. But, if the two stations
between wh ich you want to select are in different directions from your antenna site, it
is often possib le to select between t hose
statio ns by means of the proper antenna!
Note that this selecting-stat ions-by-antenna
is just what we pointed out above, when
comparing s ignal st rengt h for the dipole
versus the Yagi-U da a t points "X" and "Y".
For insta nce, if stations at "X" and "Y'' were
on the same frequency, you co uld still
"t une -ou t" the o ne at "X," to a degree, by
us ing the beam a ntenna rat her than the
dipole, beca use the beam antenna is less
responsive to signals fro m "X" th a n t hose
fr om "Y."
NORTH

t

If you have only one antenna, you can st ill
"tune" ou t one sta tio n a nd rece ive another
by rotating th e antenna. For instan ce, you
could rotate a Yagi-Uda bea m so t hat its
beam heading was pointed directly at the
sta ti o n you wa nt t o hear, or away from the
one you d on't want to hear.
Many monitoring enthusiasts, scanner
buffs, and hams use rotatable beams for the
gain and selectivity between directions
which they afford. Commercial a nd mi litary
radio systems also often use bea ms to
increase the reli abi lity of the ir communi catio ns.

When Noise Annoys
It is important to real ize that directivity in
an antenna is also useful in e liminating
interfer ence cau sed by sta tic o r other ki nds
of electrical noise. Interferin g electrica l
noise is reduced, j ust like a ny other signal,
when the beam is pointed away from its
source.
A nd t he same directivity can sometimes
save us from problems of intermodu lation
distortion if we rotate the beam to put the
offending station in a minimum-response
posit ion with respect to our a ntenna's
recept ion pattern.

NORTH

t

®

FI G. I A, HOAIZCN TAL RADIATION PAT TERN
FOR. A Dl?OL[ ANT£NNA.

UP~

FIG. IS. HOAIZONTAL AAD!ATION

?ATTEAN

FOA A BEAM ANT£NNA.

U?

f

FIG. IC. V[.:{T/CA L AADIAT!ON PATTEAN FOR A

F IG. ID. VERTICAL AADIATIO.'I PATTEAN FOP. A

DIPOLE

BEAM ONE WAVELEi\'GTH ABOVE G?.OUND.

1/4 WAVELENGTH

MONITOR ING TIMES

ABOVE

GROUND.

********************

The Ups and Downs
of the Antenna World
The radiation and reception patterns which
we have been discussing are horizontal patterns. Another useful way of showing an
antenna's performance is via its vertical
radiation pattern. Two different vertical
radiation patterns are shown in figures lC
and lD.
Most DX buffs know that DX signals are
likely to come into their antenna location at
low angles, close to the horizon. Therefo re,
an antenna which emphasizes its responsiveness at the lower angles will often be an
exceptional performer for reception of DX
signals.
Considering the vertical patterns in Figure
lC and 10, note that we can have signal
"amplification" and selectivity between stations by vertical beam orientat ion, just as
when we considered the horizontal beam
orientation earlier. Thus, th ere is gain or
"amplification" of lower a ngle DX signals
by the antenna of lD as compared to the
antenna of JC. And, also for lD, there is
the "tuning," or selectivity, favoring lowanglc DX signals, as opposed to higherangle signals which would be favored by the
antenna of lC.

Doggone!
And, in additio n to the antenna functions
just discussed, we know from past
Monitoiing Times reports that a low, longwi re antenna can also be used as a dog-run
wire to exercise your dog! Yes, the
functions of a ntennas arc many, and serve
us well, if we will just select the right
antenna for the job.

Radio Riddles
Last Month's Radio Riddle: Last month
I told you that old timers and antenna buffs
often categorize popular n onbeam antenna
designs into two groups. Each group is
named for the m an who devised the basic
prototype of the antennas in that group.
Marconi is one of these men. But who was
the oth er, and what basic design got him
that hon or ?

100 Ch 12 ~and . aircraft & SOOMHz, service scan.
bank scanmng. weather. priority, channel lockout,
auto search . illuminated. programmable. track tunmg . direct channel access. memory lock . DC with
AC adaptor. BC-760XLT $2881

TS2
75 Channel mobile/ home scanner. 1i! bands w11n
8DDMHz, aircraft & weather, Turbo-Scan®
(scans at 40 Channels per second) . bank scanning, instant weather. fully programmable. accuseek (50 channels per second). private priority,
permanent backup system, direct access. external jacks for speaker & remote antenna, with AC
adapator. DC cord & mobile mounting bracket.
t

-

_

_:~/

~

.-_ - : •"'

'.

fl!\
\.!)
fl,806-950

TS-2 $ 288

SHORTWAVE RADIO

POLICE/FIRE SCANNERS

KENWOOD
R·2000 150khz-30m~z . 01g11al.Mcmor ys
599.00
R·SOOO 100khz-30mnz.Digllal.Memorys
829.00
SONY ICF-2010 150khz-30mhz 76-t08 t t6- t36 329.00
SONY ICF·2003 150khz-30mhz.Memorys
249.00
SONY PRO·SO 150khz-216mhz.Memorys Scans
359.00
SONY AN·1 Indoor Acuve Short wave Antenna
79.00
ICOM R71-A t00khz-30mhz.D1g1tal .Men10rys
849.00
ICOM R-7000 25·2 OOOmhz.100 Me11101ys
1.049.00
YAESU FRG·8800 150khz.30mhz.Memorys Sc<111s 649.00
YAESU FRG-9600 60-905mhz.01g11al.Mr.111orys
539.00
NR0-525 0 9-34mhz.200 Memorys D1q11a1
1.165.00
MFJ·1040 Tuner/Pre-Selector Unit
99.00

BEARCAT
BC·200XlT 200:h.29-54.118-174.4C6-512.806-960mhz 279.00
BC-100XLT tOCl::h.29-54.118-174 406-512.Search Dela'/ 209.00
BC·760XLT tOCl::h.29-54.118-174.4CJ6.512.806-952rmz 288.00
BC-600XLT tOCl::h.29-54.118-174.4CJ6.5 t2.Pnollty.Search 214.00
BC-l!OOXLT 40:h.29-54.118-174.406-512.806-912rmz .259.00
BC-SSXLT t0ch.29-54. t36-174.406-512rmz
129.00
BC-15 10ch Crystal Scanner 30-50118-174.406-512... 114.00
REGENCY
TS·2 75cti.29-54. t 18· 174.406-512.806-950mhz
288.00
TS-1 35ch 29-54 t t8-174.406-512Pnonty,Delay
224.00
MX-3000 30ch 30-50.118-174.406-512.Pnonty.Search
199.00
HX-1500 SSch.29-54.118-174.406-512 Poriable Unit
199.00

USEDm~c•
GEAR

:;·;AGE 198:·;;;1LED

:i:u:c:::;~,;;•'"i~M ~~~m

AIR/POLICE/800 MHz

TRADE

FREE CELLULAR MODIFICATIONS WITH BC·200 &BC·760!!

*****

***

dipole is now thought of as a " Hertzian"
antenna. In addition, even an e nd-fed horizonta l halfwave wire antenna is so metimes
referred to as an "e n d-fed He rtz." Thus, by
these two antenna names, He rtz and
Marconi, we honor two great p ione ers of
radio communications.

This Month's Radio Riddl e: Through
Well, Heinrich Hertz, the man who ·the appropriate use of ant en nas we have
reported his discovery of electromagnetic another technique, not ment ioned above,
waves ju st 100 years ago, devised the half- for using the antenna to "tun e" or select
wave dipole antenna. So, the halfwave

MONITORING TIMES

**

**

between different stations on the same
frequ e ncy. This technique, wh ich does not
depend on tuning at the receiver, is
common ly used for preventing int erference
between communications sate ll ites transmitt ing on the same frequency, but it is also
useful in other commun ications work . What
is the basis for th is technique?
Find the answer right here next month.

October 1988

97

ask bob

Bob Grove, WA4PYQ
P.O. Box 98
Brasstown, NC 28902

A A call to NPR in Washington disclosed
that their program feed may be heard on
Westar 4, transponder 20. ·

For best resu lts, use low-loss coax like RG6/U and a masthead preamplifier. For
lengths of line well under 100 feet, an indoor
preamp is satisfactory.

A

No indoor antenna will work as well as an
equiva lent outdoor antenna. The simplest
indoor CB antenna wou ld consist of a vert ical
wire 104 inches in length (connected to the
coax center conductor) and two 104-inch
horizonta l wires (connected to the coax
shield and running in opposite directions).

The antenna is tested at various p oints
around the room, preferably against a
window or outside wall, leaving it in place
once an effective location is found as
evidenced by highest signa l strengths.

A Th ere sure arc. I would first check with
some of the larger amateur equ ipment
dealers, some of whom advertise in MT. Next ,
look in the classified ads of amateu r radio
magazines like Jfam Radio, QST, 73 and CQ.
Finally, check with one of the older,
established TV shops for thei r recommendations of an experienced tech. Good luck!
While
top-end, wide coverage,
communications receivers (!COM R 7000,
Grove SRlOOO, etc.) utilize signal-strength
metering,. with one exception (AOR AR2002), scanners ignore this feature.

A

As the name might imply, they are
available to businesses whose locations
and/or operating hours arc hard to specify.
These would include surveyors, fast food
chains, traveling sports events, entertainers
and a myriad others.
Frequencies listed by the FCC include 27.49,
35.04, 40.04, 151.505, 151.625, 158.400,
451.800, 464.500 and 464.550 MHz. Several
ot her frequencies often available "off the
shelf' from handie-talkie manufacturers
include 154.57, 154.60, 462.575, 462.625,
462.675, 464.50 and 464.55 MHz.. Power is
limited to one watt and an FCC license is
required.

! ~Jl~tllii'1lllfI

:::Sa?~t~fn;:::::-P:~Ht~r~9,a;opfQ<E:::':::,::::trn:,,:,:::,:
. ·. ~ ~'

:.

:.:.. ;.; :·.·:·:-;.;.;.;:;::::·:·:-::;:::;:;:;:;.:/·.·

:·:-::-:; : . ::..

A As 800 MHz monitoring becomes more
popular, we are hearing that question more
often. The "hiss" is actually receiver noise,
generated by the components in the radio
and magnified by successive stages of
ampli fication. A strong FM signal can
quiet en this background noise, but weak
signals cannot.
Adequate reception of 800 MHz signals is an
art as well as a science. It requ ires either a
st rong signal or specialized antenna and lowloss coaxial feedline. Signals are weaker at
that pa rt of the spectrum due to smaller
antennas and vulnerability to absorption by
terrain, atmosphere and other obstacles.
Reception at 800 MHz can often be
in1proved through the use of a UHF-TV bow
tie and screen anten na rotated 90 degrees for

TRICKING THE HX-2200 OUT OF RANGE
One of the most popular sports in the arena
of scan ner monitoring seems to be discovering keyboard techniqu es to extend the frequency coverage beyond that stated by the
manufact urer.
Formerly,
many scanners could be
manipul ated out of range by combinations
. of keypad entries, but manufocturers have
more recent ly restricted their intende.d fre-

98

October 1988

vertical polarization. A T V-type balun transforme r wi ll be needed to match the coaxial
cable and a low-noise preamplifier may be
needed as well.

quency coverage by undefeatable ROM
design.
Gary Churchill of St. John's, Newfoundland,
may have discovered a way of fooling the
Regency H.X-2200. He suggests that in addition to continuous 118-174 and 406-512
MHz, the unit is capable of 800-1200 MHz
just by entering 1.200 MHz. Try it .

MON ITO RING TIMES

The problem is economics: The scanner
industry is fiercely price-competitive; the
addition of an S meter, while costing the
manufacturer about $2-4, would be passed on
to the consumer as an addit ional Sl0-15.
Interestingly, some scanners are already Smeter capable; the PR0-2004, for example,
has an unused S-meter ou tput on pin 10 of its
IF chip, but only for wideband FM .

i~Jil~ill
A

Adhesives not only requ ire a clean glass
surface with a warm tempe rature, but pores
for additio nal bonding surface. While new
automot ive glass is smoother and easier to
clean, making it easier to see through, it has
fewer pores fo r adhesive grip.

Aut omatic car washes often mix waxes with
their cleansers, leaving a film which repels
the adhesive. Chemicals like "RAIN-X" fill in
the pores, encouraging water droplets to
drop quickly--and resist adhesive bonding
just as quickly. Larsen Antennas recommends the fo llowing procedu re to prepare
the glass surface where the antenna is to be
adhesive-mounted.
First, clean the su rface with a window cleaner
like Windex to remove loose particles;
second, scrub with a mild, non-scratch abrasive like Bon-Ami to remove waxes from the

COMPUTERS

+

RADIO =

pores; and finally, clean the area with alcohol (wipes are often supplied with the antennas).
Still, the surface mu st be warm--between 70 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit--to prevent condensation. It is a good idea to apply a hot hair
dryer to the area for a few seconds to encourage evaporat ion of any
residual moisture. Don't get the glass too hot to touch 1 The adhesive
must be applied within a minute to avoid repeated moisture condensation.

A

Several companies package a line of semiconductors for the
"MRO" (maintenance and replacement only) industry for equipment
repair when it is difficult to get the original brand. NTE and ECG are
two of these (and their numbers are interchangeable), most often
availab le from electronics distributors who sell to TV service shops.

Try a subscriplion lo Ham Radio Magazine for one year fo r 1usl $19 95. SAVE S3off1he regular Ham
Radio subscnp11on rale of S22.95 and SlO off lhe rrewssland pnce.
Ham Radio gives you morn lechmcal ar1Jcles and lhe very besl 1echnical artrcles of lhe Amaleur 1our·
nals. Transminers. receivers, anrennas. as well as s1ale·ol·1he·ar1 design lheory and prac1ical arlicles.
Ham Radio has gol i1all! In May !here's our annual Anlenna Issue - chock lull 01all kinds of anlenna
design ideas and projec1S November brings the Receiver Issue - lhe very lales1in recerver lechnol·
O'll for the Radio Ama1eur. Many consider these tNo issues alone worth the price or a year's subscnpuon.
And there's more! Monthly columns by: Joe carr. K41PV on the ms and outs of repairing and troubleshool·
mg your radio; 8111 Orr. W6SAI on antennas and antenna lechnology plus a lol more. no1ed HFNHF
opera1or and OX'er Joe Reisert. W1JR's world ol VHF and UHF 1echnology, and noled governmen1
propagalion expert Garlh S1onehocker. K~RYW on propagation.
There's even more - bul you'll have to gel a subscription 10 find oul what 11 1s.
Fill out the coupon today and send 11 1n before you miss another 1ssLoe! Remember - you nol only
gel Amateur Radio's finest magazine. you also SAVE S3 00 off lhe regular rale

Special Trial Subscription
Save $3.00 off the regular
rate of $22.95/year

A

Most scanner manufacturers make available their schematic
diagrams for a fee, generally about S5. Some arc free. Your best bet
would be to telephone the customer service department of the
manufacturer in question to determine their policy. Call Uniden at
1-317-842-2483.

JUST $19.95
Pricn US SubacrlpUon1 only

f"Sti;-1 Uoi;- H~R;o;-aI; ~;-m~;Jor-;-on-;~:;; 1
I S1JbscnptJon Just $19 95 !or 12 1S!.UtS Tll.11 s ~ SJ sav I
I
I '°OS otl the "~d,;:.'~;~~2s~scnp11on
I l . Payment Enclosed
Ctiarot to MC t 1 VISA
I
I CMd Numb<•
E<pores _
_
I
I Sognatu>e
I
I
I

1"""'

-

I"""""

~r:_- - - - - ~I~ --=-l~-=
ham radio magazine, o.p1. .., . G .....,,,•• NH .,...

,

- I

- ~j

tagged the CRF350 in Europe awaits a decision this fall as to whether
it will ever see U.S. distribution. If it docs, it will be the CRF-V21 and
list at around $6000.

A

The high frequency suggests a distant origin, possibly the Mideast.
In all like lihood these phonetic broadcasts are similar in nature to the
"spy numbers" transmissions and may even be tied to the Israeli
Mossad intelligence organization.

The luxury, high tech, desktop portable feat ures an LCD panel to
show facsimile weather maps and offers extended frequency coverage
with multimode reception. At its earliest, it would not appea r in the
U.S. before next year. There has been speculation that the model is
merely a showpiece and will not enjoy mass distribution.

Because of their long periods of repetitive identification, it is possible
that their prime purpose is to keep the channel open and/or indicate
the propagation path between the transmitter and the receiver at that
frequency.

A

While Marriott hotels nationwide use a variety of frequencies,
depending upon availability, in the 151, 154, 463 and 464 MHz ranges
across the country, the Courtyard in Homewood, Alabama, uses
464.675.

A According to Sony's own marketing spokesman, a radio tentatively
MONITORING TIMES

October 88

99

LETTERS
continued from page 3

Answering the Pope
Back in the August issue, a
reader call ing him self "Pope Sikola"
(Pep si-Co la, get it?) s;i icl he was lett ing
his subscription to Monitoring Times
lapse because we gave cover age ro
some of the religiou s stat ions on
shortwave. (Like \\'e could avoid them?
They're spacecl every 5 kHz across
some portions of the bands!). This
month, Mr. "P. SaCake" responds,
saying that " the perfect answer to
'Pope Sikola's' letter is in Tl Kings, 18,
27" of the Kin g James version of the
B ible. I can't reprint it in a family
magazine. You'll have to look it up for
yoursel f.
Our old friend, l3arry Rad er of
Fost or ia, Ohio, w rite s in wi th a
request. " I heard Raclio Moscow's
English program at 0210 UTC on 9765
kH z. Could you give me their mailing
address? " Sure thing. Barry. Write to
Raclio Moscow, Moscow, USSR. It's
th at simple.

No Freeb ies for DJs
MT subscriber Hugh lvl cGib bo ney had a bad expe ri ence. He's been
a big fan of Roi lye James ar KOA radio
-- so much so that he decided to send
her a Sony ICF-2 0 I 0 sho rt wave rad io
and external antenna. Much ro Mr.
McG ibboney's surprise, the station
returned the radi o saying that it was
aga inst policy fo r a staff member to
rece ive such an expc11sive gift. I !ugh
says the who le episode hurt hi s
fee lings.
" Why do 1 get the feeling that
this country is getting more like
Poland?" he ask . "Fi rst came the
ECPA f E!eccronics Communicat ions
P rivacy Act which makes illegal the
monitoring of certain transmissions!
and now this. Thank God I still have -for now -- the choice o f radio statio ns I
ca n listen to."
H ugh, l real ly want to help. Tell
'ya what J'm going to clo. Ju st cause T'm
a good guy, I'm go ing ro kt you se 11d
that bra11d new Sony ICf-20 10 to me.

100

Ocrolicr 1988

standard.
" Why does [Radio Canada
Jntern ational's] Ian McFarland soun d
" W hy do n't more A merican s so bored? W hat's the story, Ian ? Does
listen to the Vo ice o f Am eri ca? " asks H ava na really believe that people
I3ob Skaggs, of Santa Fe, New M exico. swallow their propaganda bu ll ? And
"Their signals are so stro ng th at you does Radio Prague think that anyone
can pick th em up on a wet noodle. I actually records the music that they
listen to our State Department's play?
polemics almost every day. But 1 also
"And what's the deal with this
l isten to Rad io H avana, Rad io Canada Superpower
KUSW,
broadcasting
International and Radio Australia for 'from the wes t to the world'? It doesn't
their slant on the news."
sound like talk to the world, it sounds
l ike selli ng to the U.S. Tal k about low
con tent -- there's no content at
The CIA Sub scribes
KUSW.
"Don't get me wrong. I love
John Henry H art of Philadel phia
shortwave
and always will. I love being
wrote us a long letter review ing a curable
to
tu
ne
in to news directly from
rent issue of Monitoring Times. In it, he
source
-even
i f the sou rce is unrethe
refers to the MT adver ti sement that
reads, "The CI A Subscrib es. Shou ldn't 1iable. Tt just seems as tho ugh what's
you? " and asks, "How do you know the o n the ai r is more of the old stuff."
Surprise, John . You haven't been
CTA subscr ibes to Monitoring Tim es?"
According to Subscrib er Se rvices asleep for 20 years. W hat you 're
Manage r Linda Newton, the subscr ip- hearing is the same old stuff, brought
tion requests come in plain brown to you courtesy of the world's most
envelopes that have bee n tampered stagnant indu stry: shortwave broad w ith. And -- this is t he give-away -- casting. As for McFarland Shortwave
they're so secretive that they cannot tell Listener's Digest program, let's be
frank. Jan's nor the draw. Glenn
us where to send the m agazi11e!
Bel ieve that? Well , OK. But it is Hauser's DX news is.
rruc
that the
CIA
has more
subscr iptions to MT than you can From the He lm
count on one hand.
Don Moore, who has writte n an
number of excel lent features in recent
Where's the Beef?
issues of Monitoring Times (look fo r
"T've been tuning around the his first -hand account of Radio Belize
shortwave ban ds fo r 20 years now," i n an upcoming issue), says he can
says John Corea of Ocean City, New identify the unu sual Mo rse code signal
Jersey. " and it still sounds the same reader Walt McCrysta! heard behind
now as i t d id back then. Sure," he con - 760-W JR. ] t is not, says Don, a
tinues. "there's a lot o f qu anti ty these jammer. "Wh at Walt heard was the S
days. but no more quality. Many kw Guanabacoa station of Cuba's
sraito ns haven 't changed any of their Radio Reloj network. Radio Reloj is a
programm i ng in the en ti re 20 years I so rt of combination all -news station
and WWV. all rolled into one.
have l istened.
''The network broadcasts news
"Oh, there's a few very good
24
hou
rs a day, with a voice l D and
broadcasters ou t there. Yes. there's a
few, but ve ry few. The rest of the sta- time announcement followed by a pip
tions see m to thi nk that a shortwave and " RR" in Morse code at the top of
broadcast should be monotona!, every minute. The ma in Radio Reloj
bo r ing, repet iti ve and hard to uncler- station is 011 590 kHz with 30 kw and is
stancl. Ye s. l thi nk that may be the usually nor too hard to hea r. The

VOA fo r Americans

MONITORING T IM E S

transmitte rs on 910, 930, 940, 950 and
1180 kHz -- which range from 250 to
1,000 watts -- are also occasionally
heard.
Harry Helms, author of the
excelle nt Shortwave Listening H andbook, concurs. "The tone and Morse
really cut through the ORM!"
"By the way," asks Helms,
"would you be interested in printing
my upcoming article o n the scientific
testing of the Shroud of E lvis?" Very
funny, Harry. We're still getti ng letters
on the S hroud of Turin article we ran
back in December of 1987!

Hickman of Baltim ore. "The broadcast
was coming from a commercial station,
Radio Antilles in Monserrat, about a
hundred miles away from the island on
which I was staying.
"I always take my Sony 4910
alo ng on trips to hear what's going on
in the world, but it's surprising to hear
Glenn Hauser o n the car radio."
It shouldn't be. G lenn Hauser is
o n more freq ue ncies -- a nd this is perhaps not even an exaggeration -- than
many government operations. According to Glenn, " We are currently
involved in two la nguages, five programs, seven stations, ten sites, 42 fre quencies, 38 times (not all weekly),
It's a Small World
every day of the week." He can also
appear in your ma ilbox. Write him for
"On a Su nd ay night, driving to de tails on his publications Review of
dinner while on vaca tion in Saint International Broadcasting a nd DX
Berthelemy, I heard G lenn Hauser's Listener's Digest a t P.O. Box 1684,
DX news on the AM radio in my E nid, OK 73702. And tell him
rickety rental car." T ha t event sur- Monitoring Times sent 'ya.
prised the bejeebers out of Timothy

Letters should be addressed to
Letters to the Editor, Monitoring Times,
P.O. Box 98, Brasstown, NC 289092
and should include th e sender's address
and telephone n·umber. Not all letters
can be used. Those that are will often be
edited and excerpted. Because of the
volume of mail received, personal
replies are not always possible.

.

Interested Ill
writing?
Send a self-addressed,
stamped envelope for your
copy of the MT writer's
guidelines to:
WRITER'S GUIDELINES
Monitoring Times
P.O. Box 98
Bra sstown, NC 28902

CONVENTION CALENDAR
Dnte

Location

Oct 1

Huntington.WV

Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct
. OCt
Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct

Oct

Club/Contas t Person

Oct 15
Syracuse, NY
RA of G1r Syracuse/ VIVian Douglas
..· .
·Box 88, Uverpool, NY 13066
Trl·State ARA/ Jim Baker K8KVX
Oct 15
Gray, TN
Tri-Cities ARC/ Wendell Messlmer K4ZHK
P.O. Box 19, Coventry, CT 06238
512 w. Poplar St., Johnson Clly, TN 37604
1-2
Boxboro. MA
New England Div/ Eugene Hastings W1VRK
Oct 15·16 W Palm Bch. FL Palm Bch Rptr Assoc/ James Schoech W04LHF '
16 Churchill Rd, Marblehead, MA 01945
129 Dayton Rd, Lake Worth, FL 33467
1-2
Biloxi. MS
Miss.State Convention/ Wayne Spearman K4JHE
Oct 22·23 Augusta, GA
ARC of AUgusta/ James Abercrombie, JR N4JA ·
133 Baywood Or, Biloxi. MS 39532
PO Box 5543, Augusta. GA 30906
2
Rockford. IL
Ill.State Convention/ James Miller W4JR
Oct 26-30 Kingston, OK
. Oklahoma State/ Dave Cox NB5N
5561 Elnor Ave, . Rockford, IL 611 06 .
181·2 S. Umbrella Cl. . Broken Arrow, OK
2
Yonkers. IL
Yonkers ARC/ John Costa WB2AU{
· Oct 2.9,30 : Chattanooga.TN . Chattanooga ARC/ Lane Wyse N40M
195 woodlands Ave. Yonkers, Nv · 10703
4813 Shorewood Or. Chattanooga, TN 37416
2
w. Liberty.IA
Muscatine & IA City ARC/ Thomas Krmer KEOY
Oct 30
Sellersvllie,PA
R.F'.Hill ARC/ Robert Buonfigllo t<A3POV
905 Leroy, Muscatine, IA 52761
361 School House Rd .. sOuderton, PA 18964.
2
Springfield.OH
Springfield IRA/ Stephen Klipfel KA60CS
Oct 30
Shelby, Ml
Utica-Shelby Emerg Com Assoc/ Harold Henry
825 S. Tecumseh Rd, Springfield, OH 45506
53062 Tundra Dr. Rochester. Ml 46064
2
Ellicott Cly.MD Columbia ARA/ Art Goodman WA3CVG
Nov 5
W. Monroe, LA Twin City Ham Club/ Benson Scott AE5V
5071 Beatrice Way. Columbia, MD 21044
107 Con1empo, West Montore, LA 71291
7-6
Warner Rbns.GA Central GA ARC/ Jesse Kirkham WB4KOA
Nov 5-6
Lawrencvlle,GA Alfcirel Memorial RC/ Hugh Manning Jr. WB4DEB ·
110 Brown Dr, Warner Robins, GA 31093
3765 Snapfinger Rel, Lithonia. GA 30036
6·9
Falls Ch., VA
DXPO 66/ John Kanode N4MM
Nov 5·6
Pompano Bch,FL Boward ARC/ David DeBear WA1 RXB
RFD 1 Box 73-A Boyce, VA 22620
1670 NW 42 Ter. C106, Lauderhlll, FL 33313
6·9
Memphis, TN
Della Div Conv/ James Alexander
Nov 16-20 Tampa. FL
SE Div Conv/ Frank Zeigler K4EUK
2969 Iroquois, Memphis, TN 36111
6316 Stillbrook. Tampa. FL 336 15
9
Queens, NY
Hall of Sci ARC/ Stephen Greenbaum
65· 1O 34th Ave, Jackson Hts, New Yori<, NY 11 372 J.{onito1ing Times is happy to 11111 m1110w1cc111ents of radio ePe/l/s open
Talk·ln 144.300,splx.223.600,223.600&445.225 rplr
to 011r readers. Send yo11r anno1111ce111ent nt least 60 days beforr: the
14-16 Houston. TX
S Texas Section Conv/ Alan Cross WASUZB
event to: Monitoling Times C01wention Calendat; P.O. Box 98,
13918 Llllja Rd, Houston, TX 77037

I3rasstown, NC 28902.

MONITORING TIMES

October 1988

101

STOCK EXCHANGE
Ads f or Stock Exch ange 11111s1 be received 45 days p n·or to the p11/Jlica1io11 clme.

NON-COMMERCIAL SUilSCRinE R RA T ES: S.25 per word - Suhsnibcrs only. All
ads m ust b e paid in ad va nce t o M o 11 i10Ji11g Times. All merchan d ise nn1~ 1 he pcrsonu l
a nd radio-re lat ed.
COM MERCIAL RATES: Sl.00 pe r wo rd payable wit h ad
1-3/4" SQUARE DISPLAY AD : $35 pe r iss ue, payable in advance.

Wa nted : SONY "Earth O rbite r" Model
5100 -- Good wo rkin g co nd iti o n. Call Les
Clarke [2 12) 354-0136 eve nings .
SONY ICF-7600A and !C F-6500W, both
excelle nt $95 each sh ippe d UPS . COLLINS
R-390A in del uxe ca bi net $200. Randy,
N6KLJ [707] 442-663 1
For Sale: IC -R7000 co nti nu o us coverage
receiver. Sel d o m ever used since I've had ir.
Same a s new. Ask fo r Ga ry after five
(PDT). [206] 659-1 885.
For Sale: KENWOOD R5000 with voice
synthesizer, mint cond ition , $610.00. U.S.
Postal M o ney Ord e r o nly. Free UPS.
H arol d
Jo sse lyn ,
620
Grove
Ave.,
Z anesvil le, O hi o 43701.
OEARCAT 10 1 swit ch programma ble
scanner, 16 channe ls. Work s fine , oldie bu t
goodie, S85 incl shi pping. C lif Brown , 336
A shlan d, E va nsto n, IL 60202 [312) 33285204.
Want ed: Car radio shortwave conve rt e r,
any ma ke, co nd it io n, or vi ntage . L ouis
Ya devia , 601 C hu rch Lane, Upper D arby,

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS
ACM Se curity
37
AF Syste ms
49
95
A nTenna F a rm
A ntiq ue R a dio
45
Communicatio ns E lectroni cs
13
CQ Communi catio ns
89
DC En terprises
39
EEB
55
Galaxy El ect ronics
97
Grove E nt e rprises
23
H a m R ad io
99
!C OM
Back Cover
l nte rn at ional R a d io
In side Front
Lunar Indu st ries
91
Monitoring T imes
87, lnside Back
N at ional T owe r
9
Ohio R adi o
22
Sca nne r World
35
System s & So ftware
41
Universa l SW R a d io
51

102

Octoher 1988

PA 19082.

Walton Way. Augusta, G A 30904.

For Sa le: Cel lul a r po rt able teleph o ne,
RA DIO SHAC K model #CT 300 with AC
cha rger, extra bau e ry pa ck, owners manua l
and box. Fou r m o nt hs o ld . New $1600, sell
for $1000 or make offe r. R obert Pacyna,
2716 Westmar # 325, T o ledo, Ohio 43615
[419) 535-6979.

Interested in c.:landestin e , re ligio us and
pirate acldrc~s lists o r in pi ra te t a pes and
CB~!-6.t DX-software? Send 2 IRC's fo r a
detailed li st Ill Ary Ooe nder, Lobeliastraat
33-13, 32021-1 R Spykcnisse, The Netherlands.

Wanted: Back issues of MON ITOR ING
TIMES. Fi rst issue thro ugh M arch 1987.
Will pay $35 plu s UPS cost. 1\1 ichael
Donworth, 1308 Shady Holl ow Court.
Euless, Texas 7603 9 18 17] 267-06 19.
Want ed: BADLOW WADLEY A M -SW
radio. Mint o nly. Top SS . King H a rri so n,
P.O. Oox 24, T e rrace P a rk, Ohio 451 74.
[513 ) 561-6677.
W a nt ed : R A D IO S HAC K P RO Cl3-8 radio,
a ny conditi o n. T. Gcnesc, 2 19 North
Seventh Ave nu e, M ou nt Vernon, New
York, 10550.
F or Sa le: SONY IC F-2010 rece ive r. new
condit io n, $265. SANGEAN ATS-803A
receiver, m int condit ion in box, S 150.
HEATHKIT HD-1 424 active a nte n na /
preselector, new, S40. A ll rad ios a rc
comple te w ith m a nu a ls and accesso ries.
Steve Raycraft Wl32 KKX [3 15] 788-9323.
W a nted: DRAK E R4-E re ceive r in very
goo d co nditi o n with b ro udcast crystuls.
Jefferso n Rice, Oo n A ir A pt s. #3 15, 2101

Wanted: 13EA RCAT 250 scan ner, excellent
condition. 15181 274-8495 after 5 pm , 150
Oakwood A\'i.: .. Troy, NY 1218 0.
TAP NEWS l. ETIER: co mplete set. Over
300 pag<.:s or telepho ne phre aking, hacki ng,
surveillance,
bu gging
a nd
locksmi th.
Prot ect yourself' S60 money order. John
Lconardclli. Box 722, Stati o n A , D owns\'iew, O natri o. f\13f\ l -3A9.
For Sa le: ICOf\ I R7000 in mint conditi on
with ori g ina l box, ma nua l an d pa cking. A lso
includes r<.:mote cont ro l, 12VDC powe r kit,
and F 10 N adapter. S935. Also, R E GENCY
f\!X-5000 wh ich has had Grove scan speed
enhnncemcnt. S235, and BEA RCAT 300
with origin:ll box. $ 185. W ill consider trade
for programmable handheld for the BC300. Cul l Harry f\lcCabe at [703 1 680-6345
a ft er 6Pf\ I, or se nd CAS HIER'S C HECK o r
f\ ! ONE Y O R DER O NLY t o 4688 J oanna
Court, Woodbridge. VA 221 93 .
PANASONIC RF-3100. like new, 500 kHz30f\I Hz, box. manual, pa id S400; se ll $225,
wi ll ship COD. John Ga rdne r, 10990 Del
None Si.# 11 , Vent ura , CA 18 05 1 659-41 29.

MONITORING TIMES DEALERSHIPS
are available at a substantial discount.
Call or write Judy Grove at
P.O. Box 98, Brasstown, NC 28902
704-83 7-9200.
M ON IT O R I NG TIM ES

Audio squelch

- - - -. .-Noise
reduction
\lox taPe control
Audio litters (3 I
-~

.• .:Ji.:

0±000

·.;::=_

Cllrislmt1s

- --

-

St1I~ ~E~

Voicegate.Patchoord& pjugs. F'bwer Pac ...
Complete ! Only$109.._. r'frui'".lillH89
An S.lSI. '"' ...... rm

1!189 "''"'" " 11n0si ·1"""'"'

RADIO ASTRONOMY
THE RADIO OBSERVER. a mon1hly
24-page "how-lo-do-rt" ama1eur
raaro astronomy magazine.
Annual subscrrp11on . . . . . . $24
We are also suppliers of technical
books. componenis and modules
tor the raaro astronomy drscrplrne.
For a sample magazine and a
current brochure sena S2 to:

"IABCO ELECYPOl\J f,CS

Pflane: (407) 464-2118

l)'J>C

of clcctromc bug

1hc mini.:11uri1cd rnd 10 1ransm 1t1cr
which can be plantt>d h) a lmos1

omen ....

'°'

anyone, almo\I an)l4hcrc

A compte1e oiagnosoc telerenu cnatt
fl.).lng
Commooote compu1e11. tic. An aos~ule musl fOt
1nose wno want 10 hx meir own compu1en and save
money ano down ume. S6 95 iMus St s /n ... HOVf Duly
PoW9< Suppty IOf' C6'·$27 95 +UPS.•.

DL-1000
SS49.00

Kasara Microsystems, Inc.

34......., ,..

••• DBH
hdC'ral

9 MHz
HC-18 CRYSTALS
Set of 10, with specs &
bibliography. Build high
performance IF filter. Only
$9.95 shipping included.

HSC
Ryder St.
Santa Clara, CA 95051
3500

(206) 941 -2757

Dnw

Sp1no v-.,, HY 109fl
1-«JO 2 48 2983 HaaorMlde

I.I318-19COMMUNICATIONS
Pacific
South
21\9

RI SOI l!6 ll!llNORll. IN 16001

LF Engineering Co. Inc. VISA and
17 Jeffry Road
MasterCard
East Haven. CT 065 13 accepted
(203) 248-6816

common

nlO!il

7605 DELAND AVE.

FT. PIERCE, FL 34951

L-1016 VLF Converter .......... $49.00
L-20 1 VLF Preamplltler ........ $49.00
L-4006 LF Active Antenna ... .. $89.00
L- 1015 LF Rec. System ...... $119.00
TM-1 LF Xmtr. 1 Watt ........ .. $98.00
M-60 1 BC Active Antenna ... .. $89.00
(all products shipped postage paid)

COMMOOORE/AMICA Cllll'S 0< FAST REPAIRS t0<
C64/ 128 Compulet/ Per1pneraJs aa IOw p11cos ~.,g.
C6-1·$54.95 comPlett). 6510 CtllP· S1 0 ,9S; 6526·
S'I 95: 6567·S16.SO; 6581· $1 285; Pl.A/ 82S100StJ 25; J25572-S11 .50; J25J02-$ 11.SO; 8721-$12.SO;
8722·S12.50; 901 ROM Senu-$10.95, and many

plan1cd in ) our home. o ffice . car or
ttll:.ichcd t o )OUr 1clc ph onc line: Th<.•
OL· IOOO 1s dc!li gned io locate the

BOB'S ELECTRONIC SERVICE

IOIQd:SOUftlmtlcn:l'lllf.llwtuoto 31lrrwt0f'momlnftlOl'1 ccrurtlr
~v-.... SJll '-.,.. ~u -..... "u'

Your Longwa ve Source ...
LF Engineering Co .

BUGGED?
hnd hidden R F tramm1ucr{i I bugs)

Wa~.

H1gh'4a\
Wash1n,1 on

Suitt
US A

~003

~ ARIZONA ---.,
FR£QUENCY DIRECTORY

ii

dlmHmRD

ncrH1n:..m1

La rge st selection o f scanner fr eq uency
guides (Federal, military, police, aero,
etc.); AM/FM/TV ur oodco•t director ies;
HF Hute" directories; Books on es plonage,
covert ops., bugging, wire tapping..
survelllonce, clandestine radio, &. more!
BIG FREE CA TALOG!

CRB n ESEARCH

P.O. Box 56-MT
Commock NY 11725

[ 408] 732-1573

Over 350 pases presented by
Service, Fre quency, City and
Area. Travel Frequencies
to
San
Dieso,
Las
Ve&as
and
Albuquerque.
Milepost
Maps.
Rad io Codes and muc h more.
Includes uodates. ==) .. MOST
complete and detailed eu1de-=
ever seen:' RCMA 8 /88 p61.
s2s.oo plu s SJ.25 S / H to: Ara.
POB 2114, Glendale, AZ 85311-2114
Ariz. Resid e nts add S.5% tax.
PUBLISHED IH ARI 20HA FOR ARI20HA !

GROVE CLEARANCE SALE!
Order ·today - limited supply - UPS shipping included
SONY 2010 SHORTWAVE RECEIVER - new condit ion. S343 val ue - ONLY S290.
KENWOOD TH215A 140-163 MHz (receive und transmit), 2.5\V, programmable
hand-held transceiver with leather carrying case, AC cha rger, nex wh ip, excellent
conditio·n. Cost $350, sell only S275.
SHORTWAVE DIRECTORY, 4TH EDITION - cosmetic damage on cover. S20.95
value, ONLY SlO.
GROVE SP-100 SOUNO ENHANCER - new conditio n but has sl ight
· dainage on cover. One only. $104.50 val[1e, ONLY $95.
GROVE POWER ANT (PRE3) - new but has slight cosmetic damage. One only
S45.
''

··-

'

-'

GROVEMOBILE SCANNER ANTENNA {ANTlO) - 20" high with 3 1/2" magne1ic
base, 12 feet low loss coaxial cab le terminated with Motorola plug (as adve rtise d in
May, 1988 catalog). $26.50 va lu e, ONLY Sl7.50.

All sales final, send check or money order to:

FORGET SOMETHING?
If you're the sort of person
who would lose his head
if it weren't attached ,
maybe you' d better renew
th at subscription now! . . .
Use the handy form on page 87.

Grove Enterprises, Inc.
140 Dog Branch Road
13rasstown, NC 28902
704-837-9200

MON ITOR ING TI!VI ES

October 1988

103

Closing Comments

A New FCC Debacle: Scanner and
Shortwave Radio Labeling
Now Lhar the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 is fully
im plemen ted (although totally
unenforced), a new specter looms on
the radio l10ri1.on: cumpulsory warning
labels on ~canners and shortwave
receivers.
1nitiated by Regency Electronics (now

a Uniden subsidiary), t he petition was
proposed as part of an effo rt by
Regency to discourage scn nner listeners
from tuning in on cellular telephone
correspondence in the 800 MHz band.
Regency was a signatory to the cellular
consortium th;ll lobbied for the ECPA.
Ironically, th e mandatory labeling
proposal is opposed by the cellul ar
tel ephone industry, bu t not for th e
same reasons listeners oppose it.
Cellu lar manuf:1cturers hope that 800
l'v! Hz scanners will be outlawed and
that the lab<.:ling is too weak a
measure to thwart uninvited mobile
'phone eave~clropping.
We support the Associat ion of North
American R :1clio Clubs (ANARC),
CTlA, Dell Atlan1ic t-.lobile, Tclocator
of America. Nynex t-.!obile Communications and other commc ntors presently
on file with the Com miss ion who
oppose m:indatory labeling of sc<1nning

October 1988

t-.IONITOR ING Tlf..IES

and shortwave receivers.
We feel that labeling a radio to
prevent unlawful use would be no
more effective than labeling a gun,
motor vehicle or any othe r product
which can be abused. The onus of
communications p rivacy clearly belongs
on the sende r, not on the receiver.
Since radio receivers and scan ners arc
capable of receiving both protected
and unprotected comm unications, often
on the same frequencies, a listen er
can not avoid protected transmissions
while tuning o r scanning through
frequency ranges which offe r unprotected communications.
The issue can be more sat isfactorily
and realistically resolved by requiring
an advisement Lo be packaged with
receive rs an d scanners <llening the new
owner of listening prohibitions as is
presently clone with electrical devices
concerni ng shock hazards.
The answer is diplomatic ed uca tio n,
not branding radio receivers and
stigmatizing thei r owners as patently
suspect.
/Job Grol'e
Publisher

THE PROS SUBSCRIBE.

SHOULDN'T YOU?
Seve ral professional
111oni tori 11g agcncit·:-.. in fac t. h ~n-e
s11hsni pt ion s to Monitoring Times.
That' s lwca11sc cn·1y month Monitoring Times offers the latest in:

Interna tio n al Broa dcasting
Utility Monito ring
Scanne rs
Sho rt.\vave and Lo ngwave
Sate llites
Electro nic Projects
Listeni11g Tips
Freque n cy Lists
Broadcasting Schedule s
News-breaking Articles
Featu res
Exclusive In tervi ews
Insights from the Experts
New Product Reviews & T ests
Jammed with up-to-date information and concise ly written by
the top writers in the field , Monitoring Times is considered indispensable reading by top government agencies.

From longwave to microwave,
if yo u are interested in communications, Monitoring Times is your
foremost g uide to internatio11al
broadcasters; new equipment a nd
accessories; profiles of government, military, police a nd fire networks; home projects; and tips on
monitoring everything from air-

to-ground a nd ship-to-shore to rad ioteletype, facsim ile and space
co mmunica tions.
Order your subscription today before another issue goes by:
only $ 18 per year in the U.S.; $26
per year for fo reign and Canada.
For a sample issue , send $2 (foreign, se nd 5 IRCs) .

MONITORING TIMES

P.O . Box 98
Brasstown, N.C. 28902

I

Your authoritative source, every month.
, Yes, hegin my subscription to Monitoring Times. I've enclosed a check.
0 Send m e a sample issue. Enclosed is a check for $2.
I J For MC/VISA orders, call 704-837-9200.

Name
Street

City

State

Zip

L------ - ----------------~