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ATN 905 Multi-Service Access Equipment

V200R002C01

Configuration Guide (CLI)


Issue

03

Date

2013-11-22

HUAWEI TECHNOLOGIES CO., LTD.

Copyright Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. 2013. All rights reserved.


No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written
consent of Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.

Trademarks and Permissions


and other Huawei trademarks are trademarks of Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.
All other trademarks and trade names mentioned in this document are the property of their respective holders.

Notice
The purchased products, services and features are stipulated by the contract made between Huawei and the
customer. All or part of the products, services and features described in this document may not be within the
purchase scope or the usage scope. Unless otherwise specified in the contract, all statements, information,
and recommendations in this document are provided "AS IS" without warranties, guarantees or representations
of any kind, either express or implied.
The information in this document is subject to change without notice. Every effort has been made in the
preparation of this document to ensure accuracy of the contents, but all statements, information, and
recommendations in this document do not constitute a warranty of any kind, express or implied.

Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.


Address:

Huawei Industrial Base


Bantian, Longgang
Shenzhen 518129
People's Republic of China

Website:

http://www.huawei.com

Email:

support@huawei.com

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About This Document

About This Document


Purpose
This document provides the basic concepts, configuration procedures, and configuration
examples in different application scenarios of the Lan features supported by the ATN 905 device.
The usage precautions are as follows:
l

A device can store keys in plaintext, reversible algorithm encryption, or irreversible


algorithm encryption mode. The plaintext mode has the low security level, and the
irreversible algorithm encryption mode has the highest security level. Use different storage
modes for different scenarios. Exercise caution when using an insecure storage mode. The
system automatically selects the irreversible algorithm encryption mode to store local user
keys. Generally, the reversible algorithm encryption mode is used to store protocol keys to
meet interworking requirements.

If the plaintext mode is used, a password is stored in plaintext in the configuration file. This
results in high security risks. The plaintext mode applies only to scenarios with special
requirements, such as compatibility and interworking requirements.

Related Version
The following table lists the product version related to this document.
Product Name

Version

ATN 905

V200R002C01

Intended Audience
This document is intended for:
l

Commissioning Engineer

Data Configuration Engineer

Network Monitoring Engineer

System Maintenance Engineer

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Configuration Guide (CLI)

About This Document

Symbol Conventions
Symbol

Description

DANGER

WARNING

CAUTION

Indicates a hazard with a high level of risk, which if not


avoided, will result in death or serious injury.
Indicates a hazard with a medium or low level of risk, which
if not avoided, could result in minor or moderate injury.
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation, which if not
avoided, could result in equipment damage, data loss,
performance degradation, or unexpected results.

TIP

Indicates a tip that may help you solve a problem or save


time.

NOTE

Provides additional information to emphasize or supplement


important points of the main text.

Command Conventions

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Convention

Description

Boldface

The keywords of a command line are in boldface.

Italic

Command arguments are in italics.

[]

Items (keywords or arguments) in brackets [ ] are optional.

{ x | y | ... }

Optional items are grouped in braces and separated by


vertical bars. One item is selected.

[ x | y | ... ]

Optional items are grouped in brackets and separated by


vertical bars. One item is selected or no item is selected.

{ x | y | ... }*

Optional items are grouped in braces and separated by


vertical bars. A minimum of one item or a maximum of all
items can be selected.

[ x | y | ... ]*

Optional items are grouped in brackets and separated by


vertical bars. Several items or no item can be selected.

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About This Document

GUI Conventions
Convention

Description

Boldface

Buttons, menus, parameters, tabs, window, and dialog titles


are in boldface. For example, click OK.

>

Multi-level menus are in boldface and separated by the ">"


signs. For example, choose File > Create > Folder.

Change History
Updates between document issues are cumulative. Therefore, the latest document issue contains
all updates made in previous issues.

Changes in Issue 03 (2013-11-22)


This document has the following updates:
Known bugs are fixed.

Changes in Issue 02 (2013-08-15)


This document has the following updates:
Known bugs are fixed.

Changes in Issue 01 (2013-05-30)


This document is the first release of the V200R002C01 version.

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Contents

Contents
About This Document.....................................................................................................................ii
1 Application Scenario Overview..................................................................................................1
1.1 Small-cell Base Station Bearer Scenario........................................................................................................................2
1.2 EDD Scenario.................................................................................................................................................................2

2 Configuration Overview..............................................................................................................5
2.1 Networking Models........................................................................................................................................................6
2.2 Configuration Overview.................................................................................................................................................7
2.2.1 Select Overall Solution..............................................................................................................................................13
2.2.2 Select Management Plane Configuration Solution....................................................................................................14
2.2.3 Select Service Solution..............................................................................................................................................16
2.3 Recommended Solutions..............................................................................................................................................19

3 Solution 1: Native IP VRF Static Route Access......................................................................23


3.1 Scenario Introduction...................................................................................................................................................25
3.2 Logging In to the ATN 905..........................................................................................................................................28
3.2.1 Logging In to the ATN 905 by Using SSH...............................................................................................................28
3.2.2 Logging In to the ATN 905 by Using the Console Interface....................................................................................30
3.3 Configuring Basic Information.....................................................................................................................................33
3.3.1 Configuring an NE Name..........................................................................................................................................34
3.3.2 Configuring the VTY User Interface.........................................................................................................................35
3.3.3 Configuring AAA Users............................................................................................................................................36
3.3.4 Configuring the SNMP..............................................................................................................................................37
3.4 Deploying the Management Plane................................................................................................................................39
3.4.1 Configuration Roadmap............................................................................................................................................40
3.4.2 Data Planning............................................................................................................................................................40
3.4.3 Configuring the Management Plane..........................................................................................................................41
3.5 Deploying VRF Lite Services.......................................................................................................................................41
3.5.1 Configuration Roadmap............................................................................................................................................42
3.5.2 Data Planning............................................................................................................................................................43
3.5.3 Configuring VRF Lite Services.................................................................................................................................46
3.6 Deploying Static Routes...............................................................................................................................................48
3.6.1 Configuration Roadmap............................................................................................................................................48
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3.6.2 Data Planning............................................................................................................................................................49


3.6.3 Configuring Static Routes.........................................................................................................................................52
3.6.4 Checking Static Route Configurations......................................................................................................................53
3.7 Deploying QoS.............................................................................................................................................................54
3.7.1 Configuring QoS........................................................................................................................................................54
3.8 Deploying the Clock.....................................................................................................................................................55
3.8.1 Configuration Roadmap............................................................................................................................................55
3.8.2 Data Planning............................................................................................................................................................56
3.8.3 Configuring Synchronous Ethernet to Achieve Frequency Synchronization............................................................57
3.8.4 Configuring IEEE 1588v2 to Achieve Time Synchronization..................................................................................58

4 Solution 2: Native IP VRF Dynamic Route Access...............................................................60


4.1 Scenario Introduction...................................................................................................................................................62
4.2 Logging In to the ATN 905..........................................................................................................................................65
4.2.1 Logging In to the ATN by Using SSH......................................................................................................................65
4.2.2 Logging In to the ATN by Using the Console Interface...........................................................................................67
4.3 Configuring Basic Information.....................................................................................................................................70
4.3.1 Configuring NE Information.....................................................................................................................................71
4.3.2 Configuring the VTY User Interface.........................................................................................................................72
4.3.3 Configuring AAA Users............................................................................................................................................73
4.3.4 Configuring the SNMP..............................................................................................................................................74
4.4 Configuring the Management Plane.............................................................................................................................76
4.4.1 Configuring the Management Plane..........................................................................................................................76
4.5 Deploying VRF Lite Services.......................................................................................................................................78
4.5.1 Configuration Roadmap............................................................................................................................................78
4.5.2 Data Planning............................................................................................................................................................79
4.5.3 Configuring VRF Lite Services.................................................................................................................................83
4.6 Deploying the IGP........................................................................................................................................................85
4.6.1 Configuring the IS-IS................................................................................................................................................85
4.6.2 Deploying the OSPF..................................................................................................................................................90
4.7 Deploying QoS.............................................................................................................................................................94
4.7.1 Configuring QoS........................................................................................................................................................94
4.8 Deploying the Clock.....................................................................................................................................................95
4.8.1 Configuration Roadmap............................................................................................................................................95
4.8.2 Data Planning............................................................................................................................................................96
4.8.3 Configuring Synchronous Ethernet to Achieve Frequency Synchronization............................................................97
4.8.4 Configuring IEEE 1588v2 to Achieve Time Synchronization..................................................................................98

5 Solution 3: Native Ethernet Access........................................................................................100


5.1 Scenario Introduction.................................................................................................................................................101
5.2 Logging In to the ATN 905........................................................................................................................................103
5.2.1 Logging In to the ATN by Using SSH....................................................................................................................103
5.2.2 Logging In to the ATN by Using the Console Interface.........................................................................................105
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5.3 Configuring Basic Information...................................................................................................................................108


5.3.1 Configuring NE Information...................................................................................................................................109
5.3.2 Configuring the VTY User Interface.......................................................................................................................110
5.3.3 Configuring AAA Users..........................................................................................................................................111
5.3.4 Configuring the SNMP............................................................................................................................................112
5.4 Configuring the Management Plane...........................................................................................................................114
5.4.1 Configuration Roadmap..........................................................................................................................................114
5.4.2 Data Planning..........................................................................................................................................................115
5.4.3 Configuring the Management Plane........................................................................................................................116
5.5 Deploying the serive...................................................................................................................................................117
5.5.1 Configuration Roadmap..........................................................................................................................................117
5.5.2 Data Planning..........................................................................................................................................................118
5.5.3 Configuring Ethernet Services.................................................................................................................................119
5.6 Deploying QoS...........................................................................................................................................................121
5.6.1 Configuring QoS......................................................................................................................................................121
5.7 Deploying the Clock...................................................................................................................................................122
5.7.1 Configuration Roadmap..........................................................................................................................................122
5.7.2 Data Planning..........................................................................................................................................................123
5.7.3 Configuring Synchronous Ethernet to Achieve Frequency Synchronization..........................................................124
5.7.4 Configuring IEEE 1588v2 to Achieve Time Synchronization................................................................................125

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1 Application Scenario Overview

Application Scenario Overview

About This Chapter


ATN 905 is small-sized, light-weighted, and low power-consuming case-shaped equipment. The
application scenarios of ATN 905 are divided into the small-cell base station bearer scenario
and the Ethernet demarcation device (EDD) scenario.
1.1 Small-cell Base Station Bearer Scenario
1.2 EDD Scenario

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1.1 Small-cell Base Station Bearer Scenario


Application Scenarios
1.

Small-cell base station bearer scenario


Mobile networks are transforming from dominant macro base stations to co-existing macro
and small-cell base stations. In addition, small-cell base stations, with characteristics such
as low cost, wide coverage, and easy installation, will play a more and more important role
in future network construction.
In Huawei's mobile bearer solution, ATN 905 devices are used as small-cell base station
bearer NEs and connected to the access device (the CSG in the figure) at the macro base
station in chain networking mode. As an extension of the IPRAN mobile bearer solution
based on the macro base station, Huawei's mobile bearer solution integrates mobile bearer
clock and maintenance solutions in an end-to-end manner, and features low cost, easy
deployment, and easy O&M. Figure 1 shows the networking diagram of the solution using
the ATN 905 as the bearer device at the small-cell base station.
Figure 1-1 Networking diagram of the small-cell base station bearer solution
Small-cell Base
Station Access
Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico

IPRAN
Macro Cell

BSC
ATN 905

ATN 905

RNC

Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico

CSG

ASG

RSG
MME
/SGW

NOTE

The mobile bearer device at the macro base station may be a third-party device. In this topic, Huawei's
IPRAN solution (ATN + CX networking) on the macro base station side is used as an example to illustrate
the deployment configuration.

1.2 EDD Scenario


Application Scenario Overview
A provider network is large-scale and complex, making management and fault locating difficult.
The Ethernet demarcation device (EDD) is a key element in provider-level Ethernet services,
leased network services, and applications of mobile backhaul networks. By deploying an EDD
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on the user side and connecting it to the CPE, the provider separates the customer network from
the provider network. As an EDD, Huawei's ATN 905 provides strong link OAM functions,
performs end-to-end fault monitoring and diagnosis, and automatically verifies the service level
agreement (SLA).
1.

Dividing Maintenance Responsibilities for the Provider's Departments


As shown in Figure 1, the provider network is divided into different maintenance domains
based on maintenance responsibilities. These maintenance domains are independent from
each other and do not need to perceive each other. There are boundaries between different
maintenance domains, and the boundaries need to be clearly demarcated to facilitate
maintenance. For example, how to divide maintenance responsibilities for the provider's
wireless and network departments in the case of an argument? An EDD can be deployed
at each base station to obtain information such as the throughput, packet loss rate, latency,
and jitter.
Figure 1-2 Dividing Maintenance Responsibilities for the Provider's Departments
Wireless maintenance territory
MBH maintenance territory

BSC

ASG
EDD

RSG

CSG
RNC

ATN 905

2.

Demarcating the Provider Network and Enterprise Network


As shown in Figure 2, on an enterprise private line network, the enterprise user's CPE
connects to the provider's PE using an optical fiber. However, the CPE is usually far from
the PE, so maintenance responsibilities are difficult to divide in the case of a fault.
Figure 1-3 Enterprise private line network with the EDD
User Network

CPE

Provider Network

EDD

PE

User Network

PE

ATN 905

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As shown in Figure 3, an enterprise rents a 100M private line from a provider. However,
the enterprise user considers the bandwidth as lower than 100 M. In the case of a fault on
the enterprise user network, the enterprise user tends to call the provider and complain.
How can the provider divide the maintenance responsibilities? The provider can deploy an
EDD near the CPE and test the throughput using RFC 2544 before the deployment so as
to prove that the bandwidth meets the requirements. After services are provisioned, the
EDD monitors service packets in real time using IP FPM, obtains information such as the
throughput, packet loss rate, latency, and jitter, and periodically provides an SLA to the
enterprise user so as to prove the provider's network quality.
Figure 1-4 Enterprise private line network without the EDD
User Network

Provider Network

CPE

3.

PE

User Network

CPE

PE

Demarcating the Provider Network and Leased Network


As shown in Figure 4, provider B rents a network from provider A. However, faults cannot
be clearly demarcated, so arguments always occur between providers A and B. To resolve
this problem, an EDD can be deployed on provider A's side and deploy OAM functions
such as RFC 2544 and IP FPM based on live network requirements to monitor and measure
information such as the throughput, packet loss rate, latency, and jitter. In this manner,
maintenance responsibilities can be divided.
Figure 1-5 Demarcating the Provider Network and Leased Network

Wholesale Network

Provider Network
EDD

PE

PE

ATN 905
B
A

NOTE

For easy description, the upstream network of the EDD is called aggregation network.

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Configuration Overview

About This Chapter


2.1 Networking Models
2.2 Configuration Overview
2.3 Recommended Solutions

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2 Configuration Overview

2.1 Networking Models


Networking Model for the Configuration Example
The application scenarios of the ATN 905 are small-base station bearer and enterprise private
line EDD. From the deployment point of view, the solutions can be classified into the following
types by access technology.
l

Native IP access solution

Native Ethernet access solution

In both solutions, the ATN 905 is connected to the nearby network of the operator. If the
operator's network is regarded as an abstract "cloud", only the deployment and configuration of
the part (marked by the dotted rectangle on the left) on the access network need to be considered.
For the marked part of the access network, the configuration roadmaps and procedures in both
solutions are basically the same. Therefore, this topic only provides detailed configuration
description from the angle of the access technology. That is, scenarios are not differentiated
while only solutions are differentiated. The following typical networking models are provided
for the configuration example.
l

Native IP scenario: Layer 3 IP packets are forwarded between the ATN 905 and CSG.
Micro/Pico
Macro Cell

RNC/SGW
ATN 905

ATN 905

IPRAN
CSG

Micro/Pico

Native IP
Traffic flow

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Native Ethernet scenario: Layer 2 Ethernet packets are forwarded between the ATN 905
and CSG.

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Micro/Pico
Macro Cell

RNC/SGW
ATN 905

ATN 905

IPRAN
CSG

Micro/Pico

Native Eth
Traffic flow

2.2 Configuration Overview


Overall Configuration Roadmap
1.

Overall solution selection: Determine the small-cell base station bearer solution or EDD
bearer solution based on the macro base station mobile bearer solution or aggregation
network bearer solution.
NOTE

Typical networking models are used in the following schematic diagrams, regardless of the small-cell base
station bearer solution or EDD bearer solution. For details, see Networking Models.

Scenario

Overall
Solution

l If a Layer 3 access solution


(such as HVPN) is used on
the macro base station side,
you are advised to deploy
the native IP solution
between the ATN 905 and
cell site gateway (CSG) to
forward services.

Native IP
solution

l If a Layer 3 access solution


(such as MPLS/IP) is used
on the aggregation network,
you are advised to deploy
the native IP solution
between the ATN 905 and
PE to forward services.

Diagram
Macro Cell

Micro/Pico

ATN 905

ATN 905

IPRAN

RNC

CSG
Micro/Pico

Native IP

This solution facilitates end-toend IP-based continuity check


(CC) and performance
monitoring.
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Scenario

Overall
Solution

l If a Layer 2 or Layer 2 +
Layer 3 access solution
(such as mixed VPN) is used
on the macro base station
side, you are advised to
deploy the native Ethernet
solution between the ATN
905 and CSG to
transparently transmit
packets from the small-cell
base station.

Native
Ethernet
solution

2 Configuration Overview

Diagram
Macro Cell

Micro/Pico

ATN 905

ATN 905

IPRAN

RNC

CSG
Micro/Pico

Native Eth

l If a Layer 2 access solution


(such as metro Ethernet) is
used on the aggregation
network, you are advised to
deploy the native Ethernet
solution between the ATN
905 and PE to forward
services.
In this solution, the VLAN
information of the small-cell
base station or enterprise
private line user is not
modified. Instead, packets of
the small-cell base station or
enterprise private line user are
transparently transmitted.

2.

Service solution selection: During actual service deployment, multiple feature solutions
are available. The following describes the applicable scenarios of these feature solutions.
You can choose an appropriate solution based on the actual networking requirements.
a.

Select a management plane configuration solution based on the overall solution


selected in step 1 and the actual networking requirements.

Prerequisit
e

Scenario

Managemen
t Plane Mode

Advantage

Disadvantage

Native IP/
Native
Ethernet
solution

The network
scale is small.

Public network
static route

The reliability and stability


are high.

The scalability is poor. When


the network topology
changes, static routes need to
be manually configured again.

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Prerequisit
e

2 Configuration Overview

Scenario

Managemen
t Plane Mode

Advantage

1. The
network
scale is
large.

Public network
IGP

1. The scalability is high and IGP configurations need to be


routes are automatically
planned and maintained.
adjusted when the network
topology changes.

2. Upstream
devices
are
managed
using the
public
network
IGP.

Disadvantage

2. The management mode


can be the same as that of
the upstream IPRAN or
aggregation network.

The ATN 905


is networked
with Huawei
products.

Private
network DCN

1. The configuration is
simple and management
routes do not need to be
configured by NE.

The CSG (or PE) must be a


Huawei product.

2. The scalability is high.


When devices are added to
the network, the
management plane
configuration of other
devices does not need to be
modified.
3. The management mode
can be the same as that of
the upstream IPRAN or
aggregation network.

Figure 2-1 Management plane configuration diagram


Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico
Macro Cell

ATN 905

ATN 905

IPRAN
CSG

RNC

Micro/Pico
Micro/Pico

b.

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Public network static route/


Public network IGP/
Private network DCN

management flow

Select a service plane access mode based on the overall solution selected in step 1
and the actual networking requirements.
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a.

2 Configuration Overview

If the native IP solution is selected in step 1:

Prerequisite

Scenario

Access Mode

Advantage

Disadvantage

Native IP
solution

Users or
services need
to be
separated.

VRF access

This solution can separate


services.

Configurations for this


solution is complex because a
unique IP route and Interior
Gateway Protocol (IGP)
process need to be planned
and configured for each
virtual routing and
forwarding (VRF) instance as
required.

l This solution can separate


different wireless
operators accessed to a
network using the ATN
905 as the backhaul
device for the small-cell
base station.
l This solution can separate
different enterprise users
accessed to a network
using the ATN 905 as the
EDD.

Users or
services do
not need to be
separated.

Entire public
network
access

The planning and


configuration is simple. A
unique IP route and IGP
process for each VRF
instance can be resolved only
by making public network
channels available.

This solution cannot separate


users or separate services
from the management plane.
IP addresses need to be
planned in a centralized
manner.

Figure 2-2 Native IP service access (VRF access) configuration diagram


VRF1

VRF2

ATN 905

Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN
CSG

VRF2

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VRF1

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RNC

main interface
Dot1q sub-interface
VRF1 service flow
VRF2 service flow

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Configuration Guide (CLI)

2 Configuration Overview

Figure 2-3 Native IP service access (public network access) configuration


diagram
VRF1

VRF2

Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN

ATN 905

RNC

CSG

VRF2

b.

Main interface
VRF1

Service flow

If the native Ethernet solution is selected in step 1:

Prerequisite

Scenario

Access Mode

Advantage

Disadvantage

Native
Ethernet
solution

Users or
services do
not need to be
separated.

Hybrid
interface
access

Extra encapsulation costs are


saved.

VLANs for customers and


operators need to be planned
in a centralized manner.

Figure 2-4 Native Ethernet service access (hybrid interface access) configuration
diagram
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 to 20
Macro Cell

VLAN10

VLAN20

IPRAN

ATN 905
ATN 905

VLAN20

c.

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VLAN10

CSG

RNC

Hybrid interface
Service flow

If the native IP solution is selected in step 1, select a service plane routing mode
based on the actual networking requirements. If the native Ethernet solution is selected
in step 1, skip this step.

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Prerequisit
e

Scenario

Service plane
routing mode

Advantage

Disadvantage

Native IP
solution

The network
scale is small.

Static Route

1. The configuration is
simple.

The scalability is poor.


l When a small-cell base
station is added to the
network, static routes
need to be added by hop
for the network segment
from the small-cell base
station to the
corresponding macro
base station.

2. The reliability and


stability are high, and
network flapping caused
by a network topology
change is prevented.

l When a PE is added to the


network, static routes
need to be added by hop
for the network segment
from the PE to the EDD.
The network
scale is large.

IGP route

1. The scalability is high.


When a device is added to
the network, only the
interface configurations
on its adjacent devices
need to be adjusted.
Configurations on other
devices do not need to be
modified.

1. IGP configurations need


to be planned and
maintained.
2. Network flapping may
occur when the network
topology changes.

Figure 2-5 Service plane route configuration diagram


Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN

ATN 905
CSG

Static route / IGP

d.

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RNC

Service flow

Select the QoS deployment mode based on the actual networking requirements.
Scenario

QoS Mode

Traffic management is required.

Simple traffic classification

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e.

2 Configuration Overview

Select the clock deployment mode based on the actual networking requirements.
Scenario

Clock Mode

Frequency synchronization needs to


be achieved between NEs.

Synchronous Ethernet

Time synchronization needs to be


achieved between NEs.

1588v2

2.2.1 Select Overall Solution


Solution Selection Principle
Determine the small-cell base station bearer solution or EDD bearer solution based on the macro
base station mobile bearer solution or aggregation network bearer solution.
Scenario

Overall
Solution

l If a Layer 3 access solution


(such as HVPN) is used on
the macro base station side,
you are advised to deploy
the native IP solution
between the ATN 905 and
cell site gateway (CSG) to
forward services.

Native IP
solution

l If a Layer 3 access solution


(such as MPLS/IP) is used
on the aggregation network,
you are advised to deploy
the native IP solution
between the ATN 905 and
PE to forward services.

Diagram
Macro Cell

Micro/Pico

ATN 905

ATN 905

IPRAN

RNC

CSG
Micro/Pico

Native IP

This solution facilitates end-toend IP-based continuity check


(CC) and performance
monitoring.

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Scenario

Overall
Solution

l If a Layer 2 or Layer 2 +
Layer 3 access solution
(such as mixed VPN) is used
on the macro base station
side, you are required to
deploy the native Ethernet
solution between the ATN
905 and CSG to
transparently transmit
packets from the small-cell
base station.

Native
Ethernet
solution

2 Configuration Overview

Diagram
Macro Cell

Micro/Pico

ATN 905

ATN 905

IPRAN

RNC

CSG
Micro/Pico

Native Eth

l If a Layer 2 access solution


(such as metro Ethernet) is
used on the aggregation
network, you are required to
deploy the native Ethernet
solution between the ATN
905 and PE to forward
services.
In this solution, the VLAN
information of the small-cell
base station or enterprise
private line user is not
modified. Instead, packets of
the small-cell base station or
enterprise private line user are
transparently transmitted.

2.2.2 Select Management Plane Configuration Solution


Solution Selection Principle
Select a management plane configuration solution based on the overall solution selected in
step 1 and the actual networking requirements.
Prerequisit
e

Scenario

Managemen
t Plane Mode

Advantage

Disadvantage

Native IP/
Native
Ethernet
solution

The network
scale is small.

Public network
static route

The reliability and stability


are high.

The scalability is poor. When


the network topology
changes, static routes need to
be manually configured again.

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Prerequisit
e

2 Configuration Overview

Scenario

Managemen
t Plane Mode

Advantage

1. The
network
scale is
large.

Public network
IGP

1. The scalability is high and IGP configurations need to be


routes are automatically
planned and maintained.
adjusted when the network
topology changes.

2. Upstream
devices
are
managed
using the
public
network
IGP.
The ATN 905
is networked
with Huawei
products.

Disadvantage

2. The management mode


can be the same as that of
the upstream IPRAN or
aggregation network.

the VRF of
Private
network DCN

1. The configuration is
simple and management
routes do not need to be
configured by NE.

The CSG (or PE) must be a


Huawei product.

2. The scalability is high.


When devices are added to
the network, the
management plane
configuration of other
devices does not need to be
modified.
3. The management mode
can be the same as that of
the upstream IPRAN or
aggregation network.

Figure 2-6 Management plane configuration diagram


Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico
Macro Cell

ATN 905

ATN 905

IPRAN
CSG

RNC

Micro/Pico
Micro/Pico

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Public network static route/


Public network IGP/
Private network DCN

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2 Configuration Overview

2.2.3 Select Service Solution


Overview
The service solution selection involves the following parts:
1.

Selecting the service plane access mode

2.

Selecting the service plane routing mode

3.

Selecting the QoS deployment mode

4.

Selecting the clock deployment mode

Solution Selection Principle


1.

Select a service plane access mode based on the overall solution selected in step 1 and the
actual networking requirements.
a.

If the native IP solution is selected in step 1:

Prerequisite

Scenario

Access Mode

Advantage

Disadvantage

Native IP
solution

Users or
services need
to be
separated.

VRF access

This solution can separate


services.

Configurations for this


solution is complex because a
unique IP route and Interior
Gateway Protocol (IGP)
process need to be planned
and configured for each
virtual routing and
forwarding (VRF) instance as
required.

l This solution can separate


different wireless
operators accessed to a
network using the ATN
905 as the backhaul
device for the small-cell
base station.
l This solution can separate
different enterprise users
accessed to a network
using the ATN 905 as the
EDD.

Users or
services do
not need to be
separated.

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Entire public
network
access

The planning and


configuration is simple. A
unique IP route and IGP
process for each VRF
instance can be resolved only
by making public network
channels available.

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This solution cannot separate


users or separate services
from the management plane.
IP addresses need to be
planned in a centralized
manner.

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Figure 2-7 Native IP service access (VRF access) configuration diagram


VRF2

VRF1

ATN 905

Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN
RNC

CSG

VRF2

main interface
Dot1q sub-interface
VRF1 service flow
VRF2 service flow

VRF1

Figure 2-8 Native IP service access (public network access) configuration diagram
VRF1

VRF2

Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN

ATN 905

RNC

CSG

VRF2

b.

Main interface
VRF1

Service flow

If the native Ethernet solution is selected in step 1:

Prerequisite

Scenario

Access Mode

Advantage

Disadvantage

Native
Ethernet
solution

Users or
services do
not need to be
separated.

Hybrid
interface
access

Extra encapsulation costs are


saved.

VLANs for customers and


operators need to be planned
in a centralized manner.

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Figure 2-9 Native Ethernet service access (hybrid interface access) configuration
diagram
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 to 20
Macro Cell

VLAN10

VLAN20

IPRAN

ATN 905
ATN 905

VLAN20

2.

VLAN10

CSG

RNC

Hybrid interface
Service flow

If the native IP solution is selected in step 1, select a service plane routing mode based
on the actual networking requirements. If the native Ethernet solution is selected in step 1,
skip this step.

Prerequisit
e

Scenario

Service plane
routing mode

Advantage

Disadvantage

Native IP
solution

The network
scale is small.

Static Route

1. The configuration is
simple.

The scalability is poor.

2. The reliability and


stability are high, and
network flapping caused
by a network topology
change is prevented.

l When a small-cell base


station is added to the
network, static routes
need to be added by hop
for the network segment
from the small-cell base
station to the
corresponding macro
base station.
l When a PE is added to the
network, static routes
need to be added by hop
for the network segment
from the PE to the EDD.

The network
scale is large.

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IGP route

1. The scalability is high.


When a device is added to
the network, only the
interface configurations
on its adjacent devices
need to be adjusted.
Configurations on other
devices do not need to be
modified.

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1. IGP configurations need


to be planned and
maintained.
2. Network flapping may
occur when the network
topology changes.

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2 Configuration Overview

Figure 2-10 Service plane route configuration diagram


Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN

ATN 905
CSG

Static route / IGP

3.

4.

RNC

Service flow

Select the QoS deployment mode based on the actual networking requirements.
Scenario

QoS Mode

Traffic management is required.

Simple traffic classification

Select the clock deployment mode based on the actual networking requirements.
Scenario

Clock Mode

Frequency synchronization needs to be


achieved between NEs.

Synchronous Ethernet

Time synchronization needs to be


achieved between NEs.

1588v2

2.3 Recommended Solutions


Introduction to the Recommended Solutions
Huawei recommends the following solutions based on the common networking modes:
1.

Solution 1: Native IP + public network static management plane + VRF access + static
route

2.

Solution 2: Native IP + DCN private network management plane + VRF access +


dynamic route

3.

Solution 3: Native Ethernet + public network IGP management plane + hybrid


interface access
NOTE

The preceding recommended solutions are only common ones and there are also other combination types.

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Solution 1: Native IP + public network static management plane + VRF access + static
route
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Application Scope

Advantage

Constraint

This solution applies to


small-scale networks that
use a Layer 3 access
solution as the macro base
station bearer solution (or
the aggregation network
bearer solution in the
EDD scenario) in a
mobile bearer solution.

1. The configuration is
simple. The basic native
IP feature is used,
dynamic protocols such
as the IGP are not
involved, and the IGP
does not need to be
planned.

1. This solution does not


apply to large-scale
networks.

2. Users are separated


using the VRF.
3. Interconnection with
third-party equipment is
supported. That is, the
mobile bearer NE (or
PE) on the macro base
station side can be a
third-party NE.

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l When a small-cell
base station is added
to the network, static
routes need to be
added by hop for the
network segment
from the small-cell
base station to the
corresponding macro
base station.
l When a PE is added
to the network, static
routes need to be
added by hop for the
network segment
from the PE to the
EDD.

Solution 2: Native IP + DCN private network management plane + VRF access +


dynamic route
Application Scope

Advantage

Constraint

This solution applies to


networks of any scale that
use a Layer 3 access
solution as the macro base
station bearer solution (or
the aggregation network
bearer solution in the
EDD scenario) in a
mobile bearer solution.

1. This solution is
recommended for
relatively large
networks.

1. IGP configurations need


to be planned and
maintained.

NOTE
This solution applies to
networks built with Huawei
equipment only. Equipment
can be managed together
with the upstream
equipment using a DCN
private network, which is
convenient and effective.

2. The scalability is poor.

2. The scalability is high.


When a small-cell base
station is added to the
network, only the
interface configurations
on its adjacent devices
need to be adjusted.
Configurations on other
devices do not need to be
modified.

2. Network flapping may


occur when the network
topology changes.

3. Users are separated


using the VRF.

Solution 3: Native Ethernet + public network IGP management plane + hybrid


interface access
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Application Scope

Advantage

Constraint

This solution applies to


networks of any scale that
use a Layer 2 access
solution as the macro base
station bearer solution (or
the aggregation network
bearer solution in the
EDD scenario) in a
mobile bearer solution.

1. This solution is
especially applicable to
scenarios in which the
ATN 905 is used as the
EDD.

1. A protocol needs to be
configured to prevent
loops and Layer 2
broadcast storms.
2. VLANs for customers
and operators do not
need to be separated.

Overall Configuration Roadmap of the Recommended Solutions


Opti
on

Solution 1: Native IP
+ Public Network
Static Management
Plane + VRF Access +
Static Route

Solution 2: Native IP +
DCN Private Network
Management Plane +
VRF Access + Dynamic
Route

Solution 3: Native
Ethernet + Public
Network IGP
Management Plane +
Hybrid Interface Access

Mana
geme
nt
plane
confi
gurati
on

1. Use Layer 3
subinterfaces
between the ATN
905 and backhaul
device at the macro
base station to
establish public
network IP
connections.

1. Plan and configure an


NE IP address for each
NE.

1. Establish public
network IP
interconnections
between the ATN 905
and the CSG (or PE)
using Layer 3
subinterfaces.

2. Manage the ATN 905


using the DCN
management plane.

2. On the ATN 905,


create a loopback
interface on the ATN
905 and configure a
management IP
address for it.
3. Configure public
static routes leading
from the ATN 905 to
the NMS by hop for
the network segment
from the ATN 905 to
the CSG (or PE).

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Opti
on

Solution 1: Native IP
+ Public Network
Static Management
Plane + VRF Access +
Static Route

Solution 2: Native IP +
DCN Private Network
Management Plane +
VRF Access + Dynamic
Route

Solution 3: Native
Ethernet + Public
Network IGP
Management Plane +
Hybrid Interface Access

Servi
ce
confi
gurati
on

1. Establish VRFinstance-based IP
connections between
the ATN 905 and the
CSG (or PE) using
Layer 3
subinterfaces.

1. Establish VRFinstance-based IP
connections between
the ATN 905 and the
CSG (or PE) using
Layer 3 subinterfaces.

1. Switch the AC port of


the ATN 905 to a Layer
2 switching port and
configure a segment of
VLANs that the AC
interface allows to pass
through.

2. Bind the AC port of


the ATN 905 to the
VRF instance that
the directlyconnected small-cell
base station (or CPE)
belongs to.
3. Configure static
routes leading to the
small-base station
and RNC by hop for
the network segment
from the ATN 905 to
the CSG (or PE).

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2 Configuration Overview

2. Bind the AC port of the


ATN 905 to the VRF
instance that the
directly-connected
small-cell base station
(or CPE) belongs to.
3. Configure an
independent IGP
process for each VRF
instance between the
ATN 905 and the CSG
(or PE) to learn the
routes leading to the
small-cell base station
(or CPE) and RNC (or
PE) respectively.

2. Switch the NNI of the


ATN 905 to a Layer 2
switching port and add a
segment of VLANs that
each AC interface
allows to pass through.
3. On the access port of the
CSG (or PE), configure
a virtual leased line
(VLL) for each service
VLAN or terminate the
VLAN for Layer 3
forwarding.

QoS
confi
gurati
on

Enable simple traffic classification for each service interface.

Clock
confi
gurati
on

1. Enable synchronous Ethernet and IEEE 1588v2 for each interface.


2. Configure the priority of imported clock sources for the NNI.

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3 Solution 1: Native IP VRF Static Route Access

Solution 1: Native IP VRF Static Route


Access

About This Chapter


Native IP VRF static route access is applicable to small-sized networks, and mainly adopts the
Native IP service solution. In this solution, management plane packets are transmitted through
public network static routes, static routes are created between ATN 905 devices and access
devices in a macro base station, and meanwhile, VRF instances are configured to isolate services
of different carriers.
3.1 Scenario Introduction
This section gives a brief introduction about scenarios, including overview, configuration
roadmap, and data planning.
3.2 Logging In to the ATN 905
This chapter describes how to log in to the ATN 905 for later commissioning. Two login methods,
login by using the console interface and SSH, are introduced.
3.3 Configuring Basic Information
Before configuring services, you need to perform basic configurations, including the device
name, user login parameter, authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA), and Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) configurations, for the devices.
3.4 Deploying the Management Plane
The management plane is an exclusive logical channel that is used to transmit management
packets between NEs on an ATN network. Logical channels of the management plane and other
planes, such as the service plane, are separated, so devices can still be managed when the other
planes become abnormal.
3.5 Deploying VRF Lite Services
This topic describes how to deploy VRF Lite services.
3.6 Deploying Static Routes
Static routes, instead of dynamic routes, are sufficient for a simple network to function.
3.7 Deploying QoS
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You can deploy quality of service (QoS) on a carrier network to provide differentiated QoS
assurance as required.
3.8 Deploying the Clock
You are advised to use a clock synchronization solution based on actual clock synchronization
requirements.

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3 Solution 1: Native IP VRF Static Route Access

3.1 Scenario Introduction


This section gives a brief introduction about scenarios, including overview, configuration
roadmap, and data planning.

Overview
Solution 1: Native IP VRF static route access (native IP + public network static
management plane + static route + VRF access)
Figure 3-1 Example network of Native IP VRF static route access

VRF1

VRF2

Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN

ATN 905
CSG

VRF2

VRF1
Static route

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RNC
main interface
Dot1q sub-interface
public network
management plane
VRF1 service flow
VRF2 service flow

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3 Solution 1: Native IP VRF Static Route Access

Table 3-1 Solution information


Solution Feature

Applicable
Scenario

Solution
Advantage

Solution
Constraint

l Service
configurations
for small-cell
base stations:
Native IP

1. Scenario in which
the carrier
solution on the
macro base
station side
adopts the Layer
3 access solution

1. The
configurations
are very simple
and easy to
understand. Basic
features are
applied to this
solution, and
dynamic routing
protocols, for
example, the
Interior Gateway
Protocol (IGP),
are not included
in this solution.

1. This solution is
not applicable to
large-sized
networks.

l Management
plane:
Public network
static routes
l IP route:
Static routes
l Native IP access:
VRF access

2. Small-sized
network
3. Small-cell base
station providing
access for
multiple wireless
carriers (Services
of different
wireless carriers
are isolated from
each other.)
4. Huawei IPRAN
products or the
third-party NEs
deployed in the
upstream
direction of the
macro base
station

2. VRF instances
are created for
service isolation.
Wireless devices
are insensible to
the VRF
instances. The
VRF instances
are created on
transmission
equipment to
isolate services of
different wireless
users.

2. This solution is of
poor
expansibility.
Specifically, if
the service IP
address of the
small-cell base
station changes,
the static routes
configured on the
backhaul devices
need to be
changed
accordingly.

Configuration Roadmap
l

Configure a management plane (based on public network static routes) between the ATN
905 and the CSG in a macro base station.

Use dot1p sub-interfaces to create VRF-instance-based IP connections between the ATN


905 and the CSG in a macro base station.
NOTE

1. When services need to be isolated at station access devices, create multiple VRFs on the ATN 905
and CSG devices so that different services use their own VRFs. The VRFs must be the same as those
configured on the macro base station.
2. When services do not need to be isolated at station access devices, create and configure only one VRF
on the ATN 905 and CSG devices so that different services use the same VRF.

Issue 03 (2013-11-22)

Hop by hop configure static routes from the ATN 905 and the CSG in a macro base station
to the small-cell base station and the RNC. Configure static routes between ATN 905 and
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small-cell base stations that are directly connected to it, between ATN 905 and its
downstream ATN 905, and between ATN 905 and small-cell base stations that are directly
connected to the downstream ATN 905.
l

Deploy simple traffic classification (STC) on the ATN 905.

Deploy Synchronous Ethernet (SyncE) on the ATN 905 to implement frequency


synchronization; deploy IEEE 1588v2 to implement time synchronization.

Data Planning
Item

Planning Guidelines

Basic configuration
parameters:

You are advised to configure the basic configuration parameters


except NE name in the centralized manner based on the entire
network. In this way, these basic configuration parameters are
planned once for all.

l NE name
l User login parameter
l SNMP
l AAA
Small-cell base station
data:
l Voice services IP
address
l Data services IP
address

1. Different VRF instances need to be configured to isolate


services of different wireless carriers. VRF instances are
planned by wireless carriers.
2. A service IP address pool (32-bit mask) needs to be planned.
3. A management IP address pool (32-bit mask) needs to be
planned.

l VRF
ATN 905 data:

1. A service IP address pool (32-bit mask) needs to be planned.

l Management IP
address

2. An IP address pool of links that connect small-cell base


stations to the ATN 905 needs to be planned.

l IP address of the link


that connects the
small-cell base station
to the ATN 905

3. Each AC port of the ATN 905 needs to be added into the


related VRF instance. The dot1q sub-interfaces between the
backhaul devices are bound to different VRF interfaces to
transmit packets hop by hop.

l VRF
Static route:
l Destination IP
address
l Next-hop IP address

1. Static routes from the ATN 905 to the small-cell base station
need to be configured.
2. Static routes from the ATN 905 to the downstream ATN 905
and small-cell base station need to be configured.
3. The default route from the ATN 905 to the RNC needs to be
configured.
4. Static routes are imported into the BGP area configured on the
backhaul device in a macro device.

QoS

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STC is deployed on each service interface of the ATN 905.

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Item

Planning Guidelines

Clock

SyncE and 1588v2 functions are enabled on the ATN 905 so that
the ATN 905 traces the clock and time of the upstream device
and transmits the clock signals to base stations.

3.2 Logging In to the ATN 905


This chapter describes how to log in to the ATN 905 for later commissioning. Two login methods,
login by using the console interface and SSH, are introduced.

3.2.1 Logging In to the ATN 905 by Using SSH


This section describes how to log in to the ATN 905 by using SSH. SSH is a secure remote login
protocol developed based on the traditional Telnet protocol. Compared with Telnet, SSH is
greatly improved in terms of the authentication mode and data transmission security.
Figure 3-2 shows the networking diagram for logging in to the ATN 905 by using SSH.
Figure 3-2 Networking diagram for logging in to the ATN 905 by using SSH

network

SSH Client

SSH Server

Prerequisite
l

The ATN 905 is running properly.

The ATN 905 has been logged in using the console interface and an IP address for each
interface has been configured on the ATN 905.

A direct or reachable route exists between the SSH client and the ATN 905.
NOTE

Perform the following configurations on the ATN 905 that serves as the SSH server. This section describes only
the SSH login by using the PuTTY program.

Procedure
Step 1 As shown in the following figure, set the IP address of the ATN 905 to 192.168.1.1 and the login
protocol to SSH.

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NOTE

After the ATN is powered on for the first time, you can log in to it in STelnet mode. The IP address of the
management network interface Ethernet0/0/0 (the console interface) is 129.0.0.1. If the ATN has accessed
the network when it is powered on for the first time, its IP address 129.0.0.1 will be automatically changed
to the IP address that DHCP obtains during the startup.

Figure 3-3 Login by using the PuTTY program

Step 2 Enter the user name root and the password Changeme_123.
NOTE

After the ATN is powered on for the first time, you can log in to it in STelnet mode. The user name and
password are root and Changeme_123 respectively. After logging in to the ATN, change the default
password in time.

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Figure 3-4 Login using the PuTTY program

----End

3.2.2 Logging In to the ATN 905 by Using the Console Interface


This section describes how to use the HyperTerminal in Windows on the PC to log in to the
ATN 905 after setting up a local configuration environment with the console interface.

Context
Figure 3-5 shows the networking diagram for logging in to the NE80E/40E by using the console
interface.
Figure 3-5 Networking diagram for logging in to the ATN 905 by using the console interface

PC

ATN

Prerequisite
l

The ATN 905 is running properly.

The PC is connected to the ATN 905 through an asynchronous interface.

Installing terminal emulation program on the PC (such as Windows XP HyperTerminal)


NOTE

Perform the following configurations on the HyperTerminal on the PC.


The console port applies the non-standard serial port communication cable sequence. For more information, see
ATN 905Multi-service Access Equipment Installation Guide.

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Procedure
Step 1 Use a serial cable to connect the serial interface on the PC and the console interface on the ATN
905.
For more information about the console interface, see the ATN 905Multi-service Access
EquipmentHardware Description.
Step 2 Start the HyperTerminal on the PC.
Choose Start > Programs > Accessories > Communications to start the HyperTerminal in
Windows.
Step 3 Set up a connection.
As shown in Figure 3-6, enter the name of the new connection in the Name text box, and select
an icon. Then, click OK.
Figure 3-6 Setting up a connection

Step 4 Set a connection port.


In the Connect To dialog box shown in Figure 3-7, select a port from the drop-down list box
of Connect using according to the port actually used on the PC or terminal. Then, click OK.

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Figure 3-7 Setting a connection port

Step 5 Set communication parameters.


When the COM1 Properties dialog box is displayed as shown in Figure 3-8, set the COM1
properties according to the description in Figure 3-8 or by clicking Restore Defaults.
NOTE

l Setting the COM1 properties according to the description in Figure 3-8 and setting them by clicking
Restore Defaults have the same effect. The default settings of the console interface will be used.
l When you log in to the ATN 905 by using the console interface, ensure that the COM1 properties on
the HyperTerminal are consistent with the interface attribute settings on the ATN 905. Otherwise, the
login will fail. This means that if default settings are not used for the interface attributes on the ATN
905, the COM1 properties on the HyperTerminal must be changed to be consistent with the interface
attribute settings on the ATN 905.

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Figure 3-8 Setting communication parameters

----End

Commissioning Result
After the preceding configurations are complete, press Enter. An initial password is required
for the first login. Set an authentication password. The system automatically saves the set
password.
An initial password is required for the first login via the console.
Set a password and keep it safe! Otherwise you will not be able to login via the
console.
Please configure the login password (6-16)
Enter Password:
Confirm Password:

If the login fails, click Disconnect and then Call. If the login still fails, repeat Step 1 to check
whether the parameters or physical connections are correct. If they are correct, log in to the ATN
905 again.

3.3 Configuring Basic Information


Before configuring services, you need to perform basic configurations, including the device
name, user login parameter, authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA), and Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) configurations, for the devices.

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3.3.1 Configuring an NE Name


If multiple devices on a network need to be managed, set equipment names to identify each
device.

Data Planning
An NE name consists of the site name, device model, and device number. Each NE is named in
the format of AA-BB-CC. The following provides the meaning of the letters.
l

AA: device model, for example, ATN 910 or ATN 905

BB: site name, for example, SmallCellSiteA

CC: device number, starting from 001

For example, ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001 refers to an ATN 905 numbered 001 at site


SmallCellSiteA.
Parameter

Value

Description

sysname

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

Indicates the NE name.

NOTE

All the NEs involved in this document are named as shown in the following figure.

Figure 3-9 NE names


SmallCellSiteB1

SmallCellSiteA1

Macro Cell
Micro/Pico

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002

Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

IPRAN

ATN910MacroCellSite-003

RNC

Micro/Pico
SmallCellSiteA2

SmallCellSiteB2

Configuration Process
l

Configure the name of the NE as ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001.


sysname ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001

Configure the name of the NE as ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002.


sysname ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002

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Configure the name of the NE as ATN910-MacroCellSite-003.


sysname ATN910-MacroCellSite-003

3.3.2 Configuring the VTY User Interface


To log in to an ATN device remotely, you can configure the virtual type terminal (VTY) user
interface to ensure equipment security.

Data Planning
To log in to an ATN device in telnet or Secure Shell (SSH) mode, you can configure the VTY
user interface to ensure equipment security. The following parameters are involved: the
maximum number of VTY user interfaces, user authentication mode, user privilege, and VTY
attributes.
l

By setting the maximum number of VTY user interfaces, you can limit the number of users
who can log in to the ATN device concurrently.

By setting the user authentication mode, you can enhance the equipment security. The user
authentication mode can be set to AAA authentication or password authentication.
1.

The AAA authentication mode is based on users, ensuring high security. To log in to
the ATN device, you need to enter the user name and password.

2.

The password authentication mode is based on VTY channels, requiring simple


configuration while ensuring high security. You only need to be create a login
password.

By setting the user privilege, you can differentiate the access rights of different users on
the ATN device to enhance the management security. User privileges are divided into 16
levels, which are numbered 0 to 15. A larger value indicates a higher user privilege.

You can configure the VTY attributes of a VTY user interface, such as the timeout interval
of communication failure for login users. Each VTY attribute on the VTY user interface
has a default value on the ATN device. You can re-configure the terminal attributes as
required.
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Parameter

Value

Description

user-interface
maximum-vty

15

Sets the maximum number of


users that are allowed to log
in to the NE to 15.
NOTE
When the value of this
parameter is set to 0, no user
(even the NMS user) can log in
to the ATN device through the
VTY user interface.

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Parameter

Value

Description

user-interface

vty 0 14

Indicates that the maximum


number of VTY user
interfaces is the total number
of users that have logged in to
the NE through Telnet or
STelnet.

authentication-mode

aaa

Sets the authentication mode


to AAA authentication for
users that attempt to log in to
the NE.

protocol inbound

ssh

Specifies the login protocol


supported by the VTY user
interface to SSH.

user privilege

level 3

Specifies the command level


to level 3.

idle-timeout

50

Sets the timeout interval of


communication failure for
login users.

Configuration Process
Perform the following configurations on all ATN devices:
1.

Set the maximum number of VTY user interfaces.


user-interface maximum-vty 15 //Set the maximum number of VTY user interfaces
that are allowed to log in to the NE at the same time.

2.

Configure VTY attributes.


user-interface vty 0 14 //Perform configurations for VTY 0 to VTY 14.
protocol inbound ssh
authentication-mode aaa
user privilege level 3
idle-timeout 5 0

3.3.3 Configuring AAA Users


If the user authentication mode is set to AAA authentication on an ATN device, you need to
configure user names and passwords on the ATN device to manage and authenticate users.

Data Planning
If the user authentication mode is set to AAA authentication in an ATN device, a user needs to
keep the login user name and password properly, and uses them to log in to the ATN device.
The levels of commands that can be used by users logging in to an ATN device concurrently are
determined by the privileges of these users in the AAA configuration.
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NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Parameter

Value

Description

aaa

Enters the AAA view to


create a user, set a user level,
or configure an
authentication scheme, an
authorization scheme, an
accounting scheme, or a
domain, so that the NE
authenticates users.

local-user XXX
password cipher XXX

USER01

Adds a local user USER01.

local-user level

Sets the user level for the


local user. The system
manages commands by
command level. A user can
use only the commands
whose levels are lower than
or equal to the user level.

local-user xxx
service-type xxx

USER01

Sets the access type of local


users to SSH.

Hello@*#123

ssh

Configuration Process
Perform the following configurations on all ATN devices:
aaa
local-user USER01 password cipher Hello@*#123 //Add a local uer (USER01) and set
the password.
local-user USER01 level 3 //Set the user level of the local user.
local-user USER01 service-type ssh //Set the access type for the user.
NOTE

Requirements on user names and passwords for ATN products are as follows:
l A local user name contains 1 to 253 characters.
l A password must contain eight characters at least.
l A password must contain digits, upper-case and lower-case letters, and special characters, excluding
question marks (?) and spaces.
l The password cannot be the same as the user name or the user name in reverse order.

3.3.4 Configuring the SNMP


After the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is configured, the NMS can monitor
and manage NEs.
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Data Planning
The SNMP is a standard network management protocol widely used on TCP/IP networks. The
NMS can manage NEs using the SNMP. Specifically, the SNMP defines several device
management operations that can be performed by the NMS and alarms that can be automatically
sent to the NMS when the ATN equipment is faulty. The NMS uses the management information
base (MIB) to identify and manage devices. The SNMP versions include SNMPv1, SNMPv2c,
and SNMPv3, which are all supported by the ATN 905.
The Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) is a Layer 2 discovery protocol defined in 802.1ab.
When the ATN and its neighbors are all enabled with LLDP, the ATN notifies the neighbors of
its status and obtains the status of the neighbors through LLDP packets. The NMS then can get
information about Layer 2 connection of the ATN. In this manner, the NMS can analyze the
network topology.
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Table 3-2 SNMP parameters

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Parameter

Value

Description

snmp-agent

Enables the SNMP agent


function. By default, the
SNMP agent function is
disabled.

snmp-agent sys-info
version

all

Configures the system to


adopt all the SNMP versions,
namely, SNMPv1,
SNMPv2c, and SNMPv3.

snmp-agent mib-view
included iso-view

iso

Includes the iso subtree in the


SNMP MIB view.

snmp-agent
community read
cipher

Huawei123!

Sets a read community name.


The NMS can access a device
only when the community
name set on the NMS is the
same as that set on the device.

snmp-agent
community write
cipher

Huawei@123

snmp-agent trap
enable

mib-view iso-view

mib-view iso-view

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Sets a write community


name. The NMS can access a
device only when the
community name set on the
NMS is the same as that set
on the device.
Enables all traps on a device.

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Parameter

Value

Description

snmp-agent trap
source

LoopBack0

Configures the LoopBack0


interface as the source
interface that sends trap
messages.

snmp-agent targethost trap

address udp-domain
20.20.20.20

Allows the SNMP agent to


send SNMP trap messages to
the Huawei NMS at
20.20.20.20.

params securityname
Huawei@123 v2c privatenetmanager ext-vb
snmp-agent trap
enable feature-name
lldp

Enables the LLDP trap


function.

snmp-agent extend
error-code

enable

Enables the extended error


code function.

lldp enable

Enables the LLDP function.

Application Process
Perform the following configurations on all ATN devices:
snmp-agent
snmp-agent sys-info version all //Enable SNMP of all versions for the system.
snmp-agent mib-view included iso-view iso //Include the iso subtree SNMP MIB
view.
snmp-agent community read cipher Huawei123! mib-view iso-view
snmp-agent community write cipher Huawei@123 mib-view iso-view //Set the read and
write permissions for the write attributes. When the read entity name and write
entity name are the same, the write attribute command will override the read
attribute command.
snmp-agent trap enable
snmp-agent target-host trap address udp-domain 20.20.20.20 params securityname
Huawei@123 v2c private-netmanager ext-vb //When the management plane is deployed
on public network routes, SNMP trap messages can be sent to the U2000 at management
IP address 20.20.20.20 using entity name Huawei@123. If an NMS provided by Huawei
is used, configure private-netmanager and ext-vb.
snmp-agent trap source LoopBack0 //Set the source interface for trap messages.
snmp-agent trap enable feature-name lldp
snmp-agent extend error-code enable
lldp enable

3.4 Deploying the Management Plane


The management plane is an exclusive logical channel that is used to transmit management
packets between NEs on an ATN network. Logical channels of the management plane and other
planes, such as the service plane, are separated, so devices can still be managed when the other
planes become abnormal.

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3.4.1 Configuration Roadmap


This topic describes the configuration roadmap for the management plane.
Traditional management and service packets are closely coupled, making equipment
management more and more complex and costly. Therefore, it is more and more important to
separate the management and service planes. A user operates and manages devices using the
management plane and deploys services using other planes, such as the service plane. That is,
the logical channels of the management plane and other planes are separated. When the
management plane becomes abnormal, other planes can still be used; when other planes become
abnormal, devices can still be managed.
The configuration roadmap is as follows:
l

Establish a management plane between the ATN 905 and the CSG based on public network
static routes.

3.4.2 Data Planning


This topic describes data planning for the management plane configuration.

Data Planning
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values and precautions in this example are for reference only.

Figure 3-10 Management plane configuration diagram


GE0/2/0.1 dot1q 1 192.168.1.21/30
Macro Cell

GE0/2/1.1 dot1q 1
192.168.1.9/30
GE0/2/1.1 dot1q 1
192.168.1.10/30
Loopback0
128.4.11.11/32

IPRAN

GE0/2/0
GE0/2/0
Loopback0
128.4.12.12/32

Loopback0
128.4.13.13/32

RNC/SGW

GE0/2/0.1 dot1q 1 192.168.1.22/30

Table 3-3 Interface planning table


NE Name

Interface

IP Address

VPN

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

Loopback0

128.4.11.11 32

GigabitEthernet
0/2/1.1

192.168.1.9 30

vlan-type dot1q 1
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NE Name

Interface

IP Address

VPN

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002

Loopback0

128.4.12.12 32

GigabitEthernet
0/2/0.1

192.168.1.21 30

192.168.1.10 30

Loopback0

128.4.13.13 32

GigabitEthernet0/2/0.
1

192.168.1.22 30

vlan-type dot1q 1
GigabitEthernet
0/2/1.1
vlan-type dot1q 1
ATN910MacroCellSite-003

vlan-type dot1q 1

3.4.3 Configuring the Management Plane


This topic describes how to configure the management plane.

Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.1
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 1
ip address 192.168.1.9 30

Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.1
description ToNext905
vlan-type dot1q 1
ip address 192.168.1.10 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.1
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 1
ip address 192.168.1.21 30

Configuring ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.1
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 1
ip address 192.168.1.22 30

3.5 Deploying VRF Lite Services


This topic describes how to deploy VRF Lite services.

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3.5.1 Configuration Roadmap


This topic describes the configuration roadmap for local VPN routing and forwarding (VRF)
instances.
Usually multiple users share a device. When a user wants to keep the internal network topology
and address allocation plan from other users, network addresses and routing information of
different users need to be separated to ensure security. Logically, each PE can be divided into
multiple virtual routers, that is, multiple VRF instances. Each VRF instance corresponds to a
VPN and has its own routing table, forwarding table, and corresponding interfaces. In this
manner, a PE shared by multiple VPNs is simulated as multiple exclusive PEs and the routing
information exchanged between the PE and CE is related to a specific VPN. In this manner,
VPN routes are separated.
Although VRF instances are usually used with Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS), VRF
instances can be used alone. VRF Lite is a typical example. VRF Lite indicates that VRF
instances are supported on the CE. The following provides an example:
Three departments of an enterprise branch are required to be isolated from each other and each
department is connected to the PE through a CE. That is, the enterprise branch requires 3 egress
routers and 3 links leading to the PE, and the PE needs to provide 3 interfaces for the enterprise
branch. In this case, port and link resources are wasted and costs increase. To resolve this
problem, VRF Lite is introduced. That is, VRF instances are configured on the CE. The following
figure shows the networking mode. The enterprise branch needs only 1 CE to connect to the PE,
VRF instances are configured on the CE, and the CE interfaces for the 3 departments are bound
to VRF instances. In addition, the CE connects to the PE through only 1 physical link and
subinterfaces of the CE interface are bound to VRF instances. In this manner, corresponding
VRF instances are logically connected on the CE and PE, so the PE and CE can run a routing
protocol in each VRF instance to exchange VPN routes.
Figure 3-11 L3VPN configuration roadmap
VRF1

VRF2

Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN

ATN 905
CSG

VRF2

VRF1

RNC

Main interface
Dot1q sub-interface
VRF1 service flow
VRF2 service flow

The preceding figure shows how to configure VRF instances. The configuration roadmap is as
follows:
l

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Use different VPNs to carry data flows of different users and bind AC interfaces on the
ATN 905 to VRF instances.
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NOTE

1. When services need to be isolated at station access devices, create multiple VRFs on the ATN 905
and CSG devices so that different services use their own VRFs. The VRFs must be the same as those
configured on the macro base station.
2. When services do not need to be isolated at station access devices, create and configure only one VRF
on the ATN 905 and CSG devices so that different services use the same VRF.

Configure dotlq subinterfaces for the interfaces connecting the ATN 905 devices and the
CSG and bind these subinterfaces to VRF instances.

3.5.2 Data Planning


This topic describes data planning required for service deployment.
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions such as network scale and topology. The following
recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Figure 3-12 Data planning for service deployment


GE0/2/1.2 172.21.1.9/30 dot1q 2 VRF1
GE0/2/1.3 192.168.1.9/30 dot1q 3 VRF2
10.182.1.4/32(VRF2)
10.224.1.4/32(VRF2)

10.182.1.1/32(VRF1)
10.224.1.1/32(VRF1)

GE0/2/0.2 172.21.1.21/30 dot1q 2 VRF1


GE0/2/0.3 192.168.1.21/30 dot1q 3 VRF2
Macro Cell

192.168.1.18

172.21.1.6
172.21.1.5
GE0/2/2

192.168.1.17
GE0/2/2
GE0/2/0

GE0/2/1
GE0/2/1

192.168.1.1
GE0/2/3
192.168.1.2

IPRAN

GE0/2/0
GE0/2/3
172.21.1.13

RNC/SGW

172.21.1.14
GE0/2/1.2 172.21.1.10/30 dot1q 2 VRF1
GE0/2/1.3 192.168.1.10/30 dot1q 3 VRF2
10.182.1.2/32(VRF2)
10.224.1.2/32(VRF2)

GE0/2/0.2 172.21.1.22/30 dot1q 2 VRF1


GE0/2/0.3 192.168.1.22/30 dot1q 3 VRF2

10.182.1.3/32(VRF1)
10.224.1.3/32(VRF1)

Table 3-4 Network segment planning

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Network Segment

Remarks

10.182.1.0/24

IP address of a small-cell wireless base


station for voice services

10.224.1.0/24

IP address of a small-cell wireless base


station for data services

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Network Segment

Remarks

172.21.1.0/24(VRF1)

IP address of the access link for all small-cell


base stations connected to one macro base
station.

192.168.1.0/24(VRF2)

IP address of the access link for all small-cell


base stations connected to one macro base
station.

Table 3-5 Interface planning


NE Name

NE
Name

Interface

IP Address

VPN

Remarks

SmallCellSi
teA

SmallC
ellSiteA
1

loopback0

10.182.1.1/32

VRF1

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
A1 for voice
services

loopback1

10.224.1.1/32

VRF1

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
A1 for data
services

loopback0

10.182.1.2/32

VRF2

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
A2 for voice
services

loopback1

10.224.1.2/32

VRF2

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
A2 for data
services

GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/1.2

172.21.1.9/30

VRF1

NNI on a
backhaul
device

192.168.1.9/30

VRF2

NNI on a
backhaul
device

SmallC
ellSiteA
2

ATN90
5SmallC
ellSiteA
-001

vlan-type
dot1q 2
GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/1.3
vlan-type
dot1q 3

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NE Name

SmallCellSi
teB

NE
Name

SmallC
ellSiteB
1

SmallC
ellSiteB
2

ATN90
5SmallC
ellSiteB
-002

3 Solution 1: Native IP VRF Static Route Access

Interface

IP Address

VPN

Remarks

GigabitEth
ernet 0/2/2

172.21.1.5/30

VRF1

To NE
SmallCellSite
A1

GigabitEth
ernet 0/2/3

192.168.1.1/30

VRF2

To NE
SmallCellSite
A2

loopback0

10.182.1.4/32

VRF2

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
B1 for voice
services

loopback1

10.224.1.4/32

VRF2

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
B1 for data
services

loopback0

10.182.1.3/32

VRF1

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
B2 for voice
services

loopback1

10.224.1.3/32

VRF1

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
B2 for data
services

GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/0.2

172.21.1.21/30

VRF1

To Next905

192.168.1.21/3
0

VRF2

To Next905

172.21.1.10/30

VRF1

NNI on a
backhaul
device

vlan-type
dot1q 2
GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/0.3
vlan-type
dot1q 3
GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/1.2
vlan-type
dot1q 2

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NE Name

NE
Name

3 Solution 1: Native IP VRF Static Route Access

Interface

IP Address

VPN

Remarks

GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/1.3

192.168.1.10/3
0

VRF2

NNI on a
backhaul
device

GigabitEth
ernet 0/2/2

192.168.1.17/3
0

VRF2

To NE
SmallCellSite
B1

GigabitEth
ernet 0/2/3

172.21.1.13/30

VRF1

To NE
SmallCellSite
B2

GE0/2/0.2

172.21.1.22/30

VRF1

To Next905

192.168.1.22/3
0

VRF2

To Next905

vlan-type
dot1q 3

MacroCellS
ite

ATN91
0MacroC
ellSite-0
03

vlan-type
dot1q 2
GE0/2/0.3
vlan-type
dot1q 3

Table 3-6 VRF data planning


NE

VPN
Instance
Name

RD

Remarks

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

VRF1

100:1

VRF2

100:2

Isolates base station data, and


adds each AC port of ATN 905 to
the specific VRF.

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002

VRF1

100:1

VRF2

100:2

ATN910MacroCellSite-003

VRF1

200:1

VRF2

200:2

3.5.3 Configuring VRF Lite Services


This topic describes how to configure VRF Lite to carry services.

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Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
1.

Create a VRF instance.


ip vpn-instance VRF1
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:1
ip vpn-instance VRF2
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:2

2.

Configure subinterfaces and bind them to the VRF instance.


interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.2
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.9 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.3
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 3
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.9 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
description To SmallCellSiteA1
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.5 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
description To SmallCellSiteA2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.1 30

Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
1.

Create a VRF instance.


ip vpn-instance VRF1
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:1
ip vpn-instance VRF2
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:2

2.

Configure subinterfaces and bind them to the VRF instance.


interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.2
description To Next905
vlan-type dot1q 2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.21 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.3
description To Next905
vlan-type dot1q 3
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.21 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.2
description To SmallCellSite
vlan-type dot1q 2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.10 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.3
description To SmallCellSite
vlan-type dot1q 3
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.10 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
description To SmallCellSiteB1
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.17 30

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interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
description To SmallCellSiteB2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.13 30

Configuring ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
1.

Create a VRF instance.


ip vpn-instance VRF1
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 200:1
ip vpn-instance VRF2
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 200:2

2.

Configure subinterfaces and bind them to the VRF instance.


interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.2
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.22 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.3
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 3
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.22 30

3.6 Deploying Static Routes


Static routes, instead of dynamic routes, are sufficient for a simple network to function.

3.6.1 Configuration Roadmap


This topic describes the configuration roadmap for service plane static routes.
Static routes refer to routes that must be manually configured. Static routes are easy to be
configured and have low requirements on the system. On a network with a simple topology,
configuring only static routes allows the network to work properly. However, when the network
undergoes a fault or the network topology changes, static routes will not change automatically
but must be changed by users manually.

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Figure 3-13 Static route configuration diagram


Micro/Pico
Macro Cell

IPRAN
CSG
Micro/Pico

NativeIP

RNC

Configure static routes to


downstream ATN 905 devices, and
to small-cell base stations that are
directly connected to the
downstream ATN 905 devices

Static route

The preceding figure shows how to configure service plane static routes. The configuration
roadmap is as follows:
l

Configure static routes between the ATN 905 and small-cell base stations that are directly
connected to it.

On the ATN 905, configure a static route leading to the downstream ATN 905 and another
one leading to the small-cell base station that is directly connected to the downstream ATN
905. In other words, configure a static route from the ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002 NE to
the ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001 NE and configure a static route from the ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001 NE to its connected small-cell base station.

Configure a default route in the upstream direction of the ATN 905.

On the CSG, configure static routes to each small-cell base station.

3.6.2 Data Planning


This topic describes data planning for static route configuration.
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

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Figure 3-14 Static route configuration diagram


GE0/2/1.2 172.21.1.9/30 dot1q 2 VRF1
GE0/2/1.3 192.168.1.9/30 dot1q 3 VRF2
10.182.1.4 32(VRF2)
10.224.1.4 32(VRF2)

10.182.1.1 32(VRF1)
10.224.1.132(VRF1)

GE0/2/0.2 172.21.1.10/30 dot1q 2 VRF1

Configure a GE0/2/0.3 192.168.1.10/30 dot1q 3 VRF2


default route in
the upstream
Macro Cell
direction
192.168.1.18

172.21.1.6
172.21.1.5
GE0/2/2

192.168.1.17
GE0/2/2
GE0/2/1

GE0/2/0
GE0/2/1

192.168.1.1
GE0/2/3
192.168.1.2

GE0/2/0
GE0/2/3
172.21.1.13

Configure a default route


in the upstream direction

RNC/SGW

172.21.1.14

GE0/2/1.2 172.21.1.21/30 dot1q 2 VRF1


GE0/2/1.3 192.168.1.21/30 dot1q 3 VRF2
10.182.1.2 32(VRF2)
10.224.1.2 32(VRF2)

IPRAN

GE0/2/0.2 172.21.1.22/30 dot1q 2 VRF1


GE0/2/0.3 192.168.1.22/30 dot1q 3 VRF2

10.182.1.3 32(VRF1)
10.224.1.3 32(VRF1)

Table 3-7 Interface planning table

Issue 03 (2013-11-22)

NE Name

Destination IP
Address

Next Hop

VPN

Remarks

ATN905SmallCellSite
A-001

10.182.1.1/32

172.21.1.6

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
1 for voice
services

10.224.1.1/32

172.21.1.6

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
1 for data
services

10.182.1.2/32

192.168.1.2

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
2 for voice
services

10.224.1.2/32

192.168.1.2

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
2 for data
services

0.0.0.0

172.21.1.21

VRF1

VRF1-based
default upstream
route

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NE Name

ATN905SmallCellSite
B-002

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Destination IP
Address

Next Hop

VPN

Remarks

0.0.0.0

192.168.1.21

VRF2

VRF2-based
default upstream
route

10.182.1.3/32

172.21.1.18

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteB2
for voice
services

10.224.1.3/32

172.21.1.18

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteB2
for data services

10.182.1.4/32

192.168.1.14

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteB1
for voice
services

10.224.1.4/32

192.168.1.14

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteB1
for data services

10.182.1.1/32

172.21.1.9

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
1 for voice
services

10.224.1.1/32

172.21.1.9

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
1 for data
services

10.182.1.2/32

192.168.1.9

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
2 for voice
services

10.224.1.2/32

192.168.1.9

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
2 for data
services

0.0.0.0

172.21.1.22

VRF1

VRF1-based
default upstream
route

0.0.0.0

192.168.1.22

VRF2

VRF2-based
default upstream
route

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NE Name

Destination IP
Address

Next Hop

VPN

Remarks

ATN910MacroCellSit
e-003

10.182.1.3/32

172.21.1.21

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteB2
for voice
services

10.224.1.3/32

172.21.1.21

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteB2
for data services

10.182.1.4/32

192.168.1.21

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteB1
for voice
services

10.224.1.4/32

192.168.1.21

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteB1
for data services

10.182.1.1/32

172.21.1.21

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
1 for voice
services

10.224.1.1/32

172.21.1.21

VRF1

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
1 for data
services

10.182.1.2/32

192.168.1.21

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmallCellSiteA
2 for voice
services

10.224.1.2/32

192.168.1.21

VRF2

IP address of NE
SmalloCellSite
A2 for carrying
data services

3.6.3 Configuring Static Routes


This topic describes the method of configuring static routes.
Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
l

Configure static routes to small-cell base stations that are directly connected.
ip route-static vpn-instance VRF1 10.182.1.1 32 172.21.1.6////Sets a static
route with the destination IP address as 10.182.1.1 and the next-hop address
as 172.21.1.6.
ip route-static vpn-instance VRF1 10.224.1.1 32 172.21.1.6

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ip route-static vpn-instance VRF2 10.182.1.2 32 192.168.1.2


ip route-static vpn-instance VRF2 10.224.1.2 32 192.168.1.2

Configure a default route in the upstream direction.


ip route-static vpn-instance VRF1 0.0.0.0 0 172.21.1.10
ip route-static vpn-instance VRF2 0.0.0.0 0 192.168.1.10

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
l

Configure static routes to small-cell base stations that are directly connected.
ip
ip
ip
ip

vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance

VRF1
VRF1
VRF2
VRF2

10.182.1.3
10.224.1.3
10.182.1.4
10.224.1.4

32
32
32
32

172.21.1.14
172.21.1.14
192.168.1.14
192.168.1.14

Configure static routes to the small-cell base stations that the downstream ATN 905 directly
connected.
ip
ip
ip
ip

route-static
route-static
route-static
route-static

route-static
route-static
route-static
route-static

vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance

VRF1
VRF1
VRF2
VRF2

10.182.1.1
10.224.1.1
10.182.1.2
10.224.1.2

32
32
32
32

172.21.1.9
172.21.1.9
192.168.1.9
192.168.1.9

Configure a default route in the upstream direction.


ip route-static vpn-instance VRF1 0.0.0.0 0 172.21.1.22
ip route-static vpn-instance VRF2 0.0.0.0 0 192.168.1.22

Configure NE ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
l

Configure static routes to the small-cell base stations that the downstream ATN 905 directly
connected.
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip

route-static
route-static
route-static
route-static
route-static
route-static
route-static
route-static

vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance

VRF1
VRF1
VRF2
VRF2
VRF1
VRF1
VRF2
VRF2

10.182.1.1
10.224.1.1
10.182.1.2
10.224.1.2
10.182.1.3
10.224.1.3
10.182.1.4
10.224.1.4

32
32
32
32
32
32
32
32

172.21.1.21
172.21.1.21
192.168.1.21
192.168.1.21
172.21.1.21
172.21.1.21
192.168.1.21
192.168.1.21

Configure a route to the private network.


bgp 100
ipv4-family vpn-instance IPRAN1
import-route static//Configures BGP to import static routes.
ipv4-family vpn-instance IPRAN2
import-route static

3.6.4 Checking Static Route Configurations


After completing static route configuration, you can check the configurations.
#Query detailed route information.
l

Run display ip routing-table vpn-instance to query the brief information about the IPv4
route table.

Run display ip routing-table vpn-instance verbose to query the detailed information about
the IPv4 route table.

#Use the Ping command to check the connectivity.


Run the ping command on the access device at a macro base station to verify the connectivity.
The destination address ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001 is the IP address of the interface
connecting the small-cell base station to the macro base station.
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[HUAWEI]ping -v -vpn-instance VRF1 172.21.1.5


LSP PING FEC: IPV4 PREFIX 172.21.1.5/30 : 100 data bytes, press
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=100 Sequence=1 time = 4 ms Return
1
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=100 Sequence=2 time = 4 ms Return
1
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=100 Sequence=3 time = 4 ms Return
1
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=100 Sequence=4 time = 4 ms Return
1
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=100 Sequence=5 time = 5 ms Return
1
--- FEC: IPV4 PREFIX 172.21.1.5/32 ping statistics --5 packet(s) transmitted
5 packet(s) received
0.00% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 4/4/5 ms

CTRL_C to break
Code 3, Subcode
Code 3, Subcode
Code 3, Subcode
Code 3, Subcode
Code 3, Subcode

3.7 Deploying QoS


You can deploy quality of service (QoS) on a carrier network to provide differentiated QoS
assurance as required.

3.7.1 Configuring QoS


You can configure simple traffic classification to classify data packets into multiple priorities
or service classes, and therefore to provide differentiated services.

Configuration Roadmap
Traditional IP networks in best-effort mode are mainly used to carry data services, and the service
quality seems insignificant. However, with fast development of IP-oriented Internet services and
emerging of various new services (such as VoIP and VPN services), IP networks have changed
from pure data networks to bearer networks with commercial values. Therefore, IP networks
must ensure the quality of each type of service that they carry. Against this backdrop, quality of
service (QoS) is developed.
The ATN 905 functions as a small-cell base station bearer device or enterprise private line
Ethernet demarcation device (EDD). When configured with simple traffic classification, the
ATN 905 can manage the traffic. Priority mapping based on simple traffic classification indicates
that the priority of the packets on a network is mapped into the packets of another network so
that the packets of the first network can be transmitted on the second network based on the
original or user-defined packet priority. That is, on the ingress, the packets obtain the priority
and color for scheduling on the ATN equipment based on the values of the DSCP and 802.1p
fields. After being scheduled on the ATN equipment, the outgoing packets obtain the values of
the priority fields (such as DSCP and 802.1p) for encapsulation based on the above-mentioned
priority and color. In this manner, during traffic management, packets of different services join
different queues, ensuring differentiated scheduling.
To configure simple traffic classification, do as follows:
l

Issue 03 (2013-11-22)

Bind the default DiffServ domain to service interfaces (including main interfaces and
subinterfaces) of the ATN 905 to configure simple traffic classification.

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Data Planning
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions such as network scale and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Parameter

Value

Description

trust upstream

default

Bind the DiffServ domain to


an interface.

Application Process
l

For ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
interface GE0/2/1.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/1.3
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/3
trust upstream default

For ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
interface GE0/2/0.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/0.3
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/1.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/1.3
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/3
trust upstream default

For ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
interface GE0/2/0.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/0.3
trust upstream default

3.8 Deploying the Clock


You are advised to use a clock synchronization solution based on actual clock synchronization
requirements.

3.8.1 Configuration Roadmap


Synchronization includes frequency synchronization and phase synchronization. In this solution,
you are advised to configure synchronous Ethernet and IEEE 1588v2 on the ATN 905 to achieve
frequency synchronization and phase synchronization respectively.
To ensure that most services run normally on a current communication network, devices on the
entire network should keep the frequency or phase difference within a permitted range. That is,
synchronization, either frequency synchronization or phase synchronization, must be ensured
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on the network. Frequency synchronization (also known as clock synchronization) indicates that
signals retain certain relationships with respect to the phase. That is, the phase difference between
signals is constant. Phase synchronization (also known as time synchronization) indicates that
signals have the same frequency and phase. That is, there is no phase difference between signals.
For example, if two watches always indicate the same time, they are in phase synchronization;
if the two watches always have a constant time difference (such as 6 hours), they are in frequency
synchronization. In the IP RAN scenario, the ATN equipment needs to support frequency or
phase synchronization to meet the requirements of base stations.
Mainstream PSN-based synchronization technologies in the industry include IEEE 1588v2 and
synchronous Ethernet. In this solution, you are advised to configure synchronous Ethernet and
IEEE 1588v2 on the ATN 905 to achieve frequency synchronization and phase synchronization
respectively.
Figure 3-15 Networking diagram for clock deployment
Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico

BITS

GE0/2/2
GE0/2/3

pri 20
GE0/2/1

GE0/2/2
GE0/2/1

pri 20
GE0/2/0 GE0/2/0

ASG
pri 10

RSG

GE0/2/3

Clock Tracking Path


pri n

Priority of a reference clock source at a port

The preceding figure shows how to configure a clock. The configuration roadmap is as follows:
l

Enable synchronous Ethernet and IEEE 1588v2 for the ATN 905, so that the ATN 905 can
track the upstream clock information and time information, and send them to base stations.

3.8.2 Data Planning


This topic describes data planning for clock deployment.
l

For synchronous Ethernet, configure clock signal priorities in the local priority list, and
enable synchronization status message (SSM) control.
NOTE

For synchronous Ethernet clock synchronization, a clock source is selected based on the following
descending order of priority: SSM clock quality, local priority setting, and clock source type.
l The SSM clock quality levels are in the following descending order: primary reference clock (PRC),
SSUA, SSUB, SDH equipment clock (SEC), and DNU. A source for which no quality level is defined,
and a clock source with quality level being DNU, are not be selected during source selection.
l The local priority is configured as follows: The value range is 1 to 255, and a smaller value indicates
a higher priority.

l
Issue 03 (2013-11-22)

For IEEE 1588v2, use the best master clock (BMC) algorithm.
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NOTE

When the BMC algorithm is used by a 1588v2-enabled device for master clock selection, priority1 of each
candidate time source is compared first, then the clock class, clock accuracy, and priority2. If priority1 of
candidate time sources is the same, the clock class is compared, and so on. The time source with the highest
priority is selected as the master clock.

Table 3-8 Data planning for synchronous Ethernet time synchronization


NE Name

Parameter

Value

Remarks

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

Local priority
list

20

Clock output
port

GE0/2/2

Connects to a base station.

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002
ATN910MacroCellSite-003

GE0/2/3

Table 3-9 Data planning for IEEE 1588v2 time synchronization


NE Name

Parameter

Value

Remarks

ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001

Port delay
measurement
mechanism

delay

The mechanism is
recommended to be
set consistently
networkwide.

NE type

BC

The networkwide BC
mode is
recommended.

Ring network
asymmetry automeasurement

enable

Automatically adjusts
the length difference
between transmit and
receive fibers when
ring network
protection switching
occurs for restoration.

Clock output port

GE0/2/2

Connects to a base
station.

ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
ATN910-MacroCellSite-003

GE0/2/3

3.8.3 Configuring Synchronous Ethernet to Achieve Frequency


Synchronization
To achieve frequency synchronization on a network, use synchronous Ethernet.

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
clock ethernet-synchronization enable //Enables global synchronous Ethernet in the
system view.

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clock ssm-control on //Configures SSM for source selection. By default, SSM is


enabled for an ATN NE.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
clock priority 20//Assigns a clock priority to the interface. This will affect
clock selection in the inbound direction on the local end. A smaller value
indicates a higher priority. Assigning the highest priority to each interface on
the shortest path for clock signal transmission is recommended.
clock synchronization enable//Enables synchronous Ethernet for an interface.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
clock synchronization enable

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
clock ethernet-synchronization enable
clock ssm-control on
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
clock priority 20
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
clock synchronization enable

Configure NE ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
clock ethernet-synchronization enable
clock ssm-control on
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
clock synchronization enable

3.8.4 Configuring IEEE 1588v2 to Achieve Time Synchronization


After frequency synchronization is achieved on a network using synchronous Ethernet, use IEEE
1588v2 to achieve time synchronization on the network.

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
ptp enable //Enables global IEEE 1588v2.
ptp device-type bc //Specifies the BC mode for all devices.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
ptp delay-mechanism delay //Configures the delay measurement mechanism of a
device as delay which calculates the time difference based on the link delay of the
master and slave clocks.
ptp enable //Enables IEEE 1588v2 for the interface.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
ptp enable
ptp device-type bc
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

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interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

Configure NE ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
ptp enable
ptp device-type bc
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

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Solution 2: Native IP VRF Dynamic Route


Access

About This Chapter


Native IP VRF dynamic route access is applicable to large-sized networks, and mainly adopts
the Native IP service solution. In this solution, management plane packets are transmitted
through DCN private network routes, the Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) is run between ATN
905 devices and access devices in a macro base station, and meanwhile, VRF instances are
configured to isolate services of different carriers.
4.1 Scenario Introduction
This section gives a brief introduction about scenarios, including overview, configuration
roadmap, and data planning.
4.2 Logging In to the ATN 905
This chapter describes how to log in to the ATN 905 for later commissioning. Two login methods,
login by using the console interface and SSH, are introduced.
4.3 Configuring Basic Information
Before configuring services, you need to perform basic configurations, including the device
name, user login parameter, authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA), and Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) configurations, for the devices.
4.4 Configuring the Management Plane
This topic describes the configuration roadmap for the management plane.
4.5 Deploying VRF Lite Services
This topic describes how to deploy VRF Lite services.
4.6 Deploying the IGP
The Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) can be deployed using either of the intermediate system
to intermediate system (IS-IS) or the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol.
4.7 Deploying QoS
You can deploy quality of service (QoS) on a carrier network to provide differentiated QoS
assurance as required.
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4.8 Deploying the Clock


You are advised to use a clock synchronization solution based on actual clock synchronization
requirements.

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4.1 Scenario Introduction


This section gives a brief introduction about scenarios, including overview, configuration
roadmap, and data planning.

Overview
Solution 2: Native IP VRF dynamic route access (native IP + DCN private network
management + dynamic route + VRF access)
Figure 4-1 Example network of native IP VRF dynamic route access
VRF1

VRF2

Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN

ATN 905
CSG

VRF2

VRF1

IGP

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RNC
main interface
Dot1q sub-interface
DCN management
plane
VRF1 service flow
VRF2 service flow

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Table 4-1 Solution information


Solution Feature

Applicable
Scenario

Solution
Advantage

Solution
Constraint

l Service
configurations
for small-cell
base stations:
Native IP

1. Scenario in which
the carrier
solution on the
macro base
station side
adopts the Layer
3 access solution

1. This solution is
applicable to
large-sized
networks.

1. The Interior
Gateway Protocol
(IGP) planning
and maintenance
are required for
this solution.

l Management
plane:
Private network
DCN
l IP route:
IGP route
l Native IP access:
VRF access

2. Different-sized
networks
3. Small-cell base
station providing
access for
multiple wireless
carriers (Services
of different
wireless carriers
are isolated from
each other.)
4. Scenario in which
the network
consists of only
Huawei products
and DCN private
network
management is
used in the
upstream
direction of the
macro base
station

2. This solution
features high
expansibility.
When a new
small-cell base
station is
connected to the
ATN 905, only
the interface
configurations of
the neighbor
backhaul devices
need to be
modified.

2. The network
topology changes
may result in
network flapping.

3. VRF instances
are created for
service isolation.
Wireless devices
are insensible to
VRF instances,
and VLANs and
IP addresses are
planned
independently.

Configuration Roadmap
l

Configure a DCN management plane between the ATN 905 and the macro base station.
NOTE

1. When services need to be isolated at station access devices, create multiple VRFs on the ATN 905
and CSG devices so that different services use their own VRFs. The VRFs must be the same as those
configured on the macro base station.
2. When services do not need to be isolated at station access devices, create and configure only one VRF
on the ATN 905 and CSG devices so that different services use the same VRF.

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Use dot1p sub-interfaces to create VRF-instance-based IP connections between the ATN


905 and the backhaul device in a macro base station.

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Configure an independent IGP process for each VRF instance between the ATN 905 and
the backhaul device in a macro base station.

Deploy simple traffic classification (STC) on each service interface.

Deploy Synchronous Ethernet (SyncE) on the ATN 905 to implement frequency


synchronization; deploy IEEE 1588v2 to implement time synchronization.

Data Planning
Item

Planning Guidelines

Basic configuration
parameters:

You are advised to configure the basic configuration parameters


except NE name in the centralized manner based on the entire
network. In this way, these basic configuration parameters are
planned once for all.

l NE name
l User login parameter
l SNMP
l AAA
Small-cell base station
data:
l Voice services IP
address
l Data services IP
address

1. Different VRF instances need to be configured to isolate


services of different wireless carriers. VRF instances are
planned by wireless carriers.
2. A service IP address pool (32-bit mask) needs to be planned.
3. A management IP address pool (32-bit mask) needs to be
planned.

l VRF
ATN 905 data:

1. A service IP address pool (32-bit mask) needs to be planned.

l IP address of the link


that connects the
small-cell base station
to the ATN 905

2. An IP address pool of links that connect small-cell base


stations to the ATN 905 needs to be planned.

l Management IP
address

3. Each AC port of the ATN 905 needs to be added into the


related VRF instance. The dot1q sub-interfaces between the
backhaul devices are bound to different VRF interfaces to
transmit packets hop by hop.

l VRF
Routes
l Static route:
destination IP
address, next-hop IP
address

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1. Static routes from the ATN 905 to the logical IP address of


the small-cell base station need to be configured.
2. The default route from the ATN 905 to the RNC needs to be
configured.

l IGP: IGP process


number

3. An independent IGP process needs to be configured for each


VRF instance between the ATN 905 and the backhaul device
in a macro base station. Static routes and direct routes are
imported into the IGP area.

QoS

STC is deployed on each service interface of the ATN 905.

Clock

SyncE and 1588v2 functions are enabled on the ATN 905 so that
the ATN 905 traces the clock and time of the upstream device
and transmits the clock signals to base stations.

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4.2 Logging In to the ATN 905


This chapter describes how to log in to the ATN 905 for later commissioning. Two login methods,
login by using the console interface and SSH, are introduced.

4.2.1 Logging In to the ATN by Using SSH


This section describes how to log in to the ATN 905 by using SSH. SSH is a secure remote login
protocol developed based on the traditional Telnet protocol. Compared with Telnet, SSH is
greatly improved in terms of the authentication mode and data transmission security.
Figure 4-2 shows the networking diagram for logging in to the ATN 905 by using SSH.
Figure 4-2 Networking diagram for logging in to the ATN 905 by using SSH

network

SSH Client

SSH Server

Prerequisite
l

The ATN 905 is running properly.

The ATN 905 has been logged in using the console interface and an IP address for each
interface has been configured on the ATN 905.

A direct or reachable route exists between the SSH client and the ATN 905.
NOTE

Perform the following configurations on the ATN 905 that serves as the SSH server. This section describes only
the SSH login by using the PuTTY program.

Procedure
Step 1 As shown in the following figure, set the IP address of the ATN 905 to 192.168.1.1 and the login
protocol to SSH.
NOTE

After the ATN is powered on for the first time, you can log in to it in STelnet mode. The IP address of the
management network interface Ethernet0/0/0 (the console interface) is 129.0.0.1. If the ATN has accessed
the network when it is powered on for the first time, its IP address 129.0.0.1 will be automatically changed
to the IP address that DHCP obtains during the startup.

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Figure 4-3 Login by using the PuTTY program

Step 2 Enter the user name root and the password Changeme_123.
NOTE

After the ATN is powered on for the first time, you can log in to it in STelnet mode. The user name and
password are root and Changeme_123 respectively. After logging in to the ATN, change the default
password in time.

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Figure 4-4 Login using the PuTTY program

----End

4.2.2 Logging In to the ATN by Using the Console Interface


This section describes how to use the HyperTerminal in Windows on the PC to log in to the
ATN 905 after setting up a local configuration environment with the console interface.

Context
Figure 4-5 shows the networking diagram for logging in to the NE80E/40E by using the console
interface.
Figure 4-5 Networking diagram for logging in to the ATN 905 by using the console interface

PC

ATN

Prerequisite
l

The ATN 905 is running properly.

The PC is connected to the ATN 905 through an asynchronous interface.

Installing terminal emulation program on the PC (such as Windows XP HyperTerminal)


NOTE

Perform the following configurations on the HyperTerminal on the PC.


The console port applies the non-standard serial port communication cable sequence. For more information, see
ATN 905Multi-service Access Equipment Installation Guide.

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Procedure
Step 1 Use a serial cable to connect the serial interface on the PC and the console interface on the ATN
905.
For more information about the console interface, see the ATN 905Multi-service Access
EquipmentHardware Description.
Step 2 Start the HyperTerminal on the PC.
Choose Start > Programs > Accessories > Communications to start the HyperTerminal in
Windows.
Step 3 Set up a connection.
As shown in Figure 4-6, enter the name of the new connection in the Name text box, and select
an icon. Then, click OK.
Figure 4-6 Setting up a connection

Step 4 Set a connection port.


In the Connect To dialog box shown in Figure 4-7, select a port from the drop-down list box
of Connect using according to the port actually used on the PC or terminal. Then, click OK.

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Figure 4-7 Setting a connection port

Step 5 Set communication parameters.


When the COM1 Properties dialog box is displayed as shown in Figure 4-8, set the COM1
properties according to the description in Figure 4-8 or by clicking Restore Defaults.
NOTE

l Setting the COM1 properties according to the description in Figure 4-8 and setting them by clicking
Restore Defaults have the same effect. The default settings of the console interface will be used.
l When you log in to the ATN 905 by using the console interface, ensure that the COM1 properties on
the HyperTerminal are consistent with the interface attribute settings on the ATN 905. Otherwise, the
login will fail. This means that if default settings are not used for the interface attributes on the ATN
905, the COM1 properties on the HyperTerminal must be changed to be consistent with the interface
attribute settings on the ATN 905.

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Figure 4-8 Setting communication parameters

----End

Commissioning Result
After the preceding configurations are complete, press Enter. An initial password is required
for the first login. Set an authentication password. The system automatically saves the set
password.
An initial password is required for the first login via the console.
Set a password and keep it safe! Otherwise you will not be able to login via the
console.
Please configure the login password (6-16)
Enter Password:
Confirm Password:

If the login fails, click Disconnect and then Call. If the login still fails, repeat Step 1 to check
whether the parameters or physical connections are correct. If they are correct, log in to the ATN
905 again.

4.3 Configuring Basic Information


Before configuring services, you need to perform basic configurations, including the device
name, user login parameter, authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA), and Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) configurations, for the devices.

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4.3.1 Configuring NE Information


If multiple devices on a network need to be managed, set equipment names to identify each
device.

Data Planning
An NE name consists of the site name, device model, and device number. Each NE is named in
the format of AA-BB-CC. The following provides the meaning of the letters.
l

AA: device model, for example, ATN 910 or ATN 905

BB: site name, for example, SmallCellSiteA

CC: device number, starting from 001

For example, ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001 refers to an ATN 905 numbered 001 at site


SmallCellSiteA.
Parameter

Value

Description

sysname

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

Indicates the NE name.

NOTE

All the NEs involved in this document are named as shown in the following figure.

Figure 4-9 NE names


SmallCellSiteB1

SmallCellSiteA1

Macro Cell
Micro/Pico

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002

Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

IPRAN

ATN910MacroCellSite-003

RNC

Micro/Pico
SmallCellSiteA2

SmallCellSiteB2

Configuration Process
l

Configure the name of the NE as ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001.


sysname ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001

Configure the name of the NE as ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002.


sysname ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002

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Configure the name of the NE as ATN910-MacroCellSite-003.


sysname ATN910-MacroCellSite-003

4.3.2 Configuring the VTY User Interface


To log in to an ATN device remotely, you can configure the virtual type terminal (VTY) user
interface to ensure equipment security.

Data Planning
To log in to an ATN device in telnet or Secure Shell (SSH) mode, you can configure the VTY
user interface to ensure equipment security. The following parameters are involved: the
maximum number of VTY user interfaces, user authentication mode, user privilege, and VTY
attributes.
l

By setting the maximum number of VTY user interfaces, you can limit the number of users
who can log in to the ATN device concurrently.

By setting the user authentication mode, you can enhance the equipment security. The user
authentication mode can be set to AAA authentication or password authentication.
1.

The AAA authentication mode is based on users, ensuring high security. To log in to
the ATN device, you need to enter the user name and password.

2.

The password authentication mode is based on VTY channels, requiring simple


configuration while ensuring high security. You only need to be create a login
password.

By setting the user privilege, you can differentiate the access rights of different users on
the ATN device to enhance the management security. User privileges are divided into 16
levels, which are numbered 0 to 15. A larger value indicates a higher user privilege.

You can configure the VTY attributes of a VTY user interface, such as the timeout interval
of communication failure for login users. Each VTY attribute on the VTY user interface
has a default value on the ATN device. You can re-configure the terminal attributes as
required.
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Parameter

Value

Description

user-interface
maximum-vty

15

Sets the maximum number of


users that are allowed to log
in to the NE to 15.
NOTE
When the value of this
parameter is set to 0, no user
(even the NMS user) can log in
to the ATN device through the
VTY user interface.

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Parameter

Value

Description

user-interface

vty 0 14

Indicates that the maximum


number of VTY user
interfaces is the total number
of users that have logged in to
the NE through Telnet or
STelnet.

authentication-mode

aaa

Sets the authentication mode


to AAA authentication for
users that attempt to log in to
the NE.

protocol inbound

ssh

Specifies the login protocol


supported by the VTY user
interface to SSH.

user privilege

level 3

Specifies the command level


to level 3.

idle-timeout

50

Sets the timeout interval of


communication failure for
login users.

Configuration Process
Perform the following configurations on all ATN devices:
1.

Set the maximum number of VTY user interfaces.


user-interface maximum-vty 15 //Set the maximum number of VTY user interfaces
that are allowed to log in to the NE at the same time.

2.

Configure VTY attributes.


user-interface vty 0 14 //Perform configurations for VTY 0 to VTY 14.
protocol inbound ssh
authentication-mode aaa
user privilege level 3
idle-timeout 5 0

4.3.3 Configuring AAA Users


If the user authentication mode is set to AAA authentication on an ATN device, you need to
configure user names and passwords on the ATN device to manage and authenticate users.

Data Planning
If the user authentication mode is set to AAA authentication in an ATN device, a user needs to
keep the login user name and password properly, and uses them to log in to the ATN device.
The levels of commands that can be used by users logging in to an ATN device concurrently are
determined by the privileges of these users in the AAA configuration.
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NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Parameter

Value

Description

aaa

Enters the AAA view to


create a user, set a user level,
or configure an
authentication scheme, an
authorization scheme, an
accounting scheme, or a
domain, so that the NE
authenticates users.

local-user XXX
password cipher XXX

USER01

Adds a local user USER01.

local-user level

Sets the user level for the


local user. The system
manages commands by
command level. A user can
use only the commands
whose levels are lower than
or equal to the user level.

local-user xxx
service-type xxx

USER01

Sets the access type of local


users to SSH.

Hello@*#123

ssh

Configuration Process
Perform the following configurations on all ATN devices:
aaa
local-user USER01 password cipher Hello@*#123 //Add a local uer (USER01) and set
the password.
local-user USER01 level 3 //Set the user level of the local user.
local-user USER01 service-type ssh //Set the access type for the user.
NOTE

Requirements on user names and passwords for ATN products are as follows:
l A local user name contains 1 to 253 characters.
l A password must contain eight characters at least.
l A password must contain digits, upper-case and lower-case letters, and special characters, excluding
question marks (?) and spaces.
l The password cannot be the same as the user name or the user name in reverse order.

4.3.4 Configuring the SNMP


Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) needs to be configured so that devices can be
managed by the network management system (NMS). This topic describes how to configure the
SNMP.
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Data Planning
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions such as network scale and topology. The
following recommended values and precautions in this example are only for reference.

Table 4-2 SNMP parameters


Parameter

Value

Description

snmp-agent

The SNMP agent function is


enabled. By default, the
SNMP agent function is
disabled.

snmp-agent sys-info
version

v2c

This parameter indicates the


SNMP version, which is set
to V2C.

snmp-agent mib-view
included iso-view

iso

The SNMP MIB view


contains the iso subtree.

snmp-agent
community read
cipher

Huawei123!

This parameter indicates a


read community name. The
NMS can gain access to a
device only when the
community names set on the
NMS are the same as those
set on the device.

snmp-agent
community write
cipher

Huawei@123

snmp-agent trap
enable

This parameter indicates a


command used to enable all
traps on a device.

snmp-agent trap
source

NNI

This parameter indicates a


command used to configure
the NNI interface as the
source interface that sends
trap messages.

snmp-agent targethost trap

address udp-domain
20.20.20.20

This parameter indicates a


command that allows the
SNMP agent to send SNMP
trap messages to the Huawei
NMS with 20.20.20.20.

mib-view iso-view

mib-view iso-view

params securityname
Huawei@123 v2c privatenetmanager ext-vb

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This parameter indicates a


write community name. The
NMS can gain access to a
device only when the
community names set on the
NMS are the same as those
set on the device.

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Parameter

Value

Description

snmp-agent trap
enable feature-name
lldp

This parameter indicates a


command used to enable the
Link Layer Discovery
Protocol (LLDP) trap
function.

ftp client-source i

NNI

This parameter indicates a


command used to configure
the NNI interface as the
source interface of the FTP
client.

Configuration Process
Configure the SNMP as follows:
#
snmp-agent
snmp-agent sys-info version all//Configure the system to use SNMP of all versions.
snmp-agent mib-view included iso-view iso//The SNMP MIB view contains the iso
subtree.
snmp-agent community read cipher Huawei123! mib-view iso-view
snmp-agent community write cipher Huawei@123 mib-view iso-view//The write attribute
includes the read-write permission. When the read community name is consistent with
the write community name, the command line of the read attribute will be
overwritten by the command line of the write attribute.
snmp-agent trap enable
snmp-agent target-host trap address udp-domain 20.20.20.20 vpn-instance
__dcn_vpn__ params securityname Huawei@123 v2c private-netmanager ext-vb//When the
management plane traverses a DCN private network channel, SNMP trap messages can be
sent to the IP address 20.20.20.20 of the U2000. In this scenario, the community
name Huawei@123 is used. If the U2000 is used, you are advised to set parameters
private-netmanager and ext-vb.
snmp-agent trap source LoopBack1024//Specify a source interface that sends trap
packets.
snmp-agent trap enable feature-name lldp

4.4 Configuring the Management Plane


This topic describes the configuration roadmap for the management plane.

4.4.1 Configuring the Management Plane


This topic describes the configuration roadmap for the management plane.

Configuration Roadmap
Traditional management and service packets are closely coupled, making equipment
management more and more complex and costly. Therefore, it is more and more important to
separate the management and service planes. A user operates and manages devices using the
management plane and deploys services using other planes, such as the service plane. That is,
the logical channels of the management plane and other planes are separated. When the
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management plane becomes abnormal, other planes can still be used; when other planes become
abnormal, devices can still be managed.
The ATN-supported private network DCN, an exclusive logical channel independent from the
control and service planes, is used to transmit management packets between NEs. Currently, an
independent service VPN (the VPN instance is named __dcn_vpn__) is occupied. This VPN is
only used to transit management packets and cannot be occupied by user services. The DCN is
independent from the control plane, which indicates that the logical channel can be automatically
established without extra service control signaling and routes. Therefore, management packets
can be transmitted. The DCN is independent from the service plane, which indicates that the
logical channel is unrelated to services. That is, the logical channel is available no matter whether
services are available. Therefore, after the ATN equipment is powered on, DCN automatically
becomes available and management packets can be transmitted.
The configuration roadmap is as follows:
l

Establish a management plane between the ATN 905 and the CSG based on private network
DCN channels.
NOTE

After DCN is enabled on the ATN equipment, the following configuration is generated by default:
#
interface LoopBack1023
description DCN loopback interface
ip binding vpn-instance __dcn_vpn__
ip address 100.4.12.12 255.255.255.255
#
ospf 65534 vpn-instance __dcn_vpn__
description DCN ospf create by default
opaque-capability enable
hostname
vpn-instance-capability simple
area 0.0.0.0
network 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255
#
dcn
ne-ip 100.4.12.12 255.255.255.255

Data Planning
When being initialized, each NE on a DCN automatically generates an NE IP address that maps
the default NE ID, diffuses the NE ID and NE IP address through the Open Shortest Path First
(OSPF) protocol, and automatically generates a core routing table that indicates the mapping
between the NE IP and NE IP address. In this manner, NEs can communicate with each other.
That is, management channels can be interconnected without any user operations. However, on
actual networks, some users can re-plan the NE ID and NE IP address as required instead of
using the default ones.

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Parameter

Value

Remarks

NEID

It is set before the device is


delivered and can be planned
and changed as required.

By default, the NE ID and NE


IP address are associated.
After the NE ID is changed,
the NE IP address will also
change; after the NE IP
address is changed, the NE
ID will not change.
After the NE IP address is
changed, the default
association between the NE
ID and NE IP address no
longer exists. If the NE ID is
changed later, the NE IP
address will not change
accordingly.

It is set before the device is


delivered and can be planned
and changed as required.

NEIP

All NE IP addresses are in the


128.0.0.0/8 network
segment.

Configuration Process
Re-plan the NE ID and NE IP address.
set neid 9a0005//Set the NE ID in the user view.
dcn
ne-ip 128.9.160.5 255.255.255.0//Set the NE IP address in the DCN view.

4.5 Deploying VRF Lite Services


This topic describes how to deploy VRF Lite services.

4.5.1 Configuration Roadmap


This topic describes the configuration roadmap for VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) Lite.
Usually multiple users share a device. When a user wants to keep the internal network topology
and address allocation plan from other users, network addresses and routing information of
different users need to be separated to ensure security. Logically, each PE can be divided into
multiple virtual routers, that is, multiple VRF instances. Each VRF instance corresponds to a
VPN and has its own routing table, forwarding table, and corresponding interfaces. In this
manner, a PE shared by multiple VPNs is simulated as multiple exclusive PEs and the routing
information exchanged between the PE and CE is related to a specific VPN. In this manner,
VPN routes are separated.
Although VRF instances are usually used with Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS), VRF
instances can be used alone. VRF Lite is a typical example. VRF Lite indicates that VRF
instances are supported on the CE. The following provides an example:
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Three departments of an enterprise branch are required to be isolated from each other and each
department is connected to the PE through a CE. That is, the enterprise branch requires 3 egress
routers and 3 links leading to the PE, and the PE needs to provide 3 interfaces for the enterprise
branch. In this case, port and link resources are wasted and costs increase. To resolve this
problem, VRF Lite is introduced. That is, VRF instances are configured on the CE. The following
figure shows the networking mode. The enterprise branch needs only 1 CE to connect to the PE,
VRF instances are configured on the CE, and the CE interfaces for the 3 departments are bound
to VRF instances. In addition, the CE connects to the PE through only 1 physical link and link
subinterfaces are bound to VRF instances. In this manner, corresponding VRF instances are
logically connected on the CE and PE, so the PE and CE can run a routing protocol in each VRF
instance to exchange VPN routes.
Figure 4-10 Networking diagram for L3VPN deployment
VRF1

VRF2

Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN

ATN 905
CSG

VRF2

VRF1

RNC

Main interface
Dot1q sub-interface
VRF1 service flow
VRF2 service flow

The preceding figure shows how to configure VRF instances. The configuration roadmap is as
follows:
l

Use different VPNs to carry data flows of different users and bind AC interfaces on the
ATN 905 to VRF instances.

Configure dotlq subinterfaces for the interfaces connecting the ATN 905 devices and the
CSG and bind these subinterfaces to VRF instances.

4.5.2 Data Planning


This topic describes data planning required for service deployment.
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions such as network scale and topology. The following
recommended values in this example are only for reference.

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Figure 4-11 Data planning for service deployment


GE0/2/1.2 172.21.1.9/30 dot1q 2 VRF1
GE0/2/1.3 192.168.1.9/30 dot1q 3 VRF2
10.182.1.4/32(VRF2)
10.224.1.4/32(VRF2)

10.182.1.1/32(VRF1)
10.224.1.1/32(VRF1)

GE0/2/0.2 172.21.1.21/30 dot1q 2 VRF1


GE0/2/0.3 192.168.1.21/30 dot1q 3 VRF2
Macro Cell

192.168.1.18

172.21.1.6
172.21.1.5
GE0/2/2

192.168.1.17
GE0/2/2
GE0/2/1

GE0/2/0
GE0/2/1

192.168.1.1
GE0/2/3
192.168.1.2

IPRAN

GE0/2/0
GE0/2/3
172.21.1.13

RNC/SGW

172.21.1.14
GE0/2/1.2 172.21.1.10/30 dot1q 2 VRF1
GE0/2/1.3 192.168.1.10/30 dot1q 3 VRF2
10.182.1.2/32(VRF2)
10.224.1.2/32(VRF2)

GE0/2/0.2 172.21.1.22/30 dot1q 2 VRF1


GE0/2/0.3 192.168.1.22/30 dot1q 3 VRF2

10.182.1.3/32(VRF1)
10.224.1.3/32(VRF1)

Table 4-3 Network segment planning

Issue 03 (2013-11-22)

Network Segment

Remarks

10.182.1.0/24

IP address of a small-cell wireless base


station for voice services

10.224.1.0/24

IP address of a small-cell wireless base


station for data services

172.21.1.0/24(VRF1)

IP address of the access link for all small-cell


base stations connected to one marco base
station.

192.168.1.0/24(VRF2)

IP address of the access link for all small-cell


base stations connected to one marco base
station.

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Table 4-4 Interface planning


NE Name

NE
Name

Interface

IP Address

VPN

Remarks

SmallCellSi
teA

SmallC
ellSiteA
1

loopback0

10.182.1.1/32

VRF1

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
A1 for voice
services

loopback1

10.224.1.1/32

VRF1

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
A1 for data
services

loopback0

10.182.1.2/32

VRF2

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
A2 for voice
services

loopback1

10.224.1.2/32

VRF2

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
A2 for data
services

loopback0

128.4.11.11/32

Router ID of
ATN905SmallCellSite
A-001

GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/1.2

172.21.1.9/30

VRF1

NNI on a
backhaul
device

192.168.1.9/30

VRF2

NNI on a
backhaul
device

GigabitEth
ernet 0/2/2

172.21.1.5/30

VRF1

To NE
SmallCellSite
A1

GigabitEth
ernet 0/2/3

192.168.1.1/30

VRF2

To NE
SmallCellSite
A2

SmallC
ellSiteA
2

ATN90
5SmallC
ellSiteA
-001

vlan-type
dot1q 2
GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/1.3
vlan-type
dot1q 3

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NE Name

NE
Name

Interface

IP Address

VPN

Remarks

SmallCellSi
teB

SmallC
ellSiteB
1

loopback0

10.182.1.4/32

VRF2

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
B1 for voice
services

loopback1

10.224.1.4/32

VRF2

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
B1 for data
services

loopback0

10.182.1.3/32

VRF1

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
B2 for voice
services

loopback1

10.224.1.3/32

VRF1

IP address of
NE
SmallCellSite
B2 for data
services

loopback0

128.4.12.12/32

Router ID of
ATN905SmallCellSite
B-002

GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/0.2

172.21.1.21/30

VRF1

To Next905

192.168.1.21/3
0

VRF2

To Next905

172.21.1.10/30

VRF1

NNI on a
backhaul
device

SmallC
ellSiteB
2

ATN90
5SmallC
ellSiteB
-002

vlan-type
dot1q 2
GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/0.3
vlan-type
dot1q 3
GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/1.2
vlan-type
dot1q 2

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NE Name

NE
Name

4 Solution 2: Native IP VRF Dynamic Route Access

Interface

IP Address

VPN

Remarks

GigabitEth
ernet
0/2/1.3

192.168.1.10/3
0

VRF2

NNI on a
backhaul
device

GigabitEth
ernet 0/2/2

192.168.1.17/3
0

VRF2

To NE
SmallCellSite
B1

GigabitEth
ernet 0/2/3

172.21.1.13/30

VRF1

To NE
SmallCellSite
B2

loopback0

128.4.13.13/32

Router ID

GE0/2/0.2

172.21.1.22/30

VRF1

To Next905

192.168.1.22/3
0

VRF2

To Next905

vlan-type
dot1q 3

MacroCellS
ite

ATN91
0MacroC
ellSite-0
03

vlan-type
dot1q 2
GE0/2/0.3
vlan-type
dot1q 3

Table 4-5 VRF data planning


NE

VPN
Instance
Name

RD

Remarks

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

VRF1

100:1

VRF2

100:2

Isolates base station data, and


adds each AC port of ATN 905 to
the specific VRF.

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002

VRF1

100:1

VRF2

100:2

ATN910MacroCellSite-003

VRF1

200:1

VRF2

200:2

4.5.3 Configuring VRF Lite Services


This topic describes how to configure VRF Lite to carry services.

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Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
1.

Create virtual private network (VPN) instances.


ip vpn-instance VRF1
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:1
ip vpn-instance VRF2
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:2

2.

Configure subinterfaces and bind them to the VRF instance.


interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.2
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.9 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.3
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 3
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.9 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
description To SmallCellSiteA1
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.5 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
description To SmallCellSiteA2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.1 30

Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
1.

Create VPN instances.


ip vpn-instance VRF1
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:1
ip vpn-instance VRF2
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:2

2.

Configure subinterfaces and bind them to the VRF instance.


interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.2
description To Next905
vlan-type dot1q 2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.21 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.3
description To Next905
vlan-type dot1q 3
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.21 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.2
description To SmallCellSite
vlan-type dot1q 2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.10 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.3
description To SmallCellSite
vlan-type dot1q 3
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.10 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
description To SmallCellSiteB1
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.17 30

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interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
description To SmallCellSiteB2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.13 30

Configuring ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
1.

Create VPN instances.


ip vpn-instance VRF1
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:1
ip vpn-instance VRF2
ipv4-family
route-distinguisher 100:2

2.

Configure subinterfaces and bind them to the VRF instance.


interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.2
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 2
ip binding vpn-instance VRF1
ip address 172.21.1.22 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.3
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 3
ip binding vpn-instance VRF2
ip address 192.168.1.22 30

4.6 Deploying the IGP


The Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) can be deployed using either of the intermediate system
to intermediate system (IS-IS) or the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol.

4.6.1 Configuring the IS-IS


This topic describes how to configure different IS-IS processes on the access ring and
aggregation ring to isolate routes. This is to relieve routing burden of cell site gateways (CSGs).

Configuration Roadmap
This topic describes the configuration roadmap for the multi-process IS-IS.
As an interior gateway protocol (IGP), the IS-IS protocol runs within an autonomous system
(AS). Also as a link status protocol, the IS-IS protocol calculates routes by running the shortest
path first (SPF) algorithm. To support large-scale networks, the IS-IS protocol uses a 2-level
structure in the route domain and enables the division of 1 domain into multiple areas. Generally
speaking, the level-1 router is deployed within an area, the level-2 router among areas, and the
level-1-2 router between the level-1 router and level-2 router. In the OSPF, routes between
different areas are advertised through the backbone area and the SPF algorithm is used only
within the same area. In the IS-IS, however, the SPF algorithm is used for both level-1 and
level-2 routes to generate shortest path trees (SPTs).

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Figure 4-12 IS-IS network diagram


GE0/2/1.2 isis 1001 VRF1
GE0/2/1.3 isis 1002 VRF2
10.182.1.4 32(VRF2)
10.224.1.4 32(VRF2)

10.182.1.1 32(VRF1)
10.224.1.132(VRF1)

GE0/2/0.2 isis 1001 VRF1


GE0/2/0.3 isis 1002 VRF2
Macro Cell

GE0/2/2
GE0/2/1
GE0/2/1

GE0/2/2

GE0/2/3

GE0/2/0
GE0/2/0
GE0/2/3

GE0/2/1.2 isis 1001 VRF1


GE0/2/1.3 isis 1002 VRF2
10.182.1.2 32(VRF2)
10.224.1.2 32(VRF2)

IPRAN
RNC/SGW

GE0/2/0.2 isis 1001 VRF1


GE0/2/0.3 isis 1002 VRF2

10.182.1.3 32(VRF1)
10.224.1.3 32(VRF1)

The configuration roadmap is as follows:


1.

Configure an IS-IS process number for each virtual private network (VPN).

2.

Enable IS-IS on interconnected interfaces between NEs.

3.

Configure a static route between the ATN 905 and its directly-connected small-cell base
station.

4.

Import static routes and direct routes to the IS-IS configured on the ATN 905.

Data Planning
This topic describes the data planning for IS-IS configuration.
Table 4-6 IS-IS parameters
Parameter

Value

Remarks

isis

l Service process number


for VRF1: 1001

The IS-IS process is enabled.

l Service process number


for VRF2: 1002

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Parameter

Value

Remarks

network-entity

ISIS 1001

This parameter indicates a


network entity title (NET).

l ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001:
49.0020.0010.0100.1001
.00
l ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002:
49.0020.0010.0100.1002
.00
l ATN910MacroCellSite-003:
49.0020.0010.0100.1003
.00
ISIS 1002
l ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001:
49.0020.0010.0100.1001
.00

NOTICE
You are advised to convert
loopback interface addresses
into NETs to ensure that each
NET is unique on a network. If
network NETs are not unique,
route flapping easily occurs.
Therefore, the NETs must be
properly planned. When
creating a level-2 neighbor, ISIS does not check whether the
area addresses of devices in the
level-2 area are the same. If a
level-1 neighbor needs to be
created, the area addresses of
devices in the level-1 area must
be the same; otherwise, the
level-1 neighbor cannot be
created.

l ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002:
49.0020.0010.0100.1002
.00
l ATN910MacroCellSite-003:
49.0020.0010.0100.1003
.00

Issue 03 (2013-11-22)

is-level

Level-2

This parameter indicates the


NE level.

cost-style

Wide

This parameter specifies the


cost style. Routes with the
specified cost style (in this
example, it is wide) are
received or advertised.

is-name

This parameter name is the


same as the NE name. For
example, set the value to
CSG1 for the NE.

This parameter specifies the


dynamic host name for the
IS-IS process.

timer lspgeneration

1 50 50

This parameter specifies the


delay for generating a label
switched path (LSP). Set the
maximum delay to 1s, the
initial delay to 50 ms, and the
incremental delay to 50 ms.

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Parameter

Value

Remarks

flash-flood

level-2

The LSP fast flooding


function is enabled to speed
up the convergence of an ISIS network.

Configuring Basic IS-IS Functions


This topic describes how to configure basic IS-IS functions.
Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
l

Configure service-layer IS-IS functions for VRF1 and VRF2.


isis 1001 vpn-instance VRF1
is-level level-2 //Configure an NE as a Level-2 NE.
cost-style wide //Set the cost type of the received and advertised IS-IS
routes to wide.
timer lsp-generation 1 50 50 level-2 //Specify the delay for generating
LSPs.
flash-flood level-2 //Enable LSP fast flooding to speed up IS-IS network
convergence.
network-entity 49.0020.0010.0100.1001.00 //Configure a NET.
is-name ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001 //Specify the dynamic host name for the ISIS process.
import-route static cost 15 //Import static routes.
import-route direct cost 15 //Import direct routes.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.2 //Enable IS-IS for the interface.
isis enable 1001
isis 1002 vpn-instance VRF2
is-level level-2
cost-style wide
timer lsp-generation 1 50 50 level-2
flash-flood level-2
network-entity 49.0020.0010.0100.1001.00
is-name ATN905-SmallCellSite1-001
import-route static cost 15
import-route direct cost 15
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.3
isis enable 1002

Configure static routes from the ATN 905 to its directly-connected small-cell base stations.
ip route-static vpn-instance VRF1 10.182.1.1 32 172.21.1.6 //10.182.1.1 is the
logical address of the small-cell base station and 172.21.1.6 is the IP address
of the interface connecting the small-cell base station to the network.
ip route-static vpn-instance VRF1 10.224.1.1 32 172.21.1.6
ip route-static vpn-instance VRF2 10.182.1.2 32 192.168.1.2
ip route-static vpn-instance VRF2 10.224.1.2 32 192.168.1.2

Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
l

Configure service-layer IS-IS functions for VRF1 and VRF2.


isis 1001 vpn-instance VRF1
is-level level-2
cost-style wide
timer lsp-generation 1 50 50 level-2
flash-flood level-2
network-entity 49.0020.0010.0100.1002.00
is-name ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
import-route static cost 15
import-route direct cost 15

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interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.2
isis enable 1001
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.2
isis enable 1001
isis 1002 vpn-instance VRF2
is-level level-2
cost-style wide
timer lsp-generation 1 50 50 level-2
flash-flood level-2
network-entity 49.0020.0010.0100.1002.00
is-name ATN905-SmallCellSite1-001
import-route static cost 15
import-route direct cost 15
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.3
isis enable 1002
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.3
isis enable 1002

If the small-cell base station uses a logical address, a static route leading to the logical
address of the small-cell base station must be configured.
ip
ip
ip
ip

route-static
route-static
route-static
route-static

vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance
vpn-instance

VRF1
VRF1
VRF2
VRF2

10.182.1.1
10.224.1.1
10.182.1.2
10.224.1.2

32
32
32
32

192.168.1.14
192.168.1.14
192.168.1.18
192.168.1.18

Configuring ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
l

Configure service-layer IS-IS functions.


isis 1001 vpn-instance VRF1
is-level level-2
cost-style wide
timer lsp-generation 1 50 50 level-2
flash-flood level-2
network-entity 49.0020.0010.0100.1003.00
is-name ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
default-route-advertise always //Advertise the default route to a common ISIS area.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.2
isis enable 1001
isis 1002 vpn-instance VRF2
is-level level-2
cost-style wide
timer lsp-generation 1 50 50 level-2
flash-flood level-2
network-entity 49.0020.0010.0100.1003.0
is-name ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
default-route-advertise always //Advertise the default route to a common ISIS area.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.3
isis enable 1002

Import VPN routes to a macro base station.


bgp 100
ipv4-family vpn-instance VRF1
import-route isis 1001 //Import IS-IS routes to the Border Gateway Protocol
(BGP).
ipv4-family vpn-instance VRF2
import-route isis 1002

Verifying IS-IS Route Configurations


This topic describes how to verify IS-IS route configurations after the routes are successfully
configured.
#After IS-IS routes are successfully configured, you can view route details.
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Run the display ip routing-table vpn-instance command to view the brief information about
the IPv4 routing table.

Run the display ip routing-table vpn-instance verbose command to view the detailed
information about the IPv4 routing table.

#You can run the Ping command to verify the connectivity.


Run the ping command on the access device at a macro base station to verify the connectivity.
The destination address is the IP address of the interface on the NE ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001 for connecting the NE and a small-cell base station.
[HUAWEI]ping -v -vpn-instance VRF1 172.21.1.5
PING 172.21.1.5: 56 data bytes, press CTRL_C to
break
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=251
ms
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=251
ms
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=251
ms
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=251
ms
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=251
ms

time=2
time=1
time=1
time=1
time=1

--- 172.21.1.5 ping statistics


--5 packet(s)
transmitted
5 packet(s)
received
0.00% packet
loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/2 ms

4.6.2 Deploying the OSPF


Configuration Roadmap
This topic describes the configuration roadmap for the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol.
As an interior gateway protocol (IGP), the OSPF protocol runs within an autonomous system
(AS). The OSPF partitions an AS into 1 or multiple logical areas and advertises routes through
link state advertisement (LSA). In the OSPF, the backbone area (represented by area 0) must be
defined. The backbone area is formed by consecutive NEs, and common areas are connected to
the backbone area to communicate with each other.

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Figure 4-13 OSPF network diagram


GE0/2/1.2 OSFP 1001 VRF1
GE0/2/1.3 OSPF 1002 VRF2
10.182.1.4 32(VRF2)
10.224.1.4 32(VRF2)

10.182.1.1 32(VRF1)
10.224.1.132(VRF1)

GE0/2/0.2 OSPF 1001 VRF1


GE0/2/0.3 OSPF 1002 VRF2
Macro Cell

GE0/2/2

GE0/2/2

GE0/2/1
GE0/2/1

GE0/2/3

IPRAN
GE0/2/0
GE0/2/0
GE0/2/3

RNC/SGW
GE0/2/1.2 OSPF 1001 VRF1
GE0/2/1.3 OSPF 1002 VRF2
10.182.1.2 32(VRF2)
10.224.1.2 32(VRF2)

GE0/2/0.2 OSPF 1001 VRF1


GE0/2/0.3 OSPF 1002 VRF2

10.182.1.3 32(VRF1)
10.224.1.3 32(VRF1)

The configuration roadmap is as follows:


l

Configure an OSPF process for each virtual private network (VPN).

Enable OSPF on interconnected interfaces between NEs.

Configure a static route between the ATN 905 and its directly-connected small-cell base
station.

Import static routes and direct routes to the OSPF configured on the ATN 905.

Data Planning
This topic describes the data planning for Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) deployment.
Table 4-7 OSPF parameters
Parameter

Value

Remarks

ospf

l Service process number


for VRF1: 1001

The OSPF process is enabled.

l Service process number


for VRF2: 1002
area

OSPF area 1 is created.

spf-scheduleinterval

Maximum interval: 200 ms

This parameter specifies the


SPF timer.

Initial interval: 50 ms
Incremental interval: 50 ms

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Parameter

Value

Remarks

lsa-originateinterval

Maximum interval: 100 ms

This parameter specifies the


intelligent timer for updating
link-state advertisements
(LSAs).

Initial interval: 50 ms
Incremental interval: 50 ms

lsa-arrivalinterval

Maximum interval: 500 ms


Initial interval: 50 ms
Incremental interval: 1000
ms

This parameter specifies the


intelligent timer for receiving
LSAs.

Configuring Basic OSPF Functions


This topic describes how to configure basic Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) functions.
For ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
l

Configure service-layer OSPF functions (VRF1 and VRF2).


ospf 1001 router-id 128.4.11.11 vpn-instance VRF1//Create OSPF process
1001.
spf-schedule-interval intelligent-timer 200 50 50//Set the maximum interval
for OSPF route calculation to 200 ms, initial interval to 50 ms, and
incremental interval to 50 ms.
lsa-originate-interval intelligent-timer 500 50 100//Set the maximum interval
for updating OSPF link-state advertisements (LSAs) to 500 ms, initial interval
to 50 ms, and incremental interval to 100 ms.
lsa-arrival-interval intelligent-timer 100 50 50//Set the maximum interval
for receiving OSPF LSAs to 100 ms, initial interval to 50 ms, and incremental
interval to 50 ms.
import-route direct cost 15 //Import direct routes.
import-route static cost 15 //Import static routes.
area 0.0.0.0//Configure the OSPF area.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.2
ospf enable 1001 area 0.0.0.0//Enable the OSPF for the interface.
ospf 1002 router-id 128.4.11.11 vpn-instance VRF2
spf-schedule-interval intelligent-timer 200 50 50
lsa-originate-interval intelligent-timer 500 50 100
lsa-arrival-interval intelligent-timer 100 50 50
import-route direct cost 15
import-route static cost 15
area 0.0.0.0
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.3
ospf enable 1002 area 0.0.0.0

For ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
l

Configure service-layer OSPF functions for VRF1 and VRF2.


ospf 1001 router-id 128.4.12.12 vpn-instance VRF1
spf-schedule-interval intelligent-timer 200 50 50
lsa-originate-interval intelligent-timer 500 50 100
lsa-arrival-interval intelligent-timer 100 50 50
import-route direct cost 15
import-route static cost 15
area 0.0.0.0
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.2
ospf enable 1001 area 0.0.0.0
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.2
ospf enable 1001 area 0.0.0.0

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ospf 1002 router-id 128.4.12.12 vpn-instance VRF2


spf-schedule-interval intelligent-timer 200 50 50
lsa-originate-interval intelligent-timer 500 50 100
lsa-arrival-interval intelligent-timer 100 50 50
import-route direct cost 15
import-route static cost 15
area 0.0.0.0
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.3
ospf enable 1002 area 0.0.0.0
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.3
ospf enable 1002 area 0.0.0.0

For ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
l

Configure service-layer OSPF functions for VRF1 and VRF2.


ospf 1001 router-id 128.4.13.13 vpn-instance VRF1
spf-schedule-interval intelligent-timer 200 50 50
lsa-originate-interval intelligent-timer 500 50 100
lsa-arrival-interval intelligent-timer 100 50 50
default-route-advertise //Advertise the default route to a common OSPF area.
area 0.0.0.0
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.2
ospf enable 1001 area 0.0.0.0
ospf 1002 router-id 128.4.13.13 vpn-instance VRF2
spf-schedule-interval intelligent-timer 200 50 50
lsa-originate-interval intelligent-timer 500 50 100
lsa-arrival-interval intelligent-timer 100 50 50
default-route-advertise //Advertise the default route to a common OSPF area.
area 0.0.0.0
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.3
ospf enable 1002 area 0.0.0.0

Import VPN routes.


bgp 100
ipv4-family vpn-instance VRF1
import-route ospf 1001//Import OSPF routes to the Border Gateway Protocol
(BGP).
ipv4-family vpn-instance VRF2
import-route ospf 1002

Verifying OSPF Route Configurations


This topic describes how to verify Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) route configurations after
the routes are successfully configured.
#After OSPF routes are successfully configured, you can view route details.
l

Run the display ip routing-table vpn-instance command to view the brief information about
the IPv4 routing table.

Run the display ip routing-table vpn-instance verbose command to view the detailed
information about the IPv4 routing table.

#You can run the Ping command to verify the connectivity.


Run the ping command on the access device at a macro base station to verify the connectivity.
The destination address ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001 is the IP address of the interface at the
small-cell base station to which the macro base station is connected.
[HUAWEI]ping -v -vpn-instance VRF1 172.21.1.5
PING 172.21.1.5: 56 data bytes, press CTRL_C to
break
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=251 time=2
ms
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=251 time=1

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ms
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=251 time=1
ms
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=251 time=1
ms
Reply from 172.21.1.5: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=251 time=1
ms

--- 172.21.1.5 ping statistics


--5 packet(s)
transmitted
5 packet(s)
received
0.00% packet
loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/2 ms

4.7 Deploying QoS


You can deploy quality of service (QoS) on a carrier network to provide differentiated QoS
assurance as required.

4.7.1 Configuring QoS


You can configure simple traffic classification to classify data packets into multiple priorities
or service classes, and therefore to provide differentiated services.

Configuration Roadmap
Traditional IP networks in best-effort mode are mainly used to carry data services, and the service
quality seems insignificant. However, with fast development of IP-oriented Internet services and
emerging of various new services (such as VoIP and VPN services), IP networks have changed
from pure data networks to bearer networks with commercial values. Therefore, IP networks
must ensure the quality of each type of service that they carry. Against this backdrop, quality of
service (QoS) is developed.
The ATN 905 functions as a small-cell base station bearer device or enterprise private line
Ethernet demarcation device (EDD). When configured with simple traffic classification, the
ATN 905 can manage the traffic. Priority mapping based on simple traffic classification indicates
that the priority of the packets on a network is mapped into the packets of another network so
that the packets of the first network can be transmitted on the second network based on the
original or user-defined packet priority. That is, on the ingress, the packets obtain the priority
and color for scheduling on the ATN equipment based on the values of the DSCP and 802.1p
fields. After being scheduled on the ATN equipment, the outgoing packets obtain the values of
the priority fields (such as DSCP and 802.1p) for encapsulation based on the above-mentioned
priority and color. In this manner, during traffic management, packets of different services join
different queues, ensuring differentiated scheduling.
To configure simple traffic classification, do as follows:
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Bind the default DiffServ domain to service interfaces (including main interfaces and
subinterfaces) of the ATN 905 to configure simple traffic classification.

Data Planning
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions such as network scale and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Parameter

Value

Description

trust upstream

default

Bind the DiffServ domain to


an interface.

Application Process
l

For ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
interface GE0/2/1.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/1.3
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/3
trust upstream default

For ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
interface GE0/2/0.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/0.3
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/1.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/1.3
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/3
trust upstream default

For ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
interface GE0/2/0.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/0.3
trust upstream default

4.8 Deploying the Clock


You are advised to use a clock synchronization solution based on actual clock synchronization
requirements.

4.8.1 Configuration Roadmap


Synchronization includes frequency synchronization and phase synchronization. In this solution,
you are advised to configure synchronous Ethernet and IEEE 1588v2 on the ATN 905 to achieve
frequency synchronization and phase synchronization respectively.
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To ensure that most services run normally on a current communication network, devices on the
entire network should keep the frequency or phase difference within a permitted range. That is,
synchronization, either frequency synchronization or phase synchronization, must be ensured
on the network. Frequency synchronization (also known as clock synchronization) indicates that
signals retain certain relationships with respect to the phase. That is, the phase difference between
signals is constant. Phase synchronization (also known as time synchronization) indicates that
signals have the same frequency and phase. That is, there is no phase difference between signals.
For example, if two watches always indicate the same time, they are in phase synchronization;
if the two watches always have a constant time difference (such as 6 hours), they are in frequency
synchronization. In the IP RAN scenario, the ATN equipment needs to support frequency or
phase synchronization to meet the requirements of base stations.
Mainstream PSN-based synchronization technologies in the industry include IEEE 1588v2 and
synchronous Ethernet. In this solution, you are advised to configure synchronous Ethernet and
IEEE 1588v2 on the ATN 905 to achieve frequency synchronization and phase synchronization
respectively.
Figure 4-14 Networking diagram for clock deployment
Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico

BITS

GE0/2/2
GE0/2/3

pri 20
GE0/2/1

GE0/2/2
GE0/2/1

pri 20
GE0/2/0 GE0/2/0

ASG
pri 10

RSG

GE0/2/3

Clock Tracking Path


pri n

Priority of a reference clock source at a port

The preceding figure shows how to configure a clock. The configuration roadmap is as follows:
l

Enable synchronous Ethernet and IEEE 1588v2 for the ATN 905, so that the ATN 905 can
track the upstream clock information and time information, and send them to base stations.

4.8.2 Data Planning


This topic describes data planning for clock deployment.
l

For synchronous Ethernet, configure clock signal priorities in the local priority list, and
enable synchronization status message (SSM) control.
NOTE

For synchronous Ethernet clock synchronization, a clock source is selected based on the following
descending order of priority: SSM clock quality, local priority setting, and clock source type.
l The SSM clock quality levels are in the following descending order: primary reference clock (PRC),
SSUA, SSUB, SDH equipment clock (SEC), and DNU. A source for which no quality level is defined,
and a clock source with quality level being DNU, are not be selected during source selection.
l The local priority is configured as follows: The value range is 1 to 255, and a smaller value indicates
a higher priority.

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For IEEE 1588v2, use the best master clock (BMC) algorithm.
NOTE

When the BMC algorithm is used by a 1588v2-enabled device for master clock selection, priority1 of each
candidate time source is compared first, then the clock class, clock accuracy, and priority2. If priority1 of
candidate time sources is the same, the clock class is compared, and so on. The time source with the highest
priority is selected as the master clock.

Table 4-8 Data planning for synchronous Ethernet time synchronization


NE Name

Parameter

Value

Remarks

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

Local priority
list

20

Clock output
port

GE0/2/2

Connects to a base station.

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002
ATN910MacroCellSite-003

GE0/2/3

Table 4-9 Data planning for IEEE 1588v2 time synchronization


NE Name

Parameter

Value

Remarks

ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001

Port delay
measurement
mechanism

delay

The mechanism is
recommended to be
set consistently
networkwide.

NE type

BC

The networkwide BC
mode is
recommended.

Ring network
asymmetry automeasurement

enable

Automatically adjusts
the length difference
between transmit and
receive fibers when
ring network
protection switching
occurs for restoration.

Clock output port

GE0/2/2

Connects to a base
station.

ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
ATN910-MacroCellSite-003

GE0/2/3

4.8.3 Configuring Synchronous Ethernet to Achieve Frequency


Synchronization
To achieve frequency synchronization on a network, use synchronous Ethernet.

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Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
clock ethernet-synchronization enable //Enables global synchronous Ethernet in the
system view.
clock ssm-control on //Configures SSM for source selection. By default, SSM is
enabled for an ATN NE.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
clock priority 20//Assigns a clock priority to the interface. This will affect
clock selection in the inbound direction on the local end. A smaller value
indicates a higher priority. Assigning the highest priority to each interface on
the shortest path for clock signal transmission is recommended.
clock synchronization enable//Enables synchronous Ethernet for an interface.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
clock synchronization enable

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
clock ethernet-synchronization enable
clock ssm-control on
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
clock priority 20
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
clock synchronization enable

Configure NE ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
clock ethernet-synchronization enable
clock ssm-control on
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
clock synchronization enable

4.8.4 Configuring IEEE 1588v2 to Achieve Time Synchronization


After frequency synchronization is achieved on a network using synchronous Ethernet, use IEEE
1588v2 to achieve time synchronization on the network.

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
ptp enable //Enables global IEEE 1588v2.
ptp device-type bc //Specifies the BC mode for all devices.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
ptp delay-mechanism delay //Configures the delay measurement mechanism of a
device as delay which calculates the time difference based on the link delay of the
master and slave clocks.
ptp enable //Enables IEEE 1588v2 for the interface.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
ptp enable
ptp device-type bc

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interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

Configure NE ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
ptp enable
ptp device-type bc
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

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Solution 3: Native Ethernet Access

About This Chapter


The native Ethernet access solution is applied to the scenario where Layer 2 access solutions are
used for the upstream network. In the native Ethernet solution, VLANIF interfaces are
configured to transmit management plane packets, and VLAN packets from a small-cell base
station are transparently transmitted between the ATN 905 and the access device at the macro
base station.
5.1 Scenario Introduction
This topic briefly introduces the application scenarios of the ATN 905, covering the overview,
configuration roadmap, and data planning.
5.2 Logging In to the ATN 905
This chapter describes how to log in to the ATN 905 for later commissioning. Two login methods,
login by using the console interface and SSH, are introduced.
5.3 Configuring Basic Information
Before configuring services, you need to perform basic configurations, including the device
name, user login parameter, authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA), and Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) configurations, for the devices.
5.4 Configuring the Management Plane
This topic describes the configuration roadmap for the management plane.
5.5 Deploying the serive
5.6 Deploying QoS
You can deploy quality of service (QoS) on a carrier network to provide differentiated QoS
assurance as required.
5.7 Deploying the Clock
You are advised to use a clock synchronization solution based on actual clock synchronization
requirements.

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5.1 Scenario Introduction


This topic briefly introduces the application scenarios of the ATN 905, covering the overview,
configuration roadmap, and data planning.

Overview
Solution 3: Native Ethernet access (native Ethernet + public network IGP management
plane + hybrid interface access)
Figure 5-1 Example network of native Ethernet access
VLAN
(10,20)

VLAN
(30,40)

Macro Cell

ATN 905

IPRAN

ATN 905
CSG

VLAN
(30,40)

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Trunk interface
Dot1q sub-interface
Management plane
VLAN(10,20) service flow
VLAN(30,40) service flow

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Table 5-1 Solution information


Solution Feature

Applicable
Scenario

Solution
Advantage

Solution
Constraint

l Service
configurations
for small-cell
base stations:
native Ethernet

1. Scenario in which
the carrier
solution on the
macro base
station side
adopts the Layer
2 access solution

1. Users' IP address
planning does not
need to be
concerned.

1. The loopbreaking
protocols need to
be deployed to
prevent Layer 2
broadcast storms.

l Management
plane:
public network
IGP management
plane
l Native Ethernet
access:
hybrid interface
access

2. Ethernet
demarcation
device (EDD)
scenario

2. Users' VLANs
are not isolated
from carriers'
VLANs.

3. Scenario in which
users' VLANs are
not isolated from
carriers' VLANs

Configuration Roadmap
Small-cell base station packets need to be transparently transmitted to the CSG. The
configuration roadmap is as follows:
l

Add each AC port of the ATN 905 into the VLANs to which the small-cell base station
data belongs, and add the NNI interfaces of the ATN 905 into the VLANs to which the AC
ports belong.

Establish a management plane between the ATN 905 and the CSG based on public network
subinterfaces.

Configure L2VPNs for packets with different VLAN tags on each AC port of the CSG.

Deploy simple traffic classification (STC) on the ATN 905.

Deploy Synchronous Ethernet (SyncE) on the ATN 905 to implement frequency


synchronization; deploy IEEE 1588v2 to implement time synchronization.

Data Planning
Item

Planning Guidelines

Basic configuration
parameters:

You are advised to configure the basic configuration parameters


except NE name in the centralized manner based on the entire
network. In this way, these basic configuration parameters are
planned once for all.

l NE name
l User login parameter
l SNMP
l AAA

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Item

Planning Guidelines

Small-cell base station


data:

1. The VLAN (to which the small-cell base station data belongs)
need to be planned.

l VLAN ID
ATN 905 data:
l Management
subinterfaces and
their IP addresses

1. Management subinterfaces and their IP addresses need to be


planned.
2. A VLAN ID needs to be planned to traverse interfaces
interconnecting the ATN 905 devices.

l Vlan ID for trunk


QoS

STC is deployed on each service interface of the ATN 905.

Clock

SyncE and 1588v2 functions are enabled on the ATN 905 so that
the ATN 905 traces the clock and time of the upstream device
and transmits the clock signals to base stations.

5.2 Logging In to the ATN 905


This chapter describes how to log in to the ATN 905 for later commissioning. Two login methods,
login by using the console interface and SSH, are introduced.

5.2.1 Logging In to the ATN by Using SSH


This section describes how to log in to the ATN 905 by using SSH. SSH is a secure remote login
protocol developed based on the traditional Telnet protocol. Compared with Telnet, SSH is
greatly improved in terms of the authentication mode and data transmission security.
Figure 5-2 shows the networking diagram for logging in to the ATN 905 by using SSH.
Figure 5-2 Networking diagram for logging in to the ATN 905 by using SSH

network

SSH Client

SSH Server

Prerequisite
l

The ATN 905 is running properly.

The ATN 905 has been logged in using the console interface and an IP address for each
interface has been configured on the ATN 905.

A direct or reachable route exists between the SSH client and the ATN 905.

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NOTE

Perform the following configurations on the ATN 905 that serves as the SSH server. This section describes only
the SSH login by using the PuTTY program.

Procedure
Step 1 As shown in the following figure, set the IP address of the ATN 905 to 192.168.1.1 and the login
protocol to SSH.
NOTE

After the ATN is powered on for the first time, you can log in to it in STelnet mode. The IP address of the
management network interface Ethernet0/0/0 (the console interface) is 129.0.0.1. If the ATN has accessed
the network when it is powered on for the first time, its IP address 129.0.0.1 will be automatically changed
to the IP address that DHCP obtains during the startup.

Figure 5-3 Login by using the PuTTY program

Step 2 Enter the user name root and the password Changeme_123.
NOTE

After the ATN is powered on for the first time, you can log in to it in STelnet mode. The user name and
password are root and Changeme_123 respectively. After logging in to the ATN, change the default
password in time.

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Figure 5-4 Login using the PuTTY program

----End

5.2.2 Logging In to the ATN by Using the Console Interface


This section describes how to use the HyperTerminal in Windows on the PC to log in to the
ATN 905 after setting up a local configuration environment with the console interface.

Context
Figure 5-5 shows the networking diagram for logging in to the NE80E/40E by using the console
interface.
Figure 5-5 Networking diagram for logging in to the ATN 905 by using the console interface

PC

ATN

Prerequisite
l

The ATN 905 is running properly.

The PC is connected to the ATN 905 through an asynchronous interface.

Installing terminal emulation program on the PC (such as Windows XP HyperTerminal)


NOTE

Perform the following configurations on the HyperTerminal on the PC.


The console port applies the non-standard serial port communication cable sequence. For more information, see
ATN 905Multi-service Access Equipment Installation Guide.

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Procedure
Step 1 Use a serial cable to connect the serial interface on the PC and the console interface on the ATN
905.
For more information about the console interface, see the ATN 905Multi-service Access
EquipmentHardware Description.
Step 2 Start the HyperTerminal on the PC.
Choose Start > Programs > Accessories > Communications to start the HyperTerminal in
Windows.
Step 3 Set up a connection.
As shown in Figure 5-6, enter the name of the new connection in the Name text box, and select
an icon. Then, click OK.
Figure 5-6 Setting up a connection

Step 4 Set a connection port.


In the Connect To dialog box shown in Figure 5-7, select a port from the drop-down list box
of Connect using according to the port actually used on the PC or terminal. Then, click OK.

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Figure 5-7 Setting a connection port

Step 5 Set communication parameters.


When the COM1 Properties dialog box is displayed as shown in Figure 5-8, set the COM1
properties according to the description in Figure 5-8 or by clicking Restore Defaults.
NOTE

l Setting the COM1 properties according to the description in Figure 5-8 and setting them by clicking
Restore Defaults have the same effect. The default settings of the console interface will be used.
l When you log in to the ATN 905 by using the console interface, ensure that the COM1 properties on
the HyperTerminal are consistent with the interface attribute settings on the ATN 905. Otherwise, the
login will fail. This means that if default settings are not used for the interface attributes on the ATN
905, the COM1 properties on the HyperTerminal must be changed to be consistent with the interface
attribute settings on the ATN 905.

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Figure 5-8 Setting communication parameters

----End

Commissioning Result
After the preceding configurations are complete, press Enter. An initial password is required
for the first login. Set an authentication password. The system automatically saves the set
password.
An initial password is required for the first login via the console.
Set a password and keep it safe! Otherwise you will not be able to login via the
console.
Please configure the login password (6-16)
Enter Password:
Confirm Password:

If the login fails, click Disconnect and then Call. If the login still fails, repeat Step 1 to check
whether the parameters or physical connections are correct. If they are correct, log in to the ATN
905 again.

5.3 Configuring Basic Information


Before configuring services, you need to perform basic configurations, including the device
name, user login parameter, authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA), and Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) configurations, for the devices.

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5.3.1 Configuring NE Information


If multiple devices on a network need to be managed, set equipment names to identify each
device.

Data Planning
An NE name consists of the site name, device model, and device number. Each NE is named in
the format of AA-BB-CC. The following provides the meaning of the letters.
l

AA: device model, for example, ATN 910 or ATN 905

BB: site name, for example, SmallCellSiteA

CC: device number, starting from 001

For example, ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001 refers to an ATN 905 numbered 001 at site


SmallCellSiteA.
Parameter

Value

Description

sysname

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

Indicates the NE name.

NOTE

All the NEs involved in this document are named as shown in the following figure.

Figure 5-9 NE names


SmallCellSiteB1

SmallCellSiteA1

Macro Cell
Micro/Pico

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002

Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

IPRAN

ATN910MacroCellSite-003

RNC

Micro/Pico
SmallCellSiteA2

SmallCellSiteB2

Configuration Process
l

Configure the name of the NE as ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001.


sysname ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001

Configure the name of the NE as ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002.


sysname ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002

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Configure the name of the NE as ATN910-MacroCellSite-003.


sysname ATN910-MacroCellSite-003

5.3.2 Configuring the VTY User Interface


To log in to an ATN device remotely, you can configure the virtual type terminal (VTY) user
interface to ensure equipment security.

Data Planning
To log in to an ATN device in telnet or Secure Shell (SSH) mode, you can configure the VTY
user interface to ensure equipment security. The following parameters are involved: the
maximum number of VTY user interfaces, user authentication mode, user privilege, and VTY
attributes.
l

By setting the maximum number of VTY user interfaces, you can limit the number of users
who can log in to the ATN device concurrently.

By setting the user authentication mode, you can enhance the equipment security. The user
authentication mode can be set to AAA authentication or password authentication.
1.

The AAA authentication mode is based on users, ensuring high security. To log in to
the ATN device, you need to enter the user name and password.

2.

The password authentication mode is based on VTY channels, requiring simple


configuration while ensuring high security. You only need to be create a login
password.

By setting the user privilege, you can differentiate the access rights of different users on
the ATN device to enhance the management security. User privileges are divided into 16
levels, which are numbered 0 to 15. A larger value indicates a higher user privilege.

You can configure the VTY attributes of a VTY user interface, such as the timeout interval
of communication failure for login users. Each VTY attribute on the VTY user interface
has a default value on the ATN device. You can re-configure the terminal attributes as
required.
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Parameter

Value

Description

user-interface
maximum-vty

15

Sets the maximum number of


users that are allowed to log
in to the NE to 15.
NOTE
When the value of this
parameter is set to 0, no user
(even the NMS user) can log in
to the ATN device through the
VTY user interface.

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Parameter

Value

Description

user-interface

vty 0 14

Indicates that the maximum


number of VTY user
interfaces is the total number
of users that have logged in to
the NE through Telnet or
STelnet.

authentication-mode

aaa

Sets the authentication mode


to AAA authentication for
users that attempt to log in to
the NE.

protocol inbound

ssh

Specifies the login protocol


supported by the VTY user
interface to SSH.

user privilege

level 3

Specifies the command level


to level 3.

idle-timeout

50

Sets the timeout interval of


communication failure for
login users.

Configuration Process
Perform the following configurations on all ATN devices:
1.

Set the maximum number of VTY user interfaces.


user-interface maximum-vty 15 //Set the maximum number of VTY user interfaces
that are allowed to log in to the NE at the same time.

2.

Configure VTY attributes.


user-interface vty 0 14 //Perform configurations for VTY 0 to VTY 14.
protocol inbound ssh
authentication-mode aaa
user privilege level 3
idle-timeout 5 0

5.3.3 Configuring AAA Users


If the user authentication mode is set to AAA authentication on an ATN device, you need to
configure user names and passwords on the ATN device to manage and authenticate users.

Data Planning
If the user authentication mode is set to AAA authentication in an ATN device, a user needs to
keep the login user name and password properly, and uses them to log in to the ATN device.
The levels of commands that can be used by users logging in to an ATN device concurrently are
determined by the privileges of these users in the AAA configuration.
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NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Parameter

Value

Description

aaa

Enters the AAA view to


create a user, set a user level,
or configure an
authentication scheme, an
authorization scheme, an
accounting scheme, or a
domain, so that the NE
authenticates users.

local-user XXX
password cipher XXX

USER01

Adds a local user USER01.

local-user level

Sets the user level for the


local user. The system
manages commands by
command level. A user can
use only the commands
whose levels are lower than
or equal to the user level.

local-user xxx
service-type xxx

USER01

Sets the access type of local


users to SSH.

Hello@*#123

ssh

Configuration Process
Perform the following configurations on all ATN devices:
aaa
local-user USER01 password cipher Hello@*#123 //Add a local uer (USER01) and set
the password.
local-user USER01 level 3 //Set the user level of the local user.
local-user USER01 service-type ssh //Set the access type for the user.
NOTE

Requirements on user names and passwords for ATN products are as follows:
l A local user name contains 1 to 253 characters.
l A password must contain eight characters at least.
l A password must contain digits, upper-case and lower-case letters, and special characters, excluding
question marks (?) and spaces.
l The password cannot be the same as the user name or the user name in reverse order.

5.3.4 Configuring the SNMP


After the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is configured, the NMS can monitor
and manage NEs.
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Data Planning
The SNMP is a standard network management protocol widely used on TCP/IP networks. The
NMS can manage NEs using the SNMP. Specifically, the SNMP defines several device
management operations that can be performed by the NMS and alarms that can be automatically
sent to the NMS when the ATN equipment is faulty. The NMS uses the management information
base (MIB) to identify and manage devices. The SNMP versions include SNMPv1, SNMPv2c,
and SNMPv3, which are all supported by the ATN 905.
The Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) is a Layer 2 discovery protocol defined in 802.1ab.
When the ATN and its neighbors are all enabled with LLDP, the ATN notifies the neighbors of
its status and obtains the status of the neighbors through LLDP packets. The NMS then can get
information about Layer 2 connection of the ATN. In this manner, the NMS can analyze the
network topology.
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Table 5-2 SNMP parameters

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Parameter

Value

Description

snmp-agent

Enables the SNMP agent


function. By default, the
SNMP agent function is
disabled.

snmp-agent sys-info
version

all

Configures the system to


adopt all the SNMP versions,
namely, SNMPv1,
SNMPv2c, and SNMPv3.

snmp-agent mib-view
included iso-view

iso

Includes the iso subtree in the


SNMP MIB view.

snmp-agent
community read
cipher

Huawei123!

Sets a read community name.


The NMS can access a device
only when the community
name set on the NMS is the
same as that set on the device.

snmp-agent
community write
cipher

Huawei@123

snmp-agent trap
enable

mib-view iso-view

mib-view iso-view

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Sets a write community


name. The NMS can access a
device only when the
community name set on the
NMS is the same as that set
on the device.
Enables all traps on a device.

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Parameter

Value

Description

snmp-agent trap
source

LoopBack0

Configures the LoopBack0


interface as the source
interface that sends trap
messages.

snmp-agent targethost trap

address udp-domain
20.20.20.20

Allows the SNMP agent to


send SNMP trap messages to
the Huawei NMS at
20.20.20.20.

params securityname
Huawei@123 v2c privatenetmanager ext-vb
snmp-agent trap
enable feature-name
lldp

Enables the LLDP trap


function.

snmp-agent extend
error-code

enable

Enables the extended error


code function.

lldp enable

Enables the LLDP function.

Application Process
Perform the following configurations on all ATN devices:
snmp-agent
snmp-agent sys-info version all //Enable SNMP of all versions for the system.
snmp-agent mib-view included iso-view iso //Include the iso subtree SNMP MIB
view.
snmp-agent community read cipher Huawei123! mib-view iso-view
snmp-agent community write cipher Huawei@123 mib-view iso-view //Set the read and
write permissions for the write attributes. When the read entity name and write
entity name are the same, the write attribute command will override the read
attribute command.
snmp-agent trap enable
snmp-agent target-host trap address udp-domain 20.20.20.20 params securityname
Huawei@123 v2c private-netmanager ext-vb //When the management plane is deployed
on public network routes, SNMP trap messages can be sent to the U2000 at management
IP address 20.20.20.20 using entity name Huawei@123. If an NMS provided by Huawei
is used, configure private-netmanager and ext-vb.
snmp-agent trap source LoopBack0 //Set the source interface for trap messages.
snmp-agent trap enable feature-name lldp
snmp-agent extend error-code enable
lldp enable

5.4 Configuring the Management Plane


This topic describes the configuration roadmap for the management plane.

5.4.1 Configuration Roadmap


This topic describes the configuration roadmap for the management plane.
Traditional management and service packets are closely coupled, making equipment
management more and more complex and costly. Therefore, it is more and more important to
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separate the management and service planes. A user operates and manages devices using the
management plane and deploys services using other planes, such as the service plane. That is,
the logical channels of the management plane and other planes are separated. When the
management plane becomes abnormal, other planes can still be used; when other planes become
abnormal, devices can still be managed.
The configuration roadmap is as follows:
l

Establish a management plane between the ATN 905 and the CSG based on public network
Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) routes.

5.4.2 Data Planning


This topic describes data planning for the management plane.

Data Planning
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions, such as network size and topology. The
following recommended values and precautions in this example are for reference only.

Figure 5-10 Management plane configuration diagram


GE0/2/0.1 dot1q 1 192.168.1.21/30
Macro Cell

GE0/2/1.1 dot1q 1
192.168.1.9/30
GE0/2/1.1 dot1q 1
192.168.1.10/30
Loopback0
128.4.11.11/32

IPRAN

GE0/2/0
GE0/2/0
Loopback0
128.4.12.12/32

Loopback0
128.4.13.13/32

RNC/SGW

GE0/2/0.1 dot1q 1 192.168.1.22/30

Table 5-3 Interface planning table


NE Name

Interface

IP Address

OSPF
Process
ID

VPN

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

Loopback0

128.4.11.11 32

1001

Loopback10

10.182.1.1 32

GigabitEthernet
0/2/1.1

192.168.1.9 30

vlan-type dot1q 1
ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002

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Loopback0

128.4.12.12 32

Loopback10

10.182.1.2 32

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Interface

IP Address

OSPF
Process
ID

GigabitEthernet
0/2/0.1

192.168.1.21 30

NOTE
The
OSPF
process
ID must
be the
same as
the
manage
ment
OSPF
process
ID on
the
macro
base
station
side.

vlan-type dot1q 1
GigabitEthernet
0/2/1.1

192.168.1.10 30

vlan-type dot1q 1
ATN910MacroCellSite-003

Loopback0

128.4.13.13 32

Loopback10

10.182.1.3 32

GigabitEthernet0/2
/0.1

192.168.1.22 30

vlan-type dot1q 1

VPN

5.4.3 Configuring the Management Plane


This topic describes how to configure the management plane.

Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.1
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 1
ip address 192.168.1.9 30
interface Loopback0 //Set the router ID.
ip address 128.4.11.11 32
interface Loopback10 //Set the management IP address.
ip address 10.182.1.1 32
ospf 1001 router-id 128.4.11.11 //Configure an IGP route between management IP
addresses.
area
0.0.0.1
network 10.182.1.1
0.0.0.0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.3

Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.1
description ToNext905
vlan-type dot1q 1
ip address 192.168.1.10 30
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1.1
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 1
ip address 192.168.1.21 30
interface Loopback0
ip address 128.4.12.12 32

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interface Loopback10
ip address 10.182.1.2 32
ospf 1001 router-id
128.4.12.12
area
0.0.0.1
network 10.182.1.2
0.0.0.0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.3

Configuring ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.1
description NNI
vlan-type dot1q 1
ip address 192.168.1.22 30
interface Loopback0
ip address 128.4.13.13 32
interface Loopback10
ip address 10.182.1.3 32
ospf 1001 router-id
128.4.13.13
area
0.0.0.1
network 10.182.1.3
0.0.0.0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.3

5.5 Deploying the serive


5.5.1 Configuration Roadmap
This topic describes the configuration roadmap for Ethernet services.
In the native Ethernet scenario, the ATN 905 needs to transparently transmit small-cell base
station packets to the cell site gateway (CSG). Trunk interfaces can be added into multiple
VLANs to interconnect network devices.

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Figure 5-11 Ethernet services configuration roadmap


Port trunk allow-pass 10 20 30 40
Port trunk allow-pass 10 20 30 40
Micro Cell

VLAN:30,40

VLAN:10,20

GE0/2/2

GE0/2/2
GE0/2/1

GE0/2/1

GE0/2/0

IPRAN

GE0/2/0
GE0/2/3

GE0/2/3

RNC/SGW

VLAN:10,20

VLAN:30,40

The L3VPN configuration roadmap is as follows:


l

Configure the AC interface and NNI-side interface on the ATN 905 as trunk interfaces and
allow packets with the VLAN of the small-cell base station to pass through.

5.5.2 Data Planning


This topic describes the data planning for service configuration.
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions such as network scale and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

Table 5-4 Data planning


NE Name

Interface

VLAN

Remarks

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-00
1

GigabitEthernet
0/2/1

port trunk allow-pass


vlan 10 20 30 40

To Next905

GigabitEthernet
0/2/2

port trunk allow-pass


vlan 10 20

To SmallCellSiteA1

GigabitEthernet
0/2/3

port trunk allow-pass


vlan 30 40

To SmallCellSiteA2

GigabitEthernet
0/2/0

port trunk allow-pass


vlan 10 20 30 40

To MacroCellSite

GigabitEthernet
0/2/1

port trunk allow-pass


vlan 10 20 30 40

To Next905

GigabitEthernet
0/2/2

port trunk allow-pass


vlan 30 40

To SmallCellSiteB1

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-02

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NE Name

ATN910MacroCellSite-003

5 Solution 3: Native Ethernet Access

Interface

VLAN

Remarks

GigabitEthernet
0/2/3

port trunk allow-pass


vlan 10 20

To SmallCellSiteB2

GigabitEthernet
0/2/0.1

vlan-type dot1q 10

To Next905

GigabitEthernet
0/2/0.2

vlan-type dot1q 20

To Next905

GigabitEthernet
0/2/0.3

vlan-type dot1q 30

To Next905

GigabitEthernet
0/2/0.4

vlan-type dot1q 40

To Next905

5.5.3 Configuring Ethernet Services


This topic describes the configuration roadmap for Ethernet services.
Configuring ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
portswitch
port link-type trunk //Specify the interface as a trunk interface.
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 20 30 40 //Allow packets with a VLAN ID ranging from
VLAN 10 to VLAN 20 to pass through.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
portswitch
port link-type trunk
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 20
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
portswitch
port link-type trunk
port trunk allow-pass vlan 30 40

Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) is a technology that provides digital connections over the copper
wire or a local telephone network. xDSL refers to various DSL technologies. It is a family of
bandwidth-efficient modulation techniques developed to achieve extremely high data transfer
rates over twisted-pair cables. The ATN 905 supports VDSL2, an xDSL technology. VDSL2 is
an extension to VDSL1. In this scenario, the upstream interface on ATN905-ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002 can be a VDSL2 or Ethernet interface.
l

If the upstream interface is a VDSL2 interface, perform the following steps:


Configuring ATN905-ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
interface xdsl 0/2/0
quit
interface virtual-ethernet 0/2/0
quit
interface dsl-group 0/2/0
add xdsl 0/2/0
dsl-group enable
bind virtual ethernet 0/2/0
quit
interface virtual-ethernet 0/2/0
portswitch
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 20 30 40

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interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
portswitch
port link-type trunk
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 20 30 40
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
portswitch
port link-type trunk
port trunk allow-pass vlan 30 40
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/4
portswitch
port link-type trunk
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 20
NOTE

In this scenario, the ATN 905 uses a VDSL2 interface to connect to a DSLAM. For detailed DSLAM
configuration, see corresponding documents of the access network.

If the upstream interface is an Ethernet interface, perform the following steps:


Configuring ATN905-ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
portswitch
port link-type trunk
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 20 30 40
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
portswitch
port link-type trunk
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 20 30 40
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
portswitch
port link-type trunk
port trunk allow-pass vlan 30 40
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
portswitch
port link-type trunk
port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 20

Configuring ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.1
vlan-type dot1q 10 //Configure a VLAN for the dot1q VLAN tag termination subinterface.
mpls l2vc 11.0.0.31 510 control-word raw
mpls l2vc 11.0.0.32 511 control-word raw secondary
mpls l2vpn redundancy master
mpls l2vpn reroute delay 500
mpls l2vpn stream-dual-receiving
mpls l2vpn arp-dual-sending
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.2
vlan-type dot1q 20
mpls l2vc 11.0.0.33 512 control-word raw
mpls l2vc 11.0.0.34 513 control-word raw secondary
mpls l2vpn redundancy master
mpls l2vpn reroute delay 500
mpls l2vpn stream-dual-receiving
mpls l2vpn arp-dual-sending
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.3
vlan-type dot1q 30
mpls l2vc 11.0.0.35 514 control-word raw
mpls l2vc 11.0.0.36 515 control-word raw secondary
mpls l2vpn redundancy master
mpls l2vpn reroute delay 500
mpls l2vpn stream-dual-receiving
mpls l2vpn arp-dual-sending
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0.4
vlan-type dot1q 40
mpls l2vc 11.0.0.37 516 control-word raw
mpls l2vc 11.0.0.38 517 control-word raw secondary

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mpls
mpls
mpls
mpls

l2vpn
l2vpn
l2vpn
l2vpn

5 Solution 3: Native Ethernet Access

redundancy master
reroute delay 500
stream-dual-receiving
arp-dual-sending

5.6 Deploying QoS


You can deploy quality of service (QoS) on a carrier network to provide differentiated QoS
assurance as required.

5.6.1 Configuring QoS


You can configure simple traffic classification to classify data packets into multiple priorities
or service classes, and therefore to provide differentiated services.

Configuration Roadmap
Traditional IP networks in best-effort mode are mainly used to carry data services, and the service
quality seems insignificant. However, with fast development of IP-oriented Internet services and
emerging of various new services (such as VoIP and VPN services), IP networks have changed
from pure data networks to bearer networks with commercial values. Therefore, IP networks
must ensure the quality of each type of service that they carry. Against this backdrop, quality of
service (QoS) is developed.
The ATN 905 functions as a small-cell base station bearer device or enterprise private line
Ethernet demarcation device (EDD). When configured with simple traffic classification, the
ATN 905 can manage the traffic. Priority mapping based on simple traffic classification indicates
that the priority of the packets on a network is mapped into the packets of another network so
that the packets of the first network can be transmitted on the second network based on the
original or user-defined packet priority. That is, on the ingress, the packets obtain the priority
and color for scheduling on the ATN equipment based on the values of the DSCP and 802.1p
fields. After being scheduled on the ATN equipment, the outgoing packets obtain the values of
the priority fields (such as DSCP and 802.1p) for encapsulation based on the above-mentioned
priority and color. In this manner, during traffic management, packets of different services join
different queues, ensuring differentiated scheduling.
To configure simple traffic classification, do as follows:
l

Bind the default DiffServ domain to service interfaces (including main interfaces and
subinterfaces) of the ATN 905 to configure simple traffic classification.

Data Planning
NOTE

Set these parameters based on the actual network conditions such as network scale and topology. The
following recommended values in this example are only for reference.

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Parameter

Value

Description

trust upstream

default

Bind the DiffServ domain to


an interface.

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Application Process
l

For ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
interface GE0/2/1.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/1.3
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/3
trust upstream default

For ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
interface GE0/2/0.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/0.3
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/1.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/1.3
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/3
trust upstream default

For ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
interface GE0/2/0.2
trust upstream default
interface GE0/2/0.3
trust upstream default

5.7 Deploying the Clock


You are advised to use a clock synchronization solution based on actual clock synchronization
requirements.

5.7.1 Configuration Roadmap


Synchronization includes frequency synchronization and phase synchronization. In this solution,
you are advised to configure synchronous Ethernet and IEEE 1588v2 on the ATN 905 to achieve
frequency synchronization and phase synchronization respectively.
To ensure that most services run normally on a current communication network, devices on the
entire network should keep the frequency or phase difference within a permitted range. That is,
synchronization, either frequency synchronization or phase synchronization, must be ensured
on the network. Frequency synchronization (also known as clock synchronization) indicates that
signals retain certain relationships with respect to the phase. That is, the phase difference between
signals is constant. Phase synchronization (also known as time synchronization) indicates that
signals have the same frequency and phase. That is, there is no phase difference between signals.
For example, if two watches always indicate the same time, they are in phase synchronization;
if the two watches always have a constant time difference (such as 6 hours), they are in frequency
synchronization. In the IP RAN scenario, the ATN equipment needs to support frequency or
phase synchronization to meet the requirements of base stations.
Mainstream PSN-based synchronization technologies in the industry include IEEE 1588v2 and
synchronous Ethernet. In this solution, you are advised to configure synchronous Ethernet and
IEEE 1588v2 on the ATN 905 to achieve frequency synchronization and phase synchronization
respectively.
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5 Solution 3: Native Ethernet Access

Figure 5-12 Networking diagram for clock deployment


Micro/Pico

Micro/Pico

BITS

GE0/2/2

pri 20
GE0/2/1

GE0/2/3

GE0/2/2
GE0/2/1

pri 20
GE0/2/0 GE0/2/0

ASG
pri 10

RSG

GE0/2/3

Clock Tracking Path


pri n

Priority of a reference clock source at a port

The preceding figure shows how to configure a clock. The configuration roadmap is as follows:
l

Enable synchronous Ethernet and IEEE 1588v2 for the ATN 905, so that the ATN 905 can
track the upstream clock information and time information, and send them to base stations.

5.7.2 Data Planning


This topic describes data planning for clock deployment.
l

For synchronous Ethernet, configure clock signal priorities in the local priority list, and
enable synchronization status message (SSM) control.
NOTE

For synchronous Ethernet clock synchronization, a clock source is selected based on the following
descending order of priority: SSM clock quality, local priority setting, and clock source type.
l The SSM clock quality levels are in the following descending order: primary reference clock (PRC),
SSUA, SSUB, SDH equipment clock (SEC), and DNU. A source for which no quality level is defined,
and a clock source with quality level being DNU, are not be selected during source selection.
l The local priority is configured as follows: The value range is 1 to 255, and a smaller value indicates
a higher priority.

For IEEE 1588v2, use the best master clock (BMC) algorithm.
NOTE

When the BMC algorithm is used by a 1588v2-enabled device for master clock selection, priority1 of each
candidate time source is compared first, then the clock class, clock accuracy, and priority2. If priority1 of
candidate time sources is the same, the clock class is compared, and so on. The time source with the highest
priority is selected as the master clock.

Table 5-5 Data planning for synchronous Ethernet time synchronization


NE Name

Parameter

Value

Remarks

ATN905SmallCellSiteA-001

Local priority
list

20

ATN905SmallCellSiteB-002
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NE Name

Parameter

Value

Remarks

ATN910MacroCellSite-003

Clock output
port

GE0/2/2

Connects to a base station.

GE0/2/3

Table 5-6 Data planning for IEEE 1588v2 time synchronization


NE Name

Parameter

Value

Remarks

ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001

Port delay
measurement
mechanism

delay

The mechanism is
recommended to be
set consistently
networkwide.

NE type

BC

The networkwide BC
mode is
recommended.

Ring network
asymmetry automeasurement

enable

Automatically adjusts
the length difference
between transmit and
receive fibers when
ring network
protection switching
occurs for restoration.

Clock output port

GE0/2/2

Connects to a base
station.

ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
ATN910-MacroCellSite-003

GE0/2/3

5.7.3 Configuring Synchronous Ethernet to Achieve Frequency


Synchronization
To achieve frequency synchronization on a network, use synchronous Ethernet.

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
clock ethernet-synchronization enable //Enables global synchronous Ethernet in the
system view.
clock ssm-control on //Configures SSM for source selection. By default, SSM is
enabled for an ATN NE.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
clock priority 20//Assigns a clock priority to the interface. This will affect
clock selection in the inbound direction on the local end. A smaller value
indicates a higher priority. Assigning the highest priority to each interface on
the shortest path for clock signal transmission is recommended.
clock synchronization enable//Enables synchronous Ethernet for an interface.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
clock synchronization enable

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Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
clock ethernet-synchronization enable
clock ssm-control on
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
clock priority 20
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
clock synchronization enable

Configure NE ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
clock ethernet-synchronization enable
clock ssm-control on
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
clock synchronization enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
clock synchronization enable

5.7.4 Configuring IEEE 1588v2 to Achieve Time Synchronization


After frequency synchronization is achieved on a network using synchronous Ethernet, use IEEE
1588v2 to achieve time synchronization on the network.

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteA-001
ptp enable //Enables global IEEE 1588v2.
ptp device-type bc //Specifies the BC mode for all devices.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
ptp delay-mechanism delay //Configures the delay measurement mechanism of a
device as delay which calculates the time difference based on the link delay of the
master and slave clocks.
ptp enable //Enables IEEE 1588v2 for the interface.
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

Configure NE ATN905-SmallCellSiteB-002
ptp enable
ptp device-type bc
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/2
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/3
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

Configure NE ATN910-MacroCellSite-003
ptp enable
ptp device-type bc

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interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable
interface GigabitEthernet0/2/1
ptp delay-mechanism delay
ptp enable

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