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Barbour Index Guide

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CENTRAL CONTROLS/BUILDING MANAGEMENT


GUIDANCE
Control systems, from a central remote location, provide a means for controlling and reporting
on the performance of a system within set criteria, and varying these criteria if required.
Monitoring systems provide information on the operational settings and general status of
services and equipment serving a building or site.
This includes control systems which:
Provide interlinks with the local controls required for each operational system.
Control the operation of the services and equipment.
Process data to provide management information for the operation of the building where
a central operator facility is specified.
The specific requirements of the project should be identified and are likely to include some or
all of the following:
Description of the operation of each system to enable the controls specialist to design
hardware and software to meet the performance criteria. The narrative should be
supported with controls diagrams and point schedules, etc.
Relationships between systems.
Scope of central control and monitoring hardware and functions that it is to perform.
Particular requirements as to performance criteria.
Where specific control routines are required, ensure that these are clearly defined.
Where an air control system is to be specified, ensure that compressed air is
incorporated into the specification.
Weather compensation
Optimise the gradient of compensation graph using dynamic simulation of the building and
heating system. The BEMS system should be configured to trim the compensation down
slowly until emitters are at 95% of load consistently.
The scope of works of the controls/BMS installation should include not only specified items
of mechanical and electrical equipment, but also all sundry components, computer programs,
data and documentation necessary for the complete execution and proper operation of the
installation, whether or not these sundry items are mentioned in detail.
The description of what the system shall include should cover the following topics:
1.
Motor control centres (MCC)
A typical arrangement is where the MCCs or starter/isolators are provided as part of the
controls package and that all wiring and wireways downstream of these are part of the
package. The electrical subcontractor is to make, test and prove the feeds into the incoming
terminals of these items.
Detail plant items which require a direct feed (ie chillers) and soft start.
Ensure that the installation of inverters is adequately described and harmonic interference
has been considered.

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2.
Power distribution
Refer to any wiring diagrams which are to be issued at tender. These should only illustrate a
wiring philosophy, illustrating the relationship between plant, local starter and panels (MCC or
distribution boards). The diagram should also define the contractual responsibilities of the
controls installer.
Provide an overview of the plant operation during power failure (plant specific modes of
operation should be detailed in the control description). Detail any requirements for a power
restart programme.
3.
Networking
The communications network linking the outstations is the backbone of the system and as
such its configuration defines the layout of the control system.
Any description should include the type of networking (i.e. peer to peer) and network
architecture (i.e. if any special arrangements are required). Special requirements such as
optical fibre cabling or communications protocol (i.e. Ethernet) should be highlighted.
If a site data network is to be used rather than the more normal dedicated BMS network, a
specification should be obtained from the IT consultant/client and inserted as the description
of the network. This should also detail the contractual responsibilities of the controls installer.
Prior to tender the specifier should ensure that each of the tenderers can use the proposed
network.
Any network diagrams which are to be issued at tender should only illustrate a network
philosophy and as such should not be based on a particular control system (unless a single
manufacturer is being specified). These diagrams should illustrate operator facilities, nominal
primary and secondary networks and interfaces to other systems but do not need to include
the exact number of outstations.
4.
Client requirement for communications security
This could range from physical protection of the communications cabling to the installation of
a duty/standby network. This is an unusual requirement as outstations can operate without a
communications network and only operator facilities would be lost.
In addition to identifying the operator facilities, all other interrogation points on the network
should be described, including:
Type of display and keypad on outstations
Points at which a hand tool can be plugged in
Points at which a laptop PC can be plugged in
In each case describe the range of information which shall be available (i.e. limited to an
outstation, limited to the network level or able to interrogate all outstations). In the case of the
laptop PC specify the BMS software required.
Describe any links to the system via the public telephone system.
5.
Field devices
Describe the mode of control (i.e. electronic/electric, electronic/pneumatic). Pneumatic
actuation may be preferable for large scale applications where good shut off is required or
where compressed air is available on site.
6.
Outstations
Detail battery backup/UPS and any special requirements.
7.
Operator facilities
The number of operator facilities required should be illustrated in the network diagram.
Identify which printers shall be capable of accepting alarms directly, generating management
reports or generating graphics.

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The specification should also include any third party software (i.e. word processor,
spreadsheet, energy management, maintenance etc.) This shall normally be determined by
the building operator.
Detail any other requirements not included in other sections.
8.
Interfaces to other intelligent systems
It will usually be simpler contractually for interfaces between different manufacturers (i.e. lifts,
fire, security, etc.) to be by the use of volt free contacts. Where companies have established
relationships with others, more complex links may be considered. Describe the type of
information to be made available to the BMS and at what level this shall be collected (i.e. field
or bus). Describe the extent of the interface ie shall the BMS be limited to monitoring the other
system or shall it be capable of modifying operating parameters or acting as a systems
integrator.
It may be easier to detail the contractual responsibilities of the controls installer by using the
diagrams which may be issued at tender. These diagrams should also illustrate the interface
between the systems.
The most common interface is that to a fire alarm system with associated firemans control
panels, and should be predominantly hard wired control. Provide an overview of the plant
operation in fire mode and firemans control (plant specific modes of operation being detailed
in the control description). Also specify the firemans control panel.
9.
Packaged plant
For all items of plant which are supplied with their own controls, describe the contractual
responsibilities of the controls installer. This could, for example, involve installation of the
packaged controls in line with the manufacturers guidelines. Installation of power wiring only
or making connections to volt free contacts in a control panel installed by others.
10. Monitoring
Detail any alarm monitoring not described in the control descriptions. Controls not
forming part of the central control system are normally to be described in the individual
system work section.

REFERENCE DOCUMENTS
The following documents provide further guidance:
BSENISO16484 Building automation and control systems Part 2 Hardware 2004, Part 3
Functions 2005 and Part 5 Data communication protocol 2003
BSRIA Application Guide AG 01/9 Standard specifications for BMS
BSRIA Application Guide AG 98/7 Library of systems control strategies
BSRIA Application Guide AG 01/10 Effective BMS guide to improving system performance
BSRIA Application Handbook AH 92/2 Commissioning of BEMS - code of practice
BSRIA Guidance Note GN 03/4 BMS maintenance guide
BSRIA Reference Note RN 90/1 BEMS Book
BSRIA Technical Note TN 98/9 Specifying building management systems
BRE Information Paper 1985/6 Selection of building management systems
BRE Digest 424 Installing BMS to meet electromagnetic compatibility requirements 1997
BRE Report 341 New environments for working re-design of offices and environmental
systems for new ways of working'1998
Butterworth Heinemann Faber and Kells heating and air-conditioning of buildings 2002
CIBSE Guide H Building control systems 2000
CIBSE Commissioning Code C Automatic controls 2001
Energy Efficiency Best Practice Programme, Fuel Efficiency Booklet 10 Controls and energy
savings 1993

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