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A monthly report by the Mark G- Maxty family

to the friends of the Kyushu Christian Siisti0


Kanoya, Kagoshima,

January, 1964

Linkletter No, 136

Dear Christian friends.


The

U.S. has had the worst stoms

of the Century. January in Japan has had the high


est temperatures ever recorded for this month. So we
live in different worlds in more ways than one.
The close of the year was full of

tragedy in Japan with the railway disaster in Tokyo


and the mine disaster in northern Kyushu. Both of
these however, were overshadowed by the death of the
YOUNG FOLKS AT HOME!

President,

I have never seen such a genuine

outpouring of affection as the country manifested


for the late President. One way the Japanese showed this was by personally coming to

express their sympathy to their American friends.

This happened to us often.

At Sueyoshi,

the congregation stood while Bro, Tanneguchi, the elder there, made a brief, formal state
ment of mourning addressed to our family.
In November I made a trip to Osaka Bible Seminary for the Councillor's
meeting, t^hile there, Walter and I had a fine but brief visit with nd and Bemice Olson,
long-time friends from the church at Truman, Minnesota where I preached 25 years ago.
There is special meaning in seeing old friends on foreign soil.

Markie (Walter at school, Markie to us at home) got home briefly at

Thanksgiving sporting a long beard he was cultivating for the Macbeth play at high school,
Christmas he was here for two weeks and a happy time it was at our house. I told Markie
that in many ways it was the last of his boyhood as we didn't know when he would be home
again for another Christmas,
We missed Paula very much.

We tried to phone her at Claremore, Okla,

where she was visiting her Grandmother Elrod (Maxey) but we couldn't hear one another.
We are grateful to many of you for including her in your circle of loved ones.

Many of you also sent food boKes and other remembrances to our family
here in Japan. Both the things sent and the thoughtfulness back of them let us know
that we were in your thoughts and prayers. Thanks very much.
We had ample opportunity
to share.
Markie had a Japanese friend from Osaka for a week. At Christmas time the
Paul PRATT family came for overnight. The young folks had a happy time playing rough and
tumble in the front room, (See the picture above). There were 16 at the dinner table JJec,
30, Greg's birthday, including the Vemey Unruh family, missionary neighbors three hours

north.
On New Year's Day, Bro. Yoshii and his family and brother came up. After a few
quick lessons on the carom board he was more than holding his own with the rest of us,
Christian service has not been neglected. Beside the regular schedule

we preached, showed slides and attended Christmas programs in four places. Gregory and
Faith were in the Christmas program at the Kanoya church on the 22nd but I could not attend.
At each place we went Pauline prepared beautifully decorated cupcakes for all those
attending, over 400 in all. The ladies at the leper colony were especially appreciative.

We had a happy time hying cookies, cakes, socks, a large curtain for
the auditorium plus a stove and rug for the infants room at the orphanage where we hold
services regularly. Antioch church, Mt. Sterling, Ky, and the church at East Orgnge pro
vided this treet. Another class of youngsters at Sciotoville, 0, provided Testaments.
The New Year began with at 6 a.m. service at the Kanoya church. Then
On January 3 and 4 a new feature of the area program began with a Young People's Rally
in a Youth Hostel 5et out on the old lava beds of Mt. Sakurajima, The preachers held
their bi-monthly meeting at the same time holding worship services jointly.
New Year is a big time in Japan. Everyone tries to pay up his debts.
Employees receive an extra month's wage's as a bonus. Parents outfit their children with
new clothes. Young ladies buy new kimonos for themselves and the country in general closes
shop for at least three days to celebrate. The man of the house saves some money back
for drinking. Between what he does at home and the saki he drinks when making the year-end
calls to his friends and relatives, his is pretty hard to live with when he gets home.
The idea back of the young people's rally was to give Chrsstion young

people a chance to get away from this situation and to have Christian fellowship instead.
For the first try, we were very pleased with the results. Over 30 came. Our two boys
and Mark Pratt came also. I thought it got the New Year off to a good start.
Last year when T spoke at the Past Tulsa_(Okla) church one of the members
gave me a diary taken from a dead Japanese soldier in the northern Philippines, He asked
me to get it translated and to return it to the soldiers family. In the course of doing

that I appeared in three newspaper interviews and over the TV station that serves this
area. No name ajJpeared in the diary but one diligent reporter eventually found the soldier's

serial number.

With this his widow and surviving daughter were found in Oita, a city in

Northeast Kyushu. They made a trip to our house to pick up the book and express their
thanks. It was the only word the wife had had concerning her husband since he boarded
a troop ship near the end of the war. Happiness and good will were the result of the search.

We were happy to welcome the Miles Avenue Church of Christ in Cleveland,


Ohio as a living link church in November. This makes a total of 16 churches which share
in the personal support of our family. About double that number regularly support the
general work of the mission. Without these and the personal contributors to this work
we could not be here in this ministry.
We are happy to be representing you in Japan,

S,M, Chang of Korea to whom we introduced you in the fall continues


his studies at Cincinnati Bible Seminary. At Christmas time he was iatridd to Miss Park,
his fiancee', who had also come from Korea to study at CBS. We wish them much happiness
and success as they continue their studies before returning to Korea later in the year.
We hope that it will be possible for those of you in that area to have him speak and to
show them both the hospitality of your homes. If they can return to Korea with an insight

into the ideal of restoring

the church as it was in New Testament times and with a genuine

feeling of friendship toward the brethren in America, good will have come from their stay
here

that will be felt in their ministry in Korea,

Please do what you can,

Not long ago we sent out cards asking for your correct address. Also
asking that you let us know you want the LINKLFTTFR by paying $1,00 per year. The response
has been good. V'e are now trying to bring our mailing list up-to-date. If you haven't sent
in your card yet, please do so soon. Or just send your name, address and dollar bill to
Box 49, North Vemon, Indiana. Mrs, Mary Deiotte, our fowarding secretary will acknowlege.

This is the year of the Dragon in Japan. Since he is supposed to be active


and energetic, this year is supposed to be one of good fortune and prosperity. We hope
this is true for each of you in a spiritual sense. If some of the financial peesperity rubs
off on you, too - well, it couldn't happen to nicer people.
[n ilis^Service,^

ark G. Maxey
LINKLETTER

Non-Profit Organization

Monthly Publication of
Kyushu Christian Mission

U. S.

Box 49
Ns

POSTAGE
PAID

Pleasure Ridge Park, Kentucky

North Vernon, Indiana

Permit No.

Missions Services
Box 968

Joilet, Illinois

60434

15

A monthly report by the MMrk G. M*x*y family


to the frieflds of the Kymbu Christism Missiom

Kji^toya, Kagc^tou, Japan

LINKLETTER NO.

137

MARCH, I961t

DEAR CHRISTIAN FRIENDS,


IN JANUARY THE PLUM TREES BLOSSOMED AND THE WEATHERMAN
PREDICTED A SPRING-LIKE WINTER.
INSTEAD WE ARE HAVING A WINTER -

LIKE SPRING.

I WISH HE COULD HAVE BEEN RIGHT THIS TIME BECAUSE

THESE WINTER BREEZES IN UNHEATED CHURCH BUILDT^'S REALLY BITE


INTO MY BOhES.

IT SEEMS TO PAULINE AND I THAT IT HAS TAKEN THE FIRST


FOUR MONTHS SINCE OUR RETURN TO REALLY GET SnUARED AWAY FOR THE
THIRD TERM WORK. PRACTICALLY ALL EQUIPMENT AROUTJD THE PLACE HAD
TO BE OVERHAULED. HUMIDITY AfO DISUSE TAKE A HIGH TOLL HERE. THE
CHEVROLET CARRY-ALL GOT ITS FIRST ENGIhE OVERHAUL IN 7 YEARS OF
SERVICE AM> ONE YEAR ON BLOCKS, AFTER WE GOT WHEELS AGAIN, VC

MISS OURASAKA

WERE ABLE TO PLU^E INTO A FULL ROUMD OF SERVICE.

AFTER GETTING HER HOUSEHOLD IN ORDER, PAUL


INE LAUNCHED HER PUPILS, GREG AND FAITH, INTO THEIR
STUDIES.

GREG IS PLUGGING AWAY ON 6TH GRADE WORK BUT

HAS A HARD TIME KEEPING HIS EYES ON HIS WORK V/HEN HIS

PLAYMATES TURN UP IN THE YARD IN EARLY AFTERNOON. HE


HAS MADE GOOD PROGRESS IN HIS CORNET LESSONS AhJD HIS
TF^CHER HAS INVITED HIM TO JOIN THE SCHOOL BAND. HE

rr^

AND FAITH SPEND A FEW MI^WTES WITH ME EACH MORNING AT


THE CENTER STUDYING JAPW^ESE KANJI (WRITING) AFTER
MORNING DEVOTIONS.

FAITH SKIPS THROUGH HER SCHOOL WORK.

THEY

HAVE 160 LESSONS TO DO FOR A YEAR'S WORK. SHE HAS 100


OF THEM DONE AND HOPES TO FINISH SCHOOL BY MAY,

SHE

AND HOPE BOTH HAVE A YARD FULL OF FRIENDS EVERY AFTER


NOON

PASSING OUT TRACTS

AND THEY TAKE AS MANY AS THEY CAN TO SUNDAY

SCHOOL WITH THEM.

FAITH IS TAKING PIANO LESSO^e, SHE


IS APT TO SKIP PRACTICE IF SHE IS NOT REMINDED BUT TO
MY UNPRACTICED EAR IT SOUNDS LIKE SHE HITS THE RIGHT
NOTES WHEN SHE DOES,

THE CHRISTIAN CENTER UNDER THE EFFICIENT


MANAGEMENT OF MISS OURASAKA HAS A FULL PROGRAM, HER

REPORT FOR LAST MONTH SHOWED 171 YOl^G PEOPLE STOPPED

IN TO PLAY PING PONG (AND TO USE THE RF^^DING RACKS


OF CHRISTIAN LITERATURE WHILE WAITING TO PLAY). 43
CHILDREN ATTENDED HER BIBLE CLASS HELD EVERY FRIDAY
AFTERNOON AND 193 STUDENTS ATTENDED MY ENGLISH BIBLE
CUSSES HELD FROM NOON TO FIVE SATURDAY AFTERNOONS.

ON THE BOOKSTORE SIDE, SHE SOLD 56 HYMNBOOKS, 38 BIB


LES, 56 MAGAZINES, 29 OTHER RELIGIOUS BOOKS AND WROTE
64 LETTERS. SHE ALSO LENDS BOOKS, SLIDES, TAPES,
CHARTS AND OTHER EVAt^ELISTIC MATERIALS. TIME BRINGS

CHANGES, HOWEVER, AND MISS OURASAKA HAS JUST ANNOUNCED


THAT SHE WILL BECOME MRS. IN THE SPRING. THE LUCKY MAN
IS A FINE CHRISTIAN FROM THE KAJIKI CHURCH. HAPPY FOR
BOTH OF THEM BUT SAD AT LOSING HER AhO SEEKING ANOTHER
TO REPLACE HER.

THE PAST MONTHS WE HAVE BEEN EMPHASIZING

HOUSE-TO-HOUSE TRACT DISTRIBUTION.

BRO. NEJIMA OF THE

KANOYA CHURCH, TEMPORARILY UNEMPLOYED DEVOTED A COUPLE


OF MONTHS OF SHOE LEATHER TO THIS PROJECT. THEN ON

JANUARY 15, A NATIONAL HOLIDAY, BRO, YOSHII, THE


KANOYA MINISTER, AND I LOADED THE CAR WITH YOUNG

PEOPLE AND HEADED SOUTH ALOTJG THE SEA COAST PUTTING


A TRACT IN EVERY HOME AS WE WENT, AT ^JOON TIME WE ALL '
SAT DOWN IN A FISHERMAN'S BOAT ALONG THE SHORE A^D EN
JOYED LUNCH TOGETHER. WE W^RIX/ED HOME AT hJIGHT WEARY
FROM A HAPPY DAY OF FELLOWSHIP A^JD WORK TOGETHER.

ABOUT 5000 TRACTS HAVE BEEN DISTRIBUTED SO FAR. 20,000


TO GO, WONDER IF WE'LL MAKE IT?

LUNCH TIME AT SEASHORE

AN INTERESTING INTERLUDE IN LATE JANUARY WAS AN APPEARANCE ON THE mTIO^^AL TELEVISION

STATIC*^ IN KAGOSHIMA, THE CAPITOL CITY OF OUR PREFECTURE.


WERE WITH ME.

TWO OTHER MISSIOHWIIES OF THAT CITY

THE 30 MINUTE DISCUSSIWJ OF OUR LIFE IN THIS AREA CONSUMED THE ENTIRE DAY. WE

MET IN THE MORNINS TO GET ACQUAINTED WITH THE PROGRAM DIRECTOR AND ANNOUNCER. AFTER LUNCH TO
GETHER WE GOT PRETTIED UP IN THE MAKE-UP ROOM AhO THEN WENT THROUGH THE PROGRAM TWICE BEFORE
THE ACTUAL PRESENTATION FOR TIMING AND CONTENT.

I SUGGESTED WE ALL HAVE A CUP OF COFFEE

TO DRINK DURIMi THE PROGRAM SO I MANAGED TO HAVE SOME OF MY FAVORITE BREW AMD TAU, TOO. ASIDE
FROM MY USING THE WORD FOR CHRYSANTHEMUM CKIKU) WHEN I MEANT TO SAY WEATHER (KIKO) THE PROGRAM
WENT WELL At> WAS A VERY SATISFYING EXPERIENCE.

OUR PROJECTED FULL-TIME TRAINING COURSE AT THE CHRISTIAN CENTER HASN'T MATERIALIZED

YET, BUT WE MAY HAVE SOMETHING GOING THAT MAY BE BETTER. TAKING THE TRAINING TO THE CHURCHES.
FOR ThE PAST THREE MONnHS I HAVE BEEN TEACHING C.J. SHARP'S TRAINING FOR SERVICE COURSE AT

EACH CHURCH WHERE I GO TO PREACH.

EVERY TVD WEEKS AT KUSHIRA, SUEYOSHI, KAIGATA, TARUMI2U

AM) THE LEPER COLONY, AFTER MY SERMON AKD FULL WORSHIP PROGRAM, "mE CONGREGATION SITS DOWN

AGAIN, DIG OUT THEIR NOTEBOOKS, WORKBOOKS, BIBlS AND PENCILS


A HALF TOGETHER

AND WE SPEKD ANOTHER HOUR AND

ON THE LESSON FOR THE DAY.

THE RESULTS HAVE EXCEEDED OUR EXPECTATIONS.

THE PEOPLE VOTED TO BEGIN THE COURSES

VOLUNTARILY BUT WE BEGAN SOMEWHAT HESITATINSLY KNOWING THAT TWO AhC A HALF HOURS IS A LONG
TIME TO SIT.
ALSO THAT EACH PERSON WOULD HAVE TO BUY A TEXT BOOK AND AN OLD TESTAMENT!
MOST
OF THE CHRISTIANS OWN ONLY NEW TESTAMENTS AM) HAVE ONLY THE FAINTEST NOTION OF THE OLD TESTA
MENT AM) ITS CONTENTS.
THAT IS CHANGING MOW. SO FAR WE HAVE SOLD OVER
100 OF THE COURSES.

ATTENDANCE HAS INCREASED IN SOf PLACES, HELD STEW)Y IN OTHERS.

THE PEOPLE HAVE REALLY BEEN

ENJOYING THEIR NEW FOUND KNOWLEDGE OF THE BIBLE.


IT WILL TAKE ALMOST TWO YEARS TO FINISH
THE COURSE AT THE RATE OF TWO LESSONS PER MONTH SO WE WILL BE TELLING YOU ABOUT THIS PROJECT
AGAIN LATER.
WE HA\^ BEEN GREATLY ENCOURAGED BY PROMISES OF NEW OR

SUPPORT FROM CHURChES AM) GROUPS IN AMERICA.

INCREASED PLEDGED MO^m^LY

HUMBLED, TOO, BY THE TRUST YOU HAVE PUT IN US

AND THE EXPECTATIONS YOU HAVE FOR THE WORK HERE.

THANKS FOR U^ERGIRDING US IN THIS WAY.

A SPECIAL WORD OF THWKS TO VERNON MILLER AND SON OF LEBANCW, OREGON WHO BROUGHT
UP OIR FURLOUGH STATION WAGON FROM SAN FRANCISCO WHERE IT HAD REMAINED UNSOLD SINCE AUGUST.

VERNON SOLD IT PROMPTLY AND THIS AKXJNT OF THE LORD'S MONEY WAS PUT BACK IN CIRCULATION.
WE HAVE HAD OPPORTUNITY FOR SHARING.

OSAKA BIBLE SEMINARY AFTER A NJMBER OF YEWIS

OF STUDYING IN AN UMHEATED BUILDING FINALLY INSTALLED A FURNACE THIS WINTER. WE CONTRIBUTED

$500 FROM THE MISSION FUND ON ITS COST.


PAUL PRATT HAS A VISION OF ESTABLISHING A WITNESS IN A NEW HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

IN KAGOSHIMA CITY.

WE HAVE PLEDGED $1000 TO HELP HIM IN THE PURCHASE OF A KEY PLOT OF GROCM)

IN THE CENTER OF THE ARBA.

IN THE TOV^ OF TARUMIZU, A FORMER ZEALOUS CHRISTIAN TURNED INTO AN IMPLACABLE


ENEMY OF THE CHURCH WHEN THE CONGREGATION; REFUSED TO LET HER CONTINUE TO RUN THE WHOL SHOW.
HER PROPERTY IS AT THE REAR OF THE CHURCH. SHE BEGAN USING THE CrtiRCH LAND AS HER OWN. SHE
CCWJSIDERS THE CHURCH BUILDING AS HER PERSONAL PROPERTY HAVRJG PAID FOR IT WITH HER CHURCH OFF

ERINGS SHE SAYS. SHE IS A LARGE WOMAN WITH A VOICE AM) TEMPER TO MATCH. WHEN SHE TALKS THE
WHOLE NEIGHBORHOOD CAN HEAR AND STOPS TO LISTEN.
HER OPPOSITION BECAME SO INTEMPERATE THAT WHILE I WAS AWAY THE

BUILDING AM) BEGAhJ MEETING IN THEIR HOMES.

MEMBERS FORSOOK THE

RECENTLY THEY APPOI^^rED A THREE MAN COWITTEE,

I AMONG THEM, TO VISIT HER AND PROPOSE m AMICABLE SOLUTION.

WE ONLY GOT IN ONE SENTENCE

BEFORE SHE STARTED TO BERATE US IN A SCREAMING MONOLOGUE. WHEN WE REFUSED TO BE INTIMIDATED,


SHE TOOK A LARGE WOODEN MALLET AND STARTED BREAKING IN THE WINDOWS, THE PLASTER AND THROWING
THE FURNITURE OUT IN THE YARD.

WITH THAT WE CALLED THE POLICE. THREE OF THEM FAILED TO GET

A WORD IN EDGEWISE AS SHE CONTINUED TO SCREAM AND SHOUT. SHE WAS KIM) ENOUGH TO LAY DOWN HER
MALLET.

RATHER THAN C,0 TO COURT OR INVOLVE THE POLICE AGAIN, THE CHURCH HAS DECIDED TO
RELOCATE AND SEEK A fJEW BEGINNING. THE TOWN IS TOO SMALL FOR A FURTHER BLACKENING OF THE
CHURCH'S NAME.

A SUITABLE LOT HAS BEEN FOUhD AM) NEGOTIATIONS FOR ITS PURCHASE HAS BEGUN.

THE CHURCH IS RAISING THE FIRST 100,000 AND WE HAVE PLEDGED TO RAISE 500,000 C$lt005 TO
COMPLETE THE PURCHASE. MUCH PRAYER, HEARTACHE AM) DISCUSSION TIME HAS ALREADY BEEN INVESTED.

AS YOU READ THESE-PAGESy PLEASE KNOW THAT WE ARE FULLY COMITTED ONCE MORE IN THE
GREAT CHRISTI/Wg TASK HERE - AT ONCE FRAUGHT WITH FAILURE AND FILLED WITH PROMISE. TAKE A
MOMENT TO PRAY.

IN HIS SERVICE,

MARK G. MAXEY
LINKLETTER

^ /

M>N-PROFIT ORGANIZATION
U.S. POSTAGE

MONTHLY PUBLICATION
THE
KYUSHU CHRISTIAN MISSION

PAID

BOX "tS, NORTH VERNON, IM).

PLEASURE RIDGE PARK, KENTUCKY


PERMIT NO. 15

Missions Services
Box 963

Joilet, IlUnols

60434

Linkletter No,

138

April, 1964
A monthly reporc by the Mark G. Maxty family
to the friends of the Kyushu Christian Mission
Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan

Dear Christian friends.

V/e can report that both the April showers and May flowers have arrived in Kanoya -

at practically the same time. The cherry blossoms were beautiful but brief as the driving

rain soon made the petals fall. The cherry blossom is the Japanese national flower, you know.
Its brief, brilliant beauty reminds them of mortal life, "Enjoy it while you may" it seems to
say.

Busy days these last weeks have been,

meeting in Kagoshima City.

A month ago we had our bi-monthly preacher's

Paul and Kathleen Pratt were our gracious hosts. These meetings

are always happy times of fellowship, prayer, serious study, a little 'horse play' and much

planning for future activities.


every August in Kanoya.

One ever-present subject for discussion is summer camp held

It falls my lot to be manager

this coming summer.

The last of March Harold Sims and son Johnnie were our guests,

Harold speaks the

best Japanese of any of our missionaries in Japan and, believe me, we gave him opportunity to
speak a lot of it during the two weeks he was here.
V/e had invited him to be guest lecturer at our 8th Training Course at the Christian

Center. The course ran two hours each night for a week, Sunday to Sunday, The subject was: "The

Gospel of Luke." Harold was thoroughly prepared and his lectures were as thoroughly appreciated.
His wit and humor enlivened the sessions as he covered the most important events and teachings
of this gospel.

On several nights I brought in delegations from outlying churches taking them back
home later. Thanks to the wliolehearted cooperation of Bro, Yoshii of the Kanoya church 21

of his members had perfect attendance every night. 22 others from elsewhere attended part-time,
I thought it was our most successful training course to date.

We gave Harold a one day breather , Then lectures on Luke at the Sueyoshi church
on Tuesday, Kushira on Wednesday and Tarumizu on Thursday. In each place class was held from

4 to 6 in the afternoon and from 7 to 9 at night. In between the church ladies served everyone

who came a Japanese meal. These institutes were an innovation in trying to carry a teaching
program to those who couldn't come to us, V/e are encouraged to try it again.

Meanwhile V.'alter had arrived hone from school for spring vacation. He had sent word
ahead to his Mother about the things he wanted to eat. Pauline provided them all in her own

delicious style. I think we all gained a couple of pounds in the week that he was home. V/e all

enioyed his vacation with us, me, especially, as he did all the driving while he was here. Now
he'is back in school for the final grind till graduation in June. He will return to the States
to ent^r Seminary this summer.

Another overnight guest that week was Velma Held, teacher in the U.S. Forces Dependent

Schools near Tokyo, and famous for her care of the missionaries during her long stay in Japan.

MAKOTO YOSHII INVITES HOPE


FOR A JAPANESE MEAL

KAGOSHIMA PREACHERS MISSIONARIES SINGING


AT ANNUAL CONVENTION OF JAPAN CHURCHES

HAROLD SIMS OF TOKYO


TEACHING GOSPEL OF LUKE

Next year she will be teaching in a school for missionary children in India at her own expense.
More power to you, Velma! You have given an enviable demonstration of the contribution a nonprofessional missionary can make on a foreign field.
Harold Sims wound up his preaching with us by a three day evangelistic meeting in the
Kanoya church. Instead of the usual advertising, Bro. Yoshii had sent out personal invitation
to all his contacts. I did the same for members of my English Bible classes. A former member now

living in Tokyo sent a sheet of stamps as an offering. These stamps sent out the invitations.
Many attended their first religious service because of this invitation method. Besides the
preaching, excellent religious movies were shown each night. No confessions of faith but many
wrote on their decision cards of their personal interest in Christ and their desire to seek and
find Him as Saviour,

Resurrection Day began bright and early with Sunrise Service at the leper colony fol
lowed by the Osumi Taikai at the Kanoya church. (Osumi is the name of our peninsula and 'taikai*
is the word for convention.) 8 churches and preaching points were represented. A student pilot
from the Kanoya Naval Air Station made the confession. A rousing song service followed by per
sonal testimonies brought the meeting to a close in the late afternoon.

Harold's visit wasn*t all work. We found time to whip up a freezer of ice cream,

drive up the side of our favorite volcano, Mt. Sakurajima, and a trip to see a small rocket
launched. We have Japan^s only rocket base being developed 25 miles south of us. "A poor man's
Cape Canaveral" you might say. Nevertheless, mighty important and a real boost to our area,
Monday, March 30, Harold and I flew north. That night, as guest speaker at the Kobe

Area Missionary Fellowship, I stirred up a little interest, even some controversy, while speaking
on the subject, "A New Strategy for Missions in Japan." That night we enjoyed the hospitality of
Claude and Evalyn Likins,

Most of Tuesday was spent at the Quarterly Councillor meeting of the Osaka Bible Sem
inary, A vital meeting but sometimes tedious as the Japanese like to talk around a subject more
than once before coming to a firm decision. In fact, at this meeting we are able to decide a mat
ter that had been discussed for five years. Thirteen years ago, if someone had told me I would

have been able to endure that much talk on one subject, not of earth-shaking importance, without
losing my temper, I would have laughed in unbelief.

But I did it.

Later that evening. Seminary president, Martin Clark and I took the electric train to

Nagoya for the ISth Annual Convention of the Japan Churches of Christ, Host missionary Howard |

Davis, met us at the station and drove us out to the hotel where it was being held. For the fir^
time I had been asked to give a convention address in Japanese. It is one thing to preach to
home folks in my very basic Japanese. It is another thing to appear in a convention before the
"city slickers. I worked, worried and fretted and finally wound up reading the message. Nobody

slept, most laughed at my jokes and there was one real loud "Amen" when I finished. I took it as
a sign of fervor, not of relief that the sermon was ended.
After that the climax of the conven

tion for me was the special music brought by the Kagoshima preachers and missionaries - of which
I was one of course.

Then back home to

Pauline and the children

and another confrontation with

the opportunities and the problems that each spring brings to the work in Japan.
IN HIS SERVICE,

MARK G. MAXEY

Non-Profit Organization

LINKLETTER

Monthly Publication of
Kyushu Christian Mission

U. S. POSTAGE
PAID

Box 49
i

North Vernon, Indiana

Pleasure Ridge Park, Kentucky

Permit No, 15

Missions Services
Box 963

Joilet, Illinois

60434

i.mHi.mTtun
A monthly report by the Mark G. Maxey family
Linkletter No. 139

to the friends of the Kyushu Christian Mission


Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan

June, 1964
r

Dear Christian friends.


Pauline speaking: "At the close of our April women's meeting in the
Kanoya church I suggested a Mother-Daughter banquet for May. I told them
about those I had attended in America. The minister thanked me for the

w 5i
I

suggestion, lie said that they were happy to get new ideas since the church , .

Ipf "

in Japan has no background for special days in the church.

"The women were interested but they had never seen a banquet like

*
w

PAULINB S DAUGHTERS

I had talked about. They did not know the work involved nor the proper Japanese word to describe

what it would be. UTien I got their approval, I asked for a committee to help. They came to the
house to talk and plan. Thank God for that committee! They were hard workers and willing to give
endless hours to the project.

"As I first described it, the purpose of the banquet would be


for the Glory of God.
Mothers would bring their daughters and daughters their mothers. Or they could borrow mothers
or daughters for the evening. Many Japanese Christians are only one in a family so it meant that
the Christian women would he bringing some one outside of Christ,
"We decided that we would plan and advertize in such a way that no one would want to miss

it.

First, the place. A large room in the local department store was promised. Mere we could

have a meal without trouble to the women. It would also be a witness to those who worked in the

store. The time would be from 6 to 9 p,m. The price, 300 per plate (83$), This was as much as
the women could pay and yet high enough to provide enough food,
"Then came the calling by all the women in every home where the members had not come for

a long time.

The young women's group was represented in the committee and I think worked as

hard as the mother's group, I told the committee it would take a good month to make all the
plans. It did to the very day. Invitations were delivered by hand to every one and later sent

byrmail for the final answer.

The committee thought we should plan for thirty people but I

thought at least fifty would come,


"We planned a program using three groups: girls from the Sunday School, young women, and

the mothers themselves. Our big attempt was a play showing a mother looking at a picture album
of pages of her daughter's life. Different mothers wrote the parts about each age. Then it was
all put together and'read by a single reader while the pages of the album were opened to revealthe girl of each age. The young women spent many evenings to construct this album with its

beautifully painted pages. It begaii with the minister's little baby as the first real life
picture and ended with one of the girls dressed in a white wedding dress. I know that this
brought memories to the women present.
"I was thrilled to hear mention of Christ and the church in every phase of the girl's

life from the time she was bom to the time she was to start her own Christian home. We had

three generations represented in the play.

'As the plans progressed, the interest grew. Soon the fifty tickets were gone. 64 were
actually sold.- The weather was fine.

ious

Japanese-style.

the table.

Every one was dressed beautifully and the food was delic

I had made a cup cake and favor for every plate.

That added color to

Mrs. Yoshii, the minister*s wife, did a wonderful job as mistress of ceremonies.

Two women gave wonderful testimonies of how being a Christian helped them to be better mothers.
One was an older Christian and the other a young mother who brought her little son of forty-one
days (the only boy to attend). The women had prepared scripture verses on large posters and
hung on the walls.

"You could feel the presence of the Holy Spirit in the meeting. As I closed my eyes and
listened to the singing, my heart was filled with thanksgiving and praise to our Lord who will
bless our feeble efforts with his power. He will do far more than we expect or ask. I believe
there was real rejoicing in the hearts of those who worked -and especially those who brought
guests who had never been in a Christian meeting before."
So ends Pauline*s account of a wonderful meeting and a very satisfying project. Well,
a few changes have taken place. To our great regret, the Paul Pratt family are leaving Kagoshima city to continue their children*s education in Tokyo and carry on the mission work of
the Andrew Pattens now on furlough. We look forward to their return two or three years hence.
Meanwhile they leave an unfillable vacancy in our hearts and in the work in the Kagoshima area.
Also, we had asked Takeo limure, minister of the Kagoshima church, if he would come to
Kanoya to take charge of the Christian Center work. He accepted and moved his family here in
April. We have a valued co-worker here who is also sharing in the preaching responsibilities.
But the Kagoshima church is without a minister. Their need is great and so is our concern. Here
is a worthy object of prayer.

Last month I had something rare for me - a seige in bed. Five days of it. After I re- *
covered, I took Gregory to Kobe for a brief visit. We saw Walter in a school play and helped
him pack his trunks. He is graduating and returning to the United States this summer, Gregory
visited the dormitory and classes at Canadian Academy, We are planning to send him up in Sept
ember to enter the 7th grade.
Bro. Yoshii will establish a Christian kindergarten soon using land here at the mission.

A new building with equipment must be prepared , however .

This is expensive. Many of you whV)


met him when he studied in the States two years ago may want to help this project. He would be
glad to hear from you. Write: Hideo Yoshii, 8201 Kitada cho, Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan.
M

A special issue of the Linkletter has been printed. It contains pictures and a brief
historial statement of the Kyushu Christian Mission. If you'd like copies for DVBS, summer camp,
or missionary gathering of any kind, write to North Vernon or to John Baker, 9164 North Plaza
Drive, Northfield, Ohio, 44067. They are packed in sets of 100 copies.
. You will receive this letter in mid-summer, the very busiest time of Christian activity

for us. Each of you, also, have your own concerns.


We hope that one of these concerns will
be for the physical and spiritual needs of the summer evangelism here. IN HIS SERVICE,

LINKLETTER

Monthly Publication of
Kyushu Christian Mission
Box 49

North Vernon, Indiana

Non-Profit Organization
U. S. POSTAGE
PAID

Pleasure Ridge Park, Kentucky


Permit No. 15

A monthly report by the Mark G, Maxey family


to the friends of the Kyuihu Christian Mission
Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan
Linkletter No.

July, 1964

140

Dear Christian friends.

Come early summer and it*s time to think of school


vacation and graduation. This was true at our house. Pauline

put her two home pupils, Greg and Faith on double schedule to
wind up their work by early June. V/e wanted to be on hand for
an important event, Walter Mark's graduation from Canadian Ac-

ademy in Kobe.

The whole family were in their Sunday best for the

happy moment.

You don't have sons graduating from high school

every day. We were happy to note that in his quiet way Walter Mark had made his Christian
life and purpose felt among his classmates. Though there were many children of missionaries in
the graduating class, Walter was the only one who had made the choice to prepare for missionary
service and return to Japan. Pauline and I were happier over this decision on his own part
than we could have been about any honor that could come to him.

Diploma in hand, he joined us for the annual missionary convention on the island of^
Shikoku. We are deeply grateful to Don and Norma Burney for making it possible. The convention
was held in a mountain hotel which the owner ingeniously air conditions by pumping in air from

a cave,

In addition to the natural scenery,

this area is famous for its roosters with tails

30 feet long. That may seem like quite a tail - and it is.
It was a time of wonderful fellowship as you can imagine. Many of us do not see one
another from year to year accept at convention time. We made our contribution to the program,

Walter sang , Gregory played his first cornet solo in public, I preached on the subject: "Using
the Bible as Criteria for Evaluating our Work," Thankfully, no one slept. We sent a large
selection of books from our Book Store and had a fine time selling them on easy credit terms
to missionaries who had turned their pockets inside out to make the convention trip.
Returning home, we preached Sunday morning at the Hiroshima home of Mr. and Mrs,

Kishi, Mrs. Kishi, a former Kanoya girl, is now working with Mrs. Dittemore in radio broad
casting and follow-up in that city. Sunday night we preached again in northern Kyushu at the

home of Bro. Yoshii's parents now living there. Monday, Walter got his own passport at the
U.S. Consulate

in Fukuoka.

The visits and hospitality of missionary friends along the way

made the trip a pleasant one. Especially, Claude and Evalyn Likins in Kobe.
All this sounds interesting enough but we made it an adventure by going by car.

took

doing to get the Chevrolet Carry-All in shape after eight years of rough roads, rust

It

and rain. We could not have done it without the help of Ray Payne and A1 Giese of Storm Lake,
Iowa, For years, these men have provided the spare parts for this gospel chariot
a

personal project.

At last we were ready to go.

The local mechanic shook his head in doubt.

Bro. Yoshii asked the church at mid-week prayer meeting to remember us and. the car in prayer.
We had driven from Kobe to Kagoshima two times before, in 1950 and 1957, Then it took

three full days over unimproved roads. Some changes have been made. All but 100 miles in Kago
shima are paved. A tunnel under the sea leads out of Kyushu to Honshu,^ Toll roads are appear
ing, New roads have been carved out of virgin mountain territory. But in the old sections,

bumper to bumper traffic is the rule. Usually the bumper you are touching is a huge truck. You

haven't lived unless you have met one of these giants passing another truck on a blind, uphill

curve. The police don't seem to mind this but they arrive promptly to pick up the pieces of
the unlucky ones who don't get out of the way in time.

We travelled 1800 miles over some of the worst and best road imaginable and by God's

grace arrived home unscathed except for three flat tires, a few scratches and a do-it-yourself
wrap around bumper. Interestingly enough, during the whole trip no filling station offered
to wipe our windshield or check the water and oil. All were pretty sharp with the gasoline
hose though. At one station, I drove on the hoist for grease. After one man got the truck off
the ground, another came running out yelling, "Don't use that hoist. It won't come down!"

He was right.

It wouldn't and didn't. It took half the timbers in the lumber yard next

door and more wisdom than Solomon had before I was able to drive away from there,

I didn't

look back.

Three weeks of high pressure work plus the regular teaching and preaching schedules

followed our return home. Every effort was bent toward making preparation for Walter's trip '
to the U.S. and making his last days with us happy ones. Two weeks of solid rain dampened

our spirits. An insignifigant thing, of course, compared to the tremendous damage it did
throughout Japan plus the Niigata earthquake. Truly, Japan is a land afflicted with disaster.
The third week it cleared and we stole time for a quick dip in the ocean every day. Walter
went with me on the visits to the churches. Each one gave him a farewell party and rememstill remember him as a boy of four when he first came to Kanoya. They
still fino It hard to believe that he is now a six-footer.

Okinawa.

Walter left there by plane at

the lumps
our throats goti in the way. Some feelings are too deep for words anyhow. '"t
We hated
to seein
flnrf wL
^ He will spend the restt'"ofPl"
took off
thatand
he husband
had become
a man
and
was on his own.
the summer
withwemyknew
sister
at Storm
present at his graduation in 1968,

"r

Cincinnati Bible Seminary in September. We hope to be

fellowship in Okinawa during our brief stay there: With Don

ThL
Smth. and Air Force family, who opened their home and hearts to our family
IheL
who he^L^rh
Boulton.
our missionaries
there,who
helped chauffeur us around. With Harlan and Emeline Woodruff
at their
home and
hL
recalled
the fellowship
had ast year at Missions Week inpreached
Wi-Ne-MaSunday
Camp morning.
in Oregon. We With
the First
ChristiLwechurch
Okinawa made up of military families on the island. It was a pleasure tn inin i-Vioi-r- r,i
on the beach on Saturday and to preach for them on Sunday afternoon!
'
baso

Sroup of people making their witness felt for Christ on and off
looking for a preacher to come and work with them. He can preach in English

w^"' inhe th^"pa1ifL^7;ny^^rusrndrt^/^S."cftlL^ar^i,chu^L"n'pav' "rf" " "vere. e should have some


income lo suppl^Ln?'
hase
^Ve"cCfh
fe^e^sUi^^'
lished, converts are being made, a great opportunity for missionary work among our own people
Rnv
BOX

TP

I"inister on the field can be the unifying force for a very imporLnt

m '
J65, F
Koza, Okinawa,

directly for particulars: First Christian Church, Koza CPO

Christian camp will be held in the Christian Center

are getting ready. Tents are being repaired.

Folding tables and

^nn^c A
Ashade tree has been
- enough
to accomodate
Ceiling
have.been
_rooms-.
planted.
The grassall.
is thick
and fans
beautifull.

put in the-class-

After camp, three weeks of the summer training program with a full schedule of

evangelistic meetings through August and September. TrLtf are being distributed vL

newspapers throughout the area. Advertisements are being printed. Meeting places and public
nreiL;,^tn T
evangelistic aids have been ordered. Work and
"ThA
is not enough.
You canmuch
share
us in the vital nartRememberThe Isupplication of a righteous
man availeth
in with
its working."
^ r%
'

IN HIS SERVICE,

I Tkh^l
imitTTEK
Monthly Publication of
K>'ushu Christian Mission

fi\'

A/- ^^^0^
^

U. S. POSTAGE
PAID

Box 49

Louisville, Kentucky

North Vernon, Indiana

Permit No. 537


Missions Services

Box 9<^8
Joilet Illinois

60A54

Non-Profit Organization

ZTfwZeffeR

rUBFECTUKE

A monthly report by the Mark G. Maxey family


to the friends of the Kyushu Christian Mission
Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan
Dear Christian friends,

(aAotsoVoW

Friends who have traveled to our home at the end of

Japan often say as they come in the door exhausted: "How in

the world did you ever find this place?". Here is the answer
very briefly.
r

Mark Gregory Maxey was born in Pomeroy, Washington

vi^r cum

August 10, 1918, one of nine children bom to R. Tibbs and

Maude Maxey.

Six are alive today, all active in Christian

service: Isabel Dittemore, Tibbs, Mark, Mary Ellen Giese,

Victor and Bryan in that order.

'

His Mother lives at Claremore, Oklahoma, still active at 83.

His Father died in 1938,

R. Tibbs Maxey believed in Restoration principles and preached the Book without fear
or favor. He pioneered in lonely places without benefit of sponsoring organizations or permis
sion from any headquarters. He believed that God cared for His own and so launched out in faith.
His children follow in his footsteps.
Mark Maxey spent his boyhood in Oregon, Idaho and Ohio. He studied at the University of
Minnesota and graduated from Minnesota Bible College. In 1937 he began preaching at Madelia and
Truman, Minnesota. Pauline Maxey was reared in Wind Ridge, Pennsylvania. A life-long desire to
be a missionary led her to Cincinnati Bible Seminary

came there for graduate work^

for training. She met her husband when he

Mark and Pauline were married December, 1941,

They ministered

at North Vernon, Indiana until Mark" left Tor five years of seiVice as an Ariny~^aplain.
The Maxeys have five children: Paula, Walter, Gregory, Faith and Hope. (We are living
on "charity".) Three other sons died at birth. The children are all fluent in Japanese. Through
grade school they study at home with their Mother as teacher. For high school they must go to
the city of Kobe, 700 miles north. Both Paula and Walter graduated from Canadian Academy there.

Paula has completed two years at Milligan College and Walter has enrolled at Cincin
nati Bible Seminary, Soon they can return to Japan as missionaries in their own right. Lonliness ,
separation and homesickness are the bitter tea the missionary family must learn to drink with
God*s grace. Any kindness yuu can show to Paula and Walter will help sweeten that tea. (They can
come speak to your church, Bible school or young people on week-ends.)
June, 1948, Pauline joined her husband at a military base in Japan, Paula contracted
polio and their stay was cut short. It was long enough, though, to catch a vision of service.
Vision became decision in August, 1949, They resigned from the Army to become direct support
missionaries. They wanted to go to Kyushu because the church of Christ had not yet entered that

Hideo Yoshii

southern island.

They wanted

to go to a place where nobody had gone nor was likely to go. UTiile

wondering where, a letter of invitation came from a group of believers in Kanoya. Paul Cook, now
of the Kaimichi Mission, had been in Kanoya as an Air Force chaplain. The teaching of he and his
wife had borne fruit.

A nucleus had been formed.

The Maxeys gladly accepted the invitation. Kanoya was remote - 1000 from Tokyo, an ard
uous journey
by train, ferry boat and bus. It was a city of 70,000, the trading center of
an unevangelized peninsula. Forty years before a British missionary had lived there two years.

After him, no one.


war effort.

The Kanoya Naval Air Station was an important "kamikaze" base for the Japanese

Other than that, few Japanese knew where it was.

Arriving in Japan, September, 1950, the Maxeys went to Kanoya immediately. First they
lived in an inn, then in an empty Army home, and finally in their own metal pre-fab house. At
first the area was lonely, but now the city has grown out to surround the 3 1/2 acre mission
site made lovely by its trees, flowers and grass.

Takeo limure and Sadahiko Motoyoshi helped Mr, Maxey as they planted churches in Kanoya,
Kushira, Koyama, Matsuyama, Sueyoshi and Tarumizu. The nearby leper colony and orphanage in town
became the first of many preaching points. Isabel Dittemore came to Kagoshima City in 1952 and
began churches in Kagoshima, Kushikino and Kajiki. Junko Daikusono and Naganori Tanijiri preach
for these churches now.

Paul and Kathleen Pratt have continued in Kagoshima since 1S59 in a fine way. They have

made significant contributions through radio broadcasting and developing a Bible correspondence
course. In 1951 work was begun on the island of Tannegashima 50 miles south, A1 and Eleanor
Hammond with Tadayoshi Ikeda have expanded that work. It continues under their direction.

A Christian Center was built in Kanoya in 1958. Leadership training, literature evangel
ism, young'people's summer camp, equipment for teaching and evangelism and various teaching min
istries are located here. It is the hub of the work. Takeo limure conducts the Center program
and preaches at Kushira.

From the mission in Kanoya, Christian carpenters have gone out to build ten church

buildings, six with parsonages attached. About 20 Kagoshima young people from this prefecture,
ten from the Kanoya area, have prepared for Christian leadership at Osaka Bible Seminary, Their
lives have blessed the entire work in Japan, One Kanoya young man, Hideo Yoshii> has returned
to minister to Kanoya and this area. Co-workers of his ability and dedication encourage the
missionary to continue.
A good beginning has been made. Christian roots have gone down. But the real job
remains to be done. - 99 3/4% of the Japanese are still not Christians. Rising costs and the
challenge of the unfinished task make additional friends and supporters welcome. Will you be one?

The Kyushu Christian Mission is a recognized non-profit corporation.

Your gift is tax-exempt.

The Maxeys report their ministry each month by this Linkletter. The cost is $1.00 per year if
you'd like to receive it.
To correspond with the Maxeys direct, write them at: Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan. Send
contributions and Linkletter subscriptions to the mission forwarding secretary: Mrs. Mary Deiotte
B^x 49, North Vernon, Indiana, 47265. Order slides and display materials from John Miles Baker,

'^'l'64irorth' Plaza Drive, NortfTfield, Ohio, 44067.


A closing thought; The world must be won to Christ! If not by you, by whom?

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMKNT:

A lecture I gave last year at the Central College of the Bible, Mob-

erley, Missouri has been printed also in A1 Hammond's fine magazine, Far Hast Christian MisS'
ionary. This quarterly is getting the total missionary message out to a wide audience. You
should be getting it. (Cost: $1 per year, 27 Sakurayama cho, Shinjuku ku, Tokyo, Japan)
Now this lecture has been re-printed in a booklet. The Title: ESTABLISHING THE

CHURCH ABROAD:

THEN AND NOW.

If you are interested in the hard facts of the missionary sit

uation today, you will find this booklet necessary and profitable reading.
TO ORDER, TEAR OFF HERE AND MAIL TO THE ADDRESS ON THE OTHER SIDE.

A monthly repKJrt by the Mark G. Maxey family


to the friends of the Kyushu Christian Mission
Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan
Linkletter No. 141

Auc
August,
1964

Dear Christian friends.


The word for August is more. More rain,
more heat, more wind, more work, more satisfaction. The first
week always belongs to summer camp, now in its 13th year and
held permanently in the Christian Center here in Kanoya,

We have two large tents so the campers

CAMP

FACULTY

really camp. Out of kindness to the girls we give them the tent most likely to survive a
storm. One always comes. This year the typhoon was kind enough to cone a day early. We
delayed setting up the tents
and then worked extra hard on Sunday afternoon. After that we
slept snug and dry in spite of showers every day.

It was a fine camp, 80 campers though not all at the same time. 8 faculty
including two students from Osaka Bible Seminary, Carl Fish as chapel speaker, Paul Pratt here
for his 4th year, myself and three preachers of our area - Takeo limure, Hideo Yoshii and Tada
yoshi Ikeda. The manager's job rotates each year. This year the lot fell on me. Since the

camp schedule ran from 6,30 a.m. to 10,30 p.m. it was the manager who was beat at the end of
the week, not the campers.

They never ran down.

Two Christian ladies served as cooks. Pauline and Bro. Ikeda helped add

variety to the menus. Chopsticks and rice were essentials for every meal. But for the first
time wc noticed food left on the plates. Evidence of Japan's increasing prosperity and wellbeing. Perhaps another good reason for left-overs was that the campers bought 800 ice cream
bars during the week.

Juniors, Intermediates and Seniors attended the same camp. This would be
an impossible situation in the U.S. but the Japanese are adaptable. Separate classes were held
for ail three levels but worship and recreation included all. Awards were given for Bible
memorization (written), for the best posters dra^vn before camp time to advertize it; and for
the best Bible plays by the various teams.

for
ance
with
Camp

Tuesday afternoon the campers took a bus to the sea shore 5 miles away
swimming and games. Pauline used the calm at camp for Ladies Day. She had a fine attend
and program with Kathleen Pratt as the featured speaker, Thursday night climaxed the cam]stunt time, inspirational sermon and the outdoor bonfire with singing and testimonies.
ended Friday noon and all pitched in and helped break camp.

BRO. IIMURE'S JUNIOR CLASS

THE CAMPERS

TO: Mrs. Mary Deiotte,


Box 49

North Vernon, Ind.

copies of Mark
Maxey's booklet, "Kstablishing the Church Abroad: Then and Now,"
I

Please send

enclose

(The cost is 25^ each, plus ten cents postage. Postage free if four
or more ordered at the same time. In bulk, 50 copies for $10,00,

SEND TO: (Your name)

Street,City State

We had two campers from Tokyo, 1000 miles away. One of them wrote back:

"I think you know every day I spent at the camp was a hearty experience and a very precious
thing for me. Also I could get something in me as to my way of life. How I could enjoy my
self in that tent - hearing the rain falling, sometimes mosquitoes, boy's talking in their
sleep, and the sweet wonderful smelling grass."

The preachers stayed over another day and night for their regular meeting.
We began with a discussion of the camp - its mistakes and successes - and ended with a wat-

ermellon feed on the front lawn. One missing member was Bro. Naganori Tanijiri of Kushikino
church.
lie had a serious kidney operation and was unable to attend camp. Much better now.

Tochihiko Shimada, faculty member of Osaka Bible Seminary, and his family
have spent August with us. lie conducted the 9th Leadership Training Course on the subject:
"Elements of the Bible".
The course lasted 3 weeks. Each morning.after I had taught an Eng
lish class from 8 to 9, I led devotions and then Bro, Shimada taught till noon. There were
6 regular students, 6 others who came part time.
Shimada-san was also the preacher for 3 evangelistic meetings held

the last three week-ends in August. "Dendo" is the word we use in Japan. 20,000 handbills
and 5000 tracts were distributed. Hoping to attract people who might not enter a church we
went elsewhere: the town hall, a primary school, a firemen's assembly room.

Attendance ran

ranged from good to bad to indifferent but everywhere we found a few who were really seeking
a new way of life.

These made the effort worthwhile,

^Mondai" is the Japanese word for problems. We had those, too. In Sueyoshi we ran competition with the annual mid-August Buddhist festival called "O-Bon", At

this time the souls of the dead are supposed to return to the family circle. It is a time
for feasting, re-union, candles, gift giving. Non-believers find it hard to resist even as

non-believers in America would find it hard to escape Christmas. But the Sueyoshi Christians
were faithful in attendance. They cleaned the church, put up posters, provided the meals.
Their cooperation and decision to re-open the long closed Bible school was reward enough.
At Koyama, Typhoon Kathy huffed on Friday, puffed on Saturday (only 8

came) and obliterated us on Sunday. What a gall

She made a complete circle of Okinawa, res

ted a day or two and finally came our way at a leisurely 5 or 6 miles an hour but with 80

m,p,h, plus center winds. The typhoon was so big it took 48 hours to pass over Kanoya, the
longest typhoon we have ever endured. We were shook up mightily but no serious damage here.
Miss Ourasaka has given the month to DVBS work: Sueyoshi, Kushira, the orphanage and the Christian Center, 76 attended here, many getting their first Christian

teaching.

Our own children. Faith, Hope and Greg , have attended faithfully bringing a host

of their Japanese friends with them. You would be surprised to hear them recite their mem
ory verses in Japanese each day.

And so into September.

Pauline has decided not to send Gregory away to

school but to teach him at home another year. We feel that he needs us and we neea him a

little longer.
The Calvert school books, lessons, paper and pencils are here for the child
ren to begin. The teacher (Pauline) is depending on occasional trips to the principal's
office (me) to keep her students in a serious mood,
IN

HIS SERVICE,

COTEOTeR
Monthly Publication of

Non-profit Organization
U, S,

Kyushu Christian Mission


Box 49

North Vernon, Indiana

Missions Services

Box 9^6
Joilet Illinois

60A5A
RETURN REQUESTED

f _,

POSTAGE
PAID

Louisvil1e, Kentucky
Permit No. 537

A monthly report by the Mark G. Maxey family


to the friends of the Kyushu Christian Mission
Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan
Linkletter No. 142

October, 1964

Dear Christian friends.

These are heady days for Japanl The Emperor's young- |L ^

est son has just been married to a Tokyo girl. Now all

the children are married and I can imagine the Emporer


gi||iW
and
Empress are heaving asigh of relief like other par- ||R|b^
On October 1 the world's fastest train began operat
ing between Tokyo and Osaka after five years_of work and
a cost of one billion dollars. People are expected to come

^CtT

EVANGELIZING AT SUEYOSHI

from half way around the world just to see it and ride it, I'm looking forward to it myself.
This month Japan is host to the 18th Olympiad, In preparation the whole nation has spent
a great deal of its strength and money the past four years. The face of the nation's capitol
has been lifted. New roads fashioned where only alleys existed before. The entire sports
facilities have been created new from the ground up. 100 yen and 1000 yen commemorative coins
have been issued to say nothing of a dozen or so special Olympic stamps. Collectors being
what they are, these coins and stamps are already too valuable to use.

The Olympic torch made its way ftom Greece and was brought to Kagoshima by airplane. Our
family went to see its arrival and shared the thrill of the Japanese watching the sacred flame
begin its journey.
Most surprising was that the flame was carried by a young woman for
the first leg of its-trip to Tokyo. In the land of the always superior male, I thought that
was quite a concession,

October is Happy Birthday for our happy four-year-old, Hope, Farmdale church, her living
link in West Virginia, sent a special gift and with that we had a little play house built
in the back yard. This is where her friends assembled for the special cake and treats that
Pauline had fixed.

It has been a pleasure to watch her personality develop this year. If she

keeps going at the present rate, Pauline and I will either

keep younger longer or get old be

fore our time. Probably the latter,

It(was fourteen years ago in October thatiour family actually began to live in Kanoya
after a year of preparation in the States and two months getting to Japan and actually finding
a piece of land on which to build. Some of you will remember the story - how we were able
to'buy 1/4 acre of unused- Army land from the Japanese government for $300, It was very

tonely then. No trees and only one house in sight. That is all changed now. This is the live

liest, growingest neigl^orhood in Kanoya,

Later we added^^ree acres 'of land alongside and built the Christian Center there. But
since our return last'year we have heard rumors that the land, was going to be divided up and
some of it given to others^Eumors became fact a few days ago when the City Hall announced
its plan to criss-cross, the area with roads., , Everybody is to lose 22% of their land, property

boundaries are to be changed and the land t(f be divided up among existing owners.
This plan, if carried out, will give a big hunk of land facing the highway to three other
people, cause the loss of four smaller buildings plus the removal of the Christian Center from

its present beautiful sight to the back of the property where it can neither be seen nor heard.
It looks like the Mission land is the special target of the city planners. Naturally we are
protesting. We do not know what the outcome will be but are determined not to worry about it,
especially when we can pray - and you can do the same.
(over)

Please detach here for

your

ANNUAL LINKLETTER SUBSCRIPTION through October, 1965

* Please mail with $1,00 to Kyushu Christian Mission, Box 49, North Vemon, Indiana, 4726S
* Your dollar helps share the cost of this paper and lets us know that you are interested
enough in this work to want the LINKLETTER to come to your home every month,
* Please look at your address on the other side. If it is not correct, please make any changes
and add the zone number i f we do not have i t ,

* Feel free to subscribe for some one else if you wish.


on a separate card.

If so, write their name and address

* If you have already paid for the coming year, please do us the favor of sending in this slip
anyhow and writing PAID near your address on the other side.
* Library and exchange copies will continue if you will return this slip to us.

Also at stake is the kindergarten project of Bro. Yoshii and the Kanoya Church of Christ.
They are going to use about half of the mission land and their contract with the government
requires that it must be in operation by April next year. Any delay by the City in making a
just solution will make that impossible. Another reason for prayer. Thanks to all of you
who have sent Bro. Yoshii offerings for this project. He still needs $3000 for construction
costs, l^hen you plan your mission budget this fall, maybe you could include an amount for
this purpose. We will be glad to see that it gets into his hands.
Do you remember the story we told you last fall about the disgruntled church member in
Tarumizu who tried to knock the building down with a wooden mallet. Since that time, to avoid
further trouble with her, we bought another piece of land in another section of town. A few
weeks ago we started to dismantle the building. Before we could move it all, this woman took

all the windows and timbers. After we appealed to the police, they warned her that they would
arrest her for stealing if she did it again. She repented and said to "save face" she could
not return these things herself but if some one came and got them she would not object.
We took her at her word and hauled the things from the back of her house to the new build

ing site, Alas! She came that night and stole them back again.

When we asked the police the

second time, the detective laughed and said, "She must be crazy. We have no authority to
deal with a crazy person. You will have to appeal to a court." That solution is out. New

lumber was bought and the work carried on.

The roof is on, the walls are up and we are look

ing forward to the dedication in November.

Another typhoon has hit us. The hardest we have ever endured. My big sister, Isabel
Dittemore, arrived from the U.S. en route to her new work in Formosa just in time to sit out

the storm with us. It was no pleasure to look out the window and see 100 mph plus winds
flattening the trees and even less pleasant to know that our farmers were losing over half
of their finest rice crop in history. We lost a lot of trees and damage to outbuildings.
The Sueyoshi church was badly battered. The frame of the church going up in Tarumizu leaned
over pulling up part of the cement foundation with it. Typhoons are expensive business and
Japanese companies will not insure for them. Life and limb are intact, however, and we are
grateful for that.

The typhoon ruined the planned boat trip to the island of Tannegashima for the annual

church convention September 23. An alternate plan to hold the meeting iii Kanoya church had
been made in case this happened. It was a good convention but small in attendance. Ferry

service is cut off well before a typhoon hits. A1 and Fleanor Hammond came from Tokyo to
deliver the message and renew fellowship with many Christian friends they had made during
the two years they carried on for us here during our first furlough and later year of lang-uage-study.-

. _

__

Martin and Evelyn Clax^-of Osaka Bible Seminary spent 17 days with us in September. With

Bro, Yoshii as interpreter and Martin as evangelist we had fine evangelistic campaigns in
Kagoshima; in Kushikino with Bro. Tanijiri; in Kajiki with Bro. Daikusono; and in Kanoya.
The Moody Science Film, "Red River of Life", a movie about the heart and the blood started off
the program each night, Bro, Clark preached sennons using the theme, "The Source of Life".
Again daily ads were placed in the newspapers. The Carry All carried everything and served
as sound car as well. Preachers and people worked together to provide meals, put up posters,
pass out tracts and welcome people to the meetings.

At Kanoya the to^m hall v;as rented. The crowds were exceptionally good and the followup meetings at the close well-attended. In fact, we can say that the meetings of August and
September while costly in preparation, bodily strength and finances produced better crowds
and more interested ones coming to church afterwards than we have had for meetings in re
cent years. Six were baptized recently in Sueyoshi.

We are encouraged to continue. Thanks to

Bro, limure at the Christian Center for all the posters he made and advertising handled and
to Pauline for her wonderful hospitality to the evangelists and many guests of the summer.

October has brought cooling breezes, a welcome change from Japan's hottest and longest
-summtsTi^Even-so the^-^as^ to be^done and responsibilities assumed are beyond our strength. ~
Please join us in "casting all our care upon Him".
IN HIS SHRVICn.

Non-Profit 'OrgahiVatioh"

LINKLETTER

Monthly Publication of
Kyushu Christian Mission
Box 49

North Vernon, Indiana

U. S.

POSTAGE
PAID

Louisville, Kentucky

Permit No. 537

Box 966
Joilet Illinois

OCT 30 W*

i-mHi-etrett

Linkletter
No. 143

November
1964

Dear Christian friends.

The Olympics linger in our memory. In the national drawings, we were eligible to buy
one ticket to the'opening ceremony. By family decision, Gregory journeyed to Tokyo alone to
enjoy this once in a lifetime opportunity. He returned to tell us all about it. Television
provided a ring side seat, however, and we managed to enjoy it that way.
It was a thrill

to see the American athletes do well and an equal satisfaction in seeing the Japanese stage

the worl3*s finest Olympics and come- in third in number of medals won.

By Olympic rules, only 30 seconds of a national anthem can be played during an award
ceremony. That left the "Star Spangled Banner"dangling in mid-air over thirty times - a frus
trating experience. One day an American dance band playing in a Tokyo night club came totKe"
stadium prepared. \Vhen the official band had finished the first half of the U.S. anthem, the
band rose where they were and finished it off with a flourish. They got a rousing ovation.

The marathon was unforgettable. The whole nation cheered for the mighty Ethiopian,
Abebe, and groaned v;hen the Japanese runner was beaten for 2nd place at the last moment by
a British runner. V/hat moved me to tears was the tremendous applause the Japanese gave to
every runner who finished the race, no matter how long he took. In fact, the later the run
ner arrived, the more ovation he got. As one bewildered straggler said; "I lost but I won."
There is a spiritual meaning here, of course. The Apostle Paul said it long before: "I have
finished the race. I have kept the faith. There is laid up for me a crown of righteousness,"

The Olympics provided good preaching material as I pointed that the Apostle Paul was
very familiar with the rules, the prizes and the events (especially running) of the Games,
Also that the New Testament was written when the Olympics were at the height of their popu
larity, In fact, the first year of the 195th Olympiad was the year of Christ's birth. Some
times the Bible has a touch of unreality to the Japanese and they are surprised to find that
it both records

history and is history,

Hebrews 12: 1

2 was my sermon text.

"The cloud of witnesses" recalled the thousands

in the stadium and the millions at their TV sets viewing the races, "Let us run with perserverance the race that is set before us" recalled that only this virtue can keep the body
or the soul running till the finish line was crossed. "Looking to Jesus the author and
perfector of our faith" recalled the added incentive the Japanese must have received as
they struggled to finish the race with their eyes on the Emporer in the royal box. Probably
the athletes who took part would think it strange that any one could find viewing the Olympics
a spiritual experience, but it was that for me.

The year's end - Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years - is a time when one thinks of his

family and friends and longs to see them again, hear their voices, exchange family news, and
to share a meal or a cup of coffee together. We would like to do that with you - very much
so, but we all know that is not possible. The best we can do is this sheet of paper. Be
cause we have given some thought to it, we hope it will let you know in a personal way that
we are well and happy and wish the same for you. IVhen the rush is over, clip the pictures and
slip them in your Bible or some place you see often. Perhaps when you come across them later
you can grace the moment with a word of prayer for us and Japan.

We'd like that.


V

LINKLETTER

Monthly Publication of
Kyushu Christian Mission
Box 49

North Vernon _Indiana

Non-Profit Organization
U. S. EOSTAGE
PAID

Louisville, Kentucky
Permit No. 537

1(964

Ikiiskms
-1

.-f

ay i\xt meaning of
Ghrisfmas ht Aztytv
and 1X5 ^aues brigWcr
a$ it ccmt5 fo you ihw Y

Mark

and

Pauline Maxey

Kyushu Christian Mission

Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan

' * ."fVJf
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'- -"

mm

Trmu^trEm
A monthly report by the Mark G. Maxey famtly
to the friends of the Kyushu Cbristsan Mission
Kanoya, Kagoshima, Japan
December, 1964

Linkletter No, 144

Dear Christian friends.

Another year has passed. We have been back on the


job 16 months. It hardly seems possible. We do not find
time to be despondent. Indeed, there are signs of growth
which are encouraging.

November 1 the whole family made a journey. First to

Kyoto for our annual physicals.

Our general health was

good but the Doctor advised extended rest for Pauline,


Easier said than done, of course, with ; an energetic
own home.

DEDICATION DAY AT TARWIZU


family

and school to teach in your

But the whole family is trying to share more in the household duties.

Thence to Osaka Bible Seminary for three days of its "Tane Make Kai" (Seed Sowing Conv.).
This was the first purely preaching, singing and fellowship convention ever held by our Japan
ese brethren. For the Japanese accustomed to long discussion with a definite conclusions an
nounced at convention's end it was baffling but before it was over many of them relaxed and

got into the spirit of the thing. Gregory brought his cornet and joined the missionaries who
got their instruments out of mothballs

and formed an orchestra for the occasion.

From Osaka to Tokyo we rode Japan's new 200 m.p.h. train. John Muto, Harold Sims, Paul
Pratt and A1 Hammond rode with us. ' Before we got the problems of the world settled we were

pulling into Tokyo station. For five days our family stayed with the Pratt's and Sims' families
while enjoyed the sights and sounds of the world's largest city and refreshed ourselves with
the fellowship of both missionaries and Japanese brethren. I helped earn my keep by speaking
for the monthly fellowship of Missionaries and Ministers, preaching for the English service
held early every Sunday for missionary families and brethren in the Tokyo area, and in Japanese
at the Nakano

Church of Christ

where Bro. Itagaki

preaches, Tokyo is 1000 miles away from

us and we get there seldom - but this visit was the finest and most refreshing of any visit yet
Returning home, I got off the train in northern Kyushu and took the overnight ferry to

Pusan, Korea, So near and yet so far. Passports, papers, visas plus customs, immigration
and quarantine inspections make the trip so difficult that few want to try it more than once.
In Pusan I enjoyed the hospitality of Dick and Melba Lash as we talked over mutual concerns for
the ongoing of the gospel, S.M, Chang introduced me to his wife and new baby boy, had me speak
to his mid-week meeting downtown and we talked over the year of study and fellowship he had

just completed in the U.S. One's heart is warmed by the Christian fellowship found in Korea
but the suffering, spiritual and physical, of the country remains in the memory continually ,

Faith's 9th birthday was November 13 but she put off her party for three days till I got
home, IThat a wonderful girl she is! Friends everyrvhere, A perfect command of the language, A
keen mind bubbling over with ideas and enterprises. Her latest is the formation of a Loyal

Temperance Legion with her Japanese friends. She duplicates the English program material in
Japanese and Pauline helps her with the refreshments afterwards. It was a solemn moment when
her friends stood up in our front room and she led them in the Japanese version of the No

Smoking - No Drinking pledge.

The church in Vandalia (Mich,has a fine missionary in her.

We've told you of our troubles at the Tarumizu church. We are glad that the story has a

happy ending. The churches of the area joined in dedicating the new building on November 29,

The basic building was the same, but a new slate roof, hardwood floor, plywood paneling, and
recessed lights

gave a bright new air to the place.

A sour note of the dedication came

when the woman who had been causing us all the trouble came and glared at us through each
window till she was sure all had seen her. I have never seen a face that shrank my spirits so

much.

After staring at the preacher from the doorway for ten minutes she left without causing

a disturbance. We all breathed a prayer of thanks.

That night, Bro. Tanijiri of Kushikino church began a week of preaching.


Leaching visitation that has resulted in three baptisms, including one school teacher who
had been a Sunday School pupil at the Tarumizu church twelve years before. After a number of
years of meeting twice monthly, the church has resumed weekly Sunday services and started the
Sunday scTiool again. A new church, new Christians and a new spirit make it a joy to go to this
church again. As I drove home the other day T had the distinct feeling that the renewal at
Tarumizu alone was worth the last 16 months of missionary effort.

Our o\m land problems with Kanoya city have not been solved.
made some concessions and so have we.

Christian Center building sets.

They have

Still at issue is the favored front corner where the

The city still wants to take over this site

and make us move

the center and other related buildings. The Japanese do not press for quick solutions in these
matters and that is good. We are going to drag our feet all the way to the finish line.
Bro. Yoshii^s new building for the Christian kindergarten is well under

way,

This was made possible by a special gift of $1000 from, the church at Vandalia, Michigan

at .Thanksgiving time.

At a special victory service^q^ember 23, we talked together by trans-

Pacific phone and the church relayed the happy news to Bro. Yoshii that their project" to raise
this amount was successful.

Thanks to this fine gift and others from friends in the U.S, and

Japan he has enough for the first building, lie seeks an additional $1400 for equipment inside.
Incidentally, a new cable was laid across the Pacific this June so you can
get immediate and perfect connections. Call us up some Sunday night after church. (It will be
Monday morning here.) Sunday rates are about S6.50 for three minutes, $2,25 for each additional
minute. Our number is Kanoya 2374,

It would be a thrill to talk to you.

Pauline has just had her Christian Women's meeting for the area in the
Center building. Christ and Christmas was the theme with Pauline giving the message in the
afternoon urging them to take this day which has become very popular in the Japanese calendar
and use it for Christian witnessing. This is the first of many Christmas meetings that make
December such a wonderful month here. Christmas cards, messages and remembrances have bright
ened our hearts and told us that though we may be out of sight we are not out of mind. Thanks!
We miss our two oldest children especially just now, Walter has made a good
adjustment at Cincinnati Bible Seminary. (2700 Glenway Ave, Cincinnati, Ohio 15204) Paula is

in her Junior year at Milligan (Box 184, Milligan College, Tenn,) and we are anticipating her
spending next summer with us in Japan and sharing in the work at the same time. Parkcrest Churcl

Church, Long Beach, Calif, has graciously undertaken to raise the funds for her round trip fare.
If you*d like to help, write: Mrs, Harvey Beard, 1503 Vuelta Grande Ave, Long Beach, California,
A new slide set for 1964 with script is ready. Write: John Miles Baker, 147
Avenue Cota, San Clemente, California 92672, He is the man to write to not only for slides, but
for publicity and display materials. You will get a prompt reply from him. Paula and Walter
also have slide sets in case you want them to come your way for a presentation. Remember to re
new your Linkletter subscription soon if you haven't already. We hope that you still want it.
The Japanese like to suggest themes for great occasions. A New Year is a
great occasion and we suggest as a theme for 1965 what the Apostle Paul said to young Timothy:
"Train yourself in godliness,,,as it holds promise for the present life also the life to come.'

IN HIS SERVICE, MARK G, HAXEY


LINKLETTER

Monthly Publication of
Kyushu Christian Mission
Box 49

North Vernon, Indiana

Non-Profit Organization
U. S.

POSTAGE
PAID

Missions Services
Box 9^^
Joilet Illinois
60h^

Louisville, Kentucky
Permit No, 537