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M. S. RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

BANGALORE-54

(Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)

BANGALORE-54 (Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU) SYLLABUS (For the Academic year 2014 - 2015) III and

SYLLABUS

(For the Academic year 2014 - 2015)

III and IV Semester B. E.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

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M.S. RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE – 560 054 DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

1. History of the Institute:

M. S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology was started in 1962 by the late Dr. M.S. Ramaiah, our Founder Chairman who was a renowned visionary, philanthropist, and a pioneer in creating several landmark infrastructure projects in India. Noticing the shortage of talented engineering professionals required to build a modern India, Dr. M.S. Ramaiah envisioned MSRIT as an institute of excellence imparting quality and affordable education. Part of Gokula Education Foundation, MSRIT has grown over the years with significant contributions from various professionals in different capacities, ably led by Dr. M.S. Ramaiah himself, whose personal commitment has seen the institution through its formative years. Today, MSRIT stands tall as one of India’s finest names in Engineering Education and has produced around 35,000 engineering professionals who occupy responsible positions across the globe.

2. History of the Department:

Instituted in 1978, the Department was the first to offer a course in Chemical Engineering by a self- financing engineering institution in Bangalore and the fifth in MSRIT. Since its inception the department has moved steadily towards the fulfillment of its mission and is emerging as a significant player in the academic landscape of Chemical Engineering education in our country. The Department is certified thrice in succession by the National Board for Accreditation and is also ISO 9001:2008 certified for imparting quality education. Over 1900 students have graduated in 32 batches. The Department has secured majority of the university ranks. The expertise of the faculty covers a wide range of disciplines and they are engaged in cutting edge technological research. The average experience of faculty in the department is more than twenty years and they are alumni of IISc, IIT and NITs. Enriching insights by eminent dignitaries from the practicing world is arranged under the activities of Society of Chemical Engineers a body comprising of chemical engineering community of the institute. The department is approved as Research Center by VTU for higher qualifications like M.Sc. Engg. (by Research) and Ph.D. degrees. Research Projects from DRDO, AICTE and VTU has been successfully completed. The Annual Technical Symposium organized by the department for students – RASAYAN encompasses a plethora of events such as Paper presentations, Poster presentations, M.S. Ramaiah Memorial Technical Quiz etc to challenge the young minds. The Bangalore Regional Centre of the Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers is functioning from this department for more than a decade. The country’s most prestigious event in Chemical Engineering Indian Chemical Engineering Congress - CHEMCON-2011 was organized here. The event invited the top chemical engineers of the nation to our institute. A joint session with Canadian Universities in the area of Energy and Environment was also a part of this event. The department offers excellent infrastructure and students have won various prestigious awards, international internships and high accolades for innovative projects.

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3.

Faculty List:

Sl.

Name of the Faculty

Qualification

Designation

No.

1

G.

A. Shareef

M.Tech., (Ph.D.)

Professor and Head

2

Dr. Archna

M.E, Ph.D.

Professor

3

V.Venkatesham

M.

E., (Ph.D.)

Associate Professor

4

S.

Swaminathan

M.

E.

Associate Professor

5

Ravi Sadasivan

M.Sc.(Engg.), (Ph.D.)

Associate Professor

6

K.A. Badarinarayana

M.Tech.

Associate Professor

7

Dr.G. M. Madhu

M.E., Ph.D.

Associate Professor

8

Dr. Brijesh

M.Tech., Ph.D.

Associate Professor

9

Rajeswari M. Kulkarni

M.Tech., (Ph.D.)

Assistant Professor

10

Ramasivakiran Reddy

M.Tech. (Ph.D.)

Assistant Professor

11

Koteswara Rao Jammula

M.Tech., (Ph.D.)

Assistant Professor

12

V.

Shravanthi

M.Tech., (Ph.D.)

Assistant Professor

4. Vision & Mission of the Institute:

The Vision of MSRIT: To evolve into an autonomous institution of international standing for imparting quality technical education

The Mission of the institute in pursuance of its Vision: MSRIT shall deliver global quality technical education by nurturing a conducive learning environment for a better tomorrow through continuous improvement and customization

5. Quality Policy:

We at M.S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore Strive to deliver comprehensive, continually enhanced, global quality technical and management education through an established Quality Management system complemented by the synergistic interaction of the stake holders concerned.We also strive to communicate this policy to all persons at all levels so that this policy becomes a working reality with in the organization.

6. Vision & Mission of the Department:

Vision:

To be a leading chemical engineering centre for quality technical education and progressive research at global level

Mission:

1. To provide a state of art environment and a rigorous academic program that train students to excel in fundamental science, chemical and allied engineering fields.

2. To offer programme that inculcate creative thinking and lifelong learning contributing to the advancements of chemical sciences and its application.

3. To foster principles of sustainability and promote environmentally benign technologies for the benefit of society.

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7.

Process of deriving the Vision & Mission of the Department:

of deriving the Vision & Mission of the Department: 8. Process of Deriving the PEO’s of

8. Process of Deriving the PEO’s of the Programme:

8. Process of Deriving the PEO’s of the Programme: 9. PEO’s of the programme offered: The

9. PEO’s of the programme offered:

The B.E. Chemical Engineering Program at M. S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology aims to provide a strong foundation of scientific and technical knowledge in a state of art learning ambience. It equips the

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graduates with problem solving abilities, teamwork, and communication skills necessary throughout

their careers. They are consistent with the following Educational Objectives:

1. To provide a strong foundation and understanding of the fundamental principles of mathematics,

science, and engineering enabling graduates to pursue their careers as practicing chemical engineers in

Chemical and Allied Engineering Industries.

2. To produce graduates who are prepared to pursue their post graduation and Research in the fields of

Chemical Engineering and Petrochemicals, Material Science, Biotechnology, Nanotechnology,

Environmental Engineering, any emerging allied areas and Business.

3. To produce graduates who posses skills with contemporary grounding in professional responsibility,

ethics, global and societal impact of engineering decisions to assume professional leadership roles and

administrative positions.

4. To provide students with opportunities to participate in various multidisciplinary teams and to develop

and practice written and oral communication skills.

10. Process of deriving PO’s:

The Programme outcomes are defined by taking feedback from faculty, alumni, Industry, professional bodies, guidelines suggested by regulatory bodies (UGC, AICTE, VTU) and graduate attributes suggested by National Board of Accreditation. The established PEO’s are in line with programme educational objectives. The following Figure indicates the information flow.

The following Figure indicates the information flow. 11. PO’s of the programme offered: The Chemical

11. PO’s of the programme offered:

The Chemical Engineering Graduates of MSRIT are expected to have the following abilities/ qualities.

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a.

An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and Engineering fundamentals.

b.

An ability to design and conduct experiments, and to analyze and interpret experimental results

with working knowledge of chemical process safety.

c.

An ability to design systems, components, or processes to meet specified objectives within all the

realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,

manufacturability, and sustainability in chemical engineering.

d.

An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex chemical engineering problems.

e.

An ability to use techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering

practice.

f.

An ability to understand the professional, societal and ethical responsibility.

g.

An ability to work as a member of multidisciplinary teams, and have an understanding of team

leadership.

h.

To have good written and oral communication skills.

i.

An ability to understand the impact of engineering solution in a global, economic and societal

context.

j.

An ability to have motivation and engage in lifelong learning.

k.

An ability to have knowledge of recent happenings/contemporary issues.

l.

To have the knowledge of project management and finance requirements and able to write project

proposals.

12. Mapping of PEO’s & PO’s:

Programme

 

Programme Outcomes

 

Educational

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

j

k

l

Objectives

1

x

x

   

x

   

x

x

x

x

 

2

 

x

x

x

x

   

x

   

x

 

3

   

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

4

         

x

x

 

x

 

x

 
 

6

13.

Curriculum breakdown structure:

13. Curriculum breakdown structure: 14. BOS composition as per VTU Guidelines: 7

14. BOS composition as per VTU Guidelines:

13. Curriculum breakdown structure: 14. BOS composition as per VTU Guidelines: 7

7

SCHEME OF TEACHING AND EXAMINATION – III SEMESTER B.E. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (2014-15)

         

Teaching hours/week

End

 

Sl.

Subject Code

Title of the Subject

Credits

Teaching

Exam

Marks

No.

(L:T:P)

Dept.

     
   

L

T

P

(Hrs)

CIE

SEE

Total

1

CHMAT301

Engineering Mathematics – III

3:1:0

MAT

3

2

0

03

50

50

100

2

CHY302

Technical Chemistry -I

2:1:0

CHY

3

2

0

03

50

50

100

3

CH303

Chemical Process Calculations

3:1:0

CH

3

2

0

03

50

50

100

4

CH304

Momentum Transfer

3:1:0

CH

3

2

0

03

50

50

100

5

CH305

Materials Science

3:0:0

CH

3

0

0

03

50

50

100

6

CH306

Process Equipment Drawing

0:1:2

CH

0

2

3

03

50

50

100

7

CHL304

Momentum Transfer Laboratory

0:0:2

CH

0

0

3

03

50

50

100

8

CHYL302

Technical Chemistry-I Laboratory

0:0:2

CHY

0

0

3

03

50

50

100

     

25

 

15

10

9

       

8

SCHEME OF TEACHING AND EXAMINATION – IV SEMESTER B.E. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (2014-15)

Sl.

   

Credits

Teaching

Teaching hours/week

End

Marks

No.

Subject Code

Title of the Subject

(L:T:P)

Dept.

     

Exam

L

T

P

(Hrs)

CIE

SEE

Total

1

CHMAT401

Engineering Mathematics- IV

3:1:0

MAT

3

2

0

03

50

50

100

2

CH402

Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

3:1:0

CH

3

2

0

03

50

50

100

3

CH403

Process Heat Transfer

3:1:0

CH

3

2

0

03

50

50

100

4

CH404

Mechanical Operations

3:1:0

CH

3

2

0

03

50

50

100

5

CHY405

Technical Chemistry-II

2:1:0

CHY

2

2

0

03

50

50

100

   

Heat Transfer

                 

6

CHL403

Laboratory

0:0:2

CH

0

0

3

03

50

50

100

7

CHL404

Mechanical Operations Laboratory

0:0:2

CH

0

0

3

03

50

50

100

8

CHYL405

Technical Chemistry-II Laboratory

0:0:2

CHY

0

0

3

03

50

50

100

     

25

 

14

10

9

       

Legend: MAT-Mathematics, CHY-Chemistry, CH-Chemical Engineering, L-Lecture, T-Tutorial, P-Practical, CIE- Continuous Internal Evaluation, SEE-Semester End Examination.

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III Semester

ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS – III

Sub Code:

CHMAT301

Credit:

3:1:0

Contact Hours: 70

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Mathematics I and II Course coordinator: Mathematics Department

Course Objectives: The students will

1. Study the complex analysis and its applications

2. Study Fourier and z-transform and its applications.

3. Study the numerical differentiation and integrations and its applications.

4. Learn the Finite differences and interpolation.

5. Study the solution of ordinary differential equations and its applications by analytical method.

Course Content:

Unit I Complex Variables-I: Analytic function, C-R Equation in Cartesian and Polar coordinates, Properties of analytic functions. Conformal transformation, Discussion of the transformations w= z 2 , w=e z , and w= z + 1/z (z 0), Bilinear transformation.

Unit II Complex Variables-II: Complex integration, Cauchy’s fundamental theorem and formula. Taylor & Laurent’s series (statements only). Singularities, Poles and Residues, Cauchy’s Residue theorem (statement only). Series solution of Ordinary differential equations and Special functions:

Series solution, Frobenius method, series solution of Bessel’s differential equation leading to Bessel function of first kind, series solution of Legendre’s differential equation leading to Legendre polynomials, Rodrigue’s formula

Unit III Fourier Series: Periodic function, Dirichlet’s condition, Fourier series of periodic functions of period 2π and arbitrary period, half range series Fourier series, Practical Harmonic analysis.

Unit IV Fourier Transform: Infinite Fourier transform, Fourier sine and cosine transform, properties, inverse transform. Z-Transform: Definition, standard Z-transform, single sided and double sided transform, linearity property, damping rule, shifting property, initial value theorem, final value theorem, inverse Z-transforms, application of Z-transforms to solve difference equations.

Unit V Finite Differences and Interpolation: Forward and Backward differences, Interpolation, Newton-Gregory Forward and Backward Interpolation, Lagrange’s Interpolation formula, Newton divided difference interpolation formula (no proof)

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Numerical Differentiation and Integration: Derivatives using Newton-Gregory forward and backward polynomials, Newton’s-Cotes integration formula, Trapezoidal Rule and Simpson’s (1/3) rd rule and (3/8) th rule.

Text Books:

1. Grewal, B.S., Higher Engineering Mathematics , Khanna Publishers, 40 th

2. Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics , Wiley publication ,8 th Edition , 2004.

Edition , 2007.

Reference Books:

1. Grewal, B.S., Numerical Methods in Engineering and Science, Khanna Publishers, 8 th Edition, 2009.

2. Ramama, B.V., Engineering Mathematics, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. Ltd., New Delhi, 2008.

3. Dennis G. Zill, Patric D. Shanahan, A First Course in Cmplex Analysis with Applications, Jones and Barlett Publishers Inc. , 2 nd edition ,2009.

Course Outcomes: On successful completion of this course students will be able to

1. Evaluate any type of integrals that arises in many branches of engineering and science to convert from Cartesian to polar, cylindrical and spherical and vice versa and also well verse with finding area, surface and volume depending on the geometry of the physical configuration.

2. Determine or analyze the position, rate of a particle or object in a space, conservative medium, circulations of the flows and also converting complicated geometries to simple geometry by transforming line to double, double to triple integrals and vice versa for physical problems.

3. Find the solution of the real problems that arise in many fields like fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, chemical reactions, environmental fields and so on by different analytical methods.

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TECHNICAL CHEMISTRY-I

Sub Code:

CHY302

Credit:

2:1:0

Contact Hours: 56

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Chemistry Course coordinator: Chemistry Department

Course Objectives: The students will

1. Study the basic colligative properties; determine the effects of solutes on boiling point, freezing point, and osmotic pressure and to calculate the molecular weight of the unknown solute using freezing point depression

2. Understand the use of VBT and MOT bonding theories to explain the structure of coordinate compounds.

3. Study the physical and chemical phenomena that occur at the interface of two phases, including solid-liquid interfaces, solid-gas interfaces, solid-vacuum interfaces, and liquid-gas interfaces.

4. Study the adsorption process which is fundamental to catalysis both theory and experimental evaluation

5. Understand the role of the catalyst in various reactions, reaction mechanism used to study why certain compounds made and to find the path way of reaction.

6. Study the use of plants as a source of natural dyes, and synthesis of various dyes, manufacture of soap and detergents, cleaning action of the soaps.

Course Content:

UNIT-I

Chemical thermodynamics Dilute solutions, Colligative properties, lowering of vapour pressure-Raults law-Determination of M.W Elevation of B.P Depression of freezing point determination of M.W, Osmotic pressure- determination of molecular weight and experimental measurements. Isotonic solutions and

abnormal M.W

UNIT- II Liquification and the properties of liquids, Colloids, Physical properties and molecular structure. 7 hours

UNIT –III Organic Reaction Mechanism: Introduction, Types of reactions with mechanism-Addition, Substitution and Elimination.

Basics of stereochemistry-Isomerism-Structural,-Structural, chain, positional, functional, metamerism, tautomerism and ring-chain isomerism. Stereo isomerism-cis-trans isomerism, optical activity of organic compounds, optical isomerism, Configuration- R,S and E, Z.

Conformation.

UNIT –IV Industrially Important Organic reactions: Beckmann Rearrangement, Perkin reaction, The Hofmann rearrangement, Reamer-Tiemann reaction, Cannizzaro reaction, Skraup synthesis, The Diels-Alder reaction, Aldol condensation. 6 hours

7 hours

6 hours

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UNIT –V Organic Materials of industrial importance:

Dyes-classification–modern theory of colour; Synthesis of methyl orange; congo red, malachite green, indigo and Alizarin. Oils-Fats Analysis of Oil; Sapanification value, Iodine and acid value of oils, Solvent extraction of oils, refining of oils, Hydrogenation of oils Soaps and detergents: Manufacture of soap, Continous jet sapanification method, mechanism of cleaning action of soap, detergents manufacture, cationic, anionic and non ionic detergents. 6 hours

Text Books:

1. Morrison B.R. and Boyd L.L., Organic Chemistry 6 th Edition, ELBS, New Delhi, 1999.

2. B.R. Puri, L.R. Sharma & M.S.Pathania, Principles of Physical Chemistry, 33 rd Ed., S.Nagin

chand & Co., 1992.

3. House, H.O. Modern synthetic reactions, ULBS Publishers, New Delhi.

Reference Books:

1. Sykes peter, Organic Reactions Mechanism, ULBS Publishers, and New Delhi.

2. Finar, Organic Chemistry Vol I & II ULBS Publishers, New Delhi.

3. Sharma B.K.Industrial Chemistry, 11 TH edition, Chand S, and Co. New Delhi, 2001.

4. Tiwari Melhotra and Vishnoi, Organic Chemistry, 7 th Edition, Chand S. and Co. New Delhi,

1996

5. Arun Bahl and Bahl B.S.; A Text Book of Organic Chemistry, 15 th Edition,.S. Chand & Co, New Delhi, 1998. 6. J. J.Bikerman, surface Chemistry: Theory and Applications, Academic press, New York,

1972.

7. A.W.Adamson, Physical Chemistry of Surfaces, Interscience Publishers Inc. New York.

Course Outcomes : On successful completion of this course students will be able to

1. Explain the effects of solutes on boiling point, freezing point, and osmotic pressure and to calculate the molecular weight of the unknown solute using freezing point depression.

2. Explain the structure and bonding of coordination compounds with proper reason of deviation, if any.

3. Write reaction mechanisms in various types of reactions.

4. Perform synthesis and purification of double salts, simple inorganic compounds and coordination complexes.

5. Explain catalytic reactions and the manufacture of dyes and applications in industry.

6. Explain manufacture of soap and detergents, and their cleaning action mechanism.

7. Perform laboratory work of experiments related to theory illustrates the principles taught in lectures and provides opportunity for the students to develop experimental skills.

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CHEMICAL PROCESS CALCULATIONS

Sub Code:

CH303

Credit:

3:1:0

Contact Hours: 70

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

Course Objectives: The students will

1. Learn basic laws about the behavior of gases, liquids and solids and some basic mathematical tools.

2. Understand systematic problem solving skills, enhance confidence, and generate careful work habits.

3. Learn what material balances are, how to formulate and apply them, how to solve them.

4. Learn what energy balances are, and how to apply them and finally, to learn how to deal with the complexity of big problems.

Course Content:

Unit I Basic Chemical Calculations: Fundamentals and derived units. Conversion of units. Dimensional consistency of equations. Dimensionless groups and constants. Conversion of equations. Concept of mole, mole fraction etc. Compositions of mixtures of solids and liquids and gases. Concept of molarity, molality, normality and ppm. Use of semilog and log-log graphs, Triangular graphs.

Unit II Vapour-Gas Concepts: Ideal gas law calculations, Vapour pressure concepts and calculations for miscible and immiscible systems. Humidity related terms, humidity chart, humidification and dehumidification operation.

Unit III Material Balance Without Reaction: General material balance equation for steady and unsteady states. Typical Steady state material balances in mixing, evaporation, drying, distillation, absorption, extraction, crystallization and evaporation. Material balances involving Bypass, Recycle and Purging.

Unit IV Steady State Material Balance With Reaction: Principles of stoichiometry, Concept of limiting and excess reactants and inerts, fractional and percentage conversion, fractional yield and percentage yield, Selectivity, related Problems – without reactions and with reactions.

Fuels and Combustion: Ultimate and Proximate analysis of fuels, Calculations involving burning of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, excess air, Air – fuel ratio calculations.

Unit V Energy Balance: General Steady State Energy Balance equation, Thermophysics: Heat Capacity, Thermochemistry and laws. Heat Capacity. Enthalpy, Heat of Formation, Heat of

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Reaction, Heat of Combustion and Calorific Value. Heat of Solution, Heat of Mixing, Heat of Crystallization. Determination of∆H R at standard and elevated temperature. Theoretical and flame temperatures and adiabatic flame temperature.

Text Books:

1. Hougen, O.A., Waston, K.M. and Ragatz, R.A., Chemical Process Principles Part – I,

Material and Energy Balances, Second Edition, CBS publishers and distributors, New Delhi,

1995.

2. Himmelblau, D.M., Basic Principles And Calculations In Chemical Engineering, 6 th Edition, Prentice Hall Of India, New Delhi, 1997.

Reference Books :

1. Bhatt, B.L. and Vora, S.M., Stoichiometry (SI Units), Third Edition, 1996, Tata Mc Graw

Hill Publishing Ltd., New Delhi, 1996.

2. Richard M. Felder and Ronald W. Rousseau, Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, John Wiley & Sons,3 rd Edition, 2005.

Course Outcomes: On completion of this course the student will have

1. Clear idea of various types of unit systems and they will be able to convert units from one

form of the unit to other.

2. Sound strategy for solving material and energy balance problems.

3. Adopt the tools learned from the course from the numerical problems which contain more than two unit operations.

4. Develop mathematical relations for mass balance and energy balances for any processes.

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MOMENTUM TRANSFER

Sub Code:

CH304

Credit:

3:1:0

Contact Hours: 70

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Mathematics Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

Course Objectives:

1. Understand concepts on nature of fluids, pressure concepts and measurement of pressure by various experimental methods and by mathematical relations and enhancement of problem solving skills .

2. Learn detailed explanation on types of fluids, stress and velocity relations, type of fluid flow and boundary layer relations.

3. Understand relationship between kinetic energy, potential energy, internal energy and work complex flow systems using Bernoulli’s equation with application to industrial problems.

4. Understand clear concepts on Flow of incompressible fluids in conduits and thin layers and friction factor variations with velocity and friction losses using Bernoullis Equations and they will be demonstrated experimentally.

5. Study Flow of compressible fluids, Dimensional analysis, Dimensional homogeneity and various dimensionless numbers and their applications.

6. Understand principles and working of various types of pumps, transportation and metering of fluids using various experimental techniques and applications to industry.

The students will

Course Content:

Unit I Fluid Statics And Its Application: Concept of unit operation, concept of momentum transfer, nature of fluids and pressure concept, variation of pressure with height – hydrostatic equilibrium, barometric equation, measurement of fluid pressure – manometers.

Fluid Flow Phenomena: Types of fluids – shear stress and velocity gradient relation, Newtonian and Non Newtonian fluids, Viscosity of gases and liquids. Types of flow-laminar and turbulent flow, Reynolds stresses, Eddy viscosity, Flow in boundary layers, Reynolds number, Boundary layer separation.

Unit II Basic Equations Of Fluid Flow: Average velocity, mass velocity, continuity equation, Euler and Bernoulli’s equations, Modified equation for real fluids with correction factors. Pump work in Bernoulli’s equations. Angular momentum equation.

Unit III Flow of Incompressible Fluids In Conduits And Thin Layers: Laminar flow through circular and non circular conduits. Hagen-Poisuelle equation, Laminar flow of non Newtonian liquids, turbulent flow in pipes and closed channels, friction factor chart. Friction from changes in velocity or direction. Form friction losses in Bernoulli’s equation. Flow of fluids in thin layers.

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Unit IV Flow of Compressible Fluids: Continuity equation, concept of Mach number, Total energy balances, Velocity of sound, ideal-gas equations. Flow through variable area conduits, Adiabatic frictional flow. Isothermal frictional flow (elementary treatment).

Dimensional Analysis: Dimensional homogeneity, Rayleigh and Buckingham-π method. Significance of different dimensionless numbers. Elementary treatment of similitude between model and prototype.

Unit V Transportation and Metering Of Fluids: Pipes, fittings and valves, measurement of liquid and gas flow rates by orifice meter, Venturi meter, Rota meter and Pitot tube. Flow through open Channels- weirs and notches. Performance and characteristics of pumps – positive displacement and centrifugal pumps. Fans, compressor and blowers. Introduction to Unsteady State Flow – Time to empty the liquid from a tank.

Text Books:

1. McCabe, W.L., Unit operations of Chemical Engineering, 5 th Edition, McGraw Hill, New York, 1993.

2. Kumar, K.L, Engineering Fluid Mechanics, 3 rd Edition, Eurasia publishing House (P) Ltd., New Delhi., 1984.

Reference Books:

1. Coulson and Richardson J.F., Chemical Engineering Vol. 1, 3 rd edn., Pergamon

Press, 1991.

2. Badger, W.I. and Banchero, J.T., Introduction to Chemical Engineering, Tata Mc Graw Hill, New York, 1997.

3. Foust, A.S., Principles Of Unit Operation, III Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York,

1997.

4. Bansal, R.K., Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, 7 th Edition, Laxmi Publications,

2007.

Course Outcomes: On completion of this course the students will be able to

1. Analyze different types of fluids and they will be able to measure pressure difference for flow of fluids.

2. Understand and analyze the relationship between kinetic and potential energy, internal energy, work, and heat in complex flow systems using Bernoulli’s equation, perform macroscopic energy balances.

3. Analyze and calculate friction factor for different types of flow in various types of constructions.

4. Develop mathematical relations using Dimensional analysis by Rayleighs and Buckinghm –π method.

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MATERIALS SCIENCE

Sub Code:

CH305

Credit:

3:0:0

Contact Hours: 42

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Chemistry Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

Course Objectives:

1. Understand concepts on properties and selection of metals, ceramics, and polymers for design and manufacturing.

2. Study variety of engineering applications through knowledge of atomic structure, electronic structure, chemical bonding, crystal structure, x-rays and x-ray diffraction, defect structure.

3. Study Microstructure and structure-property relationships, Phase diagrams, heat treatment of steels.

4. Study detailed information on types of corrosion and its prevention.

5. Learn information on selection of materials for design and manufacturing.

The students will

Course Content:

Unit I Introduction: Introduction to Materials Science, Classification of Engineering Materials, Levels of Structure, Structure-Property relationship in materials, Primary and secondary bonds.

Crystal Geometry and Structure Determination: Geometry of crystals- the Bravais lattices, Crystal directions and Planes- Miller indices, Structure determination-X – ray diffraction- Braggs Law, the power method.

Unit II Crystal Imperfections: Point Imperfections, Line imperfections- edge and screw dislocations, Surface imperfections.

Phase Diagram And Phase Transformations: Phase rule, Single component systems, Binary Phase Diagrams, Lever rule, Typical Phase diagrams for Magnesia-Alumina, Copper-Zinc, Iron- carbon system, Nucleation and growth, Solidification, Allotropic transformation, Cooling curves for pure iron, Iron-carbon equilibrium diagram, Isothermal transformations (TTT curves).

Unit III Deformation of Materials: Metals - Elastic deformation, Plastic deformation, Dislocation and Strengthening mechanism, Failure – Fracture, Fatigue. Ceramics- Brittle fracture, Stress-Strain behavior, Plastic deformation Polymers - Visco-elastic deformation, Fracture, Elastomer deformation.

Unit IV Materials Processing: Metals and Alloys – Fabrications – Forming, Casting. Thermal Processing: Annealing, Heat treatment of Steels. Surface hardening methods. Ceramics – Fabrication and processing of glass Polymers – Polymerization, Additives, Forming methods, Fabrication of elastomers and fibres.

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Unit V Corrosion And its Prevention: Electro-chemical corrosion, Galvanic cells, High temperature corrosion, Passivity, Corrosion rate and its prediction, Prevention of corrosion. Corrosion charts.

Materials Selection and Design Considerations, Environmental considerations and recycling.

Text Books:

1. William D. Callister, Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction, 6th Edition, Wiley, 2006.

2. Hajra Choudhary S. K., Material Science and Processes, Indian Book Distributing Co., 1982.

Reference Books:

1. Van Vlack, H.L., Elements of Materials Science, 2 nd Edition, Addision-Wesly Publishing Company, NY, 1964.

2. Raghavan V., Material Science and Engineering- A First Course, 3 rd Edition, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 1996.

Course Outcomes: The students are expected to do the following

1. Classify different types of engineering materials depending on structure property, crystal geometry and X-Ray diffraction.

2. Explain atomic structures, types of bonding and crystal imperfections.

3. Draw phase diagrams of different metals, TTT curves and explain deformation of materials.

4. Suggest different type of heat treatment techniques depending on the type of the material and they can analyze different types of corrosions and suggest preventive methods.

5. Select materials depending on type of application.

14

PROCESS EQUIPMENT DRAWING

Sub Code:

CH306

Credit:

0:1:2

Contact Hours: 70

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Drawing Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

Course Objectives: The students will

1. Learn to draw sectional views of the equipments, hatching and sectional planes, piping symbols, vessel enclosures and supports.

2. Learn to draw proportionate drawings of process equipments like distillation column and heat exchangers.

3. Learn to draw various assembly drawings of pipe joints, and valves.

4. Learn to draw centrifugal pump and gear pump drawings.

Course Content:

Sectional Views: Representation of the sectional planes, sectional lines and hatching, selection of section planes and types of sectional views. Proportionate Drawing 0f Process Equipment: Equipment and piping symbols, vessel component, vessel opening, Manholes, Vessel enclosures, Vessel Support, jackets, Shell and tube heat exchanger, reaction vessel and Evaporator, Distillation column

Assembly Drawing: Joints - Cotter with sleeve, cotter joint, Socket and Spigot joint, Stuffing box and Expansion joint (Screw type or Flanged type)

Valves - Stop Valve, Junction Stop Valve, Globe Valve, Stop cock and Gate Valve, Screw down Stop Valve, Rams Bottom safety Valve, Non – Return Valve. Pumps - Centrifugal pump, gear pump.

AutoCAD: Introduction, Flanged joint, Union Joint.

Text Books:

1. Gopal Krishna, K.R, Machine Drawing, 9 th Edition, Subhas Stores, Bangalore, 1995.

2. Joshi, M.V., Process Equipment Design, 3 rd Edition, Macmillan India Publication, New Delhi.

Reference Books:

1. Walas, S.M., Chemical Process Equipment, Butterworth Heinemann Pub. 1999.

2. Ludwig E.E., Applied process Design, 3 rd Edition, Gulf Professional Publishing, New Delhi,

1994.

3. Bhatt, N.D., Machine Drawing, 29 th Edition, Charotar publishing House, Anand, 1995.

4. Maidargi, S.C., Chemical Process Equipment Design, Vol. I, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., 2012.

Note: AutoCAD for only Internal Assessment. In SEE 30% marks to be allocated for memory drawing and 70% marks for assembly drawing.

15

Course Outcomes: The students are expected to do the following

1. Draw sectional view of the equipment, hatching and sectional planes, piping symbols, vessel

enclosures and supports.

2. Draw proportionate drawing of process equipment like distillation column and heat exchangers.

3. Draw various assembly drawings of pipe joints, and valves, centrifugal pump and gear pump drawings.

16

MOMENTUM TRANSFER LABORATORY

Sub Code:

CHL304

Credit:

0:0:2

Contact Hours: 42

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

The experiments should be based on the following topics:

1. Friction in Circular Pipes

2. Friction in Non-Circular Pipes

3. Friction in Helical/Spiral Coils

4. Flow rate measurement using Venturi/ Orifice meters

5. Local velocity measurement using Pitot tube

6. Flow over Notches

7. Hydraulic coefficients – Open Orifice

8. Pressure drop in Packed bed

9. Minimum fluidization velocity-Fluidized bed

10. Study of characteristics for Centrifugal pump

11. Study of Pipe Fittings and their equivalent lengths

12. Venturi/ Orifice meters, Air flow measurement

13. Reynolds apparatus

14. Positive displacement pump

15. Bernoulli’s apparatus

Note: A minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted.

17

TECHNICAL CHEMISTRY-I LABORATORY

Sub Code:

CHYL302

Credit:

0:0:2

Contact Hours: 42

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Chemistry Course coordinator: Chemistry Department

Following experiments are suggested:

1. Determination of Chloride content in the given sample of water using N/40 AgNO 3

2. Determination of partition coefficient of iodine between water and carbon tetrachloride.

3. Study of Kinetics of the reaction between K 2 S 2 O 8 and KI.

4. Effect of Salt on the critical solution temperature of phenol-water system.

5. Determination of nickel as nickel dimethylglyoximate gravimetrically (after separating Iron) in the given stainless steel solution.

6. Determination of iron as ferric oxide gravimetrically (after separating copper) in the given Chalcopyrite ore solution

7. Preparation of acetanilide by acetylation of aniline using acetic anhydride.

8. Preparation of P-amino benzoic acid.

9. Analysis of oils and fats- acid value, and iodine value

10. Estimation of carboxylic acid by Iodometric method

11. Adsorption of heavy metal ions (Cr +3 ) from solution using different adsorbents and

estimation by colorimetry.

Reference books:

1. Arthur I. Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic analysis including elementary instrumental analysis,

ELBS, Longmann group, 5 th Edition, 1989.

2. Chemistry for Environmental Engineering, Third Edition, Clair N. Sawyer and Perry L,

McCarty; McGraw- Hill Book Company, New York, 1978.

18

IV Semester

ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS – IV

Sub Code:

CHMAT401

Credit:

3:1:0

Contact Hours: 70

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Mathematics I, II and III Course coordinator: Mathematics Department

Course Objectives: The students will

1. Study the linear algebra and its applications

2. Study the series solution of ODE’s and special functions

3. Learn different numerical methods to solve algebraic and transcendental equations, system of linear equations, finite differences, interpolation, differentiation and integration applied to chemical engineering problems.

4. Study the solution of PDE’s by numerical method

Course Content:

Unit I Linear Algebra: Elementary transformations, rank of a matrix, system of linear equations, Gauss-Siedel iteration method, eigen values and eigen vectors, dominant eigen value and the corresponding eigenvector by Rayleigh’s power method.

Numerical Solution of Algebraic and Transcendental Equations: Ramanujan’s method, Newton-Raphson method.

Unit II Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations: Taylors’ series method, Eulers’ method. Modified Eulers’ method, 4 th order Runge-Kutta method.

Partial differential equation-I: Formation of partial differential equation by eliminating arbitrary constants and arbitrary functions, solution of Lagrange’s linear partial differential equation, Charpit’s method, method of separation of variables.

Unit III Partial differential equation-II: Derivation of one dimensional wave and heat equations, Numerical solution of one dimensional wave and heat equation and two dimensional Laplace equation.

Statistics: Curve fittion, method of least squares, fitting of curves of the form y=ax+b, y=ax 2 +bx+c, y=ae bx , y=ax b , correlation and regression.

Unit IV Probability: Probability of an event, classical and axiomatic definition, probability associated with set theory, additional law, conditional probability, multiplication law, Baye’s theorem.

19

Random variables: Discrete and continuous, probability density function, cumulative density function.

Unit V Probability distribution: Binomial, Poisson, exponential and normal distributions.

Sampling Theory: Sampling distributions, standard error, test of hypothesis for means, confidence limits for means, student’s t-distribution, Chi-square distribution as a test of goodness fit.

Text Books:

1. Grewal, B.S., Higher Engineering Mathematics , Khanna Publishers, 40 th Edition , 2007.

2. Ronald E. Walpole, Sharon L. Myres and Keying Ye, Probability and Statistics for Engineers and

Scientists, Pearson, 8 th edition, 2007.

Reference Books:

1. Grewal, B.S., Numerical Methods in Engineering and Science, Khanna Publishers, 8 th

Edition, 2009.

2. Ramama, B.V., Engineering Mathematics, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. Ltd., New Delhi, 2008.

3. Papoulis A., Unnikrisnan Pillai, S., Probability, random variables and stochastic processes, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. Ltd., New Delhi, 2008.

Course Outcomes: Students will be able to do the following

1. Find solutions of mathematical models of cylindrical or spherical geometries can be obtained by series technique.

2. Determine atleast a real root of an algebraic or transcendental equation

3. Determine and analyze the nature of the solution of system of equations by different techniques.

4. Apply different analytical or numerical methods to analyze the solution of a physical problems which arises in many branches of engineering and science like fluid flows, heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, concentration of chemicals and pollutants, electrostatics, acoustics and so on.

20

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS

Sub Code:

CH402

Credit:

3:1:0

Contact Hours: 70

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

Course Objectives: The students will

1. Learn fundamentals of thermodynamics such as types of properties, processes and laws of thermodynamics for flow and non flow process.

2. Understand the clear concepts on P-V-T behavior, Equations of state, thermodynamic diagrams and compressibility charts, entropy, irreversibility and problem solving skills.

3. Learn the thermodynamic properties of pure fluids, energy relations and fugacity concepts.

4. Study the estimation of partial molar properties, property changes of mixing, and ideal and non ideal solutions.

5. Learn the fundamentals of phase equilibrium, concept of chemical potential and generation and consistency check for VLE data.

6. Understand fundamentals of chemical reaction equilibrium to find feasibility and extent of conversion for the industrial reactions.

Course Content:

Unit I Basic Concepts and First Law: System, surrounding, processes, state and properties intensive and extensive properties, State and path functions, Reversible & irreversible processes, Zeroth law of thermodynamics. General statement of first law of thermodynamics, First law for cyclic process and non flow processes, Heat capacity. Derivation for closed system and steady state flow process- flow calorimeter and heat capacity.

Unit II P-V-T Behaviour: P-V-T behaviour of pure fluids, Equations of state and ideal gas law, Processes involving ideal gas law: Constant volume, constant pressure, Constant temperature, adiabatic and polytropic processes, Equations of state for real gases: Van der Waals equation, Redlich – Kwong equation, Peng – Robinson equation, Virial equation, compressibility charts:

Principles of corresponding states, Generalized compressibility charts, Thermodynamic diagrams. Second Law of Thermodynamics: General statements of the Second law, concept of Entropy, Carnot’s principle, Calculations of entropy change, Clausius Inequality, Entropy and Irreversibility, Third law of thermodynamics.

Unit III Thermodynamic Properties of Pure Fluids: Work function, Gibbs free energy, Fundamental property relations, Maxwells equations, Equations for U and H, Effect of temperature on U, G, H and S, Entropy heat capacity relations, Relationship between Cp, Cv, Clapeyron equation, Gibbs- Helmholtz equation, Fugacity and fugacity coefficient, determination of fugacity of pure fluids.

21

Properties of Solutions: Partial molar properties, estimation, Gibbs-Duhem equation, Chemical potential, Fugacity in solutions, Henry’s law and dilute solutions, Activity in solutions, Activity coefficients, Property changes of mixing, excess properties (Qualitative treatment) Activity & Activity coefficients. Ideal and non-ideal solutions.

Unit IV Phase Equilibria: Chemical potential, criterion for VLE for ideal solutions, Raoult’s law, P-x,y and T-x,y diagrams, Non ideal solutions- Azeotropes types, VLE at low pressures, VLE correlations- van laar, Margules and Wilson equation. Co-existence equation, G-D equation for VLE, Consistency tests, VLE at high pressures, Liquid-liquid equilibrium.

Unit V Chemical Reaction Equilibrium: Reaction stoichiometry, Criteria of chemical reaction equilibrium, Equilibrium constant and standard free energy change, Effect of temperature, pressure on equilibrium constants and other factors affecting equilibrium conversion, Liquid phase reactions, Heterogeneous reaction equilibria, Phase rule for reacting system.

Text Books:

1. Smith, J.M. and Vanness, H.C., Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 5 th Edition, McGraw Hill, New York 1996.

2. Narayanan, K.V., Textbook of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, New Delhi, 2001.

Reference Book:

1. Rao, Y.V.C., Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, New Age International Publication,

Nagpur, 2000.

Course Outcomes: The students are expected to do the following

1. Calculate the heat and work requirements for the given flow or non-flow processes.

2. Analyze and find properties such as Pressure, Volume and temperature for equations of states and form the fundamentals of first law of thermodynamics.

3. Calculate entropy for the processes, and various types of energies such as internal energy, enthalpy, Helmholtz free energy and Gibbs free energy.

4. Differentiate between ideal and non-ideal solution and estimate partial molar properties.

5. Generate Vapor Liquid Equilibrium data for ideal and non-ideal solutions and check for their consistency by various methods.

6. Find the feasibility and extent of conversion for any reaction.

22

PROCESS HEAT TRANSFER

Sub Code:

CH403

Credit:

3:1:0

Contact Hours: 70

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Mathematics Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

Course Objectives: The students will

1. Study various modes of Heat transfer and their fundamental relations.

2. Study conduction heat transfer and develop mathematical relations for various solid geometries.

3. Understand properties of insulation and critical thickness of insulation.

4. Understand different types of heat transfer coefficients and their estimations in various types of flows in different geometries.

5. Study the Boiling phenomenon and to generate pool boiling curve.

6. Understand the working of Heat exchangers and to learn design of double pipe, shell and tube heat exchangers and design of evaporators and conduct experiments and to submit the report.

7. Understand the phenomenon of radiation, radiation shields and estimation of emissivity.

Course Content:

Unit I Introduction: Various modes of heat Transfer.

Conduction: Fourier’s law, Steady state unidirectional heat flow through compound walls, Numerical Problems. Heat conduction with heat generation in a slab, cylinder and sphere.

Unit II Insulation: Properties of insulation materials. Types of insulation, Critical and optimum thickness of insulation.

Extended Surfaces: Types of fins, fin efficiency. Fin effectiveness. Elementary treatment of unsteady state heat conduction- Biot number, Lumped heat capacity model, Unsteady state heat conduction through a slab, Numerical Problems.

Unit III Convection: Individual and Overall heat transfer coefficients, LMTD, Empirical correlations for forced and natural convection. Analogy between momentum and heat transfer-Reynolds, Colburn and Prandtl.

Heat Transfer With Phase Change: Boiling phenomenon, nucleate boiling and film boiling, Condensation- Film and drop wise condensation. Nusselt equation.

Unit IV

23

Heat Transfer Equipment: Construction and working - Double pipe heat exchanger. Shell and tube heat exchangers. Condensers.

Design of Heat Transfer Equipment: Elementary design of double pipe heat exchanger. Shell and tube heat exchanger and condensers.

Unit V Evaporators: Types, Performance of tubular evaporator- evaporator capacity, evaporator economy, Multiple effect evaporators.

Radiation: Properties and definitions, Stefan-Boltzmann law, Wein’s displacement law, Kirchoff’s law, View factors, Radiation between surfaces, Radiation involving gases and vapors. Radiation shields.

Text Books:

1. McCabe, Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, McGraw Hill, NY, 5 th Edition, 2000.

2. Coulson, J.M and Richardson, J.F, Chemical Engineering, Vol 1, Chemical Engineering, Pergemon and ELBS, 5 th Edition, McGraw Hill, 2000.

Reference Books:

1. Rao, Y.V.C., Heat Transfer, I Edition, University Press (India) Ltd, New Delhi, 2000.

2. Hollman, J. P., Heat Transfer, 8 th Edition.

3. Kern, D. Q., Process Heat Transfer, McGraw Hill, NY, 1965.

Course Outcomes: The students will be able to do the following

1. Write all fundamental heat transfer relations.

2. Derive equations for the calculation of heat flux and estimation of intermediate temperatures in multilayer systems.

3. Calculate critical thickness of insulation requires for different geometry of solids.

4. Write different dimensionless numbers and explain their significance.

5. Estimate LMTD and heat transfer coefficients for different types of flows.

6. Design Shell and tube and Double pipe heat exchanger and Evaporator.

7. Explain radiation in different type of solids and estimate emissivity.

24

MECHANICAL OPERATIONS

Sub Code:

CH404

Credit:

3:1:0

Contact Hours: 70

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Mathematics Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

Course Objectives:

1. Study different properties of particulate solids, handling and mixing of solid particles.

2. Study principles of communition and different types of equipment for size reduction like

The students will

crushers, grinders etc.

3. Understand mechanical separation aspect such as screening, filtration, sedimentation, transportation of solids etc.

4. Understand energy requirements in solids handling, agitation and mixing, solid conveying and storage.

5. Hands on experience of working by conducting experiments on some of the basic unit operations such as separation and size reduction.

6. Present seminar on current separation techniques and submit the report on the same.

Course Content:

Unit I Particle Technology: Particle shape, particle size, different ways of expression of particle size, shape factor, sphericity, mixed particles size analysis, screens – ideal and actual screens, differential and cumulative size analysis, effectiveness of screen, specific surface of mixture of particles, number of particles in a mixture, standard screens industrial screening equipment, motion of screen, grizzly, gyratory screen, vibrating screen, trommels, sub sieve analysis – Air permeability method, sedimentation and elutriation methods.

Unit II Size Reduction: Introduction – types of forces used for communition, criteria for communition, characteristics of communited products, laws of size reduction, work index, energy utilization, methods of operating crushers – free crushing, choke feeding, open circuit grinding, closed circuit grinding, wet and dry grinding, equipment for size reduction – Blake jaw crusher, gyratory crusher, smooth roll crusher, tooth roll crusher, impactor, attrition mill, ball mill, critical speed of ball mill, ultra fine grinders, fluid energy mill, colloid mill, cutters – knife cutter.

Unit III Flow of Fluid Past Immersed Bodies: Drag, drag coefficient, pressure drop – Kozeny – Carman equation, Blake- Plummer, Ergun equation, fluidization, conditions for fluidization, minimum fluidization velocity, types of fluidization, application of fluidization, slurry transport, pneumatic conveying.

Motion of Particles Through Fluids: Mechanics of particle motion, equation for one dimensional motion of particles through a fluid in gravitational and centrifugal field, terminal velocity, drag coefficient, motion of spherical particles in Stoke’s region, Newton’s region and intermediate region, criterion for settling regime, hindered settling, modification of equation for

25

hindered

settling,

centrifugal

separators,

cyclones

and

hydro

cyclones.

Unit IV Sedimentation: Batch settling test, application of batch settling test to design of continuous thickener, Coe and Clevenger theory, Kynch theory, thickener design, determination of thickener area.

Filtration: Introduction, classification of filtration, cake filtration, clarification, batch and continuous filtration, pressure and vacuum filtration constant rate filtration and cake filtration, characteristics of filter media, industrial filters, sand filter, filter press, leaf filter, rotary drum filter, horizontal belt filter, bag filter, centrifugal filtration – suspended batch centrifuge, filter aids, application of filter aids, principles of cake filtration, modification of Kozeny – Carman for filtration

Unit V Agitation And Mixing: Application of agitation, Agitation equipment, Types of impellers – Propellers, Paddles and Turbines, Flow patterns in agitated vessels, Prevention of swirling, Standard turbine design, Power correlation and Power calculation, Mixing of solids, Types of mixers- change can mixers, Muller mixers, Mixing index, Ribbon blender, Internal screw mixer, Tumbling mixer.

Sampling, Storage and Conveying of Solids: Sampling of solids, storage of solids, Open and closed storage, Bulk and bin storage, Conveyors – Belt conveyors, Chain conveyor, Apron conveyor, Bucket conveyor, Bucket elevators, Screw conveyor.

Text Books:

1. McCabe W.L., Unit Operation Of Chemical Engineering, V Edition, McGraw Hill International, Singapore, 2000.

2. Badger, W.L. and Banchero J.T., Introduction to Chemical Engineering, III Edition, McGraw Hill International, Singapore, 1999.

3. Coulson, J.M. and Richardson, J.F., Chemical Engineering Vol.2, 4, Particle Technology and Separation Process, 1998.

Reference Books:

1. Brown G., Unit Operation, I Edition, CBS Publishers, New Delhi, 1995.

2. Perry, R and Green, W.D., Perry’s Chemical Engineering Hand book, VII Edition, McGraw Hill International Edition, New York, 2000.

3. Foust, A.S. et.al, Principles of Unit Operation, III Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York,

1997.

Course Outcomes: The students are expected to do the following

1. Classify and suggest different type of separation processes required for the feed material.

2. Suggest different types of size reduction methods such as crushing, grinding milling depending on the type and size of the material.

3. Calculate the power requirements for different type of mechanical operations.

4. Select different type of conveying methods.

5. Hands on experience on various separation and size reduction experiments.

26

TECHNICAL CHEMISTRY-II

Sub Code:

CHY405

Credit:

2:1:0

Contact Hours: 56

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Chemistry, Technical Chemistry-I Course coordinator: Chemistry Department

Course Objectives: The student will

1. Study the fundamentals of Electronic spectroscopy, Infrared spectroscopy, NMR and Mass spectroscopy.

2. Understand the principles and applications of Flame Photometry and Atomic adsorption Spectroscopy.

3. Study the Instrumentation and application of colorimetry, potentiometery and conductometer.

4. Understand the principles, working and applications of Gas Chromatography, Thin layer chromatography and High pressure liquid chromatography.

Course Content:

Unit I Spectroscopy–Introduction: Interaction of electromagnetic radiation, energies corresponding to various kinds of radiations, Types of spectroscopy, representation of a spectrum, atomic and molecular transitions, selection rules, spectral width, factors influencing positions and intensity of spectral lines.

Electronic Spectroscopy: Introduction, Principle of electronic spectrometry-Beer-Lambert’s law definition, derivation and its limitations, terminology associated with electronic spectroscopy, Intensity shifts, types of absorption bands. Electronic energy levels and electronic transitions in organic molecules Woodward- Fisher rules for conjugated dienes and carbonyl compounds; Quantitative applications.

Unit II Infrared Spectroscopy: Introduction–Regions of infrared region spectrum, Theory–correct wavelength of radiation and change in electric dipole moment of a molecule. Types of vibrations. Factors affecting the group frequencies –electronic effects and hydrogen bonding, force constant. Coupled interactions; Instrumentation-FTIR spectroscopy. Applications, Numericals.

Mass Spectrometry: Introduction, basic principles, instrumentation, methods of generating positively charged ions–electron impact, molecular ion peak, base peak, metastable peak and isotopic peak, modes of fragmentation, mass spectra of simple organic molecules.

Unit III NMR Spectroscopy: General introduction and definition; Theory of NMR, Types of nuclei, chemical shift-definition, units and factors affecting on chemical shift; spin–spin interaction; shielding mechanism of measurement; Instrumentation, sample handling, representation of NMR spectrum, Applications: Qualitative and quantitative applications.

27

Unit IV

Flame Photometry And Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: Introduction, principle, flames - ionization and dissociation in flames, types of flames used in AAS and flame spectra, variation of emission intensity with flame, metallic spectra in flame, role of temperature on absorption emission, Comparative study of flame emission spectroscopy (FES) and Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Instrumentation. Applications–Qualitative and Quantitative determination of alkali and alkaline earth metals.

Chromatography – Introduction: Classification - Theory - distribution coefficient, rate of travel, retention time, adjusted retention time, retention volume, adjusted retention volume, net retention volume, specific retention volume, column capacity, separation number, peak capacity, shapes of chromatic peak, column efficiency, resolution, optimization of column performance, Numerical problems.

Unit V Thin layer chromatography: Principle, experimental procedure, applications.

Gas chromatography: Principle, instrumentation, sample injection, column detectors (TCD, FID, ECD, atomic emission detector), qualitative and quantitative analysis.

High performance liquid chromatography: Principle, instrumentation, column, sample injection, detectors (absorbance, refractive index, electrochemical).

Text Books:

1. Silverstein, R.M. and Webster, W.P., Spectrometric Identification of organic compounds, ,Wiley & Sons, 1999.

2. Willard, H.H., Merritt, L.L., Dean, J.A. and Settle, F. A., Instrumental Methods of Analysis, CBS Publishers, 7th Edition, 1988.

Reference Books:

1. Ewing, G.W., Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis, 5th Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1988.

2. Skoog, D.A, Holler, S.J,.Nilman, T.A., Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 5th Edn., Saunders college publishing, London, 1998.

3. Chatwal, A., Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis, Himalaya Publishing House.

4. Riley, T. and Tomilinsom, C., Principles of Electro-Analytical Methods, John Wiley and Sons.

5. Sharma, K., Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis, Goel Publishing House Meerut

2000.

6. Jaffery, Gill, Basset. J, Vogel’s Text Book of Quantitative Inorganic analysis, et al 5th Edn.,

ELBS, 1998.

Course Outcomes: On completion of this course the student will be able to

1. Understand electron spectroscopy , IR, NMR and Mass spectra of simple organic molecules

2. Working knowledge of Flame Photometry and Atomic adsorption Spectroscopy.

3. Working knowledge of Gas Chromatography, Thin layer chromatography and High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

28

PROCESS HEAT TRANSFER LABORATORY

Sub Code:

CHL403

Credit:

0:0:2

Contact Hours: 42

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

List of experiments suggested:

1. Natural Convection in Bare and Finned tube

2. Vertical Shell and Tube Heat exchanger (Condenser)

3. Horizontal Shell and tube Heat exchanger (Condenser)

4. Helical Coil Heat Exchanger

5. Emissivity Determination

6. Effect of Geometry on Natural Convection

7. Heat Transfer in Packed Beds

8. Double Pipe Heat Exchanger

9. Heat Transfer in Jacketed Vessel

10. Determination of Insulation Thickness

11. Transient Heat Conduction

12. Heat Transfer in Fluidized Beds

13. Evaporator

14. Solar Heater

15. Spiral Plate Heat Exchanger

16. Cross Flow Heat Exchanger

Note: A minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted.

29

MECHANICAL OPERATIONS LABORATORY

Sub Code:

CHL404

Credit:

0:0:2

Contact Hours: 42

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Nil Course coordinator: Chemical Engineering Department

The experiments should be based on the following topics:

1. Air elutriation

2. Air permeability

3. Ball mill

4. Batch sedimentation

5. Beaker decantation

6. Cyclone separator

7. Drop weight crusher

8. Froth flotation

9. Grindability index

10. ICI sedimentation

11. Jaw crusher

12. Leaf filter

13. Plate and frame filter press

14. Pneumatic conveyor

15. Screen effectiveness

16. Sieve analysis

17. Thickener

Note: A minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted.

30

TECHNICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY-II

Sub Code:

CHYL405

Credit:

0:0:2

Contact Hours: 42

CIE:

50 Marks

SEE:

50 Marks

Pre-requisites: Engineering Chemistry laboratory Course coordinator: Chemistry Department

List of experiments suggested:

1. Conductometric estimation of Li 2 SO 4 using standard BaCl 2 (precipitation titration).

2. Determination of sulphate in the given sample of water using

3. Determination of nitrate in the given sample of water using

4. Determination of percentage composition of binary mixture using Ostwald’s viscometer.

5. Separation of dyes by thin layer chromatography

6. Potentiometric titration: FAS vs. KMnO 4

7. Gas Chromatography

8. Flame photometric estimation of Ca/K present in the given samples of water.

9. Determination of quantity of metal using AAS

Nephelometer

spectrophotometer.

10. Determination of CoCl2 concentration using colorimeter

11. Estimation of carboxylic acid by iodometric titration.

12. Estimation of amino group by acetylation.

13. Estimation of ester

14. Estimation of alcohol by acetylation

15. Dissolved Oxygen Analyzer

Note: A minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted

Reference Book:

1. Jaffery, Gill, Basset. J., Vogel’s Text Book of Quantitative Inorganic analysis, et al 5th Edition, ELBS, 1998.

31