Sie sind auf Seite 1von 68

Footwear

Match your PLAYERS’ SHOES to the surface

Tennis History

HALL OF FAME reopens after major facelift

Racquet Tech

Planning is key for ATW AND BOX PATTERNS

JULY 2015 / VOLUME 43/ NUMBER 7 / $5.00 2015 Guide To Ball Machines •
JULY 2015 / VOLUME 43/ NUMBER 7 / $5.00
2015 Guide To
Ball Machines
• Effective teaching tool
• Our exclusive listings
Nylon vs. Poly Strings
Cardio Tennis
Trainer Summit
Incorporating USPTA
pg. 39

TennisIndustry

JULY 2015

DEPARTMENTS

4

Our Serve

7

Industry News

13

Letters

14

TIA News

16

Racquet Tech

18

Footwear

20

Tennis History

24

Cardio Tennis

36

Ask the Experts

37

Tips and Techniques

38

Your Serve, by Rod Heckelman

INDUSTRY NEWS

7

Timothy Russell named new CEO of ITA

7

Tennis Magazine celebrates golden anniversary

7

Grand Canyon University adds PTM program

7

Sony Smart Tennis Sensor launches worldwide

8

USPTA to incorporate Platform Tennis Association

8

IART Symposium set for Sept. 18-22

8

ITA partners with Oracle

8

Hall of Fame rebrands with new logo

9

PTR adds two corporate members

9

Gael Monfils stars in new Asics tennis campaign

11

USTA NE creates ‘Boston Social Tennis League’

COVER PHOTO BY ELIZA JACOBS

p.22
p.22
p.26
p.26
p.34
p.34
p.28
p.28

FEATURES

www.tennisindustrymag.com

22 Champions of Tennis Honor Roll

As we take nominations for Tennis Industry’s 2015 annual awards, we look back at the impressive roster of past winners.

26 Nylon vs. Poly

With the advancements and new introductions

in co-poly strings, are nylon-based strings still

relevant? The short answer: Very much so.

34 Inside Game

Tennis helps round out the offerings of two award-winning indoor facilities.

2015 Guide to Ball Machines

28 Play the Long Game

A ball machine can be an incredible teaching

tool and a great source of revenue—and can help strengthen the game.

30 Ball Machines on the Market

Our comprehensive guide lists the ball machines currently on the market, along with features, benefits and prices.

p.39 44 Musculoskeletal Injuries in Tennis-TeachingProfessionals 47 New Initiative Rewards

p.39

44

Musculoskeletal Injuries in Tennis-TeachingProfessionals

47

New Initiative Rewards USPTAProswhoRecruitNew Members

50

61

USPTA World Conference

Opposed Slate of 2016-2017 NationalBoard

Read more articles online at www.ADDvantageUSPTA.com

PLUS

40

CEO’s Message

42

President’s Message

44

Inside Coaching

46

Endorsee News

47

USPTA Benefits

50

USPTA World Conference

60

USPTA News

62

Career Development

64

Member News

Our Serve

Catching Adult Players

I recently was looking at some marketing material for a prod- uct that, while suitable for all

ages, was being targeted mainly to adults and older Americans. One of the hooks is that these groups have money (lots of it). Now, in tennis, I fully support our efforts to reach younger players and bring more kids and teens into this sport. It’s important for the future of the game, and for the future of this industry. But, let’s look at this in terms of your (and my) business. We need revenue—now—to survive. We need people to buy equipment (the larger the margin, the better), take lessons, book court time, play in leagues, buy apparel and shoes, etc. In most instances, we have to reach adults— they have the money, they have the time, and with health and fitness such a big issue, they should have the desire and motivation to get out on the court. What they may not have, though, is an easy and welcoming way to en- ter this sport, designed and targeted especially for them. Many tennis facilities, teaching pros, and park & recs offer “adult” classes and clinics. But how many of those are designed specifically for adults, to make them feel welcome, make them progress, and keep them engaged and wanting to continue in the sport? Here’s an idea, and it will cost you nothing: Check out Play Tennis Fast, which is designed to bring adults into tennis, and see if it can

be right for your facility or program.

Play Tennis Fast was put together by the Tennis Industry Association to help grow this sport, and like most things the TIA does, PTF is free to use. It’s an option for tennis providers to help get adults engaged in tennis for the long term. If you’re

a facility or teaching pro, it will help create tennis consumers for your business. The details for PTF can be found at PlayTennis.com. Briefly, it’s a course of six one-hour lessons designed to introduce or welcome back adult players to tennis. Importantly, it uses slower balls, which helps adults achieve success quickly. PTF has a solid foundation— based largely on the successful, global ITF TennisExpress program for adults. For PTF, the TIA also had input from top PTR and USPTA pros. The TIA is not looking for any credit (you don’t even have to use the name “Play Tennis Fast”).

It just wants to get more adults

playing and consuming tennis. PTF has not been heavily pushed yet, but pilot programs at facilities in South Carolina have been well received (one saw 21 new adult players). There’s also been interest from a few USTA sections and a group of clubs in one state to offer this option to facilities as their intro to tennis adult program. Check out Play Tennis Fast on

PlayTennis.com. If it’s right for you and your business, use it to bring in long-term adult tennis consumers.

Peter Francesconi, Editorial Director peter@tennisindustrymag.com

Francesconi, Editorial Director peter@tennisindustrymag.com Publishers David Bone Jeff Williams Editorial Director
Publishers David Bone Jeff Williams
Publishers
David Bone
Jeff Williams

Editorial Director Peter Francesconi peter@tennisindustrymag.com

Associate Editor

Greg Raven

Design/Art Director

Kristine Thom

Special Projects Manager Bob Patterson

Contributing Editors Robin Bateman Cynthia Cantrell Kent Oswald Cynthia Sherman Mary Helen Sprecher Tim Strawn

Contributing Photographers Bob Kenas David Kenas

TENNIS INDUSTRY Corporate Offices PO Box 3392, Duluth, GA 30096 Phone: 760-536-1177 Fax: 760-536-1171 Email: TI@racquetTECH.com Website: www.TennisIndustryMag.com Office Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Advertising Director John Hanna 770-650-1102, x.125 hanna@knowatlanta.com

Apparel Advertising Cynthia Sherman

203-263-5243

cstennisindustry@gmail.com

Tennis Industry is published 10 times per year:

monthly January through August and combined issues in September/October and November/ December by Tennis Industry and USRSA, PO Box 3392, Duluth, GA 30096. Periodcal postage paid at Duluth, GA and at additional mailing offices (USPS #004-354). July 2015, Volume 43, Number 7 © 2015 by USRSA and Tennis Industry. All rights reserved. Tennis Industry, TI and logo are trademarks of USRSA. Printed in the U.S.A. Phone advertising: 770-650-1102 x 125. Phone circulation and editorial: 760-536-1177. Yearly subscriptions $25 in the U.S., $40 elsewhere. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tennis Industry, PO Box 3392, Duluth, GA 30096. TI is the official magazine of the USRSA, TIA,and ASBA.

Looking for back issues of Tennis Industry/ Racquet Sports Industry? Visit the archives at our website at TennisIndustrymag.com for free digital versions back to 2004.

for free digital versions back to 2004. 4 T e n n i s I n

IndustryNews

Information to help you run your business

Timothy Russell Named New CEO of ITA

T he Intercollegiate Tennis Association board of directors has appointed Dr. Timo- thy Russell as the new CEO of the ITA. Russell will take over July 1 from longtime ITA CEO David Benjamin, who is retiring.

Russell has spent three decades as an educator at two major Division I schools, Ohio State University and most recently, Arizona State University, as well as at the University of Roches- ter, a leading Division III institution. "While ASU is losing an extraordinary member of our faculty, the ITA and college tennis are gaining an incredibly creative person who will advance your cause, build your community and imaginatively address the most pressing challenges,” said Steven Tepper, dean of the Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. “I am humbled by this opportunity, and feel especially hon- ored to succeed David Benjamin who has served the ITA and college tennis tirelessly throughout his career," Russell said. Russell is well known in tennis. He served as the USTA Collegiate Varsity Chair from 2007 to 2010, where he helped put together a strategic plan for the partnership of the USTA with the ITA and varsity collegiate tennis. From 2011 to 2012, he guided the USTA through major changes in the junior competitive tournament structure as USTA Junior Competition chair. He also served as a researcher and moderator for last year's ITA For- mat Steering Committee. “Tim knows and understands the ITA and the key issues facing college tennis, and will hit the ground running,” Benjamin said. “His work with boards of directors, strate- gic planning, fundraising and expertise in unifying large numbers of people around big causes will all be super assets for the ITA and college tennis.”

all be super assets for the ITA and college tennis.” • Tennis Mag Celebrates Golden Anniversary

Tennis Mag Celebrates Golden Anniversary

T ennis Magazine turns 50 years old this year. The magazine, founded in Chicago in 1965 by Asher Birnbaum, is owned by the Tennis Media Co. and

now is led by managing partner Jeff Williams (who also is co-publisher of Tennis Industry). Tennis celebrates in May/June with a special anniversary issue, which includes “50th Anniversary Moments”—50 es- says that highlight “the moments that took us from the quiet lawns of the amateur era, to the glory years of the tennis boom, to the golden age of all-time great players that we’re witnessing today.” (The first 20 “Moments” are in Tennis’ May/June issue; the rest will appear in the next two issues.) Tennis’ editors also created a “Tournament of Champions” that puts the best players over the last 50 years against each other in a fantasy draw. “To look through issues of Tennis is to see a snapshot of the evolution of the sport,” writes Chris Evert, the magazine’s general partner. “Here’s to another 50.”

general partner. “Here’s to another 50.” • Grand Canyon Univ. Adds Professional Tennis Management

Grand Canyon Univ. Adds Professional Tennis Management Program

Grand Canyon University in Phoenix is adding a Professional Tennis Management program, the first NCAA Division 1 school to do so. The program, which begins this fall, will offer a bachelor of science degree in business management with an emphasis on tennis man- agement. GCU’s program falls within the Colangelo College of Business, named after Phoenix sports icon Jerry Colangelo. The 120-credit program will be incorporated with the University’s growing Sports Business program as well as its new hospitality program, also being rolled out in the fall. It will cover the skills needed to manage tennis operations, including facility man- agement, merchandising, event planning and introduction to food and beverage management. The program, accredited by the USPTA, also will teach player de- velopment and the skills needed to become an effective instructor, and students will be required to get at least 100 hours of experience in the industry before they graduate. Students in the program also will have the opportunity to become USPTA certified by the time they graduate.Canyon Univ. Adds Professional Tennis Management Program Sony Smart Tennis Sensor Launches Worldwide After teasing

Sony Smart Tennis Sensor Launches Worldwide

After teasing the U.S. market for months, Sony has finally launched globally its Smart Tennis Sensor, which mounts on the butt of the handle of selected racquets fromtime they graduate. Sony Smart Tennis Sensor Launches Worldwide www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry 7

mounts on the butt of the handle of selected racquets from www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry

IndustryNews

Head, Prince, Yonex and Wilson. The sensor uses vibration analysis and motion sensors to track and store data, either in the racquet, in the cloud or in the smartphone app. It offers real-time shot visualizations on smartphones and tablets, as well as display- ing recorded video and shot metrics. Players can collect data on ball and swing speed, spin, where you hit the ball, the type of shot you hit, etc. For more information, visit smarttennissensor.sony.net.

USPTA to Incorporate Platform Tennis Association

During the USPTA semiannual meeting in April, the Executive Committee voted to incorporate the Professional Platform Tennis Association (PPTA) into the USPTA. The PPTA has voted to dissolve and its assets, programs, certification process and mission will be borne by the USPTA. The USPTA will assist with administrative functions and handle certification and education responsibilities for platform tennis-teaching professionals. Platform tennis professionals will become a separately tested and certified membership category under the USPTA umbrella. All professionals who become certified in platform tennis will receive

who become certified in platform tennis will receive all of the same benefits and pay the

all of the same benefits and pay the same annual dues as current USPTA-certified tennis professionals. “With so many facilities where USPTA professionals teach offering platform tennis, there is an increasing need for professionals who are certified in the sport,” said USPTA CEO John Embree. “The steady growth in this game pro- vides USPTA professionals who become certified in platform tennis more job and business opportunities.”

IART Symposium Set for Sept. 18-22

The ninth annual IART Train- ing Symposium is set for Sept. 18-22 at Saddlebrook Resort in Tampa, Fla. Tim Strawn, execu- tive director of IART (Interna- tional Alliance of Racquet Technicians), says the 2015 event has been revised with a new format, new speakers and more hands-on training sessions. The IART Symposium includes on- and off-court activities, a three-hour trade show, and an evening meet-and-greet. Sunday will feature a full day of hands-on instruction on a wide variety of topics, led by seasoned professionals, Monday will showcase four

led by seasoned professionals, Monday will showcase four ITA Partners With Oracle I n a new
led by seasoned professionals, Monday will showcase four ITA Partners With Oracle I n a new

ITA Partners With Oracle

I n a new partnership, Oracle will serve as the title sponsor for three programs as part of the Oracle Collegiate Tennis Tour, administered by the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA). The three programs are the inaugural Oracle/ITA

Masters, hosted by Malibu Racquet Club Sept. 18-20; the Oracle/ITA Collegiate Tennis Rankings; and the Oracle/ITA Outing & Awards Luncheon (this year Aug.

28).

"We are thrilled to be a part of the Oracle Collegiate Tennis Tour and to be sup- porting these rising tennis stars," said Oracle CEO Mark Hurd. "Our partnership with the ITA gives us another opportunity to invest in college students who are key to Oracle's future." With the Oracle/ITA Masters, the top 16 men’s and women’s singles players and eight men’s and women’s doubles teams can earn a trip to Malibu, Calif. The Oracle/ITA Collegiate Tennis Rankings will track singles and doubles players in NCAA Divisions I, II, III, NAIA, Junior Colleges and California Junior Colleges. The Oracle/ITA Outing & Awards Luncheon will honor members of the ITA Col- legiate All-Star Team and ITA/Arthur Ashe Sportsmanship & Leadership National Award winners at the historic West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y.

"Partnering with Oracle will be transformative for the ITA and college tennis," said ITA Executive Director David Benjamin. “Oracle already has a major presence in the tennis world and we are thrilled with its growing commitment to the college game."

8 TennisIndustry July 2015

seminars with new speakers and topics, and Tuesday will be a full day of racquet custom- ization, led by Ron Rocchi, manager of the Wilson Team Room and Wilson Tour Services stringing team. For details or to register, visit gssalliance. com or contact Strawn at tim@gssalliance. com.

Rome, Ga., Tennis Center Breaks Ground for 51 Courts

The design for the 51-court Rome Ten- nis Center of Georgia has been finalized and ground broken. The first phase of the construction is expected to be completed by June 2016. The plans include six NCAA regulation courts, three center courts, and one exhibition court that can accom- modate seating for 2,000.com. Rome, Ga., Tennis Center Breaks Ground for 51 Courts All courts are lighted and have

exhibition court that can accom- modate seating for 2,000. All courts are lighted and have shade

All courts are lighted and have shade cabanas for players, and 12 of the courts will be lined for Youth Tennis. The facility will have a 3,846-square-foot clubhouse with a viewing deck that overlooks the terraced courts. The design also allows for future development of six NCAA regu- lation indoor tennis courts. “The Rome Tennis Center of Georgia is about increasing economic impact,” said Rome City Manager Sammy Rich. “The facility will allow us to not only keep our existing events, but make us more mar- ketable and able to go after additional, larger tournaments as well.”

Hall of Fame Rebrands With New Logo, Campaign

The International Tennis Hall of Fame has introduced a new logo and brand identity, inspired by the global nature of tennis and reflecting the organiza- tion’s commitment to

inspired by the global nature of tennis and reflecting the organiza- tion’s commitment to www.tennisindustrymag.com
inspired by the global nature of tennis and reflecting the organiza- tion’s commitment to www.tennisindustrymag.com

www.tennisindustrymag.com

IndustryNews

Industry News Monfils Stars in New Asics Tennis Campaign A sics has launched a global tennis

Monfils Stars in New Asics Tennis Campaign

A sics has launched a global tennis campaign with the tagline, “It's a tough

game. Go smash it,” and starring pro player Gael Monfils. The campaign was

launched with an ad spot to coincide with the 2015 French Open. Other ele-

ments include print ads, in-store visuals and online banners. The inspirational approach is aligned with Asics’ global advertising campaign, “It's a big world. Go run it,” which launched in early 2015. In the tennis-specific TV commercial, Monfils is transported from the tennis court to a fast-paced, urban en- vironment, where a group of opponents send tennis balls toward him at lightning- fast speeds and from all angles. In the ad, Monfils wears Gel-Resolution 6 tennis shoes. The campaign also intro- duces apparel styles of its spring tennis collection. Visit asics.com.

preserving and promoting tennis history to a worldwide audience. The logo was rolled out in early May, a few weeks ahead of the re-opening of the renovated Hall of Fame Museum. The logo will be seen in a new advertising campaign this year that will highlight the stories for the 243 individuals who have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. “Our goal is to draw attention to the sto- ried history of tennis and those who have built this history, as well as to engage fans with the International Tennis Hall of Fame, our outstanding new museum, and our programs," said HoF CEO Todd Martin.

PBI Offers Unique Tennis Camp in Austria

In conjunction with Peter Burwash International’s ongoing 40th anniver- sary celebration year in 2015, the orga- nization has announced the creation of the first PBI World Tennis Camp to take place Sept. 21-24 at the Bio-Hotel Stan- glwirt in Tirol, Austria. The camp will coincide with PBI’s annual conference, so more than 85 PBI professionals and directors from around the world will be on hand, offer- ing a one-of-a-kind tennis camp experi- ence. Participants will receive at least

tennis camp experi- ence. Participants will receive at least www.tennisindustrymag.com four hours of instruction and play

www.tennisindustrymag.com

four hours of instruction and play each day, on Stanglwirt’s eight red clay courts at the base of the Austrian Alps. (There also are six indoor courts available.) Visit pbitennis.com or contact pbiworld- camp@pbitennis.com or 800-255-4707.

Bollettieri Opens Access to Extensive Coaching Archive

Legendary coach Nick Bollettieri has announced that he is giving fans around the world exclusive access to peruse his per- sonal and formerly private library of plans, notes, photos, videos and published articles. The Hall of Famer’s new website, nickbollet- tieri.com, has personal stories, images and the secret training techniques he utilized to cultivate some of the sport’s biggest stars. The content sat for years in Bollettieri’s personal storage units. The self-proclaimed “pack rat” admits that he has kept his train- ing plans, notebooks, diagrams and photo and video library secret until now, carefully cataloging and archiving his approach and journey though the sport. “Once we opened the first box and saw its contents, the never-before-seen photos and documents, we knew we had to share it with the larger tennis world,” said Steve Shulla, content director for NickBollettieri.com. Bollettieri has partnered with TEAM HQS

NickBollettieri.com. Bollettieri has partnered with TEAM HQS (www.teamhqs.com) to launch the website, where fans can

(www.teamhqs.com) to launch the website, where fans can access his entire catalog through a $99 a year subscription. New con- tent will be added to the site weekly.

PTR Adds Two Corporate Members

Sport Court International and The Pick Up Wall by Tennis Tech have joined the PTR as corporate members. Sport Court has more than 100,000 backyard court and gymnasium floor installations worldwide and bills its ten- nis courts as “the safest courts in the world,” with its PowerGame tennis court designed for its safety and shock absorp- tion. The USTA has chosen Sport Court as its “Official and Exclusive 36’ and 60’ Court Surface Supplier.” The Pick Up Wall by Tennis Tech is an automatic ball col- lection system that requires only 3 feet of space at the back of the court and will feed any top-loading ball machine or hopper.be added to the site weekly. PTR Adds Two Corporate Members Cancer Claims Stefano Capriati Stefano

Cancer Claims Stefano Capriati

Stefano Capriati, who groomed his daugh- ter Jennifer to be a top tennis professional, died of cancer in Tampa, Florida, on April 18. He was 79 years old. The Italian-born Capriati coached his daughter to the world's top 10 when she was just 14 years old and helped her win a gold medal at the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona. Jennifer also won the Australian Open in 2001 and '02 and the French Open in 2001, becoming the No. 1-ranked player in the world later that year. She was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 2012. Capriati is survived by his daughter, as well as a son, Tampa lawyer Steven Capriati. Contributions in his memory can be made to the Children's Cancer Center, 4901 Westcourt and will feed any top-loading ball machine or hopper. Cancer Claims Stefano Capriati July 2015

July 2015 TennisIndustry

9

IndustryNews

People

Watch

Former USTA President Dave Haggerty will run for president of the International Tennis Federation, the sport’s global governing body. The ITF position is a four-year term. The current ITF president, Francesco Ricci Bitti of Italy, has held the job since 1999. The last ITF president from the U.S. was Walter Elcock in 1975. The ITF owns and operates the Davis Cup and Fed Cup and lower tier pro events, along with overseeing the sport’s anti-doping program and the Olympic tennis tournament.People Watch Gerald Mathews is the new Tecnifibre brand ambassador for Southern California and is part

Gerald Mathews is the new Tecnifibre brand ambassador for Southern California and is part of the company’s Pro Staff for the West. A former pro player, Mathews is the head coach for the Calabasas High School boys’ and girls’ tennis teams.anti-doping program and the Olympic tennis tournament. Tennis broadcaster Mary Car- illo received the ITF’s

Tennis broadcaster Mary Car-the Calabasas High School boys’ and girls’ tennis teams. illo received the ITF’s highest accolade, the

illo received the ITF’s highest accolade, the Philippe Chatrier Award, at the 2015 ITF World Champions Dinner on June 2 in Paris, for outstanding contribu- tions to the game. Billie Jean King, John McEnroe, Martina Navratilova, the All England Club, and 2014 Award winners Todd Woodbridge and Mark Woodforde are among the other former recipients.

Billie Jean King was hon- ored with the “Centennial Award” by the Girl Scouts of Eastern Pennsylvania, which recognizes an accomplishedand Mark Woodforde are among the other former recipients. female leader who will leave an indelible

female leader who will leave an indelible mark on this cen- tury's global landscape for the achievement of women and girls. She received the honor at a special ceremony May 6 in Center City Philadelphia.

After 12 years at the Yonkers (N.Y.) Tennis Center, Simonat a special ceremony May 6 in Center City Philadelphia. Gale is moving to Taconic Sport

Gale is moving to Taconic Sport

and Racquet in Hopewell Junction, N.Y., where he will be co-owner and general manager. Gale was Tennis Industry magazine’s 2014 “Youth Tennis Provider of the Year” and USPTA Eastern’s 2010 “Facility Manager of the Year.”

Patrick Kuhle of Quincy University and Joey Sway- sland of the University ofUSPTA Eastern’s 2010 “Facility Manager of the Year.” Oregon have been selected as the 2015 Wilson/ITA

Oregon have been selected as the 2015 Wilson/ITA National Promoter of the Year winners. Both Kuhle will receive a paid summer internship to work in the Grassroots Marketing Department at Wilson's headquarters in Chicago.

Peter Burwash Interna- tional pro Donald Becker is the new tennis directorDepartment at Wilson's headquarters in Chicago. at the Hanalei By Resort on the Hawaiian island of

at the Hanalei By Resort on the Hawaiian island of Kauai. He was the PBI ten-

nis director for the last three years at Caneel Bay Resort in the Caribbean.

Mark Chellas is the new director of tennis at Cop- perWynd Resort & Club in Scottsdale, Ariz. The resort’s tennis operation is managed by Cliff Drysdale Tennis.the last three years at Caneel Bay Resort in the Caribbean. Maui Jim has added WTA

Maui Jim has added WTA pro Flavia Pennetta to its roster of players who will wear the company’s Polar- izedPlus2 sunglasses. Other pros include Martina Hingis, David Ferrer, Philipp Kohlsch- reiber and Benoît Paire.tennis operation is managed by Cliff Drysdale Tennis. Adrians Zguns of Orlando, Fla., won the men’s

Adrians Zguns of Orlando, Fla., won the men’s open singles title at the USPTADavid Ferrer, Philipp Kohlsch- reiber and Benoît Paire. Clay Court Championships in May in Fort Myers,

Clay Court Championships in May in Fort Myers, Fla. On the women’s side, Julia Farina of West Palm Beach, Fla., won the singles and doubles titles.

Cypress Street, Tampa, FL 33607. —Cindy Shmerler

Sun Protection For Players’ Hands

Are your members concerned about sun exposure on their hands? Consider the PalmFree SunGloves, made from UPF50 fabric to block 98 percent of UV radia- tion. The gloves were developed by avid tennis player Patricia Ferrer, a physician assistant specializing in dermatology

Ferrer, a physician assistant specializing in dermatology who sees the long-term effects of chronic sun damage
Ferrer, a physician assistant specializing in dermatology who sees the long-term effects of chronic sun damage

who sees the long-term effects of chronic sun damage in her patients who have numerous precancers and skin cancers on the back of their hands. The palmless glove—available in two styles, four colors and five sizes—allows players to grip the racquet naturally while protecting the back of the hand. Visit palmfreesunwear. com.

Serena Williams Offers Online MasterClass

Serena Williams was one of the first ex- perts to offer an online class at MasterClass (masterclass.com), a new online instruc- tion site that launched in May and features experts in their fields. Others offering online classes at the site include Academy Award- winner Dustin Hoffman teaching acting and best-selling author James Patterson on writing. Future online classes will include sessions from performer Usher and photog- rapher Annie Leibovitz. Williams provides more than two hours of

Annie Leibovitz. Williams provides more than two hours of video lessons that cover core technique to

video lessons that cover core technique to pro-style fitness drills and the mental game. “I wanted to make my class feel as though you're right there on the court with me. It's like getting a private lesson," Williams says. The cost for her lessons is $90. The video classes were directed by Jay Roach ("Austin Powers" and "Meet the Parents") and Bill Guttentag, a two-time Academy Award- winning documentarian.

Roof Takes Shape At National Tennis Center

Construction is moving right along for the roof over Arthur Ashe Sta- dium, the most visible and talked about part of the renovations at the USTA Billie Jean King Nation- al Tennis Center. This photo was

USTA Billie Jean King Nation- al Tennis Center. This photo was 10 Tennis Industry July 2015
USTA Billie Jean King Nation- al Tennis Center. This photo was 10 Tennis Industry July 2015

IndustryNews

USTA NE Creates ‘Boston Social Tennis League’

I n its inaugural season, dozens of young adults have signed up for the Boston Social Tennis League. Created by the USTA New England

Section, the league targets 21- to 40-year-olds who want to play tennis in a fun, social environment with their friends, and want to make new friends. The doubles-only league kicked off in May, for seven weeks, with play on Wednesday and Thurs- day nights. Players pick the night they prefer and can register as a team or as an individual, and then will be placed on a team. Teams are co-ed (any com- bination of men and women) and must have at least six players. After tennis each night, players head to a local restaurant/bar that has a reserved section for the league and offers food and drink specials crafted for them. USTA New England reports the feedback has been terrific, with 84 players reg- istered. “After the first night, almost every player came up to me to say how much fun they were having and that this league was exactly what they’ve been looking for in Boston,” said league organizer Sarah Rice, manager of Community Tennis for the section. “We knew this was a group we weren’t reaching with our current USTA adult programs, so it’s wonderful to bring tennis to all of these new players.” The section’s goal is to partner with social sports organizations in Boston to ex- pand to more seasons in multiple locations around the city. For more information, visit www.ustanewengland.com/bostonsocialtennisleague. —Alexandra Troli

—Alexandra Troli • taken in late May by Melissa Schwartz of New York City, from

taken in late May by Melissa Schwartz of New York City, from a Delta Air Lines flight.

Bollettieri Partners For Exclusive Wimbledon Trip

For Wimbledon 2015, Nick Bollettieri has partnered with GR8 for a unique travel experience July 1-4. The exclusive trip, which costs $10,200 and up per person, features a personalized host, luxury transportation to the Savoy Hotel for a three-night stay, spa treatment, private welcome reception, pri- vate VIP Skyview Box seats, hospitality meet- and-greet with Bollettieri, and a private dinner or private clinic with him. (Purchase also includes a donation to a special charity.) Word is GR8 and Bollettieri are cooking up something for the 2015 US Open. Visit gr8- experience.com.flight. Bollettieri Partners For Exclusive Wimbledon Trip USRSA Announces New MRT’s and CS’s MRT’s Scott

USRSA Announces New MRT’s and CS’s

MRT’s Scott Brashier - Laugna Beach, CA Ian McCusker - Fort Collins, CO Cherkeia Ryan - Lawrenceville, GA Jason Pfannschmidt - Gaithersburg, MDgr8- experience.com. USRSA Announces New MRT’s and CS’s Stephanie Hunter - Fayetteville, NC Pedro Palma -

Stephanie Hunter - Fayetteville, NC Pedro Palma - Fayetteville, NC Jeffrey Yeh - Wattle PK AUSTRALIA Andrei Hent - Toronto, ON CANADA CS's Fernando Santos - Mount Vernon, NY

ON CANADA CS's Fernando Santos - Mount Vernon, NY ITA Announces 2015 National Award Winners Division

ITA Announces 2015 National Award Winners

Division 1—Men Coach of the Year: David Roditi, Texas Christian Univ. Assistant Coach of the Year: Howard Endelman, Columbia Univ. Senior Player: Søren Hess-Olesen, Univ.of Texas Rookie: Noah Rubin, Wake Forest Univ. Player to Watch: Andrew Harris, Univ.of Okla- homa Most Improved Senior: Jonny Wang, Univ.of Southern California Rafael Osuna Sportsmanship Award: Mitchell Frank, Univ.of Virginia Arthur Ashe, Jr. Sportsmanship & Leadership Award: Sebastian Stiefelmeyer, Univ.of Louisville Division 1—Women Coach of the Year: Geoff Macdonald, Vanderbilt Univ. Assistant Coach of the Year: Aleke Tsoubanos, Vanderbilt Univ. Player to Watch: Stephanie Wagner, Univ.of

Vanderbilt Univ. Player to Watch: Stephanie Wagner, Univ.of Miami (FL) Senior Player: Robin Anderson, UCLA Rookie:
Vanderbilt Univ. Player to Watch: Stephanie Wagner, Univ.of Miami (FL) Senior Player: Robin Anderson, UCLA Rookie:

Miami (FL) Senior Player: Robin Anderson, UCLA Rookie: Brooke Austin, Univ.of Florida Most Improved Senior: Julia Jones, Univ.of Mississippi Cissie Leary Award for Sportsmanship: Lindsey Kayati, Rutgers Univ. Arthur Ashe, Jr. Sportsmanship & Leadership Award:

Lorraine Guillermo, Pepperdine Univ. Division 2—Men Coach of the Year: Hendrik Bode, Hawaii Pacific Univ. Assistant Coach of the Year: Martin Parkes, Saint Leo Univ. Arthur Ashe Jr. Award for Leadership and Sportsman- ship: Mark Heimberger, Palm Beach Atlantic Univ. Player to Watch: Ahmed Triki, Barry Univ. Senior Player: Armand Levandi, Lewis Univ. Rookie: Marko Lenz, Hawaii Pacific Univ. Most Improved Senior: Kacper Boborykin, Midwestern State Univ.

Division 2—Women Coach of the Year: Dave Porter, Brigham Young Univ.-Hawaii Assistant Coach of the Year: Nicolai Nonnenbroich, California Univ.of Pennsylvania Arthur Ashe Jr. Award for Leadership and Sportsman- ship: Lauren Howard, West Liberty Univ. Player to Watch: Beatriz Leon, Columbus State Univ. Senior Player: Marietta Tuionetoa, Brigham Young Univ.-Hawaii Rookie: Kristyna Hancarova, Hawaii Pacific Univ. Most Improved Senior: Jesse Burrell, California Univ. of Pennsylvania Division 3—Men Coach of the Year: Steve Gachko, Stevens Institute of Technology Assistant Coach of the Year: Pauri Pandian, Brandeis Univ. Senior Player: Warren Wood, Claremont-Mudd- Scripps Colleges Rookie: Nicholas Chua, Univ. of Chicago Most Improved Player: Motasem Al-Houni, Gustavus Adolphus College Player to Watch: Ari Smolyar, Middlebury College Arthur Ashe, Jr. Sportsmanship & Leadership Award:

Tyler Carey, Univ. of Mary Washington Division 3—Women Coach of the Year: Kelly Stahlhuth, Washington Univ.–St. Louis Assistant Coach of the Year: Andrew Cohn, Pomona-Pitzer Colleges Player to Watch: Joulia Likhanskaia, Bowdoin College Senior Player: Maria Pylypiv, Williams College Rookie: Eudice Chong, Wesleyan College Most Improved Player: Claire Marshall, Depauw Univ. Arthur Ashe, Jr. Sportsmanship & Leadership Award:

Rebecca Curran, Williams College NAIA—Men Coach of the Year: Chase Hodges, Georgia Gwinnett

NAIA—Men Coach of the Year: Chase Hodges, Georgia Gwinnett www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry 11
NAIA—Men Coach of the Year: Chase Hodges, Georgia Gwinnett www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry 11
NAIA—Men Coach of the Year: Chase Hodges, Georgia Gwinnett www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry 11
NAIA—Men Coach of the Year: Chase Hodges, Georgia Gwinnett www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry 11
NAIA—Men Coach of the Year: Chase Hodges, Georgia Gwinnett www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry 11

IndustryNews

Short

Sets

Kiawah Island Golf Resort has created the Barth Tennis Academy, honoring Roy Barth, the resort’s longtime tennis director and a former world-ranked player. The academy will run throughout the summer at the resort for players looking for tournament success at all levels, in addition to preparing for college tennis.Short Sets Boast USA is the new official apparel company for the BB&T Atlanta Open, to

Boast USA is the new official apparel companyat all levels, in addition to preparing for college tennis. for the BB&T Atlanta Open, to

for the BB&T Atlanta Open, to be held July 25-Aug. 2, and will

provide apparel for the tournament’s staff, volunteers, officials and ball persons.

Cliff Drysdale Ten- nis will oversee the tennis program at the nine-court Copper- Wynd Resort & Club in Scottsdale, Ariz.—the first Southwest location for the 27 Drysdale- managed properties.staff, volunteers, officials and ball persons. Lighting company ThinkLite was named Inc. magazine’s top

Lighting company ThinkLite was namedSouthwest location for the 27 Drysdale- managed properties. Inc. magazine’s top pick in its “30-Under-30” list

managed properties. Lighting company ThinkLite was named Inc. magazine’s top pick in its “30-Under-30” list for

Inc. magazine’s top pick in its “30-Under-30”

list for 2015. ThinkLite, based in Natick, Mass., and co-founded by brothers Danny (left) and Dinesh Wadhwani, supplies businesses with LED bulbs compat- ible with their existing infrastructure.

The BB&T Atlanta Open, an ATP World

infrastructure. The BB&T Atlanta Open, an ATP World Tour 250 event to be held this year

Tour 250 event to be held this year July 25-Aug. 2, has announced a multi- year title sponsorship renewal agreement with BB&T.

the ATP ACES For Charity program, a global initiative aimed at giving back to communities where ATP World Tour events are

The Mylan World TeamTennis professional league will begin its 40th season on July 12.

The Mylan World TeamTennis professional league will begin its 40th season on July 12.

played.

Volt Athletics, which provides individualized sport-

Volt Athletics, which provides individualized sport-

The ATP World Tour has awarded a $15,000 grant to the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Cen- ter in Newport, R.I., to support its hunger relief programs. The grant is one of nine awarded by

King Jr. Community Cen- ter in Newport, R.I., to support its hunger relief programs. The grant

specific training programs built by certified strength coaches, has partnered with the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

College Assistant Coach of the Year: Johnny Thornton, Lindsey Wilson College Arthur Ashe Jr. Award for Leadership and Sports- manship: Wesley Ng, Missouri Valley College Senior Player: Fabio Silva, Vanguard Univ. Most Improved Senior Player: Miguel Grifol, Auburn Univ.at Montgomery Player to Watch: Matias Hatem,

Georgia Gwinnett College Rookie: Kevin Konfederak, Georgia Gwinnett College NAIA—Women Coach of the Year: Mark Goldin, Cardinal Stritch Univ. Assistant Coach of the Year: Sara Hawkins, Savannah College of Art & Design Arthur Ashe Jr. Award for Leadership and Sports-

Design Arthur Ashe Jr. Award for Leadership and Sports- Tennis Resorts Online Names Top Resorts, Camps

Tennis Resorts Online Names Top Resorts, Camps

T ennis Resorts Online (tennisresortsonline.com) has released its annual rank-

ings of the Top 100 Tennis Resorts and Camps worldwide, compiled from evalu-

ations submitted by tennis vacationers. Reviewers rated their experiences in

20 categories, including the overall tennis experience, quality of the teaching staff and

instruction, dedication to game arranging, allure of the tennis complex, caliber of the pro shop, and a wide variety of amenities and services, such as lodging, cuisine, value for dollar, children’s programs, spa and fitness options, and other recreation.

The top 10 resorts, in order, are:

1. Kiawah Island Golf Resort, S.C.

2. Rancho Valencia, Calif.

3. Wild Dunes Resort, S.C.

4. JW Marriott Desert Springs Resort & Spa, Calif.

5. Omni Amelia Island Plantation Resort, Fla.

6. Sea Island, Ga.

7. La Quinta Resort & Club, Calif.

8. Punta Mita, Nayarit, Mexico

9. Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, Hawaii

10. Four Seasons Resort Nevis, West Indies

12 TennisIndustry july 2015

The top 10 camps are:

1. Roy Emerson Tennis Weeks, Switzerland

2. Cliff Drysdale Tennis at Amelia, Fla.

3. Saddlebrook Tennis (Hopman), Fla.

4. New England Tennis Holidays at Sugarbush, Vt.

5. John Newcombe Tennis Ranch, Texas

6. Reed Anderson Tennis School, Calif.

7. Topnotch Tennis Academy, Vt.

8. PBI Tennis Camp at Bio-Hotel Stanglwirt, Austria

9. Sea Colony Tennis Camp, Del.

10. Wintergreen Tennis Academy, Va.

manship: Clara Ruegsegger, Olivet Nazarene Univ. Senior Player: Maria Perdomo-Medina, Brenau Univ. Most Improved Senior: Jessica Trink, Arizona Christian Univ. Player to Watch: Valeria Podda, Georgia Gwinnett College Rookie: Alice Baudeigne, Auburn Univ.at Montgomery

Junior and Community College—Men Coach of the Year: Brian Slack, ASA College Assistant Coach of the Year: Coach of the Year: Brian Slack, ASA College Assistant Coach of the Year:

Brent Krivokapich, Tyler Jr. College Arthur Ashe Jr. Award for Leadership and Sportsmanship: Shane Trebisky, Meridian Comm. College Sophomore Player: Joshua Page, Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College Most Improved Player: Jose Gonzalez-Torres, Modesto Jr. College Player to Watch: Ismael Mzai, Seminole State College Rookie: Guy Iradukunda, Seminole State College

Junior and Community College— Women Coach of the Year: Deo Sy, Glendale Comm. College Assistant Coach of the Year: Coach of the Year: Deo Sy, Glendale Comm. College Assistant Coach of the Year:

Brent Krivokapich, Tyler Jr. College Arthur Ashe Jr. Award for Leadership and Sportsmanship: Cassidy McWhorter, Eastern Arizona College Sophomore Player: Joanna Savva, Tyler Jr. College Most Improved Player: Taylor White, Meridian Comm. College Player to Watch: Megane Bianco, ASA College Rookie: Macarena Olivares, ASA College

www.tennisindustrymag.com

Letters

To the Editor:

Show Us Something Better

I truly appreciate Ellen Miller’s

article, “Fix Your Delivery,” in the

May issue. In Canada, while our “battle” with 10-and-under tennis is mostly over (it is now the norm rather than the exception), there are still pockets of resistance. What I really liked is her com- ment about the thought that, if we didn’t do the appropriate 10-and- under development, what would be the way it is done? In multiple conversations with “traditional” coaches and misinformed parents, the advocates of under-10 Red, Or- ange and Green balls seem to be the ones who have to prove everything, while the dissenters have nothing to offer. Just like Ellen, I cringe when

I see the actual lessons from the

people who want to stay in the past.

I have observed (on many, many

occasions) that the type of lessons they are holding on to are ineffec- tive, inefficient, and mostly no fun. If you don’t agree with the un- der-10 ROG pathway, at least show (don’t just talk) something that is better. So far, I have yet to see it. Wayne Elderton, Tennis Director North Vancouver Tennis Centre Head of Coaching Development & Certification-British Columbia

Improving Our Growth

The June issue, pages 28-29, has

a wonderful presentation of the

benefits of tennis. During my 15 years as a USPTA pro I have never seen this type of presentation in a magazine or newsletter outside of tennis. In fact, I have never seen tennis listed as an exercise in any health article. In my opinion, tennis associa- tions, club owners, and teaching

pros make no effort to promote tennis outside the tennis industry. There is an unlimited senior group waiting for a fun exercise. However, it has been my observation that private and municipal locations refuse to use a “free introduction” to tennis. Growth is waiting for a change. David G. Hendricks, USPTA Tucson, Ariz.

Tennis On and Off Campus

The “Our Serve” column in the June issue (“The High School Push”) was right on. Glenn Arrington continues to do great things for Tennis On Cam- pus and also for Tennis After Campus. The challenge for TAC is keeping track of those players who begin new jobs, in new cities with a new set of priorities. We in the Midwest are working diligently to achieve that bridge. We've found the best way to keep former TOC kids playing tennis is to bring them back to campus to com- pete against the current TOC team. Of course, there is a social time after- wards that deserves no mention! Denny Schackter Tennis Priorities Co., Palatine, Ill.

Turn Down the Sound!

Is grunting in women’s pro tennis driving potential players from the game? During the Miami Open, I asked both media and tennis fans what they thought about grunting. Without hesitation, 95 percent said grunting is a real turn-off, and often they’ll turn down the sound on their TV so they don’t hear it. Unfortu- nately, this also means they miss often insightful TV commentary. The problem posed by grunting goes beyond watching the pros, though— it’s simply poor sportsmanship. At some tennis academies, coaches actu-

ally encourage their students to use grunting as a tool for intimidation and distraction. Grunting is not only undignified and unappealing, but it also is gamesmanship in every sense of the word and is in direct contrast to the ITF’s Rule 26, the “Hindrance Rule,” written with the sole purpose of eliminating gamesmanship. The WTA introduced a rule recently that young players embark- ing on the pro tour will be penal- ized if they grunt. Yet officials don’t penalize top women players who are the worst offenders for fear of upsetting them, so up-and-coming pros still try to imitate their heroes. The WTA needs to stop sending this mixed message and, for the good of the fans, the game and the pros, enforce the rules—for all players. Angela Buxton, Pompano Beach, Fla., and Cheshire, UK (1956 Wimbledon singles finalist; 1956 French and Wimbledon doubles winner)

Missing Tennis’ ‘Dear Friend’

I want to thank you for the kind

words about Mary Lloyd Barbera in the June edition (“Our Serve”). Mary Lloyd was certainly one of

a kind and someone I will miss

terribly in all aspects of my life. I keep thinking she is going to burst through the door with her big grin and a huge laugh. Tennis has lost one of its most passionate support- ers, and we have all lost a dear friend.

Amy Franklin Director of Community Development, Outreach and Training USTA North Carolina

We welcome your opinions and com- ments. Please email them to peter@ tennisindustrymag.com.

www.tennisindustrymag.com

July 2015 TennisIndustry 13

Save the Dates: TIA Tennis Forum, Aug. 31, NYC T.O.M. Conf., March 23-25, Miami Peter

Save the Dates:

TIA Tennis Forum, Aug. 31, NYC

T.O.M. Conf., March 23-25, Miami

Tennis Forum, Aug. 31, NYC T.O.M. Conf., March 23-25, Miami Peter Burwash to Enter Industry Hall

Peter Burwash to Enter Industry Hall of Fame

Peter Burwash, the founder and president of Peter Burwash International, the largest tennis management company in the world, will become the 10th inductee into the Tennis Industry Hall of Fame in a ceremony at the conclusion of the TIA Tennis Forum on Aug. 31. Burwash, a former ATP tour player, founded PBI 40 years ago and now operates in 32 countries. A certified sports physiologist and nutritionist and a sought-after speaker for Fortune 500 companies, Burwash wrote the popular book “Tennis for Life,” which has sold over 1 million copies. In 1995, he received the International Tennis Hall of Fame’s Educational Merit Award. The Tennis Industry Hall of Fame was created in 2008 and currently has nine inductees: Howard Head (2008), Dennis Van der Meer (2008), Alan Schwartz (2009), Billie Jean King (2010), Nick Bollettieri (2011), Howard Gill Jr. (2013), Walter Montenegro (2013), Sheldon Westervelt (2013) and Jim Baugh (2014). Plaques of Tennis Industry Hall of Fame inductees are displayed at the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, R.I.

14 TennisIndustry July 2015

The eighth annual TIA Tennis Forum

will be on Monday, Aug. 31, on the Ballroom level of the Grand Hyatt New York City, right before play begins at the 2015 US Open.

fitness and the reasons to play tennis. Also, mark your calendars now for the third annual Tennis Owners & Managers (T.O.M.) Conference, which will be held March 23-25 in Miami during the 2016 Miami Open. While the venue and complete schedule are still being finalized, the 2016 T.O.M. Conference is expected to start in the afternoon on Wednesday, March 23. Attendees will also have the chance to attend the Miami Open. “With the upcoming Tennis Forum and T.O.M. Conference, we’re continuing our efforts from our meetings in Indian Wells this past march on ways to bring in more players, more fans, and more tennis consumers,” says TIA Executive Director Jolyn de Boer.

consumers,” says TIA Executive Director Jolyn de Boer. free to The Forum, which is attend, will
consumers,” says TIA Executive Director Jolyn de Boer. free to The Forum, which is attend, will

free to

The Forum, which

is

attend, will present the latest news about the state of the tennis industry, including participation, equipment sales data, grassroots initiatives, Youth Tennis, updates from the USTA, and more. In addition, Peter Burwash will become the 10th inductee into the Tennis Industry Hall of Fame in a ceremony at the conclusion of the Forum. The Forum also will outline pathways to increasing the number of “core” tennis players, ways to better define and boost the

economic growth and impact of the tennis industry, and effective ways to distribute clear, consistent messaging of health,

ways to distribute clear, consistent messaging of health, Krause demonstrates Cardio Tennis programming for coaches in

Krause demonstrates Cardio Tennis programming for coaches in Italy.

Cardio Tennis Debuts to Coaches in Italy

During the qualifying tennis tournament for

Italian Open in Rome in early May, the

Italian Tennis Federation (FIT), in cooperation with PTR Europe, invited TIA Executive Director Jolyn de Boer and TIA Cardio Tennis Manager Michele Krause to speak at the 2nd Annual International Tennis Coaches Symposium, which was held at the historic Foro Italico. The gathering of more than 3,000 tennis professionals and coaches is the world’s

Luciano Botti, president of Tennis Services

s.a.s. and a PTR board member, was instrumental in arranging a Cardio Tennis presentation and demonstration on the Grand Stand

Join the TIA

Increase Your Profits

Grow the Game

www.TennisIndustry.org

Tennis Participation Stable for 2014

Tennis participation in the U.S.

Gets Key Upgrades

for 2014 Tennis participation in the U.S. Gets Key Upgrades has remained stable over the three

has

remained stable over the three years, according to the

by the TIA, PlayTennis.
by the TIA, PlayTennis.

latest figures compiled by the TIA

the Physical Activity Council.

The PlayTennis.com website, which is

“central portal” for bringing people into tennis, has been upgraded with new features and functionality. The upgrades were in place in early May, in time to further help

to boost play during the tennis-

industry-wide “Try Tennis Free” campaign. PlayTennis.com is an unbranded, collaborative industry website devoted simply to getting people to play tennis

a

Total tennis players numbered

17.9 million in 2014, which is up

percent over the year before.

“Core” tennis participants, who are those who play 10 or more times a year, is at 9.91 million, down 1 percent. “The slight decrease in core players was balanced by an increase in ‘casual’ players, who play one to three times a year,” says Jolyn de Boer, executive director of the TIA. “The small

and enjoy all the health, fitness and social

benefits of the sport. Managed

com is a key component for the national “TryTennisFree” campaign, which saw nearly 2,000 tennis providers offering a free introductory tennis session for new or returning players. Upgrades to the website include an improved “Tennis Concierge” widget that quickly returns results on tennis locations and tennis organizers in local communities. There also is a new rating function so consumers can rate facilities and programs. For tennis facilities and teaching professionals, updating program and facility information on the website has been streamlined, and there’s also a live chat feature for instant answers about the site and its functionality. In addition, providers have access to new marketing collateral so they can advertise and support Try Tennis Free in their local communities. “We’ve received a lot of feedback over the last few months about the features that consumers and tennis providers would like to see when it comes to finding and offering tennis programs, and we’re happy to continue to adjust and streamline PlayTennis.com to better serve tennis players, and those looking to get into the game,” says TIA Executive Director Jolyn de Boer.

drop could indicate increasing

competition for consumers’ time.

also, poor weather in the

first quarter of the year may have

a hand in slightly reducing

play frequency.” Related to this is a slight drop in total “play occasions,” to about 440 million. “Core” players account for 80 percent of all tennis expenditures and 94 percent of all play occasions. The average core player plays tennis 42 times a year.

®
®

Court by de Boer and Krause. The on-court Cardio Tennis participants wore Polar Bluetooth heart-rate transmitters and the data for each participant was displayed on the court’s Jumbotron so the audience

could see the players’ heart rates live and follow their progress as they were put through the Cardio Tennis session, burning calories and getting their heart rate into their training zones. Cardio Tennis, which is managed by the TIA, already is offered in more than 30 countries, including as a key pillar for tennis participation in Australia and the United Kingdom. In the U.S., more than 1.7 million people participate in Cardio Tennis. Prior to the sessions at the Foro Italico, the Italian Tennis Federation hosted

a special session at the Vatican with Pope Francis, who used the encounter to speak about sports and tennis as an “educational experience.” Nearly 7,000 tennis coaches, their families and others involved in the sport were in attendance

in the Vatican’s Paul VI Audience Hall on May 8, including coaching legend

Nick Bollettieri; former touring pro, longtime tennis director and current PTR President Roy Barth; past PTR President Jorge Andrew; U.S. mental toughness coach Lorenzo Beltrame; and well-known Italian coach Pablo Lozano, among others. “You athletes have a mission to fulfill: To be, for those who admire you, good role models,” the Pope said.

Photos by Anni Miller

De Boer, with translator, addresses coaches at Foro Italico.

Join the TIA

Increase Your Profits

Grow the Game

www.TennisIndustry.org

July 2015 TennisIndustry 15

Racquet Tech

ATW and Box Patterns

Commonly used by advanced stringers, Around the World or Box Patterns call for careful planning.

By Bob Patterson

T he string tickets at most profes-

sional tournaments provide

the basic information for the

technician to string the racquet. Along with the string type and tension, there is usually a designation of “2 Knots” or “4 Knots,” indicating if the player has requested a 1-piece or 2-piece job. If two knots are designated and the frame’s pattern has the mains ending at the throat, the technician will know that a Box Pattern must be employed. Although many manufacturers allow for crosses to be installed from bot- tom to top, you will notice that almost always, the two-piece instructions show the crosses starting at the top. This is

because top-to-bottom stringing places less stress on the frame. At most pro tourneys, this is standard procedure. Around the World (ATW) patterns are as varied as racquets and there is certainly not enough space here to detail them all, so I will just emphasize some of the basic principles to consider. Usually, the pattern used is dictated by the pattern and skips in the original

used is dictated by the pattern and skips in the original pattern of the frame, but

pattern of the frame, but even then there are several different ways to ac- complish it. On a certain pattern, some technicians may install the top cross string and two bottom strings before filling in the remaining crosses, while others would install two at the top and one at the bottom. My point is there is no set pattern, but there are some key points you need to employ.

1. Plan Ahead—Before you start, decide what will be the most efficient pattern

for this frame. Your goal is install the majority of the cross strings from the top working down, but you also want to minimize the runs of strings on the outside of the frame. Make sure your method will be aesthetically pleasing as well as functional.

2. Plan Ahead, Part 2—Often you will

find that you may need to be clamped on two strings on the same side of the racquet, so make sure you have a start- ing clamp handy to supplement your machine clamp and make sure it can be placed where needed (no machine supports in the way, etc.).

3. Be Careful—Mis-weaves or du-

plicate weaves are the most common errors in ATW patterns. Know how many total crosses are in the pattern. Even-numbered strings will all employ the same weave and odd-number crosses will all be the same but op- posite of the evens. Since you won’t be installing the crosses in order, this can cause problems that are not easily caught until you are all but finished, so check and double-check as you go.

all but finished, so check and double-check as you go. • 1 6 T e n

Footwear

Bottom Liners

Offer customers the opportunity to match their shoes to their preferred court surface for optimum performance.

By Bob Patterson

court surface for optimum performance. By Bob Patterson W hat’s on the bottom of your shoe?

W hat’s on the bottom of your

shoe? It can make a world of

difference in your traction,

comfort and stability during play. The outsole is something that often goes unnoticed—most players are first attracted to the color and design of the upper. Even when the shoe is on your display shelf, players won’t see the out- sole unless they pick up the shoe. Yet, the outsole is crucial in how the shoe performs. There are all sorts of outsole patterns, and although some may look like works of art, there is a methodology to their design. Tread design is crucial to stabil- ity, traction and overall performance of

any shoe. Since the majority of tennis in the U.S. is played on either hard courts or synthetic clay, most shoes offered here are designed for those two surfaces, or in many cases, both. (There are also grass-court shoes designed specifically for those who play on the lawns.) Over the last few decades, tennis-shoe manu- facturers have been developing new technologies to help players find the best solutions for gripping the surface, or sliding, based on court type.

Clay Court Shoes

For clay courts, it’s important to have a combination of slide and grip that al- lows players to develop defensive skills and cover more area while conserving energy. Clay court shoes usually will have a tight herringbone or wave pat- tern to provide that sliding control and grip. The overall surface of the outsole is generally flat. A true clay court shoe can

be used on hard courts, but the player certainly won’t get the best perfor- mance. Usually there is less cushioning and the traction will suffer, but the big difference will come in durability. Clay shoes are not set up to withstand the abrasive aspects endured on a hard court.

Hard Court Shoes

Most hard court shoes will incorporate

a similar herringbone pattern, al-

though it will be less dense than a clay sole pattern and often less uniform. Of- ten the patterns may vary in different areas of the foot. One big difference that may not be visible is the compound used in the rubber. Generally, for hard court shoes, the rubber is much harder for durabil- ity reasons and can be thicker, espe- cially in high-wear areas of the shoe, according to the shoe design team at Head. Most hard-court shoes are not suitable for clay courts and some may even damage the softer clay-court surface with their deeper grooves.

Dual Purpose

Hunter Hines of Dunlop/Diadora says

it is important to know what the player

is seeking in order to get them in the right shoe with the right outsole. “All-court/all-surface shoes are great for both surfaces as they have a good herringbone pattern, albeit different size and directional treads,” Hines says. “At the end of the day, it’s what the player is most comfortable with, but a good all-court outsole will meet the needs of just about every player.” If the player commonly plays on

both surface types, the dual-purpose or all-court shoe may be the best answer, although they will sacrifice some performance offered in a shoe specifically designed for the playing surface.

Lacing Systems

The laces are another component that players usually don't think much about, but the lacing system, which literally holds your foot in the shoe, is crucial to comfort and performance. In fact, most people may not realize they don’t have to use all the lacing holes in the shoe; they can skip holes if it makes the shoe more comfortable or produces a better fit Companies look to strike a balance of just enough pressure and comfort. While there are slight variations in lacing systems, the two main varianc- es are a traditional tongue style and a tongue-less or uni-tongue style. The traditional style allows for more control on “how tight is too tight,” but the uni-tongue gener- ally provides a more snug fit and is usually preferred by aggressive players. Your shoe inventory should be di- verse enough to offer your customers options so they can find the perfect shoe. Having a well-trained staff that not only knows their inventory but also are good listeners will go a long in way in keeping customers happy. When players can have enough choices so they can find a shoe that not only fits well but also will help them perform better, it’s a win/win for everyone.

COURTESY OF INTERNATIONAL TENNIS HALL OF FAME / ALEXANDER NESBITT

Tennis History

Hall of Fame Reopens After Major Renovation

By Cindy Cantrell

F ollowing a six-month closure

for renovations, the museum at

the International Tennis Hall

of Fame in Newport, R.I., reopened on May 20 with an entirely new experience for visitors The $3 million project was years in planning. Interactive exhibits include a tennis history touch table, opportuni- ties to “call the match” like a broad- caster, a rotating globe highlighting the sport’s worldwide impact, and a hologram experience featuring Roger Federer—the first use of holographic technology in an American sports museum. Redesigned galleries provide a cohesive narrative of tennis history, as told through the lives and careers of the 243 Hall of Famers. In addition, the number of artifacts on display from the 25,000-piece collection has nearly doubled to 1,900, including Rod Laver’s first Wimbledon trophy, gold sneakers worn by Serena Williams, an original Andy Warhol portrait of Chris Evert and a display of more than 100 vintage tennis ball cans. The streamlined layout showcases the original 1880 architecture and fur- nishings of the historic Newport Casino building, including three previously covered fireplaces. “Tennis history dates back to the 12th century and it evolves with tourna- ments around the world weekly,” says Todd Martin, CEO of the International Tennis Hall of Fame. “There have been extraordinary people and moments throughout the sport's history. This new museum will share the stories of the sport’s legends with the world in a really exciting way, and it will hopefully serve as an inspiration for the next genera- tion of tennis greats and fans.” For more information, visit tennisfame.com.

C O U OF RT E SY O F I N WHITNEY T E R
C O U
OF
RT E SY
O F I N WHITNEY
T E R N AT I O LUCEY
N A L
T E N N I S H A L L
FAME
/ KATE
E R N AT I O LUCEY N A L T E N N I S
E R N AT I O LUCEY N A L T E N N I S
E R N AT I O LUCEY N A L T E N N I S

Awards

TI Champions of Tennis Honor Roll

Awards TI Champions of Tennis Honor Roll O ur January 2015 issue marked the 14th year

O ur January 2015 issue marked the 14th year that we’ve named our Champions of Tennis winners. As we start the process for picking this year’s Champions of Tennis, we’d like to recognize all of those past winners—people,

businesses, organizations—that have helped to make a differ- ence in tennis, and in the business of tennis.

As you can see on this impressive list, many of our past Champions of Tennis winners are still at it—still dedicated to making this sport the best it can be, to bringing in new partici- pants, to supplying players with equipment and places to play, and to making tennis businesses grow. We salute our past Champions for their continuing dedica- tion to tennis!

Person of the Year

2007: Meadow Creek Tennis & Fitness

Sales Rep of the Year

2014: Bahram Akradi

2006: Midtown Tennis Center

2014: Allan Iverson

2013: Virgil Christian

2005: Brookhaven Country Club

2013: Richard Mennig

2012: Susan DiBiase

2004: Indian Creek Racquet Club

2012: Joe Habenschuss

2011: Pat Freebody

2003: New Albany Country Club

2011: Lee Sponaugle

2010: Jon Muir

2002: Woodfield Country Club

2010: Rick Walsh

2009: Eric Babolat

Municipal Facility of the Year

2009: Tracy Lynch

2008: Dave Haggerty

2014: Indian Wells Tennis Garden

2008: Jim Haneklau

2007: George Napier

2013: Baseline Tennis Center (U. of Minn.)

2007: Hunter Hines

2006: Kirk Anderson

2012: Southlake Tennis Center

2006: Jim Willwerth

2005: Max Brownlee

2011: Roger Scott Tennis Club

2005: Kay Barney

2004: Arlen Kantarian

2010: Copeland-Cox Tennis Center

2004: Dustin Perry

2003: Jim Baugh & Kurt Kamperman

2009: Reffkin Tennis Center

2003: Bob Strimel

2002: Alan Schwartz

2008: Surprise Tennis & Racquet Complex

2002: Bob Pfaender

Pro/Specialty Retailer of the Year

2007: Arthur Ashe Youth Tennis & Education

2001: Sheri Norris & David Blakeley

2014: Your Serve Tennis

2006: Cary Tennis Park

Grassroots Champion of the Year

2013: Serious Tennis

2005: John Drew Smith Tennis Center

2014: Ellen Miller

2012: Tennis Town

2004: Lexington County Tennis Complex

2013: Carla O’Connor

2011: All About Tennis

2003: Midland Community Tennis Center

2012: Danice Brown

2010: NYC Racquet Sports

2002: Cooper Tennis Complex

2011: Brenda Gilmore

2009: Tennis Express

2001: George E. Barnes Tennis Center

2010: Robert Pangrazi

2008: Tennis & Golf Co.

Builder of the Year

2009: Lisa Stone & Susan Chambers

2007: Michael Lynne’s Tennis Shop

2014: Trans Texas Tennis

2008: Sue Jollensten

2006: Swetka’s Tennis Shop

2013: Fred Kolkmann Tennis & Sport Surfaces

2007: Dan Vonk

2005: Racquet World

2012: Baseline Sports Construction

2006: Beverly Bourguet

2004: Players Choice Tennis

2011: Leslie Coatings Inc.

2005: Shirley Ruane

2003: Advantage Yours

2010: Pro-Sport Construction

2004: Gwen & Dan Ramras

2002: Chicago Tennis & Golf

2009: DeRosa Tennis Contractors

2003: Scott Biron

2001: Dale Queen

2008: Boston Tennis Court Construction

2002: Mark Platt

Private Facility of the Year

2007: Sportsline Inc.

2001: Donna Owens

2014: Army Navy Country Club

2006: Courtsmiths

Junior Tennis Champion of the Year

2013: Tennisclub of the Low Country at Rose Hill

2005: Fast-Dry Companies

2014: Jack Newman

2012: Life Time Fitness

2004: Zaino Tennis Court

2013: Vesa Ponkka

2011: Western Racquet Club

2003: General Acrylics

2012: Todd Dissly

2010: The Polo Club

2002: Cape & Island Tennis and Track

2011: Jeff Rothstein

2009: Reynolds Plantation

2001: Welch Tennis Courts

2010: Butch Staples & Leah Friedman

2008: Boar’s Head Sports Club

 

2009: Dan Faber

p r e s e n t s CHAMPIONS OF TENNIS 2014
p r e s e n t s
CHAMPIONS
OF TENNIS
2014

2008: Chuck Kuhle

2006: Grant Morgan

2011: Tualatin Hills Park & Rec District

2007: Craig Jones

2005: Bob Patterson

Youth Tennis Provider of the Year

2006: Bwana Chakar Simba

2004: Randy Stephenson

2014: Simon Gale

2005: Wayne St. Peter

Public Park of the Year

Youth Tennis Facility Developer of the Year

2004: Emma Hubbs

2014: Mercer County Park Tennis Center

2014: Signature Tennis Inc.

2003: Phyllis Greene

2013: BNA Bank Park

2013: Fast-Dry Courts Inc.

2002: LaMont Bryant

2012: Kiest Park

2012: Top-A-Court Tennis

2001: Ned Eames

2011: Cadwalader Park

2011: Hinding Tennis

Wheelchair Tennis Champion of the Year

2010: Dwight Davis Tennis Center

Innovative Tennis Event of the Year

2014: Paul Walker

2009: Darling Tennis Center

2014: The Tennis Congress

2013: Nick Taylor

2008: Roswell Park & Rec

USTA Section of Year

2012: Curt & Lynn Bender

2007: Fort Lauderdale Park & Rec

2014: Intermountain

2011: Jeremiah Yolkut

2006: USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

2013: Eastern

2010: Harlon Matthews

2005: Scalzi Park

2012: Northern California

2009: Dean Oba

Mass Merchant/Chain of the Year

2011: Middle States

2008: Michael Mercier

2011: PGA Tour Superstores

2010: Southern

2007: Jason Harnett

2008: Sport Chalet

2009: Midwest

2006: Bruce Karr

2007: The Sports Authority

2008: Pacific Northwest

2005: Karin Korb

2006: PGA Tour Superstores

2007: Florida

2004: Julie Jilly

2005: Golfsmith

2006: Texas

2003: Dan James

2004: City Sports

2005: Florida

2002: Tina Dale

2003: Sport Chalet

2004: Pacific Northwest

2001: Nancy Olson

2002: Dick’s Sporting Goods

2003: Southern

Community Tennis Association of the Year

2001: Galyan’s

2002: Northern

2014: InnerCity Tennis Foundation

High School Coach of the Year

2001: New England

2013: Dallas Tennis Association

2014: Laurie Martin

PTR Member of the Year

2012: Tri-County CTA

2013: Ken Griffith

2014: Nigel Pugh

2011: Bucks County Tennis Association

2012: Terry Valdez

2013: Robert Carlbo

2010: Southern Crescent Tennis Association

2011: Jim Neal and Jim Solomon

2012: Roy Barth

2009: Western Wake Tennis Association

2010: Bill Wagstaff

2011: Jorge Capestany

2008: Lee County Tennis Association

2009: Rich Johns

2010: Rodney Harmon

2007: Grants Pass CTA

2008: Sue Bordainick

2009: Ken DeHart

2006: Montgomery County Tennis Association

2007: Marian DeWane

2008: Jorge Andrew

2005: Baltimore Tennis Patrons

2006: David Steinbach

2007: Luke Jensen

2004: Pikes Peak CTA

Online Retailer of the Year

2006: Ajay Pant

2003: Milwaukee Tennis & Education Foundation

2005: Tennis Warehouse

2005: Lisa Duncan

2002: Macon Tennis Association

Tennis Advocate of the Year

USPTA Member of the Year

2001: Homewood-Flossmoor

2014: Shima and Joe Grover

2014: Randy Mattingley

Stringer of the Year

2013: Robert Walsh

2013: Avis Murray

2014: David Yamane

2012: Nancy McGinley

2012: David Porter

2013: Chuck Hakansson

2011: Mike Woody

2011: Feisal Hassan

2012: John Gugel

2010: Robin Jones

2010: Ron Woods

2011: Todd Mobley

2009: Ellen Doll

2009: Robert Greene Jr.

2010: Tom Parry

Park & Recreation Agency of the Year

2008: Tom Sweitzer

2009: Ron Rocchi

2014: Washington, D.C. Parks & Recreation

2007: Mike Van Zutphen

2008: Nate Ferguson

2013: Lexington Co. Rec. & Aging Commission

2006: Brett Hobden

2007: Tim Strawn

2012: Reston Association

2005: Bob Reed

Send Us Your TI Champions of Tennis Nominations To nominate for Tennis Industry’s 2015 Champions of Tennis, email TI@racquettech.com, and put “Champions” in the subject line. In the email, include the category, the name of the person or organization you are nominating, contact info (phone and email) for the nominee, and—briefly—some information about the nominee, including a website address if appropriate. All nominations will be confidential, but we’d also like your name and contact info, in case we have questions. Deadline for nominations: Sept. 1, 2015.

Cardio Tennis

Reaching Their Cardio Summit

30 top tennis and fitness professionals go through intensive Cardio Tennis training and education.

go through intensive Cardio Tennis training and education. T he comments that came back fol- lowing

T he comments that came back fol-

lowing the Cardio Tennis Trainer

Summit in April were, in a word,

awesome. “Thank you for an incredible week- end. I learned so much and am feeling inspired to grow Cardio Tennis. I feel honored and privileged to be on your team,” said Andrew Sirota of Wayne, N.J. “Amazing. I always leave with more knowledge and gain that much more to make me better,” added Marcy Bruce of McMurray, Pa. “What a great Cardio Tennis Summit. No matter how often I am with you and the rest of the group, I learn so much,” said Bruce Levine of New Haven, Conn. The two-and-a-half-day CT Trainer Summit was held at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla., April 10-12, put to- gether by Cardio Tennis National Man- ager Michele Krause and her core team, including Dorian Adam of Bend, Ore., Lance Andersen of Boxborough, Mass., and Ted Murray of Boulder, Co. Thirty select tennis and fitness professionals from across the U.S. took part, learning the skills and knowledge required to be a TIA Cardio Tennis Trainer. “We trained the trainers,” Krause

For more about Cardio Tennis, including train- ing for tennis providers, visit CardioTennis.com or contact Krause at michele@cardiotennis. com or 941-457-7880.

said. “These 30 professionals were chosen based on their tennis and fit- ness experience, and passion for Cardio Tennis

and the role fitness plays in our sport. Now, they’re qualified to deliver official Cardio Tennis education to tennis

and fitness professionals around the country and the world, so that those pros can bring quality Cardio Tennis programs to consumers and players.” Cardio Tennis is offered in more than 30 countries, including as a key pillar for tennis participation in Australia and the United Kingdom. In the U.S., more than 1.7 million people participate in Cardio Tennis. The CT Summit kicked off with a welcome from IMG Academy founder and tennis Hall-of-Famer Nick Bollet- tieri. Then David Thompson of Polar USA talked to the group about the use of heart-rate monitors for Cardio Ten- nis participants, to make sure they’re receiving maximum benefit from their on-court activity. Over the course of the weekend, the CT Trainers were coached and evaluated on feeding technique, delivery of Cardio Tennis games, warm- up and cool-down activities, as well as personal fitness. Besides Krause, other speakers included Cassiano Costa, the head tennis fitness trainer at IMG, and Jeff Smith from Rapid Force. There also was a “Calorie Burn Chal- lenge,” with 28 trainers participating. Over the course of the two days, the group burned a total of 140,570 calories. The highest woman calorie-burner was Marley Woods of Bristol, Tenn., with 6,298; the leader for the men was Michael Branan of Longwood, Fla., who burned 10,233 calories. Also during the weekend, 36 profes- sionals participated in a Cardio Tennis “Triples” tournament. The winning team consisted of Jack Steyn of Braden- ton, Fla., Sirota, and Woods. In addition, there were TRX Cardio Tennis workouts

2015 TIA Cardio Tennis Trainers

Dorian Adam, Bend, OR Lance Anderson, Boxborough, MA Samantha Ardenfriend, Naples, FL Dan Beedle, Memphis, TN Michael Branan, Longwood, FL Marcy Bruce, McMurray, PA Enrique Casados, Bradenton, FL Gary Cimperman, Valdosta, GA Devin Crotzer, Lebanon, TN Kalindi Dinoffer, Dallas, TX Nathaniel Fleming, Bannockburn, IL Farshad Garakani, Vienna, VA Carmen Garcia, Alpharetta, GA Jason Golden, Bradenton, FL Michael Harper, Vienna, VA Feisal Hassan, Midlothian, VA Adam Jasick, Palm Desert, CA Michele Krause, University Park, FL Bruce Levine, New Haven, CT Ted Murray, Boulder, CO Josh Myers, Hilton Head Island, SC Chris Ojakian, Beverly Hills, CA Malcolm Ridenour, La Quinta, CA Troy Robinson, Kinston, NC Justin Russ, Bradenton, FL David Schwartz, Newhall, CA Heather Silvia Killingsworth, Milton, GA Andrew Sirota, Mahwah, NJ Jessica Watts, New Rochelle, NY Marley Woods, Bristol, TN

and IMG protocol pro training ses- sions. The third day of the Summit included a seven-hour Cardio Tennis course delivered to 45 participants by multiple members of the CT Trainer Team. “It was an incredible weekend of learning, bonding, teamwork and personal growth,” Krause said. “The members of the TIA Cardio Tennis Team are the best in the business, and their passion and energy over the weekend was off the charts. As an educational team, we are now that much stronger and evolved to con- tinue providing some of the very best education in the tennis industry.”

Strings

Strings Nylon vs. Poly With all the advancements and new introductions in co-poly strings, are nylon-based

Nylon vs. Poly

Strings Nylon vs. Poly With all the advancements and new introductions in co-poly strings, are nylon-based
Strings Nylon vs. Poly With all the advancements and new introductions in co-poly strings, are nylon-based

With all the advancements and new introductions in co-poly strings, are nylon-based strings still relevant? The short answer: Very much so.

By Bob Patterson

P oly strings seem to dominate the tennis scene now—from junior tournaments, manufacturer advertising and even commentators at pro tournaments. Now, when strings are men- tioned, it’s generally all about the wonders

of poly. But while it may appear that we’re headed to a time when

poly will be the dominant material for tennis string, most

experts don’t think that will be the case. Sure, poly has many

benefits, but also has some drawbacks, especially for the rec- reational player. (See “The Evolution of Poly Strings” in the May 2015 issue.) Regardless of how you feel about poly, the real loser in the

mix is nylon. It seems no one talks about nylon anymore,

although no other string segment has more variations and has undergone more development than this venerable veteran.

Even with new nylon strings being developed and introduced to the marketplace, it seems that most marketing dollars are spent promoting what the pros are using, which is often a poly/gut hybrid, although the gut is also rarely mentioned.

Identity Crisis

While it may seem that nylon strings have gotten lost in the mix, it really could simply be an identity crisis. You will be hard-pressed to find any marketing material using the word “nylon,” and you’ll rarely find it even in the fine print on the package or in the catalog. We may be able to trace the aversion to the label back its roots. Back when all racquets were wooden, natural gut was the only string used, until technology provided us with nylon as

26 TennisIndustry July 2015

an alternative that was much less expensive and much more durable. Tennis enthusiasts and better players snubbed the new string since price and durability were all it could offer in comparison with natural gut. But as time went on, and players grew up using nylon, it became more popular—especially as the game moved from country clubs to more city parks and schools. The string also got better, as manufacturing techniques began to produce string that had better playing characteristics. Wrapped construction and multifilaments proved to be better received than the original monofilaments. Somewhere along the way the better nylon strings started to be called “synthetic gut,” which was a more palatable name to the purists of the game.

Still No Respect

Fast-forward 50 years. Today, nylon still lacks respect, it seems, since all the attention is on the co-poly formulations. But can we as racquet technicians shoulder some of the responsibility? While we certainly don’t control the manufac- turer’s marketing plans, nor do we have any influence on what the commentators talk about on televised pro matches, we should be the biggest influence when it comes to helping our customers choose the right string for them. It is pretty well-established that co-poly strings are not the best choice for average recreational players, so are we guilty of letting our customers down by not informing them that using Nadal’s string is never going to help them hit screaming topspin winners? Since poly gets all the attention these days, it’s easy to just go with the flow and give customers what they ask for, even

www.tennisindustrymag.com

when it’s not the best choice for their games or their arms. In a quick, informal survey from a few dealers, most were stocking the latest in- troductions of poly strings. However, the vast majority offered nylon-based strings that had been in the marketplace for two decades or more. These are perfectly good strings to have in the inventory, as they are great products. But I was amazed that many of the newer nylon-based strings were absent from most inventories in my survey group. Can this be attributed to lack of marketing from the manufacturers, unwillingness for us to embrace new strings, or maybe both?

Client Intervention

While we can only inform and suggest, it is imperative that racquet technicians take the time to educate their clients about the best equipment choices for their particu- lar game. Sure, there are clients who won’t listen and will demand what they think they need. But there also are plenty of play- ers who are looking for anything that will help them elevate their game. It is up to the racquet technician to explain how the strings are an integral part of that process. Perhaps it is an unattainable goal to get all recreational players into a string set-up that will benefit their game and not simply mimic their favorite pro’s, but we should, at least, inform and educate each and every one.

Inventory Staple

While manufacturers have been empha- sizing co-poly strings, many new nylon strings have been introduced in the last few years and really deserve a look. Nylon offers such a wide variety of playing characteristics because it can be configured in so many ways and combined with other materials. They should be the staples of any string inventory. From soft multifilaments to single- or double- wrapped nylons, a technician can find something for every player type. Creating hybrids with a co-poly or another nylon gives the client even more options. The bottom line is, don’t give up on ny- lons! Embrace them. Learn about newer introductions and look for ways to incor- porate them in your inventory in order to offer a complete and diverse range of strings to your clients.

www.tennisindustrymag.com

a complete and diverse range of strings to your clients. • www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry
a complete and diverse range of strings to your clients. • www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry

July 2015 TennisIndustry

27

PHOTO BY ELIZA JACOBS

2015 Guide to Ball Machines

PHOTO BY ELIZA JACOBS 2015 Guide to Ball Machines Play the Long Game If used and

Play the Long Game

ELIZA JACOBS 2015 Guide to Ball Machines Play the Long Game If used and marketed properly,

If used and marketed properly, a ball machine can be an incredible teaching tool and a great source of revenue—and can help strengthen the game.

By Stan Oley

T here it is, sitting out on a far court, with a tangled mess of an extension cord, filled with balls that are no longer good enough for the juniors. It hasn’t been serviced since it was bought five years ago. Now it begins to rain,

but it is left and forgotten because of its distance from the pro shop. This is the typical scenario for most tennis ball machines across the country. Often, the culture created at the facility by the teaching pro is that the ball machine is strictly for beginners—and that it presents competition to their personal lesson revenue. But this could not be any further from reality. A ball machine is simply a tool for the teaching pro, not competition. It does not correct mistakes. It does not teach strategy. It provides a ball so the teaching pro can effectively coach.

In reality, if used and marketed properly, the ball machine can be an incredible teaching tool and a great source of rev- enue. And, it can be an effective way to separate the teaching pro from his or her competition close by.

The Lesson Culture

Let’s begin with a look at the lesson culture at the club. Ever since I can remember, private and group lessons have been done by the teaching pro standing near the net, feeding balls to the student. But anyone would agree that a ball that is fed from the net is nowhere near the type of ball that a player receives in a match. When I ask pros, why then, do they still feed from the net, the top three answers I get are: 1) It is easier; 2) Habit; 3) It is how they were taught.

When I ask tennis club and facility members why they think pros feed from the net, they answer: 1) Pros don’t take the lessons seriously; 2) They want the members to leave happy; 3) It is easier. Now, before you teaching pros out there get defensive, es-

pecially with that No. 1 answer, here are a couple of things to keep in mind. Out of the hundreds of pros that I questioned, less than 10 percent say they come to the court with a lesson plan. Members notice this lack of a plan. When members were questioned, they said that the pros rarely, if ever, work on deficiencies from their last league match in a team practice—hence, no

plan. Further, for the last three years, I’ve traveled the country doing my FBT60 (Fit By Tennis In 60 Days) clinics and have worked with hundreds of recreational players. (FBT60 is a free, innovative tennis/fitness program

combining a series of ball machine drills with nutrition and stretching, for both members training on their own as well as group clinics. Visit www.fbt60.com.) Something we noticed immediately was that players did not know any of the shots required to perform the program—for instance moonballs, high approach, low approach, etc. Most staggering, of 547 players in our clinics to date, 547 did not know what their strike zone was for particular shots. Think how hard the game must have been for those players before we taught them about strike zones. They had no idea where they had to get the ball for their technique to be successful. As an industry, in 2011 and 2012, we lost a combined total of 9.7 million players, while bringing in only 8 million, accord-

For all the latest ball machines and all their specifications and fea- tures, see our exclusive Guide to Ball Machines starting on page 30.

ing to the Tennis Industry Association based on the annual PAC study of tennis participation. While some may attribute this net loss of 1.7 million players to excuses such as the economy, a spike in other sports, industry cycles, etc., I believe it boils down to the teaching pro needing to be better and able to provide a more superior customer learning experience. Now, the ball machine may not solve all of the tennis indus- try’s problems, but it certainly can provide a great start.

Using a Ball Machine

Less than 5 percent of U.S. teaching pros use a ball machine with

private lessons. But if the pro did use a ball machine, it would al- low him or her to be beside the student to provide the necessary coaching, demonstration, and encouragement for a particular shot. It also would allow the teaching pro to work on shots and shot sequences they may otherwise not be able to or want to feed. Once the teaching pro is freed up from feeding, it also provides

a great opportunity for videotaping. (There are many video apps available, as well as standard video programs that now come on smart devices.) Most importantly, when a teaching pro uses

a ball machine in a private lesson, the student gets better at an

alarming rate, making the student excited and wanting more! Next, there is the group lesson. Most pros feel they have no problem feeding a two-line high approach and overhead drill. The problem is that for the feed to be correct, it needs to come from the baseline and be fed at a frequency of when each player’s

ball passes the pro, they feed another ball. In most cases, it needs to be about a ball every two seconds or less to be correct. If you think you can do this, start checking to see if your feeds are timely. For players to improve, it matters! Of course, if the pro is that focused on the feeding, is there really any serious instruc- tion happening? Today, we have ball machines that can do this drill without fail, allowing the pro to step in and demonstrate proper technique as well as work with each player privately as they exit the lines. The quality of instruction and encourage-

ment with the ball machine can be staggering, compared with that of feeding from afar. Again, the students get much better and want to learn more—and play more! Now let’s look at the post-lesson curriculum. After a student takes a golf lesson, they are told to practice the information given in the lesson on the range several times before taking to the course. In tennis, the teach- ing pro seems more concerned with getting the student back for another lesson, instead of what the player is doing in between lesson visits to get better.

I always had a rule that the student had to hit on a ball ma- chine twice in between lessons or the student should really not expect to improve very much at all. You have to wonder when you see a golf course has 20 range slots and the tennis depart- ment only has one ball machine that is rarely used.

Ball Machine Care

Now, let’s go back to where we started, with that lonely ball machine sitting out on that far court. Ball machines get far more use and less abuse on a court close to the pro shop, where people can be seen using it. In a sudden storm, it is much easier to put away as well. When out on court and not in use, make sure the machine is covered. It should be stored in a dry place overnight or when not in use for long periods. Always try to keep a consistency of balls in the machine for reliable throws. A ball with extra duty felt (regardless of the surface) is best because the felt is usually the first to wear out in a well-used machine. Also, to create an effortless customer experience with the machine, always have the extension cord on a reel for easy set-up and take-down. With regards to maintenance, you should use a standard leaf blower to blow clay, ball felt, and debris from the machine both top and bottom once a week. If the ball machine is utilized more than 20 hours a week, it should have a preventative mainte- nance service performed by a technician twice a year; if used less than 20 hours a week, it should be serviced once a year. To stay in the game, players have to get better and feel that they matter. If the teaching pro uses technology available to them, and becomes more invested in the student’s ability to get better, the game we so love will strengthen and prosper.

Stan Oley, a member of the USPTA, PTR and Cardio Tennis Global Speakers Team, has been working with and teaching with ball machines for 24 years. He is a product marketing specialist for Playmate Ball Machines and founder of FBT60 (Fit By Tennis in 60 Days), a tennis/fitness program combining nutrition and a series of ball machine drills. He is sponsored by Adidas and Babolat.

of ball machine drills. He is sponsored by Adidas and Babolat. www.tennisindustrymag.com July 2015 Tennis Industry

www.tennisindustrymag.com

July 2015 TennisIndustry

29

Programable

that can

in program

- Random

Underspin

to Control

Control

Feeding Intervals

Lobs

(MPH)

Wheel

- programs

Feed

Capacity

to Feed

Feed

Air Pressure

Oscillation

Oscillation

Elevation

Top Elevation

Speed

(seconds)

&

shots

stored

(Manual)

(Electric)

Sidespin

to

Ball Weight

Topspin

Able

Able

of

Able

# of #

be

2015 Guide to Ball Machines

Ball Machines on the Market

Model

Price

(MSRP)

Warranty

(years)

Dimensions

(Storage Inches)

Lobster Sports • 800-526-4041 • www.lobstersports.com

Elite Freedom Elite Liberty Elite Model 1 Elite Model 2 Elite Model 3 Elite Grand IV Elite Grand V Elite Grand V Limited Edition Phenom Phenom 2

Match Mate • 800-837-1002 • www.matchmatetennis.com

Rookie

Quickstart

iSAM Value

iSam Extend

iSam Ultimate

SAM

Sam P1 Pro Sam P1 Ultimate Sam P 4 Trainer Sam P 4 Pro Trainer Sam P 4 Ultimate Sam Coach

Playmate • 800-766-6770 • www.playmatetennis.com

Halfvolley Volly Ace Smash Deuce Genie Smash w/ iPLAYMATE TENNIS The Slam

Robot Optimizer • 888-8BOOMER • www.playmatetennis.com

Boomer (with Camera) Boomer (without Camera)

Silent Partner • 800-662-1809 • www.sptennis.com

Lite (Edge Series) Lite-R (Edge Series) Sport (Edge Series) Star (Edge Series) Rival (Scoop Series) Quest (Scoop Series) Smart (Scoop Series)

Spinfire • 888-976-6532 • www.mambatennis.com

Pro 1

Pro 2

Sports Attack • 800-717-4251 • www.sportsattack.com

$799

2 Years

2 Years

2 Years

2 Years

2 Years

2 Years

2 Years

2 Years

2 Years

2 Years

2 Year a 2 Year a 2 Year a 2 Year a 2 Year a 2 Year a 2 Year a 2 Year a 2 Year a 2 Year a 2 Year a 3 Year

21" x 14" x 20" 21" x 14" x 20" 21" x 14" x 20" 21" x 14" x 20" 21" x 14" x 20" 21" x 14" x 20" 21" x 14" x 20" 21" x 14" x 20" 32" x 25" x 50" 32" x 25" x 50"

11" x 11" x 22" 12.5 x 12.5 x 28" 19" x 17.5" x 18" 19" x 17.5" x 18" 19" x 17.5" x 18" 19.5" x 16" x 21.5" 19.5" x 16" x 21.5" 19.5" x 16" x 21.5" 19.5" x 16" x 21.5" 19.5" x 16" x 21.5" 19.5" x 16" x 21.5" 35" x 25" x 50"

19" x 21" x 25" 19" x 21" x 25" 35" x 21" x 38" 35" x 21" x 38" 35" x 21" x 38" 35" x 21" x 38" 35" x 21" x 38" 35" x 21" x 38"

$899

$1,089

$1,349

$1,599

$1,899

$2,199

$2,499

$2,999

$3,499

$449

$558

$759

$799

$999

$1,099

$1,199

$1,299

$1,599

$1,799

$1,899

$3,999

$1,430.00

$1,990.00

$3,850.00

$4,845.00

$5,730.00

$6,610.00

$5,940.00

$8,260.00

$14,450

$12,450

$799

P1 Value

2 Years Ltd 2 Years Ltd 3 Years Ltd 3 Years Ltd 3 Years Ltd 3 Years Ltd 3 Years Ltd 3 Years Ltd

4

e

2 Year

2 Year

2 Year

38.5” x 31” x 21.5” 38.5” x 31” x 21.5”

24” x 22” x 16” 24” x 22” x 16” 24” x 22” x 16” 24” x 22” x 16” 28” x 22” x 18” 28” x 22” x 18” 28” x 22” x 18”

26” x 20” x 20” 26” x 20” x 20”

$949 2 Year $949 2 Year $1,099 2 Year $1,399 2 Year $1,799 2 Year

$2,299 2 Year

$1,599

$1,899

2 Year

2 Year

150

150

150

150

150

150

150

150

250

250

70

80

250

250

250

300

300

300

300

300

300

250

200

200

200

300

300

300

300

300

300

300

200

200

200

200

300

300

300

200

200

36 X (Lbs.) Propulsion Spinning
36
X
(Lbs.)
Propulsion
Spinning

38

40

44

44

44

44

44

99

99

22

29

34

39

39

48

48

48

48

48

48

87

42

46

85

85

85

85

85

110

124

124

35

35

46

46

48

48

48

48

48

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

2 -12 sec. 2 -12 sec. 2-12 sec. 2-12 sec. 2-12 sec. 2 - 9 sec. 2-9 sec. 2-9 sec. 2-9 sec. 2-9 sec.

70

80

80

80

80

80

80

80

90

90

35

30

65

65

65

85

85

85

85

85

85

1.5 - 8 sec. 95

2-10 sec.

2-10 sec.

2-8 sec.

2-8 sec.

2-8 sec.

2-8 sec.

2-8 sec.

2-8 sec.

2-8 sec.

2-8 sec.

2-8 sec.

1-10 Sec

1-10 Sec

1-10 Sec

1-10 Sec

1-10 Sec

1-10 Sec

1-10 Sec

1-10 Sec

70

70

90

90

90

90

90

120

0.8-10

0.8-10

1.5-10

1.5-11

1.5-10

1.5-10

1.5-10

1.5-10

1.5-10

100

100

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

2-15

2-15

80

80

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Topspin

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Oscillation No Oscillation
Oscillation
No Oscillation

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

6

6

6

7

2

3

7

7

7

8

7

30

30

2

20

6

6

6

7

INFINITE

1000

1000

3

3

3

Ace Attack

a 1 year battery

b 2-4 Hours of Court Time

c 4-8 Hours of Court Time

d or $600/month

e or $300/month

$5,999

5 Year Ltd

34” x 53”

220

150

X

1.5-12

110

X

X

X

X

X

4

1 - Fast Charger $99

10 - iPhone/Android Remote Control compatible

2 - Horizontal Oscillation

11 - Great for youth and beginners to work on dealing with topspin

3 - Horizontal Oscillation + Spin Control

12 - Especially designed for 10 and Under tennis

4 - Triple-Oscillation (Horizontal + Vertical Oscillation)

13 - Extra Heavy Duty Battery $35, 110/220 Volt AC converter $135, Wireless Remote

5 - Triple-Oscillation + 2-Line Narrow, Wide

$100. Water Resistant Cloth Storage Cover $68

6 - 6 Pre-Programmed Court Drills (6 ball sequence per drill)

14 - Comes standard with 2 8-amp 12-volt batteries

7 - 3 Position Settings of 2-Line (Narrow, Medium, Wide).

15 - Lob Enhancer $30,110/220 Volt AC Converter $135, Water-Resistant Storage

8 - 12 Pre-Programmed Court Drills + 6 Custom Programmable Court

Cover $68, adjustable oscillation width

Drills + 2-Line Narrow, Medium, Wide

16 - Ships via LTL Freight, Feeds Balls from 30" above ground

9 - 12 Pre-Programmed Court Drills + 6 Custom Programmable Court Drills +

17 - Oscillation Upgrade $225, Remote Control Upgrade $310

18 locations to choose from + 2-Line Narrow, Medium, Wide

18 - Additional Non-Memory Battery Upgrade $166.95

within

or

Power

available

Height within

Wireless

- Optional

Depth within

an Control available

Only

- Built-in

Mode

within

comes

comes

Standard

- Cord

as an for

Life Indicator

Battery Only

Interval

on Power Cord

Swapability

of Tower

or

of Tower

Amp/Hour

Wheels

- Settings

on Battery

Control

Control

Spin

available

Control

Charger

Control

Features

Cover comes

Adjustable

option

Adjustable

Adjustable

Adjustable

Portability

Oscillation

Accessory

Includes

Standard

Remote

Serving

Remote

Remote

Program

Program

Program

Program

Remote

on

Remote

Battery

Battery

Battery

Smart

Smart

Cover

Player

option

Other

Runs

Runs

as

Charger as option Remote Control Remote Standard
Charger
as
option
Remote Control
Remote
Standard
Control Program Miscellaneous Serving Included
Control
Program
Miscellaneous
Serving
Included
$119 Simulation Power Runs Cord
$119
Simulation
Power
Runs
Cord
 

X

8.5

b

X

X

$49

X

1, 2

 

$119

X

8.5

b

X

X

$169

X

X

$49

X

1, 3

$119

X

18 c

X

X

$169

X

X

$49

X

1, 3

X

X

$119

X

18 c

X

X

$169

X

X

$49

X

1, 4

X

X

$119

X

18 c

X

X

$169

X

X

$49

X

1, 5

X

X

X

X

$119

X

18 c

X

X

$300

X

X

X

$49

X

6

X

X

X

X

X

$119

X

18

c

X

X

$300

X

X

X

$49

X

8, 10

X

X

X

X

X

$119

X

18

c

X

X

$300

X

X

X

$49

X

9

X

X

X

X

X

X

$300

X

X

X

$99

X

6

X

X

X

X

X

X

$300

X

X

X

$99

X

9

 

X

8

X

X

X

11

X

8

X

X

X

X

X

12

X

8

X

X

X

X

X

X

13

X

16

X

X

X

X

X

X

14

 

X

16

X

X

X

X

X

X

 

X

X

16

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

15

X

X

16

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

16

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

16

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

15

X

X

X

16

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

16

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

16

 

X

17

X