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Republic of the Philippines BATANGAS STATE UNIVERSITY Jose P. Laurel Polytechnic College Malvar, Batangas COLLEGE

Republic of the Philippines BATANGAS STATE UNIVERSITY Jose P. Laurel Polytechnic College Malvar, Batangas

COLLEGE OF TEACHER EDUCATION

College Malvar, Batangas COLLEGE OF TEACHER EDUCATION SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAM COURSE SPECIFICATION First

SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAM COURSE SPECIFICATION First Semester, AY 2015-2016

VISION

A globally recognized institution of higher learning that develops competent and morally upright citizens who are active participants in nation building and responsive to the challenges of 21st century

MISSION

Batangas State University is committed to the holistic development of productive citizens by providing a conducive learning environment for the generation, dissemination and utilization of knowledge through innovative education, multidisciplinary research collaborations, and community partnership that would nurture the spirit of nationhood and help fuel national economy for sustainable development.

CORE VALUES

Faith

Integrity

Patriotism

Mutual respect

Human dignity

Excellence

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

1. To develop secondary school teachers equipped with knowledge on the government thrusts and their roles in nation building through holistic education program that instills love of country, spiritual vigor, harmony and teamwork, commitment to excellent service, human and gender equality, transparency, honesty and accountability and concern for the environment.

2. To develop secondary school teachers who can teach their field of specializations like:

English, Mathematics, Science, Filipino, Social Studies, Technology and Livelihood Education and Music, Arts, Physical Education and Health.

3. To utilize different teaching styles aided with varied teaching methodologies, strategies, techniques and advanced Information and Communication Technology (ICT) application.

4. To function as members of the academic community in the conduct of researches and extension services anchored in their field of specialization.

5. To engage in lifelong learning, through graduate education and other professional activities for career advancement.

 

COURSE TITLE: THE TEACHING OF LITERATURE

 

COURSE CODE:

LIT 407

REVISION NUMBER:

02

PREREQUISITE:

LIT 306

ISSUED DATE:

April 15, 2015

LECTURE UNIT:

3

SCHEDULE:

 

LABORATORY UNIT:

None

ROOM:

 

1. PHILOSOPHY This course explores the basic pedagogical theories, teaching strategies, philosophical influences and movements in literature as they affect teaching. It aims to introduce aspiring literature teachers to the analysis of how educational ideas both classic texts and recent research illuminate the teaching of literature and at the same time, find connections to current educational thinking.

2.

AUDIENCE

The course is intended for fourth year Bachelor in Secondary Education major in English students.

3. STUDENT OUTCOMES

The following are the skills that teacher education graduates are expected to acquire upon the completion of their program. These skills are essential in performing their various tasks as educators.

a. Can apply basic and higher level literacy, communication, critical thinking, and learning skills in becoming life-long learners.

b. Can serve as role models in the pursuit of positive social, cultural, and political practices through actions, statements, and social interactions.

c. Can establish a favorable social, psychological, and physical environment in delivering instruction to diverse types of learners.

d. Can demonstrate mastery of the subject matter with the use of appropriate teaching- learning approaches and techniques toward the attainment of curricular goals and objectives.

e. Can innovate and design alternative teaching strategies by recognizing and respecting individual differences among learners in attaining desired learning goals.

f. Can align assessment tools to curricular goals, objectives and standards, and use the results to improve teaching and learning.

g. Can adapt, design, and utilize instructional materials and Information Communication Technology (ICT) resources in delivering instruction and performing various roles of teachers.

h. Can establish linkages with communities in attaining curricular goals.

i. Can demonstrate a high regard for the teaching profession and embark in a continuing professional development.

4. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the course, the students must be able to:

ILO 1. determine appropriate approaches in teaching different literary genres; ILO 2. examine some of the main issues involved in teaching Literature; ILO 3. demonstrate various methodologies and strategies in teaching Literature ILO 4. plan curriculum and courses in Literature through a range of modern teaching- learning and assessment methods; and ILO 5. apply various evaluation strategies on students’ works and performances.

The following table maps the intended learning outcomes with the student outcomes. This also illustrates the relationship of the intended learning outcomes (ILOs) with the student outcomes (SOs).

Intended Learning Outcome

Applicable Student Outcomes

ILO 1

c

d

e

ILO 2

c

d

i

ILO 3

d

e

f

ILO 4

e

f

g

ILO 5

d

e

f

5. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES

Upon completing the course, students should be able to exhibit the following objectives congruent with each topic outlined in the course.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

 

Topics and Objectives

ILO

ILO

ILO

ILO

ILO

 

1

2

3

4

5

A. ORGANIZING FOR LITERATURE STUDY

         

a. Specify a rationale for teaching literature.

+

+

     

b. Identify ways to group literature for teaching.

+

+

     

c. Select methods of individualizing student for learning.

+

+

     

B. TEACHING DRAMA

         

a.

Create dramatic events through pantomime, improvisation, role playing and writing.

+

 

+

   

b. Describe and design appropriate setting for a play.

+

 

+

 

c. Identify themes in a scripted play.

+

 

+

 

d. Summarize and evaluate the plot of a play.

+

 

+

 

e. Reinterpret aspects of plays for varying audience.

+

 

+

 

C. TEACHING THE SHORT STORY

       

a. Trace the evolving definition of short story.

+

 

+

 

b. Identify and evaluate themes in terms of the texts and audience’s experiences.

+

 

+

 

c. Specify the purpose of characters in a short story and evaluate the author’s characterization techniques.

+

 

+

 

d. Relate plot to other structure of the story.

+

 

+

 

e. Identify and evaluate the authors’ use of tone, mood, and point of view.

+

 

+

 

f. Evaluate stories by considering the author’s purpose and its relationship to the other elements.

+

 

+

 

D. TEACHING THE NOVEL

       

a. Classify novels as to realistic or romantic.

+

 

+

 

b. Relate values to specific character in novels.

+

 

+

 

c. Respond to dilemmas presented in novels.

+

 

+

 

d. State personal objectives for reading novels.

+

 

+

 

E. TEACHING POETRY

       

a. Explore techniques employed in teaching specific poems.

+

 

+

 

b. Determine and evaluate poetic techniques in non-poetry context, such as advertisement and everyday language.

+

 

+

 

c. Determine the voice and tone embodied in specific poems.

+

 

+

 

d. Recognize and explain symbols in poetry.

+

 

+

 

F. TEACHING NONFICTION PROSE

       

a. Characterize biography and autobiography.

+

 

+

 

b. Respond to a particular work in terms of experiences, values and beliefs.

+

 

+

 

c. Analyze and evaluate language and language strategies employed in political speeches and literature, advertising, and other forms of non- literary prose.

+

 

+

 

G. RHETORIC, STYLE, AND LITERATURE

       

a. Identify and categorize the rhetorical tools that a writer employs in a literary selection.

+

 

+

 

b. Evaluate a literary selection in terms of rhetorical strategies.

+

 

+

 

c. Employ a variety of rhetorical techniques that well-known writers have used.

+

 

+

 

H. PLANNING TO TEACH LITERATURE

       

a. Conduct a needs analysis of the target learners to identify their strengths and weaknesses in studying a literary genre.

 

+

 

+ +

b. Apply the considerations derived from the needs analysis in devising instructional materials to be used in teaching any literary genre.

 

+

 

+ +

c. Conduct demonstration teaching on the different literary genres.

 

+

 

+ +

d. Develop a unit plan that includes considerations in teaching literature.

 

+

 

+ +

e. Experiment with varying methods of teaching literature in actual classroom conditions.

 

+

 

+ +

6.

TEACHING-LEARNING STRATEGIES AND ASSESSMENT METHODS

Teaching and Learning Strategies

A. Active Learning. This is includes question-posing, inquiry, and self-directed learning.

B. Cooperative Learning. This allows students to work in groups and be responsible for each other’s learning, and each accountable for their own learning.

C. Critical Thinking. This approach to thinking emphasizes stating original claims or opinions and supporting them with reasons. Critical thinking is used expressively when students make interpretations and support them verbally or in writing. Critical thinking is used receptively when students critique other people’s arguments.

D. Directed Reading Activity. This is a building-knowledge strategy for guiding the silent reading of students with comprehension-level questions; often associated with reading with stops or chunking.

E. Explicit Teaching of Text Structure. Teaching the parts of different types of text and making sure students understand the text structure before reading is the primary goal of this strategy. This would include basics such as text in English is read from left to right, and also more sophisticated structures such as the structure of a narrative.

F. Hands-On. This encourages the students to design activities that they are actively involved. Hands-on participation is as important as verbal participation in the activity.

G. Literature Circles. Students discuss portions of books in a small group. Sometimes roles are assigned for group interaction. Students at varying levels are able to share different points about the book.

H. RAFT. A writing activity usually used in the consolidation phase of a lesson in which students consider four elements: role, audience, format and topic.

I. Reading and Questioning. A cooperative learning and study activity in which pairs of students read a text and write questions about the text and answers to those questions. Later they may use the questions and answers as study aids.

Assessment and Evaluation Methods

A. Teaching Demonstration. This is a major requirement in the course. The students will conduct teaching demonstration in their selected genre while integrating literary theories and educational technology in engaging their audience to the lesson. Performance of the students will be assessed through rubrics and test.

B. Lesson Planning. This serves as a prerequisite to demonstration teaching. Students will compose lesson plans in teaching each genre while considering appropriate theories and strategies that will shape the lesson in each learning plan. Performance of the students will be assessed through rubrics and test.

C. Instructional Material Development. In order to conduct demonstration teaching,

students should have developed instructional materials that will supplement to their lessons. The students will consider the result of the needs analysis in developing these instructional materials. The following are recommended instructional materials:

a. Biographical Montage

b. Star Diagrams

c. Value Judgement Worksheets

d. Language Worksheets

e. Thought Bubbles

f. Trailers

g. Cover Designs

h. Blurb for the Book Cover

i. Dramatic Adaptations

D. Homework and Seatwork. Homework and seatwork are integral part of the course. This may come in various task such as group work, individual activity, research work, extended reading and the like. This will provide opportunities for the students to transfer the concepts they have learned in class to a more concrete situation and to equally participate in class discussion

E. Examinations. There will be four major examinations to be administered on the date set by the department otherwise specified. These will evaluate students’ knowledge on the topics covered in the class. Make-up tests will only be given to a student having a valid reason for not taking the examination on the prescribed date. The instructor has the right to disapprove any explanations for absences presented without prior notice and to void opportunity for a make-up test.

F. Class Engagement. Students are expected to actively participate in the various activities prepared by the instructor. To be part of the learning community, students are required to accomplish various tasks required in the course while adhering to the set standards prescribed by the instructors.

7. COURSE POLICIES

A.

Refer to the University Student Handbook for the policies on Attendance, Dropping of Subject, Grading System and on Scholastic Delinquency.

B.

Academic Misconduct. Academic misconduct will be subject to disciplinary action. Any act of dishonesty in academic work constitutes academic misconduct. This includes plagiarism, changing or falsifying any academic documents or materials, cheating, and giving or receiving unauthorized aid in tests, examinations, or other assigned school works. Punishment for academic misconduct will vary according to the seriousness of the offense. Punishment for such offenses includes expulsion, suspension, non-credit of examination and the like.

C.

Regulations and Restrictions in the Classroom

The students should be completely aware of their behaviour and attitude inside the class. They must avoid interrupting or distracting the class on any level. The following must be strictly observed during the class.

a. The orderliness and cleanliness of the classroom must be maintained before, during and after the class.

b. Any material or gadget irrelevant to the subject must be turned off and kept.

c. Chatting or talking with the seatmates is prohibited unless required in the classroom activity.

d. Going in and out of the room without permission from the instructor.

e. Being excused by friends or peers from the class for any reason is not allowed except for emergency cases concerning family problems or administrative reasons.

8. ACADEMIC INFRASTRUCTURE

A. Textbook:

Rodrigues, Raymond J. and Badaczewski, Dennis. A Guidebook for Teaching Literature. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2004.

Chambers,

English

Ellie.

and

Gregory,

Marshall.

Teaching

and

Learning

Literature. London: SAGE Publications, 2006.

B. References:

Barnet, Sylvan. A Short Guide to Writing about Literature. Boston Toronto, USA:

Little, Brown and Company, 2002. Griffith, Kelley. Writing Essay about Literature: A Guide and Style Sheet. United States of America: Heinle & Heinle Thomson Learning, 2002. Heffernan, William A., Johnston, Mark, and Hodgins, Frank. Literature: Art and Artifact. Orlando, Florida: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc., 2002. Perrine, Laurence. and Arp, Thomas R. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. 9th ed. Orlando, Florida: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Publisher,

2004.

Perrine, Laurence. Story and Structure. 7th ed. Orlando, Florida: Harcourt Brace

Jovanovich Publisher, 2004.

Roberts, Edgar V.

and Jacobs, Henry E. Literature: An Introduction to Reading

and Writing. 6th ed. New Jersey, USA: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2001.

Roberts, Edgar V. Writing Themes about Literature. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey:

Prentice-Hall Incorporated, 2001. Wood, James. How Fiction Works. New York, United States of America: Picador,

2008.

9. COURSE CALENDAR

The following is the list of topics and required readings for the course. However, the instructor has the right to alter the outline any time due to inevitable circumstances or presence of other resources which he deems essential for the class.

Week

 

Topics

Required Readings

 

A.

Organizing for Literature Study

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 1 - 12

1

1. Rationales for Teaching Literature

2. Grouping the Literature for Teaching

2

 

3.

Individualizing Literature Instruction

 
 

B.

Teaching Drama

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 21 - 33

3

1. Creative Dramatics

2. Analyzing the Elements of Drama

   

3. Developing Understanding of Drama

 

4

4. Ways to Interpret Drama

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 34 - 46

5. The Evaluation of Drama

 

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION

 
 

C. Teaching the Short Story

 

5

 

1. Involving Students with Theme

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 47 - 73

2. Involving Students with Characterization

 

3. Involving Students with Plot

 
   

4. Involving Students with Tone, Mood, and Point of View

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 74 - 90

6

5. Involving Students with the Evaluation Process

 

D. Teaching the Novel

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 91 - 98

7

 

1. Selection

2. Approaches

   

3. Adolescent Literature

 

4. Multiethnic Novels

8

5. Science Fiction

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 99 - 126

6. Classics

MIDTERM EXAMINATION

 
 

E. Teaching Poetry

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 127 - 141

9

 

1. Deciding How to Teach Poetry

2. Involving Students with Poetry

10

 

3. Teaching Terminology of Poetry

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 127 - 141

11

F. Teaching Nonfiction Prose

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 161 - 170

 

1. Biography and Autobiography

   

2. Articles, Columns, Departments, and Features: The Modern Essay

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 161 - 170

12

3. Nonliterary Prose

SEMI-FINAL EXAMINATION

 
 

G. Rhetoric, Style, and Literature

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 177 - 182

13

 

1. Strategies of rhetorical Modeling

2. Rhetorical Analysis of Literature

14

H. Planning to Teach Literature

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 189 - 215

 

1. Unit Planning

15

 

2. Censorship

Rodrigues and Badaczewski: 189 - 215

3. Learning Activities for Literature Teacher

16-18

Project Making Teaching Demonstration FINAL EXAMINATION Submission of all requirements

 

Prepared by:

Mr. RICHARD M. BAÑEZ Instructor III

Checked and Verified by:

Assoc. Prof. NORA V. MARASIGAN Program Chair, CTE

Noted:

Dr. RUBILYN M. LATIDO Associate Dean, CTE

Approved:

Dr. AMADO C. GEQUINTO Dean of Colleges