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ITU: TOLERANCE

English 9: William Shakespeare

“Romeo and Juliet”


Literary Devices

Directions: Find the definitions of each literary device listed below.


Make sure the definitions you find are LITERARY TERMS definitions.
Hint: the dictionary definition is not always the literary terms definition,
so make sure to use your resources in order to find the appropriate
definition. For example, the literary terms definition for Meter is NOT
something you put money in so that you can park your car without
getting a ticket.

ALL DEFINTIONS SHOULD HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH


LITERATURE.
1. Plot the main events of a play, novel, movie, or similar work, devised and
presented by the writer as an interrelated sequence.
2. Setting the place or type of surroundings where something is positioned or
where an event takes place
3. Point of view a particular attitude or way of considering a matter
4. Characterization describe the distinctive nature or features of
5. Theme he subject of a talk, a piece of writing, a person's thoughts, or an
exhibition
6. Alliteration the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of
adjacent or closely connected words.
7. Allusion an expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it
explicitly; an indirect or passing reference
8. Analogy a comparison between two things, typically on the basis of their
structure and for the purpose of explanation or clarification
9. Antagonist a person who actively opposes or is hostile to someone or
something; an adversary
10.Aside to one side; out of the way
11.Blank Verse verse without rhyme, esp. that which uses iambic pentameter.
12.Climax the most intense, exciting, or important point of something; a
culmination or apex
13.Comic Relief comic episodes in a dramatic or literary work that offset more
serious sections.
14. Conflict a serious disagreement or argument, typically a protracted one
15.Couplet two lines of verse, usually in the same meter and joined by rhyme, that
form a unit.
16.Diction the choice and use of words and phrases in speech or writing

Dr. J. Smith, Facilitator ITU: TOLERANCE


Ms. J. Markley, Facilitator iGenda 1
Mr. M. Pryor, Facilitator Shakespeare: Literary Devices
Ms. R. Muffler, Monday Facilitator WebQuest: Western Europe
17.Dramatic Irony the expression of one's meaning by using language that
normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect
18.Dramatic Structure the structure of the story.
19.Epithet an adjective or descriptive phrase expressing a quality characteristic of
the person or thing mentioned
20.Figurative Language the way the person talked.
21.Foreshadowing be a warning or indication of (a future event)
22.Foil prevent (something considered wrong or undesirable) from succeeding
23.Imagery visually descriptive or figurative language, esp. in a literary work
24.Irony the expression of one's meaning by using language that normally signifies
the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect
25.Meter the fundamental unit of length in the metric system, equal to 100
centimeters or approximately 39.37 inches.
26.Metaphor a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object
or action to which it is not literally applicable
27.Monologue a long speech by one actor in a play or movie, or as part of a
theatrical or broadcast program.
28.Oxymoron a figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in
conjunction
29.Personification the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to
something nonhuman, or the representation of an abstract quality in human form.
30.Protagonist the leading character or one of the major characters in a drama,
movie, novel, or other fictional text.
31.Pun a joke exploiting the different possible meanings of a word or the fact that
there are words that sound alike but have different meanings
32.Rhyme Scheme the ordered pattern of rhymes at the ends of the lines of a
poem or verse.
33.Simile a figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another
thing of a different kind, used to make a description more emphatic or vivid
34.Situational Irony events that take place that reveal events later in the story.
35.Soliloquy an act of speaking one's thoughts aloud when by oneself or regardless
of any hearers
36.Sonnet a poem of fourteen lines using any of a number of formal rhyme
schemes, in English typically having ten syllables per line.
37.Symbol a thing that represents or stands for something else, esp. a material
object representing something abstract
38.Tragedy an event causing great suffering, destruction, and distress, such as a
serious accident, crime, or natural catastrophe
39.Verbal Irony events in the story verbal revealing later events to happen in the
story.

World Geography: Western Europe


WebQuest
Dr. J. Smith, Facilitator ITU: TOLERANCE
Ms. J. Markley, Facilitator iGenda 1
Mr. M. Pryor, Facilitator Shakespeare: Literary Devices
Ms. R. Muffler, Monday Facilitator WebQuest: Western Europe
 Go to phschool.com
 Under Course Content…Web Codes…insert mjk-0015 then press
Go
 Left hand side of the page…under Course Content…click onto
SOCIAL STUDIES
 Under Student Resources click on Textbook Companion Sites
 Under Select Your State and Textbook Program…click on arrows
after State and select Intl
 Next…go to program arrows and select World Geography then
press Go
 Scroll down to UNIT 4: WESTERN EUROPE and click onto Chapter
14: Regional Atlas: Introduction to Western Europe…read the
Summary to answer the questions:
○ Why is the continent of Europe called “a peninsula of
peninsulas?” There are a number of them that jet out to
the different directions.
○ What is a peninsula? (look this up in the dictionary if you
don’t know) a piece of land almost surrounded by water
or projecting out into a body of water.
○ What peninsula stretches into the Mediterranean Sea? The
Italian peninsula.
○ Is Greece a peninsula? Yes.
 Above the Summary section…click onto Go Online Activities
 On this page, under Enrichment: Ecosystems…click onto
ecosystems
 On this page, click onto Geography
 On this page, click onto World Geography
 On this page, under World Geography…scroll down to The
Difference between the U.K., Great Britain, England, and the
British Isles …and click onto that link
 On this page, take some time to maneuver…reading numerous
facts, answer the following questions.
○ What countries comprise Great Britain? England, Sctoland,
and Wales.
○ What is the capital of Great Britain? London
○ What does Greater London mean? City of London a long
time ago.
○ What are boroughs and how many are in the City of
London?
○ Where is Wales located in reference to England? South
east of it.
○ When was Wales united with England? Since 1536.
○ What river separates Scotland from England? Nith

Dr. J. Smith, Facilitator ITU: TOLERANCE


Ms. J. Markley, Facilitator iGenda 1
Mr. M. Pryor, Facilitator Shakespeare: Literary Devices
Ms. R. Muffler, Monday Facilitator WebQuest: Western Europe
○ What year were Scotland, England, and Wales united under
the name of the United Kingdom of Great Britain? 1556
○ What is the capital of Northern Ireland? Belfast
○ Where is the Isle of Man located and what is the total area
of this island? Located in middle of northern Irish Sea.
○ When did the Isle of Man enter the control of England?
1341.
○ How does the Isle of Man governed? They have one leader.
○ What is meant by European Union and how many countries
are there? 27.
○ What is the purpose of the Commonwealth of Nations?
Consultation and cooperation.
○ How is the United Kingdom governed? Parliamentary
○ The United Kingdom consists of what countries? England,
Whales, Scotland, and Ireland.
○ What did signing the Magna Carta do for the United
Kingdom? It saved the kingdom from falling into trouble.
○ What religion is the Church of England? Roman Catholic
○ When did the United Kingdom lose control of America?
1763
○ Why did Britain enter WWII? Because Germany invaded
Poland.
○ What is the name of the women who became Britain’s first
female Prime Minister? Margaret Thatcher
○ What was the name of Britain’s Prime Minister that led
Britain to become one of U.S. allies after the September 11
attacks on the World Trade Center? Tony Blair
○ What is the name of the British Royal that will take over
the throne when the Queen dies?
 Scroll to the top of the page and click onto Atlas and Almanacs to
answer:
○ Click onto EUROPE …and review the map
 What is the name of the Ocean west of IRELAND?
Atlantic Ocean
 What is the name of the Sea south of FRANCE?
Mediterranean Sea
 What is the capital of SPAIN? Madrid
 What is the name of the Sea east of the UNITED
KINGDOM? North Sea
 What is the name of the Sea west of NORWAY?
Norwegian Sea
 What is the capital of SWEDEN? Stockholm
 What is the capital of ITALY? Rome
○ Scroll down to Maps—Europe and view the Countries to
answer the following questions:
Dr. J. Smith, Facilitator ITU: TOLERANCE
Ms. J. Markley, Facilitator iGenda 1
Mr. M. Pryor, Facilitator Shakespeare: Literary Devices
Ms. R. Muffler, Monday Facilitator WebQuest: Western Europe
 Click onto Austria
• What is the capital of Austria? Vienna
• How many miles is Salzburg from Vienna? 136
miles.
What seven countries border Austria? Germany, Hungary, Czech Republic,
Liechtenstein, Slovenia, Italy, Slovakia, and Switzerland.
What is the Government of Austria? parliamentary

 Click onto Norway


• What is the capital of Norway? Oslo
• What Sea’s border Norway? Norwegian Sea
• What three countries border Norway? Sweden,
Norway, and Russia.
• What is the Government of Norway? Monarchy
 Click onto Sweden
• What is the capital of Sweden? Stockholm
• What two countries border Sweden? Germany
and Poland.
• What is considered the Scandinavian
Peninsula? Norway, Sweden, Finland
• What is the Government of Sweden? Monarchy

Dr. J. Smith, Facilitator ITU: TOLERANCE


Ms. J. Markley, Facilitator iGenda 1
Mr. M. Pryor, Facilitator Shakespeare: Literary Devices
Ms. R. Muffler, Monday Facilitator WebQuest: Western Europe