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B767/00/102

Aircraft General B767-200/300

Boeing 767-200/300

Aircraft General
Training manual
For training purposes only
LEVEL 1

ATA 00

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Training manual

B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

This publication was created by Sabena technics training department, Brussels-Belgium, following ATA 104 specifications.
The information in this publication is furnished for informational
and training use only, and is subject to change without notice.
Sabena technics training assumes no responsibility for any
errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this publication.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,
without the prior written permission of Sabena technics training.

Contact address for



course registrations
course schedule information
Sabena technics training
training@sabenatechnics.com

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B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

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B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. THE BOEING 767......................................................................................6
1.1. Specs......................................................................................................6
1.2. History....................................................................................................7
1.3. Air refueling..........................................................................................15

12. TOWING AND JACKING......................................................................62


12.1. Towing...............................................................................................62
12.2. Airplane Jacking.................................................................................68
12.3. Leveling..............................................................................................78

2. GENERAL ARRANGEMENT....................................................................16

13. FIM.......................................................................................................80

3. AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS & WEIGHTS...................................................18


3.1. Airplane Dimensions.............................................................................18
3.2. Airplane Weights..................................................................................24
4. TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS.............................................................26
5. AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION...................................................................28
6. AIRPLANE ZONE SYSTEM.....................................................................32
7. PANELS...................................................................................................40
7.1. Flight Compartment Panels...................................................................40
7.2. Circuit Breaker Panels...........................................................................42
7.3. Equipment Centers and Panels..............................................................44
7.4. Panel Locations.....................................................................................46
8. ESDS DECALS.........................................................................................48
8.1. General................................................................................................48
8.2. Electrostatic Discharge..........................................................................50
8.3. ESDS Device Handling...........................................................................52
9. KORRY PUSHBUTTON SWITCHLIGHTS.................................................54
10. GROUND CREW CALL SYSTEM. .........................................................58
11. AIRPLANE SERVICING..........................................................................60

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Aircraft General B767-200/300

Training manual

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
ACCESS PANEL ZONE CODE........................................................................................................................ 39
AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION.......................................................................................................................... 29
AIRPLANE JACKING SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS.............................................................................................. 77
AIRPLANE JACKING WEIGHT AND CENTER OF GRAVITY LIMITS
FOR JACKING AT PRIMARY JACK POINTS..................................................................................................... 73
AIRPLANE LEVELING INCLINOMETERS.......................................................................................................... 79
AIRPLANE LEVELING PLUMB BOB AND SCALE.............................................................................................. 78
AIRPLANE NOSE JACKING AND JACK ADAPTER........................................................................................... 75
AIRPLANE SERVICING.................................................................................................................................. 61
AIRPLANE STATIONS - BODY WING & STABILIZERS....................................................................................... 36
AIRPLANE STATIONS - BODY WING & STABILIZERS....................................................................................... 37
AIRPLANE WEIGHTS..................................................................................................................................... 25
AIRPLANE ZONE SYSTEM............................................................................................................................. 33
AIRPLANE ZONE SYSTEM............................................................................................................................. 34
AIRPLANE ZONE SYSTEM............................................................................................................................. 35
B767-200 AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS............................................................................................................... 19
B767-300 AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS............................................................................................................... 21
B767-400 AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS............................................................................................................... 23
CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS........................................................................................................................... 43
DOWNLOCK PINS........................................................................................................................................ 65
ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE....................................................................................................................... 51
EQUIPMENT CENTERS AND PANELS............................................................................................................. 45
ESDS DECALS.............................................................................................................................................. 49
ESDS DEVICE HANDLING............................................................................................................................. 53
FAULT ISOLATION PROCESS FOR AN EICAS MESSAGE NO FAULT CODE....................................................... 89
FAULT ISOLATION PROCESS FOR AN EICAS MESSAGE USING A FAULT CODE............................................... 85
FAULT ISOLATION PROCESS FOR AN OBSERVED FAULT
NO FAULT CODE, NO BITE............................................................................................................................ 93
FAULT ISOLATION PROCESS FOR AN OBSERVER FAULT
NO FAULT CODE, SYSTEM HAS BITE............................................................................................................ 91
FIBERGLASS/KEVLAR EXTERIOR PANEL AREAS.............................................................................................. 31
FLIGHT COMPARTMENT PANELS.................................................................................................................. 41
GENERAL ARRANGEMENT........................................................................................................................... 17
GROUND CREW SYSTEM............................................................................................................................. 59
JACKING LIMITS........................................................................................................................................... 71
KORRY P/B SWITCHLIGHTS MECHANICAL OPERATION................................................................................ 57
KORRY PUSHBUTTON SWITCHLIGHTS.......................................................................................................... 55
PANEL LOCATIONS....................................................................................................................................... 47
PRIMARY AND AUXILIARY JACKPOINTS....................................................................................................... 69
SEATING & CROSS SECTIONS....................................................................................................................... 27
SUBJECT IN EACH FIM CHAPTER.................................................................................................................. 83
TOWING...................................................................................................................................................... 63

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ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS


AC
AFT
AMM
APU
ARINC
ATA
CG
EICAS
ESC
ESDS
FIM
FLT
FWD
GND
GPM
LRU
MEL
MID
MLW
MTGW
MTOGW
MZFW
OEW
OVHD
PNL
RH
WDM

Alternating Current
Afterwards
Aircraft Maintenance Manual
Auxiliary Power Unit
Aeronautical Radio Incorporated
Air Transport Association
Center of Gravity
Engine Indication and Crew Alerting System
Escape
Electrostatic Discharge Sensitive
Fault Isolation Monitor
Flight
Forward
Ground
General Processing Module
Line Replaceable Unit
Minimum Equipment List
Middle
Maximum design Landing Weight
Maximum Taxi Gross Weight
Maximum Take Off Gross Weight
Maximum design Zero Fuel Weight
Operational Empty Weight
Overhead
Panel
Right Hand
Wiring Diagram Manual

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B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

1. THE BOEING 767


1.1. Specs
The Boeing 767 family is a complete family of airplanes providing maximum
market versatility in the 200- to 300-seat market. The Boeing 767 family
includes three passenger models -- the 767-200ER, 767-300ER and 767-400ER
-- and a freighter, which is based on the 767-300ER fuselage.
The twin-engine 767 -- sized between the single-aisle 757 and the larger,
twin-aisle 777 -- has built a reputation among airlines for its profitability and
comfort.
The Boeing 767 family is a complete family of airplanes providing maximum
market versatility in the 200- to 300-seat market. It includes four models:
767-200ER (extended range),
767-300ER -- approximately 10 feet (3.1 m) longer than the 767-200ER,
767-400ER -- approximately 11 feet (3.4 m) longer than the 767-300ER,
and a freighter based on the 767-300ER fuselage.
Cabin
Width: The Boeing 767s cabin is more than 4 feet (1.2 m) wider than singleaisle jetliners, and the 767s versatile design allows customers to select
four, five, six, seven or eight abreast seating to best suit their operational
requirements.
Seating
The extended-range airplanes typically have three-class seating of 181 to 245
passengers, using five-abreast, 747-sized first class seats; six-abreast business
class and seven-abreast economy class.

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Cargo
Lower-deck volume available for baggage and cargo ranges from 2,875 cubic
feet (81.4 cu m) for the 767-200 to 4,580 cubic feet (129.7 cu m) for the 767400ER.
Takeoff Weight
All three passenger models are offered in a variety of takeoff weights, which
allow operators to choose only the amount of design weight needed to satisfy
their requirements. These offer corresponding design ranges from 5,625
nautical miles (10,415 km) to nearly 6,600 nautical miles (12,223 km).
This range versatility gives the 767 family the ability to efficiently serve routes
as short as U.S. domestic and pan-European to long-range flights over the
North Atlantic and North Pacific. The 767 crosses the Atlantic from the United
States to Europe more often than any other jetliner.
Schedule reliability: An industry measure of departure from the gate within 15
minutes of scheduled time -- is over 98 percent for the 767. Fleet-wide, daily
utilization -- the actual time the airplane spends in the air -- averages more
than 9 hours.
Boeing has delivered 946 767s that are flown by approximately 125 operators
around the world. The 767 family has accumulated more than 27 billion
nautical miles on 7.7 million flights, and has carried two billion passengers.
About 1.3 million of the 7.7 million flights were on extended operations
(ETOPS) rules.

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1.2. History
Production Design Begins in 1981 with an Order from United Airlines
Production design of the 767-200 began in 1978 when an order for 30
short-to-medium-range 767s was announced by United Airlines. The first 767
-- still owned by Boeing -- was completed and rolled out of the Boeing plant
in Everett, Wash., Aug. 4, 1981. The airplane made its initial flight Sept. 26.
1981.
The 767-300 program got under way in September 1983. This model is longer
than the 767-200 by 10 feet (3.1 m); has 20 percent more seating capacity
(approximately 40 passengers) and 31 percent greater cargo volume. The first
767-300 was delivered to Japan Airlines in September 1986.
Each of these models was followed by an increased range (extended range or
ER) version, which offers operators even more versatility. This increased range
capability, and the 767s uniquely low operating costs are largely responsible
for the fragmentation of the North Atlantic markets.
To take advantage of the airplanes increased ranges and long, over-water
flights, new features were added: an advanced propulsion system and auxiliary
power unit with high-altitude start capability, a fourth hydraulic-motor-driven
generator, increased cargo compartment fire-suppression capability and
cooling sensors for electronic flight instruments.
Continually Improved Features and Capabilities to Maintain Market
Leadership
The 767 wing is thicker, longer and less swept than the wings of earlier Boeing
jetliners. This provides excellent takeoff performance and fuel economy.
Each 767 is powered by two high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines, which are
interchangeable with 747 engines with only minor modifications.

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B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

With its advanced-design wing and powerful engines, and at a maximum


gross weight of 300,000 pounds (136,080 kg), the basic 767-200, can take
off on only 5,700 feet (1,735 m) of runway. It can operate nonstop between
New York and San Francisco with a two-class load of 224 passengers. Even
the extended-range version of this airplane, the 767-200ER, with a maximum
takeoff weight of 395,000 pounds (179,170 kg), can take off on about
8,100 feet (2,480 m) of runway. It can fly nearly 6,600 nautical miles (12,223
km), making possible such nonstop flights as New York to Delhi; London to
Singapore; and Beijing to Sydney, Australia with 181 passengers in a threeclass configuration.
Preferred By Passengers
All passenger models of the 767 family offer a new, even more passengerpleasing cabin interior. The Boeing Signature Interior, based on the awardwinning design of the 777, uses state-of-the-art lighting and design concepts
to amplify the feeling of spaciousness on an airplane already prized for longrange comfort.
For passengers, the new interior also includes new, deeper stowage bins,
which means it is easier to find space in the compartments. For airlines,
the new interior offers increased flexibility in positioning and maintaining
lavatories. About 70 percent of the lavatory components are the same as
those found on the 777, easing maintenance and reducing the number and
type of spare parts in airlines inventories for operators of both models. The
interior also features an improved in-flight entertainment interface.
The 767 has earned high passenger ratings in every class of service. In
economy class seating, the 767 offers a seat-width that is only surpassed by
the Boeing 777. Independent research has shown the seven-abreast seating
concept in economy is popular because it places 87 percent of the seats next
to a window or aisle. The 767 has the highest percentage of window seats
and aisle seats of any jetliner.

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The Pioneer of Extended Operations (ETOPS)


In May 1985, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved 767s
for long-range flights of up to 120 minutes from an alternate airport. In March
1989, the FAA approved the 767 as the first jetliner for 180-minute extended
operations (ETOPS). This allows more direct, time-saving trans-Pacific and
trans-Atlantic flights from many U.S. gateways. After more than 15 years
ETOPS has proven successful and is now part of airlines routine operations.
767s fly more ETOPS flights than any other airplane.
The 767-300 Freighter is the Preferred Solution for the MediumWidebody Freighter Market
The Boeing 767 Freighter was derived from the 767-300ER passenger airplane.
It was launched in January 1993, and entered service in October 1995.
The main deck of the 767 Freighter can accommodate up to 24 pallets, each
measuring 88 inches by 125 inches (233.5 cm by 317.5 cm) at the base. Total
main deck container volume is 11,884 cu feet (336.6 cu m). The lower hold
can accommodate seven pallets, two LD-2 containers, plus bulk. Total lower
hold volume is 3,585 cubic feet (101.6 cu m).
These provide a combined maximum payload capability of 15,469 cu feet
(438.2 cu m). When carrying the 59-tons(53.6 tonnes) maximum payload, the
767 Freighter has a range of 3,255 nautical miles (6,025 km).
The interior of the main-deck fuselage has a smooth, fiberglass lining. A fixed,
rigid barrier installed in the front end of the main deck serves as a restraint
wall between the cargo and the flight deck. A door in the barrier wall permits
in-flight access from the flight deck to the cargo area.
The 767 Freighter keeps trip costs to a minimum with its two-person flight
deck and twin high-bypass-ratio engines offering excellent fuel economy. This
contrasts to older cargo-carrying airplanes, such as 707s and DC-8s, which
have three-person flight crews and are powered by four engines.

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B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

Type commonality with the 757 Freighter further reduces operating and
training costs for carriers that choose to operate both models.
All the advancements in avionics, aerodynamics, materials and propulsion that
were developed for the passenger version of the 767 are incorporated in the
freighter.
The Boeing 767-400ER: A Versatile New Airplane For a Dynamic Market
The newest member of the 767 family -- the 767-400ER -- was launched in
April 1997 with an order from Delta Air Lines for 21 airplanes. This model
features a fuselage that is 11 feet (3.4 m) longer than the 767-300ER model,
and carries approximately 12 percent more passengers. The additional seats
reduce seat-mile costs relative to the 767-300ER, which already offers airlines
the lowest operating costs in its class.
This stretched version of the 767-300ER addresses the medium-size (240to 300-seat) intercontinental market, accommodating growth on routes
that dont require the capacity of a 777. The 767-400ER also replaces older
airplanes serving transcontinental routes. The first 767-400ERs were delivered
to Delta Air Lines and Continental Airlines in August 2000. The first 767400ER went into service on Sept. 14, 2000.
Continually Improved Features and Capability To Maintain Market
Leadership
The 767 family has the lowest operating cost per trip of any widebody
airplane. This low operating cost, combined with a choice of three sizes,
variable range capability, almost universal airport compatibility and ETOPS
capability, makes the 767 a versatile family of airplanes. This versatility is an
extreme competitive advantage to an operator that needs to serve a variety
of different missions and passenger demands. Extensive commonality with
the Boeing 757, which includes a common pilot-type rating, offers even more
operational versatility to 767 operators.

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The 767 has a long history of leading the way in technological innovation.
Included in its list of firsts are:
First two-person flight deck on a widebody airplane
First, and still the only, common pilot type rating, which is shared with
the Boeing 757
First vacuum toilet waste system
First to use brakes made of carbon fiber
First airplane to achieve both 120- and 180-minute ETOPS approval
First widebody airplane to offer a choice of three passenger sizes -- the
767-200ER, 767-300ER and 767-400ER
First large commercial airplane to use efficiency-enhancing raked
wingtips
Boeing has delivered more than 946 767s that are flown by 125 operators
around the world. The 767 family has accumulated more than 27 billion
nautical miles on 7.7 million flights, and has carried more than two billion
passengers. About 1.3 million of the 7.7 million flights were on extended
operations (ETOPS) rules.

B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

The 767-400ER brings significant improvements in operating economics over


competing airplanes in the 240- to 300-seat market:
Increased payload capability
Additional range
Superior passenger comfort
Commonality with other Boeing jetliners
It is designed to be the most efficient airplane in its size category, making it an
ideal replacement for aging L-1011, DC-10-30 and A300 airplanes.
In growing markets, it can fly more passengers on routes served by existing
767s, A300-600s and A310s. Efficient design gives the higher-capacity 767400ER excellent range capability (approximately 5,635 nautical miles or 10,415
km) to fly about 99 percent of the routes currently being served by airplanes in
this size category.

The 767-400ER - brings significant improvements in operating economics over


competing airplanes in the 240- to 300-seat market. The payload capability,
intercontinental range, passenger comfort and commonality with other Boeing
jetliners give this airplane strong market appeal.
Sized between the Boeing 767-300ER and the Boeing 777-200, the 767400ER features a lengthened fuselage; aerodynamic improvements, including
additional wing span; increased takeoff weight capability; and an all-new main
landing gear.

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In comparison with the Airbus A330-200, the 767-400ER offers superior


economic performance -- with at least 5 percent lower operating costs. The
767-400ER weighs 40,000 pounds less than the A330-200.
The 767-400ER can fly all U.S. domestic routes as well as North Atlantic routes
such as Los Angeles-London, Newark-Moscow or Chicago-Warsaw. Other
potential routes include New York-Santiago, Chile; Seattle-Osaka and AtlantaHonolulu.
The 767-400ER was launched April 28, 1997, when Atlanta-based
Delta Air Lines announced its intent to order 21 airplanes.
Continental Airlines ordered 26 airplanes on Oct. 10, 1997.
The first airplane rolled out of the Boeing factory Aug. 26, 1999 and
made its inaugural flight Oct. 9, 1999.
The first 767-400ERs were delivered to Delta Air Lines and Continental
Airlines in August 2000.
The first 767-400ER went into service on Sept. 14, 2000.
The 767 Freighter
The 767 Freighter is a derivative of the popular 767-300ER (extended range)
passenger twinjet. All the advancements in avionics, aerodynamics, materials
and propulsion that were developed for passenger versions of the 767 are
incorporated in the freighter. Its design provides excellent fuel efficiency,
operational flexibility, low-noise levels and an all-digital flight deck.

B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

The 767 Freighter is similar in external appearance to 767 passenger airplanes,


except for the lack of passenger windows and doors. The interior of the maindeck fuselage has a smooth fiberglass lining. A fixed, rigid barrier installed in
the front end of the main deck serves as a restraint wall between the cargo
and the flight deck. A door in the barrier wall permits in-flight access from the
flight deck to the cargo area.
Boeing has been the world leader in civilian air cargo since the 707 Freighter
was introduced more than 30 years ago. As of March 2007, seven customers
have ordered 83 767-300 Freighters.
767s produce less pollutant emissions per pound of fuel than any comparably
sized jetliner, including the A330-200. When combined with the fact that the
767 also burns significantly less fuel, the 767 is truly the clear winner.
The 767 family is cleaner than industry standards for all categories of
emissions -- nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, smoke and carbon monoxide.
Breathe easy with the 767
You can breathe easy with the 767 family. 767s produce less pollutant
emissions per pound of fuel than any comparably sized jetliner. When
combined with the fact that the 767 also burns significantly less fuel, the 767
is truly the clear winner. The 767 family is cleaner than industry standards
for all categories of emissions, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, smoke and
carbon monoxide.

The 767 Freighter is a derivative of the popular 767-300ER (extended range)


passenger twinjet.
All the advancements in avionics, aerodynamics, materials and propulsion
that were developed for passenger versions of the 767 are incorporated in
the freighter. Its design provides excellent fuel efficiency, operational flexibility,
low noise levels and an all-digital flight deck. The structure employs aluminum
alloys and composite materials.

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767s burn less fuel


The 767 family of airplanes is the right size for the middle airplane market
(200-250 seat airplanes). Lighter and more efficient than competing jetliners,
the 767 family burns less fuel, for better environmental performance and
improved operating economics.

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B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

767 Fun Facts


The 767 is the first widebody jetliner to be stretched twice. The 767-300ER
is 10 feet (3.1 m) longer than the 767-200ER; and the new 767-400ER is
11 feet (3.4 m) longer than the 767-300.
The first 767 entered service in Sept. 8, 1982, since then 767 have flown
more than 7.7 million flights, and carried millions of passengers.
The air flowing through a 767-400ER engine at takeoff power could inflate
the Goodyear Blimp in seven seconds.
It takes about 60 gallons (227 l) of fuel per passenger to get from New
York to London on board a 767-400ER. The same volume of gasoline
would propel an economy car about half of that distance.
The 767 is the favorite airplane on Atlantic routes; it flies across the
Atlantic more frequently than any other airplane.
The 767-400ER flight deck instrument panel has 82 percent fewer parts
than other 767s. By using cast parts, the part count was reduced to 53
from 296. Production hours plummeted to 20 hours from 180 hours.
If GE CF6-80C2B8F engines were attached to a typical automobile, at
takeoff power the car would accelerate from zero to 60 mph (96.5 kph) in
less than half a second.
There are 3.1 million parts in a 767 provided by more than 800 suppliers.
The 767 is capable of cruising at altitudes up to 43,000 feet (13,106 m)
The 767-300ER and 767-400ER hold 23,980 gallons (90,770 l) of fuel enough to fill 1,200 minivans. It takes only 28 minutes to fill the airplane.
The noise level of a 767 taking off from a 1.5 mile (3,000 m) runway is
about the same as the average street corner traffic noise.
There are 90 miles (145 km) of electrical wiring in a 767-200ER, 117 miles
(188 km) in a 767-300ER and 125 miles (201 km) in a 767-400ER.

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History of the 767 Two-Crew Flight Deck


In the post-deregulation period of the late 1970s, airlines were facing heavy
price competition on routes that were now open to new rivals. At the same
time, airplane system reliability, redundancy in the system design, and the
exceptional record of the two-crew 737 led Boeing to examine the possibility
of expanding the two-crew flight deck to the 757 and 767 design.
Airlines were interested in the two-crew aircraft for fleet expansion. Airbus
was marketing its A310 and McDonnell Douglas its DC-9-80 -- both with twopilot crews. Boeing believed that the long-term viability of the 757 and 767
would require the two-person flight deck, at least as an option.

B767/00/102
Aircraft General B767-200/300

Boeing wanted to give airlines a savings on weight and operating cost with
the two-person flight deck. Because the 757 and 767 were developed at the
same time, a basic design criteria was that the two airplanes be part of a
family, having common pilot type rating and sharing many parts, systems,
testing and manufacturing processes.
United Airlines was the first to order the 767 (July 14, 1978). After lengthy
deliberation, the airline decided that a three-person crew would reduce the
introductory risk associated with being the first to put the 767 into revenue
service. Boeing continued to develop a second, two-crew version as an option
for later customers. Contracts with major suppliers for the two-crew flight
deck were being established as early as October 1978.
By the end of that year, three different flight-deck configurations were being
planned. The hard-wired, or permanent, three-crew was to be introduced
in August 1982 on the first 767 delivered to United. The 767 also would be
available with a two-crew convertible option, meaning this design could be
easily modified into a three-crew configuration. A third option, the three-crew
convertible, was ready by February 1983. In this case, the design could be
modified later to a two-crew configuration.
Boeing launched the 757 program in April 1979, and the first airplane was
scheduled to roll out with the two-crew flight deck in January 1983. A threecrew convertible was to be ready for the 757 by April 1983.
The crew-size debate reached its peak in the spring of 1981, when a U.S.
presidential task force was commissioned to determine the safety of two-crew
operations for large widebody aircraft. After several months of hearings and
extensive human-factors and safety data analyses, the task force concluded in
July 1981 that two-crew operations could be conducted safely. This decision
came less than a month before the first 767 was to roll out of the factory.
Following the task force report, the United Airlines pilots union agreed to fly a
two-crew 767. With similar agreements among other airlines and their pilots,
the last major barrier to full acceptance of the two-pilot configuration was
removed.

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Eleven of the 12 airlines that had ordered the three-crew 767s changed their
orders to the two-crew design. The timing of a change of this magnitude had
enormous implications for 767 production and certification. Extensive planning
and lead time were needed. The first structural parts went into production
two years before the airplane was to roll out of the factory in August 1981.
The first avionics system (an inertial navigation gyro) was delivered 20 months
before rollout.
By September 1981, Boeing had developed the necessary plans to retrofit
airplanes already produced with the three-crew flight deck and to incorporate
the new design into the production line, beginning with the 31st airplane.

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FAA certification was awarded July 30, 1982, and United took first delivery
August 19, 1982.
767-400ER FLIGHT DECK
The design is the latest advance toward a common look and feel in the flight
decks of all Boeing airplanes. The instrument panel display layout and format
shown here on a 767-400ER (extended range) airplane are also common with
the Boeing 777, yet retains the cost-saving crew commonality with all current
Boeing 767s and 757s. The flight deck also provides growth capacity for
future system enhancements.

U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification proceeded on


the first six airplanes produced. A seventh test airplane was added to the
certification flight-test program after it had been retrofitted with the new
digital flight deck. It took its first flight May 27, 1982 -- just three months
after the 757 first flight. Boeing used the airplanes configured for three crew
members to conduct certification tests that did not depend on the flight deck
configuration. The crew size, workload and operational proof testing was
conducted using the retrofitted two-crew test airplane.
To avoid slowing or interrupting the FAA certification process, Boeing chose to
build the first 30 airplanes as fully functional (and certifiable) airplanes under
the expected FAA certification for the three-crew model.
This decision was based on the companys ability to better control one of only
two possible airplane configurations, rather than the many configurations that
would have resulted if changes were incorporated on different airplanes at
different stages of production.
Among the impacts of offering a two-crew flight deck were the cost of
modifying 30 airplanes; the cost of the original design and installation of
the three-person flight decks; and the delay of the delivery schedule (Boeing
delivered 20 767s in 1982, eight fewer than planned).

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Program Begins in 1981 with an Order from United Airlines


Design of the 767-200 began in 1978 when an order for 30 767s was
announced by United Airlines.
The first 767 -- still owned by Boeing -- was completed and rolled out of the
Boeing plant in Everett, Wash., Aug. 4, 1981. First flight was Sept. 26, 1981.
The 767-300 program got under way in September 1983. The first 767-300
was delivered to Japan Airlines in September 1986.

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To take advantage of the airplanes increased ranges and long, over-water


flights, new features were added:
an advanced propulsion system and auxiliary power unit with highaltitude start capability,
a fourth hydraulic-motor-driven generator,
increased cargo compartment fire-suppression capability and
cooling sensors for electronic flight instruments.

Each of these models was followed by an increased range (extended range, or


ER) version, which offers operators even more versatility. This increased range
capability, and the 767s uniquely low operating costs are largely responsible
for the fragmentation of the North Atlantic markets.

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1.3. Air refueling


The KC-767 Advanced Tanker. The Worlds Most Capable, Most
Efficient, Most Deployable Tanker.
The mission is aerial refueling. Our warfighters require the one tanker that
delivers the most fuel in real combat environments: the KC-767 Advanced.
With its optimum size and superior capability, the KC-767 Advanced does
what no other tanker can. It raises the standard and lowers the risk for those
who buy it, those who fly it and those who depend upon it.

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2. GENERAL ARRANGEMENT.
The Boeing 767 is a twin engine, wide body aircraft.
Advanced systems, materials, and aerodynamics make this aircraft the finest in
its class.
Airplane Identification.
The model number identifies the 767 by aircraft type.
The line number identifies the 767 by production line position.
The variable effectivity .
Number identifies the options that have been selected for the aircraft.
The serial identifies a specific aircraft within the total number of Boeing
Commercial aircraft.
Performance.
With advanced engines and avionics, the 767 has greater performance than
comparable aircraft.
Configuration.
A flexible interior and cargo deck allow a wide variation in aircraft
arrangement.

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3. AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS & WEIGHTS.


3.1. Airplane Dimensions.
The basic dimensions, including steering angle data, for the 767-200, 767-300
and 767-400 airplanes are depicted in Figures 1, 2 and 3 espectively. All data
included in this section is contained in 06-10-00 of the Maintenance Manual.
MAJOR AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS - 767-200
767-200

English

Metric

Wing span

156 FT 1 IN.

47.57 M

Horizontal stabilizer span

61 FT 1 IN.

18.62 M

Height to top of fuselage

24 FT 4 IN.

7.42 M

Height to top of vertical stabilizer

52 FT 10 IN.

16.10 M

Overall length

159 FT 2 IN.

48.51 M

Distance between main gear struts

30 FT 6 IN.

9.30 M

Distance between nose gear and main gear

64 FT 7 IN.

19.69 M

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B767-200 AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS


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MAJOR AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS - 767-300


767-300

English

Metric

Wing span

156 FT 1 IN.

47.57 M

Horizontal stabilizer span

61 FT 1 IN.

18.62 M

Height to top of fuselage

24 FT 4 IN.

7.42 M

Height to top of vertical stabilizer

52 FT 7 IN.

16.03 M

Overall length

180 FT 3 IN.

54.94 M

Distance between main gear struts

30 FT 6 IN.

9.30 M

Distance between nose gear and main gear

74 FT 8 IN.

22.76 M

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B767-300 AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS


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MAJOR AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS - 767-400


767--400

English

Metric

Wing span

170 FT 4 IN.

51.92 M

Horizontal stabilizer span

61 FT 1 IN.

18.62 M

Height to top of fuselage

24 FT 4 IN.

7.42 M

Height to top of vertical stabilizer

55 FT 11 IN.

17.01 M

Overall length

201 FT 4 IN.

61.37 M

Distance between main gear struts

30 FT 6 IN.

9.30 M

Distance between nose gear and main gear

85 FT 10 IN.

26.16 M

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B767-400 AIRPLANE DIMENSIONS


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3.2. Airplane Weights.


Maximum taxi gross weight (MTGW) is the maximum certified weight for
ground maneuvering.
Maximum takeoff gross weight (MTOGW) is the maximum certified weight for
takeoff.
Maximum design landing weight (MLW) is the maximum certified weight for
landing.
Maximum design zero fuel weight (MZFW) is the maximum certified weight
without fuel.
Operational empty weight (OEW) is the weight of the aircraft ready-to-fly.
Without fuel and payload.
OEW includes crew, fluids, food, etc.
Manufactures empty weight (MEW) is the weight of the airplane as it leaves
the factory.
Usable fuel load is the total weight of fuel that the tanks can hold and that is
available during normal flight attitudes.

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4. TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS

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SEATING & CROSS SECTIONS


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5. AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION.
Fuselage Section.
The fuselage is a semi-monocoque structure.
Stringers and frames reinforce the fuselage skin.
The keel beam and stringers support the fuselage longitudinally.
Numerous bulkheads support loads placed on the fuselage.
Transverse floor beams further strengthen the fuselage.
Wing Center Section.
The wing center section has upper and lower skin panels, front and rear spars,
floor beams and the keel beam.
Wing Structure.
The wing is constructed with front and rear spars, ribs, stringers, and skin
panels.
Horizontal Stabilizer Structure.
The horizontal stabilizer is constructed with an auxiliary spar, front spar, rear
spar, and stringers and ribs.
Vertical Stabilizer Structure.
The vertical stabilizer is constructed with an auxiliary spar, front spar, rear spar,
and stringers and ribs.

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Structures General.
Airplane structure is designed to provide maximum strength and safety with
minimum weight. Fall safe load paths have been designed into the structure so
that failure of one segment cannot endanger the airplane.
Materials most commonly used throughout the structure are high strength
aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys.
Composite Materials.
Composite materials are used extensively on secondary structure and
flight control surfaces, where high strength and stiffness and low density
requirements permit. Three types of composite materials are used :
- Graphite/Epoxy for good strength-to- weight for flight control surfaces,
- Kevlar for good strength characteristics,
- Kevlar/Graphite for fracture toughness for areas subject to foreign
damage.

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FIBERGLASS/KEVLAR EXTERIOR PANEL AREAS


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6. AIRPLANE ZONE SYSTEM.


The zone system identifies different areas of the aircraft for :
- Planning,
- Maintenance,
- And servicing.
The aircraft is divided into eight major zones.
Zone 100 - Lower Fuselage-below the passenger floor.
Zone 200 - Upper Fuselage-above the passenger floor.
Zone 300 - Tail Section.
Zone 400 - Engine and Nacelle Struts.
Zone 500 - Left Wing.
Zone 600 - Right Wing.
Zone 700 - Landing gear and doors.
Zone 800 - Entry/Service/Cargo doors.
Zone numbers increase in differing ways throughout the aircraft.
In the wings, zone numbers increase from inboard to outboard and from front
to back.
Fuselage zone numbers increase from front to back.
Fuselage numbers also increase from the floor to the bottom of the fuselage
and from the floor to the top of the fuselage.
Horizontal stabilizer and elevator numbers increase from inboard to outboard
and from front to back.
Vertical stabilizer and rudder numbers increase from root to tip.
Major structural components, cargo doors, elevators, flaps, and similar items
have individual zone numbers.

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AIRPLANE ZONE SYSTEM

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AIRPLANE ZONE SYSTEM

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AIRPLANE ZONE SYSTEM


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AIRPLANE STATIONS - BODY WING & STABILIZERS


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AIRPLANE STATIONS - BODY WING & STABILIZERS


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Access Panel Zone Code.


Each access door and panel has an alphanumeric zone number.
The first letter identifies the access door or panel in an alphabetic sequence
starting with the letter A.
On the wings and the horizontal stabilizer the letters increase from inboard to
outboard.
Letters on the fuselage increase from the nose to the tail.
Letters on the vertical stabilizer increase from the root to the tip.
The letters-I and 0 are not used in the alphanumeric zone number.
Doors on the fuselage center line have left zone numbers.
Blow-out doors and tank vents do not have zone numbers.
The second letter identifies the access door or panel as to its general location
on the aircraft.
The second letters used are :
T - Top
B - Bottom
L - Left Side
R - Right Side
Z - Internal
See Chapter 6 of the maintenance manual for more information.

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ACCESS PANEL ZONE CODE


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7. PANELS.
7.1. Flight Compartment Panels.
Panels are identified below :
- P1 Captains Instrument.
- P2 Pilots Center Instrument.
- P3 First Officers Instrument.
- P5 Pilots Overhead.
- P6 Main Power Distribution.
- P7 Lightshield.
- P8 Aft Electronics.
- P9 Forward Electronics.
- P10 Quadrant Stand.
- P11 Circuit Breaker Panel Assembly.
- P13 Captains Auxiliary Instrument (FWD).
- P14 First Officers Auxiliary Instrument (FWD).
- P15 Captains Auxiliary Instrument.
- P16 First Officers Auxiliary Instrument.
- P17 First Observers Console.
- P18 Second Observer (optional).
- P55 Glareshield.
- P61 Right Side Panel.

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FLIGHT COMPARTMENT PANELS


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7.2. Circuit Breaker Panels.


Alphanumeric decals identify each circuit breaker.
Numbers increase from left to right horizontally along the bottom-of each
panel.
Letters increase vertically from bottom to top along each side of the panel.
Letters I, O and Q are not used.
Circuit breaker titles are above each circuit breaker, grouped by system.
Each system is identified above the circuit breaker title.
The amperage value is on each circuit breaker.
Each section of the P-11 panel is hinged to allow easy access to the back of
the panel.

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CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS


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7.3. Equipment Centers and Panels.


System Description.
Equipment racks, panels and card files contain control units, components and
control cards that are line replaceable units (LRUs).
Racks are identified by an E followed by a number.
Additionally shelves within a rack are identified by a dash number starting
from top to bottom (i.e., E2-2).
Panels are designated by P followed by a number.
Some control units and cards contain devices that can be damaged by
electrostatic discharge.
Do not handle before reading procedure for handling electrostatic discharge
sensitive devices.
Equipment racks and panels are identified below :
- E1 Rack-Main Equipment Center.
- E2 Rack-Main Equipment Center.
- E3 Rack-Main Equipment Center.
- E5 Rack-Mid Equipment Center.
- E6 Rack-Aft Equipment Center.
- E7 Rack-Voice & Flight Recorder.
- E8 Rack-EICAS.
- E9 Rack - Main Battery.
- P29 Master Dim & Test Card -File.
- P31 Left Generator Power Panel.
- P32 Right Generator Power Panel.
- P33 Miscellaneous Relay Panel.
- P34 APU/External Power Panel.
- P36 Left Miscellaneous Relay Panel.
- P50 Electrical System Card File.
- P51 Warning Electronics Unit.
- P54 Fire Detection Card File.
- P60 Brake Cooling Control (When Installed).

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EQUIPMENT CENTERS AND PANELS


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7.4. Panel Locations.


System Description.
The panels are designated by P numbers and the locations are as shown.
Panels are identified below :
- P19 FWD Lighting Distribution.
- P21 FWD Attendant.
- P22 Aft Attendant.
- P23 Nose Gear Landing/Taxi lights Transformer.
- P24 FWD Compartment Cargo Handling Control.
- P25 Aft Lighting Distribution.
- P27 Aft Compartment Cargo Handling Control.
- P28 Fueling Control.
- P30 External Power Receptacle.
- P35 FWD Compartment Cargo Handling Access.
- P39 Aft Compartment Cargo Handling Access.
- P40 APU remote shutdown panel.
- P43 Right Fueling (Optional, R.H. Wing).
- P43 External FWD Cargo Door Control.
- P44 External Aft Cargo Door Control.
- P45 Refueling Auxiliary Relay.
- P49 APU Auxiliary.
- P56 Right Wheel Well Service.
- P57 FWD Attendant (GLY).
- P58 MID Attendant (GLY).
- P64 MID Attendant OVHD PNL.
- P70 Left Off-Wing ESC System.
- P71 Right Off-Wing ESC System.

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8. ESDS DECALS.
8.1. General.
Three types of decals identify ESDS devices :
- Commerical,
- Military,
- And international.
The international symbol is used most often.
Other decals identify areas where ESDS precautions are required.

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8.2. Electrostatic Discharge.


Electrostatic discharge can damage many electronic assemblies.
Electrostatic discharge is the flow of electricity from a nonconductor.
Rubbing or pulling apart two non-conductors generates static electricity.
Most electronic assemblies are damaged by this electrostatic discharge,
and therefore are called electrostatic discharge sensitive (ESDS).
The table shows typical electrostatic voltages generated from walking across a
carpet and picking up a polyurethane bag from a bench, as examples.
A person cannot feel less than 500 electrostatic volts.
Damage to ESDS devices can occur with as little as 50 electrostatic volts.
Improper handling of ESDS devices is almost certain to cause damage.
An electrostatic discharge failure can be soft or hard. Soft failures occur about
90% of the time and cause intermittent problems.
Hard failures occur about 10% of the time and cause a failure of the
component.

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8.3. ESDS Device Handling.


Handling Printed Circuit Cards.
When replacing printed circuit cards, remove electrical power on the
applicable system.
Wear a wrist strap that is properly grounded.
The wrist strap prevents a build-up of electrostatic charges.
The wrist strap has a 1 meg ohm safety resistor to prevent electrical shock if
you touch a high voltage source, such as 115 volts AC.
Put the card into a printed circuit card carrier or a special conductive bag.
Close the bag with an ESDS label.
Handling Computers.
When replacing computers, remove electrical power on the applicable system.
A wrist strap need not be worn.
Remove the computer without touching the connectors on the back and
install conductive caps.
The conductive caps prevent an electrostatic discharge from reaching the pins
in the back of the computer.
For more detailed information on the safe handling of ESDS devices refer to
Maintenance Manual (MM 20-41-01).

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9. KORRY PUSHBUTTON SWITCHLIGHTS.


General.
The control panels have both momentary and alternate action pushbutton
switchlights.
Alternate Action Switchlights.
Alternate action switchlights have two positions : In and out.
A mechanical switchlight position indicator shows switchlight position.
The switchlight position indicator is backlit.
Momentary Switchlights.
Momentary action switchlights have one position.
There is no switch position shown on the face of the switchlight.
Pushing the switchlight causes a change in condition of a system.

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Lighted Pushbutton Switch (Mechanical Operation).


Maintenance Practices.
Both momentary and alternate action pushbutton switches are attached to a
mounting sleeve by a detent and two spring loaded mounting lugs.
The mounting lugs are adjustable using mounting lug screws.
The cap assembly must be removed for access to the lamps. Make sure
alternate action pushbutton switches are in the unlatched (out) position before
the cap assembly is removed. This is accomplished by gently pulling on the cap
assembly until the lock disengages from the cap assembly catch.
Bail wires hold the cap assembly to the master module assembly.
Lamp removal requires rotating the cap 90 degrees.
Changing the circuit module requires removing the master module assembly
from the housing assembly. Remove cap assembly to gain access to mounting
lug screws. The mounting lug screws should be turned counterclockwise with
lugs stowed inside housing assembly. This allows the master module assembly
to be pulled out from the housing assembly.
During reinstallation of the master module assembly check that wire follower
is located in cam track with cam plate extended from master module assembly,
and that bail wires are inside housing assembly.
Switch jamming will occur with wire follower out of track.

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KORRY P/B SWITCHLIGHTS MECHANICAL OPERATION


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10. GROUND CREW CALL SYSTEM.


Ground Crew Call - Flight Deck.
Push the GND CALL switch on the P5 panel to activate the ground crew call
horn in the nose wheel well. The ground crew call horn sounds as long as the
GND CALL switch is pushed.
Ground Crew Call - Wheel Well.
Push the FLT DECK CALL switch on the P40 APU remote control panel to
activate a single chime in the aural warning speakers in the flight deck.
The light on the GND CALL switch comes on for 30 seconds.
The ground crew call horn sounds continuously if the inertial reference system
is on battery power or if the equipment cooling system is not operating.
This warning occurs only when the aircraft is in the ground mode.

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11. AIRPLANE SERVICING.


Conditioned Air.
A connector for ground conditioned air is located downstream of the air
conditioning packs.
Electrical Ground Power.
The electrical power receptacle is located on the lower right fuselage near the
nose wheel well.
Fuel.
The fueling station is on the wing leading edge.
There are two connectors in the station.
Maximum fuel flow rate for pressure fueling is 800 GPM (3028 L/Min).
There is an overwing fueling port in each wing for gravity fueling.
Maximum fuel flow rate for gravity fueling is 155 GPM (586 L/Min).

Potable Water.
A panel on the lower fuselage forward of the bulk cargo door services the
potable water system.
There is a single service connection and two drain connections.
Hydraulic Reservoir Servicing.
There are three hydraulic systems.
Each system has a reservoir.
A service panel in the aft right wing-to-body fairing services all three
systems.
There is one pressure fill connection.
A hand pump is built in as part of the panel.

Pneumatics.
Connections for pneumatics are located on the lower fuselage forward of the
main wheel well.
Waste Tank.
A single panel on the lower aft fuselage services all the waste tanks.
There is a single drain connection and two separate flush connections.
Each waste tank is flushed separately.

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AIRPLANE SERVICING
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12. TOWING AND JACKING.


12.1. Towing.
Airplane towing is accomplished by tow tractor and towbar.
Normal operation is accomplished by use of the nose gear forward tow fitting.
Under body antennas and beacons have been located to enable towing from
behind the nose gear with standard low profile tow tractors.
Provisions have been made on the aft side of the nose gear to install an
additional tow fitting.
Each main landing gear has a towing eye at both ends.
These points are used for abnormal situations such as airplane recovery.
The towing instructions are placarded below the towing lever.
The towing lever is held in position with a lockpin.
This locks out the nose gear hydraulic steering when towing even though
hydraulic system is under pressure and permits turning up to 65.
A red indicator strip painted on the nose gear doors indicates when a 65
nose gear turn is approaching.
If the nose gear angle may exceed 65 disconnect the torsion links prior to
start the tow.
Manoeuvring the airplane on the ground is accomplished in a similar manner
to other conventional geared airplanes.
Nose wheel steering and engine thrust, as required, are used for taxiing.
When taxiing the airplane the right hydraulic system provides normal pressure
for the brake operation.
The center hydraulic system provides alternate pressure for brake operation.
If either hydraulic system fails, the brake accumulator holds a reserve of fluid
under pressure for approximately six brake applications.
The center hydraulic system provides hydraulic power for nose wheel steering.

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TOWING
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Landing Gear Downlocks.


The down locks must be installed in the main and nose landing gear before
the airplane is towed, parked or when maintenance is done.
The down locks are in a container on the flight deck.
NOTE : On some B767 airplanes, the down locks are in a container adjacent
to the access door of the main equipment center.

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DOWNLOCK PINS
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WARNING : MAINTAIN A MINIMUM OF 3 METERS (10 FEET) SEPARATION


BETWEEN PERSONS ON THE GROUND, AND THE NOSE WHEELS,
THE TOW BAR AND TOW VEHICLE, AND THE MAIN WHEEL
WHILE THE AIRPLANE IS MOVING.

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12.2. Airplane Jacking.


System description.
Three primary jacking points are used to lift and lower the airplane.
These jack points have jack pads which are part of the airplane body.
Three auxiliary jack points are used to make the airplane stable
(when it is necessary) after it is lifted to the necessary height.
Jack adapters must be installed at the auxiliary jack points before the airplane
is lifted on jacks.
WARNING : MAKE SURE THAT PERSONS AND EQUIPMENT ARE CLEAR OF
THE MAIN LANDING GEAR TRUCKS.
DO THIS WHEN YOU PRESSURIZE THE CENTER HYDRAULIC
SYSTEM WITH THE AIRPLANE LIFTED ON THE PRIMARY JACKS.
HYDRAULIC PRESSURE WILL TILT THE TRUCKS AND THE FAST
MOVEMENT CAN CAUSE INJURY TO PERSONS OR DAMAGE TO
EQUIPMENT.

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PRIMARY AND AUXILIARY JACKPOINTS


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THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

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JACKING LIMITS
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General Operations.
The specifications for jacking the 767 are given.
The airplane may be raised in winds up to 30 knots if using jacks specifically
designed for the airplane.
If using jacks that meet the specifications but are not designed specifically
for the 767, the maximum wind speed may have to be reduced and extreme
caution should be exercised.
Flight mode is simulated when the airplane is jacked off the ground with
electrical power applied.
Deactivate the airplane systems which are adversely affected when air/ground
relay system is in flight mode.
See Maintenance Manual 07-11-01 for a list of the systems.
Make sure that the airplane gross weight and center of gravity (CG) are in the
approved limits.
NOTE : The approved limits to lift the airplane on jacks are shown in the
figure.
The procedure to calculate the cross weight and the center of gravity
is shown in the airplanes weight and balance manual.
CAUTION : DO NOT CHANGE THE CENTER OF GRAVITY WHEN THE AIRPLANE
IS ON THE JACKS.
DO NOT TRANSFER FUEL IN THE TANKS OR PERMIT THE
MOVEMENT OF PERSONS AND EQUIPMENT IN OR NEAR THE AFT
END OF THE FUSELAGE. ALL NECESSARY PRECAUTIONS MUST
BE FOLLOWED OR DAMAGE TO THE AIRPLANE CAN OCCUR
AIRPLANE JACKING WEIGHT AND CENTER OF GRAVITY LIMITS
FOR JACKING AT PRIMARY JACK POINTS.
AIRPLANE JACKING WEIGHT AND CENTER OF GRAVITY LIMITS
FOR JACKING AT PRIMARY JACK POINTS.

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AIRPLANE JACKING WEIGHT AND CENTER OF GRAVITY LIMITS


FOR JACKING AT PRIMARY JACK POINTS
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Jacking Airplane Nose.


One jack point can be used to lift or lower the nose when the correct
precautions are use.
Also, the nose is lifted when the airplane is lifted fully,
on jacks.
A jack adapter must be installed at jack point D before the airplane is lifted.
CAUTION : MAKE SURE YOU EXTEND THE NOSE STRUT BEFORE THE
AIRPLANE NOSE IS LIFTED AT JACK POINT D.
WHEN THE NOSE IS LIFTED INDEPENDENTLY AND SUFFICIENTLY
FOR TIRE CLEARANCE, UNUSUAL LOADS ARE CAUSED.
JACK POINT D WILL MOVE IN AN ARC ABOUT 9CM (3 INCH)
AFT AND CAUSE LOADS THAT ARE MORE THAN DESIGN LOAD
LIMITS.
THE BEND FORCE OF THE JACK RAM IS LESS THAN THE
BREAKAWAY FORCE REQUIRED TO MOVE THE MAIN LANDING
GEAR TIRES.
DURING SOME CONDITIONS, JACK DAMAGE AND/OR DAMAGE
TO THE AIRPLANE CAN OCCUR.
THIS COULD MAKE THE RETRACTION OF THE JACK RAM NOT
EASY OR NOT POSSIBLE.
Make sure that the landing gear downlocks are installed before lifting the
nose.
Flight mode is simulated when the airplane nose is jacked off the ground with
electrical power applied.
Deactivate the airplane systems which are adversely affected when air/ground
relay system is in flight mode.
See Maintenance Manual 07-11-01 for a list of the systems.
Make sure that the airplane gross weight and center of gravity (CG) are at
approved limits.

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AIRPLANE NOSE JACKING AND JACK ADAPTER


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Jacking Airplane Axles.


The airplane has five (5) axle jack points.
Two axle jack points are on each main landing gear.
One axle jack point is on the nose landing gear.
The pads of the axle jack points are all part of the landing gear.
The airplane can be lifted at the axle jack point at any airplane weight up to
the maximum taxi weight.
The airplane may be lifted on one axle or on a combination of axles.
If you use a jack on one axle, the airplane can be lifted in winds up to 35
knots.
When two ore more axle jacks are used, the airplane can be lifted in winds up
to only 25 knots.
Two flat tires on the same axle can prevent the use of standard axle jacks.
If this occurs, you can use axle auxiliary jacking bars to lift the axle sufficiently
to install the axle jack.

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AIRPLANE JACKING SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS

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12.3. Leveling.
The airplane is supplied with one lateral and one longitudinal inclinometer,
and a plumb bob leveling scale, as leveling indicators.
The inclinometers and plumb bob leveling scale are on the keel beam near the
front of the left main wheel well.
For small adjustments to make the airplane level, the landing gear shock struts
are inflated or deflated as necessary.
For larger adjustments, the airplane must be lifted on jacks.
Procedures to weight the airplane are included in the airplane Weight and
Balance Manual.
WARNING : USE THE PROCEDURE IN 32-00-15 TO INSTALL THE DOOR
LOCKS.
THE DOORS OPEN AND CLOSE QUICKLY AND CAN CAUSE
INJURY TO PERSONS OR DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT.

AIRPLANE LEVELING PLUMB BOB AND SCALE


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AIRPLANE LEVELING INCLINOMETERS


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13. FIM.
General.
This publication was prepared by Airplane Maintenance Data Engineering
of the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group in accordance with Air Transport
Association of America Specification No. 100, Specification for Manufacturers
Technical Data.
It contains information necessary to isolate and correct faults in systems and
equipment installed in the 767 family of airplanes.
- The Fault Isolation Manual (FIM) and the Fault Reporting Manual (FRM)
together provide a structured method for the airplane operator to
report and correct faults in the airplane systems.
(1) The FRM is primarily for the flight crews.
It contains fault code diagrams to help the flight crew identify a unique
8-digit fault code and log book report for a fault.
- The FIM is primarily for the maintenance crews.
It contains numerical indexes of alt the fault codes given in the FRM.
The indexes wilt give the corrective action or a reference to a fault
isolation procedure for each fault.
For general information about the manual numbering system, arrangement,
and revision service refer to the introduction in the Airplane Maintenance
Manual (AMM).

TYPES OF FAULTS EICAS Messages.


There are different types of messages that show on the flight compartment
displays to tell the flight crew of problems or other conditions of the airplane.
These are the types (levels) of messages that can show on the display units :
- Warning (level A),
- Caution (level B),
- Advisory (level C),
- Status (level S),
- Maintenance (level M).
A warning message tells the flight crew of a condition that requires immediate
crew action.
A caution message tells the flight crew of a condition that requires immediate
crew awareness and possible crew action.
An advisory message tells the flight crew of a condition that requires crew
awareness.
A status message gives information to the flight crew and maintenance crew
about the dispatch status of the airplane.
The maintenance crew can use the status messages together with the
operators Minimum Equipment List (MEL).
A maintenance message is for the maintenance crew.
It does not require flight crew attention.
There wilt be a maintenance message for most of the conditions that make a
status message show.
The maintenance message can be the same as the status message.
Typically, maintenance messages are inhibited in flight and wilt only show
when the airplane is on the ground when the ECS/MSG page is selected.

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Observed Faults.
Observed faults are problem symptoms sensed by the flight crew, maintenance
crew, or cabin crew.
These are the types of observed faults :
- Faults that are shown on the flight compartment panels and displays
(other than EICAS messages) :
- Fault lights
- Failure and alert flags
- Other display messages
- Indicated values and displays that are not normal.
- Flight crew observations in the flight compartment or during walk
around.
- Servicing crew observations Ground maintenance crew observations
- Problems with the systems and equipment in the passenger cabin
(cabin crew observations).

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BITE Messages.
Built-in test equipment (BITE) messages are the fault indications that you get
from the BITE feature of the system or individual component.
They help you find the cause of an EICAS message or observed fault.
These are examples of typical types of BITE messages :
- A specific light or lights
- An alphanumeric code
- A group of English words or abbreviations, with or without an
associated numeric code.
You do most BITE tests at the front panel of components in the electronic
equipment compartment or other equipment racks on the airplane.
You do some BITE tests in the flight compartment.

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FIM Content - Front Matter.


The front matter has sections for record keeping, introductory, and general
information.
These are the sections :
- Transmittal Letter,
- List of Effective Pages (for front matter),
- Revision Record,
- Record of Temporary Revisions,
- FIM Index.
(The index is an alphabetical sit of all subjects included in the FIM. For
each subject, the index gives the chapter and the section in the FIM
where fault isolation procedures for the subject are found.)
- Introduction. The introduction has general information about the FIM
and describes these items :
- Types of faults,
- FIM contents,
- Using the FIM to isolate faults,
- Fault isolation procedure features.
- Effectivity,
- Abbreviation List,
- Panel Locations :
- The Panel Location section has these figures :

FIM Content - Numbered Chapters.


- Contents,
- How to Use the FIM.
These are simplified illustrations that give a summary of how to use the
FIM and the airplane systems BITE to isolate faults.
The topics covered are :
- Basic Fault Isolation Process,
- How To Get Fault Information from BITE,
- Find the Corrective Action or Fault Isolation Procedure in the FIM
- Do the Fault Isolation Procedure,
- Subjects in Each FIM Chapter.
- Index.
The Index has two parts.
The first part shows the panel indications and controls with the
chapter and the section in the FIM where the applicable fault isolation
procedures are found.
The second part has a table that shows the title of each instrument
panel in the chapter with the chapter and the section in the FIM where
applicable fault isolation procedures are found.
- The Index pages are the same as the Contents pages in the FRM.

- Flight/Passenger Cabin Panel Locations,


- Equipment Center Rack and Panel Locations,
- Ground Service Points and Panel Location.
- List of Service Bulletins,
- List of Chapters.

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SUBJECT IN EACH FIM CHAPTER


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EICAS Messages
Most chapters will have an EICAS Message table that shows all the EICAS
messages for that chapter. The EICAS Message table gives the EICAS message,
the level of the message, and the procedure to correct the fault.
The EICAS MESSAGE column shows the messages alphabetically. Messages
that start with L (left), R (right), or C (center) are put together in this list
starting with L.
Fault Code Diagrams.
The Fault Code Diagrams give fault codes through problem analysis, for
common faults that can occur on the airplane.
Most of the diagrams are equivalent to the diagrams in the FRM.
Other diagrams, shown by the word GROUND in the title, give the problem
analysis and fault codes for ground crew operated systems.
The Fault Code Diagrams have five areas of data :

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- The column at the right of the page has the fault codes.
Each fault has a fault code.
This fault code is used to communicate a problem that was observed to
the person who will do the troubleshooting.
Fault codes that end with an X-alpha (XA, XB, etc.) are used for faults
that cannot be identified in the FIM.
- The location part of the fault codes are specified in the top right corner
of the page.
These codes identify the specific part of the system or location where
the fault occurred.
Applicable circuit breakers for a system are at the bottom of the
diagram.
Fault Code Index.
The Fault Code Index is a numerical list of all fault codes for the chapter.
For each fault code that is used, the index has these items :

- The top area has the controls and the indicators applicable to each
subject. These items are at the top of columns that extend into the
analysis part of the diagram immediately below.
You can also find questions in the top area.

- Item 1 is the problem report.


This is a description of the fault.
The problem report is equivalent to the logbook report entry in the
FRM.

- The middle area is an analysis that you can follow to find the
applicable fault code. This area is intended to relate the specific system
configuration to what has been observed.
The analysis starts at an arrow on the left edge of the page and
continues to the right and down.
A diamond in a column shows where there are two or more answers to
a question about the indicator or control.
The diagram gives other possible indications or answers on lines that
extend down and to the right of the diamond.
The analysis continues until all faults that can occur for the diagram are
included.
Each fault has a line that extends into the Fault Code column at the
right of the page.

- Item 2 shows the steps to correct the fault.


If a fault isolation procedure is necessary to correct the fault, then item
2 will refer to the applicable procedure.

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FAULT ISOLATION PROCESS FOR AN


EICAS MESSAGE USING A FAULT CODE
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BITE Index.
The BITE Index is an alphabetical list of all the systems and components that
have BITE procedures in the FIM.
For each system or component, this list gives the chapter-section number
where you can find the BITE procedure.
Each BITE procedure will give the corrective action or a reference to a fault
isolation procedure for each BITE message.
Component Location Data.
Component location data is supplied for the major system components.
The data is at the front of the applicable FIM chapter-section for the system or
subsystem (subject).
It is divided into two parts :
The Component Index and the Component Location.
The Component Index is a table that list the components in a system or
subsystem in alphabetical order.
Components that are not assigned to the section or subject, but are
operationally related, are also included with a reference to its own chaptersection. For each component, the Component Index table can have this data :
- A reference to the figure and sheet that shows the location of the
component
- Quantity of each component
- Access number of the door or panel that must be opened to get to the
component
- Area, panel, or grid location (for circuit breakers) where the component
is located
- A reference for the chapter-section-subject in the Airplane Maintenance
Manual (AMM) where the component is assigned.
- Component Location figure shows the access and location of major
components in the Component Index.
The components shown in relation to any structural or system features
that near.

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Fault Isolation Procedures.


The Fault Isolation Procedures are used when one or more checks are
necessary to find the cause of a fault.
They are usually block flow diagrams that start with a description of a fault
and end with the corrective action.
There are some Fault Isolation Procedures that are not block flow diagrams.
These procedures can be in a tabular or text format.
Each Fault Isolation procedure has a PREREQUISITES box.
The data in this box is used to make sure the systems that are necessary to do
the fault isolation are in an operational condition.
For details on the structure and the content of the Fault Isolation Procedures,
refer to the paragraph Fault Isolation Procedure Features that follows.
ARINC 429 Data Bus Charts.
The data bus charts are supplied for many of the units that have an ARINC
429 data bus output transmitter (output port) that gives data to one or more
other units with an ARINC 429 bus receiver (input port).
These charts show each transmitter data bus, each connector, the pins,
the name of the bus, the word octal label, and the type of data.
An ARINC 429 data bus transmitter and reader is necessary to monitor the
buses for specific transmitted data.

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Using The FIM to Isolate Faults.


IF YOU HAVE A FAULT CODE for an observed fault (possibly reported by the
flight crew), then use the Fault Code Index :
- Look at the first two digits of the fault code.
This is the FIM ATA chapter number you need. Go to that chapter in the
FIM and find the Fault Code Index near the front of the chapter.
- Find the fault code for the observed fault.
The fault codes are shown in sequence by numbers with all the chapter
X-alpha codes (XA, XB, etc.) shown first.
- To correct the fault, read the FAULT ISOLATION REFERENCE (item 2).
- If item 2 gives corrective action steps, then do the steps to repair
the cause of the fault.
- If item 2 gives a figure and block reference, then go to the
specified Fault Isolation Procedure in the FIM. Start at the
referenced block and follow the procedure to isolate and repair
the cause of the fault.
- If the fault code is an X-alpha fault code, then item 2 is usually
a reference to the Wiring Diagram Manual (WDM) or System
Schematics Manual (SSM). Use the flight crews description of the
fault in the log book, and the referenced WDM or SSM diagram
to isolate and correct the fault.
- If you corrected the fault, then return the airplane to service.
IF YOU HAVE NO FAULT CODE for an observed fault, then do these steps :
- EICAS MESSAGE.
If the problem report has an EICAS message, then use the EICAS
Messages list :

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- Go to the applicable chapter in the FIM and find the EICAS


Messages list at the front of the chapter.
- Find the EICAS message in the list.
- To correct the fault, read the PROCEDURE column for
the message.
- If the PROCEDURE column gives corrective action
steps, then do the steps to repair the cause of the
fault.
- If the PROCEDURE column gives a figure and
block reference, then go to the specified Fault
Isolation Procedure in the FIM.
Start at the referenced block and follow the
procedure to isolate and repair the cause of the
fault.
- If you do not know the chapter for the EICAS message, then do
these steps :
- Go to the EICAS MESSAGE LIST section in the FIM.
This list is found after the INTRODUCTION to the FIM.
- Find the EICAS message in the table.
The EICAS MESSAGE column shows the messages
alphabetically.
Messages that start with L (left), R (right), or C (center) are
put together in this list starting with L.
- Find the FIM Chapter Reference on the same line as the EICAS
message.
- Go to the EICAS Messages list at the front of the chapter.
- Find the EICAS message in the list.

- If you know the chapter for the EICAS message, then do these
steps :

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- To correct the fault, read the PROCEDURE.


- If the PROCEDURE gives corrective action steps, then do
the steps to repair the cause of the fault.
- If the PROCEDURE gives a figure reference, then go
to the specified Fault Isolation Procedure in the FIM and
follow the procedure to isolate and repair the cause of the
fault.
- If you corrected the fault, then return the airplane to service.

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FAULT ISOLATION PROCESS FOR AN EICAS


MESSAGE NO FAULT CODE

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SYSTEM BITE.
If the problem report is for a system that has BITE, then you can do the BITE
procedure :
- Go to any BITE Index near the front of a FIM chapter.
- Look for the system or a line replaceable unit (LRU) in the system.
If the system or an LRU in the system has BITE, then you will find it
listed alphabetically.
- On the same line as the LRU or system name, look for the FIM
chapter-section reference in the FIM REFERENCE column.
- Find the BITE procedure in the specified FIM chapter-section and do the
steps to get the BITE message.
- Do the steps in the BITE procedure to repair the cause of the BITE
message.
- If you corrected the fault, then return the airplane to service.
- Repair a failure with an MCDP message.
- If the MCDP message is a flight fault, then go to the Autoflight
Flight Faults BITE Fault Isolation Procedure Reference
(FIM 22-00-02/101, Fig. 102).
If the MCDP message is a ground test fault, then go to the
MCDP Ground Test Messages Cross Reference
(FIM 22-00-03/101).
- Find the MCDP message in the figure.
- Do the applicable isolation procedure.
- If the problem was repaired, return the airplane to service.
If the problem was not repaired, refer to the WDM or the SSM
and correct the problem.
- Return the airplane to service.

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FAULT ISOLATION PROCESS FOR AN OBSERVER FAULT


NO FAULT CODE, SYSTEM HAS BITE
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NO EICAS MESSAGE, NO SYSTEM BITE.


If the problem report does not have an EICAS message and the system does
not have BITE, then do these steps :
- Go to the Fault Code Diagram at the front of the chapter for the
applicable system.
- Start at the arrow at the left edge of the page and follow the analysis
to the right and down. Follow the arrow in response to each question
or condition.
- Find the fault code for the fault in the right column.
- Look at the first two digits of the fault code.
This is the FIM chapter number you need.
Go to that chapter in the FIM and find the Fault Code Index near the
front of the chapter.
- Find the fault code in the Fault Code Index.
- To correct the fault, read the Fault Isolation Reference (item 2).
- If item 2 gives corrective action steps, then do the steps to repair
the cause of the fault.
- If item 2 gives a figure reference, then go to the specified Fault
Isolation Procedure in the FIM and follow the procedure to isolate
and repair the cause of the fault.
- If you corrected the fault, then return the airplane to service.

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FAULT ISOLATION PROCESS FOR AN


OBSERVED FAULT
NO FAULT CODE, NO BITE
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FAULT ISOLATION PROCEDURE FEATURE.


Format :
- Fault Isolation Procedures are given when it is necessary to do one or
more checks to find and repair the cause of the fault.
- Each Fault Isolation Procedure is a figure that can have many sheets.
The title of the figure is the fault description.
The fault description is also at the top Left corner on the first sheet of
the procedure.
This is where the Fault Isolation Procedure starts.
- Fault Isolation Procedures are usually flowcharts with three columns.
The flow charts go from top to bottom and from left to right.
- There are some Fault Isolation Procedures that are not block flow
diagrams.
These procedures can be in a tabular or text format.
Assumed Conditions at the Start of the Fault Isolation Procedure :
- Each Fault Isolation Procedure starts with these assumptions
(unless the procedure tells you differently) :
- Electrical power is off.
- Hydraulic power is off.
- Pneumatic power is off.
- Engines are shut down.
- All circuit breakers for the system are closed.
- No equipment in the system is deactivated.
- The fault was caused by a single failure, not multiple simultaneous
failures.

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Prerequisites.
There is a Prerequisites box at the top of the procedure.
The purpose of the Prerequisites box is to get the airplane from the normal
shutdown condition to the configuration necessary to do the Fault Isolation
Procedure.
The Prerequisites box can give data after each of these action steps :
- MAKE SURE THESE SYSTEMS WILL OPERATE :
- Below this step is a list of other systems that must operate in a
normal configuration.
The AMM Adjustment/Test (501 page block) or the Maintenance
Practices (201 page block) procedures for these systems are
referenced but it is not necessary to do these procedures unless
you have indications that a system that is necessary will not
operate correctly.
- All circuit breakers for these systems must be closed.
- If operation of the system is necessary, then it will usually be
stated, such as APU OPERATING or ENGINE OPERATING.
- MAKE SURE THESE CIRCUIT BREAKERS ARE CLOSED :
- Below this step is a list of circuit breakers with their panel and
grid location numbers, for the system with the fault. Make
sure these circuit breakers are closed before you start the Fault
Isolation Procedure.
- The word NONE will show under this step for these conditions:
- No electrical, pneumatic, or hydraulic power is necessary to do
the Fault Isolation Procedure.
- Operation of other systems is not necessary. Special test
equipment is not necessary.

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- MAKE SURE THE AIRPLANE IS IN THIS CONFIGURATION :


- Below this step is the condition that the airplane must be in to
do the Fault Isolation Procedure.
This condition is different from the assumed conditions of an
airplane in the normal shutdown configuration.
- If there are no prerequisites, then NONE will show in the Prerequisites
box.
Equivalent Tools, Fixtures and Test Equipment.
Some of the procedures in this manual identify tools or equipment.
But you can use equivalent alternatives unless the procedure tells you the
specified tool or equipment item is mandatory.
If you use alternative tools or equipment, make sure that they give the same
results and are as safe to the parts and personnel as the tools or equipment
specified in the procedure.
- Tools in this manual identified with an ST prefix are designed by the
Boeing Commercial Company.
Detail drawings of these tools are available upon request.

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WARNINGS, CAUTIONS, NOTES, and Flag Notes.


WARNINGS and CAUTIONS will be shown in one of two areas.
They will come before a step in a block of an isolation procedure when they
apply to only that step of the procedure.
WARNINGS and CAUTIONS will also be shown below the PREREQUISITES
block when they apply to the full procedure.
NOTE: Normal safety precautions are to be followed at all times when
potentially dangerous maintenance procedures are done.
The removal of electrical power, the use of body safety lines when
in high areas, or the use of equipment slings are all examples of
potentially dangerous maintenance procedures.
- NOTES will follow a step in a block of an isolation procedure when they
apply to only that step of the procedure.
NOTES will be shown below the PREREQUISITES block or in another
area on the page when the NOTE is applicable to the full procedure.
- Flag Notes :
- A numbered flag is used to show a reference to a flag note.
The flag notes supply more data or other necessary steps.
Flag notes are usually used in more than one block of an isolation
procedure.
- If a figure has multiple sheets and a flag is shown on more than
one sheet, the flag notes will be shown on the first sheet they
are referred to.
- When the flag is shown on only one sheet of the figure, the flag
note will be on the same sheet.

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Flowchart Blocks.
Each block in a flowchart has a number.
The first block in the procedure has the number 1.
It is the first block in the left column under the fault description.
A reference to a Fault Isolation Procedure can give the number of the block
that you start the fault isolation.
This block number is not always 1.
Typically, each block in the first two columns of a flowchart gives an action or
a check. A question related to the action or check follows.
The question can be answered with a YES or a NO.
Arrows identified as YES or NO move the user to the next action block.
Typically, each block in the right column has the corrective action necessary
to repair the cause of the fault. These blocks have a reference to an AMM
procedure, another FIM procedure, a WDM diagram, or a SSM diagram.
Some Fault Isolation Procedures can end at a block that is not a corrective
action. This occurs when all the checks are completed and the system
operation is normal.
Components in the Fault Isolation Procedures are identified by the same name
as in the AMM and, where applicable, their electrical equipment number the
same as in the WDM and SSM.
Repair Confirmation.
It is assumed that after you do a repair, you will do a check to make sure the
reported fault is gone.
When the Fault Isolation Procedure tells you to replace an LRU, the block can
have an AMM reference. The referenced procedure has a test to make sure the
LRU is installed correctly. You must make sure the test is satisfactory and the
fault is gone. You can do an operational test to make sure the fault is gone.

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If the Fault Isolation Procedure is for an EICAS message, the procedure will
tell you to Make sure the EICAS message is removed. In most cases, you
can look at the EICAS display to make sure that the status or maintenance
message does not show. Some EICAS messages are latched. If the message is
latched, then it is necessary to do the EICAS message erase procedure that is
referenced in the Fault Isolation Procedure.
Electrical Checks.
Electrical checks are used at components to find if they have a fault.
Electrical checks are also used to find a problem in the wiring
(also referred to as wiring checks).
A step can tell you to do a specific electrical check.
When a step tells you to do a wiring check, these are the checks you must do :
Examine any connectors that you disconnect for contamination, damage, and
bent or pushed back pins. Do these three types of electrical checks for the
specified contacts (pins) :
- Continuity from pin to pin
- Short circuits between pins
- Short circuits from each pin to structure ground.
Since many electrical component installations are obvious, a WDM reference is
supplied whenever an AMM procedure is not available.
The WDM reference supplies the data necessary to confirm voltages in the
circuit. This allows you to open the applicable circuit breaker before the
component is removed or replaced.
Standard procedures for connectors and wiring maintenance are shown in the
Standard Wiring Practices Manual.

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To make electrical measurements at the major card files, use an appropriate


extender card to get access to the electrical contacts. These are the part
numbers for the extender cards:
CARD FILE

EXTENDER CARD PART NUMBER

P50 Electrical Systems

G26004-39, -40

P51 Warning Electronics

G26004-39, -40

P54 Fire Detection

G26004-39, -40

ARINC 429 Wiring Checks :


- An ARINC 429 wiring circuit connects a transmitting LRU to one or
more receiving LRUs.
- To check the resistance between two pins of an ARINC 429
wiring circuit, first remove all LRUs that are connected to the
circuit (refer to the applicable wiring diagram or schematic to see
which LRUs are connected to the circuit).
- This will prevent effects on the measurement from the
resistance of the ARINC 429 receivers and transmitters in
the LRUs.
- This will also prevent damage to connected LRUs by test
equipment that operates at a high voltage. For example,
when you use an ohmmeter that measures very high
resistances to check for insulation problems.
- To make electrical measurements at ARINC 600 connectors,
use the breakout box, A34011 to get access to the electrical
contacts.
You can find more data on the A34011 breakout box in
34-00-00 of the Illustrated Tools and Equipment Manual.
- After you complete the wiring checks
(and the subsequent wiring repair, if it is necessary),
re-install the LRUs you removed.

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