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Resources for Teaching Evolution

South Carolina Science Council Conference - November 2005, Myrtle Beach


Understanding Evolution for Teachers, University of California Museum of
Paleontology, http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evosite/evohome.html.
A well-designed and rich web site that includes the nature of science, evidence, relevance
of evolution, common misconceptions and a history of evolutionary thought. The section
on teaching evolution contains valuable tips covering topics such as using appropriate
terminology, confusing terms and phrases, activities and language that encourage
misconceptions, potential pit falls, and overcoming roadblocks.
Evolution and the Nature of Science Institute (ENSI), Indiana University,
http://www.indiana.edu/~ensiweb/home.html.
Site contains numerous excellent lessons and instructional units on the nature of science,
evolution, origin of life, and NDA. There are also papers, articles and current news. The
site is published by Dr. Jean Beard (San Jose State University), Dr. Craig Nelson (Indiana
University) and Dr, Martin Nickels (Illinois State University).
Evolution, PBS Guide, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/index.html.
Contains on-line lessons for teachers and for students and a teaching guide for the PBS
series Evolution. Also contains an on-line course for teachers on how to teach evolution
complete with video of several successful high school teachers.
Evolution Resources, National Science Teachers Association,
http://www.nsta.org/evresources.
Site contains links to NSTA books, important position papers, headlines, and links to the
National Center for Science Education, the National Academies, the National Association
of Biology Teachers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
National Center for Science Education (http://www.ncseweb.org/)
NCSE is a recognized clearinghouse for information for defending the teaching of
evolution in public schools, includes critical review of Of Pandas and People, resources
for teaching evolution at http://www.ncseweb.org/article.asp?category=3.
Evolution on the Front Line, American Association for the Advancement of Science
(AAAS), http://www.aaas.org/news/press_room/evolution/
Materials include resources, questions and answers, and various news reports. AAAS is
an international non-for-profit organization dedicated to advancing science. It also
publishes Science.
Talk Origins, http://www.talkorigins.org/.
Talk.origins is devoted to the discussion and debate of biological and physical origins.
Most discussions in the newsgroup center on the creation/evolution controversy, but other
topics of discussion include the origin of life, geology, biology, catastrophism, cosmology
and theology. Good FAQ and archives with lots of information and science.
Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science (1998), purchase from NSTA or
free download from the National Academies Evolution Resources site,
http://nationalacademies.org/evolution/.
Michael Svec, Ph.D.
SC2Evolution.doc

Furman University

Department of Education

Resources for Teaching Evolution


South Carolina Science Council Conference - November 2005, Myrtle Beach
Written for teachers, parents, and community officials as well as scientists and educators,
this book describes how evolution reveals both the great diversity and similarity among
the Earth's organisms. It explores how scientists approach the question of evolution, and
illustrates the nature of science as a way of knowing about the natural world. In addition,
the book provides answers to frequently asked questions to help readers understand many
of the issues and misconceptions about evolution. The book includes sample activities for
teaching about evolution and the nature of science.
Science and Creationism: A View from the National Academy of Sciences, Second
Edition (1999), free download from http://nationalacademies.org/evolution/.
While the mechanisms of evolution are still under investigation, scientists universally
accept that the cosmos, our planet, and life evolved and continue to evolve. Yet the
teaching of evolution to schoolchildren is still a contentious issue. In Science and
Creationism, the NAS states unequivocally that creationism has no place in any science
curriculum at any level. Briefly and clearly, this booklet explores the nature of science,
reviews the evidence for the origin of the universe and Earth, and explains the current
scientific understanding of biological evolution. This edition includes new insights from
astronomy and molecular biology.
Evolution in Perspective: The Science Teachers Compendium by Rodger Bybee,
ISBN 0873552342, 2003, NSTA Press, $15.95.
The articles fall into three categories. The Scientific Perspective explores the evidence
supporting evolution. The Educational Perspective looks at evolutions place in the
National Science Education Standards and at the thorny problem of calling evolution a
theory. The Science Teachers Perspective moves into the classroom, discussing lesson
plans that allow students to explore evolution and draw their own conclusions. From the
NSTA website.
The Creation Controversy and the Science Classroom by James W. Skehan and Craig
E. Nelson, ISBN 0873551842, 2000, NSTA Press, $17.95.
In the debate over creationism, you need ammunition that will let you respond to the
opposition in a forceful but reasoned manner. This is it. Organized into three practical
parts, The Creation Controversy arms you with insights into modern science and the
Book of Genesis, effective strategies for teaching evolution and other controversial
topics, and the NSTA Position Statement on Evolution. From the NSTA website. Nelson

is a biology professor and maintains the ENSI site and Skehan is a biology
professor and Roman Catholic priest.
Finding Darwins God: A scientists search for common ground between God and
evolution. By Kenneth R. Miller. ISBN 006017593-1, 1999, Cliff Street Books.
Miller offers a thoughtful, cutting-edge analysis of the key issues that seem to divide
science and religion. As his narrative shows, the difficulties that evolution presents for
Western religions are more apparent than real. Properly understood, evolution adds depth
and meaning not only to a strictly scientific view of the world, but also to a spiritual one.

Michael Svec, Ph.D.


SC2Evolution.doc

Furman University

Department of Education