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Chapter 3

The Capital Asset Prici ng Model

3. 1

The Capital Market Line

This section will deal with a variation of the model of the previous section. In addition to the n risky assets, we will now suppose there is an additional asset with special properties. This asset will be risk free and as such will have a zero variance and a zero covariance with the remaining n risky assets. A good example of a risk free asset is Treasury bills or T-bills.

Let Xn+l denote the proportion of wealth invested in the risk free asset and let r denote its return. The expected return of this portfolio is

=
=

Its variance is

41

42

The Capital Asset Pricing Model

Chap. 3

The covariance matrix for this n + 1 dimensional problem is

covariance matrix for this n + 1 dimensional problem is for which the last row and

for which the last row and column contain all zeros corresponding to the risk free asset. This matrix is positive semidefinite, whereas E, the covariance matrix for the n risky assets, is assumed to be positive definite. The efficient portfolios are the optimal solutions for (2.3) . For the case at hand, (2.3) becomes

minimize : -t(tl, r) [ n+l ] + [ n+l ] 1 [ ;, l'x + Xn+l = 1

+ l ] 1 [ ;, l'x + X n + l = 1 subject to

subject to :

l [ �n+l l}

X n + l = 1 subject to : � l [ �n+l l } (3.1)

(3.1)

In partitioned matrix form , the optimality conditions for (3. 1) are

matrix form , the optimality conditions for (3. 1) are (3.2) and (3.3) The second partition

(3.2)

and

(3.3)

The second partition of (3.2) gives the scalar multiplier u:

u = tr.

Using this, the first partition of (3.2) becomes

(3.4)

Because E is positive definite, it is also nonsingular (see Exercise 1.7) . Thus, we can obtain the efficient risky assets as

(3.5)

and the efficient risk free asset

(3.6)

l'x + Xn+l =

1.

risky assets as (3.5) and the efficient risk free asset (3.6) l'x + X n +

Ex

=

t(l-l

- rl).

risky assets as (3.5) and the efficient risk free asset (3.6) l'x + X n +
risky assets as (3.5) and the efficient risk free asset (3.6) l'x + X n +

Sec. 3.1

The Capital Market Line

43

Using (3.5) and (3.6) we can calculate an efficient portfolio's variance and expected return as follows:

tJ.L'"E- 1 (JL - rl) + r r + t[J.L'"E- 1 (J.L - rl) r
tJ.L'"E- 1 (JL - rl)
+
r
r
+
t[J.L'"E- 1 (J.L - rl)
r
+
t[(JL - rl)'"E- 1 (JL
- rl)].

- trl'"E- 1 (JL

- rl'"E- 1 (JL

 

(3.7)

-

rl)

-

rl)]

 

(3.8)

Note that since L, is positive definite, so too is L,- 1 (see Exercise 1.7) and thus

- provided JL =I= rl. With this restriction, it follows from (3.7) and (3.8) that a; and f.L p are both strictly increasing functions of t.

(JL - rl)'"E- 1 (JL

rl) > 0

Observe from (3.6) that Xn+l (t) is strictly decreasing if and only if

l'L,- 1 (JL -

rl) > 0; i.e.,

r

<

l'L,- 1 JL l'L,- 1 [

.

(3.9)

Because L,- 1 is symmetric (Exercise 1.7) and the transpose of a scalar is just the scalar,

1.7) and the transpose of a scalar is just the scalar, and ( 3.9 ) becomes

and (3.9) becomes

of a scalar is just the scalar, and ( 3.9 ) becomes (3.10 ) From (2.7)

(3.10)

From (2.7) and (2.11), the quantity on the right-hand side of this in­ equality is a0, the expected return of the minimum variance portfolio. Thus we have shown that the allocation in the risk free asset will be a strictly decreasing function of t if and only if the risk free rate is strictly less than the expected return of the minimum variance portfolio . We will assume that r < a0 throughout the remainder of this section.

44

The Capital Asset Pricing Model

Chap. 3

Because Xn+l (t) is a strictly decreasing function of t, as t is increased eventually Xn+l (t) is reduced to zero. This occurs when

eventually Xn+l (t) is reduced to zero. This occurs when (3.11) The corresponding portfolio of risky

(3.11)

The corresponding portfolio of risky assets is

(3.12)

is called the market portfolio (hence the m subscript) . It is that

efficient portfolio for which there are zero holdings in the risk free asset. Using (3.5) , (3. 11) and (3.12) we can write the efficient risky assets as

11) and (3.12) we can write the efficient risky assets as X m t x(t) =

Xm

t

x(t) = -Xm· tm

(3.13)

Using (3. 7) and (3.8) we can obtain the equation of the efficient frontier for this model:

(3.14)

equation of the efficient frontier for this model: (3.14) In mean-standard deviation space, the efficient frontier

In mean-standard deviation space, the efficient frontier is a line. It is called the Capital Market Line (CML) and is illustrated in Figure 3.1. Investors move up and down the Capital Market Line according to their aversion to risk. According to (3.5) and (3.6) , for t = 0 all wealth is invested in the risk free asset and none is invested in the risky assets. As t increases from 0, the amount invested in the risk free asset is reduced whereas the holdings in the risky assets increase. All investors must lie on the CML. From (3. 13) , the sole thing that distinguishes individual investors is the proportion of the market portfolio they hold.

The CML can be written in a perhaps more revealing way as follows.

Recall from (3.5)

that part of the optimality conditions for (3. 1) are

(3.15)

(3.15)

Taking the inner product of both sides with (

- rl) gives

(3.16)

(3.16)

Sec. 3.1

The Capital Market Line

45

At the market portfolio, the holdings in the risk free asset have been reduced to zero. Consequently,

(3.17)

Using (3. 17) in (3.16), taking square roots and rearranging gives

(3. 17) in (3.16), taking square roots and rearranging gives 1 = [(JL - rl)'E -

1

= [(JL - rl)'E - 1 (JL - rl)] !. [ JL � : r
=
[(JL - rl)'E - 1 (JL - rl)] !.
[ JL � : r r

(3.18)

Now, taking the inner product of both sides of (3.15) with Exm gives

so that

 

1

 

am

[tm(JLm - r)]2,

or,

1

tl

  1   am [tm(JLm - r)]2, or, 1 tl (3.19) Substitution of (3.19) into (3.18),

(3.19)

Substitution of (3.19) into (3.18), rearranging and simplifying, gives

of (3.19) into (3.18), rearranging and simplifying, gives (3.20) Substituting the quantity in the left-hand side

(3.20)

Substituting the quantity in the left-hand side of (3. 14) shows that the Capital Market Line can also be expressed as

shows that the Capital Market Line can also be expressed as (3.21) Equation (3.21) shows that

(3.21)

Equation (3.21) shows that the slope of the CML is

as (3.21) Equation (3.21) shows that the slope of the CML is This is in agreement

This is in agreement with direct observation in Figure 3. 1.

as (3.21) Equation (3.21) shows that the slope of the CML is This is in agreement

46

The Capital Asset Pricing Model

Chap. 3

Capital Market Line � f-- X m r 0 cr p
Capital Market Line �
f-- X
m
r
0
cr p

Figure 3.1

Capital Market Line.

Consider the following implication of this model. Suppose in an economy that everyone is mean-variance efficient and everyone "sees" the same covariance matrix L: and the same vector of expected returns JL. Let two typical investors be Mr. X and Ms. Y and suppose their t values are tx and ty , respectively. Note that tx and iy could be obtained from the amounts Mr. X and Ms. Y invest in the risk free asset by means of (3.6) . Let Mr. X and Ms. Y's holdings in the risky assets be denoted by x and y, respectively. From (3. 13) ,

and,

This implies that their holdings in risky assets are proportional; i.e. , x = (tx/ty)y. For example, suppose n = 4 and Mr. X's risky holdings are

x = (0. 1, 0. 11, 0. 12, 0. 13)'. Suppose we knew Ms. Y's holdings in just the

first risky asset were 0.2. But then her holdings in the remaining risky assets must be in the same proportion (namely 2) as Mr. X's. Thus we would know the remainder of her holdings: y = (0.2, 0.22, 0.24, 0.26)'.

(namely 2) as Mr. X's. Thus we would know the remainder of her holdings: y =
(namely 2) as Mr. X's. Thus we would know the remainder of her holdings: y =

Sec. 3.1

The Capital Market Line

47

We next turn to the quest ion of what happens when t exceeds tm .

By definition, if the Capital Market Line were to continue, holdings in the risk free asset would become negative. This would allow short selling the risk free asset , which we will not allow in this model. For all t � tm , we shall impose the condition Xn+l (t) = 0. Substituting

= 0 everywhere in (3. 1), the problem (3. 1) reduces to (2.3) , the n

risky asset problem of the previous section for t � tm · Figure 3.2 shows

Xn+l

the Capital Market Line and the efficient frontier for the n risky asset problem superimposed, in mean-standard deviation space.

llp r �112 0 0
llp
r
�112
0
0

Figure

3.2

Capital Market Line and Efficient Frontier for Risky Assets.

Implicit in the model problem (3. 1) is the assumption that the risk free asset must be nonnegative. The key result for this problem is that the efficient frontier for it is composed of two pieces (see Figure 3.3) . The first piece is the Capital Market Line going from r to the market portfolio Xm · The second piece is a part of the hyperbola (2. 18) , the efficient frontier for the risky assets. The two pieces of the efficient frontier are shown as the solid line in Figure 3.3.

48

The Capital Asset Pricing Model

Chap. 3

CML Efficient Frontier for combined problem r 13112 0 cr 0 p
CML
Efficient Frontier
for combined problem
r
13112
0
cr
0
p

Figure 3.3

Two Pieces of the Efficient Frontier.

Figure 3.3 is drawn in a special way, and not by accident . The mean and standard deviation at Xm on the CML is identical to that for the risky asset part of the frontier. This is always the case. Indeed, the two corresponding portfolios are both Xm. To see this, from (2.8) and (3. 11) we can calculate

. 8 ) a n d ( 3 . 1 1 ) we can calculate Since

Since the two portfolios are identical, their means are equal and so too are their standard deviations. Thus, the efficient frontier is continuous.

Sec. 3.1

The Capital Market Line

49

Not only is the efficient frontier continuous, it is also differentiable. One way to think of this is that in mean-standard deviation space, the

CML is tangent to the efficient frontier for the risky assets. This is

shown in Figure 3.3. From (3. 14) , the slope of the CML is

((f.L -

rl)'L:- 1 (f.L - rl))�.

(3.22)

To verify the differentiability assertion , we need only show that the slope of the efficient frontier for risky assets at Xm has this same value. A convenient way to do this is to use (2. 14) , namely

/Lp

=

ao

+

a1t

and

ap

=

(

f3o

+ 2f31t

+

f32 t

2 ) 1

2

Using the chain rule of calculus, /31 = 0 (2.15) and /3 2 = a1 (2. 17), we

determine

aP
aP

t

When t = tm , (3.7) with (3. 12) imply

(3.23)

aP

=

1

[ (/L - rl)'L: - 1 (/L - (l' L: - 1 ( 1-l -
[ (/L
- rl)'L: - 1 (/L
-
(l' L: - 1 ( 1-l
-
rl)) 2

rl) ] 2

so that with (3. 11) we have

' (3.24)

df.Lp dap

= ((f.L

- rl)'L:- 1 ( 1-l

-

rl)) � ,

(3.25)

and this is identical to (3.22) . Thus the slope of the CML is equal to the slope of the efficient frontier for risky assets at Xm and the total efficient frontier is indeed differentiable.

Example 3.1

Find the equation of the CML using (3. 14) , tm and the market portfolio Xm for the problem of Example 2.1 and a risk free return of r = 1.02. Ve rify the equat ion of the CML by recalculating it using (3 .21).

50

The Capital Asset Pricing Model

Chap. 3

·

1 (J.L - rl)

l'L:-

] [ 3.:l

[

1

l'E- (1' - rl)

I I

1

The data for Example 2.1 has n = 3, J.l =

( 1.1, 1 .2, 1 .3)' and L: =

X w- 2 ' 7 X w- 2 ) . The required quantities all depend on so we calculate this first :

diag( l0- 2 ' 5

L;- 1 (J.L - rl)

L:- 1 (J.L - rl)

Thus

=

100

[

0

(!' - rl)'E- 1 (I' - rl) [ 0.08

i

0

]

0.18

[

�:��

0.28

0. 28 ]

] = [ 3.: ]

[

3.

4

]· (3.26)

2.4080

and since v'2.4080 = 1 .5518, it follows from (3.14) that the equation of the CML is

(3.27)

From

/-lp

(3.11 ) , we have

=

1 . 02

+

1 . 5518 fJp .

/-lp ( 3.11 ) , we have = 1 . 0 2 + 1 . 5518

1

From

(3.26) ,

so that

15.6,
15.6,

tm = 0.0641.

Finally, we have from (3.12) and (3.26) that the market portfolio is

Xm

tmL:- 1 (J.L - rl)

0.0641 [

[ �:����

0.2564

3 : 6

]

·

]

Sec. 3.2

The Security Market Line

51

We next calculate the equat ion of the CML using (3 .21) as fo llows. Using Xm above, we calculate

and

J-tm

= J-t 1 Xm

=

O"m = 0.0995,

1.1744,

IT! = x:nL:xm = 0.0099 ,

1-tm - r

1.1744 - 1 .02

0.0995
0.0995

1.5518.

From (3.21), the equation of the CML is

/-tp

=

1 . 02

+

1 . 5518 O"p ,

in agreement with (3.27) .

= 1 . 02 + 1 . 5518 O"p , in agreement with (3.27) . 3.2

3.2 The Security Market Line

In this section we continue using the model problem Section 3.1 and repeat that model problem here for convenience:

minimize :

subject to :

-t(J-t', r ) [ �n+l ] + [ �n+l ] 1 [ ;,

l'x

+

Xn+l = 1

l [ :. + , l}

1 [ ;, l'x + Xn+l = 1 � l [ : . + , l

(3.28)

The optimality conditions for (3.28) were formulated in Section 3.1 as (3.4) and (3.3) . We repeat these here.

L:x

t(J-t

-

rl),

(3.29)

l'x

+ Xn+l

=

1.

(3.30)

We now let t

Equation (3.29) now becomes

= tm.

It follows that x = Xm , Xn+ l

let t Equation (3.29) now becomes = tm. It follows that x = Xm , Xn+

= 0 and l' xm = 1.

52

The Capital Asset Pricing Model

Chap. 3

or,

52 The Capital Asset Pricing Model Chap. 3 or, (3.31) Taking the inner product of both

(3.31)

Taking the inner product of both sides of (3.31) with Xm gives

the inner product of both sides of (3.31) with Xm gives (3.32) But JlXm = J.tm,

(3.32)

But JlXm = J.tm, l'xm = 1 and x�:Exm = o-!, so (3.32) becomes

= 1 and x�:Exm = o- ! , so (3.32) becomes Upon rearrangement, this becomes J.tm

Upon rearrangement, this becomes

J.tm - r

1

=
=

Substituting (3.33) into (3.31) gives

J.t

=

rl

+

- r 1 = Substituting (3.33) into (3.31) gives J.t = rl + :E xm. (3.33)

:E xm.

(3.33)

(3.34)

Now let ri denote the random variable whose value is the return

, n. That is, J.ti is the expected

from asset i, and E(ri) = J.ti , i = 1, 2,

value of ri. The i-th component of (3.34) can be written

value of ri. The i-th component of (3.34) can be written But [o- il (xm h

But

[o- il (xm h + D" i 2 (xm h +

·

·

·

+ D" i n (Xm) n]

is just the covariance of ri with the market portfolio Xm which has return

and satisfies

· · + D" i n (Xm) n] is just the covariance of ri with the

53

Sec. 3.2

The Security Market Line

Thus, (3.35) can be rewritten as

f.Li

=

r

+

[/1m - r] a�

covh , rm)

i = 1 , 2,

, n.

(3.36)

Equation (3.36) is called the Security Market Line (SML) and shows

that the expected returns of all assets must plot on a line with slope

returns of all assets must plot on a line with slope and 11 intercept r, in

and 11 intercept r, in (cov (ri, rm), E(ri)) space.

The market portfolio also lies on the SML. See Exercise 3.6.

Example 3.2

For the problem of Example

3. 1, find the equation of the SML and

numerically verify that f11 , 11 2 and 113 lie on it.

From the results of Example 3. 1, we have f.Lm = 1 . 1 744 and am = 0.0995 so that the slope of the SML is

J-lm - r

1. 1744 - 1.02

=

a�

(0.0995)

2

= 15.5999.

We can write the Secu rity Market Line in vector fo rmat:

p,

=

rl

+

[ 1.02

1 .02

1.02

[/1 - r] : �
[/1
- r]
:

�Xm,

]

+ 15.5999�Xm·

(3.37)

We can also write the SML in compo nent form as

for i= 1, 2,

f.Li

=

r

+

15.5999 x cov (ri, rm),

, n. It is str aightforward to compute

�Xm =

[ 0.0051

0.0115

0.0179

l

.

54

The Capital Asset Pricing Model

Chap. 3

Inserting this last into the right-hand side of (3.37) and simplifying

gives in agreement with the left-hand side (namely J-t) and so the J-ti, i =

0

1, 2, 3 do indeed plot on the SML. See Figure 3.4.

Jl

m

Jl 2 = 1.2 = 1.174 r = 1.02 0.0099 (0,0.9) 0.0051 0.01 1 5
Jl 2 = 1.2
= 1.174
r = 1.02
0.0099
(0,0.9)
0.0051 0.01 1 5
0.0179

ll;

Cov(ri , r,j

Figure 3.4

SML for Example 3.2.

3.3 Computer Programs

Figure 3.5 shows the m-file Example3pl .m which is the main routine for plotting the CML for Example 3.1. Lines 2-4 set up the data. Line 5 defines the lower, upper and increment on t for plotting the CML using (3.7) and (3.8) . Line 6 performs the validity check on the covariance matrix. Line 7 calls the function EFMVcoeff (Figure 2.6) to obtain the coefficients of the efficient frontier for the risky assets. Lines 8 and 9 call CMLplot (Figure 3.6) to plot the CML.

Sec. 3.3

Computer Programs

55

1

%Example3p 1 . m

 

2

mu =

[

1 . 1

1 . 2

1 . 3

]

'

a

Sigma =

[1.e-2

0

0

;

0

S . Oe-2

0

0

0

7 . 0 e-2

]

4

r

=

1. 02

 

s

tlow=O .;

thigh= 1 .;

t inc= 0 . 0 1;

 

6

che ckdat a ( Sigma , 1.e-6) ;

 

7

[a1phaO, a 1pha1, betaO, bet a2 , hO,h 1]

=

EFMVcoe f f ( mu , Sigma )

s

CMLp1 ot (t1ow, thigh, t inc, a lphaO, a lpha1, betaO,

 

9

beta2 , mu , S i gma , r ) ;

 

Figure 3.5

Example3pl .m.

Figure 3.6 shows the m-file CMLplot.m which plots the Capi­ tal Market Line. Its input parameters are the limits on t for plot­ ting the CML, the coefficients of the efficient frontier and the prob­ lem data J.L, � and r. Line 4 calls EFMSDplot (Efficient Frontier Mean-Standard Deviation plot) to plot the efficient frontier in mean­ standard deviation space (see Figure 3.8) . Line 5 keeps the current plot open for further additions. Line 8 calculates the slope of the CML,

namely [(J.L - rl)'�- 1 (J.L - rl)] 1 1 2 . Lines 9 and 10 compute tm and Xm,

respectively. Lines 1 1-13 compute points on the CML and line 14 plots them. Lines 15 through 18 plot the extension of the CML us­ ing a dashed line. Lines 19 through 25 label some key points in the graph.

56

The Capital Asset Pricing Model

Chap. 3

1

%CMLpl ot .m

2

funct ion CMLplot ( t low, thigh, t inc, a lphaO, a lphal,

3

betaO , bet a 2 , mu , S igma , r)

4

EFMSDplot ( t low, thigh , t inc, alphaO , alpha1, betaO , beta2 ) ;

5

hold on

6

n = length (mu ) ; ell = ones (1, n) ';

 

1

coe ff = (mu - r*el l

)

'

*

SigmaA-1

*

(mu

-

r * ell )

8

coe f fs qrt = coe f f . A O .S

 

9 tm = 1./ (ell ' * SigmaA-1 * (mu - r*el l ) )

10 xm = tm * S i gmaA-1 * ( mu - r*e ll)

u t

coeff;

13 sigmap

14 plot ( s i gmap , mup , 'k' )

tlow : tinc . A2:tm;

12 mup = r + t

=

*

=

t*

coeffsqrt ;

15

t

=

tm : t

i

n c

. A 2 : 3 * tm;

16

mup

=

r

+

t

* coeff;

11

sigmap

 

=

t*

coeffsqrt ;

18

plot (si gmap , mup , ' k -. ')

19 mup = r + tm * coeff; sigmap = tm* coe ffsqrt ;

20 xlabel ( ' Port folio

21 ylabel ( ' Port folio

22 text ( s i gmap, mup ,

23 ' \ left arrow { \ rm ma rket porfolio } ,

24 t ext (sigmap/ 2 ., ( mup+r) / 2 .,

' \ leftarrow

26 t ext (2*si gmap , r+2 *tiD*COe ff,

27 ' \ leftarrow

Standard

Mean

Deviat ion

t

\ sigma_p ')

=

Lm ')

\mu_p ')

{ \ rm

{ \ rm

Capital

Market

of

Line } ')

Extension

Capital

Market

Line } ')

Figure 3.6

CMLplot.m.

Figure 3.7 shows EFMSDplot.m which plots the efficient frontier for the risky assets in mean-standard deviation space. Lines 4 through 6 compute points on the efficient frontier and its lower extension and plots them. Lines 9 through 13 construct the axes. Figure 3.8 shows the final plot.

Sec. 3.3

Computer Programs

57

1 %EFMSDplot .m 2 funct ion EFMSDplot ( t low, thigh, t i nc, a
1 %EFMSDplot .m
2 funct ion
EFMSDplot ( t low, thigh, t i nc, a lphaO,
alphal, beta0 , beta2 )
4
t
tlow : t inc : thigh;
=
mup = a lphaO + t
*
a lpha l;
5
6
mup low = alphaO - t* alphal;
st ddevp = ( bet aO + t.· 2 * beta2 ) . · o.s ;
1
plot ( st ddevp , mup , 'k' , st ddevp , mup low, ' k-- ' )
s
xmin
9
0.;
10
xmax
(betaO
+
thigh . ·2
*
beta2 ) . · o.S ;
11
ym in
a l ph aO
thigh*a lpha l;
12
ymax
a lphaO
+
thigh*alpha l;
13
axi s ( [ xmin xmax
ymin ymax ) )
Figure 3.7
EFMSDplot .m.
1 .6
/
/
1 .4
/
nsion of Capital Market Line
a.
::
/
c:
/
til
1 .2
Q)
market porfolio, t = t m
::E
.Q
pital Market Line
'
0
0.8
0.6

0

0.1

Figure 3.8

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

Portfolio Standard Deviation cr

Capital Market Line: Examp�e3p l .m.

0.7

58

The Capital Asset Pricing Model

Chap. 3

3.4

Exercises

3.1 Each of the following problems is to be augmented with a risk free asset with return r = 1 .05. Determine the efficient portfolios and the two pieces of the efficient frontier.

(a)

n

=

2,

I-t

=

(1.1,

1 .2)' and r: = diag(l0- 2 , w- 1 ),

(b)

n = 3,

J-l = (1.1,

1.15, 1 .2)' and r: = diag(l0- 4 , w- 3 , w- 2 ).

3.2 Suppose the data for problem (2. 1 1) (with no nonnegativity con­ straints) is augmented by a risk free asset with r = 1.1. Deter­ mine all the efficient portfolios, Xm and draw the two pieces of the efficient frontier in (ap, /-lp) space.

3.3 Suppose r: = diag(a1 , a2 ,

, n. Show

, an) and ai > 0, i = 1, 2,

that on the CML each investor i has holdings proportional to

- r J-t· -�-- ,
- r
J-t·
-�-- ,

(Ji

i

= 1, 2,

, n.

Obtain an explicit formula for Xm·

3.4 Consider a universe of two assets. The first asset is risky and has

1.2 and w- 2 , respectively.

an expected return and variance of

The second asset is risk free and has a return of 1.1.

(a)

Find the equations of the two pieces of the efficient frontier.

(b)

Explain your results in part (a) in terms of any assumptions that may or may not have been made.

3.5 Find the SML for each of the problems of Exercise 3.1. Also plot the SML as in Figure 3.4.

3.6 Show that the market portfolio lies on the SML.