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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

Subjects:
MSI (NAVAREA , EGC, NAVTEX)

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


Maritime safety information (MSI) is defined as
navigational and meteorological warnings, meteorological
forecasts, and other urgent safety information of vital
importance to all ships at sea. It may also include
electronic chart correction data.
MSI is promulgated, transmitted, by a variety of means,
using terrestrial and satellite communications. GMDSS
supports three independent systems for broadcasting
MSI:
NAVTEX
Inmarsat EGC system (SafetyNET)
HF Radio Telex (NBDP)
Radio telephony (Safety Messages)
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

The world is divided into 21 Navigational Areas


(NAVAREA) for the transmission of MSI. These are the
same as the Meteorological Areas (METAREA) into which
the earths navigable waters are sub-divided for the
purpose of MSI broadcasting. For each area, a NAVAREA
coordinator is assigned to coordinate the broadcasting of
navigational warnings, and a Meteorological Issuing
Service coordinates the meteorological information
throughout that area.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

21 Different NAVAREAs in the GMDSS System


Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

Metareas

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

The international establishment of this system was created


by the IMO and the International Hydrographic Organization
(IHO), for the collection and distribution of MSI worldwide.
This system is known as the World Wide Navigational
Warning Service (WWNWS).

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


The MSI service is an internationally coordinated
network of broadcast from official Information
Providers, such as:
National Hydrographic Offices for navigational warnings &
chart correction data

National Meteorological Offices for weather warnings and


forecasts
Rescue Coordination Centers (RCCs) for shore to ship
distress alerts

The International Ice Patrol for North Atlantic ice hazards


Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


EGC SafetyNET and FleetNET

CE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

To ensure that the GMDSS Operator knows when to


receive MSI for a given area and subject, many MSI
broadcast are scheduled. All navigational warnings and
meteorological
forecast
are
scheduled,
while
meteorological warnings and distress alerts are
unscheduled broadcasts.

To be sure of receiving a scheduled MSI broadcast, the


receiver
must
be
tuned
to
the
appropriate
channel/frequency/satellite at the specific time.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


A smaller number of MSI messages are transmitted as
unscheduled broadcast. Unscheduled broadcast are sent
out over entire regions to ensure that receiver will not miss
the message. These types of message will set of some
sort of alarm on the unit to alert the operator of the
incoming message.
Not really considered the primary source of MSI. HF MSI
relies on the GMDSS operator to be aware of the time of
transmission and set the equipment to the receive mode
and frequency for the broadcast.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


HF MSI
Unlike the NAVTEX and SafetyNET systems (that have
programmable features so that they can be programmed for
area of operation, type of message desired, and even sub
areas with in a NAVAREA) HF MSI has no such features. It
will receive and print any and all information received. This
means that a receiver left unattended can run through lots of
paper and storage memory in the computer system.
The following eight (8) frequencies have been set up on a
worldwide basis for transmission of HF MSI via NBDP:

4210 kHz
16806.5 kHz

6314 kHz
8416.5 kHz 12579 kHz
19680.5 kHz 22376 kHz 26100.5 kHz
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


SafetyNET
SafetyNET is a service of INMARSATs Enhanced Group
Call (EGC) system. The EGC is a method used to
specifically address particular regions or ships. Its unique
addressing capabilities allow messages to be sent to all
vessels in both fixed geographical areas or to
predetermined groups of ships.
SafetyNET is an international direct-printing satellite based
service for the promulgation of navigational and
meteorological warnings, distress alerts, forecasts, and
other safety messages. It fulfills an integral rile in GMDSS
as developed by the IMO. The ability to receive SafetyNET
service information will be generally necessary for all ships
that sail beyond coverage of NAVTEX.
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


SafetyNET can direct a message to a given geographical
area based on EGC addressing. This is particularly useful
for messages, such as local storm warnings or a ship-toshore distress alert for which it would be inappropriate to
alert ships in an entire ocean region.
Scheduled broadcasts of MSI for a given NAVAREA/
METAREA which is covered by more than one Satellite
Ocean Region are made only by a single designated
satellite. To receive scheduled broadcasts of MSI for that
NAVAREA/METAREA, the terminal must be logged in to
the designated satellite ocean region at the scheduled
time.
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


For a NAVAREA/METAREA which is covered by more than
one satellite ocean region, unscheduled broadcasts such as
distress alert relays and weather warnings, are made by all
the satellites that cover the area concerned.
For example, NAVAREA/METAREA I (the UK) is covered by
three satellite ocean regions. The AOR-W, AOR-E, and the
IOR, but scheduled broadcasts of MSI are only made by the
AOR-E.
The terminal must be logged into the AOR-E to receive the
scheduled broadcasts. If logged into either of the other two
regions, it would not receive the scheduled broadcast, it
would not receive scheduled broadcast of MSI for this area
even if the vessel were located in this region. It would,
however, receive unscheduled broadcasts of MSI.
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

x
x

Selective reception of messages


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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

IMO requires Manual position update every 4


hours

Updating ships position


Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


NAVTEX
NAVTEX is an international automatic direct printing
service for the promulgation of navigational and
meteorological warnings and urgent information to all
ships.

It provides a simple, low cost means for the automatic


reception of MSI by narrow band direct printing
telegraphy.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

The GMDSS makes specific requirements with regard to radio


equipment, and ships must be able to carry out several different
functions, one of which is the ability to TRANSMIT and
RECEIVE Maritime Safety Information (MSI). They are
Navigational reports, Meteorological reports, Weather
Forecasts and Messages of General Importance
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

NAVTEX system could reach up to a distance 400 nm


offshore.
24 NAVTEX stations in one NAVAREA.

The NAVTEX system is allocated three exclussive worldwide broadcast frequencies:


518 kHz
Internatinal NAVTEX channel
490 kHz
used for national broadcasts in local languages
(i.e.: non-English)
4209.5 kHz
allocatedHilmi
forECE
national
NAVTEX broadcasts
GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

The 24 stations are divided into 4 groups consisting of 6


transmitting stations.

Every group is allowed one hour transmission time. (10mins/4


hours).

NAVTEX stations are geographically separated.


Every NAVTEX station has its own identification character (AZ).

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

NAVTEX stations coverage is shown in the ITU List of


Radio Determination and Special Service Stations.

The NAVTEX coordinator in each NAVAREA decides


which MSI messages the system is to broadcast.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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CE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


NAVTEX Stations Worldwide
Experience has indicated that the tentatively required range of 250 to
400 nautical miles can often be attained by transmitted power in the
range between 100 and 1000 W during daylight with a 60% reduction
during night-time.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


Coastguard
Buoyage authority
Electronic Navaids
Offshore Operator
Government dept.
Ship reports
NAVAREA coordinator
National Coordinator

Navigational
warning
co-ordinator

Initial distress
message

SAR
co-ordinator

Ice
Monitoring
meteorologic
al offices

Meteorological
message
coordinator

NAVTEX

coordinator

Transmitter
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

------------------------------------------------------------

ZCZC

B1 B2 B3 B4

Message Origin .
..

NNNN
-------------------------------------------------------------

Building up a NAVTEX message


Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


Examples of station identifiers on the Coast of
Turkey are:

NAVTEX Stations ID. (B1)


NAVTEX
CODE

FREQ.

STANBUL

518 kHz

0030-0430-0830-1230-1630-2030 ENGLISH

SAMSUN

518 kHz

0040-0440-0840-1240-1640-2040 ENGLISH

ANTALYA

518 kHz

0050-0450-0850-1250-1650-2050 ENGLISH

ZMR

518 kHz

0120-0520-0920-1320-1720-2120 ENGLISH

STATION

TRANSMISSION TIME

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

LANGUAGE

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


Examples of station identifiers on the Coast of
Turkey are:

NAVTEX Stations ID. (B1)


NAVTEX
CODE

FREQ.

STANBUL

490 kHz

0010-0410-0810-1210-1610-2010 TRKE

SAMSUN

490 kHz

0000-0400-0800-1200-1600-2000 TRKE

ANTALYA

490 kHz

0030-0430-0830-1230-1630-2030 TRKE

ZMR

490 kHz

0020-0420-0820-1220-1620-2020 TRKE

STANBUL

4209.5 kHz

0200-0600-1000-1400-1800-2200 TRKE

STATION

TRANSMISSION TIME

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

LANGUAG
E

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


NAVTEX Subject Indicators (B2)
ABCDEFGHIJKLVWXYZ-

Navigational warnings
(Can not be rejected)
Meteorological warnings
(Can not be rejected)
Ice reports
Search and rescue information
(Can not be rejected)
Meteorological forecasts
Pilot service messages
Ais messages
Loran messages
Spare
SATNAV messages (related to Satellite navigation)
Other electronic NAVAID messages
Additional navigational messages
(Can not be rejected)
Special services
Special services (possible other languages use)
Special services
Special services
No message
on hand (to confirm there are no new messages)
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University
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-----------------------------------------------------------ZCZC
ZCZC

GA20
GL67
PB68

NETHERLANDS
RIGMOVE. SOUTHERN
COASTGUARD
ORKNEY
NORTHSEA.
ISLANDS
GALE
CHARLES
WARNING
ROWAN
NR.AT
55 180630
54-19N FEB
02-07.7E
LOTHER ROCK RACON 58.44N 02.49W
CANCEL THIS
DOVER
MESSAGE
THAMES
121020
SOUTH
Z FEB 258
OTHER DISTRICTS
TEMPORARILY
NO WARNINGS
OFF AIR

NNNN
NNNN
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


NAVTEX is a component of the WWNWS and is
considered an essential element in GMDSS. Vessels
under these regulations have been required to carry
NAVTEX equipment since 1 August of 1993.
NAVTEX messages are broadcast on a single frequency of
518 kHz, using the English language. Other frequencies
such as 490 kHz were considered for local language
NAVTEX, but due to the extra cost of equipment, local
language is broadcast as a separate station identifier on
518 kHz from the same station.

Plans also call for the use of a HF frequency of 4209.5 kHz


from the same station
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

Nominated station within each NAVAREA transmit on a


time-sharing basis to eliminate mutual interference. All
necessary information is contained in each transmission.
The power of each transmitter is regulated in order to
avoid the possibility of interference between transmitters,
this is known as selective fading. The typical range of a
NAVTEX broadcast is approximately 200-400 nautical
miles.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


All the NAVTEX broadcasts are formatted in the same way.
Each message is preceded with ZCZC, which is the
phasing signal that enables the receiver to decode the
message correctly. A header, consisting of two letters and
two numbers, follows this signal.
Example: DE45
The first letter after the phasing signal indicates the identity
of the transmitter that is sending the message. All
dedicated NAVTEX receivers can be programmed to
receive messages only from selected stations, known as
selective rejection of stations.
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

This is done by indicating to the receiver the letter of the


station(s) they are selected to reject. Stations identified by
the same letter are normally sited far enough apart to
prevent reception of messages from the wrong one, or
having interference between the two. As far as possible,
stations are numbered A to Z going counter-clockwise
direction around each continent.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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What do NAVTEX messages contain?


NAVTEX messages may include (A,B,C etc are called Subject
Indicators and denote the kind of message, eg, A is for
Navigational warnings. The Subject indicators are unique).
Categories A, B, D, & L cannot be rejected form the NAVTEX
receiver.
Category L, may be reject from some receiver, but should not
be.
The receiver can be programmed to reject those categories
that are of little or no concern to the operator.
For example, if the vessel does not have Loran equipment
fitted, messages concerning the Loran system are of little
interest and should be rejected to save on paper. Message
categories A, B, D and L cannot be rejected and will always be
able to receive these messages. This is to ensure that no
important safety, weather, or distress alerts are missed.
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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ZCZC DA52
ISTANBUL TURK RADIO
NAVTEX N/W NR : 126/05
SEA OF MARMARA
MAINTENANCE REPAIRMEN OF THE
UNDERWATER
CABLE WHICH IS AVAILABLE STUDIES WILL BE
CONDUCTED BETWEEN YALOVA AND ERENKOY
(40 4050N 2915 10E 40 50 05N 29 02 75E)
SEA OF MARMARA DURING 25 APR/6MAY 2005
WIDE BERTH REQUESTED
NNNN

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


The two numbers in the message header are the serial
number of each individual message.
If the receiver is left on, it remembers which messages have
been received.
Duplicate messages are not printed in order to conserve on
paper.
Any errors in the reception of the NAVTEX message text will
show up as a * and if an excess amount of errors are
received receiver will give a corrupt message on the
printer.
The corrupt message will be received again on future
broadcast, since the message header will not be stored in
the receiver.
This prevents important information from being missed due
to equipment or propagation problems.
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


NAVTEX receivers are also equipped with an alarm should
SAR type messages be received, this is designed to be reset
manually by the operator. Most Units also have a self-test
facility.
The manufacturers manual should explain its
procedure. This test should be done on a weekly basis and
the results logged.
A majority of NAVTEX receivers employ the use of a thermal
printer for printing the data. This paper is the same material
as the old rolls of fax machine paper. So it is important to
store this paper away from excessive heat or light, which
could dry out the chemicals in the paper. It is always
important to keep a good supply of paper for the NAVTEX
receiver.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


If the NAVTEX receiver should fail, the NAVTEX message
can be copied on a standard Telex (NBDP) terminal with its
receiver tuned to 518 kHz in MOD B COLFEC mode.
Remember that a GMDSS vessel must be able to receive
MSI at all time by one of the three methods (HF MSI,
SafetyNET or NAVTEX).
Some older models of NAVTEX
receiver had the capability to
receive weather faxes as well as
NAVTEX messages. These units
have a switch that would be
turned to select either Weather
fax or NAVTEX
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION


During the Practical Competency of the NAVTEX unit,
you will be required to program the unit for a particular
area.
You will be given an area with a list of stations and
message categories to program into the unit.
Messages may be assigned one of three priorities:
VITAL - for immediate broadcast subject to avoiding any
interference with other transmissions. The next
scheduled broadcast may be delayed to enable
transmission of the VITAL message. The message
number is generally 00.
IMPORTANT - for broadcast at the next available time
when the frequency is unused
ROUTINE - for transmission at the next scheduled slot
Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

VITAL messages are reserved to important distress


messages. Both VITAL and IMPORTANT messages are
normally transmitted in the next time slot. Note that VITAL,
IMPORTANT or ROUTINE is not included in the message,
but just determines how the message is handled at the
transmitting end.

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION

Any question?..

Hilmi ECE GMDSS Instructor Piri Reis University

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