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Volume Six--Cover

Volume Six
"Collected Magic Series."
Compiled By Percy Naldrett,
Associate Member Of Inner
Magic Circle, London.

Portsmouth, October 1925.


HTML version 2002
Jos Antonio Gonzlez
"From quiet homes and first beginning,
Out to the undiscovered ends,
There's nothing worth the wear of
winning,
But laughter and the love of friends."
--Hilaire Belloc.
DEDICATED TO SERVAIS LE ROY
IN ADMIRATION OF HIS MAGICAL
GENIUS

Compiler's Fanfare
Milk-Eau
A Town "Guyed"
A Page of Mystery
A Telescopic Flag Tip
Three Blind Mice
My Card
A Message from Mars
Snap!
"Your Move"
The Coil, the Cocoanut and the
Carnival Cadies
The Divining Cigarette
Penetration
A Domestic Effect
The Thoughtometer
Advertising Blunders
The Silver Shoe

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Volume Six--Compiler's Fanfare

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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Compiler's Fanfarre
Delightful deceivers, and merry magicians all, attend! For six
successive years have I bobbed up, full of energy, eager, willing, and
very urgent for your entertainment; and as I watch you crowding
round this my window, I feel sure I have seen you all before: poring,
delving, scanning, skipping and eagerly searching those
never-to-be-parted-with volumes of Collected Magic--and if I did not
love you more than a little I would surely have tired of the memory of
your faces.
Remember, I beg of you, as you read this book, that one man's meat is
another man's poison, and have hope within you, that you may
discover herein the very item your frousty programme lacks. Believe
me, the age of miracles has not ceased.
And you, critics, reviewers and turnip-munchers, bestir your jaded
parrots in praise of this book, but whether you boom it or burst it,
consider also this: that all the secret subtleties, the cute little, quaint
little moves, the tricks of affectation and of style, all the glory and
delight of accidental discovery, everything in Magic would I readily
relinquish if I could have created the four lines which grace the
fly-leaf of this book; for more potent indeed than Magic are such
accretions or pearls of the mind.
Yours fraternally,

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Volume Six--Milk-Eau

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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"Milk-Eau."
A Surprise Opening Effect.
By J. F. Orrin, A.I.M.C.
Effect-The performer fills a tumbler three-parts full with milk, drinking a
little to prove that it is the real thing. He then places the glass of milk
on a plate and covers it with a cardboard cylinder. Placing one hand
beneath the plate and the other on top of the cylinder, he suddenly
turns the whole lot upside down--then removes the plate and spins the
cylinder on his wand. The glass and milk have vanished. The vanish is
so sudden and unexpected that, if worked as an opening effect, it
cannot fail to make a deep impression on the minds of the spectators.
Method-The apparatus may seem rather formidable considering the simplicity
of the effect, but a good opening trick is worth a little trouble and I
have reason to believe that it is justified in this case. The items
required comprise: a plate, a plate-stand, two tumblers (one faked as
described later) and a cardboard "Ghost" tube.
The plate is unprepared.
The plate-stand is made
of wood, shaped as
illustrated, and is
designed to hold the plate
in a perpendicular
position. One of the
tumblers is unprepared
but the other is faked. In
the first place it is
bottomless; in addition
the inside is covered, to
within about one and a
half inches of the top, with cream coloured paper, which is pasted on;
lastly, sundry stains are painted on the inside of the tumbler, above the
paper, with Chinese white water-colour paint. One of these stains
comes right up to the top of the tumbler. At a distance of a few feet
this fake cannot be distinguished from a tumbler of milk from which

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Volume Six--Milk-Eau

someone has just taken a drink. See Fig. 2. It looks very real indeed
and it is no exaggeration to say that I have been taken in by my own
fake more than once.
The last item--the "ghost" tube,
will be familiar to most readers.
The illustration, Fig. 3, shows
that it is composed of two tubes;
the space between them is just
large enough to take the faked
tumbler comfortably.
Preparation and Working-The faked tumbler is placed on
the table on the performer's
right, immediately in front of a
black art well. The plate-stand,
containing the plate, is stood in
front of the fake, thus hiding it
from the audience. See Fig 1.
The tube stands on the table to
the right of the plate. On another table is the ordinary tumbler and a
small jug of milk.
The

performer enters, picks up the tumbler and fills it three-parts with


milk. He then drinks a little, thus making a stain on one side of the
tumbler, to correspond with the fake. Taking the tumbler of milk in his
right hand he walks over to the table containing the plate. He then
deliberately drops the tumbler into the well, immediately afterwards
permitting his right hand to rest on the faked tumbler behind the plate;
at the same time he picks up the plate with his left hand. As far as the
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Volume Six--Milk-Eau

spectators are concerned he has simply placed the glass of milk on the
table.
After calling attention to the plate, the performer picks up the faked
tumbler, places it on the plate and covers it with the cylinder, first
showing the inside of the latter to the audience. He then places his left
hand under the plate and his right hand or} top of the cylinder.
It will be observed that up to the present the performer has done
nothing which could possibly give rise to suspicion. The dnouement
is swift and startling. The performer, as quickly as he possibly can,
turns the whole apparatus upside down, removes the plate and places it
on the table, takes the cylinder in his left hand, picks up his wand in
his right, and finally spins the cylinder on his wand. This last can be
done quite easily as the faked tumbler is jambed in between the two
walls of the "ghost" tube.
It is as well that, until the dnouement is reached, the performer's
movements should be as leisurely as possible; this considerably adds
to the surprise.
Patter and Working Notes-"Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. For my first experiment I use a
glass of milk. (Pour milk into tumbler.) I am going to drink a little,
just to prove that it really is milk--or at any rate, as near as we can
expect to get to it in these enlightened times. As I am rather nervous
this evening, it is quite possible that I shall choke, but if that should
happen I want it to be distinctly understood that it is not part of the
trick. However, here goes! (Drink a little milk and make a wry face.)
Yes, that's milk all right--milk-eau in fact--with the accent on the
eau--eau being French for water. (Drop glass of milk into well and
pick up plate.)
"I also use this plate. Quite an interesting piece of old china. I've had it
ever since it was a saucer. Oh yes, and this cylinder, too. This is just a
piece of nothing with itself all round it.
"Now I would like you to watch very carefully. First of all I place the
glass of milk on the plate and then I cover it with the cylinder, so.
Now we come to the trick--well really it's a sort of puzzle. The puzzle
is to remove the glass of milk without anyone seeing me do it I will do
it by numbers. One! (turn plate, etc., upside down). Two! (remove
plate and place on table.) Three! (show cylinder and twirl it on wand.)
--and it's gone!"
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Volume Six--A Town "Guyed"

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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A Town "Guyed."
By Sydney Carton, M.I.M.C.
This little experiment proves a pleasant opening item where conditions
will not permit of fine work which may need elbow room and much
preparation.
It is intended to precede a slate or blackboard effect.
The conjurer's table is set with the prettiest chocolate box to be found.
The size of this is dependent solely upon the size of the cards or views
which are utilised in the effect. To complete the conquest of the
audience the box is tied with a jazz ribbon, the long ends of which
hang down in front of the table.
The performer enters with a pair of property field glasses slung around
his neck, and a number of large size photographs or views of London
(or his own town) and a slate under his arm. If a blackboard is used in
place of the slate that should be further to his left from table and have
its back to the audience. A small piece of chalk is also necessary. The
only preparation needed is for the six or eight (ten at most) views
which figure as principals in the piece, to be tied in a known order,
and face out, to the bottom of the chocolate box, and for the box to
stand on its edge with top toward the audience.
It follows from the presentation that the bottom of the chocolate box is
slightly larger, all round, than the views, and the tying of the ribbon
needs care in order that at a certain stage in the trick a pull with the
right hand draws it gently clear, allowing the additional views to fall
on top of those already shown to the audience.
Presentation-"Ladies and gentlemen, as every prominent man has said at some time
during his career, (exhibit the views casually) 'My views are well
known to you all.' Allow me to present my own guide to London--or
how to lose your way in five minutes. (Present the cards to a willing
assistant.) Will you just mix them a bit--the views, I mean, sir. These
are just illustrations from the book of 'Judges.' Thank you, sir;
(performer returns to stage) have you recognised any of them?
Temple Bar, the home of Driped the Traveller; the Home and

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Volume Six--A Town "Guyed"

Colonial, Peck. ham, where your weights are longer and your burdens
lighter. 'Oxton--the Bovril Estate, with the aitch silent as in the
bone,--they are all there.
"Whatever shortcomings I may have I am not like the disappointing
lover who had a past, a future, but no (indicate box) present. (Pick up
box and shake it.) I thought it was Fuller.
"What I propose to do (hold cards, faces away from audience, in left
hand, pick up box with right hand, placing the box on lop of the cards
and bringing all into register with the fingers) is to prove the power of
the Wizard's Vision. (Place box and views flat on table and withdraw
ribbon.) If we place the cards face downwards in this box and replace
the lid, normal vision will not be able to reveal the order in which the
cards are now (remove lid with right hand and box with left hand and
on word 'now' point with latter towards cards on table) but given the
possession of such admirable aids to vision as these glasses, it is a
matter of ease. (Place cards into box and replace lid.) Into the box go
the cards, on with the motley, and now for the' magic. As Goethe
sagely remarked, 'Two Bocks make one hic' --but here we have only
one box--which is singular. Perhaps you will be so good as to 'Carry
the Board' --only cardboard in this case--sir, and I will get my
witching eyes to work."
Performer now goes through business of looking through the field
glasses, to the accompaniment of interjections, and probably
suggestions from the audience. He will also write upon the slate or
blackboard, with the chalk, a correct list of the first six or eight cards,
as he' knows them to be.
"Everything looks very foggy--ah, that's better. Take your thumb
away, sir, it blocks the view. It's coming through--I get an impression
of a building; two steeples. That must be Cardinal Wolsey's place.
Where they make the cardinals, I should ,say. The second one--how
dark it is. Just an empty space, lit by gas--Houses of Parliament. In the
front of the next one I see a stoney, a stoney-it's a stone with writing
on it; wait a bit, I have it, What we have we'll hold--Admiralty or the
Stock Exchange. And the next is, yes the next is masts and
spars--mostly spars--National Sporting Club. Now for another, and
don't wobble, sir, it makes everything look like a monument to St.
Vitus; good, here it comes. It is that place Nelson has turned his back
upon, where they run the Grand National. Anyway it says 'Way in.'
"Now, sir, apart from the fun I have written here the names of several
of the cards in the box, in the order you will find them. May I trouble
you to take off the lid and look at the first card? Thank you. I believe
you will find it to be Westminster Abbey. Right! And the next, close

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Volume Six--A Town "Guyed"

handy, the Houses of Parliament, another winner? The third, you will
find to be neither the Admiralty nor the Stock Exchange but
Wandsworth Gail. Good, I recognised it at once. Fourth, the spars are
really those of the London Docks, or one of them. Pardon, I'm wrong?
What is the picture then--the Old Bailey? Well that is one of the
London Docks, isn't it? Lastly, although I could go much further, the
National Gallery. Right again, and many thanks for your kindly help."
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Volume Six--A Page of Mystery

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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A Page of Mystery.
By Herbert Milton M I.M.C.
The following problem will, 1 think, appeal to those magicians who
have a liking for novelties slightly different from the usual run of
standard effects. The problem itself is fairly simple to work, and is
equally effective in the drawing-room as on the concert stage.
Effect-A book consisting of upwards of 250 pages is handed out for
examination. A spectator chooses a page at random by the simile
expedient of thrusting a paper knife in between the leaves as the latter
are riffled by the conjurer. The book is opened at this place and the
spectator is requested to call aloud the number of the page selected
(left hand side). A note is made of this. The book is then closed in full
view of everyone, and an elastic band placed around it, and without
any exchange whatsoever, handed to a second spectator for safe
keeping. A picture frame is now shown to be empty, wrapped in a
handkerchief and placed in some conspicuous place. The spectator
holding the book is requested to remove the elastic band and to turn to
the selected page. Upon examination however, he finds the greater
part of the page missing, only a torn and jagged edge remaining. Upon
unwrapping the frame a torn page is found inside. This is removed
from frame and found to be the missing page. As a final proof the
page is fitted back into the book and the two torn edges found to
coincide exactly.
Requirements-A fair sized book containing about 250--800 pages. When selecting
the book, choose one with rather thick leaves and with the edges of the
leaves as even as possible, for a reason which will be apparent later.
Select a leaf roughly about a third of the way through the book. With a
sharp pair of scissors carefully trim off a thin narrow strip from the
side edge of this leaf, making the latter a trifle 'narrower than the
remainder. It will now be found
by experiment, that upon riffling the leaves of the book, the narrow
leaf can always be located and a "break" held, in just the same manner
as with a "short" in a pack of cards.
Next, presuming the number of this narrow page (left hand side)is 92,

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Volume Six--A Page of Mystery

with a very fine pen and a little printer's ink, carefully fake this
number to read 192. Page 93 must be similarly treated to read 193,
being the right hand page when book is opened at this place. The
genuine page 192, is now torn right out from the book, leaving just a
jagged edge behind for the purpose of identification at the end of the
problem. The page is removed and then concealed in a large sand
frame, which is, of course, familiar to every magician.
A large handkerchief, paper knife, and an elastic band large enough to
encircle the book, complete the list of requirements.
Working-The book is handed out for examination. This may be done with
absolute safety, as at this stage of the proceedings the audience are not
aware of what is going to happen. The paper knife is then, given to a
spectator, preferably a lady, to hold. Performer then takes book, turns
cover right back, and riffles the leaves of the book with his right hand,
at the same time requesting the lady to insert the. knife anywhere she
pleases. The narrow page is thus forced in much the same way as
forcing the "short" in a pack of cards. The book is opened at this place
and the lady requested to call aloud the number of the page selected,
the performer casually pointing to the left-hand page so that no
mistake is made. The book is then closed in full view, the elastic band
placed around it for the sake of effect, and it is handed to a gentleman
seated a little distance away for safe keeping.
The frame is now shown empty, wrapped in the handkerchief in the
usual way, and placed in. some conspicuous place.
Little further explanation is necessary; upon the gentleman opening
the book, the selected page has naturally vanished. The frame is now
unwrapped and the torn page is discovered. This is removed and found
to fit the book exactly.
There is just one little risk which it is as well to guard against, and that
is the risk of the gentleman accidentally finding the two faked pages
when searching for the selected page. There is very little chance of
this happening of course, as he is not likely to turn to that part of the
book, but as a precaution against this the following ruse will be found
quite satisfactory: lightly cover the blade of the paper-knife with a
little soap. After page has been forced and noted, close the book,
leaving the knife still between the pages. Then remove knife with right
hand, at the same time pressing on the covers of the book with the left
hand; this will naturally cause the two faked pages to stick together
slightly, and so completely hide all traces.
The reproduction of the missing page/may, of course, be varied to suit

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Volume Six--A Page of Mystery

the reader's own ideas; the sand frame is only given here as a simple
example.
Points for Patter-"The other day I happened to call at a booksellers to buy a book. The
bookseller approached me, and after saying what I wanted, suggested
that I should step inside as he had a very good line. I told him I didn't
want a line but I wanted a book. Eventually I chose this one. It's a
mystery story. (The reader is advised to obtain a book with a title
which will give a scope for humour.)
"Upon taking the book home however, I found that as well as being a
mystery story, the book itself was a bit of a mystery--exactly how
much, I propose to show you now. Perhaps, madam, you would be so
good as to look at the book, and see that it is quite an ordinary book
without any preparation whatsoever. Thank you."
When about to pronounce the "magic word," patter somewhat as
follows: "It is only natural, if you want goods to travel from one place
to another, you must have a carrier; well the magic words in this case
are "Carter Paterson!" Tell me sir, did you notice the book getting a
little lighter just then? Well Mr. George Washington, perhaps you will
kindly open the book and turn to the selected page. Oh! it has gone,
leaving only a small portion behind. So far, so good. Now we will try
our luck over here. Ah! this looks like the missing page. Would you
mind just seeing if the page fits the book, yes, it fits exactly"
A friendly printer will be able to match the figures and stamp the extra
figure in by hand in a very few minutes.
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Volume Six--A Telescopic Flag Tip

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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A Telescopic Flag Tip


By Percy Naldrett, A.I.M.C.
Almost every conjurer will have experienced trouble with the popular
throw out flag staves; either the flag tears away at the eye-lets, or the
eye-lets themselves get sheared off in re-closing a tightly jambed
stave. I hit upon a very simple but effective method which entirely
eliminates this trouble. At the same time I would not have considered
this tip important enough for inclusion in this book but for the fact that
more than one conjurer has commented upon it as being one of those
things which a practical conjurer appreciates. It has served me well.
First remove all the usual eye-lets except one at the end of the first
section--that is, about 8in. from the butt end. Next sew a strong piece
o[ black tape along the edge of the flag (which [ hope is a good clean
silk one). Fasten the top end of the flag to the top of the extended
stave, with good. strong macram thread. Lay the flag along the staff
and connect the bottom corner of the flag to the eye-let on the butt by
means of good elastic, adjusting it so that the tension of the elastic
keeps the flag from sagging. Close the stave, pleat the flag in the usual
way, pleat again the reverse way, finishing with a couple of rolls to
make a compact cylindrical package, and secure with a strip of black
tissue paper, place butt in vest pocket and trust that it "will be all right
on the night."
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Volume Six--Three Blind Mice

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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Three Blind Mice.


By Will Blyth, M.I.M.C.
(As presented by the author at the Magic Circle Children's
Entertainment.)
This is a suitable item for a children's show. The story is familiar to
all, and there should be no difficulty in maintaining the interest of
children of alt ages throughout the presentation.
Effect-Three mice, cut from brown, white, and blue papers respectively, have
their tails severed. The mice, together with their separated tails, are
placed in a box. When removed, each tail is found attached to a mouse
of another colour. These are then placed into a cylinder, and when
finally removed, each tail is found restored to the mouse
corresponding to its colour.
Requirements-Nine mice with long tails,
as illustrated in Fig. 1.
Three of these are cut from
brown paper, three from
white paper, and three
from blue paper. One set
of mice have their tails cut
off and stuck on again to
different colours; thus the
brown mouse has a blue
tail, the white mouse has a
brown tail, and the blue
mouse has a white tail.
Two methods for changing
articles, such as the
Changing Card Box; Changing Bag; Handkerchief Globe, etc. I use a
Handkerchief Changing Cylinder (divided diagonally with a partition),
and Wilford Hutchinson's Doll's House Changing Box.
A large property carving knife as shown in Fig 2 is also required. This
is cut from stiff cardboard. The blade is covered with silver paper and

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Volume Six--Three Blind Mice

the handle with black paper.


Preparation-The set of mice with the transposed tails is concealed under the spring
flap of the Doll's House. One set of mice (brown, white, and blue) is
placed in one end of the handkerchief cylinder; the remaining set of
mice is displayed upon the conjurer's table, together with the loaded
changing devices and the wand.
Presentation-The three mice are shown, and the old thyme sung by the children. A
girl assistant from the audience cuts off the tails with the carving
knife. They are placed in the "Cottage Hospital" to have their tails
mended. A new verse is now sung or recited by the performer, and
when the mice are taken from the "Cottage Hospital" they are found to
have had the tails fixed in the wrong colours. The three mice are then
placed in the "Magician's Castle" (the handkerchief cylinder) and are
finally taken from it with their tails properly restored.
Patter-"Boys and girls, we are now going to sing together a little musical
rhyme which I daresay most of you have sung at some time or another.
You and I will sing it as a duet, with pianoforte accompaniment, that
is of course provided our pianist is able to play the music. (Pianist
plays the opening bars.) That's the idea! Now then, boys and girls, all
together! (Performer conducts with wand.)
Three blind mice! Three blind mice!
See how they run! See how they run!
They all run after the farmer's wife,
She cut off their tails with a carving knife,
Did you ever see such fun in your life
As three blind mice!
"Splendid! I think we did that very well, don't you? (Performer claps
hands applaudingly.) Having sung the pathetic words I am going to
show you how it is possible to make the mice 'live happily ever
afterwards' as the fairy stories say. Now the song gives us three
characters: the mice, the farmer's wife, and the carving knife. Firstly
then, here are the three blind mice, with their little tails all complete.
(Hold up the three paper mice by their tails.) I may hold the mice up
like this, but a little boy told me the other day that you must not hold a
guinea pig up by its tail, or its eyes would drop out.
"Here is the formidable tail-cutting knife. I have not brought a farmer's
wife with me, so I shall have to borrow one. Would any little girl mind
assisting me by acting for a time as the farmer's wife? Thank you.
Please take the carving knife and he very careful not to cut your

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Volume Six--Three Blind Mice

fingers.
"Here are the three mice. (Performer holds mice between both hands
so that the tails may be easily cut.) Now don't be faint-hearted, but like
a good little farmer's wife, cut the tails off the three blind mice. Oh,
how cruel! I don't mean that you are cruel, dear, I mean how cruel of
the song to leave those poor blind and tailess mice to fight their way
through this hard, cold, catty world in that condition, and without
arranging for a doctor to mend their little tails. I therefore propose to
send them to the cottage hospital for tail-less mice. Here it is. (Show
Doll's House to be empty.)
"Now the poor mice enter the hospital, followed by their tails. Now
that they are safely inside I will close the sliding roof. (Shut roof and
release spring flap). Now there is a very clever doctor who attends
this hospital; his name is Dr. Wand, and here he is. (Hold up wand.)
Dr. Wand now applies his healing powers. While the healing process
is taking place, I will sing you another verse that will suit the present
occasion.
Three blind stumpy mice!
Three blind stumpy mice!
Poor little things! Poor little things!
Away to the hospital all of them run
Where the Doctor stuck on their tails with gum,
So now they are pleased and get plenty of fun,
Those three blind mice.
"Now we will see whether Dr. Wand has been able to mend their tails.
(Conjurer opens Doll's House and produces the mice with the mixed
tails.) Dear me, this is most unfortunate. Here is Brownie with Bluie's
tail, Whitie with Brownie's tail, and Bluie with Whitie's tail. However,
I will try to put matters right. This is a magician's castle (Show
handkerchief cylinder) which you see is now empty. The mice can go
in there, and we will shut the door. (Place lid on cylinder.) Now a
touch with the magician's wand, and we will open the door again.
(Reverse the cylinder and remove the other lid.) Here are the three
blind mice with their proper tails, and as our song says-"So now they are pleased and get plenty of fun,
Those three blind mice."
I have not gone into detail as to the construction of the Changing Box
and Handkerchief Cylinder as both are stock accessories and will be
familiar to any well read magician. It is not in every conjurer's ability
to successfully present magic to very young children, but "Story
Magic" will be found a great help as the youngsters are certainly
familiar with the Legends and Rhymes; their imagination, too, is fresh
and responsive. Those magicians who have not yet ventured in "Story
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Volume Six--Three Blind Mice

Magic" would do well to give the foregoing a trial.


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Volume Six--My Card

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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"My Card"
A Giant Card Effect
By Rupert Howard, A.I.M.C.
Effect-The performer asks two members of the audience to assist him, one
being asked to stand on the left and the other on the right. The
conjurer now picks. up a pack of giant cards, and asks the assistant on.
his right to take one. (The card is not forced.) He now hands the pack
to the assistant on his left, giving him half to hold in each hand.
Turning his back to the audience he asks the chooser of the card to
hold it up so that everyone in the room or hall, except the conjurer, can
see it. The chooser is now requested to place his card on top of the pile
of cards held in the other assistant's left hand. This assistant now
places the other pile of cards on. top of the chosen card, and squares
up the pack.
The performer hands a stick of charcoal to the. drawer of the card, and
asks him to trace in the air with it the words: "MY CARD," at the
same time. thinking hard of the chosen card. After this has been done
the other assistant is asked to run through the pack till he reaches the
chosen card; on doing so he finds the card, on which the words MY
CARD are written in large letters. If desired the chosen card may be
initialed at the start of the effect, as the actual card which was-freely
taken is the card on which the writing appears.
Working-This effect
depends on a
fake made of thin
sheet tin, cut in
the words, MY
CARD. The front
of it is painted
black, while the
back, on which
three needle
points are
soldered, is coloured to match the backs of the giant cards used. At the
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Volume Six--My Card

commencement this fake is on top of the pack where it is not


noticeable. The card is now freely chosen. The performer then puts the
top half of the pack into the assistant's left hand, and the other half into
his right hand. When the card is to be returned to the pack the conjurer
takes care that it is placed on the cards in the assistant's left hand, and
so on top of the fake. The trick has now been effected, and it only
remains to carry out the business with the charcoal, and then to
disclose the writing.
Since I designed the above method of working, my friend, Mr. Eric P.
Wilson, has suggested the use of a fake consisting of two cards stuck
together. Before they are fastened together a stencil is cut from one,
and this stencil is pasted on the other. The stencil, of course, is of the
words MY CARD. Needle points are fixed in the stencil, and the
working is the Same as in the other method.
As to the Giant Cards, those known as the "Jumbo Cards" are
recommended as besides being of fairly stiff substance one gets the
advantage of a full pack of fifty-two and the Joker.
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Volume Six--A Message from Mars

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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"I am Sir Oracle, and, when I open my lips,
let no dog bark."
--Merchant of Venice, Act 1, Sc. 1.

A Message from Mars


By Louis Nikola
Novelties in Magic may be segregated into three classes: successes,
failures, and the ones between. The successes are claimed by some
other fellows and torn to shreds in the struggle for possession, the
failures are hastily pushed back into obscurity as something not to be
mentioned in polite society, and the others are put aside for further
consideration, pigeon-holed like a Government Enquiry or reverently
interred in the bottom of a trunk with the mental epitaph. "Gone, but
not forgotten."
This is one of my betweens.
The apparatus consists of a light wooden frame suspended by two
cords. The frame is double; that is to say it consists of two frames
hinged together, and carries two sheets of glass with a thin sheet of
White card between. The frame is taken down, opened, the various
parts shown, replaced, re-hung, and covered with a sheet of
newspaper. A selection, is made by the audience of a question from a
so-called "Book of Fate," and a frivolous reply subsequently appears
upon the white card between the glasses.
Two points have to be explained: the appearance of the writing and the
method of controlling the choice of the question.
As to the first, a combination is made of two known devices,
producing together a more convincing effect than is attained by the
use of either alone. To conveniently put them into effect some
peculiarity in the construction of the framework is necessary. The
dimensions may be varied to suit individual requirements, but here are
the exact measurements of my own frame, the size of which was
designed to fit easily in the bottom of a suitcase.
The outside measurements of each frame are 18-1/8in x 12-1/2in.
Each frame is 3/8in. thick, 3/4in. in all. Each frame is rebated inside to
hold the glasses, and the peculiarity is merely a difference in the size

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Volume Six--A Message from Mars

of the openings. The opening of one frame, which we will call the
front, is 16-3/8in. x l0-3/4in. This is rebated to take two pieces of
glass, 16-7/8in. x 11-1/4in. The opening of the other frame is 16-1/8in.
x 10-1/2in. and is rebated to take one piece of glass 15-5/16in. x
10-11/16in.
As, at first sight, all this may convey to the reader only an
uninteresting complexity of figures, it may be explained,
parenthetically, that the gist of the whole thing is that provision is
made for a certain flap, hereinafter detailed, to take up a position
inside and outside the name, in turn.
Two sheets of glass, 16-7/8in. x l l-1/4in. and a sheet of thin white
card or stiff paper of the same size complete the acknowledged parts
of the apparatus. Upon one side of the card is written in exaggerated
script, with charcoal, crayon, or brush and ink, the message to be
produced.
There is an
additional part
which
although seen,
the spectators
are not
conscious of.
It takes the
form of a flap
fake, and is
made by
cutting a third
piece of glass
15-5/16in. x
10-11/16in.
This piece of glass is preferably of the kind known as white opal, but
in lieu thereof a piece of common glass Painted white upon one side
and its edges, will Serve. Upon one side of the opal glass, or upon the
painted side of the Substitute, a piece of newspaper is pasted and
trimmed neatly to the edge. The size of this is such that it will lie
within the rebate of the frame having the smaller opening, which, as
the apparatus hangs, is the back, or inside the actual opening of the
frame having the larger, and designated the front.
The two frames are hinged together at H H (see sketch), are fastened
with a side hook and pin at F, and are provided with screw-eyes at E
E, by means of which they are attached to hooks depending from the
suspension rod.

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Volume Six--A Message from Mars

The method of procedure to hide and reveal the writing is as follows:


the apparatus is set by laying first one sheet of glass in the rebate in
the front of the frame, then the written card, writing uppermost, next
the second sheet of glass, and then the flap, newspaper-covered side
down. The frame is then closed up and fastened, and presents from
both sides the appearance of clear glass with white paper behind. This
is suspended in readiness for presentation. When taken down, it is
shown on both sides, then opened, all the glasses removed together
and laid upon an open newspaper (consisting of at least three sheets)
placed in readiness upon the table, with the fake undermost.
The parts are then shown separately and replaced in the following
order: first the frame, then a sheet of glass; next the written card. This
lies with the writing downwards and a trifling manipulation, being the
second of the two devices used to complete the deception, comes into
play. The card is lifted with the fingers of one hand above and the
thumb beneath, from the edge nearest the operator; by a simultaneous
twist of the wrist and raising of the forearm the card is lifted and by a
reversal of the same double movement is lowered again on to the first
sheet of glass just transferred from the table to the frame, without
turning the card.
To an uncritical observer this gives an impression of a view of both
sides, which is confirmed by the apparently same view before and
after the dissection and re-assembling of the frame. Upon the top of
the card is placed the second sheet of glass and the frame is closed and
fastened.
The frame is then lifted from the table and casually shown on both
sides; as the fingers of each hand are placed beneath the frame to
grasp it by the ends, the flap left lying upon the newspaper is lifted
also and pushed into the opening of the front of frame, to temporarily
cover the writing. The frame is then laid down for a moment and lifted
again in such a way as to expose the back only, leaving the flap upon
the table. Then the frame is attached to the suspension hooks, the
written side to the rear. Two sheets of newspaper are removed from
beneath those lying on the table; one is hung over the frame and the
other left upon the top of the fake, which is thus completely shielded
from observation or left in readiness for bodily removal at a later
period.
To reveal the writing all that remains to be done is to revolve the
frame at the points of suspension, under cover of tearing down the
newspaper, and to facilitate this, the screw-eyes E E, are placed about
an inch above the exact centre of the ends, so that normally the frame
hangs with the "front" exposed. At the time of hanging, just prior to
covering, it is inverted and reversed, and is temporarily held in that
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Volume Six--A Message from Mars

position by a thread connecting the two suspension cords and shown


by the dotted line in the sketch.
In the interval between the covering of the frame and the exhibition of
the message, the audience is permitted the choice of a question which
shall be reasonably consistent with the answer in readiness. To this
end a book is prepared, of from 150 to 200 pages, and purporting to be
"Napoleon's Book of Fate." It is indeed based upon the interesting
pamphlet published under that name, subject to such chicanery as will
convert it into a tool for yet another unreliable oracle. Each page is
numbered and each page carries one question.
The questions and their numeration run thus:-1. What is the aspect of the seasons, and what political changes are
likely to take place?
2. Inform me of any or all particulars which relate to the woman I
shall marry.
3. Will the prisoner be released or continue captive?
4. Shall I have to travel by land or sea, or to reside in foreign
climes?
5. Shall I be involved in litigation, and if so, shall I gain or lose
my cause?
6. Shall I make or mar my fortune by gambling?
7. Shall I attain a good old age?
8. Shall I be eminent and meet with preferment in my pursuits?
9. Will it be my lot to experience great vicissitudes in this life?
10. Does my dream portend good luck or misfortune?
11. Inform me of all particulars relating to my future husband.
12. Do the married live longer than the single?
13. Will my reputation be at all or much affected by calumny?
14. Shall I live long?
15. Shall I ever be able to retire from business with a fortune?
16. Will the curate's sermon be longer than the vicar's?
17. Shall I ever find a treasure?
18. Shall I have many children?
19. Shall I die young?
20. Shall I ever recover from my present misfor- tunes?
21. Do married people live longer than single ones?
22. How many children shall I have?
23. After my death will my children be virtuous and happy?

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Volume Six--A Message from Mars

24.
25.
26.
27.

Will my beloved prove true in my absence?


Shall I have a large family?
Shall I live to an old age?
What shall I have for supper?

These twenty-seven questions are then repeated is the same or in


changed order throughout the book. Some it will be found are but
paraphrases of others, and other groups though different in substance
are agreeable to the same reply. The greater number are of literary
interest only and are, in their present application, mere padding and to
give a specious appearance to the "Book of Fate."
Four message cards may be prepared for alternative use:--

"Only the good die young."


which is the answer to 7, 14, 19, 26, and their repetitions under
subsequent numbers.

"No, it only seems longer."


is the answer to 12, 16, 21, and repetitions.

"Never meet trouble half way."


is the answer to 2, 18, 22, 25, and repetitions.

"Wait and See!"


answers 6, 20, 23, 27, and repetitions.
A bag of counters is used in conjunction with each message, bearing
all the numbers of its related questions and their repetitions.
The book is handed to one person and a second person is invited to
choose a numbered counter, openly exposed on a plate. The number is
announced, the corresponding question is turned up in the book and
read out. The frame is uncovered, the answer is revealed and le voila!
For the guidance of those who find the arrangement of patter an
obstacle, here is a basis to work upon. It is not offered as a finished
product, but merely as a suggestion. Perfect patter is developed rather
than written and it must be developed in accordance with the
requirements of manipulation and the personality of the performer,
and of necessity undergoes revision from time to time until matured.
Patter-"The development of wireless has led to speculation upon the
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Volume Six--A Message from Mars

possibility of communication between planets, and already we hear of


efforts to signal from the Earth, and of unusual disturbances which,
being unaccountable, are attributed to Mars. Aided by the researches
of Marconi and fortified by the enterprise of Woolworth's, I have
constructed an elaborate apparatus in sixpenny parts for the purpose of
receiving messages. This is it; a wooden frame conveniently holds the
components. A sheet of glass, a sheet of paper, and another sheet of
glass. Nothing to get out of order--unless the glass gets bent. These are
simply and securely put together in the frame, the paper between the
glass, so that you can see clearly from both sides, while the paper is
completely insulated from outside forces. As no force will come from
anywhere else, it is reasonable to assume that it will come from Mars.
It is a scientifically established fact that if you eliminate the
impossible, whatever is left, however improbable, is it, unless it can be
proved to be something else.
"This is a sort of aerial. When the frame is hung up, it remains in
suspense, awaiting any awful possibility. To avoid shock I cover it
with a sheet of newspaper. The choice of a paper needs discretion.
Never use a Sunday paper.
"One would naturally expect a world so distant and different from our
own to benefit us by unusual knowledge. There is a record of a lady
who visited Mars in the spirit and returned to earth with a design for a
new blouse. It differed from other blouses in the flounce not being
tucked into the trousers, and is now known as a jumper. I have
discovered that the principal industry of the Martians, apart from
blouses, is fortune-telling, and Mars being outside the jurisdiction of
the London County Council, now is an excellent opportunity for any
anxious enquirer to put a test.
"This is the book of words. There are nearly two hundred pages of
questions, compiled from the original "Napoleon's Book of Fate"--but
you mustn't ask anything that is not in the book--that is, not in public.
To be quite impartial, the question shall be a matter of chance. Here
are a number of numbered counters; that is, counters with numbers on
them. Just look them through to be sure it's a genuine assortment--no
duplicates or common continental varieties as the advertisements of
sixpenny packets of rare postage stamps say. Then take one, but like
cake, don't take more than one piece at a time. What number, sir?
Twenty-three! Now turn up question No. 23 in the book and read it,
please.
"'After my death will my children be virtuous and happy?' No sooner
is the question spoken, if only in a whisper, than the reply comes
straight from Mars, with all the precision and the discretion of any
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Volume Six--A Message from Mars

"Wait and See!"


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Volume Six--Snap!

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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"Snap."
By Frank Staff M.I.M.C.
Brevity, dash, snap, eclat. That is what you require now-a-days.
Effect: Nothing in this hand, nothing in that hand; blazing fire bowl!
Pass hand over fire bowl, it disappears (the bowl) and rabbit takes its
place. Clap hands and complete vanish of rabbit. Requirements: Two
hands, fire bowl, rabbit, one yard of elastic, and a reel of black thread;
and as for the explanation, I leave it to you partner. Things are made
much too easy for the present day conjurers. Think it out, Mr.
Compiler, and write to me.
Cards, eggs, and silk handkerchiefs have no part in my short
dissertation. Gone are the days of the two hours' conjuring
entertainment, at least I think so; and the average one hour's show is
apt to pall, unless a ventriloquial figure is introduced at half-time, and,
believe me, even with this break, an hour's entertaining show requires
(pardon me Mr. Compiler) a bit of wangling. When the intelligent
conjurer recognises this fact, he will probably introduce a short
display of paper tearing. This will get the conjuring portion down to
about twenty-five minutes, and as opinions have been expressed that
fifteen minutes of conjuring is about as much as a present day
audience will reasonably stand, what about ten minutes with a sheet of
drawing paper, an easel, and a few words on the manners and customs
of the Cow (also pronounced "Coo," in the North of England; and I
once heard it referred to as "Kah," during a domestic argument
between two ladies residing at Hoxton).
However, I am forgetting my excellent beginning. Snap! That's the
key-note. Snap! I talk too much. I would love to be a real silent, or
rather a silent, real conjurer. I did try once for a wager, and one of
these days you will hear about it. "Reminiscences of Frank Staff,"
book 3, chap. xx., para. 5. You wait. Talking of Snap reminds me of a
story related some years ago by a dramatic author. "Laddie," he said,
"the day of the five act melodrama is over. Snap is what the people
want: Chord from orchestra. Curtain up. Biff, biff, biff. Five minutes
chord. Curtain. Snap! Here's my idea for a One Act Drama. Listen! I'll
tell it to you. Play opens with a man and woman, in a private room of
hotel, seated in a large arm chair and caressing. Enter suddenly, a

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middle-aged man, with umbrella and suit case. Exclaims, 'My wife!'
(Picture--hold it for three seconds.) Husband drops umbrella and
produces automatic pistol. Two shots ring out. He has killed them
both. Taking out spectacles and placing them where they will do most
good, he looks about him, gives tragic start, 'Great Scot! I'm in the
wrong room!' Chord. Picture. Curtain. There's snap for you."
Phew, it has made me hot writing about it.
Procure a few sheets of white filtering paper from chemist, and soak
well in a solution of sulphate of iron; any chemist, and
three-pennyworth will suffice. Let sheets dry well, and then lightly
trace on one of them the outline of a Cow, comic or otherwise. The
drawing paper for the easel is now ready. Upon painting the outline
with brush, using a strong solution of tannic acid crystals (colourless
in water) a black outline will appear. Should you desire to elaborate
your drawing, two additional brushes and solutions will be necessary,
namely: phenolphthalein and ammonium hydrate; apply the first, then
the second (both colourless), and you will be able to portray a Cow
with deep red spots. However, the black outline from a glass of clear
water, has quite a good effect and is less trouble.
As to patter; before dealing with the lecturette to be delivered during
the aforementioned period, let me give credit where credit is due, and
the credit, or to be honest, the discredit is not mine. The dissertation
was brought to my notice by an old friend, a short time ago. He was
turning out sundry magazines, and newspaper cuttings, when he
remarked: "Here, Frank, this reads something like the tosh you hand
over to an enlightened audience." I took it with silent dignity, and
having made apology, would Suggest the following as suitable
persiflage.
"Art for Art's sake: on the paper before you, I propose to make a
drawing of any animal suggested by a member of my audience. Your
choice is free. Pigs, elephants, rhino--rhincer--bother! Dogs, cats,
hippo--hip, pip,--dash it; cows, lions, cows, giraffes, wolves, cows,
and Uncle Tom Cobbly and all. A Cow? Thank you, madam. Cows
have four legs, as you will observe as the sketch proceeds. One on
each corner. They are essentially of the land, although they hold a
regatta annually. The cow is a good mother, and will look calfter her
offspring in a loving manner. By the Cow is the milk made. Time will
not permit, otherwise I would draw the milkmaid by the Cow. When a
Cow stumbles against a blade of grass and sprains it's ankle, the
veterinary surgeon provides supports, which are termed acoustics.
Hear, hear. Cows, like conjurers, are restful creatures, and will lie for
hours--on the green sward. Cows are housed in a byre, and sheep in a
pen; thus illustrating an ancient proverb, byre poet whose name has
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Volume Six--Snap!

escaped me: 'The pen is mightier than the sward.' Cows are full of
resource, and even after death will make both ends meat. Many calves
die young, and the reason was revealed to me by our butcher. The
sketch is now complete, ladies and gentlemen, and the curtain will
descend to the popular strains of 'For Heifer and for Heifer.'"
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Volume Six--"Your Move"

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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"Your Move."
By J. F. Orrin, A.I.M.C.
The success of a magical experiment depends largely upon the
element of surprise, and that is the chief feature of the problem I am
about to describe. There is a peculiar satisfaction in suddenly
springing a surprise upon one's audience, and the spectators
themselves are not slow to respond to the performer's efforts in this
direction.
Effect-The performer shows a sheet of cartridge paper and then rolls it into a
tube, securing it with a rubber band. Two white handkerchiefs are
shown and one is pushed through the tube to show "all fair." The other
handkerchief is then pushed through, but emerges dyed black. The two
handkerchiefs, black and white, are next pushed through and they are
seen to have blended in the form of a silk draughtboard. The cartridge
paper is unrolled and shown empty.
While pattering, the performer again rolls up the cartridge paper and
pushes the draught board into one end. Then, suddenly, he stands the
tube on end on the table, and lifts it up, revealing a complete set of
draughts stacked one upon the other. These are afterwards scattered to
show that they are separate, and the tube is shown empty, the draught
board having vanished.
Method-The first part of the problem requires little explanation. A
colour-changing tube is used; this is loaded with three handkerchiefs,
one white, one black, and one chequered. The last mentioned is larger
than the other two and is best made by stencilling black squares on a
white silk.
The production of the draughts is rather more interesting. When I
stated that a complete set of draughts was produced I was not quite
correct. As a matter of fact, when the paper tube is lifted, it reveals a
stack of only eighteen draughts, but the spectators do not have an
opportunity of counting them even if they wanted to, and, anyway, it
is the broad effect that counts.
To make the set of
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draughts it is as
well to enlist the
services of a wood
turner, unless you
are yourself the
proud possessor of
a lathe. First of all,
a cylinder of wood
is turned up. This
should be nine
inches long and two
inches in diameter.
From this cut
thirteen slices, each
half an inch thick. Seven. of these are stained yellow, and the
remaining six are painted black. The rest of the cylinder, which should
be two and a half inches long, is not sliced up, but is hollowed out (see
Fig. 3) and is painted on the outside to represent a pile of five
draughts, three black and two white, arranged alternately.
So much for the draughts.
To enable them to be
loaded into the cylinder,
a tube of cartridge paper
(Fig. 2) is made. It should
be nine and a half inches
long and should fit easily
over the pile of draughts.
Both ends are open, but
two pieces of white
thread are stretched
across one end.
Preparation-The colour-changing tube
is loaded with the
chequered silk, a black
silk, and a white one. It is
placed on the servante of
the table to the
performer's left. The
sheet of cartridge paper
(which should measure ten inches by fourteen) is placed on the table,
slightly over-hanging the rear edge. The right hand rear corner of the
paper should just cover the colour-changing tube.

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To prepare the load of draughts, the fake pile of five draughts is placed
on the table, opening downwards. The loose draughts are piled on top,
first a yellow, then a black, and so on {Fig. 1). When all are stacked
they represent a pile of eighteen draughts, arranged alternately. The
upper-most draught (a yellow one) should be covered with white paper
on its upper side. The paper tube is then placed over the stack and the
whole load is suspended behind table on the performer's right, by
means of two hooks. Perhaps "suspended" is hardly the correct word,
as the hooks should be large enough to enable the load to be rested
comfortably on them. It is important that the open end of the load
should be towards the performer.
Patter and Working Notes-"For my next experiment I use a sheet of cartridge paper. I am always
particular about it being cartridge paper, because then the trick is
bound to go off all right. (Pick up paper and handkerchief tube with
left hand and transfer both to right hand. The tube is concealed by the
paper. The paper is turned up with the left hand to show the other
side, the tube being concealed in the right hand. Lastly, the paper is
rolled up with the tube inside it and secured with a rubber band. The
changing tube must have sufficient room to allow it to slide freely.
incidentally the paper should be rolled the long way.)
"It is a funny thing, but as soon as a conjurer sees a sheet of cartridge
paper he immediately rolls it into a tube and starts pushing things
through it. I will push this white handkerchief through and see what
happens. (Allow fake to drop to bottom of tube and grip it through
paper. Push handkerchief into fake, when it is well in take wand and
push fake upwards till the duplicate handkerchief appears at top of
tube. Remove this and allow fake to drop down the tube again; the
little finger prevents it dropping right out.) You see what has
happened, nothing. I'll try again with this one. (Second silk is pushed
through.) Things are beginning' to look rather black, aren't they?
"Never mind, I'll just push both handkerchiefs in together and see
what happens. Excuse me, sir, I hope you are not bored, you are not
sitting in a draught, are you? I think you must be, for here is a draught
board. (Produce chequered silk and in spreading it on table let fake
slide into well. Show paper empty and then place on right hand table
in readiness for second load.)
"That isn't a bad little trick is it? But, you know some people are never
satisfied. I was performing this at a concert the other evening, yes,
rather a posh affair it was--at Battersea swimming baths, and I made
quite a splash. But there was a gentleman there, very nice but rather
argumentative; he said: 'That's the worst of you conjurers, you never
seem to do anything really useful. What's the good of a draught board
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Volume Six--"Your Move"

without the draughts?' I said, 'Perhaps you are right, sir, but as a matter
of fact, here are the draughts! What more do you want?' He was so
flabbergasted that he forgot to ask me what had become of the draught
board."
During the last portion of the patter the most important move of all has
taken place. The cartridge paper is picked up with the right hand,
together with the concealed load of draughts. The right hand grips the
paper tightly and both paper and load are brought round in front of the
body. This brings the load into view, but only for a second, because
the paper is immediately roiled into a tube again. Moreover, the load is
all white, and the performer is talking all the time. Everything depends
upon the move being performed naturally, and with absolutely no
semblance of hurry; this would be fatal. Bear in mind that the load is
actually exposed for about a second, but owing to the circumstances in
which the move is performed it is not seen. It is a very bare-faced
move and it is this fact which ensures its success.
Having rolled up the paper the rubber band is slipped over the tube,
this time tightly gripping the fake, which should be about the centre of
the tube. The draughts are then permitted to slide gently down to the
bottom of the paper tube. All this time the performer has been
pattering, and has taken the draught board and without special
comment upon it, has pushed it into the paper tube--really into the
cavity in the fake pile of draughts. The tube is then placed upright on
the table and removed with the left hand, leaving the pile of draughts
standing on the table. Some of the draughts are now scattered, and the
paper robe shown empty and thrown on the floor, the "cotton" end of
the fake being away from the audience.
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Volume Six--The Coil, the Cocoanut and the Carnival Cadies

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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The Coil, the Cocoanut and the


Carnival Cadies.
A Concoction for Comedy Conjurers.

By Woodhouse Pitman, M.I.M.C.


The fault, in my opinion, with many effects which come under the
classification of Magical Transpositions, lies in the fact that too many
articles are transposed. This causes confusion in the minds of the
spectators, who are apt in such cases, to lose track of the disposal, or
apparent disposal of the objects used, and, since they cannot remember
where this or that object was put, they cannot be expected to show any
surprise when the various articles are produced from some other
quarter.
In the effect bearing the above title, the objects transposed are of
widely differing kinds, and are limited to two in number, viz.: the
paper ribbon and the cocoanut. As intimated in the sub-title, the effect
is intended to be a comic item,--and, if presented by a performer
blessed with a bright, brisk, and breezy style, it will be found a certain
compound of mirth and mystery.
Effect-Two hats, such as are worn by merry-makers at carnivals, are shown
empty in turn. One is of the top hat shape and the other a clown's
conical hat. From the former a cocoanut is produced, and from the
latter is developed a large quantity of coloured paper ribbon. After this
production, the conical hat (or cone, as I will refer to it in future) is
placed down over the cocoanut, which, after its production, from the
top hat (as I will call it), was placed on a tray. The paper ribbon is
crammed into the top, hat. On taking up the cone the paper ribbon is
found to have travelled to it from the topper, and in; the latter, the
cocanut is again found.
Requirements-A coloured cardboard top hat, not full sized, but: one in the crown of
which the conjurer is just able to conceal a cocoanut. This hat requires
reinforcement if it is to stand wear and tear and the weight of the
cocoanut, One method is to cover the whole affair; inside and out,
with strong fancy material (the more lurid the colours the better). The
hat may be further strengthened by the addition of an extra brim
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Volume Six--The Coil, the Cocoanut and the Carnival Cadies

secured with strong adhesive before the cloth covering is fixed.


The second hat, conical in shape, is approximately fifteen inches high.
This may consist of a tin cone suitably decorated, as being more likely
to bear the brunt of hurried, and it is to be hoped, frequent packing.
The diameter of the mouth of cone and the size of crown of top hat
depend on the size of coils and cocoanuts used, and must be
determined by experiment.
The coils are of the thin coloured type wound hard, of such diameter
that when the mouth of the the cone is pressed down over a coil, the
latter may be picked up safely and secretly by raising the cone. The
centres of most coils are loose, so the loose end is secured with a dab
of adhesive (leaving the smallest possible tab projecting to facilitate
production). If this centre is not secured the coil is apt to begin to flow
immediately the cone is lifted.
The cocoanuts--for, as you will see, two are needed--are about four
inches on the minor axis (if elongated in shape), but, if possible two
practically spherical ones should be found, of about that / diameter. In
any case they must be selected with care, so as to be duplicates as near
as possible. One of them is prepared, a hole being made in the shell
(on the "cud") one and a half inches in diameter. The kernel may now,
with a knife or scoop, and some perseverance, be entirely removed.
The other nut is left intact.
A special tray is required, and may readily be made as follows. A
piece of thin three-ply twelve inches by eight inches forms the base. A
piece of deal, of the same thickness as the coils it is proposed to use,
has two circular holes cut in it, the diameters of the holes being one
eighth of an inch greater than the external diameter of the mouth of the
cone. This piece of wood is glued to the threeply base and an edge
about one inch deep is mitred round and bradded on to the deal base.
One now has a tray having two circular depressions or recesses each
of which will accommodate a coil, the top of which is flush with the
surface of the tray. Between the coil and the side of the recess it is
possible to push down the cone in order to secretly pick up the coil.
The inside of the tray is lined with dark cloth of an "all over" pattern,
care being taken to fit the cloth lining neatly into the sides and bottom
of the recesses. A coat of paint or stain on the remainder of the tray
finishes it.
When the coils are in position in the two recesses they are concealed
by circular pieces of cloth of the same pattern as tray lining; these
pieces are left quite loose, but when neatly in position the tray looks
quite ordinary at close quarters.

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Volume Six--The Coil, the Cocoanut and the Carnival Cadies

The various properties are arranged as follows. The tray, set with its
two concealed coils, is on the table to right of stage. The conical hat,
with the unprepared cocoanut beneath it, stands upright on centre
table. The hollow cocoanut reposes on the servante of centre
table--this sounds ancient--or it may be concealed in any other suitable
position that the ingenuity of the performer suggests.
If the performer begins his series with this item the coloured top hat
can be worn at a jaunty angle at his entrance--in any case it may be
momentarily placed on the head, for the fun of the thing. If the effect
is introduced later in the show, this hat can stand on the table in front
of the other one.
Presentation-This portion of my article I shall confine to a description of the
sequence of moves. No amount of writing will convey the mode or
manner of presentation. Almost the whole of the success depends on
the "atmosphere" which the performer creates; the happy manner,
confident bearing, merry twinkle and infectious gaiety which carry so
many experiments to a Successful conclusion, are more than ever
needed in this one. What could be more melancholy than to see these
few properties, simple as they are, handled in a mirthless manner? The
objects have been specially selected because they are all associated
with events of a jolly character. The hats are the head-gear of the
hilarious, the coloured coils are the rainbow ribbons of revelry, and
the cocoanut suggests all the fun of the fair.
This effect is not for those who wish to be set a profound problem, or
to watch a worried wizard racing round the room having an envelope
initialled here, pieces of paper folded up there, and planting playing
cards everywhere! It is rather for those who would echo the bard:-"With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come!
I'd rather let my liver heat with wine, than my heart cool
with mortifying groans."*
*At it again! (Compiler.)
Begin then with the comical topper. It is not difficult to perform one or
two tricks of the juggling order with this. At any rate your attempts
should prove amusing, and, at the same time demonstrate the
emptiness of the hat. After this preliminary the hat is taken in the left
hand and brought close to conical hat, keeping the brim touching the
table, crown toward the audience. The right hand takes the point of the
cone, which is turned over, away from audience, and as it is
withdrawn, the top hat is dropped simultaneously over the cocoanut.
The conical hat--or cone--is now "tried on" or juggled with, and its
emptiness demonstrated. It is then placed mouth downward on the
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Volume Six--The Coil, the Cocoanut and the Carnival Cadies

prepared tray, being pushed down in fact, over the nearer of the two
hidden coils, some care of course having been taken in the setting of
the tray to ensure the coils being central in the recesses, so that there is
no hitch in pressing the cone down when the time comes. The top hat
is again picked up, the thumb of right hand on the rear portion of brim
and the fingers being pushed underneath. The hat is now turned over,
crown toward audience, the fingers assisting the cocoanut into the
crown, or, rather, keeping it there.
The magician now simulates surprise on discovering something in the
hat, and presently produces the cocoanut; placing the hat crown
downward on the centre table, he allows his audience to satisfy
themselves as to the genuineness of the nut. This done, it is placed on
the tray, or to be exact, on the centre of the second concealed coil. As
you are aware, a coil has a vacant space in the centre, about an inch
across, and this "vacancy," through the loose piece of cloth which
hides the coil, provides a slight concavity which allows the cocoanut
to "stay put" ' and prevents any rolling about on the tray. As the
cocoanut is deposited on the tray, the left hand raises the cone; the
point is turned over toward the audience, keeping the coil concealed
and snugly and safely accommodated in the mouth of the cone.
"Something" is now found in the cone and proves to be an apparently
interminable length of paper ribbon. This is heaped up on the centre
table behind the top hat, and when the coil is exhausted the empty
cone is replaced on the tray, this time being put down over the
cocoanut and therefore over coil number two. It is imperative that this
coil should be a tight fit--in fact both should be--but it has to be
remembered that the next time the cone is lifted, the weight of the
cocoanut has to be raised too, and the more tightly the coil is wedged
into the cone, the safer things will be.
In passing, let me say that there is no need to fear it will be noticed
that the cone enters the recesses on the tray. If the recesses which hold
the coils are put close to the front edge of the tray, the edge itself,
which stands up some five eighths of an inch or more from the surface
of the tray, is ample masking in the case of a drawing room
performance, and in the case of a platform show there is no risk at all,
as the tray is much above eye level.
Going to the centre table, the conjurer proposes to push the pile of
paper into the top hat, and, in gathering up the few loose loops which
have beer} allowed to hang down behind the table, brings up the
concealed hollow nut, which is kept hidden by the mass of paper
ribbon on the table. The whole lot is raised above the hat, and, still
under cover of the paper, the nut is allowed to slide into the hat, hole
uppermost.
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Volume Six--The Coil, the Cocoanut and the Carnival Cadies

The conjurer now crams as much of the paper as possible into the hat,
i.e., into the hollow nut. It will be found that by pressing it down with
the wand as each "bunch" is pushed in, a great deal more can be
accommodated than one would think.
While doing this the performer stands at left side of table, keeping a
few remnants of paper in his left hand level with the hat brim, thus
masking his handiwork. When no more paper can be pushed in, the hat
is exhibited with the last few strands of paper bunched up in opening
of crown of hat, hiding the nut. Then, turning crown toward audience
these last few strands are torn off and the hat laid on the table. The
pieces may be screwed up into a tight ball and a few sleights made,
finally dropping it into profonde or otherwise disposing of it.
The conical hat is now raised and the second coil
developed--presumably the paper just pushed into the hat. This lot of
paper is allowed to heap up on the tray, ready for removal. As the
production nears its end, the cone is gradually brought nearer and
nearer to the new heap of paper, and ultimately the cocoanut is
allowed to slide out to be hidden in the heap; if the underside of the
circular piece of cloth which covered the coil has been coated with a
few criss-crossed strands of coil paper, that too can be allowed to fall
out on the heap, leaving the cone really empty, enabling it to be put
down mouth toward the audience. As a climax the top hat is now
inverted on the hand and lifted by the crown to reveal the cocoanut
which has returned to its original home.
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Volume Six--The Divining Cigarette

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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The Divining Cigarette


By Bretma
At the present time there is a great demand for pocket tricks, and in
the following lines I will describe one which I feel sure will appeal to
all. As most people one meets now-a-days smoke (our Compiler being
one of the exceptions that prove the rule) a trick with a cigarette is
certain to be popular.
Effect-You have a small cardboard tube of such size that it will easily
accommodate an ordinary cigarette; a cap or lid fits on this tube at the
top, and the other 'end is closed, so it is quite impossible for anyone to
see the contents. This tube is handed for examination and the loan of a
cigarette is requested. On receiving the cigarette you also produce one
of your own; this must be of a different make to the borrowed one.
Personally I always carry a variety of cigarettes so that I may be sure
of having two different makes for use in this little problem. There is of
course no question about the borrowed cigarette, and your own will
stand any examination.
You next turn your back and request that either cigarette shall be
placed in the tube and the cap put on. The remaining cigarette is to be
hidden in the spectator's pocket. When this has been done you take the
tube and immediately announce the make or brand of cigarette in the
tube. Both cigarettes are now handed to the lender and as they can be
smoked he will be no Wiser as to your method.
Explanation-The packet of cigarettes which you carry are faked ones. You also
have a very tiny magnetic compass to which is soldered a small clip,
enabling you to attach it to your finger. When the card board tube is
brought near to the compass, if the, needle moves you will know that
the tube contains your own cigarette; if there is no movement then it is
the borrowed cigarette.
The next thing you will Want to know is how three cigarette is faked,
and you will imagine it to contain a piece of steel rod. But you Would
be wrong, because such a cigarette could not be smoked.
What you do is to take a little tobacco out of the cigarette you intend
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Volume Six--The Divining Cigarette

to use, and mix some very fine steel fillings with it. It only requires a
very small amount and when mixed with the tobacco is not noticeable,
and also makes no difference to the smoking.
The best way is to get a tin tube which will just fit inside the paper
tube of cigarette; put the paper over the tube, pack the tube with the
faked tobacco then push the tobacco with a piece of stick and at the
same time slide the paper off the tube and you will have re-made the
cigarette.
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Volume Six--Penetration

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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"Penetration."
By Woodhouse Pitman, M.I.M.C.
It is always with fear and trembling that I accept the invitation of my
old friend and correspondent, Mr. Percy Naldrett, to send him
something "really good" (his own words) for his annual publication.
There is always the risk that what I have found from actual personal
experience at scores (and may 1 modestly say scores of shows) is
"really good," may not score so well with the reader as it scores
(pardon) with an audience. After all, this penetration business is a very
simple affair, with such ordinary properties, that to those who eagerly
scan these pages with eyes bulging with excitement, in search of the
lurid, the flamboyant, and the grotesque type of effect, the following
may seem tame. But,--experientia docet.
Further, there is always the danger of treading on someone's pet corn;
it is a dreadful jolt to read a book of "really good and novel"
experiments to find. the device, or effect, or worse still the patter
which one has fondly cherished as one's own, set forth beneath
another's name. However, to business, in the hope that I have not
re-discovered well known territory.
Effect-A few, say six, coins are placed in a stemmed glass. This is covered
with a handkerchief, which is tied in position on the glass with a piece
of ribbon. A second, empty and similar glass is shown, and the glass
containing the imprisoned coins is placed on top of the empty one.
The drape is sufficiently long to conceal the bowl of the lower glass.
The conjurer now orders the coins to penetrate the upper glass and to
fall into the lower one. They are heard to do so, falling with a chink,
one at a time. Upon removal of the drape the same coins are found in
the 'lower glass, and of course the upper one is empty. No bottomless
tumblers are used, and the borrowed coins are actually found in the
lower glass.
Here we have a clean cut effect: the mysterious passage of coins from
the upper glass to the lower, under circumstances that seem to
preclude the possibility of deception.
Requirements-The requirements are few and o[ the simplest order. An opaque silk
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Volume Six--Penetration

handkerchief--prepared.
A suitable length of long narrow ribbon of contrasting colour to that of
the handkerchief.
Two stemmed goblets, the feet of which are
larger than the mouths, to enable one to be
placed upon the other, as shown in sketch,
Fig. 1.
A third glass (not seen by audience) claret
tumbler size, and six pennies--also
unseen--ready to the performer's hand, or, if
an assistant is available, the third glass and
coins are for his or her use.
Preparation-To the centre of one side of the handkerchief
is attached a cloth lined tin lid of such size
when lined, as to fit easily over the mouths of
either of the goblets. The goblets, of course,
are duplicates. The tin lid should be about
three-quarters of an inch deep, and the object
of lining it with cloth (of the same colour as the handkerchief) is,
obviously, to prevent "talking" when it is placed over the top of the
glass. The outside edge of the lid is also covered with cloth. The lid
may be either securely stuck to the silk drape, or sewn to it by means
of holes punched in it; see Fig. 3.
The glasses stand
side by side on the
table, and the
handkerchief is
loosely bunched up
behind them, but in
such a way that the performer is sure that by picking it up casually by
one corner and drawing it clear of the table, the attached lid shall hang
on the side nearest to him. Since the lid is the crux of the whole thing,
it should be kept dark. The ribbon is also placed on the table.
If the performer is working alone, the third glass is secured in an
upright position in right profonde, with its mouth about half-an-inch
below mouth of the profonde. The six pence or other coins are in a
clip where they can be easily secured when required.
If working with an assistant the third glass and the coins are behind
screen; the table in this case being fairly near the screen and as nearly

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Volume Six--Penetration

as possible in the same straight line as table and centre of the


audience.
Working-The two glasses are shown first in such a way that it is quite obvious
that there is absolutely no preparation about them. One is placed on
the table and the conjurer approaches the audience with the other, with
the request that six spectators will oblige him with the loan of a penny
each. Any coins, however, will do equally well.
There is a lot of scope for humour in borrowing these coins. The
performer must on no account handle the coins, but receive them in
the bowl of the glass he is carrying, asking each of his obliging lenders
to note carefully any peculiarity in the coin lent, namely, the date,
general appearance, shape (!) and certainly the face value. This done,
he carries the glass to the table, keeping it in full view all the time. He
proposes to close the mouth of the goblet in such a way that there can
be no possible chance for the money to escape; he takes this step
merely because he is using others people's money and not because he
wishes to hide anything!
During this "explanation" he has quietly covered the glass with the
handkerchief, bringing the "lid" over the mouth of the glass. There is a
knack in doing this that no amount of writing can explain, but in
practice it is very easy. The ribbon is next taken and tied, apparently
round the top of glass... "to prevent the silk from slipping and the
more securely to imprison the coins." The ribbon, however, does not
get tied around the glass, but around the lid, which is over the mouth
of the glass and beneath the silk handkerchief.
The glass is now taken up, and keeping the tip of his forefinger on the
top edge of lid (or what now appears to be the rim of glass), the
magician vigorously rattles the coins. As if he thought that this was
insufficient proof that the coins were really in the glass, he shows
them by raising the front edge of drape high enough for the coins to be
seen.
The second glass is now
freely shown and is placed
in the centre of the table.
Holding the glass with
coins in his left hand, in
the manner shown in Fig.
2, the performer states that
he is going to stand it on
top of the empty glass. He
now brings the draped
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Volume Six--Penetration

glass to the table, allowing


the hanging ends of drape
to surround the empty
glass, and lowers his left
hand so that the bottom
end of handkerchief rests
on the table. He inserts his
right hand under the drape
and takes the glass with
coins away from the lid,
the finger-tips of the left
hand releasing the glass,
the "lid" being held now by
the pressure of the fingers. This renders it impossible for the audience
to know that the glass is removed.
The right hand quickly places the glass with the coins on the table,
takes up the empty glass and puts it in place of the other. Thus the
empty glass becomes the upper one and any time taken in executing
the above simple operation is easily accounted for by the slight
difficulty the performer pretends to have in balancing the foot of the
upper glass on the mouth of the lower. In fact he must be careful that it
does rest properly upon it and not take away the support of the left
hand until he is sure the upper glass is safe, for, if there is a topple his
experiment will be a failure, because if the glass falls it will carry the
handkerchief with it and expose the coins in the bottom glass.
There is no danger of an accident, however, if the performer takes the
trouble to procure the proper glasses and uses a table that does not
wobble. Beware at all times of platforms with uneven or loose planks!
If working alone the performer now secures and finger-palms the stack
of six coins in his right hand, and standing to the left of table, with his
left side to the audience, he explains that he can do anything with
money except make it. (Alas, too true!) He proposes in this case to
cause the coins to penetrate the solid glass and to fall into the lower
one. He orders the first coin to pass and at once there is a chink and a
tinkle from the glasses. This is repeated and six times the sound is
heard of a coin falling into the glass (the coins dropped by performer
into the glass in his profonde, or by assistant, as the case may be).
He next raises the upper glass from the lower, and after a pause sets it
down, still draped, on the table,:showing the coins in the lower glass/..
He unties the ribbon carefully from the upper glass, and whisking the
handkerchief away, shows the glass to be empty.
The conjurer again emphasising the fact that at no time has he touched

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Volume Six--Penetration

the coins--which is literally true--returns them to the owners who are


bound to admit their identity, and these good people, only too thankful
to have their money back from such a deceitful person, are the loudest
in their applause.
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Volume Six--A Domestic Effect

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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A Domestic Effect
By Rupert Howard, A.I.M.C.
Effect-The performer picks up a piece of linoleum from a chair, and, after
showing it on both sides, rolls it into a cylinder which he places on a
chair. He now brings forward a dust-pan and brush. Showing the
dust-pan to be empty, he puts the brush inside it, and places it on his
table, back towards the audience so that the brush cannot be seen from
the front.
A duster is now picked up, which, when rubbed, vanishes from the
hands. On picking up the dustpan the duster is found inside it, the
brush having completely disappeared. The performer walks over to the
roll of linoleum and putting his hand into it, draws out the brush.
Apparatus-A sheet of thin linoleum measuring 20in. x 15in. A cardboard tube
12in. x 2-1/2in. is attached to one of the shorter sides by two pieces of
tape, so that there is about one inch of tape between the linoleum and
the tube. This is an adaptation of the 'Secret Tube' invented by Mr.
Charles Waller, and fully described in his book, Up his Sleeve!
The dust-pan itself is unprepared, but it has a flap cut from sheet tin,
which, when in position, will conceal the brush behind it. The bright
sheet tin of the flap corresponds exactly to the dust-pan and is most
deceptive. At a distance of only a few feet it is difficult to say whether
the flap is in position or not, and it is absolutely safe to use, as there is
no chance of the light being reflected or flashed, as occurs
occasionally with most apparatus in which mirrors are used.
The following articles are also required: two yellow silk 'dusters,' two
dusting brushes and a piece of fine wire.
Setting-The sheet of linoleum is rolled up on a chair {left), the secret
cardboard tube containing the brush being behind the roll. The
dust-pan is on a chair or table, the flap lying loose on the bottom,
where it is not noticeable. The brush and duster are in the pan on top
of the flap.

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Volume Six--A Domestic Effect

The duplicate duster is rolled up into a ball, and as it is made of silk it


goes into a very small space. The ball is bound round with the fine
black wire, which is then twisted so as to form a loop by which the
ball can be picked up. The balled duster lies on a servante behind the
table, the wire loop projecting above the edge of the table.
Working-Pick up the linoleum with the right hand by the top, letting it unroll.
Bring the chair forward with the left hand. Pass the linoleum from the
right to the left hand. The left hand holds the linoleum at the top, the
thumb towards the audience, the secret tube being pressed against the
other side of the linoleum with the fingers. Tap the bottom with the
right hand, and then raise it slowly. When it has just passed the top,
roll the secret tube over with the left hand and straighten out the
linoleum, keeping the secret tube held behind with the left hand. The
tube remains at the back of the linoleum, but is now at the bottom
instead of the top. Both sides of the linoleum having been shown, the
audience will be quite convinced that it is unprepared; it is now rolled
into a cylinder, the secret tube being inside. The cylinder is laid on the
chair.
Pick up the dust-pan, duster and brush, and after showing the duster,
place it on the linoleum cylinder. Show the dust-pan and brush and put
the brush into the dust-pan, pushing it well back; the dustpan is placed
on the table, with back of pan to the audience, and the flap is adjusted.
The pan is placed just in front of the wire loop from the duster on the
servante.
Flip the duster over the linoleum a few times, then roll it into a ball
and vanish it by palming. If desired a pull can be used for vanishing
the duster. Show the hands to be empty. Walk forward to the table to
pick up the dust-pan, and insert the little finger of the right hand into
the wire loop and thus sweep the duster into the pan. Turn the dust-pan
round and show the duster, being careful to slip it out of the wire so
that it may expand. Place the tips of the fingers into the roll of
linoleum and draw out the brush.
Patter-"A domestic mystery. This is a sheet of linoleum direct from Catesbys.
No expense spared to make the show a success. The inside; the
outside. I roll it round my hand into the shape of a tube, and place it on
this chair. Now to explain the mise-en-scene. This chair represents the
drawing room of a suburban villa, and this is the linoleum with which
it is carpeted--I should say linoed. The table represents the kitchen of
the same house.
"This is the story of Little Mary. Now Little Mary had been told by

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Volume Six--A Domestic Effect

her mistress that she was never to dust the drawing room linoleum
with the best duster, but always to use the brush. Unfortunately Little
Mary disliked using the brush, and on the day I am describing she was
dusting it with the duster. She had left the brush in the kitchen, in the
dust-pan, and was busily engaged in cleaning the lino with the
duster--I don't know if that's how they-clean lino, but anyhow, just at
that moment Mary's mistress came into the room and thought she saw
the duster. She immediately said, 'Why, Mary, I told you not to use the
duster for cleaning that.' 'Oh, ma'am', said Mary, 'If you will look in
the dustpan in the kitchen you will find the duster there, and here is
the brush with which I am cleaning the lino.'"
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Volume Six--The Thoughtometer

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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The "Thoughtometer."
By Edward Bagshawe, I.B.M.
Whilst no originality is claimed for the methods used in this effect, the
presentation will, I think, be found sufficiently diverting to justify its
inclusion in an up-to-date programme. The reader will be better able to
visualise the effect if I first give the general patter and presentation,
which is as follows:
"Ladies and gentlemen, in these days of wireless and other marvels,
you are possibly aware that it is only a question of another hundred
years or so before we shall be able to transmit actual solid objects by
means of electrical energy. Anticipating this trend of scientific
thought, I will now demonstrate my 'Thoughtometer,' a marvellous
invention capabable of receiving small objects--such as playing
cards--transmitted from a distance, entirely by means of thought
waves.
"I hope you will believe me when I say that there are only two people
in the world who know exactly how to work this; myself, and the man
who gave me the apparatus. He gave it to me because, to tell you the
truth, he found it was getting a bit of a nuisance. Every time he
thought of an object, that object immediately vanished and was found
endeavouring to hide itself in the apparatus. Things came to a head
when he absent-mindedly thought of buying a mangle, and sure
enough one dropped through the roof, causing quite a commotion. So,
perceiving that the invention had certain drawbacks, my friend passed
it over to me. Personally I find it the easiest thing in the world to
work. My plan is quite simple; I merely keep my mind a perfect blank
until the time comes to transmit something.
(During the above, the performer has been shuffling a pack of cards.
He now picks up an ordinary photographic printing-frame, opens the
back and shows each part.)
"To the uninitiated the 'Thoughtometer' simply consists of an ordinary
frame. There is, however, a piece of black paper inside specially
prepared with a certain pigment, making it very sensitive. Here is the
paper, and here are the other parts of the frame. Having shown you
that everything so far is above suspicion I will fasten the frame up
again and wrap it in this large handkerchief--so. Might I now ask for a
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Volume Six--The Thoughtometer

gentleman to assist me in the experiment? I won't keep him very long.


Thank you, sir--I can see by your expression that you understand all
about wireless.
"I propose to transmit to the frame a card which you will select from
the pack. So that you will be able to keep the card in your possession
securely until I am ready, we will seal it in one of these envelopes.
(Packet of envelopes shown.) If I place the pack in your coat pocket,
you will be able to pull out any card at random, sir, thus making sure
of a free selection. May I have the loan of your side pocket to place
the pack in? Thank you. (Performer has picked up the pack an dnow
proceeds to insert it in assistant's pocket, but apparently finding
something obstructing its passage, he removes the pack and placing
his other hand in the pocket, takes out a white billiard ball.) What's
this? A billiard Ball. Did you bring it along for me to do a trick with,
sir? (Addressing audience.)--this gentleman wishes me to do a trick
with a billiard ball that he has brought with him. Of course I shall be
delighted.
"I shall have to alter the experiment a little. I will pass the billiard ball
back into your pocket in same manner as I intend to transmit the card
you are going to choose. You agree? Very well. I will take one of
these envelopes, which you see is quite empty, seal it up, and ask you
to place it in your pocket. (Assistant does so.) The envelope will act as
a receiving station, and I will pass the ball into it. Are you ready?
(Performer takes a large handkerchief and puts the ball underneath).
Go! You see that the ball has utterly vanished. Before you find it in
your envelope, sir, please select one of these cards. (A few cards are
cut off the pack.) If you place your finger in the pack as I riffle them
through it will do. Remember the card you are now looking at please.
The next problem is to pass the card to the frame--pardon, I should say
the 'Thoughtometer.' (Cards are fanned out and the assistant sees that
his card has vanished.)
"Your card has gone, has it not? I thought so. It has passed into the
frame. Before I uncover it please see if the billiard ball has arrived in
the envelope in your pocket. (Assistant takes out the envelope, which
obviously does not contain the ball.) Not there? So it isn't! That's very
strange, not in your pocket loose, by any chance, sir? (While the
assistant feels in his pocket the performer slowly tears open the
envelope.)
"Why, what's this? This is the card you chose, is it not, sir? (Removes
card from envelope.) Most extraordinary. Possibly the billiard ball has
been transmitted to the frame by mistake, although how it can have
entered such a small space, I don't know. (The frame is uncovered and
the billiard ball is seen beneath the glass, considerably flattened out in
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Volume Six--The Thoughtometer

transit, as it now appears as a large flat white disc.) There sir, just see
what has happened to your billiard ball! I fear it will never be the same
again. (Ball is taken from frame and exhibited.) Well, sir, you may not
be able to play billiards with it, but if get some more like it you will be
able to play draughts. I am sorry the experiment has not gone quite as
I expected, but at any rate, it has proved that my 'Thoughtometer' has
decided possibilities."
Requirements-To perform this effect you will need an ordinary photographic printing
frame, a packet of fairly large stiff envelopes the top one of which is
double, with a duplicate card of the one you intend to force concealed
in the closed compartment. Also a large double handkerchief--known
in the dealer's lists as a "Demon" handkerchief. If you prefer to vanish
the. ball by sleight-of-hand the handkerchief can be dispensed with.
A pack of cards, the top fifteen or so being prepared on the well
known "Mephisto" principle. One white billiard ball and one
"crushed" billiard ball, the latter being a large disc of white celluloid
with a rounded edge. This disc is fixed to the piece of black paper in
the frame by a tiny dab of seccotine; the paper is placed against the
glass in the frame, with the disc at the back, and the frame then
fastened up as usual. Bend the two springs at back of frame till they fit
quite loosely, the object being to prevent the back pressing on the disc
and thus causing its outline to appear marked on the paper.
Working-False shuffle the pack and place down behind some object on the
table, behind which the billiard ball is temporarily concealed. Show
the frame, open it, turn out the back, paper and glass together into the
right hand; then replace each part separately, the black paper going in
with the reverse side to the glass, thus accounting for the production
of celluloid disc. Close up the frame and place it face down on a large
silk, wrap it up and stand against a support on the table. Obtain
assistant and seat him on left side of table. Show packet of envelopes
and then in accordance with the patter, pick up the pack again, at the
same time palming ball in right hand. Advance to assistant with pack
in left hand and pretend to have difficulty in placing the pack in his
coat pocket, then bringing up right hand and producing palmed ball
from pocket.
Next take double envelope from packet, show it empty and seal it.
Assistant places this in his pocket. Pick up the double handkerchief
and place ball underneath and also into the slit in centre of material,
and vanish it in the approved manner.
Next cut off a few cards from top of pack (the forcers), and force card

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Volume Six--The Thoughtometer

by riffling and letting the assistant glimpse the card he inserts his
finger at. Fan out the cards and his has disappeared. Finally discover
the card in the double envelope and uncover the frame to show billiard
ball; detach the ball from the paper and hand it to the assistant as a
souvenir.
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Volume Six--Advertising Blunders

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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Advertising Blunders
By W. G. Stickland, M.M.C.
Although not a magical effect, this item is worthy of a place in a
magician's programme, as it provides that variety which is so
appreciated by an audience, and, since a magician's first object is to
entertain, I do not consider any excuse necessary for its inclusion in
"Volume Six." The cost is practically nil, nothing more than the
following items and good showmanship being required.
Seven cards, six rectangular--three to be about twice the size of the
other three--and one long one; the actual size depends on whether they
are required for drawing room or stage purposes. Also a large "God
Save the King" banner, which is attached by its two top corners to the
long card, and then rolled up behind the card. The cards are either
printed or painted as illustrated and explained later.
Presentation and Patter-"Business men in my audience are well aware of the carelessness of
some billposters, and quite appreciate the trouble such a billposter can
cause. I will illustrate my point with this little original burlesque.
"In the first place, I
would like you to
imagine this (Fig. 1) to
be an ordinary billposting
hoarding, on which can
be seen two common or
garden posters. The top
one reads, 'For Sale, a
Good Dog, will eat
anything, fond of
Children'; also one
advertising the visit to
the Puddleton Palace, of
the Revue, 'I Wonder.'
This (Fig. 2) is a bill
which our dairyman,
Spots, gave to the
billposter to post on the
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Volume Six--Advertising Blunders

hoardings--'Spot's Eggs
are always Fresh.'
Imagine poor Spot's
feelings when the
billposter stuck his
advertisement over the
Palace bill, the effect
being: 'Spot's Eggs are
always Fresh--I Wonder.'

"This (Fig. 3) I want


you to imagine to be
the shop window of a
grocer, Sand, in which
you perceive a casual
advertisement of a
patent cleanser. Sand,
finding the grocery
business rather slack,
decides to augment his
income by setting up a
sideline of a hot bath
establishment. He
writes out this bill
(Fig. 4) and gives it,
just before closing
time to, the shop boy
to stick on the window.
The boy, having an
appointment to keep,
has no time to clean
off the bill advertising
the patent cleanser, so
he sticks the new one
partly over it, and this
is what the customers
read next morning-'Hot Baths One
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Volume Six--Advertising Blunders

Shilling--removes grease, rust, mould and dirt of every description.

"We now return to


the billposting
hoarding (Fig. 5).
The top
advertisement
reads: 'Snook,
Furrier, makes
muffs, capes, etc.,
for ladies out of
their own skins';
and the bottom bill
is one advertising
a patent murderer
which our chemist,
Scubb, has for
sale. We will now
go along, in our
imagination, to our
local hairdresser,
in whose window
we read this
advertisement
(Fig. 6): 'Improve
your hair By
trying our dry
shampoo.' This is
quite an effective
advertisement, but
you will note the
difference in
meaning conveyed
when the bill-poster sticks the bill over Scubb's, thus; the effect being:
'Improve your hair by trying our dry shampoo, which kills moths,
fleas, bugs and beetles.'

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Volume Six--Advertising Blunders

"Finally we
come to the
shop of our
butcher,
Bones (Fig.
7), who
proudly
displays-'I
am purveyor
to H.M, the
King,' Bones
having at
some time or
other
supplied the
King's
hounds with meat. However, during a royal visit to the town, Bones
made himself a laughing stock amongst his friends, by loyally
displaying in his window, this-- (Fig. 8). 'I am purveyor to H.M. the
King--God Save the King!'" (Banner unfolds.)
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Volume Six--The Silver Shoe

Volume Six
Percy Naldrett
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The Silver Shoe.


By Alec Bell A.I.M.C.
Effect-A wedding ring is borrowed and dropped into a glass tumbler. In
keeping with the matrimonial spirit of the problem to be, the emblem
of good fortune in the shape of a Silver Horseshoe is shown. Taking a
long piece of pale blue ribbon, the ends are threaded through the top
nail holes of the horseshoe. Two assistants are invited on to the stage,
one end of the ribbon being given to each to hold. The threaded
horseshoe is then dropped into an empty paper bag, this being rested
in an upright position on a small easel. The borrowed ring is then
removed from the glass and wrapped in a small piece of paper; the
small package is held with a pair of tweezers, and is inserted in the
flame of a candle. The package vanishes in a flash. The paper bag is
lifted down from the easel and the assistants asked to pull on their
ends of the ribbon, thus bringing the horseshoe clear of the bag. The
borrowed ring is found threaded on that part of the ribbon between the
two ends of the horseshoe.
Requisites-A silver coloured horseshoe made of wood or very stout cardboard
(not painted with aluminium paint, please!). The nail holes should be
just large enough to accommodate the tip of the performer's second
finger. The other properties required are a wedding ring, a pair of
tweezers, a piece of flash paper, a candle and candlestick, a piece of
pale blue ribbon half-an-inch wide and five yards long, a paper bag
and a small easel. Round one of the top nail holes of the horseshoe, a
fair amount of conjurer's wax is smeared. The horseshoe is placed with
this part face downwards and projecting slightly over the back of the
table used.
Presentation-The conjurer comes forward with wedding ring on third finger of right
hand, concealed by folding all fingers in towards palm of the hand.
After a willing victim has been persuaded to part with her wedding
ring, the performer takes it with the tips of the first finger and thumb
of the left hand and places it on the second finger of the right hand.
Holding that finger up so that everyone can see the ring, the performer
walks back to the stage and apparently drops the ring off the second
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Volume Six--The Silver Shoe

finger into the glass. Really the second finger with the borrowed ring
on is turned into the palm of the hand, at the same time the third finger
is straightened and it is the duplicate ring on this finger which drops
into the glass.
The horseshoe is now picked up from the table, the second finger
slipping inside the waxed nail hole thus pressing the ring on to the
wood until it is retained by the wax. The pale blue ribbon is threaded
through the holes, care being taken not to dislodge the ring from the
wax (needless to say the side of the horseshoe holding the ring is kept
away from the audience). Once the ribbon is threaded, the ends can be
held with impunity, as the pressure of the ribbon against the ring is a
preventative against dislodgment. The horseshoe is placed on the table
ring side down.
Two members of the audience are then invited on the stage and
stationed about nine feet apart and about three feet in front of the
table. One end of the ribbon is handed to the assistant on the
performer's right, whilst the assistant on the left is asked to examine
the paper bag, which after its innocence has been affirmed is taken
back by the performer, and the remaining end of the ribbon given to
this assistant. Holding the mouth of the paper bag open with the left
hand, the performer picks up the horseshoe and in placing it in the bag
dislodges the ring with his finger nail. The ring in the glass is vanished
by means of the flash paper, the well known "coin fold" being used for
the secret extraction of the ring from the packet.

End of Percy Naldrett's Volume Six.


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