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IS THERE HARM TO PICKY EATING? HEALTH PAGE 17 BUFFERBUILT COOLER WEATHER HELPS CREWS BATTLING

IS THERE HARM TO PICKY EATING?

HEALTH PAGE 17

IS THERE HARM TO PICKY EATING? HEALTH PAGE 17 BUFFERBUILT COOLER WEATHER HELPS CREWS BATTLING STATE

BUFFERBUILT

COOLER WEATHER HELPS CREWS BATTLING STATE WILDFIRE

STATE PAGE 5

GIANTS LET ONE GET AWAY IN THE 12TH

SPORT PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015 Vol XV, Edition 302

www.smdailyjournal.com

Office space bustling in San Mateo

New building planned for SolarCity, GoPro headquarters site

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Just as business is bustling along the Peninsula, so too is development in San Mateo with nearly a million square feet of office space either under construction or in the pipeline. One of the newest developments along State Route 92 will add anoth- er 100, 000 square feet of office space to the 22-acre San Mateo Executive Office Park — the former Visa headquarters now home to

SolarCity and GoPro. Despite years of few new office buildings being constructed within the city, things are picking up. The Hines Office Complex is currently under con- struction along Concar Drive, Bay Meadows is working on the first com- mercial office space at the massive transit-oriented development and two smaller projects proposed at the Three Corners Site neatly situated in a prime entrance to downtown are also under- way. Embarcadero Capital Partners and

Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management partnered last year to purchase the six- building Executive Office Park and are planning to redevelop a new three- story class-A office building. Overlooking State Route 92 at 3000-3155 Clearview Way, a ground- breaking ceremony was held Thursday to celebrate the site’s new office build- ing and six-story parking structure. The site will also boast a large out- door workspace — an increasingly

See OFFICE, Page 6

door workspace — an increasingly See OFFICE , Page 6 COURTESY OF EMBARCADERO CAPITAL PARTNERS An

COURTESY OF EMBARCADERO CAPITAL PARTNERS

An artist’s rendering of the newest office building being constructed at the San Mateo Executive Office Park,home to SolarCity and GoPro.

FIRE CONTAINED

FIRE CONTAINED GINO DE GRANDIS Firefighters work to extinguish a fire on East 38th Avenue in

GINO DE GRANDIS

Firefighters work to extinguish a fire on East 38th Avenue in San Mateo Monday.The fire,reported at 1:26 p.m., started in the garage and was knocked down quickly, said Battalion Chief Matt Turturici. Firefighters ensured there were no hot spots while investigators determined the cause of the fire, which was contained to the garage. The kitchen had some smoke damage and items in the attic made access through the roof difficult, Turturici said. Five fire engines, a fire truck and two battalion chiefs were on scene for nearly three hours.

County to set aside money for housing

$1 million remaining in Measure A funds to spend on programs, projects

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The Board of Supervisors will decide Tuesday how best to spend the remaining $1 million in Measure A funds set aside for affordable housing programs and projects. The board will consider whether to support a landlord/tenant medi- ation program for $50,000; an apartment registry for properties on unincorporated county lands which will increase housing inspections for $450,000; forgiv- able rehabilitation loans for smaller multi-family buildings in exchange for a period of rent con-

trol on improved units for $300,000; and $200,000 to go toward the county’s Affordable Housing Fund to support the con- struction of projects for seniors and veterans. The fund includes $2.5 million previously set aside for senior housing complex that will now go toward the construction of three affordable housing projects in the county. The board set aside about $11.5 million in Measure A funds for affordable housing in March. The county already has a con-

See HOUSING, Page 6

David Canepa leads money race

Four candidates vie for Adrienne Tissier’s supervisor seat in 2016

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Daly City Councilman David Canepa is far and away the top fundraiser in the race to replace Adrienne Tissier for her San Mateo County Board of Supervisors’ seat. Since announcing his candidacy in 2014, Canepa has raised nearly $95,000, includ- ing more than $39,000 during the first quar-

ter of this year, according to campaign dis- closure statements filed with the county. He has also far outspent his opponents. The District 5 seat comprises voters in the north county with most of them residing in Daly City, where Canepa and Daly City Councilman Mike Guingona have won mul- tiple elections.

See MONEY, Page 20

Police continue search for Millbrae school arsonists

Officials hope more surveillance will protect Taylor Middle School

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A recent slew of arson fires set at Taylor Middle School in Millbrae have school officials beefing up security to protect the campus while law enforcement search-

es for who is responsible. Someone set fire to a bench at the school Thursday, July 30, which was the most recent incident in a string of similar crimes at the campus, 850 Taylor Ave., over rough-

See ARSON, Page 6

campus, 850 Taylor Ave., over rough- See ARSON , Page 6 Dental Implants Russo Dental 1101
campus, 850 Taylor Ave., over rough- See ARSON , Page 6 Dental Implants Russo Dental 1101
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2 Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“A man does not know what he is saying until he knows what he is not saying.”

— G.K.Chesterton,English poet-essayist

This Day in History

1790 The U.S. Coast Guard had its begin- nings as President George Washington signed a measure author- izing a group of revenue cutters to enforce tariff and trade laws and pre- vent smuggling.

In 1735, a jury found John Peter Zenger of the New York Weekly Journal not guilty of committing seditious libel against the colonial governor of New York, William Cosby. In 1830 , plans for the city of Chicago were laid out. In 1892 , Andrew and Abby Borden were axed to death in their home in Fall River, Massachusetts. Lizzie Borden, Andrew’s daughter from a previous marriage, was accused of the killings, but acquitted at trial. In 1914, Britain declared war on Germany for invading Belgium; the United States proclaimed its neutrality in the mushrooming world conflict. In 1915, English nurse Edith Cavell was arrested by German authorities in occupied Belgium; she was executed later that year. In 1936 , Jesse Owens of the U.S. won the second of his four gold medals at the Berlin Olympics as he prevailed in the long jump over German Luz Long, who was the first to congratulate him. In 1944, 15-year-old diarist Anne Frank was arrested with her sister, parents and four others by the Gestapo after hid- ing for two years inside a building in Amsterdam. (Anne and her sister, Margot, died at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.) In 1964 , the bodies of missing civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney were found buried in an earthen dam in Mississippi. In 1975, the Swedish pop group ABBA began recording their hit single “Dancing Queen” at Glen Studio outside Stockholm (it was released a year later). In 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed a measure estab- lishing the Department of Energy.

Birthdays

a measure estab- lishing the Department of Energy. Birthdays Race car driver Jeff Gordon is 44.
a measure estab- lishing the Department of Energy. Birthdays Race car driver Jeff Gordon is 44.
a measure estab- lishing the Department of Energy. Birthdays Race car driver Jeff Gordon is 44.

Race car driver Jeff Gordon is 44.

Actor-screenwriter Billy Bob Thornton is 60.

Singer Frankie Ford is 76. Actress-singer Tina Cole is 72. Actor-comedian Richard Belzer is 71. Football Hall-of-Famer John Riggins is 66. Former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales is 60. Actress Kym Karath (Film: “The Sound of Music”) is 57. Hall of Fame track star Mary Decker Slaney is 57. Actress Lauren Tom is 56. Producer Michael Gelman (TV: “Live! With Kelly and Michael”) is 54. Retired MLB All-Star pitcher Roger Clemens is 53. Actress Crystal Chappell is 50. Author Dennis Lehane is 50. Rock musician Rob Cieka (Boo Radleys) is 47. Actor Daniel Dae Kim is 47. Actor Michael DeLuise is 46. Actor Ron Lester is 45. Rapper-actress Yo-Yo is 44.

President Barack Obama is 54.

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. CROLO
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CROLO
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
OLATT

CHELEK

Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. OLATT CHELEK AMYLUS Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow)
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. OLATT CHELEK AMYLUS Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow)
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. OLATT CHELEK AMYLUS Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow)

AMYLUS

Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. OLATT CHELEK AMYLUS Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow) ALPHA
Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. OLATT CHELEK AMYLUS Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow) ALPHA
Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. OLATT CHELEK AMYLUS Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow) ALPHA
Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. OLATT CHELEK AMYLUS Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow) ALPHA
Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow) ALPHA SILKY GOALIE REVERE After chopping firewood all day, he
Jumbles:
Yesterday’s
Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
ALPHA SILKY GOALIE REVERE
After chopping firewood all day, he was going
to — SLEEP LIKE A LOG
firewood all day, he was going to — SLEEP LIKE A LOG REUTERS A boy reacts

REUTERS

A boy reacts as a wave hits him on a algae-covered beach in Qingdao, Shandong province, China.

Massachusetts woman’s chicken getting $2,500 prosthetic leg

CLINTON, Mass. — This chicken leg isn’t for eating. A hen owned by a Massachusetts woman who specializes in chicken rehabilitation and rescue is getting fit- ted with a prosthetic leg Wednesday at Tufts University’s Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. Andrea Martin, of Clinton, tells The Telegram & Gazette she is paying for the $2,500 operation out of her own pocket. She says the alternative is euthanization. The chicken, named Cecily, was born with a damaged tendon in the leg that makes it useless. The surgery will begin when Emi Knafo, a specialist in avian orthope- dics, will amputate Cecily’s right leg. After a 10- to 14-day recovery peri- od, the prosthetic, made on a 3-D printer, will be fitted. Similar surgery has been performed on a rooster and duck, though not at Tufts.

Board: Acupuncturist negligent in giving bee sting therapy

ALHAMBRA — An acupuncturist in Southern California could have his medical license suspended by state reg- ulators who claim he used bee stings to treat patients and didn’t have an aller- gic reaction kit in his office.

In other news

Xin Sheng “Tom” Zhou has been using bee sting therapy to treat dis- eases and chronic pain at his practice in Alhambra. Bee venom acupuncture has been used in eastern Asia since at least the 2nd century B.C. The California Department of Consumer Affairs’ Acupuncture Board filed an accusation against Zhou in July. The board claims Zhou was repeated- ly and grossly negligent in administer- ing the bee stings by not having an emergency response kit or medication for patients who experience a severe allergy. “The use of a bee stinger as the deliv- ery mechanism of venom is not within the standard of care and is considered to be an extreme departure from the stan- dard of care,” the medical board com- plaint states. Zhou’s attorney told the Pasadena Star News no patients have suffered a severe reaction. “The board’s biggest problem is the use of the bee stinger,” John Dratz Jr., Zhou’s attorney, said. “They don’t have a problem with bee venom. Bee sting therapy is the most effective way to deliver it historically, and it’s still being used.” Dratz said they believe the therapy is safe. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved bee sting therapy. Dr. Michael Levine, a professor at the University of Southern

California’s Keck School of Medicine, told the newspaper it could potentially be dangerous if a patient has a life- threatening allergic reaction.

Hitchhiking robot’s cross-country trip in U.S.ends in Philly

PHILADELPHIA — A hitchhiking robot that captured the hearts of fans worldwide met its demise in the U.S. The Canadian researchers who creat- ed hitchBOT as a social experiment told the Associated Press that someone in Philadelphia damaged the robot beyond repair early Saturday, ending its first American tour after about two weeks. “Sadly, sadly it’s come to an end,” said Frauke Zeller, one of its co-cre- ators. The kid-size robot set out to travel cross-country after successfully hitch- hiking across Canada in 26 days last year and parts of Europe. It’s immobile on its own, relying on the kindness of strangers. Those who picked it up often passed it to other travelers or left it where others might notice it. It started in Marblehead, Massachusetts, on July 17 with its thumb raised skyward, a grin on its digital face and tape wrapped around its cylindrical head that read “San Francisco or bust.” The robot bounced around the Boston area and was briefly taken to sea.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Lotto

Aug. 1 Powerball 7 13 24 49 57 15 Powerball
Aug. 1 Powerball
7 13
24 49
57 15
Powerball

July 31 Mega Millions

28 32 33 40 46 10 Mega number Aug. 1 Super Lotto Plus 1 3
28
32 33
40 46
10
Mega number
Aug. 1 Super Lotto Plus
1
3 6
17 28
2
Mega number

Fantasy Five

12
12
14
14
20
20
27
27
38
38

Daily Four

 
 
5
5
6
6
1
1
2
2

Daily three midday

 
1
1
6
6
6
6

Daily three evening

 
8
8
0
0
5
5
6 Daily three evening   8 0 5 The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous George,

The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous George, No. 8, in first place; Eureka, No. 7, in second place; and Money Bags, No. 11, in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:46.91.

Local Weather Forecast

Tues day : Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the upper 60s. West winds around 5 mph. Tues day ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the

evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the upper 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Wednes day : Mostly cloudy in the morn-

ing then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morn- ing. Highs in the upper 60s. Northwest winds around 5 mph.

Wednes day ni g ht: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Lows in the upper

50s.

Thurs day thro ug h Sunday : Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the mid 60s to lower 70s.

cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the mid 60s to lower 70s. The San Mateo Daily Journal

The San Mateo Daily Journal

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Publisher: Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

3

Man who was shot by police near SFO charged with carjacking and robbery

By Scott Morris

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

A man shot by police last month after allegedly crashing a stolen vehicle near San Francisco International Airport and attempt- ing several carjackings while trying to escape is out of the hospital and was arraigned Friday in Redwood City, prosecutors said. Daniel Frederick, 24, spent three days in the hospital recovering after he was shot in the abdomen by San Francisco police on the morning of July 26, according to the San Mateo County District Attorney’s Office. Frederick allegedly stole a Toyota Yaris from the Millbrae BART station at about 6:50 a.m., prosecutors said. San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr said last week that the car’s owner had parked it there while she was running the San Francisco Marathon. A short time later, Frederick crashed the car into a light pole on South Airport Boulevard near the North Access Road to the airport. He walked away from the crash and

Road to the airport. He walked away from the crash and Comment on or share this

Comment on or share this story at www.smdailyjournal.com

hid nearby, removing his jacket. He emerged wearing a yellow T-shirt, Suhr said. A motorcycle officer spotted Frederick and stopped to talk to him for a few minutes, Suhr said. He ordered to Frederick to put down a backpack he was carrying, but instead Frederick ran west on San Bruno Avenue. He allegedly jumped into a car stopped at a stoplight nearby and threatened the driver, ordering him to drive away. The motorcycle officer caught up and, thinking the driver might be an accomplice, ordered him at gunpoint not to go anywhere. The driver put his hands up and refused to help the suspect escape, Suhr said. Frederick ran from the car, taking the vic- tim’s backpack with him. He fled down a dirt road and hid in some bushes along a frontage

road near Highway 101, Suhr said. Several other officers caught up with Frederick in the bushes and ordered him out. Eventually he left the bushes and tried to get into several other cars along the frontage road but was unsuccessful, according to Suhr. An officer again ordered him to stop at gunpoint. Frederick allegedly turned toward the officer and started approaching him. The officer fired one shot but missed, Suhr said. Frederick kept coming at him, approach- ing to within 6 feet. Other officers nearby heard him saying “shoot me” as he approached, Suhr said. The officer fired again, striking Frederick in the abdomen. Prosecutors charged Frederick with attempted carjacking, attempted kidnap- ping, second-degree robbery, vehicle theft, receipt of stolen property, resisting a police officer and hit-and-run. He was assigned an attorney and is due to return to court to enter a plea this Friday. He remains in jail on $750,000 bail, pros- ecutors said.

Dead humpback whale in Pacifica may have been hit by ship

By Scott Morris

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

Scientists who examined a dead humpback whale found on a Pacifica beach Sunday morning have found evidence the whale was hit by a passing ship, according to the Marine Mammal Center. The 38-foot juvenile humpback whale was found in the area of Esplanade Beach at about 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Although the carcass was already decom- posing, researchers with the Marin Headlands-based Marine Mammal Center and the California Academy of Sciences per- formed a partial necropsy later that after- noon, finding internal hemorrhaging on the whale’s left side below its pectoral flipper, center officials said. Such injuries are consistent with blunt force trauma and could have been caused by a

ship strike, according to center officials. The dead whale is the third to wash ashore in Pacifica since April. A 48-foot male sperm whale was discovered on April 14 and a 42-foot adult female humpback was found on May 5. Necropsies on both whales were inconclu- sive, though scientists found evidence the other humpback also died from injuries suf- fered in a ship strike, according to the Marine Mammal Center. In June, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration advised ships moving through shipping lanes near the Bay Area to slow down to avoid striking endangered blue, humpback and fin whales that had been spotted foraging in the area, according to the center. “By working with the maritime shipping industry, conservation groups and others, we hope to minimize the outcomes of

impacts from vessel-whale interactions,” Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary superintendent Maria Brown said in a statement. “At lower ship speeds whales are more likely to survive colli- sions.” The Marine Mammal Center has only responded to 22 stranded humpback whales in its 40-year history.

Michele Susan Mondani

Michele Susan Mondani, 69, of Vista, California, died July 24, 2015, in Tri-City Hospital in Oceanside. She was born in San Francisco but spent her first 18 years in Millbrae. She attended Mills High School, San Jose State University and the University of Colorado. She is survived by her husband of 40

Obituary

years, Dick Borden; her sisters Rene Mondani and Cindy Pelletier and her broth- er Gregg Mondani. Services will be 11:30 a.m., Aug. 4 at Skylawn Memorial in San Mateo. She will be laid to rest next to her grandmother Levina Atkinson and her moth- er Evelyn Mondani.

grandmother Levina Atkinson and her moth- er Evelyn Mondani. Police reports A clean fight Police responded

Police reports

A clean fight

Police responded to a dispute between neighbors regarding the upstairs neigh- bor washing her hands too loudly on Foster City Boulevard in Foster City before 7:28 a.m. Thursday, July 16.

FOSTER CITY

Di s turbance. A man reported being hit in the face by a book on Lido Lane before 6:34 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 1. Arres t. A woman was arrested for driving under the influence after being involved in a traffic accident that had been reported sec- ond-hand by an involved driver’s mother on Vintage Park Drive before 5:25 Saturday, Aug. 1.

Sus pi ci o us s i tuati o n . Numerous firework explosions were reported on Shell Boulevard before 9:01 p.m. Friday, July 31. Chi l d fo und. A toddler was found running down the street on Gull Avenue and reunited with family before 3:56 p.m. Thursday, July

30.

Arres t. A 20-year-old San Carlos resident was arrested for drunk driving on East Hillsdale Boulevard before 2:33 a.m. Thursday, July 30.

REDWOOD CITY

Di s turbance. A man was seen sitting on a sidewalk and harassing women before 10:29 p.m. Wednesday, July 29. Sus pi ci o us pers o n . A man in his 20s was seen in a parking lot looking into a window and asking people for money before 8:51 p.m. Wednesday, July 29. Bi ke fo und. A bicycle was found on Hope Court before 12:37 p.m. Wednesday, July 29.

8:51 p.m. Wednesday, July 29. Bi ke fo und. A bicycle was found on Hope Court

4 Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Two gas leaks reported within 1.5 miles of each other

Two separate gas leaks caused by con- struction crew dig-ins were reported within minutes of each other and about 1.5 miles apart in Redwood City Monday morning, a PG&E spokesman said. The first leak was reported at 10:26 a.m. on a two-inch plastic line near Duane Street and Broadway, PG&E spokesman Nick Smith said. Crews responded and capped the leak by 11:51 a.m., Smith said. No injuries were reported and no evacua- tions were ordered as a result of the leak, he said. Minutes later, around 10:30 a.m., a sepa-

Local briefs

rate gas leak was reported on Don Court, a cul-de-sac off of Edgewood Road, Smith said. A third-party crew digging for water serv- ice hit the gas line with a backhoe. The leak was quickly capped with no injuries report- ed and no service affected besides a lone res- idential customer, Smith said. In both cases, the construction crews did not call 811 to have underground gas lines marked before digging, according to Smith.

Two stabbed in parking lot brawl

South San Francisco police are investi- gating a parking lot fight that ended with

two people being stabbed Sunday night. The victims, a El Sobrante resident and a San Francisco resident, were engaged in a fight with a group of unknown suspects in the parking lot of a business at 490 S. Airport Blvd., according to police.

The two victims were stabbed around 2 a.m. and were taken by friends to a local hospital where they were treated for non-life threatening injuries, according to police. Anyone with information is asked to call police at (650) 877-8900 or (650) 952-

2244.

Redwood City to get mosquito treatment Aug. 5

in

After

detecting

adult

mosquitoes

Redwood City Monday, San Mateo County Mosquito and Vector Control District offi- cials will be conducting truck-mounted treatment between 9 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 5, and 5 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 6., weather per- mitting.

The treatment area, which is primarily residential, is approximately bounded by Elwood Street to the northeast, Vera Avenue to the southeast, Canyon Road to the southwest and Blandford Boulevard to the northwest. A map of the treatment area and further information can be found on the district website at www.smcmvcd.org. Residents with additional questions can call the district at (650) 344-8592 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

344-8592 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Music Lessons for All Ages 25
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

STATE/NATION

Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

5

Cooler weather helps crews battling state wildfire

By Terence Chea and Haven Daley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOWER LAKE — Firefighters were work- ing aggressively to regain control after a raging Northern California fire jumped a highway that had served as a containment line for the massive blaze — one of 20 wild- fires burning in California. Cooler weather had helped crews build a buffer Monday between the wildfire and some of the thousands of homes it threat- ened as it tore through drought-withered brush in Lake County that hadn’t burned in years. But Monday afternoon erratic wind blew hot embers north of Highway 20 ignited several fires across the highway north of the city of Clearlake. “There were too many (spot fires) for us to pick up,” Battalion Chief Carl Schwettmann of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection told the San Francisco Chronicle, after the stand on Highway 20. “With these drought-stricken fuels, it’s just moving at an extremely high rate of speed.” At least two dozen homes were destroyed over the past few days, and more than 13,000 people were urged to flee. The fire — the largest blaze in drought-

urged to flee. The fire — the largest blaze in drou ght- REUTERS A firefighter mops

REUTERS

A firefighter mops up a hot spot along Highway 20 during the Rocky Fire near Lower Lake.

stricken California — roughly tripled in size over the weekend to almost 97 square miles, generating its own winds that fanned the flames and reduced thousands of acres of manzanita shrubs and other brush to barren

land in hours. “There’s a lot of old growth-type vegeta- tion and four years of drought to dry it all out,” said Lynne Tolmachoff, a spokes- woman for the California Department of

Forestry and Fire Protection. “It was ready to go.” The fire was burning in the Lower Lake area, about 100 miles north of San Francisco and 10 miles from Clear Lake, the largest freshwater lake entirely within California and a popular spot for boaters and campers. Fire officials said no homes around the lake were threatened. Evacuated residents were amazed at how quickly the flames spread. “I’m overwhelmed,” Donna McDonald, of Clear Lake, said at a high school that had been turned into a shelter. “I was very happy at one point when I saw no smoke at all. Then all of a sudden it just flared up real big again.” Layna Rivas, of Clearlake Oaks, evacuat- ed her home over the weekend and wanted to get back to feed her chickens. “You have to have that let go feeling and know everything is going to be OK,” she said. “My place is going to be safe, my ani- mals are going to be safe.” Lower temperatures and higher humidity Monday allowed firefighters to contain more of the fire, said CalFire Capt. Don Camp. “We are hoping we only have to deal with winds from the weather instead of the fire creating its own winds,” he said.

Holmes jury keeps execution option as sentencing advances

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CENTENNIAL, Colo. — Jurors on Monday moved one step closer toward sen- tencing James Holmes to death for his Colorado movie theater attack, taking less than three hours to reject arguments that the former neuroscience student’s mental ill- ness means he should not die. The decision clears the way for one last attempt from both sides to sway the jury, with gripping testimony from victims about their suffering and more appeals for mercy for the man convicted of murdering 12 people and trying to kill 70 more during the 2012 assault at a Batman movie.

Holmes, his reactions dulled by anti-psychotic drugs, stood as ordered and appeared emotion- less as Judge Carlos Samour, Jr. read the deci- sions. Robert and Arlene Homes held hands, their fingers interlaced, and

directed their eyes at the floor. With each unanimous “yes,” it became ever more clear that jurors believe their son’s crimes outweighed their testimo- ny. She began to cry, and her husband held out a box of tissues.

She began to cry, and her husband held out a box of tissues. James Holmes California

James Holmes

cry, and her husband held out a box of tissues. James Holmes California minimum wage initiative
cry, and her husband held out a box of tissues. James Holmes California minimum wage initiative

California minimum wage initiative cleared for signatures

SACRAMENTO — A union-backed pro- posal to raise California’s minimum wage to $15 an hour was cleared Monday to begin collecting signatures for a ballot initiative next year as local efforts continue nation- wide to boost the minimum wage to better reflect the cost of living. The proposal by the Service Employees International Union-United Healthcare Workers West would increase California’s minimum wage by $1 an hour annually until

Around the state

it reaches $15 an hour in 2021. California’s current $9 hourly wage, among the highest in the country, is set to increase to $10 next year. It’s the latest in a nationwide effort by unions and other groups to raise the wage. The cities of Los Angeles, Seattle, San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley have approved phased-in increases to eventually take their minimum wage to $15 an hour, and the University of California system and Los Angeles County have adopted similar plans.

minimum wage to $15 an hour, and the University of California system and Los Angeles County

6 Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OFFICE

Continued from page 1

popular amenity for employees looking to collaborate out of the typical office space environment, said John Hamilton, co- founder and principal at Embarcadero Capital Partners. “San Mateo is a great city to do business with. And this location, halfway between [Highway] 101 and [Interstate] 280 on 92 with great views, great accessibility; you can get anywhere from there,” Hamilton said. “There’s two corporate headquarters, GoPro and SolarCity, so those companies are both doing very well. It’s exciting they chose Clearview for their headquarter sites

and we’d like to keep that momentum going.” While both companies are continuing to expand, the new class-A office building is being developed on speculation — meaning there isn’t an identified tenant lined up. However, Hamilton said they’ve already received interest from several companies and he’s confident the new site will rent

quickly once it comes on line in September

2016.

The Clearview Way project is joining the city’s recent list of long-awaited office buildings coming closer to fruition, a stark contrast to the more than a decade that passed without any new office develop- ments breaking ground, said Darcy Forsell, the city’s zoning administrator. While building on spec may be risky, Forsell said many of these projects, particu-

larly at the former Bay Meadows race track, have long had the city’s approval and offi- cials are interested in seeing them complet- ed. “We don’t want these things siting out there. We want them built and occupied and I think San Mateo is a great location. In addi- tion to Caltrain, which is what we’re trying to promote the usage of, for those who Caltrain isn’t a feasible option for commut- ing, we have access to 101, 280, 92 and the San Mateo Bridge. So we have a much better connectivity to the Bay Area than other areas down the Peninsula,” Forsell said. Despite buying the property with enti- tlements in hand, Embarcadero Capital Partners returned to the city earlier this year for a few modifications to the origi- nal proposal such as the outdoor work- space as well as an additional level to its

new parking garage. Outdoor collaborative spaces that provide Wi-Fi and comfortable seating are becom- ing increasingly popular amongst large cor- porations seeking to attract employees, Forsell said. “A lot of big employers need to be able to retain employees in this highly competi- tive workforce. So it is very important for employers to have amenities for their employees,” Forsell said. “And I think San Mateo has great shopping, we have great dining, we have great access to parks and recreation. I think those are all amenities and services that are desirable to employ- ees.”

samantha@smdailyjournal.com (650) 344-5200 ext. 106

HOUSING

Continued from page 1

tract with Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center to provide mediation services on a referral basis for tenants and landlords. The $50,000 will go toward expanding the pro- gram over the next two years. The apartment registry will be based on a San Jose program that tracks and monitors health and safety conditions in apartments. The funds for the apartment registry pro- gram will allow more enhanced and frequent inspections over an 18-month period for about 300 complexes in the county that have historically required the most over- sight from county Environmental Health officials. The forgivable rehabilitation loan pro-

gram would provide property owners money to fix up their aging buildings in exchange for keeping the properties affordable for a period up to 30 years. The Board of Supervisors has set aside $30 million in the past three years to sup- port the construction of affordable housing. Partnerships with nonprofits such as MidPen Housing has helped leverage addi- tional funding for new developments such as Half Moon Village on the coast, a com- munity for seniors. The average rent for a one-bedroom apart- ment in the county is now $2,516, a 50.2 percent increase in four years, according to a housing indicators report released by the county’s Housing Authority.

The

San

Mateo

County

Board

of

Supervisors meets 9 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 4,

400 County Center, Redwood City.

9 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 4, 400 County Center, Redwood City. ARSON Continued from page 1 ly
9 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 4, 400 County Center, Redwood City. ARSON Continued from page 1 ly
9 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 4, 400 County Center, Redwood City. ARSON Continued from page 1 ly
9 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 4, 400 County Center, Redwood City. ARSON Continued from page 1 ly

ARSON

Continued from page 1

ly the past month. The San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office began searching for the criminal who ignit- ed a blaze Monday, June 29, at the school and believe the same unidentified suspect is responsible for two other subsequent simi- lar incidents. No suspects have been identified yet, but due to the nature of the incidents, it is believed all the fires are related, according to Sal Zuno, spokesman with the Sheriff’s Office. “We do not have any leads,” he said. “But the investigation is ongoing.” He said the Sheriff’s Office has increased surveillance on the school campus in recent weeks, and canvassed the surrounding area during the investigation, which has resulted in heightened awareness of neighbors liv- ing near the campus who may help provide information leading to an arrest. Security cameras have also been recently installed at Taylor, as school officials are hopeful to deter or identify the suspects responsible for starting the blazes, accord- ing to Michelle Henson, chief business offi- cial at the Millbrae Elementary School District. The most recent incident, reported near 2 a.m. Thursday, July 30, caused an estimated $420 of damage to school property, accord- ing to a report from the Sheriff’s Office, as

some vegetation was also scorched near the bench. Previously, about six small fires were set near each other Monday, July 1, in the school quad which caused minor damage to

some structures, and burnt some of the cam- pus grounds. Law enforcement was able to extinguish the flames by dousing them with a garden hose, and a subsequent investigation found

a range of items, including incendiary

devices, which may have been used to start

or fuel the burns.

The fires were reported around 6:30 a.m., by school staff when they smelled smoke and noticed the flames. Zuno said details of the first fire are not available, but judging by the size of the blaze and remnants left behind, law enforce- ment officials are comfortable assuming the crime is related to the later incidents. He said roughly the same amount of school property was damaged in all three fires. Classes are currently out for the summer at the school, and will not reconvene until Monday, Aug. 31. Henson said the school is also working with the Central County Fire Department to investigate the incidents. Anyone who has more information which may lead to arrest should call the Sheriff’s Office at 216-7676, or the anonymous tip line at 547-2700, said Zuno.

austin@smdailyjournal.com (650) 344-5200 ext. 105

Office at 216-7676, or the anonymous tip line at 547-2700, said Zuno. austin@smdailyjournal.com (650) 344-5200 ext.
Office at 216-7676, or the anonymous tip line at 547-2700, said Zuno. austin@smdailyjournal.com (650) 344-5200 ext.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/NATION

Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

7

Obama power plant rules spark 2016 fight over climate change

By Julie Pace

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s sweeping new power plant regula- tions are thrusting the divisive debate over climate change into the race for the White House, with candidates in both parties see- ing an opportunity to capitalize. To Democrats, rallying around global cli- mate change is a way to energize liberal sup- porters and paint Republicans as out of touch with the majority of Americans. To the GOP, Obama’s executive actions to curb greenhouse gas emissions are burdensome to business and block job creation, an argu- ment targeting Americans’ worries about the economy. The president unveiled the plan at the White House Monday, calling it the “single most important step” the U.S. has taken to combat a major global threat. Broad support for the rules by Democratic candidates and universal opposition from Republicans puts the parties’ eventual nom- inees on a general-election collision

eventual nom- inees on a general-election collision REUTERS Barack Obama delivers remarks on the Clean Power

REUTERS

Barack Obama delivers remarks on the Clean Power Plan at the White House.

course. Most of the changes Obama outlined would have to be implemented by the next president, if the rules survive court chal- lenges. Republicans gave little indication of what they would do differently to curb emissions

from U.S. power plants, if anything at all. They cast the measure requiring states to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 32 percent by 2030 as unnecessary and costly White House overreach that will raise energy costs for Americans.

Jeb Bush unveils border security,immigration reform plan

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI — Jeb Bush outlined plans Monday to improve security of the nation’s borders and enforcement of its existing immigration laws, calling both a requirement before any president could begin to address the status of the estimated 11 million people living in the country illegally. “Finding a practical solution to the status of the people who are here illegally today is

to the status of the people who are here illegally today is Jeb Bush a nonstarter

Jeb Bush

a nonstarter if our bor- ders are not secure against future illegal immigration,” the former Republican governor of Florida said in a state- ment, released ahead of Monday night’s GOP candidate forum in New Hampshire and the

party’s first presidential primary debate later in the week.

A focus on border security as a pre-condi- tion of any overhaul of the nation’s immi- gration laws has become a common policy point among many of the Republican candi- dates for president. But Bush’s focus on this aspect of the debate is notable, given the months he has spent defending his support for creating a path to permanent legal status for those in the country illegally — a position that is deeply unpopular among the party’s most passionate primary voters.

Local brief

Man who allegedly killed co-worker in Burlingame pleads not guilty

A man who allegedly stabbed a co-worker

to death outside a Burlingame office build- ing last month pleaded not guilty to charges of murder Monday, accord- ing to the San Mateo County District Attorney’s Office. Rodney O’Neil Williams, a 28-year-old San Francisco man, was

arrested by the U.S. Marshals Service and

Sacramento police at a Sacramento residence after a more than two- week long investigation, according to Burlingame police. His bail is set at $50 million. He was also appointed a private defender Monday and is due back in court Sept. 3 for a preliminary hearing. Police said Williams stabbed 28-year-old Neil Lewis during a fight outside an office complex on the 1800 block of Gilbreth Road just before 6 p.m. July 7. Williams and Lewis worked together as “hikers,” or contractors who would move rental cars from various lots for the Hertz Rental Car company at the San Francisco International Airport. The men had apparently been dropped off to pick up a rental car near Gilbreth Road when they began to argue about Williams’ girlfriend. Although police don’t believe Lewis and the woman were ever actually involved, it appeared to have sparked the fatal altercation, according to prosecutors. Witnesses told police they saw two men fighting on the sidewalk in front of the building before one of them fell to the ground and the other fled in a red sedan. Lewis was found suffering multiple stab wounds and was taken to San Francisco General Hospital where he died about 40 minutes later, police said.

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8 Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the world

Gulf Arabs welcome Iran nuke deal but seek further assurance

DOHA, Qatar — Gulf Arab states on Monday welcomed

the nuclear deal negotiated between Iran and world powers but said they would like further assur- ances that the U.S. would help them counter increasing Iranian assertiveness in the region. Speaking for the six-member Gulf Cooperation Council, Qatar’s top diplo- mat said Monday that the bloc had been impressed by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s presentation of the agree- ment and explanations of how it will be

of the agree- ment and explanations of how it will be John Kerry verified and enforced.

John Kerry

verified and enforced.

“Consequently, the GCC countries have welcomed on this basis what has been displayed and what has been talked about by His Excellency Mr. Kerry,” said Foreign Minister Khalid al-Attiyah, whose nation cur- rently chairs the group. “He let us know that there is a going to be live oversight over Iran,” al Attiyah said of Kerry’s presentation. “This is reassuring to the region.”

Iran’s Ahmadinejad seeks political comeback

TEHRAN, Iran — Iran’s former President Mahmoud

Ahmadinejad has launched a political campaign ahead of February’s parliamentary elections in what could prove a challenge to the mod- erates behind a landmark nuclear agree- ment reached last month. Few expect a rerun of Ahmadinejad’s surprise victory in the 2005 elections, which kicked off an eight-year presiden- cy marked by confrontation with the West, incendiary rhetoric toward Israel and refusal to compromise on the disput-

ed nuclear program. Many former allies have turned on Ahmadinejad, and two of

his former vice presidents have been jailed for corruption. But the unapologetic populist is believed to command strong support in the countryside, and could be seen by Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei as a counter- balance to the reformers who have tried to reverse Ahmadinejad’s confrontational legacy since the election of President Hassan Rouhani, a moderate, two years ago.

of President Hassan Rouhani, a moderate, two years ago. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad REUTERS Smoke rises after what

Mahmoud

Ahmadinejad

Rouhani, a moderate, two years ago. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad REUTERS Smoke rises after what activists say was

REUTERS

Smoke rises after what activists say was shelling by forces of Syria’s President Bashar Assad in Old Aleppo’s Kadi Askar area,Syria.

Report: U.S.-led strikes in Iraq and Syria killed 459 civilians

By Vivian Salama and Zeina Karam

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD — U.S.-led airstrikes tar- geting the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria have likely killed at least 459 civilians over the past year, a report by an independent monitoring group said Monday. The report by Airwars, a project aimed at tracking the international airstrikes targeting the extremists, said it believed 57 specific strikes killed civilians and caused 48 suspect- ed “friendly fire” deaths. It said the strikes have killed more than 15,000 Islamic State militants.

While Airwars noted the difficulty of verifying information in territory held by the IS group, which has kidnapped and killed journalists and activists, other groups have reported similar casualties from the U.S.-led airstrikes. “Almost all claims of noncombatant deaths from alleged coalition strikes emerge within 24 hours — with graph- ic images of reported victims often widely disseminated,” the report said. “In this context, the present coali- tion policy of downplaying or denying all claims of noncombatant fatalities makes little sense, and risks handing (the) Islamic State (group) and other forces a powerful propaganda tool.”

The U.S. launched airstrikes in Iraq on Aug. 8 and in Syria on Sept. 23 to target the Islamic State group. A coali- tion of countries later joined to help allied ground forces combat the extremists. To date, the coalition has launched more than 5,800 airstrikes in both countries.

The U.S. has only acknowledged killing two civilians in its strikes:

two children who were likely slain dur- ing an American airstrike targeting al- Qaida-linked militants in Syria last year. That same strike also wounded two adults, according to an investiga- tion released in May by the U.S. mili- tary.

year. That same strike also wounded two adults, accord ing to an investiga- tion released in
year. That same strike also wounded two adults, accord ing to an investiga- tion released in
year. That same strike also wounded two adults, accord ing to an investiga- tion released in
year. That same strike also wounded two adults, accord ing to an investiga- tion released in
year. That same strike also wounded two adults, accord ing to an investiga- tion released in
year. That same strike also wounded two adults, accord ing to an investiga- tion released in
year. That same strike also wounded two adults, accord ing to an investiga- tion released in
year. That same strike also wounded two adults, accord ing to an investiga- tion released in
year. That same strike also wounded two adults, accord ing to an investiga- tion released in

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

9

An unfortunate attack on health access

A recent push to defund

Planned Parenthood because

of recent videos that sur-

faced purported to show a casual atti- tude about selling the body parts of aborted fetuses is an unfortunate reac- tion. The videos have caused some amount of controversy because it could lead one to believe that the organization profits from its abor- tion procedures and could be inter- preted that it might push for such procedures to continue to make

money. However, Planned Parenthood officials contend that the videos are selectively edited and that it only recovers the cost of proce- dures with consent and for research. The videos themselves are chilling and deserve serious exploration about how often this is done and why. However, to move forward with a plan to defund the organization because of this is short-sighted and altogether wrong considering the work the organization does through- out the nation. Planned Parenthood is the primary health care provider for millions of American women, many who are low-

Editorial

income. Only 3 percent of its servic- es are for abortions and no federal money, by law, goes toward provid- ing abortions. It provides contracep- tion, treatments and tests for sexual- ly transmitted diseases, cancer screenings and other health services. Many California counties would not have a family planning clinic for low-income people if Planned Parenthood did not exist. While abortion is obviously a con- troversial issue for many in this nation, it has been the law of the land for more than 40 years and there should come a time when funding for organizations that provide the serv- ice is no longer under question. The movement to again discuss cutting off federal funding for Planned Parenthood is a tired response to a new situation that has arisen because of these recent videos. Yes, the videos are disturbing, yet nobody knows for sure how valid they are. That should be explored, and officials at Planned Parenthood should make the necessary changes

to ensure there is no casual sale of aborted fetuses for profit. Yet to make the jump to immediately cut off federal funding for the entire organi- zation that provides other essential health care services is a dangerous move. The movement had limited traction and was derailed Monday in the Senate. Yet it created an issue for social conservatives who wish to make this a galvanizing issue mov- ing into the fall and the next elec- tion cycle. If this is the issue that will hold up a spending bill exten- sion that will avert a government shutdown in October, then portions of the Republican party have lost their way. Providing a way for many to plan parenthood in a responsible way while also receiving basic health care is an important mission of Planned Parenthood, and has been for years. Most Americans support greater access to health care, and Planned Parenthood provides that. It deserves to be funded while a full exploration of the videos takes place and the organization should make necessary changes if that proves to be necessary.

Letters to the editor

Rent increases affect low-income

Editor, As I read articles about the rent increases in San Mateo County, I received a letter from my landlord increasing the rent from $2,000 in 2012 to $2,150 this November and really difficult to find a place who accept Section 8 Vouchers. I looked on Craigslist when an attendant was

looking for places in this county and every list said “no Section 8.” That disappointed me, like I may have wanted to move and can’t. HUD low- ered the market value in 2006 from $1,928 for a two-bedroom unit to $1,698 in which is the current rate now. The housing market increased but HUD stays the same as it did in

2006.

Legislators should review and increase housing market value as the same as the regular housing market value. When SSI or low-income resi- dents can’t afford to live in this coun- ty or state in this matter and you ask yourself why people are moving out of state.

Helen Lo

San Mateo

Millbrae sewer rates

Editor,

During the Millbrae City Council meeting July 28, the large sewer rate increases were officially approved. A large number of Millbrae resi- dents came in numbers to express their disapproval over the rate hikes. Hundreds of protest letters were sent to the city clerk — thousands of

Millbrae residents are still unaware of the rate hike proceedings.

I asked the council for three things:

1). Very simple reprieve from the accelerated rate hikes by stretching the increases over a longer period of

time; 2.) A more detailed breakdown of capital expenditures; and 3). Transparency, due diligence, good governance and basic fiduciary responsibility. The city cannot rightfully claim

appropriation for 1,400 sewer lateral repairs — this is an expense already passed to the homeowner.

I have done three rounds of Freedom

of Information Act requests from the city and found no direct and specific number correlation in the Baykeeper consent decree and the funds requested by City Hall. Will the proposed BART develop- ment designed by Urban Republic and favored by the City Council pay their “fair share” toward sewer usage?

The proposed new sanitary sewer overflow charges monthly surcharge possibly violates Proposition 218 as codified in California Constitution Article XIII D Section 6(2)(b)(3). Charge shall not exceed the propor- tional cost of the service attributable to a parcel. The talk about “need for more pub- lic outreach” is a moot point and frankly comical at this point. The city has been aware of this problem

since 2010.

Doug Radtke

Millbrae

Singing the

national anthem

Editor, Instead of a celebrity performing

his/her rendition of the national anthem before the start of games, I believe it would show more pride in our country if all the patrons loudly sang out “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

Mary Cravalho

San Mateo

Jerry Lee , Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek,

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Fan the flame

I t is said that one flame-lit candle can light the wicks of a thousand candles. Those of us who have lost a loved one can certainly attest to the way they

lit a flame within us. Through an unspeakable joy, laugh- ter and love that these beloved individuals possessed here on Earth, we will always be mindful of how they lit up our lives with their vibrant spirit in times of tribula- tion. Death is the inevitable fate from which we cannot escape. In spite of the awareness that comes with this humility, we often continue to live life daily as if tomor- row is promised. We often take for granted that which matters most — our family members, closest friends and, ultimately, precious life itself. Nevertheless, something always humbly reminds us

that in spite of our vast materialistic possessions or var- ious ideologies, our temporary existence will one day force us to leave behind the mundane possessions that matter least. In fact, we will only take with us the intangi- ble love we have manifested for and through others. Much of the essence of who we are remains with those who cher- ish us in life. Researchers and staff at Life Chronicles witness and learn about this phenomenon every day. Founded in 1998 in Santa Barbara, Life Chronicles is a nonprofit dedicated to provid-

ing video coverage of elderly

and critically ill medical patients entering their final moments on Earth. The video coverage is distributed to the family and friends of deceased patients. Life Chronicles has conducted several video interviews for numerous loved ones right here in San Mateo County. Beyond our county, the nonprofit has conducted more than 1,200 interviews in 38 states, as well as in the United Kingdom and Canada. The genesis of Life Chronicles began when its founder, Kate Carter, was inspired to videotape some of the final sentiments of a dear friend as they lost a courageous fight with breast cancer. Witnessing the extraordinarily positive effect the footage had on her friend’s family after her passing, Carter was convinced that this gift should be shared with the world. Carter suggests that the idea behind Life Chronicles is “creating something that loved ones will cherish even if things work out and the person [filmed] lives to be 100.” Equally important, children can once again grasp what it felt like to be loved and cherished by them in life through watching video footage of these moving senti- ments. I was moved to learn about the most common regrets of the individuals taped. Many of them expressed a deep regret that they could have done more to be a better hus- band, wife, father or mother. Beyond all else, the regrets represent the inevitable shortcomings that come with being human. Yet, those same regrets symbolize the aspiring goodness of humankind. The beloved individuals captured on these films have one thing in common: In life, they lit the wicks of thou- sands of candles around them. The Life Chronicles video footage captures that intangible flame. Through their unlimited joy, humorous laughter and unconditional love, they reached the hearts of loved ones in a way that their loved ones will never forget. Like the individuals captured on film, deceased loved ones have set an example for each of us on how best to live our fleeting lives on Earth. Now, let us follow their examples in our lives. Let us go out and light another thousand candles. Let us go forth and love others the way that our deceased loved one’s treasured each and every one of us. Let us cherish every waking moment from this moment forward the way they cherished them. Let us go out and accom- plish our dreams and visions with the same tenacity and compassion that they embodied to accomplish their achievements in life. Let us go forward and continue the humor and laughter with which they enlightened each of our lives. Whether we remember our loved ones through video footage, photographs or our most vivid memories, let us forever carry their undying spirits. The more candles we light, the brighter our world will shine. That, I would say, is the very reason and purpose for our existence: to light the wicks of others is to light the world itself.

Jonathan Madison
Jonathan Madison

Jonathan Madison worked as professional policy staff for the U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Financial Services, for two years. Jonathan currently works as a law clerk at Fried & Williams, LLP during his third year of law school and can be reached via email at jmadison@friedwilliams.com.

10 Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Fall in the energy sector drops stocks

THE DAILY JOURNAL Fall in the energy sector drops stocks Dow 17,598.20 -91.66 10-Yr Bond 2.15

Dow

17,598.20

-91.66

10-Yr Bond

2.15

-0.06

Nasdaq

5,115.38

-12.90

Oil (per barrel)

45.68

S&P 500

2,098.04

-5.80

Gold

1,085.30

 

Big movers

Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:

NYSE Tyson Foods Inc., down $4.39 to $39.96 The meat producer reported worse-than-expected fiscal third-quarter profit and cut its outlook,citing high cattle costs. NextEra Energy Inc., up $2.51 to $107.71 The parent company of Florida Power & Light Co.reported better-than- expected second-quarter profit and raised its outlook. Honda Motor Co., up 68 cents to $34.64 The automaker reported better-than-expected quarterly profit on a rise in sales with a key boost from the Chinese market. Trex Co., down $6.53 to $38.84 The maker of fencing and decking products reported worse-than- expected second-quarter profit and gave a disappointing outlook. Nasdaq Sears Holdings Corp., down $2.16 to $19.39 The operator of Sears and Kmart stores said a key sales figure fell sharply in the second quarter,dragged down by weakness at its namesake stores. Lexicon Pharmaceuticals Inc., up $5.16 to $13.60 The biotechnology company reported positive late-stage study results for a potential treatment of a cancer-related condition. BroadSoft Inc., down $2.88 to $32.04 The telecommunications software company's second-quarter results topped expectations but it trimmed its earnings expectations for the year. Abengoa SA, down $3.30 to $7.75 The energy and environmental industry engineering company is raising up to 650 million euros in a move to cut its corporate debt.

By Steven Rothwell

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Another bad day for

the energy sector pulled down stocks

on Monday.

Energy stocks slumped as the price

of oil dropped to its lowest in more

than four months. Oil has fallen sharply since the end of June on evi- dence that a global supply glut is building at the same time demand appears to be slowing. The energy sector is down 15 per- cent this year, making it easily the worst performing industry group in the S&P 500 index. Earnings at ener- gy companies have dropped almost 60 percent in the second quarter. “Certainly, oil production has been

strong globally,” said Serena Vinton,

a portfolio manager at Franklin

Templeton. “And with some of the global economic concerns and strong global production, it creates a nerv-

ous environment for oil.” The Standard & Poor’s 500 index

dropped 5.80 points, or 0.3 percent,

sliding since reaching a high this year of $61.43 a barrel on June 10. Overall, stocks have been in the doldrums since the S&P 500 closed at an all-time high of 2,130 on May 21. Short sell-offs have been followed by short rallies as investors have weighed signs of an improving U.S. economy against signs of weakening growth overseas. Among individual stocks, Tyson Foods was the biggest loser in the S&P 500 index Monday. The meat producer slumped $4.39, or 9.9 per- cent, to $39.96 after cutting its out- look for fiscal 2015 earnings. The company, which owns the Jimmy Dean breakfast sausage brand, blamed conditions in the beef market for its woes, citing high cattle costs and “export issues” as factors that

were hurting its profits. Michael Kors was another big loser, dropping $3.28, or 7.8 percent, to $38.71 amid concern that demand for the luxury fashion retailer’s handbags is dropping off. Analysts at invest- ment bank Canaccord cut their price

to

2,098.04. The Dow Jones industri-

target on the stock ahead of the com-

al

average fell 91.66 points, or 0.5

pany’s latest earnings report due out

percent, to 17,598.20. The Nasdaq composite slipped 12.90 points, or

Thursday. In Europe, Greece’s stock market

0.3

percent, to 5,115.38.

sank 16 percent as it reopened from a

Benchmark U.S. crude fell $1.95, or

month-long shutdown brought on by

4.1

percent, to close at $45.17 a bar-

the near collapse of the country’s

rel in New York. U.S. crude has been

financial system during its high-wire

bailout negotiations. Two surveys published Monday showed the damage caused to the Greek economy in July by the bank closures, money controls and uncer- tainty over the country’s future. A gauge of manufacturing in Greece plummeted in July to the lowest read- ing ever recorded, despite improve- ments across the rest of the 19-coun- try eurozone. A separate survey showed that business and consumer confidence fell for a fifth consecutive month in July to its worst level since October 2012. “The fundamentals of the country are still so weak and so uncertain,” Jorge Mariscal, regional chief investment officer for emerging mar- kets at UBS Wealth Management. “Clearly, the market is trading these assets as what they are, distressed assets.” Even after reaching the basis of a deal with its creditors, Greece s till has to demonstrate that it can deliver on its pledges for reform, he said. Investors also got an update on how the U.S. economy is doing. U.S. factories were a little less busy last month. The Institute of Purchasing Managers’ manufacturing index slipped to 52.7 from 53.5 in June. Economists had expected the index to remain unchanged. Any read- ing above 50 indicates growth.

U.S. auto sales strong in July on SUV, luxury demand

By Dee-Ann Durbin

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT — More Americans are buying cars that say “look at me.” Luxury vehicles like Audis and Volvos drove off dealer lots at a furious pace in July and, combined with sizzling demand for SUVs, helped the auto industry roll on toward its best annual sales since before the recession. July sales rose 5 percent to more than 1.5 million, according to Autodata Corp. Subaru reported the biggest sales gain of

10.5 percent over last July. General Motors, Fiat Chrysler and Hyundai all saw 6 percent sales increases, while Honda and Nissan saw 8 percent gains. Ford’s U.S. sales rose 5 percent. Volkswagen sales rose 2 percent. Toyota’s sales were flat, hurt by a big dip in car sales.

The high demand for big, pricey vehicles is defying recession-era predictions that Americans would downsize and stop flaunt- ing their wealth. Luxury sales were up 10 percent in the first six months of this year; in the same time period, mass-market vehi- cle sales rose just 3 percent, according to

car shopping site TrueCar.com. The surge in SUV sales is due in part to relatively low gas prices, which ended July at around $2.70 per gallon nationwide. Sales of Nissan’s new Rogue SUV jumped 51 percent in July, while sales of GM’s Buick Encore jumped 68 percent. Summer discounts to clear out 2015 mod- els also lured buyers. Sales of midsize sedans have been struggling as Americans pass them over for small SUVs, so automak- ers enticed buyers with zero-percent financ- ing deals on the Toyota Camry, Ford Fusion, Nissan Altima and other sedans. It

worked. Altima sales rose 27 percent and set a new July record. Another big motivator: status. Luxury brands made up 11.5 percent of vehicles purchased so far this year, up from 10.2 per- cent three years ago, according to TrueCar. Audi saw its best July ever in the U.S., with sales up 21 percent to more than 17,500 cars and SUVs. Lincoln’s sales jumped 21 percent; the brand sold 785 Lincoln Navigator SUVs, or 25 per day, at more than $62,000 apiece. Acura and Infiniti sales both climbed 20 percent. Volvo’s sales were up 15 percent.

both climbed 20 percent. Volvo’s sales were up 15 percent. Greek stock market bloodbath as exchange
both climbed 20 percent. Volvo’s sales were up 15 percent. Greek stock market bloodbath as exchange

Greek stock market bloodbath as exchange reopens

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATHENS, Greece — Greece suffered its worst stock market bloodbath in decades on Monday, when it opened after a forced five-week closure, and new data showed a dismal outlook for the bailout-dependent country’s shrinking economy. The main stock index shed over 22

percent just minutes into the opening,

as investors got their first opportunity

since late June to react to the latest twists in the country’s nearly six-year economic drama. The index closed 16.2 percent lower, with bank shares hitting or nearing the daily trading limit of a 30 percent

loss. Collectively, Greek-listed com-

panies lost about a sixth of their mar- ket value — almost 8 billion euros ($8.7 billion). “There’s a sense of panic,” said Evangelos Sioutis, financial analyst and head of equities at Guardian Trust. He noted some traders are selling stock merely to raise cash because there is so little liquidity in the Greek economy. “There are no buyers,” he said. “The outlook is not clear.” The last comparable plunge was in 1987, when the main index lost 15 percent. Markets in the rest of the world, however, were largely unaffected, a sign that investors outside Greece have now largely cut off ties with the country.

European shares closed higher. The Athens stock market and Greek banks were closed on June 29, when the government put limits on money withdrawals and transfers to keep a run on the banks from bringing down the financial system. People were panick- ing over the prospect that the country could fall out of the euro after its talks with international creditors broke down. The country’s radical left-led gov- ernment has since then capitulated to creditors’ demands for new austerity, and resumed talks on a new bailout — the third since June 2010 — worth 85 billion euros over the next three years. Banks have reopened, however strict limits on cash withdrawals remain.

Delta says it’s banning shipment of hunting ‘trophies’

NEW YORK — Delta Air Lines had a major change of heart about shipping hunting trophies, announcing Monday afternoon that it would no longer accept lion, leopard, elephant, rhinoceros and buffalo trophies. As recently as May, the Atlanta-based airline had said that it would continue to allow such shipments — as long as they were legal. At the time, some inter- national carriers prohibited such cargo. The move comes after an American dentist killed a well-known lion named Cecil in Zimbabwe last month in an allegedly illegal hunt, setting off a worldwide uproar. The dentist, Walter

Business briefs

James Palmer, lives in Minnesota, which is a major hub for Delta. Delta has the most flights of any U.S. airline to Africa. Several foreign air- lines announced similar bans last week.

Former trader given 14 years prison for market manipulation

LONDON — A British judge sen- tenced a former Citibank and UBS trader to 14 years in prison Monday after a jury found him guilty of masterminding the manipulation of a key interest rate, the London Interbank Lending Rate, or Libor. Judge Jeremy Cooke sentenced 35-year-old Tom Hayes, who special-

ized in products pegged to yen-denomi- nated Libor, after jurors found him guilty of manipulating the rate from 2006 to 2010. He was charged with conspiring with other traders — but he says he was made a scapegoat for a com- mon practice. “What this case has shown is the absence of that integrity which ought to characterize banking,” Cooke said. “You, as a regulated banker, succumbed to temptation in an unregulated activity because you could.” Libor is a key rate that banks use to borrow from each other. Revelations that it was rigged shook the markets because the rate affects what many peo- ple pay when they take out loans, such as a car loan.

CHICAGO BOUND: SKYLINE LEFT-HANDER TOM CAULFIELD TRANSFERS TO CHICAGO STATE UNIVERSITY >> PAGE 12 <<<
CHICAGO BOUND: SKYLINE LEFT-HANDER TOM CAULFIELD TRANSFERS TO CHICAGO STATE UNIVERSITY >> PAGE 12
<<< Page 14, Raiders great Tim Brown
at long last to be enshrined in Canton
Tuesday • Aug. 4, 2015

Giants blow lead in 12-inning loss to Braves

By George Henry

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATLANTA — Brandon Crawford felt confi- dent that the San Francisco Giants were about to wrap up another victory and head to the hotel early. Then everything fell apart. “We probably should have put them away early,” Crawford said. “Tough loss. We probably relaxed too much, and they jumped on us.” Crawford hit two home runs that helped the Giants to an early 6-0 lead, but starting

that helped the Giants to an early 6-0 lead, but starting Adonis Garcia pitcher Matt Cain

Adonis Garcia

pitcher Matt Cain and the San Francisco bullpen struggled in a 9-8 loss to the Atlanta Braves in 12 innings Monday night. Adonis Garcia ended the game — and completed Atlanta’s final comeback — with a two-run homer off Ryan Vogelsong in

the bottom of 12th. The Braves rallied with four runs in the sixth against Cain, then A.J. Pierzynski hit a two-run homer with two outs in the ninth

off Santiago Casilla to tie it at 7. Buster Posey, who had homered early, hit a go-ahead single in the top of the 12th for the Giants. Jace Peterson led off the bottom of the 12th by reaching on a throwing error by Crawford from shortstop. Vogelsong (7-7), trying to earn the first save of his 11-season career, fell behind in the count and Garcia homered over the wall in center field. “To get out to a big lead and let it go to waste and then to battle back in extras and still end up losing, it’s definitely disap- pointing,” Crawford said. “We just weren’t

disap- pointing,” Crawford said. “We just weren’t DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO Jonathan Engelmann, drafted in the

DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO

Jonathan Engelmann, drafted in the 28th round by the Minnesota Twins, opted for the college route to play at University of Michigan.

Engelmann Michigan bound

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It was one year ago Jonathan Engelmann was patrolling center field in the Area Code Games. The pride of Burlingame’s baseball class of 2015, Engelmann benefitted from the elite weeklong scouting tournament in Long Beach. Getting looks from a legion of pro- fessional and college baseball scouts, Engelmann’s stint with the A’s Area Code team earned him a full ride to the University of Michigan. “That was the most intense, awesome, exciting event of my baseball career,” Engelmann said. “All the (free baseball) gear, which is super cool, and you get to play

in front of 500

hard to believe it was a year ago.” Engelmann caught more than just the attention of collegiate scouts though. Following his senior year at Burlingame, the Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division bat- ting champion was selected in the 28th round

of the MLB draft. And while he was intent on

a signing bonus comparable to that of the

top five rounds, Engelmann said the negotia- tion process went right down to the wire of the July 17 signing deadline. “It was a pretty stressful decision,” Engelmann said. “It was exciting but stress- ful at the same time. The decision came down to a few minutes before the deadline.” Ultimately, the Twins did not meet Engelmann’s monetary demands, he said. All

Looking back, it’s

the while, he was settling in to a dorm room at Mosher-Jordan Hall on the Michigan cam- pus and beginning summer classes. But he still made the trip to the Twins’ home digs of Target Field, as the team hosted him the week of the signing deadline. There Engelmann got to meet with Twins All-Star second base- man Brian Dozier, as well as general manager Terry Ryan and owner Jim Pohlad. College baseball looks to be quite the con- tingency plan, though, as Engelmann pre- pares to join a rich tradition with Wolverines baseball. The program will be celebrating its milestone 150th season in 2016. “I’m excited just to be here at Michigan and be part of something that is really special,”

See MICHIGAN, Page 12

putting together the same at-bats we were earlier in the game. Give credit to their bullpen, I guess.” Garcia made his major league debut this season and has three home runs in 11 games. Both teams hit four homers. Arodys Vizcaino (2-0) got two outs for the victory. “Just to continue to battle and then go down again in the 12th — it’s fun,” said Pierzynski, who had four hits. “It’s what

See GIANTS, Page 13

Rousey runs roughshod throughUFC

W hile having a nightcap during a

weekend getaway in San

Francisco with my wife

Saturday night, I went on Twitter to find out the result of the Ronda Rousey UFC fight. Just after 10 p.m., one tweet said the fight was just start- ing. About a minute later, the tweets starting flying in. Once again, Rousey dominated an oppo- nent, finishing off Brazilian Bethe Correia 34 seconds into the first round

to retain her UFC bantamweight title. As if anyone needed any more validation, Rousey is baddest fighter on the planet right now. Her last five fights have lasted a total of 130 seconds — or 2 minutes and 16 seconds. To put that in perspective, a boxing round is three minutes, while a UFC championship round lasts five. What makes Rousey so impressive is the fact that she has yet to settle. When she first came on the scene, she was known mostly for her grappling skills and has arguably the most lethal finish- ing move in the business — the arm bar. But since then, Rousey has added to her arsenal. Saturday night, she used what many considered the weakest part of her fight game, striking. So of course it was a crushing right hand to Correia temple that sent her crumpling to the mat, face first, at which point the referee jumped in a stopped the fight. The only other fighter to whom I can compare is a young Mike Tyson. When Tyson was coming up, he was an absolute beast, taking people out with a

is a young Mike Tyson. When Tyson was coming up, he was an absolute beast, taking

See LOUNGE, Page 16

Bellis eliminated in opener at Bank of the West Classic

By Rick Eymer

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STANFORD — Sixth-seeded Andrea Petkovic got her body realigned and returned to form to beat fellow German Carina Witthoeft in a first-round match of the Bank of the West Classic on Monday. “I played really bad up to 1-5,” Petkovic said. “It felt like my upper body and lower body were swapped. After that I played fine.” The 17th-rankedPetkovic won 5-7, 6-1, 6-3. “Stanford is special with the conditions.

The ball really flies,” she said. “You have to feel the court.” The seventh-seeded Madison Keys also advanced. The 18th-ranked American need-

ed just 5 minutes to take care of Aleksandra

Krunic 6-3, 6-0. “I think I played really well,” Keys said.

“Once I got the lead I tried to keep the pres- sure on her. My first serve was definitely working for me and that’s something I want

to keep up.”

American teenager CiCi Bellis lost her match to qualifier Misaki Doi, 6-3, 7-6 (3).

Bellis was the youngest player in 15 years to win a match at the U.S. Open last year. “I thought I played pret- ty well and gave her a good fight,” said Bellis, who lives a few minutes from the campus. “It’s good for me to play against players

ranked so high.” Qualifier Nicole Gibbs, who won a pair of NCAA singles titles while at Stanford, beat

won a pair of NCAA singles titles while at Stanford, beat CiCi Bellis France’s Caroline Garcia

CiCi Bellis

France’s Caroline Garcia 6-4, 7-5, for her first WTA main draw victory since April. “This was a big barrier for me to break through,” Gibbs said. “To do it in front of my home crowd was something special.” American Alison Riske topped German Tatjana Maria 6-2, 5-7, 6-1 to earn a date with third-seeded Carla Suarez Navarro in the second round of the tournament that is a tune up for the U.S. Open at the end of the month. Doi meets No. 2-seed Agnieszka Radwanska on Thursday. Mona Barthel beat wild card Carol Zhao 6-3, 6-0.

12 Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Skyline’s Tom Caulfield rides whirlwind D-I transfer

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

All of a sudden, Tom Caulfield is a Division- I baseball player. Just a week ago, Caulfield didn’t know where his pitching career was headed. The left-hander wrapped up an injury-plagued sophomore year at Skyline College in the spring. Because a recurring back injury limit- ed him to just 40 innings this season, his transfer prospects were slim. Then, last Wednesday, Caulfield received a phone call from Chicago State University coach Mike Pirillo. Two days later, the south- paw committed to play at the Division-I pro- gram on a full athletic scholarship. In early July, Caulfield’s twin brother Phil accepted a transfer scholarship from Loyola Marymount. “I’m relieved to say the least,” Caulfield said. “Especially after Phil committed, I felt a lot of pressure to find a place.” Caulfield — the 2013 Peninsula Athletic League Pitcher of the Year as a senior at Burlingame — said he had never missed a start in his life until this year. But after enter- ing the season as one of the aces of the Trojans’ staff, he suffered a muscle strain in his back a month into the season. Plagued with pain for the rest of the season, Caulfield missed nearly half his starts. After throwing eight innings against Monterey Peninsula March 3 in the Coast Pacific open- er, he totaled just 6 1/3 innings for the rest of

open- er, he totaled just 6 1/3 innings for the rest of DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO

DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO

Skyline left-hander Tom Caulfield walked off the mound at Cañada College after back tightness cut his March 24 outing short in the Trojans’ eventual 3-0 loss.

the season. “He was nowhere near healthy through the entire season,” Skyline pitching coach Tony Brunicardi said. “He pitched hurt the entire season, including into the playoffs.” Caulfield’s final start of the regular season came on March 24 at Cañada. He said he knew he wasn’t 100 percent entering into the game, but tried to soldier through. He lasted just one-plus innings in an eventual 3-0 loss.

“I kind of knew before the start I wasn’t 100 percent,” Caulfield said. “I just wanted to go out there because I sat out the last two starts in a row and I just wanted to get out there. I kind of battled through it … and kind of put on a poker face for my coaches.” After a pair of short relief stints down the stretch, Caulfield took the ball for his final overall start in Skyline’s playoff finale of a three-game series at Fresno City College. He

worked four innings to take the loss as Skyline fell 11-8 to see an end to its first playoff appearance since 2010. Brunicardi said he knew Caulfield wasn’t 100 percent for the playoff start, but he had the green light from Skyline trainer Jose Bonilla that Caulfield couldn’t do any long- term damage. “He wasn’t going to damage it any further,” Brunicardi said. “He was just going to be in discomfort when he was throwing.” Caulfield worked his way back to strong health this summer with the Walnut Creek Crawdads of the California Collegiate League. He struggled through 24 2/3 innings with an inflated 12.04 ERA, but said he felt his health was back to 100 percent by sea- son’s end. Caulfield’s twin brother also played for the Crawdads. In fact, the two have played togeth- er with every team they’ve ever played for, dating back to their start with the Burlingame Youth Baseball Association. The two will now be heading to different colleges to play for dif- ferent teams for the first time ever. “It’s going to be weird,” Caulfield said. “I’m used to always having him behind me. … It’s going to be lonely, to be honest.” Brunicardi, a Burlingame grad who watched the Caulfields grow up with his younger brother Andrew, spoke to the fire and intensi- ty they both bring to the baseball diamond. “Their love for the game, you wish every kid had it,” Brunicardi said.

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Beltre hits for the cycle

ARLINGTON, Texas — Adrian Beltre became the first major leaguer since the 1930s to hit for his third career cycle and the Texas Rangers held on for a wild 12-9 victory over the AL West-leading Houston Astros on Monday night. Beltre’s solo homer in the fifth, a liner deep into the seats in left field, completed the cycle against three Houston pitchers. A two-run triple by Beltre in the first inning put the Rangers ahead to stay at 3-2. He had a double in the second and a single in the third before his ninth

Baseball briefs

homer of the season made it 12-7. All three of Beltre’s cycles have come at the Rangers’ ballpark, two for the home team and one as a visitor when he was playing for Seattle on Sept. 1, 2008. The third baseman’s other cycle for Texas was Aug. 24, 2012, against Minnesota.

Hessman sets MiLB HR record

TOLEDO, Ohio — Call him the real- life Crash Davis. Mike Hessman, an infielder for Triple-A Toledo in the Detroit Tigers’ system, became the career home run

leader for U.S.-based minor leagues Monday night, hitting his 433rd in the seventh inning of a game against Lehigh Valley. Davis was the character played by Kevin Costner in the movie “Bull Durham” who set the minor league record for homers. Hessman reached the actual mark in style, hitting a grand slam to break a tie on the career list with Buzz Arlett. According to the Society for American Baseball Research, Hector Espino hit 484 minor league home runs, but he hit most of them in the Mexican League, which is not part of the affiliated minor league system.

MICHIGAN

Continued from page 11

Engelmann said. “For a while there I was spilt into two allegiances. But now, I’m part of a great program. It’s a long and rich tradition here. So, we’re going to win a few national championships now.” That’s an ambitious goal, even though Michigan has won seven all-time nation- al championships. The Wolverines last triumphed in Omaha in 1984, capping a run of five titles in seven years. Last year, the Wolverines made their first NCAATournament appearance since 2008, winning two games in the region- al playoffs before getting ousted by Louisville. But Engelmann — the only incoming freshman outfielder on the ros-

ter — is optimistic the team will contin- ue to gain momentum back to Omaha. “I think our program is huge on the blue-collar baseball, getting out there and getting work done, not necessarily the easy way,” Engelmann said. Engelmann is the only player from Burlingame’s 2015 Central Coast Section Division II quarterfinal team to sign with a Division-I program. As a sophomore in 2013, however, he played his first season with the varsity Panthers on a roster chock-full of D-I talent. Two pitchers from the 2013 squad immediately went the D-I route; Grant Goodman now plays for USF and Vince Arobio plays for University of the Pacific. Two more players have since transferred, with Phil Caulfield going to Loyola Marymount and his twin brother Tom Caulfield going to Chicago State University.

Engelmann, who transferred from Aragon as a sophomore during Burlingame manager Shawn Scott’s second year at the varsity helm, credit- ed his former skipper as being the driving force behind the Panthers’ myriad talent. “It’s the championship mindset real- ly,” Engelmann said. “He just knows how to play. He played at a high level himself. And he’s a selfless guy. … Shawn really works to get you there.” As a Division-I player, Engelmann again becomes draft eligible at the end of his junior season in 2018. The Twins must have made quite an impres- sion on him, as he said he would be up for negotiating with them again should they draft him then. “Hopefully we’ll revisit this process a few years down the road,” Engelmann said.

draft him then. “Hopefully we’ll revisit this process a few years down the road,” Engelmann said.
Store Closing ˇ
Store Closing
ˇ

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

13

Braves 9, Giants 8 (12 inn.)

Giants

ab

r

h

bi

Braves

ab

r

h

bi

Aoki lf

5

1

2

1

Markks rf

6031

Lopez p

0

0

0

0

EPerez lf

4000

Casilla p

0

0

0

0

FFrmn 1b

2000

Petit p

0

0

0

0

CJhnsn 1b

4221

Tmlnsn ph 1

1

1

0

Przynski c

6242

Vglsng p

0

0

0

0

Maybin cf

6120

Blanco cf

5

0

0

0

JPetrsn 2b

5233

Duffy 3b

6

0

1

0

AdGarc 3b

6222

Posey c

6

1

2

3

DCastro ss

5010

Pence rf

5

0

1

0

Fltynwcz p

2000

Belt 1b

5

2

3

1

Gomes ph

1000

Crwfrd ss

5

2

2

3

Mrksry p

0000

Adrnza 2b

3

1

1

0

Ardsma p

0000

Cain p

2

0

0

0

Ciriaco ph

1000

Kontos p

0

0

0

0

McKrh p

0000

Pagan ph

1

0

0

0

Brighm p

0000

Strcklnd p 0

0

0

0

Lvrnwy ph 1000

Romo p

0

0

0

0

Detwilr p

0000

Mxwll ph-lf

2

0

1

0

Vizcaino p

0000

Totals

46

8

14

8

Totals

49 9

17

9

San Francisco 022

200

001

001 —

8

14

2

Atlanta

000

004

102

002 — 9

17

1

E—Posey (1),B.Crawford (11),Ad.Garcia (2). DP—San Francisco 2,Atlanta 4.LOB—San Francisco 7,Atlanta 10.2B—Aoki (10),Pence (12),J.Peterson (18),Ad.Gar- cia (3). HR—Posey (16), Belt (13), B.Crawford 2 (18), C.Johnson (2), Pierzynski (7), J.Peterson (5), Ad.Gar- cia (3).SB—Maybin (18). CS—Adrianza (1).

San Francisco

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

M.Cain

5

10

4

4

1

1

Kontos H,11

110

00

0

Strickland H,12

111

10

0

Romo H,22

100

00

2

Lopez H,12

.1

0

0

0

0

0

Casilla BS,5

.2

3

2

2

1

0

Y.Petit

2

1

0

0

0

1

Vogelsong L,7-7 BS,1012

10

0

Atlanta

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Foltynewicz

6

9

6

6

1

0

Marksberry

1

0

0

0

0

0

Aardsma

1

0

0

0

0

1

McKirahan

1

3

1

1

0

2

Brigham

1

0

0

0

0

0

Detwiler

1.1

1

1

1

2

1

Vizcaino W,2-0

.2

1

0

0

1

0

HBP—by M.Cain (E.Perez), by Detwiler (G.Blanco). Umpires—Home,Dan Iassogna;First,Lance Barrett;Sec- ond, CB Bucknor;Third, Dale Scott. T—3:53.A—23,428 (49,586).

GIANTS

Continued from page 11

this game is all about. Keep fighting. You never know what can happen.” The Giants have lost two straight for the first time since stopping a seven-game skid in early July.

A’s hammered by O’s in Coco’s return

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Coco Crisp has long been considered a catalyst for the Oakland Athletics. At this late stage of the season and in last place in the American League, he could at least provide a bright spot. The left fielder returned from the 60-day dis- abled list from a neck injury that sidelined him since May 20 and provided a pair of hits in a 9-2 loss to the Baltimore Orioles on Monday night. Crisp was one of six roster moves by Oakland before the game. He batted second and went 2 for 4 following a five-game rehab assignment with Class-A Stockton. “I haven’t had that many at-bats from the end of last year, no at-bats really in spring training, so when I came back the first time from elbow surgery I didn’t really have the appropriate time,” Crisp said. “I wanted to wait and make sure I was myself, and I was able to do that.” Baltimore rookie Tyler Wilson shut down the A’s, and the Orioles hitters jumped on Jesse Chavez in a hurry. Chavez’s winless stretch reached three starts. The right-hander failed to reach five innings for the second time in three starts, knocked out after 3 2/3 with nine hits and six runs. He went a season-low three innings July 24 at San Francisco then five at Dodger

Stadium last Wednesday. “They made him work pretty hard, and when he threw the ball in the mid- dle of the plate they hit it,” manager Bob Melvin said. Felix Doubront pitched 4 1/3 innings of relief in his Oakland debut follow-

ing a trade from Toronto on Friday. With Boston (47-59) off, the A’s (47-60) fell into last place in the American League. “He got quite a few swings and misses. He’s got some deception,” Melvin said. “I thought as the game went along he mixed his pitches a little bit better.” Chris Davis hit a three-run shot in the first inning for his 27th homer to back Wilson’s impressive spot start. Caleb Joseph added a two-run homer in the fourth off Chavez (5-11) as Baltimore won for the eighth time in 10 games. “That’s what’s frustrating is I’m physically fine, I feel strong,” Chavez said. “It’s just one little mechanical thing that can make it look like you’re dragging.” Orioles skipper Buck Showalter earned his 1,313th career managerial victory, tying him with Hall of Famer Ned Hanlon for 31st all- time. Adam Jones had an RBI double in the third inning on one of his three hits, while Jimmy

in the third inning on one of his three hits, while Jimmy Coco Crisp Orioles 9,

Coco Crisp

Orioles 9, A’s 2

Baltimore ab r

4

5

5

5

5

4

0

4

0

2

1

1

0

1

1

0

2

h

1

1

3

1

0

2

1

0

3

bi

Oakland

ab

r

h

bi

Machdo 3b 4 GParra lf-rf A.Jones cf C.Davis 1b Wieters dh JHardy ss Pareds rf Lough lf Schoop 2b

1

0

1

3

0

0

1

0

0

Burns cf

Crisp lf

Vogt c

Butler dh

Davis 1b

Lawrie 3b

Fuld rf

Semien ss

Sogard 2b

4000

4120

4021

4000

3011

3000

4000

3000

3110

Joseph c

4123

Totals

40

9

14

9

Totals

 

32 2

6

2

Baltimore

301

220

010

9

14

0

Oakland

000

100

010

2

6

1

E—Lawrie (20). DP—Oakland 2. LOB—Baltimore 6, Oakland 5. 2B—A.Jones (19), Paredes (15), Schoop (4),Joseph (9),Vogt 2 (15).HR—C.Davis (27),Joseph (9).CS—Lawrie (2).

Baltimore

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

T.Wilson W,2-1

7.2

6

2

2

2

3

Givens

1.1

0

0

0

0

3

Oakland

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Chavez L,5-11

3.2

9

6

6

2

1

Doubront

4.1

5

3

3

0

5

Scribner

1

0

0

0

0

2

Umpires—Home, Laz Diaz; First, Alfonso Marquez; Sec- ond,Dan Bellino;Third,Chris Segal.

T—2:47. A—11,476 (35,067).

Paredes and Joseph hit run-scoring doubles in the fifth. Wilson (2-1) pitched 7 2/3 innings in place of Chris Tillman, who has an injured left ankle. Wilson allowed two runs and six hits, struck out three and walked two in his second major league start and sixth appearance after being recalled from Triple-A Norfolk.

Peterson and Chris Johnson homered for the Braves. Brandon Belt homered for the Giants. Making his sixth start since returning from season-ending elbow surgery last year, Cain allowed 10 hits and four runs in five- plus innings. “Kicking myself,” Cain said. “We’ve got a six-run lead right there and that’s the job of the starter, is to keep it and I didn’t do a good job right there. With a lead like that, that can’t happen.”

Johnson, who replaced Freddie Freeman before the start of the fifth inning, homeredoff Hunter Strickland to make it 6-5 in the sev- enth. Freeman left with a strained right oblique, and the team listed him as day to day. Nori Aoki’s RBI single in the ninth off Andrew McKirahan gave San Francisco a 7- 5 lead. Braves starter Mike Foltynewicz allowed all four homers. Crawford has two multihomer games in his career, both against the Braves.

Trainer’s room

Joe Panik will return to San Francisco on Tuesday for an MRI on his lower back. The team put him on the 15-day DL before the

game. Panik has struggled for the last week

Manager Bruce Bochy

changed the lineup an hour before the game, scratching CF Angel Pagan with right knee soreness. Gregor Blanco took his place. Pagan flied out as a pinch-hitter in the seventh.

with the

Resources and services from all of San Mateo County–over 30 Exhibitors Saturday, August 15 9
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14 Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

After 6-year wait, Brown ready for Hall

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Perhaps more than any other position in football, wide receivers are forced to depend on teammates for success. Without a quarterback to throw it, a line to block or other running backs and receivers to divert attention, it is nearly impossible for a wideout to accumulate the big numbers neces- sary to become a Hall of Famer. That’s why Tim Brown takes so much pride on the way he made it to Canton. Despite spending most of his career with pedestrian quarterbacks and few other big- play talents around him on the Raiders, Brown earned his Hall of Fame honors by becoming one of the league’s most consis- tent and prolific receivers. In a 17-year career that included 1,094 catches for 14,934 yards and 105 overall touchdowns, Brown caught balls from 19 quarterbacks with the Raiders and Tampa Bay. “I used to tell them throw it in my vicinity and I’ll do the rest,” Brown said. “To be consis- tent for that many years with so many quarter- backs is something I’m very proud of. I don’t know if a lot of other guys weathered through some of the things that had to be done. It was sometimes more mental than it was physical to get on the same page of these guys and almost babysit some of the young quarterbacks.” While Jerry Rice hadJoe Montana andSteve Young, Michael Irvin hadTroy Aikman, Andre Reed had Jim Kelly, Brown’s quarterbacks were not exactly a who’s who at the position. There were journeymen Jay Schroeder, Vince Evans, Jeff Hostetler, Jeff George and Donald Hollas. There were fringe players Marques Tuiasosopo, Chris Simms, David Klingler, Rob Johnson, Tee Martin and Bobby Hoying. That all changed when Rich Gannon arrived in Oakland in 1999 to give Brown a top-flight quarterback late in his career. Gannon was the only quarterback who was an original selection

was the only quarterback who was an original selection REUTERS Tim Brown totaled 1,094 catches for

REUTERS

Tim Brown totaled 1,094 catches for 14,934 yards in his 17 years with the Raiders.

to the Pro Bowl while playing with Brown. Hostetler was a replacement selection in 1994. There were only three other skill position players who made the Pro Bowl while team- mates with Brown: Rice, Bo Jackson and Ethan Horton each getting one selection. “Timmy did a lot of good things without a big-name quarterback,” Hall of Fame defen- sive back Rod Woodson said. “That adds to what he accomplished. That means at the top of his routes, he was open. Most great quar- terbacks can throw people open. The not-so- good ones can’t. That means Timmy was get- ting open a lot of times. When he was at his best and some of the elite cornerbacks were covering him, he was still getting open.” Gannon called Brown one of the smartest teammates he ever had, pointing to a photo- graphic memory that allowed him to memo- rize game plans almost as soon as he got

them. Brown had the creativity to make sub- tle in-game adjustments to get open. Despite just 4 1/2 years together, including three with coach Jon Gruden calling plays, Gannon completed more passes to Brown than anyone else, 356. Brown averaged 5.3 catches per game in four full seasons with Gannon at quarterback starting at age 33. At the time they split up, only Marvin Harrison, Rice and Sterling Sharpe averaged more. “When you look at all the quarterbacks and coaching changes and system changes that he had to deal with and still put up those num- bers, it’s really amazing,” Gannon said. “If he was in the right system with a good quarter- back his whole career, he already put up real- ly incredible numbers. But who knows?” Brown said he doesn’t allow himself to

See BROWN, Page 16

McKenzie optimistic in fourth year as GM

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NAPA — Reggie McKenzie knew it would take some time to build the Oakland Raiders the way he wanted to after being hired as general manager in January 2012. McKenzie has endured 37 losses in his first three seasons as he tore down the ros- ter, got the salary cap in order and began building the team back up through the draft. With a quarterback in place with second-year player Derek Carr, other promising youngsters sur- rounding him such as pass rusher Khalil Mack, and a handful of key veterans sprinkled throughout the

roster, McKenzie feels he

could finally have a team ready to compete after years of losing. “I knew I had to take some lumps,” McKenzie said Monday. “To see it come like the way I had planned it from building the roster and getting the team together, it’s the best I’ve felt going into Napa and training camp since I’ve been here. I’m anxiously waiting for preseason games now. I want to see how they jell and come together. I feel pretty good about this team. Really good.” There wasn’t much to feel good about those first three years as the Raiders allowed the most points in the NFL and lost the sec- ond-most games while cycling through two coaches, five starting quarterbacks and 135 players. Yes, a lengthy rebuilding process. Only five players McKenzie inherited have remained on the team throughout his tenure as he has tried to build the roster his way in hopes of ending a 12-year playoff

the roster his way in hopes of ending a 12-year playoff Reggie McKenzie See RAIDERS ,

Reggie

McKenzie

See RAIDERS, Page 16

a 12-year playoff Reggie McKenzie See RAIDERS , Page 16 Use of bat boys suspended after

Use of bat boys suspended after 9-year-old’s death

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WICHITA, Kan. — The National Baseball Congress has suspended using bat boys and girls during its World Series games in Kansas following the death of a 9-year-old boy who was accidentally hit in the head with a bat during a game. Kaiser Carlile died Sunday after he was hit by a follow-through swing near the on-deck circle during the Liberal Bee Jays’ game on Saturday. The boy was wearing a helmet, The Wichita Eagle reported. The National Baseball Congress’ general manager, Kevin Jenks, said the decision to

suspend the use of bat boys and girls is “out of respect for the Bee Jays.” The organiza- tion is planning to honor the boy at games Monday and Tuesday. Kaiser was a “kid, small in stature, who just wanted to be one of the guys,” said Mike Carlile, a member of the boy’s extended family and the Bee Jays’ general manager. He said Kaiser was eager to get to the ballpark every day and interact with the players, noting that they’d “kid each other, gig each other.” The city of Wichita owns Lawrence-Dumont Stadium, where the accident took place, and is deciding whether to investigate.

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SPORTS

Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

15

Dial could be big part of revamped 49ers DL

By Craig Massei

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTACLARA— Quinton Dial is running with the first-team defense for the San Francisco 49ers, who are looking to once again turn a young, raw prospect into a pro- ducer along their defensive line after the departure of long-time starters Ray McDonald and five-time Pro Bowler Justin Smith. As the team prepares for its first practice in pads Tuesday, Dial isn’t the only unheralded youngster that could play a prominent role on a line groomed the past eight seasons by Jim Tomsula, now entering his debut season as San Francisco’s head coach. The revamped front will have several faces who have fol- lowed a similar path. Since joining the 49ers as their defensive line coach in 2007 - a position he held until being promoted in January to replace the departed Jim Harbaugh - Tomsula has men- tored several projects and undrafted prospects into productive players along a unit that has anchored one of the NFL’s top defenses of the past five seasons. Dial is one of them. Drafted in the fifth round out of Alabama in 2013, he appeared in only three games and recorded two tackles as a rookie. But last year, when injuries rocked

San Francisco at nose tackle, the 6-foot-5, 318- pound Dial got an oppor- tunity to step in and start- ed six of the 49ers’ final seven games. This summer, with Ian Williams and Glenn Dorsey back from injuries that ended their seasons

last year, Dial is sliding over to right tackle and relishing a chance to continue his progress at a new position now that the hitting finally will begin. “I can’t wait, man,” Dial said Monday. “It’s a great opportunity and something I’ve been looking forward to for a long time. Doing all this offseason training, pushing weights, somebody’s got to pay for the work I’ve been putting in. Can’t wait.” Without McDonald and Smith - regular starters at tackle since 2011 in San Francisco’s 3-4 defensive scheme - several youngsters whom Tomsula has developed are getting opportunities this summer for bigger roles. Smith retired in May after 14 decorated sea- sons. McDonald was released abruptly last December due to off-field issues after starting San Francisco’s first 14 games at left tackle. That has left significant voids along the

at left tackle. That has left significant voids along the Quinton Dial defensive front on each

Quinton Dial

defensive front on each side of Williams, who is settling back in as the starting nose tackle for the third consecutive summer. Dial is getting a legitimate shot to replace Smith. “I watch a lot of tape of Justin,” Dial said. “The last two years I was with him I asked a lot of questions and worked with him on some stuff, and what I’ve learned from him I try to put in my game. Everybody plays dif- ferent. And playing D-line, it’s pretty much playing the same positions. You all see the same blocks. It’s helped me a lot to get ready for this opportunity.” Dial got his first career start last November when a fractured fibula ended Williams’ sea- son after eight starts. Williams, who joined the 49ers as an undrafted rookie in 2011, was one of several undrafted players who became defensive line starters under Tomsula’s tutelage, including Tony Jerod-Eddie and DeMarcus Dobbs. Jerod-Eddie, who started the final two games at left tackle in place of McDonald last season, also is in the mix for extensive playing time, along with Lawrence Okoye, another undrafted project who may be ready this summer. Okoye competed for England as a discus thrower in the 2012 Olympics. He had never played a snap of organized football before the 49ers signed him in 2013. Too raw to

play immediately, Okoye enters his third season still waiting for his first NFL action. He spent his rookie season on injured reserve and was on San Francisco’s practice squad last season. An imposing figure along the front at 6-6 and 304 pounds, the muscle-bound Okoye says he’s finally ready to contribute like the unheralded prospects before him. “I remember when I first got here, the first thing Jimmy (Tomsula) told me was, if you want to play in the NFL, and you’re a defen- sive lineman, the best place to be is here,” Okoye said. “He has honed me to a point where I can play in the NFL now. The track record speaks for itself, the number of undrafted guys that have gone through this system to start their careers and done well.” It’s not just longshots looking to move up. Rookie first-round draft pick Arik Armstead, 2013 second-round pick Tank Carradine and former first-rounder Glenn Dorsey also are in the thick of the competition. But Dial has made an impression during the non-padded opening days of camp, attempt- ing to make the open spot his job to lose. “Q is a tough, hard-working, feisty guy,” Okoye said. “I mean, anyone in this locker room will tell you that. He’s one of the toughest guys you’ll run across, and he’s earned his position.”

Judge: St.Louis residents don’t need vote on stadium money

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. LOUIS — The effort to build a new football riverfront stadium in St. Louis got a big boost Monday when a judge ruled that approval from city voters is not necessary to use bond proceeds for the project. St. Louis Circuit Judge Tomas Frawley’s ruling voided a city ordinance requiring voter approval for any project using tax dollars for a professional sports facility. He called the 2002 law’s language confusing and vague. A spokeswoman for Mayor Francis Slay says the city is reviewing the ruling. The St. Louis stadium proposal was announced in January. The open-air stadium is expected to cost $998 million. Bond extensions would provide $201 million — $66 million from the city and $135 million from the state. A combination of seat licenses, state tax credits and other incentives would help pay for it. About half the money would come from the team owner and an NFL loan program. The stadium could be ready for the 2019 season.

Brazilian universities to help with dirty water cleanup

RIO DE JANEIRO — Rio de Janeiro Governor Luiz Fernando Pezao signed a deal Monday with several Brazilian universities and research institutes to develop a plan for cleaning up the pol- luted waters of the city’s sewage-

Sports brief

strewn Guanabara Bay, where Olympic sailing events will be held. Pezao hailed the deal as a “very important step” toward the long-prom- ised cleanup, which has dragged on for more than 20 years with little progress. As part of Brazil’s Olympic project,

authorities pledged more than six years ago to drastically cut the amount of raw human sewage in the bay before the 2016 games. But only one of the eight promised treatment plants aimed at fil- tering much of the waste out of the rivers that have become open-air sewage ditches has been built, and the bay’s once-crystalline waters remain fetid.

the rivers that have become open-air sewage ditches has been built, and the bay’s once-crystalline waters
the rivers that have become open-air sewage ditches has been built, and the bay’s once-crystalline waters
the rivers that have become open-air sewage ditches has been built, and the bay’s once-crystalline waters
the rivers that have become open-air sewage ditches has been built, and the bay’s once-crystalline waters

16 Tuesday Aug. 4, 2015

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

 

AL GLANCE

     

NL GLANCE

 

East Division

East Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

 

W

L

Pct

GB

New York

59

45

.567

 

New York

56

50

.528

Baltimore

54

51

.514

5 1/2

Washington

54

50

.519

1

Toronto

55

52

.514

5 1/2

 

Atlanta

48

58

.453

8

Tampa Bay

53

54

.495

7 1/2

Miami

43

63

.406

13

Boston

47

59

.443

13

Philadelphia

41

65

.387

15

Central Division

 

Central Division

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Kansas City

62

42

.596

 

St. Louis

67

38

.638

Minnesota

54

51

.514

8 1/2

Pittsburgh

61

43

.587

5 1/2

Detroit

51

54

.486

11 1/2

Chicago

57

47

.548

9 1/2

Chicago

50

54

.481

12

Cincinnati

47

56

.456

19

Cleveland

48

57

.457

14 1/2

Milwaukee

44

63

.411

24

West Division

West Division

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

W

L

Pct

GB

Houston

60

47

.561

 

Los Angeles

60

45

.571

Angels

56

49

.533

3

Giants

57

48

.543

3

Texas

52

53

.495

7

San Diego

52

54

.491

8 1/2

Seattle

49

58

.458

11

Arizona

51

53

.490

8 1/2

A’s

47

60

.439

13

Colorado

44

60

.423

15 1/2

Monday’s Games Toronto 5, Minnesota 1 Texas 12,Houston 9 Tampa Bay 5, Chicago White Sox 4 Seattle 8, Colorado 7 Baltimore 9, Oakland 2 Angels 5, Cleveland 4 Tuesday’s Games Boston (Owens 0-0) at NYY (Tanaka 7-4), 4:05 p.m. Twins (P.Hughes 10-6) at Jays (Estrada 8-6),4:07 p.m. K.C.(Duffy 4-5) at Detroit (Verlander 1-3),4:08 p.m. Houston (Fiers 0-0) at Texas (Gallardo 7-9),5:05 p.m. Rays (Archer 9-8) at Chi Sox (Sale 9-6), 5:10 p.m. M’s (Nuno 0-0) at Colorado (J.Gray 0-0), 5:40 p.m. O’s (Mi.Gonzalez 9-7) at A’s (Bassitt 0-4), 7:05 p.m. Tribe (Carrasco 11-8) at Angels (Shoemaker 5-7),7:05 p.m.

Monday’s Games Arizona 6,Washington 4 Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, ppd., rain N.Y.Mets 12,Miami 1 Atlanta 9, San Francisco 8, 12 innings San Diego 13,Milwaukee 5 Seattle 8, Colorado 7 Tuesday’s Games DBacks (Corbin 2-3) at Nats (Scherzer 11-8),4:05 p.m. Cubs (Arrieta 11-6) at Pittsburgh (Happ 0-0),4:05 p.m. L.A. (A.Wood 7-6) at Phili (J.Williams 3-8), 4:05 p.m. NYM (Niese 5-9) at Miami (B.Hand 1-2), 4:10 p.m. S.F. (Peavy 2-4) at Atlanta (S.Miller 5-8), 4:10 p.m. St. L. (Lackey 9-6) at Cinci (DeSclafani 6-7), 4:10 p.m. Pads (Cashner 4-10) at Brews (Nelson 8-9),5:10 p.m. M’s (Nuno 0-0) at Colorado (J.Gray 0-0), 5:40 p.m.

RAIDERS

Continued from page 14

drought that began in the final years under late owner Al Davis. McKenzie said the difference between this

year’s team and the previous three versions is “obvious.” “I think we’re big and strong. I think we’re fast,” he said. “I like the way the players are responding to the coaches, the energy is off the

chain. I think it’s looking the way I like it to look.” The building blocks really began being put in place last offseason. Oakland drafted Mack, Carr, starting

left guardGabe Jackson, cornerbacks TJ Carrie and Keith McGill, and defensive tackle Justin Ellis to pro- vide a young core for the franchise. McKenzie hopes the additions of rookies such as receiver Amari Cooper, defensive lineman Mario Edwards Jr., and tight end Clive Walford will give the Raiders depth that has been lacking in recent years. The biggest questions on the ros- ter this summer are on the right side of the offensive line and the corner- backs. After bringing in a new pair of veteran starters at cornerback in each of his first three seasons, McKenzie opted to give the young guys a chance this year. Carrie, McGill and 2013 first- rounder DJ Hayden are competing

for the starting spots. The trio has made a combined 15 career starts, with Hayden being a disappoint- ment his first two years. But the Raiders believe those players will be an upgrade over Carlos Rogers and Tarell Brown. The right side of the line is an open competition, with J’Marcus Webb getting the first look at right guard and 2013 second-round pick Menelik Watson starting at right tackle. But rookie Jon Feliciano, Khalif Barnes, Matt McCants and Austin Howard are also in the mix. “We’re not concerned like, ‘Ah shoot, we don’t have anybody,”’ McKenzie said. “We’re just trying to figure out just how good they will be. We just don’t know.”

BROWN

Continued from page 14

think like that, although others close to him try to remind him.

“I had a cousin one time when I retired who took my numbers with Gruden andGannon andextrapolated them out over my career,” he said.

“It was something crazy man. It could have given Jerry Rice a good run for his money, that’s for sure.” Despite the nine Pro Bowl selec- tions, 10 straight 75-catch seasons and an accomplished career as a returner, Brown needed to wait six years to get his Hall of Fame call. Brown said he doesn’t begrudge receivers such as Reed and Cris Carter who got inducted before he did, but was frustrated by two years when no receivers were elected.

The long wait also means Brown’s father, former teammate Chester McGlockton and former Raiders owner Al Davis won’t be able to witness the induction, hav- ing died in recent years.

“That is tough,” he said. “It defi- nitely makes the situation bitter- sweet. It would have been nice if I had my dad here to see that big smile on his face when his son made the Hall of Fame.”

LOUNGE

Continued from page 11

ferociousness rarely seen in the fight game. Rousey has that kind of ability. And unlike Tyson, I can’t see Rousey ever getting complacent with her game. She continues to find the motivation to go into the octagon, seeing red, and destroying whoever is in front of her.

Rousey’s biggest obstacle, how- ever, may be the lack of competi- tion at the 135-pound weight limit. The word is she will face Meisha Tate in her next fight — a fighter Rousey has absolutely destroyed twice — including nearly tearing Tate’s arm out of her socket with

her arm bar when Tate refused to tap. Is there any doubt Rousey will make it a three-peat? Other than Tate, there is not a lot left for Rousey to prove at ban- tamweight. The scuttlebutt is Rousey will eventually needs to fight Cris “Cyborg” Justino. But “Cyborg” fights at 145 pounds and all the experts say Justino would have a tough time dropping the weight to fight Rousey at 135. As the biggest name in the sport, Rousey would call the shots in a fight against Justino. Could she move up to 145? She could, but why would she? The best-case sce- nario is they meet at a catch-weight of 140 — meaning Rousey would come up five pounds and Cyborg come down five. But there is more to it than that. Cyborg has been suspended in the

past for steroid use and Rousey has, on more than one occasion, brought up that fact. But at this point, Rousey may have to over- look it if she wants to face the potentially biggest challenge of her career. Experts say Justino’s forte is striking (read: punching) and that would give Rousey trouble. But as Rousey proved Saturday night, her striking has definitely improved, making her the most dangerous all- around fighter in the world. *** Another American Legion state tournament and another controver- sy involving San Mateo’s Post 82 squad. The controversy started before the tournament as Post 82 was ini- tially ruled ineligible because it filed necessary paperwork too late.

Aday later, Post 82 was back in the tournament, only to be declared ineligible after winning its semifi- nal game Saturday over Merced, which protested the game because of the paperwork snafu, which was upheld. The California American Legion needs to figure things out. Either Post 82 was ineligible before the tournament or it wasn’t. You can’t reinstate it and then make it ineli- gible once the tournament starts. Not only is not fair to the team, but it ruins the entire tenor of the tour- nament. How can a team that lost in the semifinals, Merced, feel good about playing in the champi- onship game on a technicality? I guess it’s karma Chico beat Merced in the finals. Before I started working for the Daily Journal, I had never heard of

American Legion baseball. It’s not a major organization in the East Bay, where I cut my teeth as journalist. Once I got to the Peninsula, I found out how big a deal Legion ball was. Area 2, the district in which San Mateo plays, used to have about a dozen teams playing in its state- qualifying tournament. Over the last several years, team participation has dwindled, to the point that this season there were only three teams in the Area 2 tournament — all from San Mateo County. Legion ball in the Bay Area is effectively dead. Maybe it’s time for the San Mateo team to look for a different organization.

Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:

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