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BE SAFE Because you want to

Principles of Behaviour Based Safety


Application Form A1

Contents
A.

Identifying Information ................................................................................................................................ 2

B.

The background conditions in your company ............................................................................................ 3

C.

Descriptions of the workers........................................................................................................................ 7

D.

Safety Concerns. ....................................................................................................................................... 9

E.

Description of your PBBS programme ..................................................................................................... 11

F.

The PBBS data, Graphic Displays of Data and Analysis of Data ............................................................ 15

G.

Sustained Improvement ........................................................................................................................... 26

H.

Impact of CBS on People, Projects and Business ................................................................................... 28

I.

Summary .................................................................................................................................................. 33

J.

Appendices .............................................................................................................................................. 34

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A. Identifying Information
Name of Organisation
Costain Ltd

Location of Corporate Office


Costain House
Vanwell Business Park
Maidenhead
Berkshire
SL6 4UB
United Kingdom

Name of Company Representative in charge of application


Alan Cheung BEng, CEng, MICE, MAPM

Phone number of company representative


00 44 7799 435792
00 44 1628 842444

E-mail address of the representative


alan.cheung@costain.com

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B. The background conditions in your company


Introduction to Costain
Costain is a leading UK Engineering Company with a history that dates back over 145 years, during which
time Costain has helped to shape the infrastructure and landscapes of both the UK and the world at large.
The Group turns over c1Bn per year and is engaged in Engineering, Construction, Maintenance and Land
Development, it has 3 Operating Divisions, namely Environment, Infrastructure and Energy & Process,
which operate over 10 specific sectors; Water, Waste, Education, Marine, Highways, Airport, Rail, Nuclear,
Hydrocarbons & Chemicals, and Power.
We have a reputation not only for delivery, but in how we deliver on all aspects of our projects, including
Innovation, Time, Cost, Quality and most importantly SHE Safety, Health and Environment.
We have a diverse range of projects within our portfolio, with project duration ranging from 3 months to 3 or
more years. As such we have a workforce made up of both directly employed and supply chain workers.
Our Vision is To be one of the UKs top solution providers, which is underpinned by our Company Growth
Strategy Choosing Costain.
Choosing Costain addresses the significant changes our industry faces and ensures that we focus our
business in the specific areas where there is an Acute National Need, targeting key Blue Chip and Public
Sector Customers.
The strategy allows us to deliver an ever increasing full service, a one stop shop, through all phases of a
projects life; we have broken this down into the 3Cs of Consultancy, Construction and Care.
Our principle area of work is Nationwide within the UK, we also operate overseas where we have
established relationships with key customers and the projects align with our experience, expertise and
support our strategy.
Corporate Responsibility lies at the heart of our business and as such our Choosing Costain Strategy is
supported by Costain Cares, which we launched earlier this year.
Costain Cares is an operational drive to build a long term sustainable business, which creates a greater
Economic, Environmental and Social value.
In essence it sets out how we do business, it has been developed after detailed stakeholder engagement
and is designed to enhance the performance of every part of our operations and allows for our
performance to be continually measured by Business in the Community (BITC). This allows us to bench
mark ourselves and ensure that we are operating in a Corporate and Socially Responsible way.
Costain have received many awards in recognition of the success it has achieved most notably these have
included;
2007 ROSPAs Sir George Earle Trophy
2008 Major Contractor of the Year
2009 Major Contractor of the Year
2010 Contractor of the Decade

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Divisions involved in PBBS Programme


Costain is made up of 3 Divisions operating across 10 Specific Sectors.
See Appendix A for a copy of our company structure.
All of our divisions are involved in the Costain Behavioural Safety (CBS) Programme.
Environment Division
Consists of 4 Operational Sectors that operate in their respective markets
1. Water Sector
Delivering improved water assets
2. Waste Sector
Solving waste sustainability
3. Marine Sector
Delivering vital marine infrastructure
4. Education Sector
Enhancing the learning environment
Infrastructure Division
Consists of 3 Operational Sectors that operate in their respective markets
1. Rail Sector
Upgrading the railways
2. Highways Sector
Improving road journeys
3. Airport Sector
Improving airports
Energy and Process Division
Consists of 3 Operational Sectors that operate in their respective markets
1. Nuclear Process Sector
Managing nuclear waste safely
2. Power Sector
Improving energy infrastructure
3. Hydrocarbons and Chemicals Sector
Delivering full lifecycle solutions

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Kinds of jobs in which workers are involved


Our workforce is engaged in many different jobs and activities, typically these would include:

Ground Works

Mechanical Installation

Drainage installation

Electrical Installation

Earthworks

Commissioning

Road Construction

Operating and Maintenance

Steelwork

Design and Consultancy Work

Steel Fixing

All aspects of Project Management

Concrete Placement

Site Investigation

Shuttering

Concrete and Materials testing

Joinery

Road Maintenance

Recent non-safety initiatives and company changes


The main company initiative introduced in the last 6 months is Costain Cares; this is an operational drive
to build a long term sustainable business, which creates a greater Economic, Environmental and Social
value.
See Appendix B for more information on Costain Cares

Recent non-PBBS safety initiatives


We have introduced a number of Safety Initiatives over the last 12 months and whilst they are at face value
non PBBS safety initiatives, we have used the principles of Applied Behavioural Science in their
formation and introduction to the business.
Typical examples include:

Revised Back to Basics


This is where all projects are required to do a back to basics tool box talk with the workers each
month. This initiative had been running for over 2 years and was based on a subject that Costain
Group believed was relevant. This was revised such that a project decided on the subject based
on what its particular issues or risks were in the particular month.

Stop Shift Briefs


This is where all projects are required to stop for a minimum of 2 hrs within a given timeframe and
engage with the workers on current safety issues. Initially these were run every 3 months and
were very prescriptive. This was revised so that the Stop Shifts were carried out at key times
where accidents were more likely to happen, e.g. when the clocks changed, as winter was
approaching, reduction in daylight hours, start back after the summer, lead up to Christmas.
Effectively we moved them on to a variable schedule, followed up with a Survey Monkey and used
the feedback to improve the next briefs. We also made them less prescriptive and ensured that all
operational directors attended a project briefing.

Frontline Supervisors Protocol


This protocol allows us to simply measure and review whether our Frontline Supervisors were
suitably experienced, qualified and competent. This was developed in conjunction with our Senior
Works Managers and was only introduced after we tested it out on a number of projects.

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Other Background Factors


Typically in the UK main stream SHE management focuses on the use of procedures and process as well
as inspection and audit by Safety Advisors and Inspectors.
The main UK measure of Safety Performance is the AFR (Accident Frequency Ratio), this is calculated as
follows:
No. of RIDDOR Incidents x 100,000
Total Hours Worked
A RIDDOR Incident can generally be summed up as an incident that has resulted in a person being off
work for more than 3 consecutive days the exact definitions are laid down in RIDDOR (Reporting of
Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrence Regulations).
The following table gives typical AFR figures for the construction industry

Typical Construction Industry

AFR = 0.45

Construction Industry - Good Performance

AFR<0.2

st

Costain Year Ending 31 December 2010

AFR = 0.14

The UK construction market is such that there is a very transitional workforce who may only be on site for
very short period of time, or who comes to site to carry out very specific work activities.

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C. Descriptions of the workers


Overview
Our workers can be broken down into 3 principle groups:
1. Directly Employed
2. Agency or Temporary Workers
3. Subcontract Workers
The makeup of the workforce at any point in time will be dependent on our Projects specific needs and the
strategy deployed on those projects. However everyone who works on our projects needs to be able to
demonstrate they have are Suitably Qualified and Experienced

Ages
16 to Retirement age, this would typically be 65, however changes to the law now means that there is no
prescribed age where a worker has to retire.

Experience
Workers will have a diverse range of experience based on their age, experiences to date and time spent in
our industry.

Training
Training is a key element of our BE SAFE Strategy; it comes under the Competence Section. We require
that everyone who works for Costain can demonstrate that they have the appropriate level of training for
the work they are engaged to carry out.
Where the workers are directly employed they will have a progressive programme of training identified for
them, this is typically identified on a projects training matrix and plan.
Where agency or temporary workers are engaged, we ensure that they have the appropriate training for
their role and will provide further training as appropriate to the projects needs or as and when their roles
develop.
Where workers are employed by our supply chain we expect to see that they are included on the supply
chains training matrix and plan.
See Appendix C for an example of a training matrix.

Safety Training
As a minimum requirement all workers are required to possess a valid and appropriate Safety Training
Card for the UK construction industry.
Typically this would be:
CSCS card for workers both skilled and unskilled
CPCS card for plant operators
This is a mandatory requirement and cards are checked at induction and periodically through the life of a
project.
Safety training is delivered in the same way as discussed in the section above, with each project and
subcontractor having a training matrix and training plan.

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Education
The educational base of our workers is extremely diverse and will depend on their trade.
For example a general worker may have left school at 16, whilst an instrument technician may have gone
to college or university and gained the associated qualifications.
We also operate apprentice schemes, sponsor workers to attend the National Construction College and
where appropriate sponsor them to attend college or university to progress their educational base.

Health
Workers health is monitored as appropriate to the project and will generally follow a risk based approach.
We require workers who are in high risk roles to have a valid and up to date medical, e.g. Crane
Operators, Scaffolders etc.
Where workers may be exposed to specific health risks e.g. radioactive material, hand arm vibration,
working in contaminated works, we set up specific exposure and health monitoring systems for the project.
We also take a proactive approach to health through educating the workers on subjects such as hygiene,
manual handling, healthy eating and hydration.
We also provide the facility to have a Health Check Up with a qualified medical person.
The above relates to anyone who works on a Costain Project and is not limited to directly employed
workers.

Safety Records
Workers safety records are monitored for trends to help us identify if we have any particular problems or
training needs

Other: specify other relevant information about workers


It is important to understand that the nature of our business and industry that we work in means that our
workforce can be extremely transient. Some of our subcontractors may only work on a project for a week
whilst others may be there for considerably longer.
The nature of the UK construction market also means that workers will frequently move between
employers, predominantly because of job security and hourly rates.

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D. Safety Concerns
Costain has a stated Value that Safety Health and Environment (SHE) is our No.1 Priority and in order to
achieve this we must continue to improve our performance in this area.
Costain safety performance, (based on AFR data), since the year 2000 has shown a general downward
trend.
The initial downward trend can be attributed to the implementation of our Procedures and Guidance Manual;
however between 2003 and 2006 the performance had reached a plateau.
The start of CBS in 2006 led to a step change improvement in safety performance.
These trends can be seen in the following graph which charts Costains AFR between 2000 and 2010,

1
0.9
0.8

"BE SAFE" Started


P&G Manual

0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4

BBS on JV Projects

0.3
0.2
0.1
0
2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Costain Group AFR Chart

It became obvious that to continue to drive our SHE Performance forward and continue to reduce our AFR
we had to do something different, we were confident that our systems and procedures were robust as we
had accreditations and audits to verify this, however our performance was varied which lead us to the
conclusion that we needed something to address our peoples behaviour.
In 2005 two of our large Framework Projects, 4D and UU, both with a 5 year programme of work ahead of
them piloted two Behavioural Based Safety Programmes, the results over the following years showed a
significant impact on the Frameworks Safety performance which helped to deliver an improved safety
performance at group level.
The following graph charts one of the pilot programmes, 4Ds, AFR performance over the 5 year period.

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0.40

0.35

0.30

0.25

0.20

Monthly AFR

0.15

0.10

0.05

0.00
Apr-06

Dec-06

Aug-07

Apr-08

Dec-08

Aug-09

Apr '10

Dec '10

4D Framework AFR Chart

In 2008 it was decided to commence adopting a behavioural approach to safety across the wider business
and training started to be rolled out.
In 2010 Costain appointed a dedicated Costain Behavioural Safety (CBS) Delivery Manager to give CBS a
focal point, build on its success to date and deliver a step change to our safety performance.
The CBS Delivery Manager reports directly to the Divisional Managing Directors as opposed to the SHE
Director and is one of the Framework Managers who piloted the original programmes. The reason we have
adopted this approach is that a fundamental principle of CBS is that it is lead by Management and supported
by our SHE Teams.

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E. Description of your PBBS programme


Costains PBBS Programme is called Costain Behavioural Safety (CBS) the people involved in the original
pilot programmes agreed on what it should be called and also developed the Vision, Mission and Objectives
for CBS.
The Vision for CBS is very simply:
BE SAFE Because you want to
The overriding Objective of CBS is:
To deliver a sustainable improvement to our SHE Performance and Culture through proactive SHE
leadership at all levels within our business, which provides clear Expectations, Measurement,
Feedback and most importantly Consequences.

The CBS Programme is based on the work carried out by the two pilot programmes, the results they
achieved and understanding what worked and how it can be applied to the specific needs of our business.
The over arching principle of CBS is Leadership and Engagement, as such we have adopted a top down
leadership approach, using the key principles of Applied Behavioural Science along with a suite of tools to
aid implementation. This approach has ensured that CBS was developed to address the specific needs and
requirements of the Costain Business, which included addressing the issues of having a predominantly
transient workforce and the short duration of projects.

Overview of CBS Process


The following diagram gives a simplified overview of the CBS Process:

CBS Course for Leaders

Behavioural Improvement Plans from Course


Delegates

Behaviour change in Leaders, Leaders use


behaviour in decision making

Leaders create new environments; more


behaviourally sound decisions are made

New worker behaviour

Injuries decrease

Project Specific Implementation Plan for site to


sustain improvement

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CBS can essentially be broken down into two distinct parts:


1. Training
2. Implementation

Training
The approach to training focuses on top down; this is to ensure that we develop a sustainable CBS model
where everyone in the delivery chain of command, including our supply chain, clearly understands the
impact and consequences of their behaviours on their direct reports.
Costain working with Hollin Consulting developed four bespoke Costain Behavioural Safety Training Courses
designed to address the specific needs, of the different levels within the company. We also developed and
produced a CBS Training Booklet which included Costain specific examples of how CBS has been used to
make improvements as well as to illustrate key learning points.
The four levels of training are delivered through a combination of Hollin and Costain trainers.
Type of Course

Duration

Delivered by

Executive Board

2 x 4hr modules

Hollin

Senior Managers

4 x 4hr modules, 2 weeks apart +


follow up module 6 weeks later

Hollin

Frontline Managers and


Supervisors (FMS)

3 x 4hr modules , 1 to 2 weeks


apart + follow up module 4 weeks
later

Costain internal trainers

Workers

2 x 2hr module

Costain internal trainers

Train the Trainer Course

2 x 2 day modules, 2weeks apart


+ coaching

Hollin

Each Project develops its own CBS Training Plan which identifies everyone on the project, what training they
require and would normally include, staff, directly employed workers, subcontractors and client members of
the project team.
It is worth noting that several of our Executive Board have subsequently attended the Senior Managers
course as well.
Key elements of the course syllabus include:

Understanding what Behaviour is

Consequence Analysis

Pinpointing Behaviour

Behaviour and the Environment

Antecedent / Behaviour / Consequences

Feedback

Analysing Behaviour

Measurement

Consequence Types

Shaping Behaviour

See Appendix D for diagrams illustrating the course syllabus.


All of the training courses have been designed to give the delegates an understanding and working
knowledge, appropriate to their level, of applied behavioural science.
The Managers course has a slightly more managerial emphasis than the FMS course, as we have found that
this group of people start to apply it to other areas of their role as opposed to just safety.
In addition to the training modules, both the Managers and FMS courses have coursework, reading and
coaching attached to them which are carried out in the period between the modules.

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At the end of the Managers and FMS courses, delegates are required to produce a Behavioural
Improvement Plan (BIP) that they will then carry out over the next 4 to 6 weeks, at which point they feedback
to their group on what they achieved and how they achieved it.
See Appendix E for information on numbers trained

Implementation
Training is only the first step of our CBS Programme, it is designed to engage, educate and equip our people
with a fundamental understanding of the principles of Applied Behavioural Science and how to apply it in the
real world.
Once training has been undertaken, it is up to individuals and leadership to implement the principles of CBS
in the work place; this is driven and supported by our management teams.
To aid implementation we have produced an Implementation Pack designed to help teams look at things in a
different way and provide them with a number of tools to support CBS on a project. The Pack has been
designed to provide a Simple Guide to Implementing CBS on a Project, it comprises of an Implementation
Guidance Booklet and a set of CBS Tools.
Each Project is required to produce a CBS Implementation Plan that looks at and addresses the specific
needs of the project. It includes when training is scheduled to be delivered, the projects choice of tools that it
intends to use and when they intend to implement them.
It should be noted that this is a live plan and if a particular tool is not working or the projects data tells them
they need to do something different, then the plan should change to reflect this.
See Appendix F for an example of a CBS Implementation Plan
Whilst we have developed an initial suite of behavioural tools it is expected that over time teams will adapt
and develop their own CBS Tools that are appropriate to the their specific issues, these will be identified and
driven by data captured at a project level, which in turn will be used to make the decisions that really will
make a difference.
The principle of the CBS Implementation Plan is to identify and make focused and often small changes in the
project teams behaviour, in a structured and measurable way.
As part of the Implementation Plan, each Project is required to nominate a CBS Champion responsible for
driving and implementing CBS on the Project.
Each Champion is an Operational Member of the Projects Senior Management Team and is appointed in
writing by their Sector Director, this ensures that the Sector Directors are engaged with CBS, made aware of
the impact of their behaviour on the project team and made part of the CBS consequence chain.
A key feature of CBS is that it is designed to address a projects individual need and is based on
implementing a series of tools across the projects lifecycle. Consequently when we are operating with a
client who has a Behavioural Safety Programme or are working in a Joint Venture where our partner may
have a Behavioural Programme, we are able to integrate their programmes and tools into the Projects
implementation plan.
We have been successful in achieving this with our client at Sellafield Ltd where we integrated their Human
Factor tools into our implementation plan and combined their training into an additional bolt on module.
We have also worked with our Joint Venture Partner Skanska and integrated their behavioural Observation
Programme into the projects implementation plan.
In addition to this our Client London Underground has asked Costain to provide CBS training to 60 key
London Underground staff who are not working on Costain Projects.
Figure 1 depicts the principle of Behavioural Science sitting at the core of our CBS Programme and that
projects then select CBS tools that are appropriate for the project.
Figure 2 depicts how CBS fits into the Costain BE SAFE Strategy along with its constituent parts. It
demonstrates that there is a need for some quick win tools that will have a relatively quick impact on worker
behaviour as well as long term cultural change tools, the blank boxes represent the fact that other tools will
be developed to suit the needs of the business or project.

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Names on
Helmets
RF Card
Road Shows
and TBTs

Client /
Partner BBS
Tools

Behavioural
Science

Culture
Survey

Simple
Observation
Scheme

Engagement
& Comms

Hazard
Recognition

Charity
Donation

Figure 1

Figure 2

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F. The PBBS data, Graphic Displays of Data and Analysis of Data


CBS is different to more traditional BBS Programmes, in that it does not solely focus on worker observations.
As previously discussed the focus of CBS is on leadership behaviour and using a suite of tools to achieve
this, consequently PBBS data can be broken down into in to 3 principle areas:
1. CBS Programme data
2. Project specific data
3. BIP Data
In order to aid with the understanding of the CBS Programme I have combined the Data, Graphic Display of
Data and Analysis of Data sections for each of these 3 areas.

1. CBS Programme Data


The success / impact of the CBS Programme is measured and monitored using a number of metrics and
sources of data. These are rolled up from a Project Level to a Sector Level to a Group Level. This is done
to ensure that there is a clear consequence chain through to the Managing Directors
There is a mixture of Leading and Trailing measures that we track and trend over a rolling 12 month period,
as this allows us to see any recurring trends and whether we are realising a sustained improvement.

The Trailing metrics are:


Data

AFR and No. Minor Accidents


These are classified under RIDDOR

Importance

These measures are important to the business as they are how the company
and wider construction industry bench marks itself. In addition to this these are
two of the measures that our clients judge our SHE performance
Due to the low number of Incidents it is often hard to identify any trends

How is it Collected

Monthly returns from site

Ensuring Accuracy

Data gets checked during monthly inspections

The Leading metrics include:


Data

Near Miss / Hazard Observations / Unsafe Acts / Observations etc

Importance

This data set helps to identify what is likely to happen next and hence allows
us to implement proactive measures to minimise the likelihood that a similar
more serious incident does not occur.
We have also found that this is a good measure in identifying the level of
engagement with both CBS and wider SHE aspects on a project.
Consequently there are a number of initiatives to increase the level of reporting
in this area

How is it Collected

Data is collected by projects on a daily level and then incorporated into monthly
returns from site

Ensuring Accuracy

Data gets checked during monthly inspections, data gets verified through the
use of anonymous RF card surveys

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Data

Inspection Scores and associated Red Scores

Importance

Carried out monthly on each project by an independent SHE Advisor.


Projects are scored in a number of key areas and given Red Scores in areas of
particular poor performance.
By trending overall scores, no. & type of red scores, comments from the SHE
Advisors, we are able to consistently identify and trend a Projects SHE
Performance.

How is it Collected

SHE Advisors carrying out inspections

Ensuring Accuracy

The SHE advisor is independent from the project, normalisation days are held
for the advisors to ensure consistency in scoring &approach.

Data

CBS Training Plans and Implementation Plans

Importance

This is a key in measuring whether projects are truly engaging with CBS and
have an organised and planned approach.

How is it Collected

Monthly returns and through Director check list returns

Ensuring Accuracy

CBS Delivery Manager spot checks projects

Data

CBS Champion Appointment Letters and Director Check Sheets

Importance

This gives an indicator as to the level the projects and Sector Directors are
engaging with CBS.
It provides evidence as to the interactions that are going on between directors
& PMs & ensures that Directors know what their projects are doing

How is it Collected

Letters and check sheets collected by CBS Delivery Manager

Ensuring Accuracy

Spot checks by CBS Delivery Manager

Data

CBS Ratio
Total No. of Near Misses, Hazards and Observations / Total No. of Accidents

Importance

Provides an indicator as to the level of Near Miss / Hazard / Observation


reporting compared to Accidents that are being realised.
This is then pulled back to the accident triangle, a continuing upward trend
indicates an improving level of reporting and engagement

How is it Collected

Monthly project returns to CBS Champion

Ensuring Accuracy

Spot checks on data by SHE Advisors

Data

Near Miss Ratio


Total No. of Near Misses, Hazards and Observations x 100,000 / Total Hours
worked

Importance

Provides an indicator as to the level of Near Miss / Hazard / Observation


reporting compared to hours being worked on a project.
An upward trend indicates an improving level of reporting and engagement, a
static trend would indicate the same people are reporting near misss

How is it Collected

Monthly project returns to CBS Champion

Ensuring Accuracy

Spot checks on data by SHE Advisors

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Engagement with the CBS Process is measured using a combination of metrics which are weighted
dependant on importance. Figure 3 provides a snap shot of this engagement data along with an overall
engagement score.

Division

Environment

Nuclear

Project

Evap D

31

Berkley Framework

31

Trawsfynnydd
Capping Roofs

31

Bond Street XRAIL

85

Bond Street LUL

85

MAC 14

FMS

MAC 12

FMS

MAC 10

FMS

MAC 7

FMS

E and SE
Framework

FMS

Bidston Moss

90

Port Talbot PDR

90

M1 J10-13

88

Welsh Water AMP4


and 5

4D

UU AMP5

4D

STW AMP5

29

4D AMP5

40

Brighton and Hove

40

GMW

FMS

Highways

Water

Park Way, Newbury

FMS

Infrastructure

Waste

St Georges,
Lincolnshire

4D

Env Other

Lewisham Schools

Sector Director Coursework


Score %

Education

Bradford Schools

GSD

GSD

Sector

Project Manager Coursework


Score %

93

15

75

66

73

100

4D

4D

21

73

100

69

100

100

4D

78

100

86

91

63

TBC

90

100

81

CBS Ratio

12

26

42

73

180

96

33

33

56

14

19

57

34

49

49

Near Miss Ratio

36

39

50

50

13

96

115

578

61

89

299

203

16

38

30

28

107

305

272

188

CBS Champion Coursework


Score %

100

FMS

90

66

66

93

4D

4D

99

73

FMS

77

100

100

4D

FMS

FMS

100

86

Appointed in Writing

Training Plan

Implementation Plan

Engagement Score (max 36)

26

36

28

26

35

Y
13

26

11

18

26

19

Y
17

28

27

27

10

10

10

10

31

14

33

Y
Y
29

30

Figure 3

Figure 4 is a snapshot of the CBS Measurement Data; it uses the engagement data from Figure 3 to identify
Project Engagement as well as other the data from both leading and trailing measurement.
It measures and tracks the rolling 12 month trends for this data set and uses a simple Red / Amber / Green /
Blue coding for a Projects / Sectors / Divisions performance.

Environment

Isabel Coman

Llion Evans
Tony Kopec

Simon Atwell

Matt Butler

MAC 10

MAC 12

MAC 14

Bond Street LUL

Bond Street XRAIL

Trawsfynnydd
Capping Roofs

Berkley Framework

Evap D

Rob Phillips

Clive Loosemoore

MAC 7

Joint Venture Not


implementing CBS

Simon Atwell

Clive Leadbetter

E and SE
Framework

PA

Andy Clarke

Andy Bannister
Andy
Bannister

Bidston Moss

M
PA

Phil Davies

Simon Ellison
Simon Ellison

Port Talbot PDR

M
MC

Doug Coutts

Bruce Richards
M1 J10-13

L
GK

Rob Fancourt John Skentelbery

John Madden

Flat

Richard
Scrase

Up

Ray Dennis

Overall CBS Ratio Trend

Welsh Water

12

Simon Radley

164

Simon Radley

UU

20

Rolling CBS Ratio

Bill Lomas

No of Near Miss / Hazards


etc

Mark Lloyd

14

STW

Barry Mitchell

Barry Mitchell

No of Minors

M
MH

4D

No of RIDDORS

Phil Risbridger

Nuclear

Craig Reede

Rail

Brighton and Hove

Jerry Hayes
Parkway, Newbury

Highways

John Boyd

Kevin Miners
St Georges,
Lincolnshire

AB

Project

Water

Paul Howells

David Woodhouse

Clive Kraus
Lewisham Schools

Director Check Sheet

CBS Champion

Infrastructure

Waste

GMW

Kevin Miners
Matt Robinson

Overall Engagement Rating

PM

Phil Parsons

Bradford Schools

Env Other

Carly White

Education

GSD

GSD

Craig Snow

July 2011

44

19

44

12

11

34

21

18

21

12

434

494

157

83

458

437

1078

575

228

1123

223

110

303

211

111

170

34

49

26

42

73

180

96

33

33

56

14

19

57

34

49

623
52

Flat

Flat

Down

Flat

Up

Flat

Up

Up

Up

Down

Flat

Flat

Flat

Down

Down

Up

Flat

Up

Up

Rolling Near Miss Ratio

36

39

50

50

13

98

116

578

61

89

299

203

16

38

30

28

107

305

272

188

Overall Near Miss Ratio


Trend

Up

Flat

Flat

Flat

Flat

Flat

Up

Flat

Up

Up

Up

Flat

Up

Flat

Down

Flat

Flat

Down

Flat

Up

Up

Engagement

CBS Ratio

Near Miss Ratio

Blue

Very High

Fully Engaged Proactive


Approach

>100

>200

Green

High

Engaged, Largely doing what


is expceted of them

65 to 100

100 to 200

Amber

Medium

Partially Engaged / Starting


out on CBS Process

25 to 65

40to 100

Red

Low or Non

Not Engaged / Difficulty in


Engaging

<25

<40

Figure 4

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Three key trends have been identified from this data;


1. The level of project engagement is clearly related to the level of Sector Director and Managing
Director Engagement.
2. Projects which have Red CBS and Near Miss Ratios and have Flat or Down Trends are generally
having RIDDOR Incidents, the opposite is also true.
This in turn identifies which projects the sector Directors need to focus on, or indeed which Sector
Directors the Managing Directors need to focus on.
For example based on the data in Figure 4 and current performance, Lewisham Schools is likely to
realise a RIDDOR Incident in the near future. The Sector Director is currently working with the team
to minimise the likely hood of this occurring.
3. This data is currently leading us to the conclusion that the level of Near Miss, Hazard and
Observation data captured on a project is reflective of the level of engagement the project teams has
with CBS and the wider SHE.
The data points to the fact that Projects with high levels of reporting generally have fewer less
serious incidents, this is probably contributed by the fact that these projects are proactive in
addressing the issues this data set identifies.
Consequently this data is being used to support the drive to sustainably increase the level of Near Miss,
Hazard and Observation reporting by all parties to a project, i.e. Staff / Supply Chain / Client / Worker /
Visitor / Manager.
There are four projects within the above data that are not engaged with the CBS Programme, this is down to
the fact that the projects are three way joint ventures that are legal entities in their own right. This data has
been included as it provides an example of performance in a non CBS Environment.

2. Project Specific Data


The data captured at a programme level is also used at a project level, Figure 5 & 6 show inspection score
data and near miss reporting data for a project.

CBS Commenced on Project

Figure 5

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CBS Commenced on Project

Figure 6

The success of CBS and a project realising sustained improvement as demonstrated in the previous two
graphs, is dependent on getting people to use what they have learnt in the day to day running of our
business, as such the Project Implementation Packs help to support our project teams by providing simple
guidance and providing a number of tools that they could use.
The CBS Implementation Plan helps a project to identify where the issues are on the project and hence
allows the team to focus its efforts on being proactive and adopting a Behaviourally sound approach in
increasing the levels of safe behaviour.
The tools have been designed around the principles of applied behavioural science and on what we have
found to work, examples of these tools are:

Simple Observation Scheme

Hazard Recognition Tool

Behavioural Bonus Scheme

RF Card Road Shows

Some of the tools focus on collecting local data on specific behaviours that the project team believes are
safety critical, whilst others focus on creating and maintaining an Environment that will allow desired safe
behaviours to thrive or how we can shape workers behaviours.
Whichever tools a project selects to use they need to address the specific needs and issues of that particular
project.
As CBS develops and matures on a project, the project teams are asked to develop their own tools that we
can add to the Toolbox an example of this is the BBS report card developed at Bidston Moss.
See Appendix G for example of Bidston Moss BBS Report Card.
The following four case studies explain the tools and type of data that a project may choose to implement
collect and act up on, they also demonstrate positive results they attain.

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Simple Site Observation Scheme Tool


A Site Agent and Foreman completed a CBS course and decided to carry out some measurements on 5 key
behaviours using a simple observation checklist that measured if the behaviour was safe or at risk.
At the end of each day they plotted the observations on a graph and displayed it on the canteen wall.
At the end of the first week the site agent called the work force in to discuss the data they had collected.
The area that most concerned the site agent was the fact that only 20% of the workforce was wearing
goggles when placing concrete. He asked the guys about the goggles and got the usual, they are
uncomfortable, you cannot see through them and so on. However he continued to press them for the real
reason. After a period of discussion he found out that the workers could not be bothered walking back to the
stores to get the goggles when the concrete wagon arrived. Not an answer he particularly wanted to hear,
but at least an honest one that he could work with.
He then asked the workforce how he could help them wear goggles as he really did not want them to get an
eye injury. After further discussion one of the joiners on site asked if it would help if he made them a small
tool box that they could store the goggles in and take them out at the start of each shift. The workers agreed
that this was a good idea.
The foremen continued to measure the observations for the next few weeks and put the results on a graph in
the canteen.
They found that goggle wearing increased initially to 90% and then on to 100% over the following 2 weeks.
The site agent continued to use the observation to measure other at risk behaviours and continued to work
with the workforce to solve the issues he found; moving the focus onto different behaviours once he had a
high degree of compliance measured over 3 to 4 weeks. He also began to use a similar technique to
improve production from 2 of his subcontractors which were initially 3 weeks behind programme and finished
4 week early.

Goggles being worn when placing concrete


100%
90%
80%

% Safe Behaviour

70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0

Week Number

Figure 7

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Hazard Recognition Tool


The Construction Manager on a Framework wanted to raise the level of near miss reporting across his 20
Projects. After failing to achieve this on a number of occasions he decided to adopt a different approach.
He asked all of his senior foremen to attend a meeting where he engaged with them as to why near misses
were not reported. All of the usual reason came out such as, we get punished when we raise them, it takes
too long to fill out the paperwork, its like admitting you messed up etc.
The foremen were then challenged to develop a tool that would increase the level of near miss reporting,
they understood the importance of having the near miss data.
Over the next 2 hours they had come up with their solution;

They were going to call it Hazard Recognition

They would collect the data during the start of shift briefing in the morning

Hazards / Near Misses would be captured by the person delivering the start of shift briefing by
writing on the briefing sheet what had been observed by the workers, this also meant that the
foremen had to actively engage with the workers

The Site Manager would then categorise the data captured against 12 specific categories, as data
points this gave the project team real time data on where the hazards were on the project at any
point in time and allowed proactive measures to be implemented.

The site manager was to ensure that all high potential near misses were then formerly reported as
per the company procedure.

The site manager was only required to submit numerical data, against the 12 categories, to the
Construction Manager on a monthly basis to allow a framework review of any trends which was then
feedback to the projects.

The result was that Near Miss reporting increased from an average of 10/month to 154 and stayed above
100 for the next 6 months and above 70 for the following 6months, this drop can be attributed to the
workload in the framework dropping by 2/3rds.
Figure 8 shows the rolling 12 month data for near miss reporting, total number of accidents & CBS ratio on
the Framework.

1200

Workload drops off

1000

800

600

Rolling 12 Month No. of Accident

Introduced Hazard Recognition


Tool developed and
implemented by Foremen

Rolling 12 Month No. of Near Miss


Rolling 12 Month CBS Ration

Accident levels reduce as


Near Miss Reporting
increases

400

200

Jun-11

Apr-11

Feb-11

Oct-10

Dec-10

Jun-10

Aug-10

Apr-10

Feb-10

Oct-09

Dec-09

Jun-09

Aug-09

Apr-09

Feb-09

Oct-08

Dec-08

Jun-08

Aug-08

Apr-08

Feb-08

Oct-07

Dec-07

Jun-07

Aug-07

Apr-07

Figure 8

It is also worth noting that the AFR for the Framework has been zero since the introduction of this initiative.

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RF Card Road Show Tool


This tool uses Radio Frequency (RF) cards to obtain instant real time anonymous data from the workers.
The feedback is then used to engage with the worker to understand what is really happening on a project
and identify any gaps or actions that need to be addressed.
It is important that the questions asked are relevant to the project.
On one such road show the answers to 2 particular questions raised some concerns with the Contracts
Manager who was delivering the road show; these results can be seen in Figures 9 and 10.

Figure 9

Figure 10

The Contracts Manager started to engage with the 85 workers who were participating in the road show, very
quickly he found that there were a number of supervisors who were simply not carrying out start of shift
briefings but were getting their teams to sign that they had received one.
The Project Manager and Works Manager were astounded; they thought everything was OK, they had been
checking that sheets had been signed. Their immediate reaction was to try and find out who the problem
supervisors were and punish them.
The Contracts Manager pointed out to them that it was perhaps they who should be punished as they had
been sat in an office checking that pieces of paper had been filled in as opposed to physically going to see
and understand what was actually happening.
The agreed action was for the Project and Works Managers to engage with the supervisors and understand
why this was happening and then come up with a shaping plan to change the behaviour.
This was carried out and they found that the supervisors need some training in how to effectively
communicate and in what they should be delivering. They also ensured that they periodically attended the
start of shift briefings to check on what was being carried out and to reinforce the supervisors.
The questions were asked again on the next road show & received a significantly more positive result.
A side effect of this case study was that it was discussed at the next foremans forum where it was identified
and agreed that the staff foremen required their own effective communication training course as not all of
them were confident in delivering briefings or wanted to improve the quality of their briefings.

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Behavioural Bonus Scheme Tool


The Project manager on a high profile project needed to install a pipeline up the middle of the high street in a
town centre. He was under significant political, time and cost pressures to get the pipeline installed in the
shortest time.
Consequently he agreed with his Works Manager to pay the workers a weekly production bonus to
incentivise them to get the pipeline installed quickly.
The works Manager subsequently pointed out to him that this would potentially drive the wrong behaviours
and lead to corners being cut. This was of concern as the pipeline had to cross over 130 known services.
They decided to break the bonus down into two parts

1. Production Bonus Paid for achieving the desired production rate


2. Behavioural Bonus

Paid for achieving the desired behaviours

Correct PPE being worn

No service strikes

Correct permits being in place

Zero Complaints

Correct level of quality

If the workers achieved both the production and behavioural targets they got the full bonus, if the workers
achieved the behaviour target but missed the production target they got 50% of their bonus.
However if they achieved their production target but missed their behaviour target they got no bonus.
The result of implementing this scheme was that the pipeline was finished 3 weeks ahead of programme, the
team negotiated over 270 services without hitting one; this was especially impressive as over 50% were
uncharted.
In addition to this there were no quality issues and the team received letters of thanks from several
stakeholders and residents along the route.
These positive results lead to the worker receiving an additional discretionary bonus and the company was
awarded additional work by the client.

Not all of these tools are suitable for use on all projects, but when they are used the change in behaviours
and following results have been outstanding.
We have also found that the CBS Training on its own is often enough to have an impact on an individuals
behaviour, such that they seek to increase the safe behaviours of others around them. This can be
demonstrated with the following case study.

Overcoming Barriers to the Costain Behavioural Safety Training


A site supervisor was extremely concerned about attending the Costain Behavioural Safety Training.
However, his concerns for the workforce were soon transformed as he realised that the principles of the
training could have a long term impact on the way he and his team worked.
Responsible for the supervision of the dumpers on site, he realised that there were two main behaviours that
he needed to address and he used the principles of the CBS training to realise a positive outcome.
The two specific unsafe behaviours that he identified and targeted were:
1. Overloading
2. Workers usage of seatbelts

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Since undertaking the training, the supervisor has addressed the reasons why the dumpers get overloaded
and has gradually shaped his behaviour and those within his team, to ensure that they are always working
as safely as possible.
He attributes the success of the training to the fact that he now feels more comfortable being vocal with the
workforce. The training has affected the way he works on a daily basis and he has noticed that he finds that
he is consistently challenging unsafe behaviours and reinforcing safe behaviours, which in turn has improved
his hazard awareness.

3. Behavioural Improvement Plan Data


As part of the training courses, delegates are required to produce a behavioural improvement plan (BIP)
which they are required to implement in the 4 to 6 weeks after the last module of the course.
Projects also use BIPS as a wider tool on a project.
Over 1000 BIPS have been carried out over the last 5 years, the following table gives some examples of the
BIPs that have been carried out, these are all owned by individuals who are asked to feedback to their
course group on what they have achieved.

DESCRIBE THE
PROBLEM

People leaving vehicles,


plant and materials in
access walkways and
roads throughout site.

TARGET RESULT

Greater control over


vehicles on site,
especially wagons when
being unloaded.

Workers walking in Haul


Road - think this is ok
because seen Unnamed
Blue Hat Supervisor do
the same, but with HIViz trousers.

Workforce to understand
and follow rules.

T-cards not being put in


correct holder on doors
of boxes (cannot fit
because cards in bad
condition) Zone 30.

T-cards to be place in
correct holder - replace
when needed.

Some personnel not


wearing the proper
masks for painting
often wearing
inappropriate masks.

For all personnel to be


wearing correct mask for
task.

RECOMMENDED
CONSEQUENCES

OBSERVED
IMPROVEMENTS

Speak to supervisors
from all companies and
suggest wagons be
unloaded in a temporary
location, & for materials
to be moved later on.
Give toolbox talks on
obstructing main roads
through site.

Number of vehicles
blocking walkways and
roads throughout site
has reduced
dramatically, with people
giving feedback to
continue improvement.

Improve message and


understanding.
Encourage Blue Hat
Supervisors to lead by
example.
Offer replacement cards
for when card becomes
unusable - remind
workers of importance of
T-Cards.
Brief personnel on
correct type of mask and
filter for the task.
Provide a face-fit test for
all personnel.
Order additional masks
for stores to ensure
enough are available.

Reduced number of
Workers walking in haul
road, although still
occurring due to
pedestrian walkway
being blocked. BBS
Card submitted.
Problem not been
repeated since - T-cards
being used in correct
manner.

All painting personnel


have correct type of
mask and filter for the
painting of internal and
external of Bidston Moss
Viaduct.

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Workers being reluctant


to use the safety selfretracting Stanley
knives, and continue to
use traditional Stanley
knives.

Incorrect usage of skips


(materials being placed
into wrongly designated
skip)

Ensure all workers are


using the self-retracting
Stanley knives, and the
use of traditional Stanley
knives becomes extinct.

Encourage workforce to
place correct waste in
designated skip.

Dust collection boxes


not being emptied daily
effecting overall
tidiness of site.

To encourage all
aspects of the site to be
tidied and maintained
daily specifically
improve the Dis Plant
Set ups.

Some workers not


wearing helmet inside
box.

To wear helmet or have


suitable agreed
protection to be worn
inside the boxes.

Brief the supervisors and


workers, and follow up
with a Toolbox Talk and
S.O.S on the issue.

Large increase in the


number of workers
choosing to use selfretracting Stanley knives
rather than traditional
knives continuous
improvement.

Improve the signage


around skip areas.
Discuss issue with all on
site and physically stop
individuals from using
the skips incorrectly.
Speak to individuals
responsible for each
plant set up and discuss
ideas/implications of
untidy work area.
Ask for feedback from
workforce as to why dust
boxes are not being
emptied.
All CBUK given a
briefing in S.O.S and a
Toolbox Talk on the
importance of wearing
helmets at ALL TIMES.

Reduction in incorrect
usage of skips observed.

After 2 weeks a great


improvement was seen
in the tidiness dust
boxes emptied much
more frequently.

There have not been


any more reported
incidents of helmets not
being worn in boxes.

Change environment
Access Lighting being
moved, and used as
Task Lighting

Eating in Canteen and


leaving rubbish on
tables.

Access Lighting to
remain in place

All rubbish to be placed


in the bin.

- spray symbol at
permanent lighting
locations so removal
can easily be identified

There have been no


reported issues with
permanent lighting

Give workforce
opportunity to tidy up
and then punishment for
those who continue to
leave rubbish

Posters being displayed


on each table in the
canteen reminding
workers to put rubbish in
the bin.

People putting rubbish in


cigarette buckets where
it can set fire

Rubbish placed in
rubbish bin at smoking
huts

Place mesh over


cigarette bucket to stop
rubbish entering

Mesh placed over


existing cigarette bins problem remains.
Placing clear plastic
bags for rubbish next to
smoking huts to
encourage correct usage
of bins.

People putting rubbish in


the fire stand opposite
the turnstiles (entering
from the car park)

Rubbish places in a
rubbish bin

Place a bin in the area

Bin being placed next to


fire stand

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G. Sustained Improvement
The CBS Programme has been able to demonstrate not only local sustainable improvements as discussed
in the previous section, but can also demonstrate long term sustainable improvement.
Figure 11 charts Costains AFR over the last 10 years, the graph demonstrates a sustained improvement in
the companys performance over this period, the improvements since 2007 can largely be attributed to the
introduction and implementation of the CBS Programme.

1
0.9
0.8

"BE SAFE" Started


P&G Manual

0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4

BBS on JV Projects

0.3
0.2
0.1
0
2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Figure 11

In addition to this we can demonstrate a sustained improvement in SHE Performance over a 5 year period
with the following two sets of data.

GCA Framework Data


Our GCA Framework started their CBS programme over 5 years ago.
The Framework was run by two Construction Managers reporting to a Framework Director; initially all of the
senior managers underwent CBS Training, at which point Construction Manager A sat down with his team
and told them he did not buy into it and it was not for him, however if his team wanted to use CBS he would
not stop them.
Construction Manager B sat down with his team and told them he wanted to really support and use CBS as
he believed that it could really make a difference to their performance, however he needed their buy in to
make it work. His team unanimously backed him.
So for 5 years the GCA Framework effectively carried out a controlled experiment where two construction
managers adopted different approaches, Construction Manager A adopting a traditional approach and
Construction Manager B adopting a Behavioural approach.
Figure 11 provides the data over the 5 year period, it is worth noting during this time staff and workers
swapped between the 2 construction Managers projects as did the supply chains workforce.
The only difference between the two performances was the two different Construction Managers, their
immediate direct reports, their leadership and approach to SHE.

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Figure 11
The data clearly demonstrates that there is a significant difference between the performance of the two
construction managers and their teams and that CBS really does make a difference.

4D Framework Data
Our 4D Framework commenced their CBS programme in 2006.
On this framework the CBS programme was driven and lead by the Framework Director, the results clearly
show an outstanding SHE Performance, Figure 12 charts their AFR over the 5 year period, it is worth noting
that they achieved an AFR of Zero for over 3 years during which time they worked in excess of 7 Million man
hours, the jump in AFR in Jan 11 is the result of a single injury.

0.40

0.35

0.30

0.25

0.20

Monthly AFR

0.15

0.10

0.05

0.00
Apr-06

Dec-06

Aug-07

Apr-08

Dec-08

Aug-09

Apr '10

Dec '10

Figure 12

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H. Impact of CBS on People, Projects and Business


CBS has had a significant positive impact on other parts of the Costain Business, as well as in peoples
personal lives. This can be put down to the fact that our training courses are deliberately based on the
principles of Applied Behaviour Science (ABS).
The following five Examples help to demonstrate this;

1. Communication
We have used the principles of ABS to help us improve the way we communicate, this has ranged from
changing the content and style of our communications, through to where we put notices that we want
people to read, to how and where we deliver briefings.
For example we now use the space on the back of the toilet door, above the urinals and next to the kettle
to place notices that we would like people to read, we have carried out a number of experiments to see if
this works.
We have also worked with project teams to get them to communicate face to face with workers as
opposed to simply putting notices up.
We have worked on the content and style of our communication, keeping communication short and to the
point, using appropriate imagery and telling them what we want them to do.
We also use the RF Cards in the wider business to test for knowledge, during and after briefings as well
as within the various training courses we deliver.

2. Understanding the environment we create and the impact of engagement


We have used the principles of ABS to understand and improve the environments we create and the
positive effects of engagement.
We have now moved to a position that when we are introducing a new process or initiative, we engage
with the people it is going to impact on or who are required to use it, we then pilot it and ensure that we
provide appropriate feedback before full implementation.
Currently the CBS team is working with the HR Department to use ABS to improve the engagement with
our performance review process, this includes ensuring that we are not making empty threats that we
follow through with what we say and that the right consequences, both reinforcing and punishing are put
in place and are applied consistently.
We are also currently working with our Business Systems Team to develop a Behavioural Approach to
Business Systems, which includes Quality and our Implementing Best Practice Procedures.

3. Shaping Directors Behaviours


We are using the principles of CBS and ABS to shape Directors Behaviours, a couple of examples of this
are:
Directors are now being more effective in the use of their chain of command or consequence chain in the
operation of their business. For example if a particular project is not performing in the area of Quality,
the Managing Director (MD) is now applying Consequences through the Sector Directors (SD) to the
Project Managers (PM), previously this would have gone straight from MD to PM with the SD receiving
no appropriate consequence.
Equally we have had to work with the Quality Director to get him to realise that he will be largely
ineffective if he tries to apply consequences directly to the PM as the PM does not see him as their
consequence provider.
Directors are now more aware that when they come across an issue, they need to do more than simply
change the process, which is how they have historically managed. They are now using ABS to analyse
the behaviours and ensure that the right consequences are applied to the right people at the right time,
before blindly changing the process. This in turn is shaping peoples behaviour and helping to get
compliance with our systems and procedures.

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4.

Using the Principles of CBS Outside of the Work Place


Following the implementation of the Costain Behavioural Safety initiative on Five Fords, it was noted
that there had been extremely positive feedback received from one of the workers on site.
The worker has taken the principles of CBS to address a serious issue outside of work where by a
family member had been recovering from a stroke and was refusing to eat.
Following his CBS briefing, the worker decided that in order to address the problem he needed to look
at the possible reasons for the change in behaviour.
Inspired by what he had learnt, the worker and other family members looked at what and when the
behaviour started. They resolved the issue by removing the family member from the environment where
it was possible for her not to eat and as a consequence they were able to monitor the behaviour more
closely and provide timely and appropriate consequences.

There are many more examples of CBS affecting family life such as this one. Virtually every course
results in some improvement projects being directed at improving life at Home.

5.

Executive SHE Leadership


This section describes the makeup of the Executive SHE Leadership Team and how it responds to data
and incidents.
This has been broken down into the following three sections:
1. Make up of Executive SHE Leadership Team
2. Response to data
3. Examples of Response to Poor Data and Incidents
Please note Costain combine Safety, Health and Environment (SHE) together and review these aspects
of the business as a collective.

Executive SHE Leadership Team


There are two principle levels of Executive SHE Leadership Team (ESLT) within the Costain business:
i. Group Level
ii. Divisional Level
Group Level
At Group Level the Executive SHE Leadership Team meets on a monthly basis and takes a more
strategic overview of the Costain Group Performance and reviews trends and wider issues pertinent to
the group.
The Group ESLT will review overall trends, good practice, policies, procedures and new initiatives that
are being considered for introduction into the business. It also challenges the performance and specific
issues in each of the Divisions ensuring that the Managing Directors are not operating in isolation.
Figure A indicates the makeup of the Group Executive Leadership Team.

Alan Kay
MD

Darren James

Charles Sweeney

Peter Fisher

MD

MD

SHE Director

CBS & SHE Managers


By Invitation or
Request

Figure A

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Divisional Level
Within each of the three divisions there is an Executive SHE Leadership Team, these teams meet on a
monthly basis and have a dedicated meeting to review the safety performance of the Division and it
Sectors.
The Divisional Executive Leadership Team generally deals with the operational needs and issues of the
business,
Figure B indicates the typical make up of a Divisional ESLT.
Managing
Director

Sector Dircetor

Sector Director

Sector Director

CBS Delivery
Manager

Divisional SHE
Manager

Environmental
Manager

Health and
Wellbeing
Manager

Figure B

SHE Leadership Teams are also in existence at subsequent levels in the business, i.e. similar structures
to Figure B occur at the Sector Director Level, Framework Level and Project Level.

Response to Data
The ESLTs have dedicated SHE meetings to ensure that issues surrounding SHE are listened to and
addressed appropriately. By having these dedicated meetings the Managing Directors are sending out a
very clear message that SHE is one of our core values and needs dedicated time to review and discuss.
The CBS Programme has been designed to ensure that there is a CBS consequence chain from
Managing Director to Worker. This has been done through the requirement for Sector Directors to
formerly appoint, in writing, CBS Champions for their projects.
Consequently when there is an issue on a project, specifically around CBS, the CBS Delivery Manager is
able to apply appropriate consequences, through the Managing Directors as necessary, to the Sector
Directors and on to the Project Teams.
This consequence chain ensures that leadership issues are addressed and that there is clear leadership
and ownership for any specific issue.
When data is received that highlights a specific issue on a project, it will be reviewed at the appropriate
Divisional SHE Meeting, an open discussion will then be held with points of view being tabled from
appropriate attendees. Actions are then allocated to the appropriate Sector Director, with agreed
timescales for feedback and follow up, where the issue is more complex other parties such as the CBS
Delivery Manager will work alongside the Sector Director to help resolve the issues.
Equally where there are projects or sectors with excellent performance or whom have examples best
practice, these are shared and recognised by the teams and cascaded appropriately to other projects.
This ensures that the consequence chain is used to resolve the issues and recognise good performance
through the provision of timely and appropriate consequences.
It is the responsibility of the CBS Delivery Manager and SHE Managers to ensure the accuracy of the
data and support the teams in its analysis and interpretation.

Examples of Response to Poor Data and Incidents


This section contains two examples of how the ESLTs respond to poor data and incidents.
Poor Data Example

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A particular projects CBS and Near Miss Ratio data highlighted particularly low scores and downward
trends. This was brought up at a Divisional SHE meeting as a cause for concern by the CBS Delivery
Manager, who highlighted that the projects data was significantly lower than other projects in the division
and according to the CBS Data trends, increased the probability that a RIDDOR incident would occur.
The action plan was for the Sector Director to discuss the data with his project team and work with the
CBS Delivery Manager in identifying and implementing a CBS Tool that was appropriate for the project
and would address the projects specific needs.
Weekly feedback was scheduled between the Sector Director and CBS Delivery Manager, who
monitored and reviewed the data and trends, feedback to the Managing Director was required for the
next meeting.
Had the Sector Director failed to address the issue with his team the chain of consequences would allow
the CBS Delivery Manager to apply consequences through the Managing Director to Sector Director.
Incident Example
Following a serious incident on site that resulted in a worker turning over a tele-handler and sustaining a
fatal injury the ESLTs acted in the following way. Note this example focuses on the response following
the incident as opposed to how the incident was dealt with, which is subject to our standard procedures
and guidance.
The Group ESLT reviewed what was known to have happened and identified what needed to be
communicated immediately to all parts of the business; they also ensured that appropriate support and
advice were available to all. In addition to this the Divisional SHE Manager and CBS Delivery Manager
were tasked to review how we could adopt a behaviourally sound approach in how we communicated
and implemented the actions that were required to be carried out by the business.
An example of this is how the Frontline Supervisor Assessment was derived The CBS Delivery
Manager and Divisional SHE Manager engaged with several of the Senior Works Managers and General
Foremen in developing a simple tool that addressed their needs and the needs of the business.
Consequently when this tool was introduced, initially as a pilot and then to the whole business, there was
an immediate uptake in implementation and positive feedback received from all parties as to why we had
not done this before.
The Divisional ESLT worked with the SHE Team to identify and compile a plan of corrective measures
following the incident, this included measures to ensure the actions were implemented.
After such an incident it is imperative that Group and Divisional ESLTs have a joined up approach and
communicate a clear expectation based on the knowledge they have at any particular point in time and
share the best practice and ideas developed from the project teams.
The response to the incident is detailed below, with actions broken down into Group and Divisional
Executive SHE Leadership Actions:
Group Actions

Safety Stand Down for all projects incident briefed and expectations re-set on the operation of
plant and specifically tele-handlers;

Working with the tele-handler manufacturer to identify if:


o

They could design in a stability device and auto cut off when the machine sensed it was
becoming unstable;

They could design in an interlock system to ensure that the machine could only be
operated if the driver was correctly wearing the fitted seat belt.

All plant operators underwent a specific briefing, reinforced what their training and CPCS
License teaches them and requires them to do;

All tele-handlers now require specific RA and Authorisation prior to being brought onto site;

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Front Line Supervisor (FLS) Assessments have been introduced to ensure that we have
competent FLS, this is a two part assessment carried out by observing their behaviour and
performance whilst discharging their duties.

Divisional Actions

There has been a focus on what consequences are in play and how teams could change them
to encourage the wearing seat belts;

Working with supervisors to increase the vigilance of plant operators wearing seatbelts and
correctly operating the plant;

Project teams have investigated other technology based solutions such as fixing lights on top of
cab when seatbelt is being worn;

All FLS have been engaged and instructed to pay particular attention to the safe use of plant,
specifically seat belt use, and have been asked to reinforce the wearing of seat belts;

Workforce has been engaged and encouraged to be a "Critical Friend" to the drivers by
checking and reinforcing the wearing of seat belts with the machine drivers they are working
with;

Project Managers / GF's have engaged directly with tele-handler drivers to understand what
they thought could be done to support them;

Please note:

The Divisional ESLTs are responsible for discharging the actions from the Group ESLT;

The actions were not limited to the above and ongoing sharing of best practice between projects
through the Sector and Divisional Directors continues to occur.

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I. Summary
As this Application for Accreditation by the Cambridge Center for Behavioural Studies demonstrates, the
Costain Behavioural Safety Programme has had and is continuing to have a positive and sustainable impact
on not only our SHE performance, but also other areas of our business as well as in our workers personal
lives, specifically:
1. CBS has shown a sustained improvement injury rates at both a Project and Group Level over a 5
and 3 year period respectively
2. CBS has produced visible changes in safety behaviour at all levels within the business, from
Directors understanding the downstream impact of their behaviours and using behavioural analysis
to understand what the issues are, to supervisors listening and engaging with the workforce and
workers being prepared to speak up and stopping unsafe acts.
3. CBS and its training is based on the principles of Applied Behavioural Science, as such people who
have undertaken the training programme have used the principles to make a positive significant
impact in SHE. In addition to this the principles have also been used to make improvements in
other areas of our Business such as communication and engagement as well as in the personal
lives of the people who work for us.

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J. Appendices
A.

Costain Company Structure

B.

Costain Cares Imitative

C.

Example of Training Matrix

D.

CBS Course Syllabus

E.

Number of People Trained

F.

Example of a CBS Implementation Plan

G.

Bidston Moss BBS Report Card

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Appendix A

Company Structure
Chief Executive Officer
Andrew Wyllie
Chief Executive Officer
Andrew Wyllie

Group Finance Director


Tony Bickerstaff

ENVIRONMENT
Managing Director
Alan Kay

Water

Waste

Education

Marine

Financial Controller
Martin Hunter
Projects

Highways

Airports

Nuclear
Process

Power

Hydrocarbons
& Chemicals

Projects

Projects

Projects

Commercial and Risk Management / Procurement / Supply Chain / Insurance

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Corporate Development and Strategy / Business Development / New and Emerging Market Development / Corporate Responsibility

Projects

Projects

Patrick Bruce

Investments Director
Alistair Handford

Rail

Finance / Accounts / Tax / Audit / Treasury

Commercial Director
Patrick Bruce
Corporate
Martin Hunter
Development Director
Alex Vaughan

ENERGY & PROCESS


Managing Director
Charles Sweeney

INFRASTRUCTURE
Managing Director
Darren James -

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Investment / Private Finance Initiative

Projects

Projects

Group Secretarial / Legal Support / Human Resources

Company Secretary/
Legal/Human
Resources Director
Handford
Tracey Wood

Projects

Safety, Health &


Environment
Peter Fisher

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Safety / Health / Environment

Projects

Stakeholder Communications and Brand Development

Communications
Director
Graham Read

Projects

Property
Development
Martin Burdes

Projects

Legal
Tracey Wood

Business Systems
Tony Blanch /
Bill Price

Projects

Human Resources
Director
Christina Wade

Projects

Corporate
Responsibility Director

Catherine Warbrick

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Appendix B

Costain Cares
about your
environment
We operate in the built environment
where we meet national needs for
strategic investment in infrastructure.
We compete in an economic
environment where we must deliver
value for customers and shareholders.
We have to deliver our responsibilities
to the natural environment for the
benet of everyone.
We will:
deliver sustainable solutions
ensure our long-term viability
reduce waste
prevent pollution
reduce our impact on climate change
conserve resources

Costain Cares
about relationships
We encourage open, honest and
respectful communication. We believe
in strong, long-lasting relationships that
are mutually benecial.
We will:
be safe, promoting health and wellbeing
treat everyone fairly
work as partners
deliver a sustainable investment
return for shareholders
do everything that we can to be
the employer of choice
operate a collaborative and responsible
supply chain policy
support local communities

Costain Cares about your future


We have a key role to play in helping the UK economy ourish.
The benets of investment in infrastructure today will be felt for
many years to come.
We will:
be one of the UKs top solutions providers
anticipate the evolving needs of society
invest in innovation and technology
inspire people to attain skills that will be needed
in the future and realise their potential
support regeneration opportunities
focus on continual improvement

Corporate organisations must care.


Costain, the international engineering
and construction group, has launched
Costain Cares to underline the Companys
commitment to you.
Our primary focus is to both understand
and meet the needs of stakeholders.
In every relationship and facet of operation,
we are focused on one simple but powerful
message
Costain Cares

Costain Cares will establish a new level of competitiveness.


It will shape the future of our business and drive actions
on a day-to-day basis.
Costain Cares has come about after a period of detailed
stakeholder engagement. We have listened to the views
of customers, communities, colleagues and shareholders.
This process has highlighted the issues that really matter.
It has allowed us to assess what we are doing well and
identify where we need to focus for the future.
Costain Cares is not a slogan. It is an attitude of mind.
It is a commitment to exemplary behaviour and a
touchstone against which we can all evaluate and
measure our performance.
Costain has a duty of care to all of our stakeholders.
We aim to build a depth and richness into our relationships
that goes beyond what is expected.
This is a new Costain chapter and one that will play
a major role in helping Costain to full its potential.

about

YOU

Andrew Wyllie

David Allvey

Chief Executive

Chairman

What you are saying


We, at Viridor, one of the UKs leading recycling, waste management and renewable energy
companies, want a supply chain like Costain which places social and environmental sustainability at
the centre of their operations, as well as providing practical economic solutions on time and budget.
This means in particular:
total commitment to health and safety
commitment to working with the community
the highest environmental standards.
Colin Drummond, Chief Executive, Viridor Limited

I want to work for a company that:


recognises the benets of a diverse workforce and provides opportunity, success and reward equally
to those that bring conventional skills and those that bring something different to the business.
recognises the importance of effective communication
learns from experience, to continually improve and deliver better value to customers
in a safe and healthy environment.
Isabel Coman, Project Director, Costain Group PLC

The best main contractors understand that in order to succeed they must secure the condence
of their supply chain. They achieve this by creating honest, safe and trusting relationships.
Nick Richards, Managing Director, WALTERS UK Ltd

Costain is a valued member of Business in the Community and we are pleased that the Company
is moving along on its sustainability journey and clearly articulating what sustainability means to the
Company through Costain Cares.
Stephen Howard, Chief Executive, Business in the Community

a companys primary consideration should be the generation of long-term shareholder value,


and this should be based on appropriate nancial disciplines, competitive advantage, and within
a framework which is economically, ethically and socially responsible and sustainable.
Colin Melvin, CEO, Hermes Equity Ownership Services, The Hermes Principles, 2008

To achieve our vision to be one of the UKs


top solutions providers, we must be the
best for technical, innovative expertise and
sustainable solutions.
Costain Cares is a continued commitment
to you, our stakeholder, to focus on the
issues you care about, to continue to
set more ambitious goals against
which you can hold us to account.
We will now raise the bar even
further. We will work closely with our
stakeholders to develop Costain Cares.
Catherine Warbrick
Corporate Responsibility Director
Email: costaincares@costain.com

Costain Group PLC


Costain House
Vanwall Business Park
Maidenhead
Berkshire
SL6 4UB

www.costain.com

This document is printed on 100% recycled paper.

Principles of Behaviour Based Safety


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Appendix C

Chief Executive
Directors

Op Mgt

Front Line
Mgt

Tech/Eng
Mgt

Bidding

Office Staff

SHE Mgt

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

IWA

COSS

Personal Track Safety

Confined Space Entry

CAT Scanning

Environmental Awareness

Environmental Awareness - Waste

Environmental Awareness - Noise

Site Supervisor

RPS Course
2-4

1/2

Office safety ******

SHE Manual Update

Pipework Pressure Testing *********

Temporary Works Manager

Temp Wks Co-ordination


1

Confined Spaces

Scaffold Inspection
29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

M
M
M

Contracts Manager

Head of Departments

Construction Manager

Project Manager

Agent

Site Manager

Commercial Manager

Quantity Surveyors

Snr Gen Foreman

Foreman

Section Manager

Senior Engineer

Engineer

Planners

Chief Engineer

Design Co-ordinators

BSE/M&E

Planning Engineers

Land Surveyors

Estimators

Architects

M
R

R
M
R

R
O

Asst Site Manager

Grad Site Manager

Grad Civil Engineer

Industrial Placement

Plant Managers

Plant Operatives

Section/Trade F/man

Technicians

O
O

R
O

Operatives

Site Accountant

Storeman

Office Management

Administrative staff

Office Other

R
M

SHE Managers

Regional SHE Advisor


Site SHE Advisor

Appointed Person

Fire Co-ordinator

Fire Warden

First Aider

O
M

M
R

Traffic Mgmt Co-ord

Site Security Co-ord

Radiation Protect Ad
Site SHE Co-ordinator

Temp Wks Co-ord


Crane Supervisor

Chargehand

Environment
Manager/Advisors

Site App'd

1-3

First Aid Refresher*****

1-2

First Aid

Fire Safety

Crane Supervisor

Appointed Person - Crane


4

Hand/Arm Vibration

The basics of Occupational Health

Working with Wildlife****

IEMA Env Mgt Cert

10

Waste & Material Management

Env Awareness for Estimators, Bid Managers etc

Environmental Management Training (SHE Advisors)


1

Env Management awareness training

4 x Behavioural Safety for Frontline Managers

4 x Behavioural Safety for Managers

Accident Investigation

2 x Behavioural Safety for Exec Board Directors

Planning/Risk Assessmts

NEBOSH Construction Certificate

15

Refresher for Managing Safely***

TBC NEBOSH Diploma /Nottingham Trent Diploma / NVQ *******

Managing Safely in Constr

Site Supervisors Safety Training


6

Site Op Staff Ganger

Acc'g

Temp Works Designer

Plant Staff

Area Manager

Design Staff Design Managers

New Entrants

Regional Director

Senior Site
Senior Agent
Mgt

Comm Mgt

Network Rail
Projects

CORE Course Reference Number

Job title
Executive

QS SHE Training

Directors SHE Briefing

Senior Managers / Project Directors SHE Briefing

Site Mgt Safety Training**

Duration of course
(days)

Generic
groups

Core course
titles
M: Mandatory
O: Optional
R: Recommended m:
Mandatory (as
required to meet
Network Rail
standards)

SHE Induction for Graduates*

CORE SHE TRAINING MATRIX

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Appendix D

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Appendix E

Principles of Behaviour Based Safety


Application Form A1

Number Trained
Manager

FMS

Operative

495

763

442

1700

Principles of Behaviour Based Safety


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Appendix F

Heathrow CBS 100 Day Implementation Plan


October

September
Area

ID

Activity

DevelopTraining Plan

Develop Implementaion Plan

Appoint CBS Core Team

Introduce CBS Programme to Project Teams

January

December

Comment
5

November

Notes
12

19

26

10

17

24

31

13

20

27

11

18

25

15

22

29

Initiation

CBS Managers Course Module 1


CBS Managers Course Module 2
4

4 x 4hr Modules + Feedback Module For


A1+ BS CoreTeam (12 No.)

CBS Managers Course Module 3


CBS Managers Course Module 4
Delievered By Hollin
CBS Managers Course Module 5 (Feedback)
FMS Course Module 1
FMS Course Module 2

3 x 4hr Modules + Feedback Module


(12No.)

NB Dates to be adjusted to suit Xmas

6
Training

FMS Course Module 3


Delivered by Internal Trainers
FMS Course Module 4 (Feedback)
FMS Course Module 1
FMS Course Module 2

3 x 4hr Modules + Feedback Module


(12No.)

7
FMS Course Module 3
Delivered by Internal Trainers
FMS Course Module 4 (Feedback)
7

CBS Operative Training Phase 1

CBS Operative Training Phase 2 - Follow up TBT

Review Quality of Induction / TBT / SoS Briefings

Further courses to follow on as req.


1x2hr, start after 1st FMS Comp.
4 x 1hr TBT as required

10 Review Existing Data


11 Implement Hazard Recognition Tool
12 Meeting with Supervisors to Discuss CBS
Implementation

13 RF Card CBS Roadshow


14 Review how and where feedback is given / displayed
15 Review Hazard Recognition Tool Effectiveness
16 Implement Simple Observation Scheme

A Cheung to help Develop & Facilitate

Ongoing
TBC

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Appendix G

Principles of Behaviour Based Safety


Application Form A1

BBS Report Card

BBS Report Card

(Bidston Behavioural Safety)


How would you like to get involved?

(Bidston Behavioural Safety)


Behavioural Safety Example

Simple
suggestion

Feedback on
Improvement

Develop improvement
with BBS team

Pinpoint Behaviour
(Brief description of behaviour you want to change/stop)
........................................................................................................................
.......................................................................................................................
.......................................................................................................................

Pinpoint behaviour (describe the problem):


On average we are having 3 minor incidents per month due to slips and trips. This is due
to use of non-designated walkways.

Target result (brief description of desired behaviour):

Target Result
(Brief description of desired behaviour)
.........................................................................................................................
.........................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................

Increase use of designated walkways

Data Collection (detail the exact number of times you have observed this
behaviour):

Data Collection

At day 1, only 3
members of staff were
observed using the
designated walk ways.
Day 2 = 4
Day 3 = 7
Day 4 = 8
Day 5= 8
Day 6 =9

(detail the exact number of times you have observed this behaviour)

...............................................................................................................
...............................................................................................................
...............................................................................................................
Recommended Consequence
(detail the recommended consequence to get desired behaviour)
........................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................

Improvements
(has the behaviour stopped or changed)
.......................................................................................................................
......................................................................................................................
......................................................................................................................
Name.........................................( to receive feedback on any aspect of this card)
BBS Support Team member...............................................Date..........................

Recommended Consequences (detail the recommended consequence to


get desired behaviour):
Brief Supervisor on the problem behaviour, set expectations to staff of required usage of
the designated walk ways, record data and feed back to staff on daily/weekly basis.
From feedback realised that designated walkways were inadequate footpaths
improved.

Improvements (has the behaviour stopped or changed):

EXAMPLE OVERLEAF

Injuries due to slips and falls decreased and the use of walkways continued to
increase with continued feedback.

BE SAFE Because you want to