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THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE BRITAIN TR AVEL CULTURE WIN a private tour of the Royal Yacht

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE

BRITAIN

TR AVEL CULTURE WIN a private tour of the Royal Yacht Britannia
TR AVEL
CULTURE
WIN
a private
tour of the
Royal Yacht
Britannia

8

HERITAGE

Romantic Lake District hideaways
Romantic
Lake District
hideaways

STYLE

AWARD-WINNING MAGAZINE

S hakespeare under the stars
S hakespeare
under the stars
From London’s Globe to Cornwall’s Minack Theatre
From London’s Globe to
Cornwall’s Minack Theatre
ENGLAND’S QUEENS Our greatest female monarchs celebrated
ENGLAND’S
QUEENS
Our greatest female
monarchs celebrated
QUEENS Our greatest female monarchs celebrated Cream of Devon The sleepy villages that inspired Agatha

Cream of Devon

The sleepy villages that inspired Agatha Christie’s mysteries
The sleepy villages that inspired Agatha Christie’s mysteries
JULY/AUGUST 2015 £4.25 0 9 9 7 7 1 7 5 7 9 7 3
JULY/AUGUST 2015
£4.25
0 9
9
7 7 1 7 5 7
9 7 3 0 8 4

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PHOTOS: © ISTOCK/GARY CALTON/INCAMERASTOCK/ALAMY

EDITOR'S LETTER

ISTOCK/GARY CALTON/INCAMERASTOCK/ALAMY EDITOR'S LETTER It’s now o cially summer and what better way to

It’s now o cially summer and what better way to celebrate than on a trip to the English Riviera, in Devon, the setting for our feature Sun, Sea and Smuggling (p6), which also provided much of the inspiration for Agatha Christie’s famous mysteries. Of course it wouldn’t be summer in Britain without the ubiquitous picnic and with this in mind, we’ve rounded up some of our favourite outdoor theatres in Shakespeare Under the Stars (p22) so you can enjoy a bit of culture alongside your al fresco dining. Talking of the great outdoors, there are few destinations as evocative as the Lake District – Romantic poet William Wordsworth once described it as “the loveliest spot that man hath ever found” – and we’ve tracked down some of the region’s most charming hideaways in Romance of the Lakes (p49). Finally, the recent birth of Princess Charlotte has prompted us to celebrate some of our nation’s greatest female monarchs in Women Rule (p61), while in Cooking for Royalty (p80) we talk to the woman who was Prince Charles’s personal chef for 11 years. Enjoy.

was Prince Charles’s personal chef for 11 years. Enjoy. Sally Coffey, Editor @BRITAINMAGAZINE

Sally Coffey, Editor

@BRITAINMAGAZINEpersonal chef for 11 years. Enjoy. Sally Coffey, Editor FACEBOOK/BRITAINMAGAZINE PINTEREST/BRITAINMAGAZINE

FACEBOOK/BRITAINMAGAZINEfor 11 years. Enjoy. Sally Coffey, Editor @BRITAINMAGAZINE PINTEREST/BRITAINMAGAZINE BRITAIN_MAGAZINE THE OFFICIAL

PINTEREST/BRITAINMAGAZINECoffey, Editor @BRITAINMAGAZINE FACEBOOK/BRITAINMAGAZINE BRITAIN_MAGAZINE THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE BRITAIN TR AVEL

BRITAIN_MAGAZINEFACEBOOK/BRITAINMAGAZINE PINTEREST/BRITAINMAGAZINE THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE BRITAIN TR AVEL CULTURE HERITAGE

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE BRITAIN TR AVEL CULTURE HERITAGE STYLE AWARD-WINNING MAGAZINE WIN a private S
THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE
BRITAIN
TR AVEL
CULTURE
HERITAGE
STYLE
AWARD-WINNING MAGAZINE
WIN
a private
S hakespeare
tour of the
Royal Yacht
Britannia
under the stars
From London’s Globe to
Cornwall’s Minack Theatre
8 ENGLAND’S
QUEENS
Romantic
Lake District
Our greatest female
monarchs celebrated
hideaways
Cream of Devon
JULY/AUGUST 2015
£4.25
0 9
The sleepy villages that inspired Agatha Christie’s mysteries
9 7 7 1 7 5 7 9
7 3 0 8 4
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Cover image: Devon © Andrew Roland/Alamy

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6

The colourful seaside town of Salcombe, DevonCover image: Devon © Andrew Roland/Alamy 6 22 70 CONTENTS VOLUME 83 ISSUE 4 FEATURES 6

22 70
22
70

CONTENTS

VOLUME 83 ISSUE 4

FEATURES

6

SUN, SEA AND SMUGGLING

With two dazzling coastlines, Devon was a smuggler's paradise and its connections to Agatha Christie are equally intriguing

22

SHAKESPEARE UNDER THE STARS

From Regent's Park Open Air Theatre to the Globe, here are some of our most atmospheric al fresco performance venues

31

CAPITAL VIEWS

Enjoy glorious vistas of London, from far-reaching views from the top of the Shard to romantic panoramas from Hampstead Heath

38

SECRETS AND SPIES

We go behind the scenes at Bletchley Park, the unlikely spy base where Alan Turing and his team helped break the Enigma code

49

ROMANCE OF THE LAKES

49

There are few places more romantic than

the land of lakes and mountains, which inspired

William Wordsworth and Beatrix Potter to create their most famous works

61

FEATURES

61

WOMEN RULE

The author of two books charting the history of our female monarchs shares stories on the most memorable queens in history

72

THE ROYAL YACHT BRITANNIA

We take a photo tour of the Edinburgh-based yacht that HM The Queen once called home

78

COMPETITION

Win a private tour for two and a glass of Champagne on board the Royal Yacht Britannia

80

COOKING FOR ROYALTY

REGULARS

17

THE BULLETIN

The arrival of the new royal baby, a rare artistic discovery and a recipe fit for the royals

45

COMPETITION

Win a break for two to Bletchley Park and stay in the Hilton Milton Keynes Hotel

46

SCANDALOUS ACCUSATIONS

In the first of our new series, read about a Victorian mystery that captured imaginations

71

COMPETITION

Win a two-night stay at The Stafford London in the heart of beautiful St James's

85

CITY BREAKS: ELY

Discover the Cambridgeshire city famous for its cathedral and links to Oliver Cromwell

91

LETTERS

Your views on Britain, and your magazine

98

QUIZ: WHAT'S IN A WORD?

Learn your apples and pears from your dog and bone with our guide to Cockney rhyming slang

4 BRITAIN

72

The former chef to Prince Charles talks about working on Britannia and cooking for the young princes

85
85

IN THIS ISSUE

SCOTLAND EDINBURGH p72 KESWICK p49 IRELAND ENGLAND WALES BUCKINGHAMSHIRE p38 LONDON p31 DEVON p6
SCOTLAND
EDINBURGH p72
KESWICK p49
IRELAND
ENGLAND
WALES
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE p38
LONDON p31
DEVON p6

CAMBRIDGESHIRE p85

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE p38 LONDON p31 DEVON p6 CAMBRIDGESHIRE p85 THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE www.britain-magazine.com BRITAIN is
THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE
THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE

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BRITAIN is the official magazine of VisitBritain, the national tourism agency. BRITAIN is published by The Chelsea Magazine Company Ltd, Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London SW3 3TQ Tel: 020 7349 3700 Fax: 020 7901 3701 Email: info @ britain-magazine.com

Editor Sally Coffey Art Editor Clare White Sub Editor Ben Grafton Editorial Assistant Flora Hughes-Onslow

Publisher Simon Temlett Digital Product Manager Oliver Morley-Norris

Advertisement Manager Natasha Syed Sales Executive Jack Shannon

Managing Director Paul Dobson Deputy Managing Director Steve Ross Commercial Director Vicki Gavin Subscriptions Manager William Delmont

For VisitBritain Iris Buckley

Printed in England by William Gibbons, Willenhall, West Midlands Production All Points Media

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expressed by contributors to BRITAIN are not necessarily those of the publisher or VisitBritain. www.britain-magazine.com

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WORLD WIDE LIMITED EDITION OF 50

The gift of memories created in a breathtaking Keepsake Box

A unique and personal story told through exquisite marquetry is an extraordinary gift. The window scene displays, choice of colours together with the internal fittings, are personalised to each owner, thus ensuring every Box is always unique.

Call 01332 824819 or email us at info@wheathills.com to request a free copy of the ‘Little Book of Memories’. Please visit www.exquisitememorybox.com to see examples of our work.

a free copy of the ‘Little Book of Memories’. Please visit www.exquisitememorybox.com to see examples of

SUN, SEA & SMUGGLING

With its history of illicit trading and connections to crime writer Agatha Christie, the beautiful county of Devon is a place of intrigue and boasts not one but two stunning coastlines

Starehole Bay, Salcombe, offers impressive views and a sandy beach

6

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offers impressive views and a sandy beach 6 BRITAIN WORDS SALLY COFFEY 3 HOURS FROM LONDON

WORDS SALLY COFFEY

3 HOURS FROM LONDON

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Clockwise, from top left: Kingswear, on the east bank of the River Dart; thatched cottage
Clockwise, from top left: Kingswear, on the east bank of the River Dart; thatched cottage

Clockwise, from top left: Kingswear, on the east bank of the River Dart; thatched cottage in Crediton; Bayards Cove, Dartmouth; hire a boat in Salcombe. Below:AgathaChristie at Greenway House

C ocooned between the southwesterly counties of Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset, Devon is a land of striking contrasts. In the southern half of the region you’ll nd some of the prettiest beaches in Britain,

framed by the picture-postcard villages of the English Riviera, which still evoke the old-school glamour of the 1920s and 30s, brought to life so vividly in the stories of Agatha Christie. Dartmoor National Park, in the middle of the county, is a sprawling area of untamed moorland, dotted with ancient sites, which led another crime writer, Arthur Conan Doyle, to write in The Hound of the

writer, Arthur Conan Doyle, to write in The Hound of the Baskervilles : “The longer one

Baskervilles: “The longer one stays here the more does the spirit of the moor sink into one’s soul, its vastness, and also its grim charm.” Finally, Exmoor and the north Devon coastline is the wilder cousin of the south coast and is home to hidden coves that make you wonder about the murky undertakings that once took place here. It was in the south, however, in an area known as the English Riviera, that Devon-born Agatha Christie wrote most proli cally. The sleepy yet re ned corners of Torquay and its surrounds may not immediately strike you as a place

8

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lled with murder, intrigue and passion, but perhaps therein lay its appeal for Christie; even long after she had left her childhood home in the town she returned to write here, bringing the allure of Devon to the rest of the world through the escapades of her two most popular detectives, Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller was born in Torquay on 15 September 1890 into a wealthy upper-middle-class family. Sadly the large Victorian mansion where Agatha grew up on Barton Road in the seaside town was demolished in the 1960s, but a blue plaque still marks the site of the home in which she lived until she married her rst husband, Archibald Christie, with whom she had her only child, Rosalind. A visit here is a must for any Christie a cionado, if only for the views and to walk the lanes and stroll down to the sea – a route Agatha would have taken herself many times – or you could venture further inland towards Dartmoor to the town of Chudleigh where Agatha rst met Archie. Fans can also visit some of the places that inspired her novels. Stay at the original Majestic Hotel (The Imperial Hotel in Torquay), which features in The Body in the Library and Peril At End House, or take a train ride to Churston Station on the Dartmouth Steam Railway, and walk down to Elberry Cove in Brixham – both the

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© SCOTT JESSOP.

COLLECTION/CORBIS/

HARDING WORLD IMAGERY. ILLUSTRATION:

BOND/ALAMY/HULTON-DEUTSCH

BURTON/ROBERT

IMAGES/STEPHEN

IMAGES/ADAM

ISTOCK/ALAN COPSON/AWL

CHARLES © BOWMAN/GETTY

PHOTO:

ISTOCK / ALAN COPSON/AWL CHARLES © BOWMAN/GETTY PHOTO: train station and the beach are referenced in
ISTOCK / ALAN COPSON/AWL CHARLES © BOWMAN/GETTY PHOTO: train station and the beach are referenced in
ISTOCK / ALAN COPSON/AWL CHARLES © BOWMAN/GETTY PHOTO: train station and the beach are referenced in

train station and the beach are referenced in Christie’s bestselling novel The ABC Murders. Talking of steam trains, Greenway Halt on the same

route is the nearest station to the writer’s much-loved home of Greenway, which is now in the hands of the National Trust and which Christie described as “the loveliest place in the world” – she even set three of her novels here.

If you want to see more of the area, you can book on

a round-robin trip from a choice of start points, which includes a ferry ride on the River Dart for views of Greenway from the water, a steam train ride and a bus journey through local towns and villages.

A stop-off in Dartmouth, home to the eponymous castle,

offers glorious views across the estuary towards the colourful town of Kingswear on the other side of the water, which also has its own castle; both fortresses played their part in the English Civil War. While here make sure you stop off for ice cream at the Dartmouth Ice Cream Company, or for some delicious cream tea, for which the area is famous – plenty of places can be found in the town’s cobbled back streets. Nowhere does clotted cream quite like Devon. Dartmouth is what lazy summer days were made for:

eating fish and chips on the harbour wall as you watch the boats come and go or picnics on the beach.

chips on the harbour wall as you watch the boats come and go or picnics on

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chips on the harbour wall as you watch the boats come and go or picnics on

BRITAIN

9

London’sDevon

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Palaces

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PHOTOS: © JOHNROCHAPHOTO/ENGLAND/ALAMY/ADAM BURTON/AWL IMAGES

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BURTON/AWL IMAGES www.britain-magazine.com From left to right: Dawn above Holwell Tor, Dartmoor; pretty

From left to right:

Dawn above Holwell Tor, Dartmoor; pretty Rose Cottage in the village of Cockington, on the outskirts of Torquay

A visit to Torre Abbey, in Torquay, should also be on your itinerary. This 12th-century abbey is the largest surviving medieval monastery in Devon and Cornwall. Having been transformed into a private mansion following King Henry VIII’s Dissolution of the Monasteries, today it hosts art exhibitions and events and from 11-20 September this year it will host the International Agatha Christie Festival, which celebrates the author’s 125th birthday. The Abbey is also home to the Spanish Barn, a medieval tithe barn where 397 Spanish Armada prisoners were held for two weeks after being captured by Sir Francis Drake. The barn is said to be haunted by ‘The Spanish Lady’; the fiancée of a young lieutenant who joined the Armada dressed as a sailor, and was imprisoned and died here. Legend has it she roams the barn crying for her lost love. There are many beaches to choose from in south Devon, from the tucked away South Sands, where a boutique hotel creeps onto the shore, offering privacy and comfort in equal doses, to the more traditional South Milton Sands, where shallow waters and rock pools encourage children to explore. At the latter the beachside café serves up tasty crispy squid and crab cakes. Meanwhile, the charming fishing villages of Salcombe and Brixham are delightful places to fill up on fresh seafood lunches or go present-hunting.

of Salcombe and Brixham are delightful places to fill up on fresh seafood lunches or go

BRITAIN

11

FREE PUBLIC LECTURES

SOCIETY

OF

ANTIQUARIES

OF

LONDON

Art, archaeology, architecture, history and more. Join us for a lecture on material culture!

22 September (13.00 – 14.00)

The Dublin King: What Really Happened to the ‘Princes

in the Tower’ (by John Ashdown-Hill, FSA)

27 October (13.00 – 14.00)

Agincourt: The Battle, Myth & Memory (by Anne Curry, FSA)

Find details of these and more on our website at www.sal.org.uk/public-lectures.

Space is limited and booking is recommended to avoid disappointment. Book via our website at www.sal.org.uk/events or call 020 7479 7080.

WWW.SAL.ORG.UK/PUBLICLECTURES

Henry V (1386–1422). Artist unknown, oil on panel, 16th century. © Society of Antiquaries of London The Society is a registered charity (207237)

of London The Society is a registered charity (207237) Magna Carta through the ages Free Exhibition:
Magna Carta
Magna Carta
The Society is a registered charity (207237) Magna Carta through the ages Free Exhibition: 26 May
through the ages
through the ages

Free Exhibition: 26 May – 31 July

Museum Late: 19 June (details online)

Society of Antiquaries of London Burlington House, Piccadilly www.sal.org.uk/magna-carta

Late: 19 June (details online) Society of Antiquaries of London Burlington House, Piccadilly www.sal.org.uk/magna-carta
Late: 19 June (details online) Society of Antiquaries of London Burlington House, Piccadilly www.sal.org.uk/magna-carta
Late: 19 June (details online) Society of Antiquaries of London Burlington House, Piccadilly www.sal.org.uk/magna-carta
Late: 19 June (details online) Society of Antiquaries of London Burlington House, Piccadilly www.sal.org.uk/magna-carta
Late: 19 June (details online) Society of Antiquaries of London Burlington House, Piccadilly www.sal.org.uk/magna-carta
Late: 19 June (details online) Society of Antiquaries of London Burlington House, Piccadilly www.sal.org.uk/magna-carta

IMAGES/

PHOTOS/HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY

LEWIS/ALAMY

HARDING/CORBIS/BARRY

© REG SPELLER/FOX

ROY RAINFORD/ROBERT

PHOTOS:

Devon

Left: The beautiful Art Deco Burgh Island Hotel Right: Holidaymakers leave the famous Burgh Island
Left: The beautiful
Art Deco Burgh
Island Hotel
Right: Holidaymakers
leave the famous
Burgh Island Hotel
in 1935.
Left: Noss Mayo is
considered to be one
of Devon's most
unspoilt villages
considered to be one of Devon's most unspoilt villages If this all sounds a little too

If this all sounds a little too sedate, then why not learn about the history of these two villages – Fort Charles is a reminder of Salcombe’s position as the last Royalist stronghold to survive during the English Civil War, while it was in Brixham that William of Orange (later King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland) landed and declared: “The liberties of England and the Protestant religion I will maintain.” The seclusion of this part of England meant it was long popular with smugglers and their illicit tradings. The village of Beer, in the southeast of the county, was the headquarters of a gang of smugglers led by Jack Rattenbury, known as ‘The Rob Roy of the West’. The bay was so protected here that seafarers often put out to sea in conditions that would be deemed too rough elsewhere. At Ness Cove, in Shaldon, you can still access the shingle beach via the atmospheric smugglers’ tunnel, although whether it was actually built by smugglers or the owners of nearby Ness House in the 1800s is a subject of debate. Whatever the origins of it, smugglers were known to operate in the area during this time. If you want to visit a bona de smugglers’ tavern, then The Pilchard Inn on Burgh Island is worth a visit, if you time it right, as it’s only accessible on foot at low tide. The upstairs bar with its beams and agstone oor

on foot at low tide. The upstairs bar with its beams and agstone oor www.britain-magazine.com BRITAIN

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BRITAIN

13

PHOTO: © SEBASTIAN WASEK/GETTY IMAGES

Devon

THE PLANNER

THE PLANNER GETTING THERE Direct trains from London Paddington to Totnes with First Great Western take

GETTING THERE Direct trains from London Paddington to Totnes with First Great Western take less than three Direct trains from London Paddington to Totnes with First Great Western take less than three hours. Look out for the stunning views between Exeter and Totnes. www.firstgreatwestern.co.uk

SOUTH SANDS, SALCOMBE This seaside hotel and restaurant (above) offers soothing views, tasty dishes and exemplary service. It This seaside hotel and restaurant (above) offers soothing views, tasty dishes and exemplary service. It can be found tucked away down a winding road on the edge of a sandy beach. www.southsands.com

road on the edge of a sandy beach. www.southsands.com ANCHOR INN, UGBOROUGH A pub offering B

ANCHOR INN, UGBOROUGH

A pub offering B & B with a hearty menu and contemporary

but homely rooms makes for a good base for exploring Dartmoor National Park. www.anchorinnugborough.co.uk

Dartmoor National Park. www.anchorinnugborough.co.uk AGATHA CHRISTIE MILE, TORQUAY To mark her 125th birthday a

AGATHA CHRISTIE MILE, TORQUAY To mark her 125th birthday a special walk has been devised from Agatha Christie’s hometown of Torquay along the seafront. Start off at either The Imperial Hotel or The Grand Hotel and look out for plaques along the way. Guided walks can also be arranged. www.englishriviera.co.uk

Guided walks can also be arranged. www.englishriviera.co.uk ROYAL ALBERT MEMORIAL MUSEUM, EXETER Housed in a spectacular

ROYAL ALBERT MEMORIAL MUSEUM, EXETER

Housed in a spectacular Victorian building in Exeter, this museum's collection includes glassware, West Country silver, clocks and watches, as well as displays on local history and archaeology. Children will love the exotic animals, birds and butterflies on display. www.rammuseum.org.uk

birds and butterflies on display. www.rammuseum.org.uk ROYAL WILLIAM YARD, PLYMOUTH Set around the old naval docks

ROYAL WILLIAM YARD, PLYMOUTH Set around the old naval docks in Plymouth in the west of the county, this collection of Grade I and II listed buildings has been reinvented into a buzzing area, with tea shops, independent boutiques and a fabulous food market the first Sunday of every month. www.royalwilliamyard.org

the first Sunday of every month. www.royalwilliamyard.org GRAZE AND FLAVOUR, PLYMOUTH If you want to learn

GRAZE AND FLAVOUR, PLYMOUTH

If you want to learn a little more about the fishing industry

on which this region has depended for centuries then these bespoke tours could be for you. Fish In Sutton Harbour (F.I.S.H), in Plymouth, offers a visit to the historic Barbican area as well as a tour of the fish market, before taking you out so you can catch

your very own lunch in the area's surrounding waters. www.grazeandflavour.com

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surrounding waters. www.grazeandflavour.com 1 4 BRITAIN Above: The narrow cobbled streets of Clovelly, north Devon

Above: The narrow cobbled streets of Clovelly, north Devon

is reserved for locals and guests from the Burgh Island Hotel, an Art Deco hotel that has been entertaining socialites since the 1920s, including Christie herself. Of course, not all smuggling was confined to the south coast – on the north coast, illegal trading was also rife, if a little riskier. The exposed north coast made landing here trickier but the benefit was that it was inconspicuous as revenue boats were less vigilant than in the south. It is in the village of Clovelly though that one of the murkiest local legends endures – that of cannibals keeping tubs of salted human flesh in caves along the coast, which (hopefully) was invented and retold to keep inquisitive visitors away from their hoards. Thankfully, visitors today can expect a much warmer welcome in this pretty village, where cobbled streets and ancient buildings lead down to the sea. If you want to appreciate the natural beauty of the county then you should visit one of its two national parks:

Exmoor or Dartmoor. The former is a lush landscape of valleys, farms and woodland, with lots of cosy pubs and tearooms to stop in for refreshment, while in the latter you can discover Neolithic and Bronze Age villages that prove this area has attracted people for millennia.

that prove this area has attracted people for millennia.  For more information on this intriguing

For more information on this intriguing part of Britain, including Agatha Christie's love of the region, visit www.britain-magazine.com

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Spend an inspiring day at Britain’s Greatest Palace • Enjoy a diverse and exciting range

Spend an inspiring day at Britain’s Greatest Palace

Spend an inspiring day at Britain’s Greatest Palace • Enjoy a diverse and exciting range of
Spend an inspiring day at Britain’s Greatest Palace • Enjoy a diverse and exciting range of

• Enjoy a diverse and exciting range of events throughout the year

• Celebrate our ‘Greatest Briton’ Sir Winston Churchill in this commemorative year by visiting our re-invigorated exhibition and new memorial garden, amongst many more dedicated experiences

new memorial garden, amongst many more dedicated experiences • Discover more than 300 years of history

• Discover more than 300 years of history inside the Palace

• Explore over 2000 acres of Parkland and Formal Gardens

• Take a specialist tour from our new daily tours programme, including the Duke of Marlborough’s Private Apartments

including the Duke of Marlborough’s Private Apartments FOR MORE INFORMATION visit www.blenheimpalace.com BUY ONE
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HISTORY / NEWS / REVIEWS / INSPIRATION The BULLETIN The latest news, from a certain
HISTORY / NEWS / REVIEWS / INSPIRATION
The
BULLETIN
The latest news, from a certain royal birth to a rare
artistic discovery, plus our favourite stately homes
and traditional British recipes
NEWS
A royal welcome
On 2 May 2015, the world rejoiced at the news that Princess
Charlotte of Cambridge had been born at St Mary's Hospital,
London, and within hours she had taken part in her first photo
shoot with her parents, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.
Princess Charlotte was born at 8.34am and weighed 8lbs 3oz.
Unsurprisingly, the new princess was soon showered with gifts
from around the world, including a Tasmanian merino wool
blanket and donation to a possum sanctuary from Australia, and
a snowsuit and $100,000 donation to immunisation charities
from Canada. The newest member of the Royal Family was also
introduced to her great-grandmother, HM The Queen, who told
guests at a Buckingham Palace garden party that she was delighted
to have another girl in the family.
Download your free copy of our digital souvenir magazine at
www.britain-magazine.com/PrincessCharlotte, which celebrates
Princess Charlotte’s birth with fun features and gorgeous photos.

MUMGAUDYTE/ENGLISH HERITAGE/

PHOTOGRAPHY

HILL TAYLOR/LINA

LIPINSKI/PA WIRE/ELEANOR

MILLSON-WATKINS/ELAINE

© DOMINIC

RIPLEY/LUCY

PHOTOS:

PHIL

HISTORY / NEWS / REVIEWS / INSPIRATION

H O T O S : PHIL HISTORY / NEWS / REVIEWS / INSPIRATION NEWS Fine

NEWS

Fine art

The winner of the Prize for Illustration 2015 has been announced, selected from over 1,000 entries worldwide. This year the competition, run by The Association of Illustrators and London Transport Museum, invited artists to capture a famous or lesser-known place or concept in a single illustration, following the ‘London Places and Spaces’ theme. Gold went to artist Eleanor Taylor for her atmospheric depiction of the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, which will soon be displayed on a poster on the London Underground. Until 6 September 2015, 100 of the entered illustrations will be on display at the London Transport Museum, taking you on a visual journey across the capital. www.theaoi.com/events

a visual journey across the capital. www.theaoi.com/events 1 8 BRITAIN EXHIBITION The perfect crime For the

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BRITAIN

EXHIBITION

The perfect crime

For the first time, objects from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum will go on public display at the Museum of London in a major new exhibition, The Crime Museum Uncovered, which runs from 9 October 2015 until 10 April 2016. Visitors will be able to see evidence from some of the UK’s most notorious crimes, including the Great Train Robbery of 1963 and the Millennium Dome Diamond Heist of 2000. The exhibition will also look at terrorism, espionage, counterfeiting and narcotics, while the Crime Museum’s visitors’ book contains an eclectic list of names, including King George V and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. www.museumoflondon.org.uk

V and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. www.museumoflondon.org.uk SHOPPING Snug as a bug in a rug There’s

SHOPPING

Snug as a bug in a rug

There’s nothing quite like a British picnic. Come rain or shine, you can count on Brits to fill parks, fields and beaches across the country, tucking into picnic hampers full of cucumber sandwiches, pork pies and strawberries. These picnic rugs, available from the National Trust, are perfect for such an outing, whether for sitting on or for wrapping up warm. Luxuriously soft and made in the UK from pure new wool, the Herringbone Rugs come in light green or slate blue and grey. Price £30 ($24). www.shop.nationaltrust.org.uk

and grey. Price £30 ($24). www.shop.nationaltrust.org.uk NEWS The real deal A rare artistic discovery has been

NEWS

The real deal

A rare artistic discovery has been made at Apsley House, the London home of the Duke of Wellington. While cleaning off centuries of thick black paint and grime, an English Heritage conservator uncovered a genuine Titian signature on a painting, which until then was believed to be an imitation of the 16th-century master. The battered painting of a woman half-wearing a gold braid-trimmed silk and fur robe (above), known as Titian’s Mistress, was once part of the Spanish Royal Collection, but was assumed to have been painted after the artist’s death in 1576. It will go on display at Apsley House from 1 July until the end of October 2015. www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/ places/apsley-house

from 1 July until the end of October 2015. www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/ places/apsley-house www.britain-magazine.com

www.britain-magazine.com

HISTORY / NEWS / REVIEWS / INSPIRATION OPEN HOUSE The restoration game Following a three-year
HISTORY / NEWS / REVIEWS / INSPIRATION
OPEN
HOUSE
The restoration game
Following a three-year £8 million restoration, the
resplendent 18th-century house of Mount Stewart,
on the shores of Strangford Lough in Northern Ireland,
is open again. Visitors will now be able to explore the
reinvigorated rooms in the grand neoclassical mansion,
with hundreds of new items on display, including 11 family
portraits by 19th-century British portrait artist, Sir Thomas
Lawrence (1769-1830), and the Congress of Vienna Desk
belonging to Viscount Castlereagh when he was Foreign
Secretary, said to have been used at the signing of the
Treaties of Paris and Vienna in 1814 and 1815. The garden
has also been restored, reflecting the formal gardens
created by Lady Edith Londonderry during the 1920s.
Other additions include a 14ft Celtic figure, sculpted from
yew, that will welcome visitors to the gardens.
www.nationaltrust.org.uk/mount-stewart

HISTORY / NEWS / REVIEWS / INSPIRATION

The word ‘muffin’ comes from the French ‘mouflet’ meaning ‘soft’ or ‘small child’ RECIPE Breakfast
The word ‘muffin’
comes from the
French ‘mouflet’
meaning ‘soft’
or ‘small child’
RECIPE
Breakfast muffins
RECIPE EXTRACTED
FROM THE £25.
ROYAL
TOUCH:
SIMPLY STUNNING
HOME COOKING FROM A ROYAL CHEF BY CAROLYN ROBB
PUBLISHED
BY ACC EDITIONS,
PHOTO:
© SIMON
BROWN

Carolyn Robb was personal cook to HRH The Prince of Wales for 11 years. Here she shares a delicious recipe from her cookery book. Turn to page 80 for our full interview.

Ingredients: MAKES 24 MEDIUM MUFFINS

2 free-range eggs (UK medium/US large)

285g (10oz) plain flour (2 and a half cups)

285g (10oz) demerara or light soft brown sugar

1 tbsp bicarbonate of soda

80ml (2.7 fl oz) oil

2 tsp mixed spice

70g (2.5oz) oatbran

85g (3oz) soft, plump dried figs, finely sliced

450ml (15.2 fl oz) milk

FOR THE TOPPING:

1 tsp vanilla extract

Choose from: 100ml (3.4 fl oz) mixed linseeds, poppy seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, flaked almonds, slivered pecans, chopped pistachios, pumpkin seeds and dried cranberries.

1 tsp salt

Method:

Beat together the eggs and sugar in a large bowl and then add the oil and mix well. Add all the remaining ingredients, sieving the our, salt and bicarbonate of soda. Mix well. Cover and leave in the refrigerator overnight to allow the bran to swell. Line two medium/large muf n tins with paper cases or ‘tulips’ of baking parchment. Spoon in the mixture and sprinkle with seeds. Bake at 160ºC (310ºF) for 20 to 25 minutes for medium muf ns or, for the large ones, allow 30 to 35 minutes. Serve with butter, cream cheese, honey, jam, peanut butter or almond butter.

cream cheese, honey, jam, peanut butter or almond butter. 2 0 BRITAIN READING CORNER Cosy up

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BRITAIN

READING

CORNER

Cosy up in your favourite chair and lose yourself in one of these books

your favourite chair and lose yourself in one of these books Life Portraits Series by Zena
your favourite chair and lose yourself in one of these books Life Portraits Series by Zena
your favourite chair and lose yourself in one of these books Life Portraits Series by Zena
your favourite chair and lose yourself in one of these books Life Portraits Series by Zena
your favourite chair and lose yourself in one of these books Life Portraits Series by Zena

Life Portraits Series by Zena Alkayat and Nina Cosford (Frances Lincoln, £12). Charming illustrated biographies that offer quotes, inspiration and trivia on literary legends such as Jane Austen.

First Lady: The Life and Wars of Clementine Churchill by Sonia Purnell (Aurum Press, £25). To coincide with the 50th anniversary of Winston Churchill’s death, this is a candid biography of his beloved wife.

Beside the Sea:

Britain’s Lost Seaside Heritage by Sarah Freeman (Aurum Press, £25). A celebration of the British seaside, with photography and memories from our forgotten youth.

25 Royal Babies that Changed the World (Amy Licence, £8.99). From Norman times to the birth of Princess Charlotte, Amy Licence examines royal births throughout history.

The Mythology of Richard III (John Ashdown-Hill, Amberley, £16.99). Following Richard III's reinterment, this book explores the myths of the last Plantagenet king.

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Illustration: London Places and Spaces by Erica Sturla The Prize for Illustration 2015 London Places

Illustration: London Places and Spaces by Erica Sturla

The Prize for Illustration 2015

London Places and Spaces

An exhibition of the best entries Open until 6 September 2015

London Transport Museum Covent Garden Piazza WC2E 7BB

of the best entries Open until 6 September 2015 London Transport Museum Covent Garden Piazza WC2E
of the best entries Open until 6 September 2015 London Transport Museum Covent Garden Piazza WC2E
of the best entries Open until 6 September 2015 London Transport Museum Covent Garden Piazza WC2E

Media partner

of the best entries Open until 6 September 2015 London Transport Museum Covent Garden Piazza WC2E
of the best entries Open until 6 September 2015 London Transport Museum Covent Garden Piazza WC2E
of the best entries Open until 6 September 2015 London Transport Museum Covent Garden Piazza WC2E
of the best entries Open until 6 September 2015 London Transport Museum Covent Garden Piazza WC2E

Explore Britain

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BRITAIN

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PHOTOS: © DAVID JENSEN 2013/TRAVEL PIX COLLECTION/AWL IMAGES LTD/WASHINGTON ALLSTON/WIKIMEDIA

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A performance of Pride and Prejudice at Regent's Park Open Air Theatre

Explore Britain

at Regent's Park Open Air Theatre Explore Britain SHAKESPEARE UNDER THE STARS From historic stages like

SHAKESPEARE UNDER THE STARS

From historic stages like Regent's Park’s to spectacular settings such as Cornwall's Minack Theatre, here are some of our most atmospheric al fresco performance venues

WORDS HEIDI FULLER-LOVE

Minack Theatre, here are some of our most atmospheric al fresco performance venues WORDS HEIDI FULLER-LOVE

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23

PHOTOS: © MARSHALL IKONOGRAPHY/ALAMY/ROBBIE JACK/CORBIS

PHOTOS: © MARSHALL IKONOGRAPHY/ALAMY/ROBBIE JACK/CORBIS I n the early 18th century, following a fashion set by

I n the early 18th century, following a fashion set by Europe, theatre was moved indoors away from the problems of inclement weather. It wasn’t until the Swinging Sixties, with the advent of al fresco pop

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BRITAIN

concerts and impromptu ‘happenings’, that outdoor theatre became popular once more. These days audiences are more than happy to wrap up with a rug or wear a raincoat to watch their favourite play performed in a gorgeous natural setting. “Whether it’s in a purpose-built open-air theatre like the Globe or a pop-up theatre that you might find in one of the Oxford College gardens during the summer, you can feel the excitement even before the play begins,” says Trevor Walker, Professor of Drama at St Mary’s University in London. One of Britain’s most historic open-air theatre venues, Shakespeare’s Globe in London, is likely to be the very first theatre where the playwright’s King Henry V urged his battalions: “Once more unto the breach… Or close the wall up with our English dead.” Built in 1599 to house performances of Shakespeare’s own playing company, The Lord Chamberlain’s Men, the original three-storey theatre, with its rush straw area known as ‘the pit’ – where the poorest spectators known as ‘stinkards’ would stand cramped together like sardines – burnt down in 1613 during a performance of Henry VIII. Luckily there were no serious casualties from the blaze, which was caused by a misfired theatrical canon, but spectators recorded that one man’s breeches caught fire and had to be doused with a jug of ale. Rebuilt a year later, then closed, along with countless theatres across the country, during the reign of Puritanism, the Globe was finally pulled down in 1644, 28 years after the death of the Bard with whom it is synonymous. Carefully recreated in 1997, the modern Globe theatre, founded by US actor and director Sam Wanamaker, stands close to the site of Shakespeare’s original playhouse: its circular yard, thrust stage and tiered seats closely resemble the original open-air theatre built in the 16th century.

the original open-air theatre built in the 16th century. Top left: The Comedy of Errors at

Top left: The Comedy of Errors at the Globe Theatre, London

This image:

The Minack

Theatre, Cornwall

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www.britain-magazine.com

The Minack Theatre, built in the 1930s, is a glorious amphitheatre with dramatic views over Cornwall’s rugged coastline

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25

Opening the 2015 Season at Kilworth House Theatre is the sparkling Olivier Award winning ‘Singin’
Opening the 2015 Season at Kilworth House Theatre is the sparkling Olivier Award winning ‘Singin’

Opening the 2015 Season at Kilworth House Theatre is the sparkling Olivier Award winning ‘Singin’ In The Rain’ from 3 rd June – 19 th July. This light-hearted spoof, set in Hollywood in the 1920’s, is packed full of charm, romance and tinseltown glamour and features all the songs from the glorious MGM score including ‘Good Morning’; ‘Make ‘em Laugh’; ‘You Stepped Out Of A Dream’; ‘You Are My Lucky Star’ and the show-stopping ‘Singin’ In The Rain’.

The second production for this summer is the all-singing, all-dancing musical comedy ‘Legally Blonde’ which runs from 20 th August – 20 th September. Winner of no less than 7 major awards, it is the funniest and most fabulous musical around. Perennially perky, University student Elle Woods can handle anything, so when her boyfriend Warner dumps her, she decides to follow him to Harvard Law School. Determined to win back her man, she learns that it’s so much better to be smart – case closed!

THEATRE BREAKS £140*per person from just
THEATRE BREAKS
£140*per
person
from just

Take time out and enjoy the truly luxurious facilities at Kilworth House Hotel with a ‘Theatre Break’ inclusive of pre-theatre dinner served in the Hotel, tickets for the show, overnight accommodation and breakfast. Just four miles east of Junction 20 of the MI and easily accessible from the M69, M6 and A14, this is an ideal gift for someone special or quite simply a perfect opportunity for a wonderful treat and an unforgettable

experience! * Double occupancy in a Garden Room.

Theatre Breaks can be booked through the Hotel Sales & Marketing Office on 01858 881881 (9.00am - 5.30pm, Monday to Friday, full payment is required upon booking).

Sister Act, Kilworth House Theatre 2014

upon booking). Sister Act, Kilworth House Theatre 2014 Kilworth House Theatre 2015 SEASON 3 RD JUNE

Kilworth House Theatre

2015 SEASON

2015 SEASON

3 RD JUNE – 19 TH JULY
3 RD JUNE
19 TH JULY
House Theatre 2015 SEASON 3 RD JUNE – 19 TH JULY – 20 T H SEPT
House Theatre 2015 SEASON 3 RD JUNE – 19 TH JULY – 20 T H SEPT

– 20 TH SEPT

20 TH AUG

TICKETS from £30 - £38

BOX OFFICE 01858 881 939 Opening hours: Mon - Fri, 10am - 4pm

OR BOOK ONLINE AT www.kilworthhousetheatre.co.uk

KILWORTH HOUSE HOTEL & THEATRE LUTTERWORTH ROAD NORTH KILWORTH LEICESTERSHIRE LE17 6JE

FREE TM
FREE
TM

www.kilworthhousetheatre.co.uk

Kilworth House Hotel & Theatre, Lutterworth Road, North Kilworth, Leicestershire LE17 6JE

www.kilworthhouse.co.uk

Kilworth, Leicestershire LE17 6JE www.kilworthhouse.co.uk @KHTheatre Kilworth House Theatre @KilworthHouse

@KHTheatre

@KHTheatre Kilworth House Theatre

Kilworth House Theatre

@KilworthHouse

Kilworth House Hotel

PHOTO: © TOBY MELVILLE/CORBIS

For offers and to book tickets go to www. britain-magazine.com/ outdoortheatres
For offers
and to book
tickets go to www.
britain-magazine.com/
outdoortheatres

Explore Britain

www. britain-magazine.com/ outdoortheatres Explore Britain A performance at the open-air clifftop Minack Theatre, near

A performance at the open-air clifftop Minack Theatre, near Land's End, Cornwall

“When you come here you can really imagine what it must have been like to watch plays in Shakespeare’s time,” says actor and theatre director, Dan Philpott. A short walk from London’s Baker Street, the Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre was founded in 1932 by actors Robert Atkins and Sydney Carroll. The oldest professional and permanent outdoor theatre in Britain, this stunning stage is surrounded by lush parkland and fringed by one of London’s longest theatre bars. Notable al fresco performances staged here include Romeo and Juliet, starring Sherlock actor Benedict Cumberbatch, and Sweet Mister Shakespeare, starring Dame Judi Dench. “We are so lucky because London has so many outdoor theatres,” says Philpott. There are plenty of spectacular venues outside of the capital, too, including the glorious Willow Globe in Llandrindod Wells, Powys, Wales. Part of an outreach project organised by Shakespeare Link, a group

The life project of amateur thespian Rowena Cade, the Minack Theatre was made from driftwood that was dragged up from the beach

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established in 1994 to bring the Bard’s work to smaller venues, the willows that gave their name to this organic theatre were planted in 2003. Now one of the country’s largest constructions made of willows – and almost certainly the only willow-bound theatre space in the world – the mature trees of the theatre stand in a woven circle around a low wooden stage, forming an intimate space where 150 spectators can enjoy musicals and theatrical performances from April to September. Another of Britain’s celebrated outdoor venues, the Minack Theatre, built in the 1930s, is a glorious Greek-style amphitheatre set in a semicircle high on a bluff, with dramatic views over Cornwall’s coastline where dolphins are frequently spotted during performances.

It is the life project of Rowena Cade, an amateur

thespian who owned a house here, and the original stage was made from driftwood dragged up from the beach.

The original theatre’s do-it-yourself spirit meant that car headlights were used to light the first public performance. Cade was passionate about the project and continued adding wings to the theatre, with the aid of her faithful gardener, until she died in 1983. “We often saw Ms Cade single-handedly hauling beams up from the beach below to build extra seating,” one contemporary remembers.

A couple of counties away, Dorset is home to the

Brownsea Island Open Air Theatre, whose members lay

BRITAIN

A couple of counties away, Dorset is home to the Brownsea Island Open Air Theatre, whose

27

PHOTO: © SANDRA VON RIEKHOFF

Explore Britain

PHOTO: © SANDRA VON RIEKHOFF Explore Britain Clockwise, from above: Larmer Tree Gardens is home to

Clockwise, from above:

Larmer Tree Gardens is home to the Singing Theatre; Kilworth House Theatre; The Willow Globe, Powys, Wales

on boats to carry their spectators over to see performances. Set on the spectacularly rugged island where Robert Baden-Powell held his first Boy Scout camp in 1907, the theatre was created by members of a local acting company in the 1960s. In a magazine article written to commemorate the theatre’s 50th anniversary, Keith Rawlings, one of the company’s original members, remembered how cast members would perform in costumes that were clammy from the previous night’s downpour. But as Trevor Walker

comments, bad weather doesn’t seem to deter either actors or the spectators. “Quite simply it’s the buzz you get from the audience that makes open-air theatre so enjoyable – even in the rain,” he laughs. Set in a beautiful wooded glade by the lake in the grounds of Kilworth House Hotel in Leicestershire, is a secretive yet well-accommodating theatre that can seat up to 550 patrons in tiered seats. This being Britain, huge sail-like canopies protect the audience from the inevitable adverse weather and there’s a well-stocked bar so you can make an evening of it. In fact, why not book in for a pre-show meal in the elaborately decorated Victorian Orangery of the hotel, or better still, pack a picnic and find a quiet spot in the grounds. Another lesser-known theatre is that of Larmer Tree Gardens, an old hunting ground of King John, which was later inherited by General Augustus Lane Fox, who was forced to change his name to Pitt Rivers, under the condition of his inheritance, and set about creating the Victorian pleasure grounds, which include the Singing Theatre – apparently just one of two in the world – which still stages lively performances today.

the world – which still stages lively performances today.  For more information on the history

For more information on the history of Britain's theatres and the best new shows go to www.britain-magazine.com

PACK A PICNIC

Book tickets, grab your hamper, and make your way to one of these great outdoor venues. THE GLOBE, LONDON Book in advance at this popular summer venue. Arrive

early and take one of the theatre’s guided tours to learn about life as a playwright in Shakespeare’s time, and how the modern venue was built. Open from May to September. Prices start at £5 for standing tickets. www.shakespearesglobe.com REGENT’S PARK OPEN AIR THEATRE, LONDON Tickets to Britain’s oldest professional outdoor theatre sell out fast, with exciting productions such as William Golding's Lord of the Flies and J M Barrie's Peter Pan. Make sure you get there early on sunny days

to get a seat in the shade. www.openairtheatre.com

THE MINACK THEATRE, CORNWALL

A visit to the Minack Theatre is an event in itself, so pack

a picnic of strawberries and clotted cream. Open from

April to September, it hosts musicals, children’s shows and classical theatre, but wrap up well because the wind really howls in this high-flung spot. www.minack.com

wind really howls in this high-flung spot. www.minack.com THE WILLOW GLOBE, POWYS, WALES This mini version

THE WILLOW GLOBE, POWYS, WALES This mini version of Shakespeare’s Globe hosts performances from April to September in a truly magical and intimate setting. About a third of the size of its London counterpart, the theatre is a hidden gem. www.shakespearelink.co.uk/willow-globe BROWNSEA OPEN AIR THEATRE, DORSET This venue celebrates more than 50 years of ‘Shakespeare on an Island’ this year, so it’s an ideal time to visit. Boats leave for the island from Poole Quay from 5pm onwards and it’s worth going early in order to have time to explore this rugged little isle before the show begins. www.brownsea-theatre.co.uk

isle before the show begins. www.brownsea-theatre.co.uk KILWORTH HOUSE THEATRE, LEICESTERSHIRE Enjoy a spot of

KILWORTH HOUSE THEATRE, LEICESTERSHIRE Enjoy a spot of outdoor theatre amid the magnificent grounds of the Kilworth Estate, set in a magical-looking glade. Kilworth House Theatre – now in its ninth season – prides itself on staging musical theatre of a standard rarely seen outside of London’s West End. www.kilworthhousetheatre.co.uk LARMER TREE, WILTSHIRE There are lots of lovely events that take place in these Victorian pleasure gardens every year, including one or two festivals. However, we think the Singing Theatre is the best way to experience all the drama. www.larmertree.co.uk

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PROMOTION

Scottish Mar vels

WITH RAILBOOKERS

Journeying from London overnight to picturesque Scotland, the Caledonian sleeper train is just one of the many unforgettable options offered by Railbookers

O ffering bespoke holidays by rail in the UK, Europe and beyond, Railbookers specialises in creating tailor-made

itineraries by rail and has been organising train holidays all over the world since 2003. The new Caledonian Sleeper to Fort William and Mallaig itinerary is one of Britain’s most iconic rail journeys. Board the famous Caledonian sleeper train in London, settle into a comfortable compartment and speed towards the Scottish border, arriving into Fort William the next morning. With fresh sheets, duvets and plump white pillows, the sleeper train offers comfortable accommodation. Head to the lounge car for a nightcap of whiskey or for a full dinner of

Haggis, tatties and neeps before falling asleep as you race north. The train snakes along the banks of Loch Lomond, circles the famous horseshoe curve around Beinn Dorain, Beinn a’ Chaisteil and Beinn Odhar, passes Britain’s most remote train station in Corrour and speeds by Loch Treig before arriving

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into Fort William in the late morning. On arrival, make your way to the Nevis Bank Inn for an unforgettable two-night stay. Explore Fort William, the second largest settlement in the Scottish Highlands, nestled at the foot of Ben Nevis at the head of Loch Linnhe. Soak up the atmosphere and spectacular natural beauty of the surrounding areas and visit the West Highland Museum for some insight into the region’s fascinating history. Next board a train along the West Highland Line to Mallaig. Regularly celebrated as one of the most scenic rail journeys in the world, the train passes stunning scenery. Travel around the banks of Loch Eil and Loch Eilt; catching a glimpse of Ben Nevis as you head towards the Caledonian Canal. Gaze at ‘Neptune’s Staircase’, a succession of locks, before travelling over the Glenfinnan Viaduct. Passengers will recognise this segment of the trip as it was made famous in the Harry Potter films. After staying overnight at the West Highland Hotel, Mallaig, you will travel back to Fort William,

where you will connect onto a sleeper train that takes you back over the border and through England towards London. Passengers travelling with Railbookers will enjoy the same fantastic amenities discovered on the outbound trip, so relax and sleep comfortably as you head back to England’s capital. Arrive in London the next morning and continue with your onward journey. If you’d like to head beyond the UK, Railbookers can help there too, offering specially selected holidays all over Europe and beyond.

specially selected holidays all over Europe and beyond.  For more information please visit the Railbookers

For more information please visit the Railbookers website at www.railbookers.com or call 1888 829 3040 from the US, 1300 938 534 from Australia, 0800 000 554 from New Zealand, or 020 3327 3550 from the UK.

3040 from the US, 1300 938 534 from Australia, 0800 000 554 from New Zealand, or
BRITAIN 29
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DISTINCTIVE

FAMILIES

DISTINCTIVE FAMILIES WITH A FABULOUS CENTRAL LONDON LOCATION IN LEAFY KENSINGTON, THE 5-STAR ROYAL GARDEN HOTEL
DISTINCTIVE FAMILIES WITH A FABULOUS CENTRAL LONDON LOCATION IN LEAFY KENSINGTON, THE 5-STAR ROYAL GARDEN HOTEL

WITH A FABULOUS CENTRAL LONDON LOCATION IN LEAFY KENSINGTON, THE 5-STAR ROYAL GARDEN HOTEL IS THE PERFECT RETREAT FOR FAMILIES.

KENSINGTON GARDENS AND HYDE PARK ARE JUST NEXT DOOR, WHILE FAMOUS LONDON ATTRACTIONS AND MUSEUMS ARE A SHORT WALK AWAY, TO KEEP CHILDREN ENGAGED ALL DAY LONG.

WHATEVER THE OCCASION, THE ROYAL GARDEN HOTEL IS PERFECTLY POSITIONED FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY TO EXPERIENCE THE LONDON WAY OF LIFE.

FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY TO EXPERIENCE THE LONDON WAY OF LIFE. 2-24 KENSINGTON HIGH STREET LONDON

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LIFE. 2-24 KENSINGTON HIGH STREET LONDON W8 4PT FAX +44 (0)20 7361 1991 WWW.ROYALGARDENHOTEL.CO.UK TEL +44
London CAPITAL VIEWS For glorious vistas of London, from vertigo-inducing views from the top of
London
CAPITAL
VIEWS
For glorious vistas of London,
from vertigo-inducing views from the top
of the Shard to romantic panoramas from
Hampstead Heath, head to the city’s best
vantage points
WORDS FLORA HUGHES-ONSLOW

THE LONDON EYE

Just one revolution on board the giant Ferris wheel, the London Eye, will enable you to view a remarkable stretch of the capital. At its peak the wheel is 442ft (135m) high and you can see for 25 miles in every direction (weather permitting), from your comfortable glass pod. It offers plenty of packages for special occasions, from afternoon tea to a chocolate-tasting experience or a Champagne reception.

www.londoneye.com

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PHOTOS: © TRAVEL PIX COLLECTION/AWL IMAGES LTD/ALAN COPSON/CULTURA TRAVEL/RICHARD SEYMOUR/GETTY IMAGES

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THE SHARD

London

While a little pricey to get up there, the view from the Shard, London’s magnificent 87-storey skyscraper, is certainly impressive. With the UK’s highest public viewing galleries, 787ft (240m) above street level, visitors can enjoy 360-degree views for up to 40 miles. Tickets allow you 30 minutes at the top, plus a weather guarantee, meaning that in case of bad weather you can return another time for free. The Shard frequently hosts fun events across its various floors, including yoga classes, silent discos and, more recently, a Fortnum & Mason High Tea Experience. For the latter, from 23 June until 8 September, guests can indulge in a ‘Hamperling’ filled with a selection of afternoon tea treats including finger sandwiches, scones, and Fortnum’s signature Royal Blend tea.

including finger sandwiches, scones, and Fortnum’s signature Royal Blend tea. www.theviewfromtheshard.com BRITAIN 3 3

www.theviewfromtheshard.com

including finger sandwiches, scones, and Fortnum’s signature Royal Blend tea. www.theviewfromtheshard.com BRITAIN 3 3

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PHOTOS: © ALEX SEGRE/ALAMY/ALISTAIR LAMING

London

HAMPSTEAD HEATH Whatever the weather, the untamed meadows, ponds and woodlands of Hampstead Heath offer
HAMPSTEAD HEATH
Whatever the weather, the untamed meadows,
ponds and woodlands of Hampstead Heath offer
an enchanting escape from the sprawling city.
Spanning 791 acres from Hampstead to Highgate
in north London, it has been the inspiration behind
much art and literature and is home to the
beautiful former stately home, Kenwood House.
Now managed by English Heritage, Kenwood and
its grounds often play host to outdoor summer
concerts and exhibitions. The swimming ponds are
perfect for cooling off on hot summer days and
the cityscape in the distance forms a wonderful
backdrop for picnics. In the southeast corner of
the Heath, Parliament Hill boasts a panorama of
London so impressive it is protected by law.
On a clear day, you can see almost all of the
capital’s major landmarks, from the ‘Gherkin’
and the Shard to majestic St Paul’s.
www.cityoflondon.gov.uk
The Monument
stands exactly 202ft
(62m) from where
the Great Fire of
London started
on Pudding Lane
THE MONUMENT
Built between 1671 and 1677 to commemorate the Great Fire of
London of 1666 and to celebrate the rebuilding of the City, the
Monument boasts prime position as a Central London vantage point
near the northern end of London Bridge. It is the tallest isolated stone
column in the world, at 202ft (62m) high, and is in close proximity to
the spot in Pudding Lane on which the Great Fire is believed to have
started. Visitors to this grand, fluted Doric column, designed by Sir
Christopher Wren with a gilded urn of fire on the top, can climb up
the interior to the observation gallery to enjoy a splendid urban vista.
Thanks to an installation by video artist Chris Meigh-Andrews, even
those not keen to ascend the 311 steps to the top can enjoy the views
via a live stream of time-lapse images 24 hours a day, screened on a
display near the base of the Monument.
www.themonument.info

34

BRITAIN

www.britain-magazine.com

It’s London. Under one iconic roof. Fantastic dining, tax-free shopping, awe-inspiring public art and exciting
It’s London.
Under one
iconic roof.
Fantastic dining, tax-free
shopping, awe-inspiring public art
and exciting cultural events, all
under 150 years of breath-taking
architectural history.
Shopping. Dining. Art. Culture.
St Pancras is more than a station – it’s a destination.
Find out more at:
www.stpancras.com
– it’s a destination. Find out more at: www.stpancras.com /stpancrasint | @StPancrasInt | stpancrasinternational

/stpancrasint |

– it’s a destination. Find out more at: www.stpancras.com /stpancrasint | @StPancrasInt | stpancrasinternational

@StPancrasInt |

– it’s a destination. Find out more at: www.stpancras.com /stpancrasint | @StPancrasInt | stpancrasinternational
– it’s a destination. Find out more at: www.stpancras.com /stpancrasint | @StPancrasInt | stpancrasinternational
– it’s a destination. Find out more at: www.stpancras.com /stpancrasint | @StPancrasInt | stpancrasinternational

stpancrasinternational

– it’s a destination. Find out more at: www.stpancras.com /stpancrasint | @StPancrasInt | stpancrasinternational

PHOTO: © VISITBRITAIN/MARKTHOMASSON

London

PHOTO: © VISITBRITAIN/MARKTHOMASSON London TOWER BRIDGE Arguably the most famous bridge in the world, and certainly

TOWER BRIDGE

Arguably the most famous bridge in the world, and certainly one of London’s most instantly recognisable landmarks, Tower Bridge recently received a £4 million facelift. The now revamped Tower Bridge Exhibition offers fantastic bird's-eye views of London life from its new, high-level glass walkways. Set 137ft (42m) above the River Thames, you can watch the traffic of red London buses and

black cabs whir beneath you and perhaps even catch the bascules being raised. You can also gaze outwards at the Tower of London, St Paul’s and hundreds of other landmarks while learning, via the exhibition, how and why the bridge was built and the intricacies of all its inner workings.

www.towerbridge.org.uk

ST PANCRAS STATION London’s St Pancras International Station, with its grand neo-Gothic façade, also provides

ST PANCRAS STATION London’s St Pancras International Station, with its grand neo-Gothic façade, also provides one of the city’s most impressive views, from within. A beautiful construction with gracefully curved arches and light pouring in, it is the result of a massive redevelopment that has made the view at St Pancras a must-see. www.stpancras.com

made the view at St Pancras a must-see. www.stpancras.com SKY GARDEN With three venues to choose

SKY GARDEN With three venues to choose from – Fenchurch Seafood Bar & Grill, the Sky Pod Bar and the Darwin Brasserie – at the top of 20 Fenchurch Street in the City of London, Sky Garden offers some of the best views in the capital. Book ahead to enjoy a cocktail or two with a magnificent river and city backdrop. www.skygarden.london

a magnificent river and city backdrop. www.skygarden.london ROYAL OBSERVATORY GREENWICH High up on a hill in

ROYAL OBSERVATORY GREENWICH High up on a hill in Greenwich Park, overlooking the River Thames, the Royal Observatory is one of the best spots to watch the sun setting over London (and for star-gazing at night). It’s also the home of Greenwich Mean Time; you can stand on the Meridian Line here – the dividing point between Earth’s eastern and western hemispheres. www.rmg.co.uk/royal-observatory

36

BRITAIN

www.britain-magazine.com

Spies &

SECRETS

Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire might not seem like the most likely of spy bases but it was here that Alan Turing and his team broke the code that helped the Allied forces win the Second World War?

WORDS CHRIS FAUTLEY

Allied forces win the Second World War? WORDS CHRIS FAUTLEY T he weather during the rst

T he weather during the rst half of August 1938 had been hot and thundery, but by the time Captain Ridley arrived at a country house

in Buckinghamshire later in the month with an entourage, it had turned cool and ne. To the casual observer, conditions must have seemed ideal for a shooting party. The house was set in 581 acres of parkland and gardens that included an arboretum and several hothouses. Completed by 1881, the red brick building boasted ne architectural features such as decorative plaster ceilings and replaces; its ballroom had wooden columns and arches, while the hallway was adorned with painted glass. However, it wasn’t the architecture, nor for that matter the shooting, that interested Captain Ridley. The Bletchley Park estate had been acquired in 1937 by a development

consortium, the aim being to demolish the house and replace it with a housing estate. That plan, however, was curtailed when in May 1938 Admiral Hugh Sinclair, Head of the Secret Intelligence Service (now MI6), purchased the house and much of the estate. The intention of Sinclair (known as ‘C’), was to use it as a base for the Government Code and Cipher School: with the clouds of war brewing ominously, the ‘shooting party’ was effectively making a dummy run for moving from its London headquarters. In August 1939, with con ict all but inevitable, the full move took place. Some 200 staff were involved; by the war’s end that number had ballooned to 7,000. The majority took lodgings locally, Woburn Abbey among the requisitioned buildings. The mission was clear: to crack enemy ciphers and provide the Allies with intelligence.

The mission was clear: to crack enemy ciphers and provide the Allies with intelligence. www.britain-magazine.com
The mission was clear: to crack enemy ciphers and provide the Allies with intelligence. www.britain-magazine.com

www.britain-magazine.com

Estate Secrets

This picture: Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire. Facing page: The Colossus machine, which helped code breakers to garner vital intelligence

PHOTOS: © JACK ENGLISH/2014 THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY/BLETCHLEY PARK/HERITAGE IMAGE PARTNERSHIP/ALAMY

COMPANY/BLETCHLEY PARK/HERITAGE IMAGE PARTNERSHIP/ALAMY Left to right: Code breakers hard at work in Hut 6; Alan

Left to right: Code breakers hard at work in Hut 6; Alan Turing; Bletchley Park is located in an idyllic rural setting

40

BRITAIN

6; Alan Turing; Bletchley Park is located in an idyllic rural setting 4 0 B R
6; Alan Turing; Bletchley Park is located in an idyllic rural setting 4 0 B R

www.britain-magazine.com

www.britain-magazine.com Estate Secrets Above: Huts 6 and 3 celebrate VE Day. Left: Benedict Cumberbatch stars
www.britain-magazine.com Estate Secrets Above: Huts 6 and 3 celebrate VE Day. Left: Benedict Cumberbatch stars

www.britain-magazine.com

Estate Secrets

www.britain-magazine.com Estate Secrets Above: Huts 6 and 3 celebrate VE Day. Left: Benedict Cumberbatch stars as

Above: Huts 6 and 3 celebrate VE Day. Left: Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing in 2014's The Imitation Game

Initially, senior staff were based in the mansion, but it soon became apparent that the premises were wholly inadequate for the

Since it dealt largely with Enigma codes, Block D at Bletchley Park became one of the most important departments; Block G

burgeoning contingent of operatives required

housed the code breakers, while Huts 11,

to

run the facility effectively. A programme of hut-building commenced

11A and 11B accommodated what was known as the Bombe Section. The Bombe

in

earnest. These were either single or double

was a decoding machine built speci cally to

storey, invariably comprising a lengthy passageway with a dozen or more spurs. The

crack Enigma: the buildings housing it were blast and splinter proof.

most important huts were built of reinforced concrete with a solid concrete roof. Each section was assigned a letter

By all accounts, working conditions at Station X were good. The general consensus was that the food was outstanding: wartime

or

number, and a

rationing seemed far

dedicated role. Hut 10, for example, accommodated the Air Intelligence Section; Block B, originally

used by the Naval

Section, was the rst

e Enigma’s settings changed daily – there were 159 million million million possibilities

away. It did, however, have a reputation for being extremely cold in winter. In 2013, a stash of paper known

as the Banbury sheets, used in the deciphering of Enigma, was discovered in the ceiling and walls of Hut 6 where it had been used as draught-proo ng – the hut had frugal heating and no toilet facilities. Upon the outbreak of war it soon

became obvious that there were insuf cient code breakers at Station X to undertake the task in hand. The work was, hardly surprisingly, particularly suited to mathematicians and academics. It also appealed to those with an enquiring mind

to

be built and Block

H

was the last, being completed in late 1944. Most of Germany’s coded messages were

encrypted using machines, the best-known

of which was Enigma, a piece of apparatus

similar to a typewriter. The sender keyed in a message, then scrambled it using rotors. To decode it, the recipient had to know the precise settings. These changed daily, and with 159 million million million possibilities, the challenge faced by staff at Bletchley– or ‘Station X’ – was huge.

million million possibilities, the challenge faced by staff at Bletchley– or ‘Station X’ – was huge.

BRITAIN

41

PHOTOS: © ANDREW NICHOLSON/ALAMY/BLETCHLEY PARK/CHRIS HOWES/WILD PLACES PHOTOGRAPHY

Estate Secrets

Top to bottom:

Bletchley Park huts seen from the lake; rebuild of the Bombe at Bletchley Park, which helped decode German Enigma messages

Bletchley Park, which helped decode German Enigma messages 4 2 BRITAIN and who were competent at

42

BRITAIN

and who were competent at tussling with the intricacies of language. This did not go unnoticed by the War Office – many of Bletchley Park’s finest appointments were cruciverbalists – crossword addicts. Early in 1942, The Daily Telegraph – publisher of one of Britain’s best-regarded cryptic crosswords – printed correspondence that said the puzzle was becoming too easy and could be cracked in mere minutes. The editor, spurred on by the donation of a cash prize by a mysterious individual named W A J Gavin, decided to see if this was so.

A competition was held in the newspaper’s

Fleet Street offices, whereby contenders had 12 minutes to crack a 36-clue cryptic crossword – 20 seconds for each clue.

Five of the contenders were successful. About a month later, by strange coincidence, some of the competitors were contacted by the War Office who, without The Daily Telegraph’s knowledge, had been keeping a watching brief all along. It was no coincidence that several were subsequently recruited

to work at Bletchley Park.

From the outset, the Allies had enjoyed success in

deciphering German army and air force communications – they already had some knowledge of Enigma before the war started. However, there was a crucial weak link: naval communications remained virtually impenetrable. The havoc being exacted by U-boats was increasing; there was a fear that it could tip the balance of the war. The first breakthrough came in June 1941, when mathematician Alan Turing and a group of colleagues finally had success in deciphering the U-boat codes. It was Turing who had, a year earlier and with help from fellow mathematician, Gordon Welchman, developed the Bombe – a complex piece of apparatus that reputedly had more than a million soldered connections – as depicted in the 2014 film The Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, though Welchman’s role is not mentioned. There was always a danger that Station X could become

The Enigma machine looked similar to a typewriter – any intelligence gleaned was known by the code word ‘Ultra’

The Enigma machine looked similar to a typewriter – any intelligence gleaned was known by the
The Enigma machine looked similar to a typewriter – any intelligence gleaned was known by the
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PHOTOS: © WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES/STEVE VIDLER/CORBIS

Estate Secrets

© WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES/STEVE VIDLER/CORBIS Estate Secrets Above: The Duchess of Cambridge listens to a recorded

Above: The Duchess of Cambridge listens to a recorded message at Bletchley. Below: Alan Turing statue at the museum

too successful, making it obvious to the Germans that their codes had been compromised. This situation was neutralised by feeding misinformation to the enemy, but there remained valuable intelligence that could not be exploited. One rumour suggests, for example, that Churchill may have known in advance of the bombing of Coventry in November

1940, yet was powerless to act for fear that Hitler would learn of

Britain’s advantage. By 1943 the Allies were enjoying limited success in cracking the German code – in its prime, Bletchley Park was decoding more than 4,000

messages daily – but the Bombe machine struggled to keep up with an even more complex German coding machine, nicknamed ‘the Tunny’. It was in early 1944 that the code was comprehensively broken thanks to the work of a Post Office engineer called Thomas (Tommy) Flowers. Named the Colossus, his code-breaking machine was the world’s first programmable computer. By the end of the war, there was a new enemy: the Soviet Union. The work of

Bletchley Park was far from done and it became vital that the Soviets should remain ignorant of what had happened at Station X. Nevertheless, with the gradual thawing of relations, Bletchley Park finally closed as an intelligence facility in 1987. By 1991 there were, ironically, again plans to demolish it and build a housing estate. Fortunately, thanks to growing appreciation

for its work, demolition was averted and it is now a visitor centre.

Although the work of Alan Turing has been acknowledged in recent years, most of Bletchley’s staff were unassuming men and women. A few found fame –

including novelist Angus Wilson, and Roy Jenkins, who became Home Secretary in 1965. The Duchess of Cambridge’s grandmother also worked here. The newly revamped visitor centre is a fitting memorial to the unsung heroes who

shortened the war by at least two years. They were, as Churchill observed, “The geese who laid the golden eggs”.

Rumour has it Churchill knew in advance about the Coventry bombing in 1940 but was powerless to act

about the Coventry bombing in 1940 but was powerless to act  For more on Britain's

For more on Britain's wartime efforts visit www.britain-magazine.com

44

BRITAIN

BEHIND THE SCENES

THE HOUSE AND GROUNDS Following an £8m restoration project, Bletchley Park is now an interactive heritage site, with a Following an £8m restoration project, Bletchley Park is now an interactive heritage site, with a new visitor centre and refreshed exhibits such as Bletchley Park: Rescued and Restored, which includes a time capsule and wartime notes found stuffed in hut roof cracks, including the only known example of used Banbury sheets, a system devised by Alan Turing to help find the daily-changing Enigma settings. Visitors can explore the Victorian house and grounds and listen to atmospheric soundscapes, which include snatches of conversation, music, laughter and noises that are reminiscent of the 1940s wartime era. The grounds have been freshly landscaped, with reminders of where the long-gone Huts 2 and 9 once stood and the tennis courts have also been restored to grass, as they would have been in late 1940 and early 1941.

EXHIBITION In the ballroom and billiard rooms of the mansion, a major new exhibition celebrates the In the ballroom and billiard rooms of the mansion, a major new exhibition celebrates the 2014 film The Imitation Game in the very room where the bar scenes were filmed. Visitors can see costumes worn by Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, a German Enigma machine, a replica of the prototype Bombe machine and a copy of the crossword puzzle published in The Daily Telegraph newspaper. The exhibition runs until 1 November 2015 and admission is included in the general ticket price.

2015 and admission is included in the general ticket price. TICKETS Admission price to Bletchley Park

TICKETS

Admission price to Bletchley Park entitles you to an Annual Season Ticket, which gives unlimited access for one year. Admission prices are as follows: Adults: £16.75; concessions: £14.75; children (12-16): £10; under-12s:

free. Check the website for opening times:

www.bletchleypark.org.uk

£14.75; children (12-16): £10; under-12s: free. Check the website for opening times: www.bletchleypark.org.uk

www.britain-magazine.com

PHOTO: © SHAUN ARMSTRONG/MUBSTA PHOTOGRAPHY

Competition

A 4-STAR BREAK TO

BLETCHLEY PARK

Enjoy tickets for two to Bletchley Park and stay in the Hilton Milton Keynes Hotel with Great Little Breaks

O nce Britain’s best-kept secret, Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire is now a heritage site and vibrant tourist

attraction. The historic estate has seen an increased number of visitors in recent years – as many as 195,000 people visited in 2014. Readers of BRITAIN can enjoy two tickets to Bletchley Park with Great Little Breaks, plus an overnight bed and breakfast stay at the 4-star Hilton Milton Keynes Hotel. Great Little Breaks is an expert in organising three to five-star accommodation and short breaks throughout the UK and is now offering this exclusive chance to discover Bletchley Park. Located just 10 minutes from the park, the

Hilton Milton Keynes offers facilities including a gym and an indoor swimming pool as well as a business centre. Guest rooms are spacious and comfortable with wifi, while Queen Deluxe Family rooms also feature a seating area with sofa, and luxurious bathrobe and slippers. Upon arrival at your hotel enjoy a complimentary bottle of wine. Dinner is served in the Horizon’s Restaurant, which serves classic British cuisine. Guests can also sample international favourites in a bright dining room with modern décor.

www.britain-magazine.com

Bletchley Park is open daily and visitors can explore the iconic huts that housed codebreakers such as Alan Turing, whose work is said to have helped shorten the Second World War by two years. Turing was the subject of 2014 film The Imitation Game. So as interest continues to grow, what better time to see this museum? For more information on the competition visit www.greatlittlebreaks.com/win-bletchley.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Closingdateforentriesis31August2015.Winnerwillbecontactedwithin48hours

of the competition closing. Prize is to be redeemed by 30 November 2015; subject to availability. By entering you agree to receive exclusive offers from Great Little Breaks. ForTs&Csvisitwww.britain-magazine.com/bletchley-park-competition

HOW TO ENTER
HOW TO ENTER

For your chance to win visit www.britain-magazine.com/ bletchley-park-competition or fill out the coupon below with the answer to the following question:

Question: Who played Alan Turing in 2014’s The Imitation Game?

a) Benedict Cumberbatch

b) Eddie Redmayne

c) Hugh Bonneville

ENTRY FORM

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Scandalous ACCUSATIONS In the first part of a new series exploring unbelievable stories, we investigate
Scandalous
ACCUSATIONS
In the first part of a new series exploring unbelievable stories,
we investigate a real-life thriller that captivated late-Victorian
and early-Edwardian society
WORDS SALLY COFFEY

I n 1897 a widow applied for the

exhumation of the grave of her late

father-in-law. Her reason? She believed

his body didn’t lie there at all but that

he had faked his death to do his legitimate heirs, (and her son), out of their fortune, favouring his secret double life. The extraordinary claims of Anna Maria Druce led to a protracted legal battle between the 6th Duke of Portland and several pretenders to his throne who argued that he should not have inherited his cousin’s title and estate, as his predecessor had secretly fathered several children, one of whom must surely be his rightful heir. In The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife and the Missing Corpse, Piu Marie Eatwell explores the Druce-Portland case, which was one of the most drawn-out and tangled legal sagas of the era and caused a media sensation. Central to the case was the accusation that the 5th Duke of Portland, who died in 1879, had led a double life as a department store owner and had killed off his alter ego in 1864 before retreating into virtual obscurity.

46

BRITAIN

In March 1898 Druce stated her claim in

court to the incredulous Chancellor Tristram:

“If I understand you correctly, Mrs Druce,” he said, “you are requesting me to grant you a faculty for the exhumation of your father-in-law’s cof n, which was buried in consecrated ground at Highgate Cemetery. “And the reason for this

peculiar request is that you say he did not die 34 years ago in December 1864, as everyone believes, and indeed, was represented by his funeral at that time. Your assertion is that the funeral in 1864 was a charade, and that in fact your father-in-law carried on living in secret under an assumed identity.” The woman continued to look ahead unwaveringly. “Yes, my lord,” she replied. “That is exactly what I seek.” In her claim, Anna Maria Druce said her father-in-law,

Thomas Charles Druce, owner of the Baker Street Bazaar, was also the 5th Duke of Portland and that he had fathered several children with a lady called Annie May (three of whom were born out of wedlock) before growing tired of his double life, faking his

death, and returning to his role as the Duke of Portland. Anna Maria

BUY THE BOOK The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife and the Missing Corpse by Piu
BUY THE BOOK
The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife
and the Missing Corpse by Piu
Marie Eatwell (£16.99 Head
of Zeus) delves into this
extraordinary story in detail.
www.headofzeus.com
i
i

asserted that her husband Walter was the rst legitimate child of Thomas and Annie May and so her son was heir to the dukedom. It was a story that captivated the country, from the poor working classes to the dizzy heights of the aristocracy. “Mrs Druce”, announced the

Daily Mail, “is now the most

Druce”, announced the Daily Mail , “is now the most interesting woman in England. She occupies

interesting

woman in England.

She occupies more space in the

newspapers than is claimed by

the Queen of England.”

Perhaps most interesting of

all was the fact that the

supposed trickster was

www.britain-magazine.com

PHOTOS: © THE DEAD DUKE, HIS SECRET WIFE AND THE MISSING CORPSE BY PIU MARIE EATWELL/WWW.BRIDGEMANART.COM

Tall Tales

CORPSE BY PIU MARIE EATWELL/WWW.BRIDGEMANART.COM Tall Tales Facing page, clockwise from top left: The North Lodge
Facing page, clockwise from top left: The North Lodge and tunnel entrance of Welbeck Abbey;
Facing page, clockwise
from top left: The North
Lodge and tunnel
entrance of Welbeck
Abbey; underground
tunnel at the abbey;
Annie May.
This page, left to right:
A photograph of Druce;
a portrait said to be
of the 5th Duke
showing an uncanny
resemblance; caricature
of the Duke from
Figaro magazine

descended from one of the best-known gures of the Elizabethan age, Bess of Hardwick, who built some of the nest buildings in England, many of which still stand today, such as Chatsworth House. Meanwhile, the 6th Duke, who decades after he inherited the title was subject to these lurid claims, was also well connected – he even entertained Queen Victoria and Edward, Prince of Wales, at his aristocratic home of Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire, which King Henry VIII had handed to his administrator Richard Whalley of Screveton following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. There were also links between the two men and some of the most revered people of the day – Charles Dickens was said to be a close friend of Druce’s, though his family strenuously denied it. The 5th Duke of Portland was indeed an odd character; obsessive about privacy – he mainly travelled at night and in his carriage he always had the silk blind tightly drawn. To further hide himself from the world he created a web of tunnels underneath

from the world he created a web of tunnels underneath Welbeck, lbeck which which “crisscrossed “crisscrossed
Welbeck, lbeck which which “crisscrossed “crisscrossed
Welbeck, lbeck which which “crisscrossed “crisscrossed

P

Photos of the two men were also circulated

beneath the abbey in a vast labyrinth, like a Nottinghamshire Palace of Knossos.” Druce, it seemed, had fathered many children – he was still married to his rst wife and had several children by her when he set up home with Annie May – and as more and more people came forward with a claim to his fortunes, so the story developed. There were a few things that people said pointed to the dual identity, not least the men’s eating habits: “Long averse to red meat, the Duke in later years took to dining on chicken alone – in the morning and evening only, and never at lunchtime. This was, of course, exactly the reverse of Druce, who ate only at lunchtime (and also disliked red meat), and it therefore became another argument to support the idea that the two men were one and the same person.” Of course the similarities didn’t stop there. There were witnesses who came forward to say that they knew that the two men shared an identity; it was almost like an open secret.

– one of which was an uncontested image of Thomas Charles Druce with a bushy beard, and a second, said to have been taken from

a portrait of the 5th Duke (the original had

been destroyed in a re) showing what appeared to be an uncanny resemblance. The two men shared certain physical traits: the 5th Duke suffered from a skin disease that gave him jaundice. Druce, likewise, had this complexion, and some of his children and grandchildren were said to be similarly af icted. Druce and the Duke were both also about ve feet nine inches tall, sturdily built and around 13 stone. Did the Duke lead a double life as Thomas Charles Druce? You’ll have to read the book to nd out, but one thing is for sure – the court hearings and investigations revealed a dark underbelly of lies and secrets beneath the genteel façade of late-Victorian England and it makes for compelling reading.

late-Victorian England and it makes for compelling reading. 8 For more weird and wonderful tales from

8 For more weird and wonderful tales from our shores visit www.britain-magazine.com

www.britain-magazine.com

BRITAIN

47

Holiday Hideaways R OMANCE OF THE LAKES What could be more romantic than an escape
Holiday Hideaways R OMANCE OF THE LAKES What could be more romantic than an escape
Holiday Hideaways R OMANCE OF THE LAKES What could be more romantic than an escape

Holiday Hideaways

Holiday Hideaways R OMANCE OF THE LAKES What could be more romantic than an escape to

R OMANCE OF THE LAKES

What could be more romantic than an escape to the Lake District, the place that inspired both Wordsworth and Beatrix Potter? Here are some of our favourite romantic havens

WORDS GILLY PICKUP

www.britain-magazine.com

BRITAIN

49

TRUST IMAGES/CUMBRIAN COTTAGES/

LANDSCAPES UK/ALAMY

BOURSNELL/NATIONAL

WAITE/ANNA STOWE

© PAUL HEINRICH/ALAMY/CLIVE

VISITBRITAIN/CHARLIE

PHOTOS:

A t 885 square miles, the Lake District is England’s largest

national park. Where better to wander lonely as a cloud,

stride across hills, mess about in a boat, cycle the trails or

simply relax and soak up the views?

There is an incredible variety of camera-ready scenery here, from rugged hillsides and woodlands rich in Atlantic mosses, ferns and lichen, to glassy lakes and fells where ravens and birds of prey are a common sight. This is one of the best places in Britain to experience the great outdoors, though it has to be said the weather is unpredictable; locals say it is not unusual to experience all four seasons in one day. However, look at it another way – rain showers

and racing clouds only serve to emphasise the grandeur of the scenery, and as hill-walking oracle Alfred Wainwright famously said:

“There’s no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing.” Whatever the weather, a good place to embark on a walking tour of the Upper Eden Valley is the market town of Kirkby Stephen, situated about 30 miles from Kendal: Wainwright’s Coast to Coast Walk passes through the town. The Eden Valley offers walks of all levels, along old railways and nature trails, to routes via ruined castles, stone circles and ancient settlements. For something tougher, climb to the enigmatic Nine Standards, a line of nine drystone cairns. Why are they here? No-one knows – their original purpose is shrouded in mystery. One good place to stay in the area was once a key building in a long-gone community: Waitby School, which dates from 1680 and was built on Waitby Fell.

The five-star property is now a cottage that stands alone in the Eden Valley, with far-reaching views and distant sightings of

Grasmere is where William Wordsworth used to stroll the lakeshore in search of inspiration, calling it “the loveliest spot that man hath ever found”

calling it “the loveliest spot that man hath ever found” steam trains on the Settle to

steam trains on the Settle to Carlisle Railway. The railway has been restored with advice from English Heritage. The entrance, through the original school cloakroom, leads to open-plan living accommodation. Original features include

the school bell, double front doors, wood-panelled walls and even the boys’ outside lavatory, complete with wooden seat – but don’t worry, there are modern bathrooms inside too. This year marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of Romantic poet William Wordsworth’s poem Daffodils and Grasmere is where the poet used to stroll the lakeshore path in search of inspiration. He adored the area and described Grasmere as “the loveliest spot that man hath ever found”. At that time Wordsworth lived in Dove Cottage, which happens to be right across the road from the Daffodil Hotel & Spa, a great place to lay your hat and follow in Wordsworth’s footsteps. Once known as The Prince of Wales Hotel – a nod to a visit in the 19th century from the future King Edward VII – the hotel has established itself as one of the Lake District’s most desirable places to stay and its bedrooms have stunning views overlooking the lake. The spa has a thermal pool, steam room, sauna and tepidarium; perfect for relaxing after a day’s walking or climbing. Alternatively, pay a visit to Poet’s View Cottage, the charming former residence of Wordsworth’s grandson. A stay at Old Mill Barn, a detached watermill conversion in Penrith overlooking great swathes of countryside, is sure to nourish the spirit. The barn is just outside the village of Gamblesby – an ideal location for exploring the North Pennines and Hadrian’s Wall.

– an ideal location for exploring the North Pennines and Hadrian’s Wall. 5 0 BRITAIN www.britain-magazine.com

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www.britain-magazine.com Clockwise, from left: Lindeth Howe, on Lake Windermere; Derwent Water to the south of Keswick

Clockwise, from left: Lindeth Howe, on Lake Windermere; Derwent Water to the south of Keswick is one of the Lake District's largest bodies of water; the view from Derwent Water looking towards Castle Crag.

Below, left: The luxurious Daffodil Hotel & Spa

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See the Lakes Better by Goat Northern England’s Leading Tour Company Tours of the Lake
See the Lakes Better by Goat Northern England’s Leading Tour Company Tours of the Lake
See the Lakes Better by Goat Northern England’s Leading Tour Company Tours of the Lake

See the Lakes

Better by Goat

Northern England’s Leading Tour Company

Tours of the Lake District, North York Moors, Yorkshire Dales & Hadrian’s Walls

Short Break &Holiday Itineraries

Exclusive and Bespoke Itineraries available

Contact +44 (0)15394 45161 mountain-goat.com yorkshiredaytours.com tours@mountain-goat.com

yorkshiredaytours.com tours@mountain-goat.com L I N D E T H H O W E C O U

L I N D E T H

H O W E

C O U N T R Y

H O U S E

H O T E L

LINDETH HOWE COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL

PREVIOUSLY OWNED BY FAMOUS CHILDREN’S AUTHOR BEATRIX POTTER AND SET IN 6 ACRES OF PRIVATE GARDENS, OVERLOOKING LAKE WINDERMERE AND THE HILLS BEYOND.

AWARDED 4 STARS AND 2 ROSETTES BY THE AA FOR ITS FANTASTIC CUISINE.

WITH FACILITIES INCLUDING AN INDOOR SWIMMING POOL AND SAUNA.

ENJOY A RELAXING BREAK IN THIS COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL STEEPED IN HISTORY.

PICTURES AND LETTERS FRAMED ON THE WALLS FROM WHEN THE POTTER FAMILY STAYED AND LIVED HERE.

THE WALLS FROM WHEN THE POTTER FAMILY STAYED AND LIVED HERE. 78% Lindeth Drive, Longtail Hill,

78%

Lindeth Drive, Longtail Hill, Windermere, Cumbria LA23 3JF Telephone +44 (0) 15394 45759 Facsimile +44 (0) 15394 46368 hotel@lindeth-howe.co.uk

www.lindeth-howe.co.uk

PHOTO: © CHLOEIMAGES/ALAMY

Holiday Hideaways

This picture: Lindeth Howe Hotel.

Below: Peter Rabbit draws in visitors at Beatrix Potter World, Windermere

Rabbit draws in visitors at Beatrix Potter World, Windermere A set of 18th-century stocks on the

A set of 18th-century stocks on the village green here somehow look as if they’ve slipped through a time warp. Last time they were used was to punish someone who had stolen a turnip. Cosy-down in this hide-and-chic retreat, which comes with bells and whistles, including a fully-equipped kitchen, TV and wifi. An open-plan living area includes kitchen, dining and seating area with wood-burning stove, and a separate mezzanine. Another unusual bolthole worth considering is Keswick Boat House, which has enviable views across Derwent Water – indeed the property actually overhangs the water. Sit on the balcony, pour yourself a glass of wine and simply watch the boats come and go on the jetty as you enjoy some precious moments of unhurried bliss. Windermere is England’s largest lake and the surrounding area, cobwebbed with walking trails, has been drawing tourists since trains first came here with the opening of the rail line in 1847. Lindeth Howe Country House Hotel, once children’s author Beatrix Potter’s home, has plenty of bragging rights, with guest rooms offering superlative views over the lovely lake, sprawling garden and woodland. All en-suite rooms come with the usual comforts, while deluxe rooms, include a DVD player, chilled water and extra toiletries. To relax at the end of a busy day’s sightseeing, there is a heated indoor pool, sauna and fitness room. Nearby, the World of Beatrix Potter Attraction brings to life magical scenes from the author’s books. Children of all ages can enjoy Jemima Puddle-Duck’s glade and the Peter Rabbit Garden, offering a glimpse of the cabbages where Peter lost a shoe and the garden gate under which he squeezed while trying to escape Mr McGregor.

shoe and the garden gate under which he squeezed while trying to escape Mr McGregor. www.britain-magazine.com

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A luxurious Lake District Escape With 10 individually interior designed Suite’s and Rooms Candlelit Restaurant
A luxurious Lake District Escape With 10 individually interior designed Suite’s and Rooms Candlelit Restaurant
A luxurious Lake District Escape With 10 individually interior designed Suite’s and Rooms Candlelit Restaurant
A luxurious Lake District Escape With 10 individually interior designed Suite’s and Rooms Candlelit Restaurant
A luxurious Lake District Escape With 10 individually interior designed Suite’s and Rooms Candlelit Restaurant

A luxurious Lake District Escape

With 10 individually interior designed Suite’s and Rooms Candlelit Restaurant with 2 AA Rosette’s featuring Cumbrian produce Friendly personal service Special breaks available year round

The perfect place to relax and enjoy the beauty of the Lake District.

place to relax and enjoy the beauty of the Lake District. Cedar Manor Hotel & Restaurant

Cedar Manor Hotel & Restaurant Ambleside Road, Windermere, Cumbria, LA23 1AX, UK Email: stay@cedarmanor.co.uk • Tel: 015394 43192 www.cedarmanor.co.uk

Road, Windermere, Cumbria, LA23 1AX, UK Email: stay@cedarmanor.co.uk • Tel: 015394 43192 • www.cedarmanor.co.uk
Yet more literary connections abound on the nearby 5,000-acre Graythwaite Estate where the woodlands were
Yet more literary connections abound on the nearby 5,000-acre Graythwaite Estate where the woodlands were
Yet more literary connections abound on the nearby 5,000-acre Graythwaite Estate where the woodlands were

Yet more literary connections abound on the nearby 5,000-acre Graythwaite Estate where the woodlands were also featured in Beatrix Potter’s short story The Fairy Caravan. Silverholme,

a Grade II listed Georgian country house for hire on the estate, is the former home of Oscar Gnosspelius, a pioneer seaplane builder. A friend of author Arthur Ransome, Gnosspelius advised the writer on Pigeon Post, his sixth Swallows and Amazons book. He was also the inspiration for Timothy, the character known as ‘Squashy Hat.’ Although it is almost 200 years old, Silverholme has been immaculately restored with each room a blend of period character and modern comfort. The house sleeps 16 in eight individually-styled en-suite bedrooms and another two in the original

Coachman’s Cottage in the 12-acre gardens. Incidentally, the gardens were the first commission for Victorian designer Thomas Mawson, who went on to lay out the Peace Palace Gardens at The Hague. Four reception rooms include an enormous kitchen and library, plus a TV room with 50-in screen and surround sound. Concierge services on hand help guests plan leisure

pursuits – from fly-fishing on Graythwaite’s private tarn to clay pigeon shooting and Segway tours along a scenic route of private tracks. Then again, it’s the perfect place for doing nothing at all. In June 1881 Charles Darwin stayed in Glenridding House for five weeks with members of his family. Thanks to surviving letters, it is clear that he enjoyed his stay by picturesque Ullswater, the region’s second largest lake, which forms the border between the ancient counties of Cumberland and Westmorland. These days Glenridding House, a Grade II listed villa not too far from mighty mountain Helvellyn, offers AA five gold star accommodation awash with Regency elegance. Built around 1820, bedrooms with panoramic lake or mountain views have

oak floors, hand-finished mango wood furniture, original window shutters and Victorian brass bedsteads. All bedrooms come with en-suite showers or bathrooms with cast iron slipper baths. Extensive grounds and landscaped gardens provide tranquility – the danger of course is that once you’ve checked in, you’ll never want to leave.

Clockwise, from top: Silverholme country home on the Graythwaite Estate; a bedroom at Lindeth Howe; Old Mill Barn, in Penrith, is a cosy converted watermill

a bedroom at Lindeth Howe; Old Mill Barn, in Penrith, is a cosy converted watermill www.britain-magazine.com

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PHOTOS: © VISITBRITAIN/LEE BEEL/BRITAIN ON VIEW/JOE MURPHY

Holiday Hideaways

To find out more about visiting the Lake District go to www.britain- magazine.com
To find out
more about visiting
the Lake District
go to www.britain-
magazine.com

BOOK AHEAD

POET'S VIEW COTTAGE Situated in Hunting Stile, this three bedroom cottage-style apartment was formerly the ballroom of a gentleman's residence built for the grandson of William Wordsworth. Today it has been transformed into an idyllic holiday retreat. www.cumbrian-cottages.co.uk

WAITBY SCHOOL This former school is now a cosy cottage offering a dose of nostalgia, with all the mod cons. It has two double bedrooms and three singles in a triple room, sleeping up to seven. The cottage is family-friendly with a cot and high chair available. www.waitbyschool.com

LINDETH HOWE COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL This four-star hotel was once the home of children’s author Beatrix Potter. It overlooks Lake Windermere and boasts a 2 AA Rosette restaurant. www.lindeth-howe.co.uk

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2 AA Rosette restaurant. www.lindeth-howe.co.uk 5 6 BRITAIN DAFFODIL HOTEL & SPA This 78-room, 4-star hotel

DAFFODIL HOTEL & SPA This 78-room, 4-star hotel is the ideal lakeside location for enjoying a Champagne afternoon tea. The hotel also provides guests with information on William Wordsworth, with themed walks in the area. www.daffodilhotel.co.uk

SILVERHOLME Guests at this elegant manor house have exclusive access to a heated swimming pool, fitness suite and table tennis room. With a mix of period character and modern luxuries, Silverholme is a delightful country

and modern luxuries, Silverholme is a delightful country house for hire – it even has its

house for hire – it even has its own private jetty. www.graythwaite.com/silverholme

OLD MILL BARN The five-bedroomed converted Old Mill Barn is located in the unspoiled village of Gamblesby. Well-behaved dogs welcome you to this family-friendly establishment. www.oldmillbarn.co.uk

GLENRIDDING HOUSE HOTEL Stay in the Grade II Georgian villa that hosted Charles Darwin and his family in 1881. Originally built in

www.britain-magazine.com

Poet's View Cottage

Poet's View Cottage 1820, today it is a luxurious five-star boutique hotel in an enviable location

1820, today it is a luxurious five-star boutique hotel in an enviable location on the edge of Ullswater, the Lake District's second largest body of water. www.glenriddinghouse.com

KESWICK BOAT HOUSE Sitting on the shores of Derwent Water, and extending into the lake, Keswick Boat House offers stunning views set in peaceful lakeside surroundings. Overhanging balconies are the perfect place to enjoy tea and coffee in the morning, while access to row boats make this a water lover's paradise. www.cumbrian-cottages.co.uk

www.britain-magazine.com

Craftmanship

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TRAVEL ESSENTIALS

GETTING THERE By train: The West Coast Main Line train runs to the east of the Lake District, connecting Oxenholme, Penrith and Carlisle with London and Glasgow. Direct trains run from Manchester to Windermere. Towns and villages such as Ambleside, Windermere, Coniston and Keswick are linked by bus, with extra summer services.

By air: The nearest airports are Manchester and Glasgow. There is a railway station at Manchester airport with services that run to Oxenholme (next to Kendal),

Kendal, Staveley and Windermere.

By car: The average journey time from London is around five hours. The M6 motorway runs to the east of the Lake District. Turn off either at Kendal (Junction 37) or Penrith (Junction 40) for quickest access to the national park.

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GETTING AROUND By car: Bear in mind narrow roads and traffic jams in places, depending on time of year. If you don’t want to drive there are plenty of car hire companies in the area.

By bus: The Lake District has good public transport links and Stagecoach Cumbria runs a network of local bus services. www.stagecoachbus.com

runs a network of local bus services. www.stagecoachbus.com By train: Get around by train on the

By train: Get around by train on the Lakeside and Haverthwaite Railway or the Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway. A particularly scenic trip runs along the coastline of Cumbria from Barrow-in-Furness to Carlisle. www.lakesiderailway.co.uk www.ravenglass-railway.co.uk www.northernrail.org

By boat: There’s no better way to explore the lakes than by boat and there are several charters to choose from, including Ullswater Steamers, which has operated on its namesake lake for 150 years, or Windermere Lake Cruises – the most popular attraction in Cumbria. www.ullswater-steamers.co.uk www.windermere-lakecruises.co.uk

www.windermere-lakecruises.co.uk Let each new issue of BRITAIN take you on a colourful

Let each new issue of BRITAIN take you on a colourful journey through our nation’s rich history and landscape, from the comfort of your armchair

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Discover award-winning surprises in Wirral

Wirral Peninsula is an oasis of breathtaking coastline, and lush countryside, with a delicious range of eateries and welcoming places to stay. Ideally situated between the two cities of Chester and Liverpool, enjoy stunning views over the Welsh Hills and the River Dee on one side, with the spectacular Liverpool skyline and the River Mersey on the other. Discover Wirral for an action-packed break or a leisurely long weekend.

Discover a warm welcome

The stunning Grade II listed Hillbark Hotel & Spa is an idyllic place to stay and Merseyside’s rst 5 star hotel. Set in beautiful parkland, indulge here - choosing from 2 AA or 3 AA Rosette ne dining, and be pampered in the sumptuous spa. Revitalised, explore Royden Park and ride the model railway - ideal for kids.

Hillbark Hotel & Spa, Frankby

In nearby West Kirby, enjoy some retail therapy at the boutique shops before strolling along the promenade or beach, and take in wonderful views of Wales and Wirral’s treasured Hilbre Islands. Walk or take a boat to the islands and see a variety of wildlife, followed by more adventure with the water sports at the Marine Lake. Emerge shaken not stirred at The Wro Bar, Lounge & Loft; Best Bar in Merseyside three times and Wirral’s Best Bar Team this year, before taking a short hop to Hoylake, childhood home of James Bond actor, Daniel Craig. Here, choose from quality eating places and nd Royal Liverpool Golf Club, which played host to the last Men’s British Open Championship. Wirral is a golfer’s paradise; with 14 spectacular courses, and the Wirral Golf Classic - an amateur golf tournament taking place every September.

Ness Botanic Gardens, Ness

Discover Coast & Countryside

Visit Ness Botanic Gardens to discover an exquisite educational environment, and outstanding collections of plants and owers, along with a visitor centre, nature trails and a café. Close-by is Inglewood Manor, recognised with a Visit England Taste award for its ne dining. This country house hotel retains all the charm of a lavish Edwardian family home and is surrounded by 38 acres of exquisite grounds. Later explore Wirral Country Park in Thurstaston; the rst country park in Britain. It is home to the Wirral Way, a 12-mile former railway line tracing the Dee Estuary coast and o ering an environmental oasis for walkers and cyclists, as well as breathtaking views from the dramatic cli s across the estuary. You will also discover the Shore Cottage Studio, winner of a North West Coastal Excellence Award and o ering a variety of art courses with inspirational views.

The Jug & Bottle, Heswall

In nearby Heswall is The Jug and Bottle - welcoming guest accommodation with views of the Dee and perfect for a delightful meal in an inviting gastro-pub environment. Finally, relax at award-winning Thornton Hall Hotel & Spa in the quaint Thornton Hough Village. Treat yourself to a 3 AA Rosette ne dining experience, here in its Lawns Restaurant with panoramic views of the beautiful grounds, or indulge in afternoon tea on The Lawns.

Discover Culture

The delightful, 5 Star Gold, Mere Brook House is the perfect base to explore some must-see attractions. Wirral Accommodation of the Year three years on the run, and recently named Merseyside Guest Accommodation of the Year, this Edwardian guesthouse in Thornton Hough o ers a warm welcome in luxurious surroundings.

Dell Bridge, Port Sunlight

Then, begin the day at Port Sunlight to receive an absorbing insight into a 19th Century model village. Marvel at award-winning gardens, the art gallery, and uniquely designed houses. Just across the village unwind at the Leverhulme Hotel, an art-deco boutique resting place with its 2 AA Rosette restaurant. Step back in time at Wirral Attraction of the Year - Port Sunlight Museum, before visiting nearby Claremont Farm, home to the Wirral Farm Feast every summer. Try one of the cooking courses here or visit the superb farm shop. Later, ferry across the Mersey with Europe’s celebrated and oldest ferry service, departing from Seacombe and Woodside. Follow this with a quality real ale at Gallagher’s Pub & Barbers - ‘Wirral CAMRA Pub’ for the fourth time, and gents get a hot towel shave while you’re there!

Discover the taste of Wirral

Discover historic Birkenhead Park; the inspiration for New York’s Central Park, before journeying to Oxton Village. This is home to the established Michelin star restaurant, Fraiche - number one in the Sunday Times Top 100 UK restaurants and in the top 20 UK restaurants within the Which Good Food Guide. Make time for a stop at the nearby Williamson Art Gallery, and view its permanent and national touring exhibitions. Then, heading to the eastern side of Wirral Peninsula, explore North Wirral Coastal Park, with Britain’s oldest brick lighthouse - Leasowe Lighthouse, and the seaside town of New Brighton. The promenade here is home to the Floral Pavilion Theatre, the Light cinema, and Championship Adventure Golf, along with a casino and places to eat and stay. The perfect end to your stay is award-winning Ca e Cream. Choose from one of their many unique ice cream avours produced on site, and enjoy views of New Brighton Lighthouse, with Liverpool as its backdrop.

Don’t miss out - plan your break:

visitwirral.com & follow @visit_wirral

Discover Wirral 50 miles of beautiful walks, 22 miles of breathtaking coastline, award winning attractions
Discover Wirral
50 miles of beautiful walks, 22 miles of breathtaking coastline, award
winning attractions and accommodation with fantastic places to eat,
including our very own Michelin star restaurant - discover it all in Wirral!
For your chance to win an unforgettable stay:
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Hilbre Islands
WOMEN R ULE England’s England’s Queens Queens The author of two books charting the history

WOMEN

R

ULE

England’sEngland’s QueensQueens

The author of two books charting the history of our female monarchs tells the stories behind some of our most memorable queens

WORDS ELIZABETH NORTON

Above: Queen Elizabeth I in a portrait by Nicholas Hilliard. This photo: Queen Victoria visits
Above: Queen
Elizabeth I in a
portrait by
Nicholas Hilliard.
This photo: Queen
Victoria visits
HMS Resolute
Over the past 2,000 years, nearly 80 women have sat on the royal throne of
Over the past 2,000 years, nearly 80 women have sat on the royal throne of

Over the past 2,000 years, nearly 80 women have sat on the royal throne of England, either as consort or reigning queen. Some of the country’s most formidable rulers have been female, with our current queen, Elizabeth II, now approaching the record for longest-reigning monarch, a record held by Queen Victoria. Perhaps the most redoubtable of English queens was also the earliest. The records of queenship begin with Boudica (c.30-60/1 AD), the best known of all the Ancient Britons. She was the wife of Prasutagus, the King of the Iceni – a tribe based in East Anglia. Britain was conquered by Emperor Claudius in AD 43, with Boudica and her husband ruling as clients of Rome. When Prasutagus died, the Romans seized his kingdom – beating his widow and raping his daughters. Boudica, who was a giant of a woman with flowing fair hair, responded to these outrages with violence. Uniting the neighbouring tribes under her leadership, she sacked the new cities of Colchester, London and St Albans. The speed of her rebellion caught the outnumbered Romans by surprise and it was some time before they were ready for battle. Riding up and down her lines in a chariot, Boudica spurred her troops on, but they were no match for the Romans’ ordered discipline. The result was a bloodbath, with the queen reputedly poisoning herself when she realised her defeat. While Boudica’s rebellion was swift and dramatic, her efforts ultimately ended in failure and some 500 years later, Bertha of Kent (c.539-612) proved to have a much longer-lasting legacy.

ended in failure and some 500 years later, Bertha of Kent (c.539-612) proved to have a

England’s Queens

Bertha, who was the daughter of the King of Paris, married the pagan King Ethelbert of Kent before 567. As a Christian, she brought her chaplain with her to England and worshipped in her own chapel in Canterbury. When, in 596, Pope Gregory sent St Augustine to convert the English, Bertha offered the use of her own church. Augustine also received a warm welcome from Ethelbert thanks to his familiarity with his wife’s faith. He soon agreed to be baptised. Bertha’s role in the conversion of England was widely known and in 602 she received a letter of thanks from the Pope. There were few queens more daring than Emma of Normandy (c.980-1052), who married two successive English kings. As a teenager, Emma wed the middle-aged Ethelred II. This famously ‘unready’ king was plagued by Viking attacks and, after his death in 1016, his throne was seized by the Danish Cnut the Great. To bolster his claim, Cnut married Emma, with the queen prominent during his reign. With the coronation of her son, Harthacnut, in 1040, she was able to ensure her continuing prominence as queen mother. She was also responsible for the return from Normandy of her eldest son, Edward the Confessor, who succeeded his half-brother in 1042. Emma’s great-nephew, William the Conqueror, claimed the throne in 1066 through his relationship with the English queen. The most powerful English queen was probably Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122-1204), who ruled one of the richest fiefdoms of medieval Europe. She was married at age 15 to King Louis VII of France, a man who would have been more suited to a monastery than a throne. Nonetheless, the couple had two daughters and Eleanor accompanied

the couple had two daughters and Eleanor accompanied PHOTOS: LIBRARY/MARY © LEBRECHT MUSIC AND ARTS PHOTO
PHOTOS: LIBRARY/MARY © LEBRECHT MUSIC AND ARTS PHOTO LIBRARY/ALAMY/V&A IMAGES/DE AGOSTINI PICTURE EVANS
PHOTOS: LIBRARY/MARY
© LEBRECHT MUSIC
AND
ARTS PHOTO
LIBRARY/ALAMY/V&A
IMAGES/DE AGOSTINI
PICTURE
EVANS
PICTURE
LIBRARY/GETTY/ELIZABETH
NORTON/JONATHAN
REEVE
PICTURE LIBRARY/GETTY/ELIZABETH NORTON/JONATHAN REEVE www.britain-magazine.com Facing page, top to bottom :

www.britain-magazine.com

Facing page, top to bottom: Boudica; stained glass window depicting Queen Bertha at Canterbury Cathedral; King Cnut and Emma of Normandy

Above: Fleet of ships carrying Isabella of France to England to wed King Edward II. Left: Isabella of Angoulême and Eleanor of Aquitaine

DID YOU KNOW?

Aside from the real queens, there were mythical queens such as Cordelia, the youngest daughter of King Lear (or Leir), immortalised by William Shakespeare. According to the 12th-century writer Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordelia killed herself after her two nephews forced her from the throne and imprisoned her.

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PHOTOS: © WORLD HISTORY ARCHIVE/ALAMY/JONATHAN REEVE/OYAL COLLECTION TRUST / HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II 2015

her husband to the Holy Land on Crusade. After meeting the future King Henry II of England, she asked Louis for a divorce, marrying her second husband in 1152. Henry and Eleanor had a turbulent relationship, with the queen later inciting her sons to rebel against their father. When this failed in 1173, Eleanor was captured trying to escape to France dressed as a man. After 16 years as a prisoner in England, she was released in 1189 on the accession of her son, King Richard I. The new king relied on his elderly mother during his long absences from England and she was a political force to be reckoned with. Eleanor continued to support her youngest son, John, after he became king in 1199. She remained active to the end, even being besieged by her grandson in 1202. Surely there is no English queen more notorious than Isabella of France (c.1295-1358). Remembered as the ‘She-Wolf of France’, she endured an unhappy marriage to the unpopular King Edward II. During a visit to her homeland in 1325, she built a party of English exiles around her, including her lover, Roger Mortimer, and her brother-in-law, Edmund, Earl of Kent. With support from her brother, the King of France, the queen declared that she and her eldest son (the future King Edward III) would not return to England when summoned.

Elizabeth I is remembered as one of our greatest rulers, but her path to the throne was a troubled one

Isabella landed at Harwich with an army in September 1326 and rapidly seized power, capturing Edward and his favourite aide, Hugh Despenser, as they ed towards Wales. Despenser, who was rumoured to be the king’s lover, was executed, while Edward was deposed in favour of his son. Since the new King Edward III was a minor, Isabella and Mortimer ruled England on his behalf. They became increasingly unpopular after being suspected of ordering the murder of King Edward II and executing their former friend, Edmund of Kent. In 1330, the young king and a party of armed men rushed into the queen’s bedchamber at Nottingham Castle. As they dragged her lover from the room, Isabella cried out ‘fair son, have pity on gentle Mortimer’, but he was executed. The queen was placed under house arrest in a succession of castles before settling in Castle Rising in Norfolk. Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) is remembered as one of England’s greatest rulers, but her path to the throne was a troubled one. The idea of a reigning queen was still an unusual one in England and, on her accession, everyone expected her to quickly marry and provide England with a king. Instead, Elizabeth was determined to rule alone, presiding over a period marked by exploration and advances in the arts and technology. With her Religious Settlement of 1559, Elizabeth also helped to create the

Settlement of 1559, Elizabeth also helped to create the www.britain-magazine.com England’s Queens Facing page:

www.britain-magazine.com

England’s Queens

to create the www.britain-magazine.com England’s Queens Facing page: This Queen Elizabeth I image appeared on the

Facing page: This Queen Elizabeth I image appeared on the frontispiece to the 1569 publication Christian Prayers

Above: Queen Elizabeth I. Below: Mary, Queen of Scots, painting by François Clouet

A SCOTTISH CONTENDER? Aged just six days when she ascended to the throne following the
A SCOTTISH CONTENDER?
Aged just six days when she ascended
to the throne following the death of her
father, King James V of
Scotland , Mary, Queen of Scots,
led a tumultuous reign. She
unsuccessfully tried to seize the English
throne from her cousin,
Queen Elizabeth I, and when she was
ousted from the Scottish throne in
favour of her young son, King
James VI (who went on to be
crowned King James I of England),
it was with her English cousin that
she sought refuge. Unfortunately
for Mary, her earlier inflammatory
actions proved to be her downfall
and Elizabeth imprisoned her
in many of the country's castles
and manor houses before
having her executed for supposedly
organising the plot
to have her assassinated.
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Edinburgh Tattoo Edinburgh Castle, Scotland visitbritainshop.com
Edinburgh Tattoo
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66 BRITAIN

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PHOTOS: © FINE ART IMAGES/HERITAGE-IMAGES.COM/GL ARCHIVE/ALAMY

England’s Queens

For more tales of our famous kings and queens go to www.britain- magazine.com
For more
tales of our famous
kings and queens
go to www.britain-
magazine.com

modern Church of England. Her greatest moment came as she surveyed her troops at Tilbury during clashes with the Spanish Armada in 1588. With this crushing defeat of Spain, she ruled for nearly 15 more years as ‘Gloriana’. Queen Anne (1665-1714) modelled herself on Elizabeth I when she came to the throne in 1702. The last monarch of the House of Stuart was, by that stage, middle aged and disabled by 17 pregnancies – her only child to survive past the age of two, the Duke of Gloucester, died aged 11. Nonetheless, the first Queen of Great Britain ruled during a period of great expansion in British prestige, with the Duke of Marlborough’s victories in the War of the Spanish Succession particularly notable. The fiercely intelligent Caroline of Ansbach (1683-1737) was one of the most politically influential English consorts. After the accession of her husband, King George II, she persuaded him to keep Sir Robert Walpole as his prime minister. The queen formed a close partnership with Walpole and used her influence with the king to push her policies. She also carefully selected her unfaithful husband’s lovers, to ensure that they were inferior to her. When, on her deathbed, she asked George to remarry, he replied “no, I shall have mistresses”.

to remarry, he replied “no, I shall have mistresses”. DID YOU KNOW? With her notoriety for

DID YOU KNOW?

With her notoriety for being an adulterous queen, Isabella of France was lampooned for centuries for her extra-marital affairs, despite the fact her husband was widely believed to be attracted to men.

fact her husband was widely believed to be attracted to men. Top left: Queen Above: Queen

Top left: Queen

Above: Queen

Victoria in the

Anne, while

Royal Box at the

still Princess

Drury Lane Theatre in 1837

of Denmark

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BRITAIN

67

PHOTOS: © MARY EVANS PICTURE LIBRARY/TIM GRAHAM/GETTY/GL ARCHIVE/ALAMY

England’s Queens

LIBRARY/TIM GRAHAM/GETTY/GL ARCHIVE/ALAMY England’s Queens Above : Queen Victoria. Below, right : Queen Elizabeth II

Above: Queen Victoria. Below, right: Queen Elizabeth II has reigned for 63 years

Right: Queen Elizabeth II arrives at Westminster Abbey for her coronation in June 1953

Victoria (1819-1901) holds the record as England’s longest-reigning monarch. After enduring a strict childhood, she was determined to enjoy herself when she came to the throne at the age of 18, recalling in one letter that “I have been dancing till four o’clock this morning”. She soon married her cousin, Prince Albert, to whom she was devoted; she remained black-clad after his early death. She became Empress of India in 1876, and it was said that the sun never set on her empire. Victoria’s longevity meant that she came to de ne her era and she was the rst English monarch to celebrate her diamond jubilee in 1897. Queen Elizabeth II (b.1926) will overtake her great-great-grandmother as longest-reigning monarch this September. She became heir to the throne unexpectedly in 1936, with the abdication of her uncle, King Edward VIII. Her Majesty was visiting Kenya when she heard the news that she was to become Queen in 1952, and her reign was romantically hailed as a ‘New Elizabethan Age’. Over the years she has devoted herself to her duties as a constitutional monarch and has weathered many storms, most notably the marital dif culties of her children, the 1992 Windsor Castle re and the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997. Now approaching 90, the Queen remains one of the most popular Royal Family members. English history is full of powerful queens, both consorts and monarchs, and each one has helped to shape a role that has survived for nearly two millennia.

to shape a role that has survived for nearly two millennia. 8 For more stories on

8 For more stories on the lives and loves of our famous kings and queens go to www.britain-magazine.com

68

BRITAIN

kings and queens go to www.britain-magazine.com 6 8 BRITAIN BUY THE BOOKS England’s Queens: From Boudica
kings and queens go to www.britain-magazine.com 6 8 BRITAIN BUY THE BOOKS England’s Queens: From Boudica
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PHOTOS: © ALAN BROADFOOT/GLASGOW CITY COUNCIL (MUSEUMS)

Th e Glasgow

LETTER

PROMOTION

Did Mary, Queen of Scots, betray her husband on a visit to Provand’s Lordship? Visit this fascinating museum and decide for yourself

B uilt in 1471 by Andrew Muirhead, Bishop of Glasgow, as the manse for the priest of Glasgow Cathedral and the nearby

St Nicholas Hospital, Provand’s Lordship in Glasgow is one of the few surviving medieval buildings in the city. Over the years Provand’s Lordship has been a private residence and its position as one of the oldest buildings in Glasgow has led to it being affectionately known as the ‘auld hoose’. Inside, it is furnished with a fine collection of 17th-century Scottish furniture, donated by Sir William Burrell, with room settings giving a flavour of interiors of the period from 1500-1700, but the house is probably best known for its links to

Mary, Queen of Scots and her husband Lord Henry Darnley, whose portraits hang here. The portraits allude to one of the most enduring legends connected to Provand’s Lordship – that in 1567, Mary, Queen of Scots may have lodged here while visiting the ailing Lord Darnley. The story goes that having arrived in Glasgow from Stirling, and possibly suffering from smallpox, Darnley was cared for nearby and that while visiting him, Mary may have stayed at

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Provand’s Lordship. At this time, Provand’s was owned by William Baillie, Lord of Provan, who was one of Mary’s advisors. Mary came to Glasgow to persuade Darnley to return to Edinburgh with her, which he did, only to be killed the very next day in an explosion at his Edinburgh residence. Darnley had many enemies but Mary was also suspected of having a hand in his demise – a theory backed up by a letter supposedly written by Mary to the Earl of Bothwell, whom she married only three months after Darnley’s death. The letter has become known as the ‘Glasgow Letter’, one of a collection said to have been written by Mary in 1566 and 1567.

If genuine, the most incriminating of the

‘Casket Letters’ could have been written at Provand’s Lordship. By 1568, Mary was defeated at the Battle of Langside by her half-brother, the Earl of Moray. Today a monument at the edge of Queen’s Park

marks the site of this battle, while many streets in the area are named in commemoration of it.

A selection of objects relating to the battle

can be seen on display at Kelvingrove Art Gallery

and Museum, including armour, cannon balls, paintings and pictures of the battle site, as well as portraits of Mary and the Earl of Moray. After being forced to abdicate, Mary fled to England to seek refuge with her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I. The last 19 years of the former queen’s life were spent in captivity, before she was finally executed on 8 February 1587 at Fotheringhay Castle in Northamptonshire.

8 February 1587 at Fotheringhay Castle in Northamptonshire.  Text informed by the book Provand’s Lordship

Text informed by the book Provand’s Lordship and Old Glasgow, published by Glasgow City Council (Museums) in 2004. www. glasgowlife.org.uk/museums

Council (Museums) in 2004. www. glasgowlife.org.uk/museums VISIT FOR FREE Provand’s Lordship is one of nine civic

VISIT FOR FREE

Provand’s Lordship is one of nine civic museums in Glasgow, also including Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum and Riverside Museum, which are free to visit. For more information, please visit www.glasgowmuseums.com

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✁ Competition A LUXURY STAY AT THE STAFFORD LONDON Enjoy two nights at this glorious hotel

Competition

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✁ Competition A LUXURY STAY AT THE STAFFORD LONDON Enjoy two nights at this glorious hotel

A LUXURY STAY AT

THE STAFFORD LONDON

Enjoy two nights at this glorious hotel and explore the surroundings of St James’s on a walking tour

N estled amongst the Royal Parks and Palaces, The Stafford London is located in the heart of St James’s, in the capital.

A historic gem, the five-star hotel, restaurant

and bar features 380-year-old wine cellars, built

in the 17th century, which run underneath the

site of one of Christopher Wren’s former houses. BRITAIN readers can enter our competition for the chance to win a two-night break for two with dinner, afternoon tea and breakfast each day at The Stafford London, plus enjoy a walking tour of London conducted by the hotel’s Executive Concierge Frank Laino. Founded in 1912, The Stafford London is home to 105 individually decorated bedrooms

and suites split across the Main House and the Carriage House, each furbished with English décor. The Lyttelton Restaurant is open daily serving breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea and dinner with modern European dishes by Head Chef Carlos Martinez. The American Bar at The Stafford is an institution. During the Second World War, the hotel served as a club for American and

Canadian officers. Today, the bar’s collection of memorabilia is a mix of items donated by guests

of the hotel started by an American who

donated a carving of an eagle. Celebrity fans

have also signed photos for the walls.

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The Stafford Wine Cellars, built in the 17th century by Lord Francis Godolphin, house some 8,000 bottles of the finest wine. The cellars were used as an air-raid shelter in the Second World War and as visitors arrive they are greeted with artefacts from the war. The Stafford London’s Master Sommelier, Gino Nardella, oversees operations; his 40 years of experience makes for exceptional wine pairing events. Visitors can also discover St James’s on the Discover The Secrets of St James’s tour, which takes visitors in the direction of St James’s Park – admire town houses, exclusive shops and wine merchants. The tours take place each month, are priced £35pp and last three hours. For more information on The Stafford London visit www.thestaffordlondon.com.

HOW TO ENTER
HOW TO ENTER

For your chance to win this great prize visit www.britain-magazine.com/ thestaffordlondon or fill out the coupon below with the answer to the following question:

Question: In what year was

The Stafford London founded?

a) 1902

b) 1912

c) 1922

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

For full Ts & Cs go to www.britain-magazine.com/ thestaffordlondon. Closing date for entries 5 September 2015, prize to be taken by 5 September 2016. Subject to availability.

to be taken by 5 September 2016. Subject to availability. ENTRY FORM SEND YOUR COUPON TO:

ENTRY FORM

SEND YOUR COUPON TO: US readers – The Stafford London Competition C/O Circulation Specialists, 2 Corporate Drive, Suite 945, Shelton, CT 06484 UK and ROW – The Stafford London Competition, BRITAIN magazine, The Chelsea Magazine Company, Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London, SW3 3TQ , UK

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here if you would prefer not to be contacted by BRITAIN . . , the competition

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, or carefully selected third parties

IMAGES/MARC MILLAR PHOTOGRAPHY/

ENTERTAINMENT/PA

IMAGES

FINCHER/GETTY

HUSSEIN/EMPICS

BRITANNIA/JAYNE

© ANWAR

YACHT

PHOTOS:

ROYAL

Clockwise, from above:

The Library at Erddig, Wrexham; the house includes a servants' hall with portraits of estate and household staff; Holkham Hall Norfolk, home of the Earl of Leicester; gardeners at Erddig; house servants c.1914

A PALACE ON WATER

We take a photographic tour of the yacht that the Queen once called home and which now draws in the crowds in Edinburgh

WORDS SALLY COFFEY

72

BRITAIN

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The Royal Yacht Britannia

The Royal Yacht Britannia T he Royal Yacht Britannia was home to the service as Her
The Royal Yacht Britannia T he Royal Yacht Britannia was home to the service as Her
The Royal Yacht Britannia T he Royal Yacht Britannia was home to the service as Her
The Royal Yacht Britannia T he Royal Yacht Britannia was home to the service as Her

T he Royal Yacht Britannia was home to the

service as Her Majesty’s floating residence in

1954 before finally being retired in 1997.

Queen and her family for over 40 years, entering

Her decks have borne witness to some of the most memorable events in modern times and her cabins have hosted countless illustrious guests, including Sir Winston Churchill, Nelson Mandela and Rajiv Gandhi. Often used as the perfect backdrop to a photo shoot, the Royal Yacht Britannia has been there on many of the Royal Family’s momentous occasions. Princess Anne and Prince Charles were carried to Malta on the ship’s maiden voyage to reunite with their parents, the Queen and Prince Philip, at the end of the royal couple’s Commonwealth tour in 1954 and Charles and

Diana, the Prince and Princess of Wales, took their honeymoon cruise aboard Britannia in 1981. The Queen is said to have relished the annual summer cruise that she and the Royal Family would take following the Cowes Week sailing regatta on the Isle of Wight, once saying of the ship: “This is where I can truly relax.” The tradition was to sail to the Western Isles of Scotland, landing on remote beaches, which gave the family privacy and the Queen a break from her official duties. The Royal Family would take picnics on islands such as Colonsay, Skye, Eigg, Rum and the Isle of Harris and be entertained by the Royal Yachtsmen with concerts that on occasion featured a member of the Royal Family in the cast. Throughout the 1960s, the Royal Racing Yacht Bloodhound accompanied the ship in the Western Isles and

Clockwise, from facing page: The State Drawing Room on board the Royal Yacht Britannia; the Queen and Prince Philip on Britannia with Ronald and Nancy Reagan in 1983; Prince Charles and Diana depart for their honeymoon cruise in 1981

Reagan in 1983; Prince Charles and Diana depart for their honeymoon cruise in 1981 www.britain-magazine.com BRITAIN

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BRITAIN

73

PHOTOS: © MARC MILLAR PHOTOGRAPHY/ROYAL YACHT BRITANNIA/PA ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES

PHOTOGRAPHY/ROYAL YACHT BRITANNIA/PA ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES Clockwise, from above: Sir Hugh Casson's idea for the
PHOTOGRAPHY/ROYAL YACHT BRITANNIA/PA ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES Clockwise, from above: Sir Hugh Casson's idea for the

Clockwise, from above:

Sir Hugh Casson's idea for the design of Britannia was for it to be like a country house at sea; fireworks during an evening event on Britannia; Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip board Britannia for a cruise to the Western Isles of Scotland; the Grand Staircase

74

BRITAIN

it was during this time that both Prince Charles and Princess Anne learned to sail. The mood on board was relaxed but Britannia’s of cers did create a booklet, Western Isles Without Tears, to ensure that everything went perfectly. Family holidays aside, the ship also had a more practical purpose – its design allowed it to be converted into a hospital ship in time of war and though this capability was never fully tested, it was used in the evacuation of 1,000 refugees from the civil war in Aden, Yemen, in 1986. In the event of a nuclear war the plan was that the Queen would take refuge on Britannia. But it was as a British ambassador, promoting trade and industry around the globe, that the ship really gained its column inches. An invite aboard was rarely refused and the reaction on witnessing the level of service and splendid interiors was equally positive. When Ronald Reagan visited he is said to have remarked: “I know I promised Nancy everything in the world when I married her, but how can I ever top this?”

It’s easy to see what won Reagan’s approval – the simple and elegant design, overseen by the Queen and Prince Philip, is a throwback to 1950s glamour – its designer, Sir Hugh Casson, said: “The overall idea was to give the impression of a country house at sea.” In 1997 the incoming Labour government decided to retire the ship. Its nal foreign mission was to transport

retire the ship. Its nal foreign mission was to transport DID YOU KNOW? • This was

DID YOU KNOW?

This was the second royal vessel to bear the name Britannia –

the first being a racing cutter built for the Prince of Wales in 1893.

The Prince would later be crowned King Edward VII in 1902.

Although she is recognised around the world, you won’t see

Britannia’s name written anywhere on her hull.

Britannia was the only ship in the world whose captain

traditionally held the rank of Admiral.

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e Royal Yacht Britannia

e Royal Yacht Britannia www.britain-magazine.com www britain-magazine com BRITAIN 7 5
e Royal Yacht Britannia www.britain-magazine.com www britain-magazine com BRITAIN 7 5

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PHOTOS: © PA IMAGES/MARC MILLAR

e Royal Yacht Britannia

Clockwise, from left: The interior of the Royal Yacht Britannia after its major refit; the
Clockwise, from left:
The interior of the
Royal Yacht Britannia
after its major refit;
the Sun Lounge;
Queen Elizabeth II
and the Duke of
Edinburgh on board
at Suva for the
‘Cavuikelekele’
ceremony performed
by Fijian chiefs

the last Governor of Hong Kong, Chris Patten, and Prince Charles away following the of cial handover of Hong Kong to China in July 1997. When the ship was of cially decommissioned on 11 December 1997 the Queen is said to have wept. Today the Royal Yacht Britannia is a ve-star visitor attraction in Edinburgh. Highlights of a visit include a tour of the beautiful state apartments and royal bedrooms – the Queen’s room is the only bedroom of a living monarch ever to be viewed by the public. You can also visit the Sun Lounge, much loved by the Queen, and take tea in the Royal Deck Tea Room. Private tours – which must be booked in advance – offer insight into what life was really like on board for the Royal Family and crew. The Royal Racing Yacht Bloodhound is also moored alongside the ship in Edinburgh, except in July and August when it can be chartered around the Western Isles – now that really would be something.

the Western Isles – now that really would be something. 8 For more information on the

8 For more information on the Royal Yacht Britannia visit www.royalyachtbritannia.co.uk or call +44(0) 131 555 8800.

ROYAL YACHT BRITANNIA IN NUMBERS 1,000,000+ Number of miles Britannia sailed around the world 44
ROYAL YACHT BRITANNIA IN NUMBERS
1,000,000+ Number of miles Britannia sailed around the world
44
Number of years she served the Royal Family
82
Number of royal vessels prior to Britannia since the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660

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BRITAIN

77

e Royal Yacht Britannia

WIN HOW TO ENTER For your chance to win visit www.britain-magazine.com/ royalyachtbritannia or fill out
WIN
HOW TO ENTER
For your chance to win visit
www.britain-magazine.com/
royalyachtbritannia or fill out the coupon
below with the answer to the question.
PHOTOS:
© PA BRITANNIA/KEYSTONE/HULTON
ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES/MARC MILLAR
PHOTOGRAPHY/
ROYAL
YACHT
ARCHIVE/GETTY
IMAGES

One lucky BRITAIN reader and their guest will win a private tour of the Royal Yacht Britannia, at its base in Edinburgh, followed by a glass of Champagne and tea on board.

Question: In what year was the Royal Yacht Britannia taken out of of cial service?

a)

b)

c)

1996

1997

2009

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Closing date for entries 5 September 2015. Prize to be used by 31 June 2016. Subject to availability. For full terms and conditions go to www.britain-magazine.com/royalyachtbritannia

ENTRY FORM

SEND YOUR COUPON TO: US readers – Royal Yacht Britannia Competition, C/O Circulation Specialists, 2 Corporate Drive, Suite 945, Shelton, CT 06484 UK and ROW – Royal Yacht Britannia Competition, BRITAIN magazine, The Chelsea Magazine Company, Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London, SW3 3TQ , UK

Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London, SW3 3TQ , UK My answer: Name: Address:   Postcode:

My answer:

Name:

Address:

 

Postcode:

Tel no:

Email:

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. .
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here if you would prefer not to be contacted by BRITAIN . . , the competition

, the competition providers

to be contacted by BRITAIN . . , the competition providers , or carefully selected third

, or carefully selected third parties

Top to bottom: Dining on board the Royal Yacht Britannia; Major A D Firth MBE receives the

Military Cross from Queen Elizabeth II on the promenade deck, circa 1960; clock on board Britannia

Firth MBE receives the Military Cross from Queen Elizabeth II on the promenade deck, circa 1960;
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Interview

BELL/PA ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES Interview COOKING FOR R OYALTY Carolyn Robb was chef to Prince

COOKING FOR ROYALTY

BELL/PA ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES Interview COOKING FOR R OYALTY Carolyn Robb was chef to Prince Charles for
BELL/PA ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES Interview COOKING FOR R OYALTY Carolyn Robb was chef to Prince Charles for
BELL/PA ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES Interview COOKING FOR R OYALTY Carolyn Robb was chef to Prince Charles for
BELL/PA ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES Interview COOKING FOR R OYALTY Carolyn Robb was chef to Prince Charles for
BELL/PA ARCHIVE/PA IMAGES Interview COOKING FOR R OYALTY Carolyn Robb was chef to Prince Charles for

Carolyn Robb was chef to Prince Charles for 11 years. Here she talks about working on the Royal Yacht Britannia, cooking for princes Harry and William, and her book, The Royal Touch

fortunate to be offered the position as their personal chef. Two years later I was offered a position just a few hundred yards away within Kensington Palace – as chef to TRH The Prince and Princess of Wales.

B eing a chef is a notoriously high-pressured job, but for Carolyn Robb seemingly not enough of a challenge. Robb spent years as

personal chef to the most high-pro le of clients, including TRH The Prince and Princess of Wales, before becoming a food critic, entrepreneur and food advisor.

becoming a food critic, entrepreneur and food advisor. Born and raised in South Africa, Carolyn was

Born and raised in South Africa, Carolyn was inspired to cook by her mother from an early age and her childhood spent in a warm climate, surrounded by fresh fruit and vegetables, provided her with plentiful ingredients. After going to university in South Africa she came to England and gained a diploma from Le Cordon Bleu, paving the way for her culinary career.

How did you come to work in the royal household? From a very young age it had always been an ambition. When I was seven years old and I came to England to visit my grandparents, my father took me to Buckingham Palace to see the Changing of the Guard. I vividly remember peering through the railings at the front of the palace, like millions of other curious tourists do. Later, while I was at cookery school, I was invited to Kensington Palace for an interview with TRH The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester. I was very

What kinds of things did you cook for Prince William and Prince Harry? They had a very healthy and well-balanced diet. As young children their food was simple and quite traditionally British: roast chicken, shepherd’s pie, sausage and mash. I like to think of the way I cook as being the very best of ‘home-cooking’, which is more suited to working as a private chef than in a commercial kitchen, so I always kept things simple. The food was never grand; I used a lot of wonderful produce that was fresh from the garden and it really needed very little doing to it in order to make a delicious meal. I have always loved cooking for children and making food fun and appealing for them. In my new cookbook (The Royal Touch) I have devoted a chapter called ‘Little Bites’ to children’s food.

What was it like being on board Britannia? It was a great privilege and I have some amazing memories of my time on board, in

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BRITAIN

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Le p R R P re c H R Left to right : Former personal
Le p R R P re c H R Left to right : Former personal
Le p R R P re c H R Left to right : Former personal
Le p R R P re c H R Left to right : Former personal
Le p R R P re c H R
Le
p
R
R
P
re
c
H
R

Left to right: Former

personal chef to the

Royal Family, Carolyn

Robb; the Prince and

Princess of Wales are

reunited with their

children, William and

Harry, aboard the

Royal Yacht Britannia

some amazing locations around the world. To name a few: Brazil, Jamaica, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Hong Kong (for the Handover in 1997). This was the nal voyage of the Royal Yacht and was a very emotional time for people in many ways. The galley on board was quite small, often hot, and when the sea was rough it was very rocky. The team of chefs on board were wonderful; we were often very busy and they were a brilliant support and a lot of fun.

What’s the best thing about being a royal chef? As chef jobs go, it couldn’t have been a nicer one. The variety of food required was huge, from simple picnics to exquisite banquets. Every day was different and with all the travelling both within the UK and abroad there was never a dull moment, but for me the highlight was the enormous privilege of working for such an incredible family.

While working as royal chef, were there any heart-stopping moments? I am happy to say that I didn’t have any major disasters. I did once have a challenge with some souf és for a big event; the handle broke off the oven door – I could see them looking perfect, but I couldn’t get them out.

I hastily made another batch and cooked them in a different oven.

Could you tell us a bit more about your current book, The Royal Touch?

I always wanted to write a book with my

mother, who was a wonderful cook and taught me so much. Unfortunately, that didn’t happen, but she was the inspiration behind it. It has 100 recipes with ideas drawn from far and wide, from my childhood, from my time living in South Africa, Switzerland, Dubai and California, and some of the recipes in the book are dishes

that I served to the Royal Family. Being a busy mum to two small children I understand the need for simple meals that don’t take too long to prepare, yet are nutritious and appealing to young and old alike.

yet are nutritious and appealing to young and old alike. BUY THE BOOK Buy ‘The Royal
BUY THE BOOK Buy ‘The Royal Touch: Simply Stunning Home Cooking from a Royal Chef’
BUY THE BOOK
Buy ‘The Royal Touch:
Simply Stunning Home
Cooking from a Royal Chef’
by Carolyn Robb (£25, ACC
Editions) from Amazon and
The Book Depository.

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