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To develop performance indicators for employees on the basis of

which incentive can be given to them.

BY
Pankaj Kumar Singh (25083)
Organizational Traineeship Segment
PRM - 25

Faculty Guide:
Prof. Nivedita Kothiyal

Submitted to:

Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra, Hazaribagh.


August, 2005

INSTITUTE OF RURAL MANAGEMENT, ANAND

Acknowledgement
I would heartily acknowledge my OTS coordinator Prof. Jayant Negi and Mr. Girija
Satish, Executive Director, NBJK for bestowing me the opportunity to have a closer look at
the working of an organization and to appreciate the intricacies of working in a typical
organizational setting.
I would also like to thank my faculty guide Prof. Nivedita Kothiyal for providing me
guidance and enabling me to develop a conceptual understanding of my topic. Her keen
interest and direction helped me to look beyond the obvious and thus fathom the topic to a
deeper extent.
I would also like to thank Mr. Sudhir Upadhay, Programme Coordinator, Micro Credit
Dept. who was my reporting officer on behalf of the Executive Director, NBJK and who
provided me with his invaluable suggestions at all stages of this study. His personal attention
was instrumental in making this experience extremely insightful and enjoyable.
Last but not the least, I would like to thank all the other staff of NBJK for their
valuable time and cooperation. Without their help and support this project would not have
seen the light of the day.
Pankaj Kumar Singh
IRMA.

ii

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Project Title:
Organisation:
Reporting Officer:
Faculty Guide:
Students Name:

To develop performance indicators for employees on the basis of


which incentives can be given to them.
Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra, Hazaribagh.
Mr. Girija Satish, Executive Director, NBJK, Hazaribagh.
Prof. Nivedita Kothiyal
Pankaj Kumar Singh.

Objectives: 1) To understand and analyze the functioning of the staff of NBJK. 2) To


understand the existing performance appraisal system of NBJK. 3) To design a set of
performance indicators for staffs working at different levels in different projects viz
Education, Health, Clean Jharkhand Project & Micro Credit, on the basis of which their
performance will be appraised and incentive will be given.
Scope of the study: The study is limited to the employees working in NBJK in the above
four projects only. The indicators for the health project are based on the RCH project while
that of the education is based on the formal education centers and is not applicable for the
non-formal centers.
Methodology: In-depth interview with the Project Coordinators, Block Supervisors and
Field Staffs, School visits and informal interview and interaction with the teachers &
principals. Field visits and interaction with the stake-holders. Available literature about the
Projects,
its
objective
and
activities
were
consulted.
Sources of Data: Primary data and information was collected through interviews of the
employees of NBJK. Records at NBJK served as source of Secondary data and information.
Major Findings: NBJK is the largest NGO in Jharkhand in terms of number of employees,
infrastructure, capacity, area covered and number of projects implemented. At present there
are 348 employees coming from various background and working at various level. No
incentive based pay system is in place to motivate the employees. The performance appraisal
is done subjectively and there is no uniformity in the incentive/increments given to staffs at
same level which de-motivates the hard working employees and it is one of the reasons of
high turnover of the employees. High turnover hinders the smooth implementation of the
projects and the outcome of the interventions is not as desired.
Conclusion: NBJK will be able to retain and motivate its experienced employees if some
objective performance indicators are in place and are used for all the employees. This will
also bring in a sense of distributive and procedural justice among the employees. Motivated
employees will work more sincerely and the projects will attain its objective. This will also
help the organization in attaining its over all goal and mission.
Recommendations: 1) Performance indicators should be developed for all the projects. 2)
The amount of incentive or the increment should be substantial to motivate the employees. 3)
The appraisal on the basis of the performance indicators should be done at regular interval
instead of once in a year. 4) Employees who have consistently performed better should be
given public recognition.

iii

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgement .....ii
Executive Summary..iii
1. The Project: ...1
2. Objective of The Study:.1
3. Methodology...1
4. Limitation of the Study:2
5. Organization Background:...2
5.1 Geographical area of operation:.2
5.2 Functional area of operation:.5
6. Staff Structure:..6
6.1 Recruitment:6
6.2 Induction & socialization:...7
6.3 Staff turnover:..7
7. The Existing System of Performance Appraisal at NBJK:....7
8. Need For Performance Indicators:...8
9. The Process of Developing Performance Indicators:...11
9.1 Selecting what performance data to collect:11
9.1.1. Productivity .11
9.1.2. Personality traits...12
9.1.3 Proficiency12
9.2 Determining who conducts the appraisal:...................................12
9.2.1. Employee.13
9.2.2. Co-workers...13
9.2.3. Supervisor13
9.2.4. Subordinate..13
9.2.5. Outside the organization..14
9.3 Deciding on a rating philosophy...14
9.3.1. Comparison against others...14
9.3.2. Rating against a standard.14
9.4 Overcoming rating deficiencies14
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9.5 Creating a rating instrument15


9.5.1. Critical incidents..15
9.5.2. Narratives.15
9.5.3. Predetermined anchors.16
9.6 Guidelines for performance standards16
9.6.1. Checking the Standards16
10. Educational Projects of NBJK..18
10.1. Methodology18
10.2. Performance Indicators for the Teachers.18
10.2.1. Implementation plan..20
10.3. Performance Indicators for Principal...22
10.3.1. Implementation plan..23
10.4 Recommendations23
11. Health Projects of NBJK...24
11.1 Staff structure of health projects24
11.2 Methodology.25
11.3 Performance indicators for field level health workers.25
11.3.1 Implementation plan...27
11.4 Performance indicators for block supervisors..28
11.4.1 Implementation plan...31
11.5 Performance indicators for project coordinators.33
11.5.1 Implementation plan...34
12. Clean Jharkhand Project..37
12.1 Staff structure...37
12.2 Performance indicators...38
12.2.1 Implementation Plan...38
12.3 Performance indicators for other staffs.39
13. Micro Credit Programme..39
13.1 Staff structure...40
13.2 Roles and responsibilities41
13.2.1 Credit Officers41
13.2.2 Block Managers..42
13.2.3 Area Manager..42
13.2.4 Branch Manager..42
13.2.5 Programme Manager...42
v

13.2.6 MIS Assistant/Accountant......42


13.3 Performance indicators...42
13.3.1 Implementation Plan...43
13.4 Performance indicators for credit officers44
13.5 Performance Indicators for Accountant44
14. Conclusion..45

vi

1. The Project:
To develop performance indicators for employees of Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra, on
the basis of which incentive can be given to them.
2. Objective of the Study:
The specific objectives of the study were:
a.To understand and analyze the functioning of the staff of NBJK.
b. To understand the existing performance appraisal system of NBJK.
c.To design a set of performance indicators for staffs working at different positions in
different projects, on the basis of which their performance will be appraised and
incentive will be given.
3. Methodology:
The study was conducted in two stages. The first stage of the study was exploratory in
nature, mainly to understand the organization structure and develop a preliminary
understanding of the functioning of the organization at the coordination office level. For this,
in-depth interviews of the Project Coordinators and Assistant Project Coordinators. The focus
of these interviews was to get to know NBJK from their perspective, how they feel about the
various components of the organization functioning, whether the organization is really
serving its vision and mission and also whether they are really helping the poor and the
people in need improve their living standards. Besides, information about their job profile
was also gathered from these interviews, which was then used to design an appraisal system
for them.
In the second stage informal interview and interaction was done with the teachers and
principals (in educational projects), Block Supervisors, and the Field workers (Health
projects). Field visits were done to understand the various activities undertaken and to learn

about the implementation of the projects. Reports and other project related documents of
NBJK were also consulted and they were the source of the secondary data.
4. Limitation of the Study:
The study is limited to the Educational projects, Health projects & Clean Jharkhand
Project only. Under the broad heading of Educational and Health Projects different projects
with different objectives are run. The performance indicators developed may not be
applicable as such to all the projects and may need some editing according to the objective
and activities of the individual projects.
5. Organization Background:
The foundation stone of Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra was laid in 1971, by four engineering
graduates who were sensitive to the cause of deprivation of the poverty stricken masses.
Highly moved by the condition of the poor villagers in Bihar, trapped in the vicious circle of
poverty they decided to shun their career and plunge into nation building and service to the
poor. Deeply influenced and motivated by Jai Prakash Narayan, they initiated social work
with a small hamlet of Dalits in Bahera village of Hazaribagh District. They gradually
extended in many villages.
Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra (NBJK) formally came into existence in 1974, when it got
registered under Society Registration Act, XXI, 1860 and under Foreign Contribution
Regulation Act, 1976 in the year 1985.
Over the years it has extend to many new areas and at present through its branch
offices and network organizations, it provide various services to the poor and needy of over
30 districts of Jharkhand and Bihar.
5.1 Geographical area of operation:
NBJK is directly implementing its activities through its eight branch offices in five
districts of Jharkhand and two districts of Bihar, covering 29 blocks and above 1500 villages.
Table No. 1 and Figure No. 1 depicts its wide area of operation.

Table No. 1
S.n.

NBJK

Name of the Projects

Offices

Hazaribag

Micro Credit, Credit

Total

Total

Total

Approx

Block

ward

Villages

Direct

s in

And Slums

Beneficiaries

towns
4
540 villages

27,000

Plus, RIP, Action Against

Villagers

Child Trafficking, Kopal,

&

PACS, Lok Samiti, FCC,

2000

CBR, CMH, Adopt a

households in

Mother Save her Child,

the town.

RACHNA, Reproductive
Health Family Welfare,
CJP, Maternal & Child
Health, Strengthening
Primary Education
Program, Spandan,
Small Group Support
Program, Primary and
2

Ranchi

Secondary schools
CJP, Micro Credit, Lok

12

14

463 villages

25,000

Samiti, Swashakti,

beneficisries

CBRE, Socio Economic

in villages

Development project of

&

the poor and people with

27,999

disability, Kopal,

househols in

Reproductive Health &

the town

family welfare, CBR,


3

Khunti &

Swasthya Apke Dwar,


Integrated Tribal

Murhu

Development Program,

CBR, Reproductive

289 villages

32,000

Health & Family


Welfare, Lok Samiti
4

Koderma

Chauparan

Pakuria

Setu Vidyalayas
Micro Credit, RIP, Lok

60 villages

1000

Samiti, CJP, Rural

villagers &

Building Center Program

1200 HH in
300 villages

the town.
4500

42 villages

900

N.A
1

N.A
15 Slums

50
1500

24

1,694

91,950

Villages and

villagers and

15 Slums

31,199

Eye Hospital, Low Cost 1


Technology Application
for integrated village
development,
Environment Enrichment
program, RACHNA,
Primary and Secondary
Schools, NFE Centers
and Lok Samiti
Micro Credit,
1
Community
Development Program,
Watershed Program,
Women group
Strengthening and
Nutrition Program, Rural

7
8

Bodh Gaya
Patna

Building Center Program


Orphanage
1
Micro
Credit,
Lok 1
Samiti,

Community

Based SWM in Slums,


NFE

Centers

Socio-

Economic Development
of women and children
in Slums
Total

29

households in
4

the towns
(Source: Annual Report, NBJK 2005)
Figure No. 1

(Source: Annual Report, NBJK 2005)


5.2 Functional area of operation: The major functional area in which NBJK works
includes:
1. Education
2. Health
3. Small Group Support Programme
4. Mass Awareness and Social Action Programme
5. Natural Resource Management and Development
6. Micro Finance
Different projects are implemented under the above six functional areas. For example
in health sector, NBJK implements projects like Reproductive and Child Health, Community
5

Based Rehabilitation of Disables, Adopt a Mother Save Her Child, RACHNA (Reproductive
and Child Health, Nutrition and AIDS), Swasthya Aapke Dwar etc.
6. Staff Structure:
At present NBJK is having 348 employees who work at different branches at different
position. Each project is handled by a Project Coordinator who is assisted by one or two
Assistant Project Coordinators. The APCs oversee the work of Block Supervisors who in turn
monitor the Field Staffs. Field level staffs are at the lowest level. Project Coordinators report
to Executive Director. There are around 50 employees at the PC/APC level. Rest are Block
Supervisors and Field Staffs.
6.1 Recruitment: For the post of PC/APC suitable candidates are selected directly from
colleges imparting social work and rural management degree like XISS, Ranchi.

The

organization also advertises in leading local & national dailies about job description and
qualifications needed for various posts, which need to be filled. Selection criteria are
different for different designations like they prefer professionals from rural development field
or from social work field for PC and APC. Besides these NBJK need support staffs also, and
their qualifications are different.
Applications from interested candidates are short listed on the basis of their
educational qualifications and experiences. After short-listing the candidates, personal
interviews by a panel of experts are conducted. Through this interview they try to judge
suitability of candidates in terms of various competencies, strengths, past experience and
aptitude etc. Every appointed person is kept on probation for a period of three months. The
probation may be extended if required. If the service of an employee is not up to mark he can
be removed after giving a notice of one to three months. An employee contract is renewed for
further one year if his service is satisfactory.
6.2 Induction & socialization: There is no formal mechanism for the proper induction and
socialization of the newly recruited employee in the organization. The employee is just
introduced to the others and thats all in the name of socialization. Employees establish
relationship with the others in due course of time through their own efforts. At the PC/APC

level it is because each staff is busy in his/her work and since there hasnt been any tradition
of socialization it is not given much importance. At the level of field staffs, new employees
are introduced to another field staff by the Block Supervisor who briefs him about the work
and how to do it.
6.3 Staff turnover: The employee turn over is high, especially at the PC /APC level. The
main reason for high turnover in case of professionals is the poor pay structure and second
reason is the lack of growth and chance of promotion as it is a very flat organization. There
are more opportunities of growth outside after attaining few years of experience as compared
to opportunities when one decides to remain in the organization. So these professional use
NBJK as a launch pad and as soon as they get any better offer they leave the organization.
The turn over is not so high in the case of the Block supervisors and the field workers
because in the given environment there is lack of opportunity and this is the best they can get
with their educational qualification and skills.
7. The Existing System of Performance Appraisal at NBJK:
At present the performance appraisal of the employees is not based on indicators.
They are more subjective than objective and often there is a lot of dissatisfaction among the
employees over the issue of performance based incentives. Majority of employees feel that
incentive is decided solely by the top management and instead of performance relationship
with the management is more important. This de-motivates the employees as they are not
sure of the procedural and distributive justice*.

Procedural Justice the perceived fairness of the process used to determine the distribution of rewards.
Distributive Justice perceived fairness of the amount and allocation of rewards among individuals.

This along with the fact that the wages are not good prompts the employees to leave
the job when ever they get a better offer and is the main reason of high turnover rate of the
employees especially at the PC and APC level. Of late management has realized the issue and
have started working to get objective performance indicators in place. This study was also a
part of this exercise.

8. Need For Performance Indicators:


The sole intent of every performance appraisal system should be to improve
performance, to provide feedback on quality of performance and then review progress on the
desired improvement in performance. In other words, the purpose of appraisal is to improve
the organizations performance through the enhanced performance of individuals.
When we think about performance appraisal, we often refer to a number of more
specific positive objectives such as:
o To review past performance
o To assess training needs
o To help develop individuals
o To audit the skills within an organization
o To set targets for future performance
o To identify potential for promotion
More negatively some of us may believe that performance appraisal is simply used by
the organization to apportion blame and to provide a basis for disciplinary action. Some
people see it as a stick that management has introduced with which to beat people. It is
therefore important that performance appraisal should have specific objectives. Not only
should the objectives be clear but also they should form a part of organizations whole
strategy. In this way, the key objectives can be incorporated into the appraisals, highlighting
areas for improvement, new directions and opportunities.
The benefits of a successful appraisal scheme can be summed up as follows:
For the Organization
1. Improved performance throughout the organization due to:

o More effective communication of the organizations objectives and values;


o Increased sense of cohesiveness and loyalty;
o Improved relationships between managers and staff
o Managers who are better equipped to use their leadership skills and to
motivate and develop their staff
2. Improved overview of the tasks performed by each member of the staff
3. Identification of ideas for improvement
4. Expectations and long term views can be improved
5. Training and development needs identified more clearly
6. A culture for continuous improvement and success can be created and maintained
7. People with potential can be identified and career development plans formulated to
cater to future staff requirements
8. The message is conveyed that people are valued
For the appraiser:
1. The opportunity to develop an overview of individual jobs and complete departments
2. Identification of ideas for improvements
3. Increased job satisfaction
4. Increased sense of personal value
5. The opportunity to link team and individual objectives and targets with departmental
and organizational objectives

6. The opportunity to clarify expectations of the contribution the manager expects from
teams and individuals
7. The opportunity to re-prioritize targets
8. A means of forming a more productive relationship with staff based on mutual trust
and understanding
For the appraisee:
1. Increased motivation
2. Increased job satisfaction
3. Increased sense of personal value
4. A clear understanding of what is expected and what needs to be done to meet
expectations
5. The opportunity to discuss work problems and how they can be overcome
6. The opportunity to discuss aspirations and any guidance, support or training needed
to fulfill these aspirations
7. Improved working relationships with the manager
8. Self-Assessment.
A good performance appraisal system can be developed and implemented only when
the indicators of the performance are in place. Also to give incentive to the staffs their
performance has to be measured on the basis of common indicators which are applicable to
all the staff at similar position. Performance indicators also help in reducing subjectivity in
the performance appraisal and provide a feeling of distributive justice to the staffs.

10

In the present context, NBJK wants to have a performance appraisal system in place
in order to evaluate the performance of its staff, and to have a common basis, in form of
performance indicators, to give incentive to its well performing staffs. The objective of
getting a system designed has primarily been to measure and quantify the performance of the
field staff and also the coordination office staff.
9. The Process of Developing Performance Indicators:
Some key steps toward developing effective performance indicators -ones that can be
used to validate the selection process as well as to make decisions about pay or
promotions/incentives are as follows:
(1) Select what performance data to collect
(2) Determine who conducts the appraisal
(3) Decide on a rating philosophy
(4) Overcome rating deficiencies
(5) Create a rating instrument
(6) Deliver useful information to employees
9.1 Selecting what performance data to collect: One way to classify on-the-job worker
behaviour is by considering the three "Ps"--productivity (what was done), personality traits
(how it was done, conduct) and proficiency (skill).
9.1.1. Productivity can be measured in terms of specific performance accomplishments.
9.1.2. Personality traits such as motivation, willingness to take criticism, cooperation,
initiative, dependability, and appearance (dress and grooming) may be considered. Personal
trait ratings are useful, even though they sometimes say more about how supervisors get
along with an employee than how well the employee performs on the job. Top management
is unlikely to want to reward performanceno matter how excellent it isif a worker only
11

performs grudgingly and after repeated admonitions. When personal traits are considered as
part of a performance appraisal, specific characteristics should be related to the job. Often, a
personal trait issue can be translated into an achievement. Instead of talking about worker
dependability (personal trait), for instance, one may want to address how well an employee
reports on assignment completions (productivity).
9.1.3 Proficiencyskill, knowledge, and abilityplays an important role in employees
performance. When appraisals address worker proficiency factors, they help assure
employees interest in overcoming deficiencies that may be blocking future performance or
growth.
In evaluations, organizations need to strike the right balance between productivity and
personality traits. Jobs vary in the importance that can be attached to such factors. For
example for the PC the personality traits play an important role when they are dealing with
the donor agencies. But for the field workers though the personality traits do play a role, its
the productivity which is more important component. Over-emphasis on personality traits
may increase compliance at the expense of both creativity and performance. Stressing
achievement over personality traits may lead to a philosophy where the end justifies the
meansno matter how dysfunctional or unethical the behaviour.
9.2 Determining who conducts the appraisal: The next step is to determine who will be
conducting the appraisal. Input into the appraisal of worker performance may come from
many sources including the employee, co-workers, supervisors, subordinates, or even persons
outside the organization. Ratings from multiple sources usually yield more reliable
performance appraisals*. As the number of evaluators increases, the probability of attaining
more accurate information increases. If rater error tends to follow a normal curve, an increase
in the number of the appraiser will tend to find the majority congregating about the middle.
But employing more number of appraisers may be costly and time consuming.
*

J.D. Facteau and S.B. Craig, Are Performance Appraisal Ratings from Different Rating Sources Compatible? Journal
of Applied Psychology, April 2001, pp. 215-27.

12

9.2.1. Employee: Usually, but not always, the employee has a good understanding of his
daily performance and how it can be improved. Employees can be the most important
persons in the evaluation process. Nevertheless, employees have a vested interest in making
positive comments about their own performance, and no matter how motivated they are, can
usually benefit from outside evaluation.
9.2.2. Co-workers: At times co-workers have a better grasp for a colleagues performance
than the supervisor, but co-worker evaluations have a tendency to be lenient. Sometimes coworkers hope management will read between the lines and praise irrelevant or insignificant
factors. At times a co-worker may be particularly hard on a disliked worker. Peer review is
usually anonymous and several peers are involved in the evaluation. This anonymity, while
often needed, can also lend itself to abuses.
9.2.3. Supervisor: Performance appraisal data obtained from the immediate supervisor is the
most common rating source. Supervisors are often in the best position to give workers an
honest evaluation. The danger in supervisory evaluations is the substantial amount of power
and influence wielded, often by the hand of a single rater.
9.2.4. Subordinate: Formal evaluation by subordinates is unusual, although from time to time
subordinates may be asked for input into the evaluation of their supervisor. When
subordinates have an input into their supervisors evaluation, supervisors have been known to
improve their interpersonal relations and reduce management by intimidation. Issues of
anonymity and adequate sampling of subordinates may be important in traditional appraisals.
9.2.5. Outside the organization: Evaluations by outside clientele may be useful in instances
when there is much personal contact with outsiders or when the person being evaluated
knows more about aspects of the job than the supervisor.
9.3 Deciding on a rating philosophy: Next stage is to decide on the rating philosophy.
Performance appraisal data can be classified according to whether employees are compared
against others or are rated against a standard.

13

9.3.1. Comparison against others: Normally, when comparing employees against each other,
a few employees end up at the top and a few at the bottom in what is known as a normal
distribution curve (also known as grading by the curve). The majority end up somewhere in
the middle. Where the employee is ranked depends on how a person performs in comparison
to others.
The principal advantage of the comparison method is preventing raters from placing
all employees in one category (for example, all superior). Two disadvantagesespecially
when very few workers are involvedinclude assuming (1) employees fall in a normal
distribution (there may be four excellent performers in a group of five, or none in a group of
three), and (2) there are similar differences in performance between two adjacent employees,
for instance, between those ranked 1 and 2 and those ranked 4 and 5.
9.3.2. Rating against a standard: It permits a supervisor to classify employee performance
independently from that of other employees. Both supervisor and employee have a reference
point for accurately looking at an employees long-term performance growth. In a healthy
organization, one employees success need not mean anothers failure. If all can succeed,
much the better.
9.4 Overcoming rating deficiencies: Supervisory evaluations often suffer from numerous
rating deficiencies. One particularly good or poor trait may contaminate other performance
areas considered in the evaluation. Once a worker is classified as a poor performer, it may
take a long time for a supervisor to notice the worker has improved. Supervisors tend to
remember events more recent to the evaluation. Workers, realizing this, may strive to
improve performance as time for appraisals near. Supervisors may tend to rate workers as
average, especially when rating forms require a written justification for a high or low rating.
Others may tend toward being either overly strict or lenient. Lenient raters may later appear
to contradict themselves (e.g., when a worker is disciplined or does not get a raise).
Raters may also be influenced by an employees personal attributes such as origin,
level of education, union membership, philosophy, age, race, gender, or even attractiveness

14

Studies show attractive people are often judged to be more intelligent and have other positive
qualities*.
*Feingold, A. (1992). Good-looking people are not what we think.

Psychological Bulletin, 112 (1), 125-139; Fletcher, C.


(1999) The implication of research on gender differences in self-assessment and 360 degree appraisal, Human Resource
Management Journal, 9, 1, 39-46.

9.5 Creating a rating instrument: We can choose from several data collection and
evaluation techniques, or rating scales. Whatever instrument is used, its aim should be to
provide meaningful information to both employees and management. There are a number of
ways of classifying performance appraisal instruments. Data can be presented in terms of
critical incidents, narratives, or predetermined anchors. A combination of approaches is often
necessary to end up with a useful performance appraisal. Appraisal instruments require
substantial rater training if results are to be meaningful.
9.5.1. Critical incidents: This technique involves noting instances where workers reacted
particularly well or poorly. To be effective and accurate, critical incidents need to be jotted
down as they take place and are still fresh in the supervisors mind. The strength of the
process is in the concreteness of the examples provided. If care is not taken, though, the
critical incident is susceptible to emphasizing negative worker behaviour. When used alone,
employees may have difficulty translating critical incident reports into improved day-to-day
performance. Further, long periods of time may not yield any particularly good or poor
behaviour. The critical incident approach can be used to come up with data and ideas to
develop more complex rating scales.
9.5.2. Narratives: As compared to the critical incident, narratives provide a broader outlook
on worker performance. Narratives work best when raters have the skills and take the time to
provide a thorough, analytical report while maintaining a positive tone.
9.5.3. Predetermined anchors: Appraisals where raters simply check or circle the most
appropriate answer can potentially make for more standardized evaluations than either the
narrative or critical incidents and are less time consuming for the supervisor. Their ease in
use may be deceiving, and raters may give the appraisal less thought than it deserves.
Anchor-based appraisals include rating factors with a numerical scale (e.g., 0 to 3), or an

15

adjective-descriptive scale (e.g., superior, good, below average) or weightage can be assigned
to various anchors and employees can be awarded against that particular anchor according to
the performance.
9.6 Guidelines for performance standards: The following guidelines have been kept in
mind while developing the performance indicators.

Performance standards should be related to the employee's assigned work and job
requirements.

The reporting systems should be adequate to measure and report any quantitative
data.

Quantifiable measures may not apply to all functions. Attempt has been made to
describe in clear and specific terms the characteristics of performance quality that are
verifiable and that would meet or exceed expectations.

Accomplishment of organizational objectives has been included where appropriate,


such as cost-control, improved efficiency, productivity, project completion, process
redesign, or public service.

9.6.1. Checking the Standards: After performance standards have been written, they have
been checked against the questions in the following list:
1. Are the standards realistic? Standards should be attainable and consistent with what
is necessary to get the job done. Standards for performance which meets expectations
represent the minimum acceptable level of performance for all employees in that
position.
2. Are the standards specific? Standards should tell an employee exactly which
specific actions and results he or she is expected to accomplish.

16

3. Are the standards based on measurable data, observation, or verifiable


information? Performance can be measured in terms of timeliness, cost, quality and
quantity.
4. Are the standards consistent with organizational goals? Standards link individual
(and team) performance to organizational goals and should be consistent with these
goals. The success of the Organization and the projects depends on this strategic
connection.
5. Are the standards challenging? Standards may describe performance that exceeds
expectations. Recognizing performance that is above expectations or outstanding is
crucial to motivating employees.
6. Are the standards clear and understandable? The employees whose work is to be
evaluated on the basis of the standards should understand them. Standards should use
the language of the job.
7. Are the standards dynamic? As organizational goals, technologies, operations or
experiences change, standards should evolve.
Keeping the above factors in mind an attempt had been made to develop the
performance indicators for the employees of the NBJK. The indicators developed, try to
cover the productivity, personal traits and proficiency of the employees. On the basis of
these indicators performance appraisal will be done by the supervisors i.e. seniors. Due to
the cost involved and the time constraint which the organization faces ratings from
multiple sources will not be used. These indicators will rate the performance against set
standards. Predetermined anchors will be used for appraising the performance of the
employees.

10. Educational Projects of NBJK:

17

NBJK runs a variety of schools under its educational projects with an objective to
provide quality education to the poor and at-risk children. It is running bridge camp schools
for the poor and the deprived girls from the interiors. Besides it runs schools with latest
equipments and facilities also with subsidized fees. Out of the total 116 educational centers 1
is for the mentally retarded children, 101 is Bridge Camp School, 1 primary school, 1 middle
school, 4 high school out of which 1 is an English medium school and the rest 8 are NFE.
These educational centers are run under different projects which are funded by
different funding agencies and have different objectives. Similarly some of the activities
undertaken by the staffs employed in these centers are quite different from each other. Since
different project demands different set of activities, it is not possible to develop indicators
that are applicable comprehensively in all projects. The attempt is in the direction of evolving
a set of performance indicators that will help in assessing the performance of teachers and
principals of different formal schools that are being run by NBJK. Though the underlying
theme is same, some editing needs to be done to apply it to different centers. The staff
structure at the different formal school is same. The school is headed by a Principal and there
are a number of teachers to assist him in teaching the students.
10.1. Methodology: For developing the performance indicators for the teachers and the
principals of the various formal education centers run by the NBJK, in-depth interviews of
the teachers and principals were conducted. Four schools were visited to get a better
understanding of the role and responsibility of the teachers and the principals. Informal
interactions with the students were also done. The records maintained were checked and the
project proposals were also consulted.
10.2. Performance Indicators for the Teachers: The performance of the teachers can be
measured against the following indicators:

Performance Indicators for Teachers


SL.
NO.
1.

WEIGHTAGE

TARGET

(MARKS)

(%)

INDICATORS
What

is

the

performance/success

18

rate*

of

his 20

80

2.

class/subject?
Pedagogy adopted (interactive class) and involvement 10

3.

with students.
Punctuality (Does he reach the class on time?). Is the 10

99

4.
5.

number of leave taken is more than the prescribed limits?


Personal attention to each student.
10
Planning (Does he make lesson plan, weekly plan 10

95
95

6.
7.
8.

monthly plan and stick to it?)


Is he able to finish the assign curriculum on time?
5
Does he maintain the attendance register daily?
5
Does he regularly gives assignments and provides 5

99
99
90

9.
10.

feedback on them?
Promptness in conducting extracurricular activities.
5
Willingness to carryout other responsibility assigned by 5

#
#

11.

the superiors.
Teaches about various other aspect of life like health, 5

cleanliness, good habits, character building and leads his


12.

students by setting examples.


Feedback from students:

10

Is he available to students after class hours? (5)

Does he provide constant feedback to students?

(3)

Do students feel free to discuss their problems


with him? (2)

10.2.1. Implementation plan:


1. * Performance/success Rate = Number of students who graduate from the class
Number of students enrolled in the class in that particular
year.
The minimum acceptable level of the Performance/success Rate will be decided by
the organization but it should not be below 0.8 i.e. 80%. Now this can also be achieved by
increasing the value of numerator, by decreasing the denominator or by applying both
simultaneously. That is teacher may be tempted to pass more students by setting relatively

19

easy examination paper, giving more marks etc. This has to be checked by the Principal, he
may have a say in setting the question paper and may summon a sample of corrected answer
sheet to see the marking pattern.
2. Pedagogy adopted by the teachers should be checked at regular intervals by the Principal
who should randomly visit the class during teaching hours.
3. Punctuality can be checked by the attendance register and the leave records.
4. One of the indicators of whether the teacher is giving personal attention to each student
especially the weak students is - Does he know the name of each students of his class?
5. Planning and its implementation can be checked by Principal by the help of a teachers
diary which each teacher has to maintain and get the lesson plan, weekly plan and monthly
plan approved by the Principal.
6. Principal should see that teachers are finishing the assigned curriculum on time. This can
be checked by the help of teachers diary. Feedback from students will also help.
7. Attendance register should be checked daily by the Principal.
8. Principal can call checked copies of the students periodically and can verify if assignments
and feedback on them are given regularly.
9. Number of extra curricular activities carried out and the involvement of the particular
teacher can be measured.
10. Principal will be able to comment on this topic. The willingness to carry out other
responsibilities assigned by superior will also be reflected in the service records.
11. Students learn a lot from their teachers and follow them. Therefore, teachers should set
examples for their students. The way the teacher is dressed, their habits and conducts will
reflect this attribute.
12. The real evaluation of a teacher can be done by the student only. Feedback from the
students should form a major indicator of the performance of a teacher. The Principal or other
monitoring agents can collect feedback from the students by class visits and informal
interviews where students can be asked questions like:

How the classes are going on?

Is the teacher teaching well?

Are you able to understand the topic well?

Are teachers available after class if you have any problem? Etc.
20

Note: Targets for the indicators marked # can not be quantified and has to be judged
qualitatively.
For implementing a performance based incentive programme, the minimum
acceptable level of performance as measured on the above scale should be decided by the
organization but in my opinion it should be minimum 70%. For teachers performing above
the minimum level, the incentive should be that much percent of the fixed incentive. For
example if the incentive has been fixed as Rs.500 and the performance rating is 80% then the
teacher should be given 500*0.8 = Rs.400 as incentive plus their salary.

10.3. Performance Indicators for Principal:


The performance of the principal can be judged on the basis of the following indicators.

SL.
NO.
1.

WEIGHTAGE
INDICATORS
Financial

planning,

budgeting

and

(MARKS)
timely

reporting. 20

2.

Maintaining the receipt and expenses balance at optimal level.


Ensuring timely receipt of the fee.

3.

Supervising the teachers (random class visits, feedback from 10

4.

students) to ensure quality education.


Efforts made to increase the enrolment.

21

10

5.

Efforts made to decrease the drop out rate.

6.

Regular checking of the lesson plan, weekly plan and monthly 5

7.

plan submitted by the teachers and providing feedback on them.


Steps taken to identify the weak students and assistance 5

8.

provided to them.
Regular and proper conduct of extra-curricular activities.

9.

Performance/success Rate of the different class. (Internal as 5

well as external i.e. Board Examinations where ever


10.

applicable).
Proper maintenance of the library, laboratory, hostel, mess and 5

11.

other infrastructure facility.


Proper maintenance of the transportation facilities and proper 5

12.

record keeping.
Regular monitoring of attendance records of teachers and 4

13.

students both.
Conducting staff meetings at regular interval to motivate the 3

14.

staff members.
Ensuring that curriculum is cover in the assigned time.

15.

Ensuring proper use and maintenance of the teaching aids and 4

16.

their stock register.


Ensuring cleanliness in the class and in the campus.

17.

Whether regular parents teacher meeting are held and follow up 3

actions taken on the issues discussed or not.

10.3.1. Implementation plan: An external observer should visit the school at random to assess
the performance of the Principals. The observer can be the project director himself or any
other person working in the organization and appointed by him or the Executive Director.
The observer should interact with teachers and students, attend a few classes and observe the
surrounding to get the feedback before assigning marks. The natures of indicators are such
that no targets can be fixed.

22

10.4 Recommendations:
A good performance appraisal should be void of subjectivity and reliance on memory.
It should be a continuous and comprehensive evaluation that incorporates both scholastic and
non-scholastic aspects of education spread over the total span of instruction time. It is
recommended that

Instead of annual appraisal, quarterly or monthly appraisal should be done.

A neutral monitoring agent, any one from the organization, should also be employed
along with the Principal of the school for appraising the performance of the teachers.
This will help in decreasing the subjectivity and any chance of favoritism by the
Principal.

Principal is the head of the school and it is his responsibility that school functions
properly and fulfills its mission and objectives. For this reason he should be given
complete control over the matters of the school and external intervention should be
kept to minimum.

Same external observer should not be sent to the same school time and again to
reduce the chance of any subjectivity being creeping in the evaluation.

11. Health Projects of NBJK:


NBJK runs several different projects that deal with various aspects of health, viz
Reproductive and Child Health, Disability, Cleanliness, Eye defects, etc. with the objective to
provide health facilities to the poor and resource less people of the area.
Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) programme is one of the most important project
among all other health projects. Since this programme is of long duration and there is
possibility of such programmes being extended to new area and to continue for longer
duration, it was required to develop performance indicators for this programme. At present
three projects viz, RACHNA funded by CARE, Jharkhand; Reproductive Health and Family
Welfare Program funded by David and Lucile Packard Foundation, USA and Maternal &

23

Child Health funded by CINI (Child in Need Institute) PFI (Population Foundation of
India) are being implemented under RCH programme.
11.1 Staff structure of health projects: The RCH programme is being implemented through
a three-tier staff structure. The staff structure comprises of field level health workers, block
coordinators/supervisors and the assistant project coordinators and project coordinators. Staff
at different level undertakes different activities. The activities also vary slightly according to
the project objectives. Effort has been in the direction to develop some performance
indicators, which can be applied to all such projects after editing to match the project
objectives.
Most of the projects are implemented after conducting a baseline survey. The overall
improvement in the reproductive and child health status in the project area is the objective of
RCH projects. For achieving these objectives various activities are undertaken. Measuring
the outcome of these planned activities will be more meaningful in judging the performance
of the staff at field level and also at other levels. More weight age (75%) has been assigned
for the outcome of these activities while 25% has been assigned for other administrative
works for the field level health workers. For Block Supervisors and Project Coordinators the
weight age between these two components will be different and has been described along
with indicators in subsequent pages.
11.2 Methodology: Project proposal was studied to understand the role and responsibility of
the various levels of staffs of the health project. The activities outlined in the project proposal
were noted and field visits was undertaken to see their implementation. Informal interaction
with the field workers and the block supervisors were done to understand their job. Health
camps were also attended to understand their function and role of health worker in
mobilizing the community.
11.3 Performance indicators for field level health workers:
The performance of the Field level health workers can be measured against these indicators:

S.

INDICATORS

MAR

24

TARGET

ACHIEVE

MARKS

N.
1.

KS
Timely completion of the planned

75

(%)
Number of

activities and the extent to which its

these

outcome helps in attaining the

activities will

programme objective:

depend on the

i. No. of village health committee

(5)

project plan.

formed, meeting attended and

The target

no. of health related activities

should be to

taken up by the VHC.


ii. Selection & training of Sahiyaa*

attain at least
(5)

to ensure proper care of pregnant

completion of

mothers.
iii.No. of new cases of pregnancy
identified and follow up through

the planned
(5)

reaching 90%

iv. No. of pregnant women groups


(5)

attached with such group.


(5)

vi. No. of IFA tablets distributed and


no. of pregnant women using

(5)

them.
vii. No. of cases at risk identified,
referred to hospitals and other

(5)

services provided.
viii. No. of deliveries attended by
trained TBA or done in hospitals.

or above of
the given
targets should

v. No. of pregnant women getting


two doses of TT.

activities. Any
health worker

home visit.
formed and number of women

90%

(6)

ix. No. of children immunized.


x. No. of adolescent group and
(7)
25

be given full
marks.

AWARDED

eligible couple group formed and

(5)

their meetings attended and


activities undertaken by such
groups.
xi. No. of contraceptives distributed
and no. of eligible couple aware

(7)

of reproductive health & family


planning methods.
xii. No. of awareness generation
activities like wall writing, group

(5)

meetings etc. undertaken.


xiii. No. of people attending the
health camps and no. of pregnant

(10)

women getting two ANC and


two PNC checkups.
*Sahiyaa is a lady from the group who is given the basic training.
For the above indicators appraisal should be done on a quarterly basis, as performance will
be more evident in a quarter than in a month. For the other activities listed below appraisal
can be done at monthly intervals.

MARKS
S.N.

INDICATORS

MARKS

TARGET

2.
3.
4.

Weekly planning and reporting.


Punctuality in the field visit.
Rapport enjoyed in the community and

5
5
10

(%)
100
95
#

5.

ability to mobilize the community.


Level of awareness about family

planning methods, reproductive and


child health among the eligible couples

26

ACHIEVE
D

AWARDE
D

and others in their area of operation.


11.3.1 Implementation plan: - The marks awarded will depend on the target achieved. The
total marks obtained will be calculated and on the basis of the percentage of marks obtained
the incentive/increment will be determined.
1. Timely completion of the planned activities: The performance of the field level
health worker against this indicator can be measured by the weekly plan report
submitted to and approved by the Block Supervisor. A quarterly progress report
indicating the previous status, the achievement of this quarter and the final status at
the end of the quarter should be submitted by the health workers. The Block
Supervisor should visit the field to cross check the report submitted by the field staff.
The Block Supervisor can also attend some of the meetings of the VHC and other
groups. The Project Coordinator during their field visits can verify the report by
interacting with a sample of women and villagers of the area.
2. Weekly planning and reporting: Timely submission of the weekly plan and report
by the Health worker and punctuality in attending the weekly meeting will determine
their performance against this indicator. The APC/PC should also get a copy of this
report so that they can monitor the programme.
3. Punctuality in the field visit: Block Supervisors/APC/PC during their field visit can
inquire from the villagers about the punctuality of the health worker.
4. Rapport enjoyed in the community and ability to mobilize the community: This
can also be judged during the field visits of Block Supervisors/APC/PC by interacting
with the villagers. The number of villagers participating in the health camps
organized in the area will also reflect on the field health workers ability to mobilize
the community. The field health workers should spread the information about the
health camp to be organized and should ensure active participation of the villagers.
The turnout of the villagers at such camps will be the basis of judging their effort in
this direction. They should also ensure that these health camps are able to meet its
objective i.e. all pregnant women get IFA tablets, 2 doses of TT and children are
immunized.

27

5. Level of awareness about family planning methods, reproductive and child


health among the eligible couples and others in their area of operation: This can
be measured by asking questions from the villagers/group members or conducting an
informal survey of the area by the Block Supervisor. The number of wall writings,
meetings organized etc will also help in measuring the performance of the health
worker against this indicator.
Note: The indicators marked as # are subjective and targets could not be fixed for these
indicators. The appraisal will be based on the various factors, which has been indicated in the
implementation plan.
11.4 Performance indicators for block supervisors:
The main activity of the block supervisor is to coordinate and monitor the activities of
the field level heath worker, liaisoning with the officials at PHC level and planning and
reporting. The activities can be divided broadly in two parts. One dealing with the
administrative part likes reporting and planning, and the other part, which is the ground level
implementation of the project. The performance of the Block Supervisor can be judged on the
basis of the following indicators.
S.
N.

1.

INDICATORS

ACHIEV
MARKS

Timely completion of the planned activities

60

TARGET

(%)
Number

and the extent to which its outcome helps in

of these

attaining the programme objective:

activities

i. No. of village health committee

will

formed, meeting attended and no. of

(5)

depend on

health related activities taken up by

the project

the VHC.

plan.

ii. Selection & training of Sahiyaa to

(5)

ensure proper care of pregnant

The target
should be

mothers.
28

MARKS
AWARDED

iii. No. of health camp organized and no.


of people attending the health camps

to attain at
(10)

least 90%

and no. of pregnant women getting

completio

two ANC and two PNC checkups.

n of the

iv. No. of pregnant women groups

planned

formed, number of women attached

(5)

with such group and no. of meetings

activities.
Any

attended.

Block

v. No. of cases at risk identified, referred


to hospitals and other services

Supervisor
(5)

provided.

reaching
90% or

vi. No. of children of the area immunized.

(10)

vii. No. of adolescent group and eligible

above of
the given

(5)

couple group formed and their

targets

meetings attended and activities

should be

undertaken by such groups.

given full

viii. No. of contraceptives distributed and

marks.

no. of eligible couple aware of

(5)

reproductive health & family planning


methods.
ix. No. of awareness generation activities

(5)

like wall writing, group meetings etc.


undertaken.
x. Decrease in the infant mortality rate

(5)

and the death of mother during


delivery in their area.
2.

Regular monitoring of the field workers &

90

3.

providing guidance to them.


Liaisoning with govt. health dept. officials

4.

and rapport enjoyed with them.


Training the TBA and health workers to

As per the

ensure safe delivery.

schedule
29

5.

Stock & issue register of the audio-visual aid

100

6.
7.

and others maintained properly or not.


Budget control and proper utilization.
Transparency in financial dealing and timely

8
5

95
100

8.

settlement of advances.
Timely performance appraisal of the junior

95

9.

staffs.
Rapport with the villagers, seniors, juniors

and other staff and willingness to accept


additional responsibility.

11.4.1 Implementation plan: - The marks awarded will depend on the target achieved. The
total marks obtained will be calculated and on the basis of the percentage of marks obtained
the incentive/increment will be determined.
1. Timely completion of the planned activities and the extent to which its outcome
helps in attaining the programme objective: The performance of the Block
Supervisors against this indicator can be measured by the weekly plan report
submitted to and approved by the Project Coordinator. A quarterly progress report
indicating the previous status, the achievement of this quarter and the final status at
the end of the quarter should be submitted by the Block Supervisors. The Project
Coordinator should visit the field to cross check the report submitted by the Block
Supervisor. The Project Coordinator during their field visits can verify the report by
interacting with a sample of women and villagers of the area.
2. Regular monitoring of the field workers & providing guidance to them: Regular
visit to the field by the Block Supervisor will motivate the Health workers and the
random visit and appraisal at site will keep them focus. The Project Coordinator
should time to time interact with the health workers to judge the performance of the
Block Supervisor against this indicator. He should also attend some of the weekly
meetings time to time.
3. Liaisoning with govt. health dept. officials and rapport enjoyed with them:
Performance against this indicator is subjective and should be measured keeping
30

certain factors in mind like the level of participation and support provided by the
Govt. official in the various programmes. The level of participation of the PHC in the
various health camp organized by the organization will also reflect the level of effort
being put in by the Block Supervisors.
4. Training the TBA and health workers to ensure safe delivery: Block Supervisor
should ensure that the Health worker and the TBA working in the area are fully
trained. For this Block Supervisors should be instrumental in organizing the training
programme as per the schedule. The performance against this indicator will be
reflected in the monthly plan and report as the number of training programme
organized. The Block Supervisors should access the training need of the health
worker and the TBA and accordingly arrange for the training.
5. Stock & issue register of the audio-visual aid and others maintained properly or
not: The stock and issue register of the various instruments like audio-visual aids
should be maintained properly and should be checked regularly by the Project
Coordinators.
6. Budget control and proper utilization: Performance against this indicator will be
reflected in the monthly plan and report in the form of activities conducted and
expenses incurred. Project coordinator should ensure that the budget is utilized
properly and there is no misappropriation. Report from the accounts department will
also help in measuring performance against this indicator.
7. Transparency in financial dealing and timely settlement of advances: All the
personal and project advances should be settled in time and transparency in financial
dealing should be maintained. Failing to maintain transparency should be penalized.
The report from the accounts dept. will help in judging performance against this
indicator.
8. Timely performance appraisal of the junior staffs: Block Supervisor should
submit the performance appraisal report of the junior on time. This report can be
submitted along with the monthly report to the Project Coordinator.
9. Rapport with the villagers, seniors, juniors and other staff and willingness to
accept additional responsibility: This can also be judged during the field visits of
APC/PC by interacting with the villagers. The number of villagers participating in the

31

health camps organized in the area will also reflect on the Block Supervisors ability to
mobilize the community. The turnout of the villagers at such camps will be the basis
of judging their effort in this direction. They should also ensure that these health
camps are able to meet its objective i.e. all pregnant women get IFA tablets, 2 dose of
TT and children are immunized. Good rapport with the health worker will help in
keeping them motivated and to get the desired results. Willingness to accept
additional responsibility assigned from time to time should also be taken in account
while judging the overall performance of the Block Supervisors.
Note: The indicators marked as # are subjective and targets could not be fixed for these
indicators. The appraisal will be based on the various factors, which has been indicated in the
implementation plan.
11.5 Performance indicators for project coordinators:
The Project Coordinator is the in-charge of any project and its his responsibility to see that
project is being implemented in true sense, all the listed activities are carried out on time and
that the subordinates are working properly. The performance of the project coordinators can
be measured against following indicators:
S.N.

INDICATORS

1. Timely reporting and compliance to


funding agencies
2. Timely completion of the planned
activities
3. Extent to which the outcome of these
activities have helped in achieving the
programme objectives.
4. Budget control and proper utilization
5. Transparency in financial dealing and
timely settlement of advances.
6. Timely internal reporting

(Daily,

weekly and monthly)


7. Proper coordination and monitoring of

TOTAL

TARGET

MARKS

(%)

15

100

10

90

10

90

10

95

100

100

10

32

ACHIEVED

MARKS
AWARDED

the project staffs & Ensuring proper


follow

up

supervisors

action
and

by
the

the

block

field

health

workers.
8. Liaisoning with the Govt. Official

10

9. Ensuring that the field staff and block

#
No. of

supervisors are properly trained.

training
5

programs
as in the
project
plan.

10. Timely performances appraisal of the


junior staffs.
11. Rapport with the seniors, juniors and
other staff and willingness to accept

100

10

additional responsibility.
12. Efforts made to expand the programme
in new areas and to search new funding
agencies

to

support

the

ongoing

programme for extended duration.


11.5.1 Implementation plan: The marks awarded will depend on the target achieved. The total
marks obtained will be calculated and on the basis of the percentage of marks obtained the
incentive/increment will be determined.
1. Timely reporting to funding agencies: - Timely reporting to the funding agencies is
important for the next installment of the funds and also the rapport of the
organization. It is of utmost importance that all the queries raised by the funding
agencies are dealt with urgency. All reports should be sent on time and the top
management should see that it is being done.
2. Timely completion of the planned activities: - All planned activities for the project
should be completed on time. It can be checked through the weekly and monthly
internal reporting.

33

3. Extent to which the outcomes of these activities have helped in achieving the
programme objectives: Most of the programmes start with a baseline survey to
know the status before the intervention. Amount of difference made on the various
parameters after intervention will be a good indicator of the success of the
programme as well as the efforts made by the PC. The information about the
availability of services and changes in the situation will be collected over a period of
time at various levels and once a year or at 6 months a sample survey can be done by
an external agent to assess the progress.
4. Budget control and proper utilization: - This can also be checked through the
internal reporting and the account section. PC should ensure that no amount is left
unused & also that there is no wastage and misappropriation of the budget.
5. Transparency in financial dealing and timely settlement of advances: - All
advances should be settled on time and transparency in financial dealings should be
maintained. Accounts department should not release any amount in absence of proper
vouchers.
6. Timely internal reporting: - The daily, weekly and monthly plans and reports should
be submitted on time and get approved by the Executive Director. Executive Director
should sought clarification, if any.
7. Proper coordination and monitoring of the project staffs: - Project Coordinators
should properly coordinate the activities of all the staff working in the project. He
should ask for the weekly plan and reports from the junior staffs and provide
guidance. Regular meetings should be organized with the block supervisors and he
should randomly attend the meeting of the block supervisor and the field health
worker. Inputs about the performance of the field staff can be obtained by randomly
visiting their fields and interacting with the villagers. The top management should see
that PC visits the field at regular interval. This can be checked from the daily/weekly
planning and reporting.
8. Liaisoning with the Govt. Official: - This can be measured by the support provided
by the government officials to the project, number of meeting held with the govt.
officials, workshop arranged and attended and rapport with the govt. official. The top

34

management will have to assess what kind of rapport the PC shares with Govt.
Officials keeping the above factors in mind.
9. Ensuring that the field staff and block supervisors are properly trained: Number of trainings camps and exposure visits arranged will reflect this. Occasional
interaction of the field workers with the top management either at coordination office
or in the field will also help in appraising the performance of the PC in this regard.
10. Timely appraisal of the junior staffs: - PC should do the appraisal of the junior staff
at monthly interval and should get it approved by the top management. The appraisal
can be submitted along with the monthly plan reports.
11. Rapport with the seniors, juniors and other staff and willingness to accept
additional responsibility: - This will be judged by the general behavior of the PC on
day-to-day basis. Since they are in the coordination office most of the time, the top
management can easily judge it.
12. Efforts made to expand the programme in new areas and to search new funding
agencies to support the ongoing programme for extended duration: The health
projects should run for a longer duration to make any real difference on the ground
level. Most of the projects are funded by the donor agencies for a time period of 3-5
years. To make a real difference in the lives of the poor villagers the PC should make
effort to find new donors interested in this type of project and should try to mobilize
resources to expand the programme in new areas. The top management on the basis of
the sincerity shown by the PC can judge the performance on this account.
Note: The indicators marked as # are subjective and targets could not be fixed for these
indicators. The appraisal will be based on the various factors, which has been indicated in the
implementation plan.

35

12. Clean Jharkhand Project:


Clean Jharkhand Project was launched in 2002 with the support of ICEF (India
Canada Environment Facility) in Ranchi municipality area. The project aims at solid waste
management through the community with the help of municipality, training and capacity
building of Municipal staffs and other stakeholders, awareness generation, institutional
resource recovery and policy formulation on waste management. Today the programme has
been extended to cover Hazaribagh and Koderma municipality area also.

36

12.1 Staff structure:

Project
Manager
Assist. Project
Manager

Community
Coordinator

Awareness
Coordinator

Environment
Education
Coordinator

Policy &
Liaisoning
Officer

Training
Coordinator
Production
& Research
Manager

Assist.
Community
Coordinator (2)

Community
Supervisor (12)

Animator

Site
Supervisor

Safai Mitra

37

Market
Supervisor

Sales
Agents (2)

Organization wants to have the incentive system for the Awareness Coordinator,
Environment Education Coordinator, Policy & Liaisoning Officer, Training Coordinator,
Production & Research Manager, Community Coordinator, Assistant Community
Coordinator, Community Supervisor and the Community Animators. For this the
organization wants performance indicators to be in place.
12.2 Performance indicators: The Awareness Coordinator, Environment Education
Coordinator, Policy & Liaisoning Officer, Training Coordinator and Production & Research
Manager work as support for the project. For them the performance will be measured in two
parts. Part I - the performance will be measured against the activities planned & conducted
during the month and the utilization of the allocated budget. Each activity will be given
certain weightage by the employee himself and will be finalized after approval of the Project
Manager. Over the month the activities will be conducted and the budget spent will be
compared with the budget allocated and accordingly points will be awarded. The Part-I will
account for 70% of the total incentive amount. The incentive will be applicable in case of
completion of 70% of the activities planned for the month. The rest 20% of the total incentive
amount will be decided by the performance against Part II based on nine criteria viz,
transparency in financial dealing, effectiveness, budget control and its proper utilization,
timeliness in reporting & account settlement, independent & professional attitude, rapport
with colleague and other employee, willingness to accept additional responsibility if any and
over all sincerity towards the job. The indicators and implementation plan for Environment
Education Coordinator has been attached as Annexure I.
12.2.1 Implementation Plan: The incentive plan will be implemented as follows:

Incentive should be given only if the staff gets above 70% of the total weightage
assigned to the planned activities.

Whole incentive amount of the Part A should be given to the staff if he is able to score
100% of the total weightage.

Out of the total amount assigned to Part A, 50% of it should be given as incentive if a
staff scores 70% of the total weightage.

Rest of the 50% of the incentive for Part A will be divided into 30 parts and for each
percentage score above 70 the employee will get that much part of it. E.g. if the total
38

incentive for the Part A is Rs. 1000 and an employee scores 80% of the total
weightage assigned to the planned activities for the month, he will get Rs. 500 for
scoring 70% plus Rs. 166.6 for scoring above 70% (500*10/30 = 166.6).

The activities planned for the month for each employee should be in accordance with
the Project Targets but it should be set after discussion with the employees so as not
to overburden them.

More emphasis should be on the economical use of the allocated budget instead of
full use of the budget. If an employee manages to get the quality work done in
amount less than the allocated budget he should get some bonus points and it should
be considered that he has utilized the complete budget.

The weightage for the activities should be decided in consultation with the
employees.

12.3 Performance indicators for other staffs: For the Community Coordinator, Assistant
Community Coordinator, Community Supervisor and the Community Animators the
incentive plan is based on the household covered and service charge collected from them.
The incentive provided to the Community Coordinator & Assistant Community Coordinator
is in the form of percentage of total collection. As per the functional budget and sustainability
budget (attached as Annexure-II) prepared for the Programme, targets for number of
household covered on the monthly basis have been calculated and the amount to be collected
has been fixed. The percentage of incentive is increased if the collection is above the target.
Similarly for Community Animators & Community supervisors targets has been fixed
quarter wise. The incentive is dependent on the amount collected. The performance
indicators and the incentive plan for these staffs have been attached as Annexure III.
13. Micro Credit Programme:
Micro Finance Programme of the N.B.J.K. was started in March 1994 as Women
Entrepreneurship Development Programme with an objective to promote Income Generation
Activities among the poor women organized in groups by

extending credit facilities and

other support services. The programme was based on the Gramin Model of Bangladesh.

39

CORDAID provided the initial financial support for the programme in the form of revolving
fund to cover the operational cost. Today the programme is self-sustaining and works with
the objective:

To create self employment through income generation activities.

To make available easy, timely and appropriate credit and other financial/support
services to the target group.

To reduce the dependence on local money lenders or other middle man for capital.

To stop land/asset mortgage, advance Crop selling and other income eroding process.

To reduce women discrimination and increase their dignity and status in the society.
The programme has come a long way since its inception. At present the area of

operation includes Hazaribag (including Ramgarh), Ranchi, Koderma and Pakur districts of
Jharkhand & Slums in Patna, the capital city of Bihar. Programme is running in 15 blocks of
the above districts.
The detail of the microfinance programme has been given in the Annexure IV.
13.1 Staff structure: The operational structure is as follows:

Head/Coordination Office

Branch/District Office

Block Office

40

The staff structure is as follows:

Executive Director

Programme
Manager
(Coordination)

HR Manager

Branch/District Manager
(Coordinator)

Manager
Finance

MIS Asstt./Accountant

Asstt./Area Manager (Coordinator)

Block Manager

Credit Officers
(Works within 20-25 km of radius)
13.2 Roles and responsibilities:
13.2.1 Credit Officers Credit Officers/Field Workers are the interface of the organization
with the community. They form the SHG groups and over see its activities. The up keeping of
the book of accounts of the SHG is done by them. After the group has stabilized and have
sufficient savings, members become eligible for loans. The loan application is filled by the
Credit Officers and submitted to the Branch Office. Timely loan recovery is the other major
job of the Credit Officer. They have to deposit the daily collection in Bank and in the

41

afternoon update the journal and ledger. They also have to help the Block Manager in
completing the pre-disbursement formalities like preparation of Muster Roll and agreement
Paper.
13.2.2 Block Managers: The responsibility of the Block Manager include collection of
installments in absence of Credit Officers, checking the loan application forms, predisbursement formalities, general ledger and journal entries, budget preparation, day wise
report checking, monthly basis account checking, preparation of cheque requisition,
monitoring the Credit Officers and SHGs.
13.2.3 Area Manager: Apart from monitoring the Block Managers and the Credit Officers,
Area Manager has to prepare cash flow and manage the fund at the Branch Level. He also
has to appraise the performance of the juniors as well as the SHGs. Area manager also has to
check the monthly accounts prepared by the Block Manager.
13.2.4 Branch Manager: Apart from monitoring the whole programme in his branch, the
Branch Manager has to appraise the performance of all the Staffs below him. Its his
responsibility to see that programme expands in his area. He also has to prepare the budget
for his branch and manage the fund for his branch.
13.2.5 Programme Manager: The work of Programme Manager is similar to the Branch
Manager only the scale is high. He has to look over the programme at the organization level,
prepare the budget at the organization level and manage the fund. He is also responsible for
the appraisal of all the junior staffs and the success of the programme.
13.2.6 MIS Assistant/Accountant: The role of the accountant is to up-keep the books of
account and up-date it on regular basis. He is the person who deals with the Bank Accounts,
issue of cheque, staffs advance account and others.

13.3 Performance indicators: The following performance indicators have been developed
for the Block Manager, Area/Branch Manager and the Programme Manager. Total nine
indicators have been identified and for these nine indicators different weightage has been
assigned for the staff at different level.

42

DESIGNATION UNDER THE PACKAGE


SL.
NO.
1
2
*3
4
5
6
7
8
9

INDICATORS

DISBURSEMENT TARGET
REPAYMENT RATE TARGET
(AVERAGE)
INCREMENT IN REPAYMENT
RATE
STAFF MANAGEMENT AND
SUPPORT
PROPER MONITORING AND
APPRAISAL
RECORD CHECKING AND
KEEPING AT OFFICE
GROUP STRUCTURE
(PARTICIPATION OFMEMBER,
RECORD AT GROUP LEVEL
ETC.)
TRANSPIRANCY IN
ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS
SPECIAL/INNOVATIVE/OTHER
CONTRIBUTION TO THE
PROGRAMME

BLOCK
AREA
PROGRAMME
MANAGER MANAGER
MANAGER
MARKS
MARKS
MARKS
30
20
15

TOTAL

35

25

20

10

10

10

10

20

15

10

10

100

100

100

13.3.1 Implementation Plan:


1) Incentive will be calculated on half yearly basis i.e. April-September/October-March.
2) Staff who will get 100% marks will be eligible for amount equal to 40% of their salary as
monthly incentive.
3) No Incentive will be provided for the marks obtained less than 50
Increment in repayment rate refers to the increment in average repayment rate in respect of
previous six month.

43

* To get 100% marks under this criteria Block Manager should be on 4% average increment,
Area Manager should be on 3% average increment and Programme Manager should be on
2% average increment.
13.4 Performance indicators for credit officers: The Credit Officers are not given any
salary by the N.B.J.K. instead they are given commission in the form of incentives. The
incentive is dependent on two bases, the monthly repayment rate base and the monthly loan
disbursement base. Organization was already following this system but some improvement
was suggested because due to various reasons the Credit Officers of Barkagaon and
Chauparan Block were not getting enough commissions. Sometimes the aggregate
commission was below Rs. 2000. So to motivate them higher % was proposed. The reasons
for lower commission was low return rate by some group of these blocks, dysfunctional
SHGs, less number of SHGs and less number of members as programme was introduced in
these blocks recently. Other reason to propose higher percentage of commission was to pay
the Credit Officers above the minimum wages announced by the Government so that legal
conditions can be fulfilled. This was suggested only as a temporary measure till the situation
improves and the rates are subject to revision. The incentive calculation sheet for the Credit
Officers for Hazaribagh District is given in the Annexure V.
13.5 Performance Indicators for Accountant:

The performance of the MIS

Assistant/Accountant will be measured against the following indicators.

1.
1.1

1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5

WORK DETAILS
MICRO CREDIT RELATED
Perfect ness in record checking and keeping on
time (Loan ledger/cash
book/ledger/vouchers/Receipt & Payment
A/c/Loan Status format/Cheque
Utilisation/Cheque Requisition etc.)
Perfect ness in Micro credit computerized A/c on
time
Disbursement target
Repayment Rate Target (Average)
Other Special/innovative contribution

44

FULL
MARKS

20

15
5
5
5

MARKS
OBTAINED

2. INTERNAL AUDIT
2.1 Completion of assigned internal audit on time

7.5

2.2 Quality/level of completed internal audit


3. PROJECT RELATED
3.1 Perfect ness in A/c checking and keeping
(Manual/computerized) of assigned project
(CORDAID, Credit Plus, SIDBI Capacity Build.,
CAA, Help Age India, Caritas India, IGSSS etc.)
3.2 Monitoring of budget/fund project wise
4. BRANCH RELATED
4.1 Perfect ness in A/c checking and keeping details
in computer regarding branch's projects like RIP,
Building Centre, WDRF of Koderma and Caritas
India, Building Centre, GF, WDRF Watershed,
IGSSS etc. of Pakur)
4.2 Monitoring of budget/fund project wise

7.5

8
4

5. OTHER WORK
5.1 Day Book maintenance (Manual)

5.2 Finalization of Stri Shakti Accounts on yearly


basis, Completion of other delegated work on time
TOTAL
TOTAL MARKS OBTAINED

6
100
=

14. Conclusion:
Performance appraisal for evaluation of employees serves the following purposes:
1. Promotion, separation, and transfer decisions
2. Feedback to the employee regarding how the organization viewed the employee's
performance
3. Evaluations of relative contributions made by individuals and entire departments in
achieving higher level organization goals
4. Reward decisions, including merit increases, promotions, and other rewards
5. Ascertaining and diagnosing training and development decisions
6. Criteria for evaluating the success of training and development decisions
7. Information upon which work scheduling plans, budgeting, and human resources
planning can be used

45

It also serves the following additional purposes:


1. Provided employees the opportunity to formally indicate the direction and level of the
employee's ambition
2. Show organizational interest in employee development, which was cited to help the
enterprise retain ambitious, capable employees instead of losing the employees to
competitors
3. Provided a structure for communications between employees and management to help
clarify expectations of the employee by management and the employee
4. Provide satisfaction and encouragement to the employee who has been trying to perform
well.
Important steps to obtaining useful performance appraisals include determining the
type of data to be collected as well as who will conduct the appraisal, establishing a rating
philosophy, overcoming typical rating deficiencies, creating a rating instrument, and
engaging the employee in making decisions on future performance changes.
An effective negotiated performance appraisal helps the employee take additional
ownership for both continuing effective performance and improving weak areas. Employee
goals set through performance appraisals should be difficult but achievable, as goals that are
overly ambitious are doomed for failure. Some employees tend to boycott their own progress
by setting impossible goals to achieve. Finally, employees want to know what the
management thinks of their work. Letting workers know that management have noticed their
efforts goes a long way towards having a more motivated workforce.
The study is of significance in the context that NBJK is growing and diversifying in
many diverse areas of activities. NBJK needs dedicated human resources to cater to this
demand. Dedication will arise only when the employees will feel that their efforts are noted
and suitably rewarded. The performance appraisal should be based on measurable indicators
so that there is very little chance of subjectivity. Based on these indicators not only the
performance of employees will be measured, it will also help in identifying the training needs
of the employees. Lack of subjectivity will also increase the employees motivation and the
results will come fast when employees feel that their efforts are being noted and rewarded.

46

The new indicators have been in lines with the existing one with slight changes in an attempt
to make it more objective and measurable.
Based on my interactions and observations in NBJK, there are very few Human
Resource policies set in place and NBJK currently does not have a full fledged Human
Resource system in place. As student of Management, I see this as an issue that needs
immediate attention. NBJK is one of the biggest NGO in Jharkhand and has been able to
reach this stage because of excellent track record and also because of the good reputation it
has slowly but steadily built over the last 37 years, ever since its inception. Considering that
NBJK is still growing, changes in its outlook and way of functioning are a natural process.
Therefore, a more pro-active Human Resource system would certainly aid NBJK in smoother
and more efficient functioning in the overall sense. This is an important point of
consideration because; Human Resource is one of the four pillars that build and bind an
Organization.

47

List of Reference
1. Annual Report (2004 & 2005), Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra, Hazaribagh, Jharkhand
2. Dessler, Gary Human Resource Management, Ninth Edition, Delhi: Pearson
Education (Singapore) Pte. Ltd., Indian Branch (2005).
3. Garg, Ajay Labour Laws One Should Know, 21st Revised Edition, New Delhi: Nabhi
Publications (2005).
4. Robbins, Stephen P Organizational Behaviour, Tenth Edition, Delhi: Pearson
Education (Singapore) Pte. Ltd., Indian Branch (2004).
5. Robbins, Stephen P Organization Theory, Third Edition, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of
India Private Limited (2003)
6. www.cnr.berkeley.edu
7. www.gallup.com
.

48

ANNEXURE I
INCENTIVE CALCULATION SHEET FOR EE COORDINATOR FOR
THE MONTH OF_____________
PART - I

49

PART - II
S.No.
1.
S.
NO.

Criteria
Transparency in financial

Weightage

Marks

(100)
10

awarded

dealing
ACTIVITY
BUDGET
2.
Effectiveness
25
Plan
Report
Planned
Actual
3.
Budget Control and its proper
20

Weight
age

10
PDC Festivalutilization (economical).
10000
14
Seminar
4. on SWM
Timely settlement of accounts10000
10
10
Development
of 2
8000
5.
Punctuality
in
reporting
5
model school
(internal as well as external)
6
4. Launch of env. Club
2000
6.
Independent & Professional
10
10
5. Workshop for NCC
15000
cadets
Attitude
6
6. Eco-Exposure
3000
7.
Rapport with colleague and
5
10
7. Data bank preparation
5000
other staff
10
8. Pamphlets
6000
8.
Willingness
to
accept
5
5
9. Green bazaar
6000
programme additional responsibility
3
9. forOver
10
10. Memento
guestall sincerity toward the
7500
6
11. CD of film on
CJP
20000
work
10
12. Book on EE
50000
PART A ACCOUNTS FOR 80% OF THE INCENTIVE AMOUNT
PART B ACCOUNTS FOR 20% OF THE INCENTIVE AMOUNT

1.
2.
3.

50

Marks
obtained

ANNEXURE - II
Functional Budget for 2005-2006
Community Division Budget Projection for the Year 2005-2006
Particulars

By

Amount in Rs.

Community Contribution

Particulars
To

Honorarium/Coordination Allowance

April'05

(28,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 40%

224000

PM

Met through the Project Mgt. costs

May'05

(28,500 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 40%

228000

APM

Met through the Project Mgt. costs

June'05

(29,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 45%

261000

CC

Met through the Proiect Mgt. costs

July'05

(29,500 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 45%

265500

CS

Met through the Project Mgt. costs

Augusf05

(30,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 50%

300000

PDC Accountant

RS.3,500 * 12 months

September'05

(30,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 50%

300000

October'05

(30,500 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 55%

335500

Safai Mitra

November'05

(31,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 60%

372000

December'05

(31,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 60%

372000

Ward labour
Incentive to RMC
tractor

January'06

(31,500 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 60%

378000

Feburary'06

(30,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 60%

384000

March'06

(30,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X 60%

384000

713000

865500

To

1079500

To
1146000

Amount
in Rs.

42000

Cleanliness Cost
140+145+150+155 PDC for 4
months+160PDC for 8 months
14 Ward labour @ RS.1950 for 12
Months

driver

Rs. 5,0o0/- p.m. x 12 Monthsx

Incentive

Annexure B

3490500
327600

60000
882840

C. Animator
CS

Total Receipts

4E+06

3804000

CC
To

Repair & Maint (Rickshaw Trolly)


Annexure C

To

51

Consumables

243000

Nuvan
Bleaching
Lime
Broom
To

2081140

By Deficit

TO

Rs. 500/- x 12 CS x 12 Months

72000

Safai Mitra dress

320 Sets @ Rs. 250/- (December Dist.)

80000

Health camp

4 Health Camp @ 7500/-

30000

Raincoat
R trolly/painting
Iwriting

Rs. 150 x 460 No.

69000

Rs. 100 x 160 Trolley

16000

wall writing

Rs. 2000 per ward x 12 Ward

24000

Cleanliness Drive

160 PDC x 2 days x 5 labor x Rs. 70 x


3 times

Prog. Related Exp.

Stationary
PDC receipt book

TOTAL

1722860
To

To

5000

PDC Cash book

New NGO/CJP PDCs

ORE related

NA

40000
0

Conference Meeting
PDC Meetina

Rs. 150 x 12 Ward X 12 Months

21600

WDC Meeting
Purchase of New
Rickshaw

Rs. 150 x 12 Ward X 12 Months

21600

20 Trolley @ Rs. 6200/TOTAL

Sustainability Budget for 2005-2006


Community Division Budget Projection for the Year 2005-2006

52

336000

124000
5885140

Particulars
By

By

Amount in Rs.

Opening
Balance

Particulars
To

Honorarium/Coordination Allowance

Contribution

PM

Met through the Proiect

Buffer stock

APM

Met through the Proiect

Depreciation

CC

Met through the Project

CS

Met through the Proiect

PDC Accountant

Rs.3,500 * 12 months

Community Contribution
(28,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
April'05
40%

June'05

(28,500 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
40%
(29,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
45%

July'05

(29,500 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
45%

May'05

December'05

(30,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
50%
(30,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
50%
(30,500 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
55%
(31,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
60%
(31,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
60%

January'06

(31,500 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
60%

Augusf05
September'05
October'05
November'05

Feburary'06
March'06

(30,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
60%
(30,000 HH @ Rs.20/-) X
60%

224000

To

228000
261000

713000

265500
300000
300000

To
865500

Safai Mitra

140+145+150+155 PDC for 4 months+160PDC for 8 months

Ward labour

14 Ward labour @ Rs.1950 for 12 Months

Incentive to RMC
tractor driver

Met through the Project

Incentive

Annexure B

882840

3490500

Annexure C

243000

327600

C. Animator
CS

372000

CC
1079500

378000

To

Repair & Maint


(Rickshaw Trolly)

384000
384000

42000

Cleanliness Cost

335500

372000

Amount in
Rs.

1146000

To

Consumables

53

By

Miscellaneous
Receipts
(30,000 HH @ Rs.2/-) X 12%

720000

720000

To

TO

Nuvan

Met through the Proiect

Bleaching

Met through the Proiect

Lime

Met through the Project

Broom

Met through the Proiect

Prog. Related Exp.


Safai Mitra dress

Met through the Proiect

Health camp

Met through the Project

Safai mitra Training

Met through the Proiect

Team Trainina

Met through the Project

Documentation

Met through the Proiect

Raincoat

Met through the Project

R trolly/painting
/writing

Met through the Proiect

wall writing

Met through the Project

Stationary
PDC receipt book

10000

PDC Cash book

40000

ORE related

By

Deficit

1418482

To

Buffer

Total Yealy Collection/12

306542

To

Contingencies

10000*12 months

120000

To

Conference Meeting

Met through Proiect

To

Depreciation

54

To
TOTAL

Rickshaw Trolly

Rs.5,OOO*160/24*12

Other (Belcha, Kudal)

Rs.500*160/12*12

Purchase of New
Rickshaw

Met through the Project

5942482

TOTAL

Several Expenditures as indicated in the above sheet are being met through the
Project.

2>

Depreciation & Buffer have been created to meet the related expenditure after completion of the Project.

Annexure B
INCENTIVE CALCULATION FOR THE YEAR 2005-2006
MONTH

april
may
june
july
aug
sept
oct
nov
dec
jan
feb
march
total

TOTAL
COLLECTION

224000
228000
261000
265500
300000
300000
330000
330000
360000
360000
360000
360000
3678500

COMM. ANIMATOR
(15%)

COMM.
SUPERVISOR (7%)

33600
34200
39150
39825
45000
45000
49500
49500
54000
54000
54000
54000
551775

15680
15960
18270
18585
21000
21000
23100
23100
25200
25200
25200
25200
257495

55

80000

5942482

1>

Note

400000

COMM. COORDINATOR
(2%)

4480
4560
5220
5310
6000
6000
6600
6600
7200
7200
7200
7200
73570

Annexure C
repair & maintenance of rickshaw trolly
year 2005-06
Amount in
Rs.

Month

Particulars

apr

70 rickshaw@Rs 500
70 rickshaw@Rs 100

35000
7000

may

145 rickshaw@Rs100

14500

june

150 rickshas@Rs100

15000

july

155 richshaw@Rs 100

15500

aug

160 rickshaw@ Rs 100

16000

sept

160 rickshaw@ Rs 100

16000

oct

70 richshaw @ Rs 500

35000

90 rickshaw@Rs 100

9000

nov

160 rickshaw@ Rs 100

16000

dec

160 rickshaw@ Rs 100

16000

jan

160 rickshaw@ Rs 100

16000

feb

160 rickshaw@ Rs 100

16000

mar

160 rickshaw@ Rs 100

16000

ANNEXURE III
Incentive Calculation Sheet For C.A. & C. S.
Month:
Ward No.:

56

Qtr.

House hold
coverage by
C.S.

Collection
(Rs.)

Incentive to C.A.
Planned

Qtr.1

2000

13000
15000

Actual

1000
1750

800
2750

1000

23000
Qtr.2

Planned
300

18000
20000

Incentive to C.S.

1200

2200
25000

3750

1600
1800

28000
Qtr.3

2500

30000
33000

2000
4250

2500
2900

Qtr.4

2750

35000

4750

38000
40000

5250

3500

* Fixed incentive = Rs. 600

57

Actual

Actual
Household
coverage by C.S.

Incentive calculation for CC/ACC


MONTH

DETAILS

AMOUNT
COLLECT
ED

INCENTI
VE 2 %

AMOUNT
COLLECTE
D

INCENTIV
E 3%

AMOUNT
COLLECTE
D

INCENTIV
E 4%

APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
SEPT
OCT
NOV
DEC
JAN
FEB
MAR

28000HH@Rs 20 *40%
28500HH@Rs 20*40%
29000HH@Rs 20*45%
29500HH@Rs20 * 45%
30000HH@Rs 20*50%
30000HH@Rs 20*50%
30500HH@Rs 20*55%
31000HH@Rs 20*60%
31000HH@RS 20*60%
31500HH@Rs 20*60%
32000HH@Rs 20*60%
32000HH@Rs 20*60%

224000
228000
261000
265500
300000
300000
335500
372000
372000
378000
384000
384000

4480
4560
5220
5310
6000
6000
6710
7440
7440
7560
7680
7680

250000
250000
275000
280000
325000
325000
350000
400000
400000
400000
400000
425000

7500
7500
8250
8400
9750
9750
10050
12000
12000
12000
12000
12750

2750000
275000
300000
300000
350000
350000
375000
425000
425000
425000
425000
450000

11000
11000
12000
12000
14000
14000
15000
17000
17000
17000
17000
18000

58

AMOUN
T
REALIS
ED

INCENTI
VE
GAINED

ANNEXURE - IV
SL.
NO.

HEAD

1 No. of blocks

MICRO CREDIT AT A GLANCE


AS ON 31ST MARCH`2005
HAZARIBA RANCHI KODERM PAKUR PATNA
GH
A
15(slums
7
4
3
1
)

2 No. of SHGs
3 No. of SHGs members

TOTAL
30

658

447

90

48

107

1,350

10644

10108

1502

772

1604

24,630

4 No. of loanee SHGs


No. of SHGs loanee
5 members

264

327

19

27

106

743

3136

3058

297

265

1317

8,073

6 No. of JLGs

119

107

230

7 No. of JLGs members

595

535

20

1,150

8 No. of loanee JLGs


No. of JLGs loanee
9 members
Saving generated in
10 SHGs

119

107

230

595

535

20

1,150

12184049

11472241

1147950

339415

608085 2,57,51,740

11 Loan disbursed to SHGs

17787000

11320000

1781000

626500

874000 3,23,88,500

12 Loan disbursed to JLGs

6810000

3519000

185000

13 Total loan disbursed


Loan repayment from
14 SHGs
Loan repayment from
15 JLGs

24597000

14839000

1966000

626500

16467926

11178776

1788400

1333700 1693501 3,24,62,303

4221114

3319421

33440

16 Total loan repayment


Loan outstanding in
17 SHGs
Loan outstanding in
18 JLGs
TOTAL LOAN
19 OUTSTANDING

20689040

14498197

1821840

1333700 1693501 4,00,36,278

9378201

5979587

755250

444117 2046503 1,86,03,658

4226512

1676883

151560

12695867

7656470

906810

59

1,05,14,000

874000 4,29,02,500

75,73,975

60,54,955

444117 2046503 24658613

ANNEXURE V
Incentive Chart for Credit Officers.
MONTHLY
LOAN
DISBURSEMENT
BASE

>RS.5,00,000/-

>RS.4,00,000/-

>RS.3,00,000/-

>RS.2,00,000/-

>RS.1,50,000/-

REPAYMENT
RATE BASE
NAME OF
BLOCK
SADAR
ICHAK
CHOUPARAN
BARKAGAON
KODERMA
SADAR
ICHAK
CHOUPARAN
BARKAGAON
KODERMA
SADAR
ICHAK
CHOUPARAN
BARKAGAON
KODERMA
SADAR
ICHAK
CHOUPARAN
BARKAGAON
KODERMA
SADAR
ICHAK
CHOUPARAN
BARKAGAON
KODERMA

###

98%

96%

94%

92%

90%

88%

86%

84%

82%

80%

6%
7%
9%
10%
6%
5%
6%
8%
9%
5%
4%
5%
7.5%
8%
4%
3%
4%
7%
7%
3%

5%
6%
8%
9.5%
5%
4%
5%
7.5%
8.5%
4%
3%
4%
7%
7.5%
3%
2%
3%
6.5%
6.5%
2%

4%
5%
7.5%
9.5%
4%
3%
4%
7%
8.5%
3%
2%
3%
6.5%
7.5%
2%
1.5%
2%
6%
6.5%
1.5%

3%
4%
7%
9%
3%
2%
3%
6.5%
8%
2%
1.5%
2%
6%
7%
1.5%
1%
1.5%
5.5%
6%
1%

2%
3%
6.5%
9%

2%
6%
9%

5.5%
8.5%

5%
8.5%

4.5%
8%

4%
8%

3.5%
8%

1.5%
2%
6%
8%

1.5%
5.5%
8%

5%
7.5%

4.5%
7.5%

4%
7%

3.5%
7%

3%
7%

1%
1.5%
5.5%
7%

1%
5%
7%

4.5%
6.5%

4%
6.5%

3.5%
6%

3%
6%

2.5%
6%

0.5%
1%
5%
6%

0.5%
4.5%
6%

4%
5.5%

3.5%
5.5%

3%
5%

2.5%
5%

2%
5%

3%
6.5%
6.5%
2.5%

2%
6%
6%
1.5%

1.5%
5.5%
6%
1%

1%
5%
5.5%
0.5%

0.5%
4.5%
5.5%

0.25%
4%
5.5%

3.5%
5%

3%
5%

2.5%
4.5%

2%
4.5%

1.5%
4.5%

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