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TLIA907D Complete

and check import/


export documentation
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 1
Planning your learning ........................................................... 2
How you will be assessed ...................................................... 4

Section 1............................................................................................. 5
Identify documentation requirements for import/export of goods
............................................................................................... 5

Section 2........................................................................................... 25
Completing and checking documents .................................. 25

Additional resources ....................................................................... 36

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 38


TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  learning  guide  is  about  the  skills  and  knowledge  required  to  
complete  import  and  export  documentation  including  identifying  
procedures  required  for  documentation  for  import  and  export  of  
goods  and  completing  documentation  to  meet  regulatory  and  
workplace  requirements.  

The  Elements  of  Competency  from  the  unit  TLIA907D  Complete  and  
check  import/export  documentation  covered  in  this  Learner’s  Guide  
are  listed  below.  
Identify  procedures  for  documentation  of  import/export  of  
goods  
Complete  and  check  documentation  to  meet  regulatory  and  
workplace  requirements  

This  unit  of  competency  is  from  the  Transport  and  Logistics  Training  
Package  (TLI07).  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 1


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Planning your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
........you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  
time,  and/or  
........you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  who  can  
show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

Page 2 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


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TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Section 1: Identify procedures required for


documentation for import/export of
goods

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


..............identify  documents  required  for  goods?        
..............apply  content  requirements  for  each  section  of  the  
documentation?        
..............identify  requirements  for  permits  and  note  
implications?        
..............identify  and  follow  procedures  for  obtaining  
clearances  including  Export  Declaration  Numbers  (EDN)?   ...............    
..............identify  letters  of  credit  and  note  implications  of  
each?      

Section 2: Complete and check documentation


to meet regulatory and workplace
requirements

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


..............follow  workplace  procedures  for  authorisations?   ...............    
..............complete  data  entry  for  documents?        
..............check  entries  to  ensure  they  meet  customs  and  
workplace  requirements?        
..............check  letters  of  credit  to  ensure  they  meet  
commercial,  transport  and  overseas  requirements?     ...........  
..............check  dangerous  goods  documentation        
in  accordance  with  regulatory  requirements  and  
workplace  procedures?        
..............complete  workplace  records  and  file          
according  to  workplace  requirements?        

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 3


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TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

How you will be assessed

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to  demonstrate  that  you  can:  


........identify  documentation  requirements  related  to  
import/export  of  goods  
........complete  required  documents  accurately  and  in  
required  time  frame  
........obtain  required  authorisations  for  documents.  

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ADELG1007 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Section 1

Identify documentation
requirements for import/export of
goods

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 5


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1007
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


........Identify  documentation  requirements  including:  
 types  and  range  of  documents  
 workplace  requirements  
 regulatory  and  compliance  requirements  
 ensuring  the  accuracy  of  your  work  
........  

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ADELG1007 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

How do you identify documentation


requirements for import/export of goods?

What types of documents might be required?


........The  process  of  moving  goods  out  of  Australia  and  
into  other  countries  is  called  exportation  or  exporting.    
The  opposite  process  of  bringing  goods  into  Australia  is  
called  importation  or  importing.  
........Recently,  the  processes  involved  in  the  movement  
of  goods  internationally  as  governed  by  legislation  have  
been  reviewed.    International  agreements  and  taxation  
also  have  an  impact  in  this  field.  
........The  complexity  of  international  trade  is  increased  by  
the  fact  that  currencies  are  not  fixed  against  each  other  
(the  exchange  rate  varies  from  day  to  day  and  hour  to  
hour!).  
........Documentation  might  cover  the  following  areas:  
........regulatory  and  compliance  issues  (e.g.  permits  
required  under  quarantine  laws,  Export  Declaration  
Numbers  or  EDNs  from  the  Australian  Customs  Service))  
........financial  matters  including  taxation  and  banking  
........transport,  warehousing  and  logistics  documentation  
........dangerous  goods  documentation  where  applicable  
........internal  or  workplace  records  and  documents.  
........A  range  of  penalties  is  in  place  where  these  
documentation  requirements  are  not  met.    Also,  if  details  
are  incorrect,  this  can  cause  costly  delays  in  goods  being  
cleared  (allowed  to  be  unloaded  from  wharves/airports  or  
allowed  to  be  released  to  be  transported  to  their  final  
destination).    Therefore,  it  is  important  to  correctly  
identify  documentation  requirements  and  complete  these  
accurately.    A  final  check  is  always  recommended  to  make  
sure  that  all  details  are  correct  and  the  document  
completed  fully.  
........Because  this  area  is  very  complex  and  subject  o  a  
range  of  legislation,  many  companies  choose  to  outsource  
this  function  to  specialist  such  as  Customs  Brokers  or  
Freight  Forwarders.    Other  companies  do  undertake  this  
function  in-­‐house.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 7


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1007
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

........The  first  activity  focuses  on  ‘getting  it  right’  with  


respect  to  documentation  requirements.  

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ADELG1007 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Activity 1: Getting it right

Talk to your fellow team members, your trainer and supervisor.


Discuss what can go wrong with the process of completing
documents such as incomplete details, wrong details, forms lodged
late, etc. Find out what can happen where documents are not
completed accurately. Summarise what you have learnt in the
space below.
________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 9


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1007
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

What sorts of permits are required?

Goods  for  import  or  export  can  fall  into  three  categories:  
........prohibited  goods  
........restricted  or  prescribed  goods  requiring  a  permit  
........goods  that  do  not  require  specialised  permits.  

All  goods  for  export  are  now  subject  to  Customs  control.    This  change  
came  about  with  the  implementation  of  the  ‘Trade  Modernisation  
Legislation’.      

The  main  types  of  goods  that  are  prohibited  imports  and  exports  with  
relevant  authorities  are:  
........firearms  and  strategic  goods  that  can  be  used  for  
military  purposes  (explosives,  firearms,  military  goods)  
including  materials  that  can  be  processed  or  changed  into  
weapons  or  explosives  (chemicals,  biological  materials)  
(Department  of  Defence  and  Department  of  Foreign  
Affairs  and  Trade)  
........objectionable  goods  (goods  related  to  pornography,  
drug  misuse  or  addiction,  crime,  cruelty,  violence,  
revolting  or  abhorrent  phenomena,  descriptions  or  
depictions  related  to  a  person  under  16  in  an  offensive  
manner)  (Office  of  Film  and  Literature  Classification)  
........radioactive  minerals  and  radioactive  waste  
(Department  of  Industry,  Tourism  &  Resources)  
........counterfeit  credit  cards  (Australian  Federal  Police)  
........drugs  and  human  products  (narcotics,  psychotropic  
drugs  and  human  products)  (Department  of  Health  &  
Ageing).    

In  addition,  exports  to  countries  restricted  by  United  Nations  


embargoes  and  resolutions  may  be  restricted  and  permission  required  
from  the  Department  of  Foreign  Affairs  and  Trade.    Similarly  importing  
from  these  countries  may  be  prohibited  or  subject  to  conditions  or  
permits.  

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ADELG1007 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

The  following  goods  are  subject  to  permits  for  export  or  import  
(relevant  authority  indicated):  
........prescription  medicines  (Department  of  Health  &  
Ageing,  Health  Insurance  Commission)).  
........native  animals,  marine  life  and  plants  as  well  as  
endangered  animals  and  plants  (Environment  Australia)  
........meat,  dairy  products,  eggs,  fish,  grains,  vegetables  
and  fruit  (Australian  Quarantine  Inspection  Service,  Wheat  
Export  Authority)  
........moveable  cultural  artefacts  such  as  paintings,  
fossils,  ceremonial  items,  etc  (Department  of  
Communications,  Information  Technology  and  the  Arts)  
........ozone  depleting  substances  (Environment  Australia)  
........wine  and  spirits  (over  100  litres)  (Australian  Wine  
and  Brandy  Corporation)  
........hazardous  waste  such  as  battery  scrap  and  metal  
bearing  sludges  (Environment  Australia)  
........cash  to  the  value  of  A$10,000  (or  in  foreign  
currency)  (Australian  Transactions  Reports  and  Analysis  
Centre).  

The  web  sites  provided  in  this  Learner’s  Guide  under  “Additional  
Resources’  provide  information  on  required  permits,  legislation  and  
other  details  such  as  licensing.  

When  you  find  the  required  permits,  note  that  in  many  cases  additional  
information  is  required  to  be  appended  or  added  to  the  form  or  
document.  

Always  keep  a  record  of  the  documents  you  complete  in  case  there  is  
any  question  asked  later  about  the  permit.    File  these  documents  
according  to  workplace  filing  systems  or  record  keeping  processes.    
Make  sure  the  date  is  clearly  marked  and  a  record  attached  of  when  
you  sent  off  the  document.      

If  emailed,  you  can  keep  the  record  electronically.    Email  systems  allow  
you  to  have  the  receipt  of  the  document  acknowledged  and  sent  back  
to  you  electronically.    Many  systems  such  as  the  Australian  Customs  
Service  have  made  provision  for  electronic  lodgement  of  forms.  

The  next  activity  looks  at  prohibited  and  restricted  imports  and  
exports.  
........  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 11


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1007
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Activity 2: Prohibited and restricted goods

Discuss with your supervisor or trainer the types of goods that you
import or export that are subject to some form of permit. Make a
list of these types of goods, the relevant authority/the identify of the
permit required and where to get the particular permit.

Maintain this list for at least a month and as you come across other
goods, add these to the list. One example has been provided for
you as a guide.

Type of Name of Permit Source of


goods permit authority permit

Wine and Bulk consignee Australian Wine Web site for


spirits approval and Brandy AWBC
Corporation

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 12 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1007 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Activity 3: Going electronic

Ask someone in your workplace (or use help functions on your


program) to show you how to set your emails so that you get a
receipt back of sending electronic documents.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 13


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1007
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

What is the process for obtaining clearances


and EDNs?

The  Australian  Customs  Service  (ACS)  is  the  regulatory  body  for  
imports  and  exports.    Exports  require  an  Export  Declaration  Number  
or  EDN.    An  Export  Entry  Declaration  is  required.  

Changes  to  the  system  of  obtaining  an  EDN  include  the  use  of  an  
interactive  electronic  clearance  and  reporting  system.    This  system  is  
called  EXIT  (EXports  InTegration  System).  

The  electronic  system:  


........allows  for  electronic  lodgement  for  clearance  of  
exports  
........links  with  other  regulatory  bodies:  
 Australian  Bureau  of  Statistics  (to  collect  data  for  balance  of  
trade  and  balance  of  payments).  
 Australian  Tax  Office  (for  Business  Activity  Statements).  
 Permit  Issuing  Authorities  (e.g.  AQIS,  other  government  
departments).  

The  aim  of  ACS  is  to  provide  a  response  in  10  minutes  to  the  request  
for  clearance.    If  the  information  is  incorrect  or  incomplete,  an  error  
message  is  sent  back  detailing  the  error.    This  must  be  corrected  and  
relodged  before  clearance  is  provided.    The  EDN  is  quoted  on  the  
manifest  and  can  be  checked  back  to  ensure  that  the  EDN  was  
granted.  

An  EDN  contains  14  alphanumeric  characters  (letters  and  numbers)  and  


ends  with  a  ‘C’  if  clear  or  an  ‘E’  if  it  contains  errors.    Once  the  error  is  
corrected,  the  ‘E’  changes  to  a  ‘C’.  

The  EDN  applies  to  a  ‘consignment’  –  a  grouping  of  goods  from  one  
consignor  to  one  consignee  and  being  sent  from  one  port.    If  two  
consignees  were  receiving  the  goods,  two  entries  would  be  required.  

The  entry  can  be  resubmitted  where  exact  details  are  not  known.    This  
might  include  details  such  as  FOB  (Free  On  Board)  or  port  of  
destination.  

 
Page 14 © Australian National Training Authority 2003
ADELG1007 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

 
There  are  36  data  fields  (pieces  of  information  lodged  into  boxes  by  
typing  or  data  entry).    The  fields  and  an  explanation  of  each  are  given  
in  the  following  table.    The  activity  that  follows  practices  your  skills  at  
completing  these  entries.  

Data  field   Comment/explanation  

Senders  reference   Unique  to  that  consignment  

Type  of  exporter   Conforming  C,  Multiline  M  –  these  require  


registration  with  ACS  or  Non-­‐conforming  N    

Owner/agent   If  owner  lodging  O  or  if  agent  lodging  A  

Excisable/customable   If  subject  to  excise  or  duty  Y  or  if  not  N  

Excise  Establishment   Only  if  Y  above  and  relates  to  warehouse  or  
Code   excise  establishment  

ABN  or  Owner  Name   If  agent  lodging,  include  owner  contact  


phone  and  area  code  

Consignee  name   Person  taking  final  possession  of  goods  

Consignee  City   Of  person  taking  final  possession  of  goods  

Country  of   Using  country  codes  for  final  destination.    Can  


destination   use  UNKN  (unknown)  and  amend  when  
known  

Port  of  loading     Closest  port  with  valid  port  code  (sea  or  air)  
or  Post  Office  of  despatch  if  posted  

Port  of  discharge   Port  where  goods  from  ship/plane  are  being  
discharged  (may  not  be  final  destination)  

Invoice  Currency   Coded  for  currency  used  on  invoice  

Total  FOB   FOB  (Free  on  Board)  –  sum  of  value  of  all  
commodities  in  the  entry.    Currency  used  
depends  on  variety  of  factors.  

Mode  of  Export   Ship  S,  Air  A,  Post  P  

Proposed  Date  of   Date  of  departure  or  posting  


Export  

Lloyd’s  No.  or   For  ship  or  aircraft  stores  only  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 15


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1007
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Registration  No.  

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Data  field  (cont.)   Comment/explanation  (cont.)  

No.  of  containers   For  exports  by  sea  only  

No.  of  packages   For  air  and  post,  is  greater  than  0  ALWAYS  

AHECC   Australian  Harmonised  Export  Commodity  


Classification  code  according  to  AHECC  
manual  (see  note  below)  

State  of  Origin   Single  letter  code  used.    IF  multi-­‐state,  multi-­‐
codes  used  

Goods  description    

Net  quantity   Unit  and  number  required  (e.g.  5000  litres)  


for  each  AHECC  code  

Units  of  net  quantity   e.g.  litres  for  each  AHECC  code  

Gross  weight    

Units  of  gross   e.g.  tonnes  T  or  kilograms  KG  


weight    

Container  type   Full  container  load  or  FCL  F,  Less  container  
load  LCL  L,  Non-­‐containerised  N  

Thermal  coal   No  longer  required  

Assay   Chemical  test  as  required  

Container  no.   Not  mandatory  but  should  be  included  if  


permit  required  

Seal  No.   As  above  

Permit  No.   Prefixed  with  Permit  Agency  prefix  

Permit  encryption   Only  used  by  Department  of  Defence  

Export  Scheme  Code   If  subject  to  export  schemes:  Drawback  DRB,  


TRADEX  BLX,  Motor  Vehicle  Plan  MVP  

FOB  Value   Free  on  board  value  of  goods  –  includes  


production  costs  to  this  point  but  not  
insurance  and  transport  costs  

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NOTE:  The  AHECC  codes  are  determined  by  ‘classifiers’.    Rules  for  
classification  are  prescribed  in  Schedule  2  of  the  Customs  Tariff.    
Training  programs  are  available  for  learning  this  skill.    This  will  not  be  
covered  in  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

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Activity 4: Completing entries

Obtain examples of clearance numbers and practice reading the


details from these to familiarise yourself with these. Practice using
EXIT to complete entries. Use the information in this Learner’s
Guide and get assistance from your fellow team members, trainer
and supervisor as required.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What sort of financial documentation is involved


in the import/export of goods?
Trading  in  goods  generates  income  for  the  country  exporting  the  
goods.    Financial  institutions  are  involved  as  money  changes  hands.    
Because  of  currency  fluctuations  and  the  risk  of  bad  debtors  or  non-­‐
payment,  a  variety  of  mechanisms  are  used  to  ensure  that  the  seller  
gets  paid  (and  the  buyer  receives  the  goods).      

Both  the  importer  and  exporter  will  try  to  minimise  the  risk  involved  in  
the  transaction.    The  outcome  of  the  method  or  mechanism  of  
payment  and  who  takes  on  the  greater  risk  will  depend  on  the  relative  
bargaining  strength  of  the  two  parties.  

Financial  institutions  might  include:  


........banks  
........merchant  banks  
........confirming  houses.  

A  common  instrument  used  and  issued  by  financial  institutions  is  a  


‘letter  of  credit’.    This  is  also  known  as  a  ‘documentary  credit’.    The  
‘Uniform  Customs  and  Practice  for  Documentary  Credits’  or  UCP  sets  
out  a  standardised  set  of  conditions  for  issuing  of  documentary  
credits.    (See  also  ‘Finance  of  International  Trade’  under  Additional  
Resources).  

An  irrevocable  credit  is  a  definite  undertaking  of  the  issuing  bank  to  
pay  the  amount  shown  on  the  credit  (and  withdraw  these  funds  from  
the  account  of  the  organisation  that  requested  the  credit)  when  the  
conditions  of  issue  have  been  met  and  under  one  of  the  following  
arrangements:  
........payment  at  sight  (when  presented  by  the  consignor)  
........payment  on  the  maturity  date  indicated  on  the  
credit  
........payment  on  acceptance  by  the  issuing  bank.  

This  means  that  the  bank  is  accepting  the  risk  of  the  buyer  not  making  
payment  rather  than  the  seller  having  to  do  this.    A  bank  will  only  do  
this  if  it  believes  that  the  credit  risk  is  justified.    The  seller  then  has  to  
assess  the  risk  of  the  bank  not  honouring  the  credit.    An  importer  can  
use  a  letter  of  credit  to  match  payment  details  to  on-­‐selling  of  the  
goods  to  a  third  party  or  parties.  

Documentary  credits  are  usually  passed  from  the  bank  used  by  the  
buyer  to  the  bank  used  by  the  seller.    Hence,  one  responsibility  of  the  

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seller  is  to  provide  these  details  to  the  buyer  to  ensure  that  this  
happens  correctly.  

When  the  Australian  bank  receives  advice  that  the  documentary  credit  
has  been  issued,  the  exporter  is  informed.    Unless  the  Australian  bank  
adds  confirmation  (accepts  the  credit  risk  if  all  terms  and  conditions  
are  met),  the  role  of  the  bank  is  merely  to  pass  on  the  information  to  
the  exporter.  

The  exporter  or  seller  should  examine  the  terms  and  conditions  on  the  
documentary  credit  to  check  these  against  what  has  been  negotiated  
and  formalised  through  a  contract  and  that  the  terms  and  conditions  
can  be  met.  

If  details  are  incorrect,  not  according  to  agreements  reached  or  not  
possible  to  meet,  the  exporter  should  contact  the  buyer  via  the  
advising  bank  to  take  action  that  might  include  amending  the  
documentary  credit  or  delaying  shipment  of  goods  until  the  matter  is  
resolved.  

The  following  checklist  is  useful  to  apply  on  receipt  of  the  
documentary  credit.  

CHECKLIST  ON  RECEIPT  DOCUMENTARY  CREDIT  

Criterion      X  

Do  goods  described  match  contract  description  in  terms  of:      


 quantity,  price,  sizes,  etc  
 period  of  validity  or  time  limit  for  shipment  
 terms  of  delivery  
 origin  of  goods?  
What  are  the  terms  of  the  documentary  credit  -­‐  revocable,      
irrevocable,  confirmed  or  unconfirmed?  
What  risks  are  associated  with  the  overseas  bank  issuing      
the  documentary  credit?  
Are  the  identifiers  (names  and  contact  points)  of  all  parties      
(buyer  and  seller)  correct?  
Is  the  documentary  credit  subject  to  UCP?      
Do  the  timelines  allow  for  any  processes  for  verification  and      
validation  of  documents?  
Are  the  conditions  as  set  out  able  to  be  met?      
Have  any  risks  associated  with  requests  for  negotiable      

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documents  to  be  made  available  to  buyer,  been  assessed?  


Are  timelines  for  shipment  able  to  be  met?      
Are suitable transport arrangements able to be made as    
described in documents?
Can you be certain that goods can be delivered to    
designated place and from designated place?
Can the transport documents be made ready in time (if    
credit stipulates a transport document, the documents
have to be presented at the bank no later than 21 days
after the issue date of the transport document unless
credit stipulates another time limit)?
Do you understand the terms and conditions of the    
documentary credit? (IF NOT, SEEK ADVICE)
Do you understand how to send out the draft or bill of    
exchange? (IF NOT, SEEK ADVICE)
Is the description of the goods from the documentary    
credit accurate and legible and able to be copied word
for word onto the invoice?
Is the transport document described precisely?    
Are monetary amounts given in correct currency and    
accurately for value of goods?
For rail freight – can the duplicate of the railway bill be    
obtained?
Can electronic means be used for the transaction to    
speed up the process? If so, can a record be generated
and retained?
Is insurance covered to an adequate amount? Can    
terms of insurance be fulfilled?
Does the insurance describe and cover the identified    
risks?
Can a certificate of origin issued in the country of origin    
be issued in time?
Can legalisation be effected in time?    

This  list  is  quite  extensive  and  may  require  some  explanation  and  
supervised  practice  before  you  can  competently  and  confidently  
follow  up  letters  of  credit/documentary  credits.    The  ‘Export  
Handbook’  and  the  book  ‘Finance  of  International  Trade’  (see  
Additional  Resources)  are  very  useful  references  to  guide  learners.    
The  next  activity  looks  at  documentary  credits.  

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Activity 5: Documentary credits

Talk to your supervisor and trainer and ask for copies of letters of
credit. Work through these using the checklist provided and those
in the ‘Export Handbook’ and ‘Finance of International Credit’ to
practice applying the information provided in this Learner’s Guide.

Seek help if you do not understand any of the details provided.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Section 2

Completing and checking


documents

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


........Completing  and  checking  documents  including:  
 authorisations    
 dangerous  goods  documentation  
 workplace  procedures  

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How do you complete and check documentation


requirements for import/export of goods?

What is involved in authorisations?

The  importance  of  ‘getting  it  right’  has  been  discussed  in  the  previous  
section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.    It  is  recommended  that  you  follow  this  
process  when  completing  documents:  

  What documents need to be completed?


What does such a document look like
  when it is completed?

 
Where do I access the documents
  required? When are they required to be
finished? What information will I have
  to get from other people?

 
Who will authorise this document prior
  to sending off? Does the document meet
the required format, are the contents
  accurate/complete?

 
After a final check am I ready to have
  this authorised? After sending off, how
do I check it has been received at other
  end?

Authorisation  will  be  determined  by  workplace  procedures.    The  next  


activity  asks  you  to  investigate  required  authorisations.  

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Activity 6: Authorisation

Talk to your trainer about the authorisation required for


documentation. Respond to the following questions and use the
space below to record your answers.

Who authorises documents?

How are they transmitted?

Does your workplace have checklists to follow when checking


these documents?

What are the consequences of errors in documentation?


________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What documentary requirements are involved in


transporting dangerous goods?

Transport  by  ship  

The  transport  of  dangerous  goods  is  subject  to  individual  countries  
regulations  but  the  International  Maritime  Dangerous  Goods  Code  
usually  applies  for  transport  by  ship.    The  responsible  Australian  
authority  is  the  Australian  Maritime  Safety  Authority.    Enquiries  should  
be  made  with  this  authority  before  exporting  dangerous  goods  by  
ship.    The  comparable  authority  in  the  country  of  destination  should  
also  be  contacted.  

Companies  and  individuals  involved  in  the  packing,  storage,  handling,  


transportation  and  shipping  of  dangerous  goods  should  familiarise  
themselves  with  the  requirements  of  Issue  5  of  Marine  Orders  Part  41  
and  any  additions  (4  at  time  of  writing)  published.    These  regulations  
became  effective  on  1  January  2002.      

Under  these  regulations  it  is  no  longer  required  to  provide  AMSA  with  
an  intention  to  ship  dangerous  goods.    The  shipper,  however,  must  
provide  notice  to  the  Master  and/or  consolidator  as  required  and  the  
consolidator  must  also  provide  notice  to  the  Master.    Notification  to  
the  Master  should  be  sent  as  soon  as  practical,  and  prior  to  the  goods  
being  placed  on  board  the  ship.    The  shipper  must  also  provide  a  copy  
of  the  Multimodal  Dangerous  Goods  Form  to  AMSA  whenever  the  
Surveyor-­‐in-­‐Charge  requests  (available  via  AMSA  web  site).  

The  Master  of  a  vessel  loading  dangerous  goods  must  provide  to  the  
Surveyor-­‐in-­‐Charge  (through  the  nearest  AMSA  office),  as  soon  as  
practical  and  prior  to  the  goods  being  loaded  on  board,  a  special  list  or  
manifest  of  the  dangerous  goods  to  be  loaded.    One  type  of  
Dangerous  Goods  Manifest,  acceptable  for  this  purpose,  can  be  found  
in  IMO  Circular  FAL.2/Circ.51,  reproduced  in  the  supplement  to  the  
IMDG  Code.    

If  it  is  not  practical  or  possible  for  all  the  information  required  to  be  
sent  24  hours  before  the  goods  are  to  be  loaded,  the  Master  must  
provide  the  following  information  at  least  24  hours  prior  to  loading  the  
goods:    
........ship  Name  
........IMO  Number  
........port  of  loading  
........date  of  loading  and  departure  

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........classes  of  goods  being  loaded.    

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The  Master  must  also  notify  the  Surveyor-­‐in-­‐Charge  in  writing  of  any  
subsequent  changes  to  the  special  list  or  manifest  prior  to  loading.    

Correct  packing  and  documentation  for  consignments  of  dangerous  


goods  is  essential  so  that  personnel  engaged  in  the  transport  and  
handling  of  the  dangerous  goods  cargo  are  not  exposed  to  risk.    For  
this  reason  declarations  as  to  packaging  in  accordance  with  the  legal  
requirements,  and  container  packing,  should  be  entrusted  to  persons  
within  the  organisation  directly  responsible  for  the  supervision  of  such.    
The  personnel  engaged  in  the  packing  of  dangerous  goods  and  the  
preparation  of  documentation  should  be  competent  to  perform  these  
tasks.    The  management  of  such  companies  has  a  responsibility  to  
ensure  that  appropriate  training  has  been  provided  for  these  
personnel.    

The  AMSA  will  continue  random  and  targeted  inspections  of  vessels  
loading,  unloading  and  carrying  dangerous  goods  as  well  as  containers  
being  stuffed  or  unstuffed,  with  dangerous  goods,  at  terminals  and  
depots,  as  part  of  its  compliance  monitoring  program.    

Penalties  apply  to  the  false  declaration  of  dangerous  goods,  and  to  
incorrect  packing,  stowage  and  carriage  of  dangerous  goods.    

(Marine  Orders  Part  41  "Dangerous  Goods"  can  be  found  on  the  AMSA  
website  at  www.amsa.gov.au/sd/mo/MO_main/MO41_14of01.pdf)  

Transport  by  air  

For  air  transport  of  dangerous  goods,  Australia  is  a  signatory  to  the  
Chicago  Convention  of  the  International  Civil  Aviation  Organization  
(ICAO)  which  governs  international  aviation.    Annex  18  of  this  
convention  covers  the  broad  principles  relating  to  the  carriage  of  
dangerous  goods  by  air.    Many  airline  operators  use  the  International  
Air  Transport  Association  (IATA)  dangerous  goods  regulations  which  
adopt  the  ICAO  Technical  Instructions  and  achieve  an  even  higher  
standard  in  some  areas.  

In  Australia,  the  relevant  body  is  the  Australian  Dangerous  Goods  Air  
Transport  Council.    This  is  a  multi-­‐organisational  body  comprising  of  
representatives  of  the  major  and  regional  airlines  from  Australia  and  
New  Zealand,  dangerous  goods  training  organisations,  domestic  and  
international  freight  forwards,  Australia  Post,  packaging  
manufacturers  and  CASA.  

The  relevant  Australian  legislation  is  the  Civil  Aviation  Act  1988  and  
Civil  Aviation  Regulations.    Under  these  regulations,  cargo  shipped  by  
air  must  be  declared  as  not  dangerous  or  a  description  of  the  contents  
declared.  

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Where  goods  to  be  transported  are  declared  as  dangerous  goods,  the  
following  conditions  must  be  met:  
........goods  are  not  classified  under  ‘not  to  be  shipped  by  
air  under  any  circumstances’  
........goods  that  are  normally  not  allowed  to  be  shipped  
by  air  have  required  approval  from  country  of  origin  and  
country  of  receipt  and  the  country  where  aircraft  is  
registered,  if  applicable)  
........restrictions  on  type  of  aircraft  used  to  transport  
dangerous  goods,  are  followed  -­‐  cargo-­‐only  aircraft  if  
applicable  
........packaging  is  as  per  UN  performance-­‐tested  
specification  packagings  or  Limited  Quantities  “Y”  
packaging  instructions  (CAASA  can  advice,  if  in  doubt)  
........Shippers  Declaration  is  completed  for  dangerous  
goods  and  airline  has  completed  Notification  to  Captain  of  
goods  being  shipped  together  with  location  in  aircraft  and  
emergency  response  actions  in  the  event  of  an  emergency  
(MSDS  may  be  attached  to  Shippers  Declaration)  
........Package  is  labelled  with  UN  number,  proper  
shipping  name  of  the  contents,  hazard  labels  
........CASA  required  training  has  been  completed  by  
employees  involved  in  transportation  and  handling  of  the  
dangerous  goods.  

The  next  activity  looks  at  transporting  dangerous  goods  and  


associated  requirements.  

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Activity 7: Transport of dangerous goods

Use the references above and any completed forms available in


your workplace to practice completing the required forms for
transport of dangerous goods. Seek feedback from your trainer
and supervisor.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What workplace procedures apply to


documentation for import/export of cargo?

Throughout  this  Learner’s  Guide,  you  have  been  referred  to  workplace  
procedures  and  it  is  recommended  that  you  check  with  your  trainer  to  
see  what  has  already  been  provided  as  guidance  for  you.  

Where  you  are  unsure  of  what  you  are  supposed  to  do,  you  should:  

1. Check  any  existing  workplace  procedures.  

2. Check  with  your  trainer.  

3. Check  relevant  web  sites  of  government  and  regulatory  bodies  


such  as  ACS,  AQIS,  etc.  

4. Check  again  with  your  trainer.  

As  well  as  having  the  required  information,  you  need  to  understand  
the  information  and  how  to  apply  it  to  completing  documents  related  
to  import  and  export  of  goods.  

 
 

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© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 35


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1007
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Additional
resources
 

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ADELG1007 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Web  sites:  
• Australian  Maritime  Safety  Authority    
http://www.amsa.gov.au    
• Australian  Customs  Service      
http://www.customs.gov.au  
• Australian  Quarantine  Inspection  Service    
http://www.aqis.gov.au  
• Australian  Institute  of  Export  (NSW)  Ltd    
http://www.aiex.com.au  
• Customs  Brokers  and  Forwarders  Council  of  Australia  Inc  (CBFCA)  
http://www.cbfca.com.au    
• Civil  Aviation  Safety  Authority  Australia  (CASA)  
http://www.casa.gov.au/index.htm  
• ‘Is  your  freight  safe?’  (part  of  CASA  web  site)  
http://www.casa.gov.au/airsafe/freight/index.htm  
• Sample  declaration  (Shippers  declaration  of  dangerous  goods  
carried  by  air  –  part  of  CASA  web  site)    
http://www.casa.gov.au/airsafe/freight/ship_dec.htm  
• Department  of  Transport  and  Regional  Services  
http://www.dotars.gov.au/index.htm  
• EMO  Transport  (International  Freight  Forwarding  Company  
http://www.emotrans.com.au/dangerous.htm  

Paper-­‐based  resources:  
• Export  Handbook,  College  of  International  Business,  Australian  
Institute  of  Export  (NSW)  Ltd.,  Sunbird  Publications,  2000  
• Finance  of  International  Trade,  ninth  edition,  National  Australia  
Bank  Ltd,  2000  
• Achieving  Export  Compliance,  Participant  Textbook,  CBFCA  
Australia,  2002  
• Implementation  of  the  Trade  Modernisation  Legislation  Items  to  
Commence  in  1  July  2002,  Participant  Textbook,  CBFCA  Australia,  
2002  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 37


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1007
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

Page 38 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1007 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008
TLIA907D Complete and check import/export documentation

Activity 1: Getting it right

Hopefully, the stories you hear will be about other workplaces and
mistakes made by others. Delays can be very costly particularly as
storage costs at the wharves and airports are very high. Being
accurate and checking documentation is critical.

Activity 2: Prohibited and restricted goods

The range of restricted goods that you company handles will vary.
Check your list regularly with your trainer and supervisor.

Activity 3: Going electronic

It is important to ensure that you have records of forms that you


lodge and emails that you send. This is one way of keeping
records that you require.

Activity 5: Documentary credits

The two references and this Learner’s Guide are useful resources
to support your learning. Also talk to others in your workplace
including your trainer and supervisor.

Activity 6: Authorisation

Procedures related to authorisations will vary across workplaces. If


you need to be convinced of the need for a senior person in the
organisation to authorise documents, look at the penalties for
incorrect entries.

Activity 7: Transport of dangerous goods

Seek feedback from your trainer and supervisor on your practice


efforts. You should also look at the Learner’s Guide for TDT D27
97B Prepare for transport of packaged dangerous goods or seek
assistance form your trainer if you require further help with
identifying dangerous goods.
 

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Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L March 2008 ADELG1007