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1 General Instructions

1.1 The Master and all other officers who are assigned immediate
responsibility for embarking and disembarking passengers,
discharging or securing cargo, closing hull openings, or for
passenger management on board this vessel, shall have completed
approved training in passenger safety, cargo safety and hull
integrity as required under section A-V/2, paragraph 4 of the
STCW Code.
1.2 The Master and all other officers who are responsible for the safety
of passengers in emergency situations on board this vessel shall
have completed approved training in crisis management and human
behaviour as specified in section A-V/2, paragraph 5 of the STCW
Code.
1.3 Documentary evidence of such training shall be available on board
the vessel and produced for inspection as required.

Organization on Passenger Vessels


2.1 Shipboard Organisation Chart
MASTER

SHIP'S
MANAGEMENT

DEPARTMENT

FUNCTIONS

MASTER
CHIEF OFFICERS
CHIEF ENGINEERS
HOTEL MANAGER

DECK
DEPARTMENT

CHIEF OFFICERS
SAFETY &
SECURITY
DECK REPAIR
MAINTENANCE
RADIO STATION

MASTER
&
STAFF
MASTER

OFFICER ON DUTY
DECK OPERATION
&NAVIGATION

PART FUNCTIONS
SECURITY PERSONNEL
RADIO OPERATOR

BOATSWAIN

ABLE SEAMEN

DOCTOR & NURSE


HOSPITAL

2ND ENGINEER
ENGINE REPAIR
MAINTENANCE

ENGINE
DEPARTMENT

CHIEF
ENGINEERS

HOTEL

ENGINEER ON DUTY
ENGINE OPERATION
CHIEF ELECTRICIAN
EL. OPERATION

ELECTRICIAN

FOOD & BEVERAGE

EXECUTIVE CHEF

SENIOR WAITER

EXEC. HOUSEKEEPER

STOREKEEPTER

HOTEL
DEPARTMENT

MANAGEMENT

DIRECTOR
FOOD & BEVERAGE
ACCOMMODATION

WAITERS

PORT CLEARANCE

VIP SERVICE MGR

HOTEL MANAGER
F&B MANAGER
CASINO MANAGER

ASST HOTEL
MANAGERS

OFFICERS
CASINO MANAGER
CASINO & ENTERT.

2.2 Safety Organisation


2.2.1

Purpose

MOTORMEN
FITTERS
REPAIR & MAINTENANCE

ENTERTAINMENT
MANAGER
ENTERTAINMENT STAFF

HR MANAGER

2.2.1.1 The purpose of the organization is to ensure that all


operations on the ship are always conducted in a safe and
environmentally friendly way.
2.2.2

Responsibility

2.2.2.1 The ship's Master has the overall responsibility for


ensuring that the safety system onboard is initiated and
upheld. The Master also holds the authority to make
decisions related to the implementation of company safety
and environmental protection policies as well as statutory
regulations.
2.2.2.2 The ship's group leaders are responsible for ensuring that
the safety organization on board follows the pre-arranged
plan. All crewmembers have their own duty within the
ship's safety organization and hence the responsibility of
obtaining knowledge about the safety organization.
2.2.2.3 Discovery of any neglect in safety, regarding equipment,
escape ways etc., should be immediately notified to the
nearest leader.
2.2.2.4 Group leaders hold the additional responsibility that all
safety equipment within their own work zone remains at
its designated area and that equipment is easily available.

2.2.2.5 Group leaders must ensure that escape ways always remain
free from any blockage.
2.3 As detailed in the Ship's organization chart, administration on
board is divided into three departments:
2.3.1

Deck Department

2.3.2

Engine Department

2.3.3

Hotel & Casino Department

2.4 For the purpose of maintaining passenger safety, divisions of


emergency squads, parties and groups is as follows:
A. Bridge and Communication squad
B. Engine Room and Communication squad
C. Hotel and Communication squad
D. Lifeboat and liferaft preparation squad
E. Emergency squad #1
F. Emergency squad #2
G. Damage Control and Boundary Cooling party
H. Medical and First Aid party
I. Containment group
J. Man Overboard response team
K. Work party
L. Zone Personnel
M. Assembly station personnel

N. Stairway guides
O. Passenger assistance party
P. Assessment party
2.5 Squad Mustering Locations
Mustering points for the squads/groups mentioned above are:
A. Bridge
B. Engine Control Room
C. Reception (Level 6)
D. Level 7, at funnel area (P & S)
E. Level 6, starboard fire locker #1
F. Level 3 (Garage), fire locker #4
G. Emergency Room (remote operating centre for watertight doors,
level 4)
H. Hospital
I. As per requirement on Muster List
J. As announced
K. Assembly station D (Uppermost level)
L. As per zone
M. As per assembly station
N. As per staircase
O. In lobby, by Reception area
P. Proceed to location of fire

Note: A detailed description of each emergency squad/group, with ranks


and duties of staff assigned, is available in the Appendix to this manual,
along with a sample copy of the Muster List. A listing of the various squads,
parties and groups (as described above) is also included.

Ship Board Safety Committee and Shipboard Management


Meeting
3.1 Purpose
3.1.1

The purpose of shipboard safety is to promote safe


working procedures on board and promote overall well
being of the crew. In order to achieve these purposes, a
shipboard Safety Committee is formed. The aims and
objectives of this committee will be to provide a forum for
ship crew to express their opinion about the safety
environment as well as the safety measures implemented
onboard. The committee, under leadership of the Master,
shall evaluate the opinions collected and then use same for
improving the safety environment on board.

3.2 The Shipboard Safety Committee (SSC)

3.2.1

Organization of the Shipboard Safety Committee (SSC)


shall consist of crewmembers appointed by Shipmaster as
follows:

3.2.1.1

Master

Chairman

3.2.1.2

Ship Doctor

Deputy Chairman

3.2.1.3

1 Crew from Deck Dept.

Member

3.2.1.4

1 Crew from Engine Dept.

Member

3.2.1.5

1 Crew from Casino Dept.

Member

3.2.1.6

1 Crew from F&B Dept.

Member

3.2.1.7

1 Crew from Housekeeping

Member

3.3 In addition to the above statutory members, additional personnel


may be co-opted to the SSC.
3.4 The Chairman shall call a meeting at least once per month for
discussing various safety matters on board. He may call more
meetings if necessary whenever accidents or near accidents have
occurred on board. During the meeting, only safety or safety
related issues should be discussed. The meeting should not become
a forum for discussing crew benefit/welfare or personal complaint.
3.5 Responsibility
3.5.1

The SSC acts as a bridge of communication between the


Shipmaster and crew for safety matters onboard. After
each Committee meeting, the chairman shall arrange for

minutes of the meeting to be prepared at the earliest. The


minute/report shall be submitted to the Master and a copy
sent to the company. Each member of the committee shall
also be given a copy of the minutes. Each member shall
have the copy displayed on the notice board of his
department.
3.6 Shipboard Management Meeting (SMM)
3.6.1

Ship management meeting on board is to be chaired twice


a month by the Master, or as required. The Staff Master,
Chief Engineer, both Chief Officers, Hotel Manager,
Casino Manager, and when needed other section heads
from Hotel Department will attend. An expanded meeting,
including junior officers and senior ratings should be
arranged once a month. This meeting is the forum which is
used to discuss matters concerning the Company's Safety
Management System and day to day matters. Minutes of
this meeting will be kept on file.

4 Safe Manning

4.1

The purpose of safe manning is to ensure that the ship is manned in


accordance with the flag state requirement for safe manning.

4.2

Responsibility
4.2.1

The Master is responsible for ensuring that the ship is


safely and competently manned in accordance with
Minimum Safety Manning certificate issued by the flag
state. Any discrepancies are to be reported to Fleet
Personnel Department at the earliest.

4.3 Safe manning requirements


4.3.1

While Safe Manning on board passenger vessels is to be


followed strictly in accordance with the Safe Manning
Certificate, the following are minimum requirements,
unless otherwise stated:

Rank

Number

Master

Chief Officer

Deck Officer

Radio Officer*

Chief Engineer

2nd Engineer

Engineer Officer

Able Seaman

Ordinary Seaman
Oiler

2
3

__________________________________

Total

15

*The requirement for a Radio Officer can be dispensed with if the


vessel is equipped with a GMDSS station, and at least two
watchkeeping officers have GMDSS operators licences. However, this
vessel carries a Radio Officer at the present time.

The above list is exclusive of Hotel Management and Casino staff.

5 Employment Routines for Hotel Staff


5.1 Purpose
5.1.1

The purpose of the employment routine is to ensure that


crewmembers have the qualifications and competence that
is required for each individual position and that he/she has
a valid medical certificate and the ship is sufficiently
manned.

5.2 Responsibility
5.2.1

The Fleet Personnel Dept., are responsible for ensuring


that the ship is sufficiently manned by marine crew and
that the crewmembers are qualified, competent and
medically fit. The responsibility for hotel, security, casino
and support staff lies with the Owners,

5.2.2

The Chief Officer is responsible for crewmember safety


instructions and familiarization training in accordance with
Company guidelines.

5.2.3

The Port Clearance Officers are responsible for checking


and collecting all marine, casino and hotel crewmembers
valid certificates and crew documents, as well as passenger
documents.

6 Registration & Initial Orientation Procedure for Hotel Staff


6.1 After arrival on board, all crewmembers are required to sign on
with Port Clearance department, on the ship articles (Muster roll).
The Port Clearance Officer is responsible for the sign on/off of all
crewmembers. He is also responsible to collect the valid
certificates and personal documents from crew.
After signing on, initial orientation for new crewmembers is given
by the heads of their respective department (Managers). They will
also be provided key/s and given general information on domestic
arrangements by the Housekeeping department.
6.2 After

registration,

respective

Department

Heads

or

their

representatives will come to meet the new crew for job orientation.
In addition the Department Head or his/her representative will see
the new crew reading through familiarization documents given by
the Chief Officer. In particular the new crew must mark down
his/her emergency stations on the familiarization card which will
then be posted on the door of his/her cabin. This initial orientation
must be completed before sailing.

7 Safety Orientation for New Employees


7.1 Purpose

7.1.1

The purpose for safety orientation of newly employed


crewmembers is to ensure that they obtain knowledge of
the ship's safety organization, their own safety assignment,
learn to be familiar with ship and its emergency exits as
well as policies regarding safety, environment, alcohol and
drugs.

7.2 Responsibility
7.2.1

The Master is responsible for ensuring that all newly


employed crewmembers receive proper orientation from
the ship's officers assigned this task.

8 Procedures and checks prior boarding of Passengers


8.1 Ashore
8.1.1

The company, or agents authorized by the company, shall


ensure that the number of passengers booked for travel on
board never exceeds the vessels approved passenger
carrying capacity as mentioned in the Passenger Ship
Safety Certificate. Due account must be made for any extra
crew or repair/temporary staff that have been assigned to
travel on board.

8.1.2

Prior accepting passengers for travel on board, the


company, or agents authorized by the company, shall
ensure

that

all

passengers

possess

the

required

documentation for travel on board. This will include


Passports,

certificates

of

health,

and

any

other

documentation as may be required by the local


administration.
8.1.3

Complete information on passengers shall be maintained


by the Port Clearance officers throughout the voyage. This
information shall include, but not be limited to the
following:

8.1.4

Name

8.1.5

Age

8.1.6

Sex

8.1.7

Nationality

8.1.8

Details of Travel Document

8.1.9

Medical condition

8.1.10 Details of Personal Effects


8.2 On Board
8.2.1

All passenger cabins and spaces are to be inspected and


prepared for boarding.

8.2.2

Highest regard shall be paid to passenger safety, health and


comfort.

8.2.3

Any damaged or inoperative equipment / fittings are to be


repaired prior boarding of passengers.

8.2.4

On receipt of the passenger manifest, ships staff shall


ensure that adequate accommodation is available for listed
passengers as per the class of booked travel.

8.2.5

A plan is to be made for allocation of cabins/berths to each


booked passenger.

8.2.6

Company is to be informed immediately about any over


booking beyond the certified capacity.

9 Boarding procedure of Passengers


9.1 After completing port formalities i.e. (a) port entry (b) immigration
(c) health and (d) customs, following routine procedure shall be
followed:
9.1.1

Properly rigged gangway, life buoy (if applicable) with a


heaving line and self-ignition light shall be in place.
Gangway shall clean at all times and be well lit at night.

9.1.2

If Master encounters unruly behaviour among Passengers


while boarding or there could be a threat of violence and
damage to ship's property, he may suspend boarding of
Passengers and ask for police protection. Any prospective
passenger who by reason of inebriation or otherwise is in
such state which might cause annoyance or injury to other
Passengers, may be refused entry on board.

9.1.3

The officer in charge of reception of passengers, and


departmental staff under his charge shall be stationed at
most convenient place for assisting the passengers to their
respective cabins/berths. Doctor and para-medical staff
will also be readily available during boarding of
passengers and will render any assistance if required.

9.1.4

Catering crew shall be dressed as per company standard.


They will stand mustered near the accommodation ladder
and in turn guide/assist the passengers as necessary.

9.1.5

As far as practicable, Passengers should not be delayed at


the gangway for collection of documents such as
passports, health cards and tickets. These are be collected
by the company's shore staff ashore (if possible) before
permitting passengers to proceed to the vessel's gangway
for embarkation.

9.1.6

Should Passenger boarding (or disembarkation) be by boat


tenders, great care must be taken about their personal
safety and that of their baggage. A crew member must be
positioned at the gangway bottom platform to assist each
passenger.

10 Watch Keeping and Security in Port


10.1

Owners shore staff shall ensure that every passenger completes


immigration, health and customs formalities before boarding the
vessel.

10.2

Housekeeping and Hotel department staff shall be in attendance


in the Reception area at Level 6, to answer any queries from
passengers, and also for receiving valuables, which passengers
may like to keep in ship's custody.

10.3

The Chief officers and officers deputed by the Master are to take
regular rounds and also ensure that the baggage of passengers is
suitably stowed in their cabins and under their respective bunks
and spaces provided for the same.

10.4

Ship's staff must ensure that passageways are kept clear and
embarkation progresses smoothly and expeditiously.

10.5

Housekeeping staff and marine crew patrols shall be deputed to


make regular rounds so that all spaces are kept well swept, dry
and in hygienic conditions during the boarding process.

10.6

Adequate awning or cover shall be spread over the deck near


embarkation gangway and other deck spaces to provide shelter
from the sun, if necessary.

10.7

Only authorised porters are to be permitted to handle passenger


baggage.

10.8

Other than hand carry-on luggage, all heavy luggage must have
stickers on baggage for identification with (i) name of the person
(ii) ticket number and (iii) destination.

10.9

Oversized baggage must be put in the luggage locker/baggage


holds or other spaces specially designated on the vessel.

10.10 Explosives, flammable substances, firearms are not permitted as


baggage.
10.11 For security reasons, once a passenger boards the vessel after
passing customs and immigration, he shall not be allowed to
leave the vessel till the vessel reaches the port of destination.
10.12 The gangway for embarkation /disembarkation shall be restricted
and continuously manned by security staff and company's staff.
10.13 When vessel is alongside a wharf, embarkation/disembarkation
shall be permitted only from one side (shore side).
10.14 Any contracted labour shall be issued with proper identification
cards.
10.15 Fire patrol shall be maintained during the boarding process in all
sections of the vessel. A positive report is to be made by the
officer in charge of each area to the Chief Officer and
consolidated results are to be logged.

10.16 Officer in-charge of deck watch is to make a complete round of


the vessel particularly in passenger spaces and his findings shall
be logged at the end of each watch

11 Crowd Control
11.1

Crowd management and control form a vital safety aspect on


passenger vessels and ships staff must be adequately trained to
assist passengers whenever and wherever necessary, especially
in emergency situations.

11.2

A crowd control crisis is most likely to be encountered during


the embarkation and disembarkation of Passengers and during
emergency situations. It is therefore essential that responsible
ships staff be designated and trained to advise and direct
passengers during such eventualities. Please refer to the lans in
the Appendix of this manual, for Crowd Control management
procedures.

11.3

Master shall ensure that staff designated for crowd control and
management are in accordance with procedures clearly defined
in muster lists.

11.4

Regular training of staff in charge of crowd control must


include, but not necessarily be limited to:

11.4.1

Awareness of Life Saving Appliances and Control Plans,


including:

11.4.1.1 Knowledge of muster lists and emergency instructions,

11.4.1.2 Knowledge of the emergency exits, and

11.4.1.3 Restrictions on the use of elevators;


11.4.2

The ability to assist passengers en route to muster and


embarkation stations, including

11.4.2.1 the ability to give clear reassuring orders,


11.4.2.2 the control of passengers in corridors, staircases and
passageways,
11.4.2.3 maintaining escape routes clear of obstructions,
11.4.2.4 methods available for evacuation of disabled persons and
persons needing special assistance, and
11.4.2.5 search of accommodation spaces
11.4.3

Mustering procedures, including:

11.4.3.1 the importance of keeping order,


11.4.3.2 the ability to use procedures for reducing and avoiding
panic,
11.4.3.3 the ability to use, where appropriate, passenger lists for
evacuation counts, and
11.4.3.4 the ability to ensure that the passengers are suitably
clothed and have donned their life jackets correctly.
11.4.4

Ability to communicate with passengers during an


emergency, taking into account:

11.4.4.1 the language or languages appropriate to the principle


nationalities of passengers carried on the particular route,

11.4.4.2 the likelihood that an ability to use an elementary English


vocabulary for basic instructions can provide a means of
communicating with a passenger in need of assistance
whether or not the passenger and crew member share a
common language,
11.4.4.3 the possible need to communicate during an emergency by
some other means such by demonstration, or hand signals,
or calling attention to the location of instructions, muster
stations, life saving devices or evacuation routes, when
oral communication is impractical,
11.4.4.4 the extent to which complete safety instructions have been
provided to passengers in their native language , and
11.4.4.5 the languages in which emergency announcements may be
broadcast during an emergency or drill to convey critical
guidance to passengers and to facilitate crew members in
assisting passengers. On this vessel, the current trading
pattern has necessitated the use of English and Chinese

Information on Passengers
12.1

All passengers booked to travel on board must be counted prior


to vessels departure from port.

12.2

The Passenger Manifest, handed to the vessel by Owners


contracted Travel Agents must be checked by ship's staff to
ensure that the information contained therein is correct. Any
errors must be brought to the notice of Company representative
and corrected prior departure.

12.3

The names and gender of all persons on board, distinguishing


between adults, children and infants, shall be recorded for
search and rescue purposes. In no case must the vessel carry
more Passengers than the certified Passenger carrying capacity
as mentioned in the Passenger Ship safety certificate.

12.4

Passengers documentation is to be held in safe custody till


such time that the passenger disembarks at the port of
destination.

13 Safety Familiarisation of Passengers and Practice Musters


13.1

Immediately after Passengers board the vessel, Passenger


safety briefings are to be carried out and a log entry to that
effect is to be made in the deck log. The welcoming and safety
feature video is to be screened at all public points.

13.2

Passenger Safety briefing should include at least the following:


13.2.1

Muster stations of the Passengers

13.2.2

Muster station signals

13.2.3

Essential actions to be taken by Passengers in an


Emergency

13.2.4
13.3

Life Jacket Donning Instructions.

The briefings may be in the form of Announcements on the


Ship's Public address system in one or more languages
commonly understood by the passengers. However, the
briefings are to be face-to-face, wherever possible.

13.4

On a voyage where passengers are scheduled to be on board for


more than 24 hours, muster of the passengers shall be arranged
within 24 hours of embarkation on board. However, during the
vessels current trading pattern between Haikou and Ha Long
Bay, which involves less than 24 hours at sea, the muster is to
be carried out as soon as possible after passenger embarkation.

13.5

Passengers are to be instructed in the use of the lifejackets and


action to be taken in emergencies.

14 Passenger Muster Stations


14.1

Passenger muster spaces are designated A to C, with an


additional area D for crew only. These spaces all have easy
access to the embarkation stations, and are clearly marked in
the vessels evacuation plan, posted in common areas.

14.2

The muster stations are designed and located to provide ample


room for marshalling and instructing passengers.

14.3

Escape routes are provided for every passenger space and are
arranged so as to provide the most direct possible route to the
passenger muster station. Please refer to the vessels
evacuation plan for details.

14.4

The escape route is indicated and marked with luminous


symbols, in accordance with IMO requirements.

14.5

The routes to muster stations are not to be obstructed by


furniture or other obstructions such as beddings, luggage,
boxes of goods or cleaning carts.

15 Passenger Guides
15.1

The vessel's emergency muster list shall assign duties to


responsible crew members to act as passenger guides.
These personnel assigned as passenger guides are trained
in crowd control procedures.

15.2

The duties of Passenger guides shall include:

15.2.1

Warning the Passengers of any emergency situation on


board

15.2.2

Observing that they are suitably clad and have donned


their lifejackets correctly during an emergency

15.2.3

Assembling passengers at muster stations

15.2.4

Keeping order in the Passageways and on the stairways


and generally controlling the movements of passengers.

15.2.5

Ensuring that passengers do not obstruct ship's crew or


come in their way when the crew is engaged in carrying
out essential duties during emergencies.

15.2.6

Ensuring that supplies and blankets are taken to the


Survival Craft.

16

Fire Patrol

16.1

An efficient Patrol system shall be maintained on the ship


from dusk to dawn whenever Passengers are on Board so
that an outbreak of fire can be promptly detected.

16.2

Crewmembers assigned to fire patrol duties are to be


familiar with the arrangements of the ship as well as the
location and operation of any equipment that they may be
called to operate.

16.3

The Master and/or Safety officer are to ensure that the


vessels approved route plan for Fire Patrol is followed.

16.4

The route plan covers all passenger spaces, common


spaces, galleys, pantries and other areas where there is a
potential risk of fire.

16.5

Each of these areas would be covered once an hour and a


report made to the officer of the watch. Members of fire
patrol are provided with two-way UHF walkie-talkies so
that communications can be maintained with the bridge at
all times.

17

Adverse Weather Precautions


17.1

The Master shall, so far as safety permits, plan the ships


route to avoid adverse weather conditions.

17.2

Where required, weather updates will be obtained through


local Agents. The data will be translated by Staff Master,
for use by the Bridge team.

17.3

Where heavy weather is unavoidable, Passengers must be


forewarned before the onset of such conditions.

17.4

Ship's officers are to take rounds to ensure that no


passengers are on deck or at vulnerable places.

17.5

Passenger spaces must be thoroughly inspected to ensure


all pieces of loose baggage are secured and that side
scuttles/portholes on decks close to waterline are tightly
closed.

17.6

Hospitality staff must visit passengers spaces during


adverse weather conditions and anti sickness/vomiting
bags should be given to the passengers as required.

17.7

In case of vomiting by passengers the area is to be cleaned


immediately with antiseptic and air freshener is to be
sprayed in surrounding areas. The passenger concerned is
to be directed to the Sips Doctor.

18

Passenger Health and Welfare


18.1

The Master is responsible for the health and welfare of


passengers during their stay on board the vessel.

18.2

All cases of ill health or health related discomfort felt by


passengers are to be brought to the notice of the Ships
Doctor.

18.3

Any major medical condition or injury suffered by a


passenger must be reported to the Master and in turn the
Company.

18.4

Any suspected cases of infectious disease are to be


isolated from other passengers and medical advise sought
from appropriate authority.

18.5

Inebriated passengers, unless violent, are to be handled


with tact and discretion.

19

Safety Drills for Ships staff


19.1

Divisions of Responsibilities will be assigned by the Master.

19.2

The purpose of responsibility assignment is to ensure that


safety drills are executed in a responsible and uniform way.

19.2.1 The responsibility for conduct of safety drills shall rest


with the Chief Officers.
The responsibility includes the following items
19.2.2 Formulating a program for drills
19.2.3 Executing the Drill
19.2.4 Reporting Maintenance Status
19.2.5 Development of additional drill requirements
19.3

The officers responsible for the training drills will post the
program for safety exercise on the bulletin board. One copy
of the report is to be submitted to the Master.

19.4

During the drill all equipment is to be checked and if any


deficiencies are noted, they are to be dealt with as soon as
possible.

19.5

Periodical maintenance of the safety equipment is to be


carried out as per companys planned maintenance system
and SOLAS requirements.

20

Training Drills Routines


20.1

Purpose
The purpose of training is to ensure that all employed
personnel onboard obtain suitable knowledge about their
duties in the organization and that they perform their
duties under the required circumstances.

20.2

The Master has overall responsibility to ensure that all


training drills are held in accordance with company and
SOLAS requirements.

20.3

Lifeboat and Liferaft drills are to be held at least once a


week.

20.4

Fire drills are to be held at least once a week.

20.5

Evacuation drills are to be held at least once a week.

20.6

First Aid drills are to be held twice a month.

20.7

Damage control drills.

20.7.1

At least once a year a mock damage control exercise


should be planned between vessel and office in order to
co-ordinate communications and organization between the
two.

20.7.2

Other Emergency drills and exercises listed in the


Company Safety Manual and Quarterly Report shall be
carried out on board as relevant.

21

Evaluation of Drills
21.1

Purpose

21.2

The purpose of evaluating safety drills and safety


training is to ensure that crewmembers attain the
required level of competence as required by the trade.

21.2

Responsibility

21.2.1

The Master has the overall responsibility to evaluate the


competency and professional level of ships staff and
report same to company.

21.2.1.1 Emergency Drill Evaluation Form is to be used, to


maintain a record of drill evaluations.

22

Waste Handling
22.1

Garbage

22.1.1

Purpose

22.1.2

The purpose of waste handling is to ensure that all


shipboard waste is handled in an environmentally safe way
for persons, ship and environment.

22.2

Responsibility

22.2.1

The Chief Officers and Second Engineer are responsible


for waste handling of dry and wet garbage, which is going
ashore. Signed receipts must be obtained from the receiver.

22.2.2

The F&B Manager is responsible that the raw meat waste,


and packing from the same is handled according to the
instructions from the Chief Officer/ Second Engineer.

22.2.3

The Doctor is responsible for ensuring that remaining


medicines, expired medicines, syringes etc. are handled
according to instructions given by the Chief Officer.

22.3

General Handling Procedure

22.3.1

Garbage is handled according to the relevant regulations


under MARPOL. The garbage management plan is in
Chief Officers possession, and stickers are posted at
relevant areas on board.

22.3.2

Waste for landing ashore is to be stored within the


dedicated container at the main wagon deck, which is
specially cooled to prevent decay of stored garbage.

22.3.3

General garbage including paper products are collected in


garbage bags which are placed strategically onboard. The
filled garbage bags are then collected and brought to the
containers for transportation ashore.

22.3.4

Food waste garbage is also bagged and placed in the


container for landing ashore.

22.3.5

Problem garbage of any type is collected and sorted out


into different boxes and handed ashore together with other
dry/wet garbage, where the receiver takes over the
responsibility.

22.3.6

Records of garbage handling are filed in the Hotel


Manager's office.

22.3.7

Before sending garbage to the container, all waste must be


properly packed and secured inside garbage bags. For wet
garbage, two layers of garbage bags are needed.

22.4

Sorting

22.4.1

The garbage is separated into three categories: Wet


garbage for food wastes. Dry garbage for paper, cans, used
rugs, old cloth, etc. Paper cartons & boxes .

22.4.2

Hotel, Casino & Discotheque outlets; Galley, Restaurant


Pantry, Bakery, Mess room and all Bar outlets are
allocated dedicated garbage bins. The same applies to
Deck and Engine room garbage.

22.4.3

All garbage from these outlets will be sent to the garbage


container on a daily routine basis to avoid it being left over
night at the outlets. All garbage must be packed properly
inside garbage bags before transporting to the garbage
room. The responsibility for garbage stowage lies with the
Hotel department.

22.5

Disposal Procedure

22.5.1

In Haikou all garbage will be sent ashore at every call, via


transportation van from private shore contractor.

22.5.2

Before the disposal time, duty crew are to bundle all paper
waste into packages for easy handling as well as to check
all other garbage is sealed properly.

22.5.3

Transportation from garbage container aboard vessel to


garbage trucks on wharf will be via stern ramp, if the
wharf configuration permits. If not, bags and packages will
be landed via side door.

22.5.4

Acknowledgement of receipt paper from the contractor


will be issued and kept onboard by hotel manager. Entry in
the Garbage Management Manual is also to be made for
reference purpose.

23

CREW MEMBERS SAFETY INFORMATION


For those crewmembers that have never worked on board a passenger
ship, and for those crewmembers that have never worked at sea, this
information will become one of the important working tools and
requirements for you to follow to successfully perform the duties and
responsibilities you have been assigned aboard the Ming Fai Princess.

A passenger ship is in many ways a floating hotel with the additional


concerns of safety at sea. As in any mode of transportation, tragic
events may occur and the employees or crewmembers must be
knowledgeable and competent in assisting the passengers in their
safety and life saving concerns.
There is no crewmember exempt from these responsibilities, nor is
there any crewmember who should not be versed in all the safety rules
and regulations drills and equipment necessary for safety on board.

On a passenger ship every crewmember from the Captain to the


Cooks to the Entertainers are a part of the safety plan and all are
assigned a specific set of duties and responsibilities to comply with.

Along with your assigned passenger services and duties comes your
safety role.
This informational piece is in no way a final solution or manual for
your safety role, nor does it assign you a specific safety role. This
piece is merely a working tool for you to understand the basics of
safety onboard. The Captain and/or the ship's Safety Officer will
assign your emergency stations and specific duties related to the
safety procedures on board.
Safety on board a passenger ship is different in presentation and
implementation than a cargo vessel, due to the fact that crew and
cargo are not the focus of the safety concern but rather human lives,
the passengers and the crew.

24

CREW

ATTITUDE,

APPEARANCE,

KNOWLEDGE,

DISCIPLINE, COMMITMENT AND PLANNING


24.1

ATTITUDE:
It is imperative that crewmembers convey the right attitude to
the passengers not only during an emergency but in their every
working day when in the view of passengers. Passengers will
depend on, and must react to the crewmembers instructions
during the emergency. If the passenger has a sense that the
crewmember is incompetent in his/her work habits, sloppy in
his/her work role, or overly friendly in his/her relationship with
the passenger, the passenger will not have confidence in the
crewmembers ability to assist in an emergency, and may
choose not to listen to this crewmember. This could be a fatal
flaw in the crewmembers role as a safety component in an
emergency situation. Be sharp in your work, be alert in your
relationship with passengers and their needs, and the passenger
will see a professional who they can rely on if an emergency
occurs.

24.2

APPEARANCE:

The objective of crewmembers wearing uniforms may appear to


be so passengers can define the various roles and services
provided by the crew. To a certain extent this is true. On this
vessel the uniform look is for the above reason, but it also
serves as a psychological tool for the implementation of the
safety procedures on board. Remember, a passenger ship is in
many ways not a democracy but a dictatorship, with the central
figure being the Captain. On a cruise ship a mix of civilian and
military rule is prominent.
A point to consider as you work on board the ship, you will
notice that passengers seem to look up to the Captain and in
most cases any person who is wearing stripes and a uniform.
We are all aware in our daily lives of the policeman and other
authority figures that we deem should receive our respect, not
necessarily the person, but in reality the uniform and what it
represents. Discipline and authority. We are all aware of the
military hand salute. Most people are not aware that a hand
salute is extended, not to the person, but out of respect for the
uniform and the rank.

Even if you are in the uniform of a waitress or a public area


cleaner, the Captain during the safety drill has informed the
passengers that you are in essence an extension of his authority
and command, and that the person in that uniform is
knowledgeable is assisting you in an actual emergency. You as
the crewmember now should understand that being in the
proper uniform at all times whenever in the passenger areas is
not just for appearance and uniformity, it goes far deeper. You
are now a safety feature for the passenger to search out in an
emergency.
24.3

KNOWLEDGE:
Understanding all of the safety rules, regulations and equipment
is a must for all crewmembers. In an emergency, you may be
the only crewmember who is available to assist a passenger's
life saving situation. You are expected to be able to understand
what the emergency is, what is expected of you, and where you
are supposed to be. Neglecting these functions puts not only
your life, but your fellow crewmembers as well as passengers in
jeopardy.

Being able to direct passengers to their muster

stations and boat stations is not enough. If in fact passengers

get to their Muster stations and boat stations and there is no one
there to further assist them in the next safety step this could be a
problem. From the fire fighting equipment to the life boats you
must have enough knowledge to implement the use of this
safety tools if need be. Passengers will ask questions of you
during the cruise which will need to have the answers to. BUT
REMEMBER, your role is not to explain the emergency, that is
the Captain's role, you have to be able to react to the different
types of emergencies and their implication. Fire - collision grounding, which could lead to the abandon ship process. Your
role is to know where the passenger should go during the
various emergency situations and the fastest and safest and
most reliable route to get there.

24.4

DISCIPLINE:
This word can be defined as "the attitude one takes to ensure
order". This is a critical component of the safety procedures
and your reaction to an emergency.

When a potential

emergency is declared by the Captain, most times it is a


precautionary measure and does not lead to abandoning ship.

As a crewmember it is your responsibility to follow the


Captain's lead and concern without concern for your personal
safety at that point. In creating your level of discipline you
must take into consideration all of the other points in this
section.
Discipline includes your attending to your assigned station until
relieved verbally by the Captain or an assigned Officer. It
includes your conveying to the passengers in a calm manner the
direction they should move and to ensure they are properly
attired including, life-jacket.

It includes your assisting in

calming down crewmembers that may have lost their sense of


discipline. It includes your being dressed properly in uniform if
time has allowed, and that you are wearing your life-jacket. It
includes not discussing the emergency or being interviewed by
passengers as to the nature of the emergency unless directed to
by the Captain. A lack of discipline could be the one factor in
the emergency procedure that could create havoc and panic
when none is necessary.
24.5

COMMITMENT:

Your commitment to understanding and maintaining a high


level of understanding of the ship's safety procedures and
equipment should be derived from your concern for the
passengers safety as well as your fellow crewmembers and your
own safety. As you should be committed to the high level of
service standards required by the company, you should also be
committed to the high standards of safety for all on board. You
do this by learning all you can about the safety procedures,
features and equipment on board and the understanding of your
fellow crewmembers roles during an emergency from the
Captain to the lowest rank.
24.6

PLANNING:
An emergency is only declared when something goes wrong.
In all probability, all procedures during an emergency will not
go according to plan. For example, the exit route you are
directed to send passengers to could be blocked due to fire or
other mishap. You need to plan ahead an alternate route for the
passengers, which means you have to know the ship extremely
well, for access to alternative escape routes. A life raft may end
up inflating upside down, what do you do? A passenger may be

hurt or confused, how do you assist them to their muster or boat


station?

Simply put, you must evaluate in your mind the

available alternatives to performing your safety role. Once you


have weighed these alternatives, discuss these with the Safety
Officer for approval. Remember you may not in some cases
know the full extent of the emergency, so it is not your role to
change safety procedures, you could cause more harm than
good. Just plan ahead and always be alert for alternate options
if you are alone and out of communication. with the Captain of
Safety Officers. And most important, follow the instructions of
your superiors who may have more knowledge of the
emergency situation.
Finally, remember, with all of these points above, all may not
go the way is should, so educate yourself completely on the
ship's safety features, procedures and equipment. Be alert to
safety equipment damage, misuse, missing equipment and
report all to the Safety Officer on board. By being a concerned
safety crewmember you will enhance your comfort level
working on board, and you will become a source of pride to the

passengers by instilling in them a sense of confidence for their


safety.

25

TEN STEPS FOR HANDLING PASSENGER


COMPLAINTS

25.1

IDENTIFY YOURSELF!

25.2

LISTEN carefully to the passenger's complaint!

25.3

REPEAT the complaint back to the passenger, and get


acknowledgement that you heard and understood the complaint
correctly!

25.4

APOLOGIZE for any inconvenience the passenger has


encountered!

25.5

ACKNOWLEDGE the passengers feelings and emotions,


(anger, frustration, disappointment, etc.)

25.6

EXPLAIN what action you will take to correct the passenger's


complaint!

25.7

FIND the cause of the passenger's complaint!

25.8

SOLVE

the

passenger's

complaint

to

the

passenger's

satisfaction!
25.9

THANK the passenger for bringing the complaint to your


attention!

25.10

NOTIFY your immediate supervisor of the Passengers


complaint, and the action you took to rectify the passenger's
complaint!

26

QUALITY SERVICE GUIDELINES


26.1

Passenger relations means treating the passengers the same way


you would like to be treated.

26.2

The passengers are the most important people in our business.

26.3

Passengers are more than customers.

They are individual

people with special needs and wants just like you.


26.4

26.5

The passengers are expecting you to accommodate them to:

Enjoy their cruise and feel "at home"

Get the best value for their money

Anticipate their needs

Act to solve any problem they may have

Any passenger contact is your chance to:

Provide excellent service

Offer other services

Make a great impression

26.6

Have a "can do" attitude. Never say "it's not my job".

26.7

When you offer and give quality service, passengers are more
likely to:

Cruise with us again

Recommend our cruise line to others by word of mouth

26.8

Always leave your personal problems in your cabin.

26.9

Remember when leaving the crew area and entering the


passenger areas, you are "on-stage".

26.10

Do more than is expected of you. Always be willing to do a


little extra.

26.11

Be a team player. Everyone pulling together to provide quality


service.

26.12

Be friendly and courteous. A warm smile, eye contact, and a


sense of humour go a long way. You are "on-stage" and this
should be a part of your uniform look.

26.13

A passenger is not someone to argue or match wits with. The


passenger may not always be right, but the passenger is still a
paying customer.

26.14

Always present a professional and caring attitude.

Let the

passengers know that you are glad they are cruising with us.
26.15

Always show interest in what the passenger is saying when you


are speaking with them. Listen carefully.

26.16

Always use the passengers name, formally and professionally.

26.17

Always acknowledge early and anticipate the needs of the


passengers.

26.18

Create a positive work environment for the passengers and


practice an image of team spirit.

26.19

Protect the property and privacy of the passengers.

26.20

Be informed by knowledge all aspects of the ship the different


public rooms, vessel directions, various service outlets,
emergency equipment and policies, so that you may be able to
answer and accommodate any guest inquiries.

26.21

Take pride in your work. The passengers depend on you and


your efforts.

26.22

Be prompt with the passengers.

Passengers appreciate not

having to wait.
26.23

If you cannot assist a passenger, direct them to someone who


can. Never leave a passenger unattended.

26.24

Help passengers enjoy their "home away from home". It is


good business for everyone.

26.25

By improving your passenger relations you will feel; better


about yourself and your job.

26.26

Always provide the passenger with (5) five star service and
attitude.

26.27

Always show concern and care for the passengers.

26.28

Act first, without being asked.

26.29

Make amends with the passenger for any inconvenience.

26.30

Remember

these

three

words

of

service

guidelines:

CONSISTENCY COMMITMENT COOPERATION.

27

RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR SHIP'S CREW


27.1

GENERAL:
This Rules and Regulations manual has been established to give
you a guideline of the expectations and operating procedures on
board M/V----------.

27.2

TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS:
Travel arrangements vary depending on the crewmember, in
your Letter of Agreement or Contract this item is specified.

27.3

EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS:
Every member of the ship's crew is entitled to and will receive a
Letter of Assignment or Contract. Aboard this vessel, letters of
assignment are issued to marine crew by----------, while other
staff are employed directly by the Owners.

27.4

PASSPORT / VISA:
Your Passport and necessary Visa's are the responsibilities of
the individual crewmember and will be kept secure with the
Port Clearance Officer.

27.5

SIGNING ON / OFF:

When joining a ship for the first time and on subsequent


occasions, you are required by law to "sign on". You are now
bound by Maritime Law, and the disciplinary procedures
established by the Merchant Marine Regulations. When going
on leave or departing the ship, you will be instructed to "signoff". Always remember to sign off as a crewmember and never
as a passenger unless instructed otherwise by your department
head.
27.6

CREW PASS:
A "crew identification card" will be issued to you. This is your
official Identification Card / Pass. You must carry it with you
at all times when departing and boarding the ship.

When

signing off the ship this pass must be returned to your


department head. You will receive your pass back when you
sign back on the ship.

27.7

ASSIGNMENTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES:


You will have specific assignments and responsibilities aboard,
related to your position. You are required to comply with all

responsibilities as outlined in your job description and/or


advised by your department head. You are expected to perform
your assigned responsibilities to the best of your ability. If you
have any questions regarding your responsibilities, please
discuss them with your department head.
27.8

SAFETY PROCEDURES:
You are responsible for making sure that you are supplied with
a life-jacket in your cabin.

If not, request one from your

department head or the safety officer.


You will be given safety instructions and responsibilities to
perform during emergency drills and actual emergency
situations. It is required that you familiarize yourself with this
safety information and follow all safety procedures as
instructed. A safety card describing the alarms to be sounded in
an emergency, as well as your station during Emergency and
Survival Craft stations, is placed in your cabin. It is to be read,
understood and signed on arrival.
Safety and sanitation are responsibilities shared by all
crewmembers.

All members of this vessel are expected to

follow safety and sanitation standards and procedures as they

apply to their work assignments. All toilets have signage in


English & Chinese, prohibiting personnel from throwing any
objects (including toilet paper) into the cistern. A special bin is
provided for soiled toilet paper, by each cistern.
27.9

FIRE / LIFEBOAT EMERGENCY DRILLS:


You will be responsible for attending and participating in all
mandatory Fire / Lifeboat drills on embarkation days as well as
other required days of safety drills. Please be guided by the
assigned duties on the Muster List.

27.10

CUSTOMS REGULATIONS:
You will be informed when necessary, during the course of any
voyage or prior to arriving in port, when you may be required to
complete a customs declaration form. Correct and honest details
must be provided on the customs form, especially when you are
about to depart the ship. All crew must obey the customs laws
of the country of port of entry and departure. It is an offense to
give incorrect or false information.

27.11

CABIN ASSIGNMENTS:
A cabin will be allocated to you on board the ship. In most
cases this will be on a shared basis which is a prerequisite of

your terms of employment. Your cabin is "your home away


from home" and is treated as such. You will be responsible for
keeping your cabin neat and clean in accordance with the ship's
standard. All crew must retain the cabin allocated to them. No
cabin changes can be made without approval from the Hotel
Manager through your department head.
27.12

CABIN INSPECTION:
Cabins will be inspected once per week on a random schedule
during the Captain / Hotel Manager Inspection, and your cabin
is expected to be in compliance with all ship's standards. The
Captain and/or Hotel Manager may also hold a periodic "spot"
inspection as necessary and cabins may be inspected when
demanded by customs authorities at any given time on a day-today basis.

27.13

MEALS:
Meals will be provided in an assigned dining area according to
your department and rank on board at no charge.

The

scheduled meal hours and menu of the day will be posted for
your information in the dining room(s). If your rank entitles
you to dine in the passenger dining room you must always be

dressed in the dress code of the day for passengers or authorised


ship's uniform. It is strictly prohibited to take food from the
dining rooms to you cabin.
27.14

RECREATION EQUIPMENT:
Officers and Crew are expected to take care of recreational
equipment supplied for their use.

27.15

MEDICAL ASSISTANCE:
Aboard the ship a certified Doctor and Nurse are always
available at no charge to crewmembers. There are set hours
each day for crew medical visits.

If you have to visit the

Doctor or Nurse during working hours, you must notify your


department head.
27.16

TARDINESS AND ABSENTEEISM:


Whenever you are late or absent from your job, an additional
burden is placed on your co-crewmembers and on your
department head. Although we understand that illnesses and
emergencies do happen, it is a serious matter to be late or
absent without notice. In the event of an illness, a Doctor or
Nurse's note must be submitted to your department head.

27.17

MAILING PROCEDURES:

You may send and receive mail while aboard the ship. Check
with your department head for the proper address and
procedures for sending and receiving mail.
27.18

TELEPHONE PROCEDURES:
While at sea, you may receive and/or make telephone calls.
However, it is to be borne in mind that Inmarsat telephone calls
at sea are expensive.

27.19

PERSONAL HYGIENE:
Personal hygiene and cleanliness must be practiced by all
crewmembers. The daily habits of personal grooming are to be
religiously followed & practiced.
APPEARANCE:
You will be in the public eye any time you are outside of your
cabin. While outside your cabin and the crew areas, you are
working, unless ashore. Therefore you must be properly attired
and well groomed and present a professional appearance.
Personal Protective Equipment must be always used.

27.20

UNIFORM / DRESS CODE:


While on board, all crewmembers are required to wear the
designated ship's uniform.

Uniforms are required to be

immaculately cleaned and ironed with clean and polished shoes,


in order to present a professional image to our passengers.
Slippers are not allowed to be worn on board.

27.21

NAME BADGE:
Name badges are required to be worn as part of the dress code.
These are supplied by the Hotel Department, and carry the
vessels name. You are to contact your department head during
the sign on procedures to receive your name badge.

27.22

LAUNDRY PRIVILEGES:
As the vessel has no onboard laundry facilities, staff are
permitted to send moderate amounts of laundry ashore at,
through the Hotel dept. This service is offered free of charge to
marine staff, and care must be taken to ensure the privilege is
not misused.

27.23

CO-WORKERS SUPPORT:
As a crewmember of M/V-----------, you are expected to be
supportive of your co-workers. All departments are necessary
for the successful operation of the cruise. Some crewmembers

will have more responsibilities than others. Your objective is to


be an example for others.

27.24

COURTESY / ATTITUDES:
All crewmembers must be courteous and polite to all
passengers and co-workers.

Courtesy and politeness and

accommodating manners are absolutely essential in the efforts


to keep our passengers happy.

Your attitude towards the

passengers and co-workers must always be a positive and


helpful one. Your attitude will be an extension of your job.
27.25

PASSENGERS' CABINS:
It is strictly forbidden to enter a passenger cabin. There are no
exceptions to this rule. Any crewmembers found in a passenger
cabin that is not fulfilling a passenger accommodation service,
i.e. (room-service, cabin cleaning) shall be subject to immediate
dismissal.

27.26

PUBLIC AREAS:
Our passengers come first, and will never be denied seating in
public rooms or areas due to occupancy by Crew Members,
shoreside employees and/or officers. Passengers will always be

given first priority at gangways, tenders, unless you have been


scheduled to work these areas. There are some crewmembers
with public areas access privileges and there are some
crewmembers without these privileges.

Check with your

department head for your status on this matter.


27.27

PORTS OF CALL:
Ports of Call visits and travel are part of the benefits of working
at sea. However, there may be occasions when a visit ashore is
impossible due to berthing and/or anchoring conditions. You
are also subject to the rules and regulations imposed by the
local authorities. These rules must be complied with at all
times.

27.28

SHORE LEAVE:
When off duty, and permission from Head of Department and
conditions permit, you may proceed ashore for shore leave.
Always carry your crew pass and any identification as required
by the country being visited.

When ashore crewmembers

should return to the ship a minimum of (1) one hour before the
ship's scheduled departure, and a minimum of (2) two hours
before being expected to be on duty. All crew must show their

crew pass upon boarding the ship. Crew Members are not
allowed to congregate at the passenger gangway areas.
Remember passengers come first.
27.29

CONFIDENTIALITY:
In the course of performing duties, crewmembers may come
into contact with information and materials, which are
confidential. Therefore no information, records or materials
concerning crewmembers, employees, passengers or official
business of M/V --------- may be used, released or discussed
with anyone or agency without proper authorization from the
management.

27.30

SEXUAL HARASSMENT:
It is a standing policy aboard this vessel that crewmembers
should be able to work in an environment free from all forms of
discrimination including sexual harassment. Sexual harassment
is a violation of the company's rules of conduct.
Sexual harassment is defined to include: unwelcome sexual
advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or
physical conduct of a sexual nature. It is considered to be
sexual harassment when; 1) submission to such conduct is made

directly or indirectly as a term or condition of your


employment, 2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by is
used as their basis for employment decisions which affect you
or 3) such conduct has the purpose or the effect of unreasonably
interfering with your work performance of creating an
intimidating, hostile or offensive working environment.
27.31

GRATUITY AND TIPS (SERVICE CHARGE):


Gratuities in our area of cruising are not accepted as the norm
by the management. They are to be politely refused, if offered,
and never solicited.

27.32

INFORMATION / KNOWLEDGE OF THE SHIP:


It is imperative to familiarize yourself with the ship and her
layout to answer and accommodate any passenger inquiries.
Also for the passengers and your safety in assisting passengers
in case of an emergency.

27.33

LANGUAGE ON BOARD:
The command language on board this vessel is English. Most
of our passengers will speak one or more Chinese dialects,
though some may speak English. If you do not understand a
passenger's

request,

seek

the

assistance

of

fellow

crewmember, or direct/escort the passenger to the Reception


desk.
27.34

PRIVATE PARTIES:
Generally private parties are not permitted, but on special
occasions the Captain and Hotel Manager may grant special
permission. Passengers are not permitted to attend crew parties.

27.35

VISITORS:
Crewmembers are not allowed to have visitors on board without
prior approval from the Captain and the Hotel Manager.

27.36

SMOKING:
Smoking is forbidden in the public areas by crewmembers at all
times.

27.37

ACCIDENT PROCEDURE:
In spite of all precautions, accidents will sometimes occur. If
an accident occurs involving you, it is your responsibility (if
physically capable) to follow the following steps:

27.37.1

Notify your department head or safety officer.

27.37.2

Depending on the injury, make sure you get prompt


attention from the ship's medical staff.

27.37.3

Make sure all accident report (SAFIR) forms are filled


out by the safety officer.

27.37.4

Get names of other crewmembers (if possible) to verify


the circumstances of the accident.

27.38

GAMBLING:
Crew Members are forbidden to gamble on board. No
crewmembers are allowed to participate in any type of
passenger gaming on board.

27.39

OVERBOARD GARBAGE DUMPING:


It is strictly prohibited to throw garbage of any kind overboard.
It is imperative that we keep our water environment clean of all
pollution. Think twice before dumping anything over the side
of the ship. Very high fines can be levied on the company for
this offense.

27.40

DRUGS / ALCOHOL / WEAPONS:


It is strictly prohibited to bring any drugs, alcohol, and/or
weapons onboard the ship. Violation of this policy may result

in immediate dismissal. The Drug and Alcohol Policy applies to


all crew, irrespective of department.
27.41

INTOXICATION:
Intoxication will not be tolerated at any time.

27.42

SMUGGLING:
Smuggling of any goods contraband or otherwise is a severe
offense, and the Company will cooperate in the prosecution of
any individual found involved in smuggling.

27.43

THEFT:
Theft of any kind will not be tolerated.

27.44

PERSONAL MATTERS:
All personal matters should be left in your cabin. Never discuss
your personal matters with the passengers.

27.45

NOTICE OF LEAVING:
If you want to sign off the ship, you must give ample notice in
accordance with your contract. If you intend to give notice,
please do so as early as possible prior to your departure date.
When you leave you should remove all of your personal
belongings from your cabin.

The company does not cover

personal effects kept for you by your friends while you are on
vacation.

27.46

IMPORTANT:
It is repeated that Crew Members are NOT PERMITTED TO
GAMBLE ON BOARD. Anyone found to disregard this rule
will be dismissed.

28

CREW CABIN RULES AND REGULATIONS


28.1

The use of a steady open flame is strictly prohibited (candles).

28.2

Only the approved wastebaskets (ie. metallic) are allowed.

28.3

No posters or articles of any kind which may damage the finish


of the cabin walls are allowed.

28.4

Painting of walls is strictly prohibited.

28.5

Use of electrical converters unless approved by the Chief


Engineer are not allowed in the cabins.

28.6

Life-jackets are to be kept in your cabins at all times.

28.7

Cooking, storing of open food containers or eating is forbidden


in the cabins. Exceptions are made for sick personnel that have
been relieved of duty by the ship's Doctor or Nurse.

28.8

All crewmembers must retain the cabin allocated to them. The


Hotel Manager through your department head must first
approve any changes.

28.9

Passengers are not permitted in crew cabins at any time.

28.10

When sharing cabin and rest room facilities with other


crewmembers be considerable of their needs and feelings.

29

RULES OF CONDUCT

High standards of conduct are necessary to preserve a safe and


harmonious productive working environment on board.

As a

crewmember of this vessel you are a part of a select team, and it is


necessary that these Rules of Conduct be strictly followed.
The following rule violations or misconduct include, but are not
limited to:

Discrimination by any crewmembers against any passenger or cocrewmembers because of race - nationality - religion or handicap.

Carrying or having the possession of drugs, firearms, or any other


weapons.

Theft of any property that is not rightfully yours.

Intoxication on board the vessel.

Participation in any type of gaming on board (gambling).

Entering any passenger or crew cabin without proper permission.

Intimacy with passengers.

Cooking in cabins.

Harboring a non-paying person on board (stowaway).

Congregating with co-crewmember and ignoring passengers.

Fighting, under any circumstances.

Indecent language in the presence of passengers or crewmembers

Sabotage of the ship and/or passengers equipment and property.

Purchasing alcohol from the public bars without permission.

Smuggling of any goods.

Refusal to work.

Creating or contributing to unsanitary or unsafe conditions.

Breach of confidentiality.

Sleeping while on duty.

An excessive pattern of tardiness or absenteeism.

Refusal to comply with the ship's dress code and grooming.

Unauthorized usage of the public areas and rooms.

Violation of fire / lifeboat drills and/or safety regulations.

Exhibiting a negative attitude, which interferes with job


performance or the performance of others.

Dispensing medications as a non-member of the ship's medical


staff.

Flagrant insubordination.

Discussing business, personal or unauthorized matters in public


areas of the ship where passengers can overhear the conversation.

Refusal to wear name badge.

Smoking in public areas.

Discussing and requesting gratuities from the passengers.

Violation of any other established ship regulations.

30

DISCIPLINARY ACTION
Rules and Regulations are made in order to maintain order and
discipline aboard the ship. Violations of these rules and regulations
constitute a breach of contract with the Company, and will result in
immediate dismissal.