Sie sind auf Seite 1von 21

Assemblage Sculpture:

Louise Nevelson style

Assemblage Sculpture : Louise Nevelson style Sculpture I

Sculpture I

Objective:

Students will explore the sculptural technique of assemblage while creating their own, wooden assemblage sculpture which mimics the style of Louise Nevelson.

Students will learn the differences between symmetrical, asymmetrical and radial balance and use one of these forms of balance within their

work.

Students will add thematic found objects as well as one common color of paint to their assemblage

sculpture to create unity within the piece.

Artist and Culture:

Artist: Louise Nevelson

Origins of Assemblage Sculpture: read page

125 in textbook.

Artist and Culture: • Artist: Louise Nevelson • Origins of Assemblage Sculpture: read page 125 in

Terms/Vocabulary

Assemblage: an artistic process in which a three-dimensional artistic composition is made from putting together found objects.

Found object art: use of objects that are not normally considered art for an art work.

Monochromatic: tints, shades and tones of one color.

Asymmetrical balance: Asymmetrical balance is typically off-center

or created with an odd or mismatched number of elements.

Symmetrical balance: mirror image balance.

Radial balance: all elements radiate out from a center point in a circular fashion.

High relief: quality of a projecting image where the overall depth is deep.

Low relief/bas-relief: quality of a projecting image where the overall

depth is shallow.

Louise Nevelson

Louise Nevelson
Louise Nevelson

Symmetrical

Balance

Symmetrical Balance
Symmetrical Balance
Symmetrical Balance
Symmetrical Balance
Symmetrical Balance

Asymmetrical

Balance

Asymmetrical Balance
Asymmetrical Balance
Asymmetrical Balance
Radial Balance
Radial Balance
Radial Balance

Radial

Balance

Radial Balance

Process: Day 1

Select your box which will be used as the frame for your assemblage sculpture.

Select wooden pieces that interest you. (10)

Before doing any gluing, arrange and rearrange your wooden pieces, playing with various compositions and types of balance. Let me see what you come up with.

Think of the following while composing your sculpture:

How does light contrast with shadows? How does the viewer’s eye move around the piece? Does my

sculpture combine low and high relief? Do the objects

in my piece feel balanced in visual weight? Are there interesting contours? Is there visual rhythm, a fluidity of lines? Is there a sense of cohesiveness (unity) with all

the separate parts?

Process: Day 2

If you have a well balanced

composition which illustrates

foreground, middle ground and

background, begin gluing your

pieces together starting with the

background and working forward.

Process: Day 3

If all of your pieces are glued and secure,

begin spray painting your sculpture outside.

You may select either white or black paint

but may NOT combine both colors.

Make sure you spray in light layers until your sculpture has a nice, uniform and solid coat

of color.