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Victory in the Opening

by IM Gary Lane

B.T.Batsford Ltd, London

First published in 1999


@ Gary Lane 1999

ISBN 0 7r34 8546 9

Contr

British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data.

A catalogue record for this book

is

available from the British Library.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be

Introduction

reproduced, by any means, without prior permission


of the publisher.

Printed in Great Britain by


Creative Print & Design (Wales), Ebbw Vale
for the publishers,
B.T.Batsford Ltd,
583 Fulham Road,
London SW6 5BY

Greedy Openings

2 Chasing the King


3 Attacking the King in the

4 Attacking the Castled King


5 Checkmate in the Opening

6 Winning Moves
7 Opening to the Ending
8 Opening Surprises

9 Lack of Development

Index to Games

A BATSFORD CHESS BOOK


General Manager: Nigel Davies
Advisors: Mark Dvoretsky, Raymond Keene OBE,
Daniel King, Jon Speelman, Chris Ward

Ckr

Contents
Introduction

Greedy Openings

King

2t

3 Attacking the King in the Centre

34

2 Chasing the

King

46

5 Checkmate in the Opening

63

6 Winning Moves

80

7 Opening to the Ending

97

8 Opening Surprises

111

9 Lack of Development

131

Index to Games

143

4 Attacking the Castled

Dedicated to Nancy Jones

The main aim of this b

uru

show how to punish

I would like to thank Frangois Mertens for his help in producing this book.

or mistaken mw
opening by taking sriff
propriate action. So oft
ferent

faced with a bad more, pL


just carry on blindly nirl

mal plan and thereby


decisive winning

mis

charc-

The opening tusslcs I


here are all decided r
moves and provide a
Symbols used

+
++
+:
-+
+
:+
!
!l
l?
?!
?
??
l-0
0-1

)/z-t/z

check

winning advantage for White


large advantage for White
slight advantage for White
winning advantage for Black
large advantage for Black
slight advantage for Black
level position
good move
outstanding move
interesting move
dubious move
bad move
blunder
the game ends in a win for White
the game ends in a win for Black
the game ends in a draw

wiL

tactical ideas desiepod r


maximum difficulties fr
ponent at a very ea*y q
game. You will haw

elsewhere

for deep t

rnnovatlons on move

twcl!
Et

the examples here, all

practical play, :uE d


decided well before thD!

familiarising yourself wiA


the many tricks and tapc G
in the openings it should bc
for you to win many ,r.-r

quickly and incisivety- ll


with three diagrams oa Gl

you can even follow the gr


beginning to end withou r
of a chess set, thus meti
ideal travelling compani(r.
Chapter One deals wit

Openings', which higtliS


necessity of knowing ul

sacrifice material aD4


to acrq

importantly, when

Introduction
The main aim of this book is to
show how to punish unusual, indifferent or mistaken moves in the
opening by taking swift and aP-

can be a difficult learning curve,


especially when your oPPonent's

mal plan and thereby miss out on


decisive winning chance.

because they

propriate action. So often, when


faced with a bad move, plaYers will
just carry on blindly with their nor-

queen is busy snatching your Pawns


and all you can remember is that the

book said you had comPensationbut did not tell you whY! Here the
illustrative games are very valuable

tell the full story of

how a sustained initiative generated


by rapid piece development can lead
to a quick victory.
If you cherish hopes of winning a
fantastic game in dramatic fashion

The opening tussles Presented


here are all deci&d within 25
moves and provide a wide range of
tactical ideas desigled to create
maximum difficulties for your oP- then the chapter 'Chasing the King'
ponent at a very earlY stage of the is for you. All the conditions
game. You will have to look necessary for launching a successful
elsewhere for deep theoretical king-hunt are laid down, together
innovations on move twenty or so- with brilliant practical examples of
the examples here, all taken from how to conduct the attack.
practical play, are effectivelY Identification of recurring patterns,
decided well before then! Indeed, by

familiarising yourself with some of


the many tricks and traps contained

such as critical weaknesses in the


opponent's defensive pawn shield,
will alert the experienced chess

in the openings it should be possible

tournament camPaigner

for you to win many more games


quickly and incisively. Moreover,
with three diagrams on each Page,

enemy king.

you can even follow the games from

beginning to end without the need


of a chess set, thus making it an
ideal travelling companion.

Chapter One deals

with

'GreedY

Openings', which highlights the


necessity of knowing where to

sacrifice material and,


importantly, when

to

equallY

accept

it. It

possibilities

of

to

ambushing the

'Keeping all options open' is the

slogan

of those players brave

enough to defer castling. Though


leaving the king in the centre until
the middlegame might enable a
player to castle on the opposite wing

to where an

opponent shows

aggressive intentions, there

is

the

drawback that such an uncastled


king interferes with the coordination

lntroduction

of the rooks, thus resulting in an


overall lack of harmony of one's
forces.

'Attacking the King in the Centre'


looks at the consequences of not

being able to castle.

Typical
examples show powerful methods

ofexploitation and execution on the


board.

'Attacking the Castled King'


offers various techniques which
more often than not result in the
destruction of the enemy pawn
cover. Our illustrative games feature
popular methods of attack such as

opening lines and diagonals, the

pawn storm, manoeuwing and


probing for weaknesses. How to
handle opposite-side castling is also
explained with a particular empha-

sis on timing-a crucial factor in


determining which attack arrives
first.
'Checkmate in the Opening' presents a feast of games with a strong
tactical slant. The king is hounded at
every opportunity and a number of
typical mates are demonstrated.

'Winning Moves' sounds like the


answer to all our problems. Surprisingly, the fact that the games tend to
be spectacular is more the result of a
well thought out plan rather than
spontaneous inspiration. So here
you have the opportunity to sharpen
up your tactical awareness as well as

to

implement familiar attacking

themes.

There will be times when you will


be obliged to transpose into an endgame with many hours of tedious

in prospect. But not


always! The chapter'Opening to the
Ending' shows that this final phase
manoeuvring

lGn

of the game may not be slow and


strategic in nature, but tactical. In
such cases it may be a positive advantage

to

head straight

for

the

ending.

'Opening Surprises' looks at unusual continuations designed to confuse and upset your opponent. Here
you are handed an arsenal of open-

ing tricks, backed up by

logical
analysis, to help you score an early
vrctory.
The serious consequences of not
activating one's pieces is a theme

which we have seen again and


again. However, our final chapter,

'Lack of Development' is dedicated


solely to this topic. It is clear, after
looking at a few games illustrating
the attacking possibilities, that the
task of organising a defence with
half of one's pieces still on their
original squares is a recipe for
disaster.

Throughout
the book, the
selection of openings and games has
been governed by their likelihood of

appearing in practical play-and


with an emphasis on decisive action
taking place within only ten moves.

'I

can resist anything

tion' is the quote whict cr


mind in Greedy Openiryr f
of

pawn or a piece is

offa

for players to lose dreir

principle
where a big advantage in d
ment is gained as a rcd
forget about basic

opponent grabbing

mt'rril
s

opening continue to be
and again.

A signiflrcant advantage i
opment can be a deadty fm
grandmasters are not irrrrdanger. In

BrownrQuinuu

goes pawn hunting in tb r


and after twelve moves bs o

queen

in play while Sli

mobilised virnrally his cilh


The end comes swiftly rt
ripping open the centre b

Black's uncastled king.


ln the game Onischul{G
Black tries his luck wirh a I
line of the French. Oncc ;
queen goes on walkabout i.

of material gain but rhils k

queenside undeveloped

rh

you will

inm an end-

hrs of tedious

But not

lpcningto

the

final phase
bc slow and

h tactical. In
b e positive ads.ight for the
'

looks at un-

eigDed to conryonent. Here

!r

1 Greedy Openings

tfo

rsd of oPenW by logical

soore an earlY

of not
theme
a
is
trlircs
sctn again and
u final chaPter,
is dedicated

It is clear, after
gmes illustrating
sitrilities. that the
a defence with

still on their

is a
_6.

recipe for

book, the
and games has

their likelihood of
pactical PlaY-and

rb on decisive action
only ten moves.

'I

can resist anything but temPtacomes to


mind in Greedy Openings. The bait
of a pawn or a piece is often enough
for players to lose their senses and
forget about basic principles. Games
where a big advantage in develoP-

tion' is the quote which

a result of an
in the
opening continue to be seen time

ment

is

gained as

opponent grabbing material


and again.

A significant advantage in development can be a deadly force. Even


grandmasters are not immune to this
danger. In Browne-Quinteros, Black
goes pawn hunting in the oPening
and after twelve moves has only his
queen

in play while White

has

mobilised virtually his entire army.


The end comes swiftly with White
ripping open the centre to get at
Black's uncastled king.
ln the game Onischuk-Hertneck,
Black tries his luck with an obscure
line of the French. Once again the
queen goes on walkabout in pursuit
of material gain but this leaves his
queenside undeveloped and unable

to form a reasonable defence. Inevitably, Black pays a heavy Price for


his indulgence.

Keres-Spassky provides

an

example of calculated risk from toP


class chess. Keres offers material,
not for any immediate return but for
lasting pressure. This kind of material investment requires fine
judgement and is probably the most
diffrcult to apply in practical play.
Keres's conduct of the game is most
instructive.
Then again, it can happen that a
player will grab a pawn or piece and
simply hang on to it and win! The
game Dougherty-Hergott will make
you think tiryice before emPloYing
an opening which sacrifices a pawn

after a mere two moves. Also the


idea of throwing all your pieces into
one massive attack sounds great but

the game Illescas-Anand issues a


cautionary warning that such an
attack doesn't always come off.
Black jumps at the chance to snatch
material and lives to tell the tale.

Greedy Openings

French: 3 ...oleq

Sicilian:3

Onischuk-Hertneck
Biel 1997

I e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 ad2 6rO es
2,e4
A popular way to avoid main line

theory. The position can also arise


after 3 Ac3
5

drc

+ eS 2,eq.

Axe4

Onischuk rightly wants to give


Black a weak pawn on e4. Instead
Agnos-Rice, Port Erin 1997, continued 5 9ag AxaZ 6 9xd2 c5 7 c3
Wuo s 6R 6co:.
5 ... dxe4 6 Ac4 c5 7 d5
An aggressive continuation which
directly challenges the soundness of
Black's opening choice.
7 ...

gb6?!

The one-move threat of

%ry
t,ffi\ffi,

"%

after 4 ...o,e4

afl tt

ll

al95 96 t2

b) 7 ".. exd5 8 Wxd5 Uxd5 9


Axds hdz l0 gfil f5 I I exf6 6xf6

12 Eel e5 which led to a &n


2l moves.
8...9c6

In Bologan-Paranicher.
Team Championship l9t&

6c6 1l Ac3 e6 D Af4 &


Ua: S"ez 14 tradl 6fb rs
0-0 16 UA 6e8 17 -Lxff!
l8 c5 9e7 19 cxd6 Axd6 !O
Val Zt 6xd6 exd5 22 AxdF.

after

d5

6xd4 Wxc4

9 ... Wd7 is a

more pe

choice but White has plenn ol


after I0 Ab5.

10 6a3 Wc8

ll .t.f4 tf

Aab5 e5
Quinteros's backward da,
ment encourages White to rip
the centre.

0-0-0+-.

13

0-0 gxg3 14
hxg3 0-0 15 f5 Uxg3 t6 gf4 gg4

t2 693 9h4 t:

6xd5 20 exfS:9+ xf8 21 9aO+


*e822 gb5+ gd7 23 Ef8 mate.

Williams. Witley 1998. sli


the pawn immediately *rrh t

l2 0-0-0+:.
8 cS AaZ 9 f4! exd5
9... exB!? helps White to develop
with l0 6xR.
l0 9xd5 996 11 0re2 9-e7
Or ll ... Vxg2? 12 WxfT+ d8
13 trgl Uxh2 14 Ae3 Ae7 15

17 e6'!
White triumphs with panache.
17 ... fxe6 18 fxe6 6n6 t9 eZ+lt

tack on the queen. In

experimented with 8 . Ug{


came under enduring prEssut
game continued 9 h3 lEaz tO,

e7 t4'&,f+ Aao
15 9e5 gh6 16 6xe4 Axe4 t7
Axh6 l-0 Dvoirys-Florath, Berlin
1996.

AxdT+ WxdT 5 c4 Hg4?!


5 0-0 is considered the mei
Now Black tries to take edr
of White's 5th by grabbing e I
6 0-0 Wxe4 Z dl crd4 t Ea
Logically gaining time wirt

There followed 8 ... ,9 S


Wg4 l0 Wa4+ P47 I I ail(

...6a2 s dxe6 fxe6 9 am!

10 gh5+
Wg4 h5 13 gb5+

le4c52af3d63ebs+

ru-A

Wb4+ a[ows Black to adopt an un-

a) 7

Wijk aan Zee 1971

ll

usual set-up. Also:

hxe5

gb5-

Browne.euintere

Axe5 dxe5

t4

14

trxeSr Aci

gd8 l7 6xb7+ wins or l4 __0


ls ga 6rc 16 trdt tcs
...

de7

15

af5 tr

16

Au:+-.
after 17 e6

rs trds Wc8 16 afs

6xe7 xe7

18 Ee5+

l-0

SA

Greedy Openings 9

Sicilian:

AUS+

Browne-Quinteros
Wijk aan Zee 1974 -

1e4c52af3d63gbs+g.d74
AxdT+ I{xd7 5 c4 9g4?!
5 0-0 is considered the main line.
Now Black tries to take advantage
of White's 5th by grabbing a pawn.
6 0-0 Wxe4 7 d4 cxd4 8

Eel

Logically gaining time with an at-

tack on the queen. In

Bates-

Williams, Witley 1998, White took


the pawn immediately with 8 6xd4

after

VSa

There followed 8 ... 6t0 g 6c:


Wg4 l0 Pa4+ 9d7 ll adb5 ac6
12

2l

Eel e5 which led to a draw after


moves.

8... Uc6

In

Bologan-Paranichev, USSR

Team Championship 1988, Black


experimented with 8 ... Wga and
came under enduring pressure. The
game continued t h3 Ed7 l0 Axd4

ll hc3 e6 12 9;f4 trd8 13


9e7 14 Eadl af6 ls adb5
0-0 16 9R 6e8 17 9.xd6! Axd6
l8 c5 9e7 19 cxd6 axd6 20 ad5
Wd7 2l6xd6 exd5 22Bxd5+:.
2,c6

Wd3

d_1

after 9

6dl

6xd4 Wxc4

9 ... gd7 is a more practical


choice but White has plenty of play
after l0 hb5.
l0 6a3 I{c8 11 gru gaz

rz

Aab5 e5
Quinteros's backward develop-

ment encourages White to rip open


the centre.
13

9xe5 dxe5

14 Exe5+ 9"e7

t4 ... ae7 15 af5 f6 16 afd6+


gd8 17 6xb7+ wins or 14 ... Ed8
ls gR af6 16 trdl 9c8 t7
Ab:+-.

ls trds {&c8 16 6rs rs tz

17 e6

6xe7 xe7

18 EeS+ 1-0

after 12 ... e5

l0

Greedy Openings

Nimzo-Indian:4 e3 6e4
Aleksandrov-Sulskis
New York 1998

d4

af6 2 c4 e6 3 6c3

g,b4 4

NLry-e.
l"/&LT

e3 Ae4t?

b) 5 6ge2 Uf6 0 f3 Axc3 7


6xc3 c5 8 d5 9xc3+ 9 bxc3
9xc3+?! l0 gd2 Wf0 t t Ad3 exd5
12 cxd5 9g5 13 0-0 Wxd5 14 Ac3

c4 15 9c2 9xdl 16 trftdl 0-0 17


Axc4 gave White a stranllehold on
the position in Komjenovic-Meana
Fernandez, Dos Hermanas 1998.
5... fs 6 gd3 0-0 7 dge2b6
A distinct improvement on 7 ... d5
which was played in ReshevskyKramer. USA Ch 1957, which con-

tinued: 7 ... d5 8 a3 Axc3+ 9 bxc3

b6 l0 cxd5 exd5 1l c4 dxc4 12


Axc4+ rrs t: dU ca u a4 ad6
15 gb3 a5 t6h4 treS 17 9uz us ra

after 4 ... de4

,rru,

%
T,a%i

%L%
,,ffit

gare

1e4e52a]f3f53-t-c

AA

In

Kozlov-Svendsen- Co

dence 1991. Black tricd


square for his king *irh 7
That game went 8 Agt-t
Wh4 Exht+ l0 Ed2 c3+
9g7 t2 orc3 rYg213 aor!
Axf6 95 15 Ufh5 9xe4 t6

*xg7

17 Wxg5+ and thc rcr

Black's inventive pla;'


posrtron.
8 9xg6

rl

Wxhl+ 9 c2 ef

e3

'T

."

Eager to win more mrrflil


a) l0 ... Wg2 I I 6fIAxe4 Bg7 13 axhs A6 I

Pavlanin-Sladek, Czech
after

l3Ya4

Championship 1995.

...b) lo ... 6ro ll gs5


9xf6+ Ae7 13 IIr En l,
AxfS 15 Ag5+ c7 16:&l
17 6xg6 gave White e r
ending in Grava-Budovstfo,

,i

spondence 1970.

ll

2,n+ *c7 t2 3.16

Ug5 Ae7 t4 gf4+

M
Or 14 ... d6 15 gd6-

Sne f O
xfl Utrl 17 adt trxfZ+!0-1
Checkmate will quickly follow:
l8 6xf2 trfB 19 el Uxf2+ 20
at Un+ 2t &c2 Vaz+ zz &az
Ef2+.

Correspondence

eds

8 0-0 Axc3 9 9xe4 fxe4 l0 6xc3


dS 1r b4 dc6 t2 Ub3 AaO 13 9a4
Aleksandrov is hoping for the
passive l3 ... gb7.
13 ...9xc4!
Black abandons material in search
of a lightning attack.

9xc6 3.xfl

An outrageous attqt I
to capture as much rratcrid
ible and then try to srrtiv
sulting onslaught.
. 5 d4 Bxg2 6 fYhs+ g5

d5 o,c419 -Q.xc4+.

14

---

Repp-paschitt

6xe5 9g5

This direct approach has been ignored for years in favour of more
flexible options such as 4 ... b6, 4 ...
c5 and 4 ... 0-0.
5 Wc2
Other possibilities are:
a) 5 Wga 6xc3 6 a3 9e7 7 bxc3
0-0 with equal chances.

Latvian Gambit: 4

15 Uxe6+

Wf5+ mating.

15 Aa4+ a6 t6 -e.dt+
6c5+ UO rS ad6 6ef lt I
The harmonious pcitio
White's forces encourage

after

l7 ddl

!
19 ... bxc4 20 0e4+ t
gUS+t cxb1229e4+ l{l
finish.

Greedy Openings I

Latvian Gambit:

'

... Wg5

Repp-Paschitta
Correspondence game

l99l

1e4e52aAf53Ac4fxe44
hxe5 Ug5

An outrageous attempt by Black


to capture as much material as possible and then try to survive the resulting onslaught.

5 d4 lUxg2 o 9trs+ 96 7 9f7+


d8

In

4a

4 ...o,e4

Kozlov-Svendsen, Correspon-

dence 1991. Black tried another


square for his king with 7 ... &e7.
That game went 8 9g5+! af6 9
uh+ wxht+ l0 gd2 e3+ t 1 e2
3.;g7 t2 orc3Vg213 6e4l *fa t+
9xf6 95 15 gh5 Uxe4 16 AxgT+
*xg7 17 Uxg5+ and the reward for
Black's inventive play was a lost
position.
8

9xg6 t&xhl+ 9 e2 c6 10 6c3

e3

,%

Eager to win more material. Or:

a) l0 ... Vg2 ll 6ft+ *c7 12


9xe4 Bg7 13 hxh8 af6 14 gflt
Pavlanin-Sladek, Czech Team

$w ljYaa

L'T

Championship 1995.

b) l0 ... Af6 ll Ugs trg8 12


9xf6+ 9.e7 13 gf/ trfB 14 t{xf8
AxfS 15 Ag5+ c7 16 Exhl hxg6
17 dxg6 gave White a winning
ending in Grava-Budovskis, Corre-

after

t0 0,cj

spondence 1970.

ll afl+ *c7 12 Axe3 Uxal

13

gf4+ b6
14 ... d6 15 ad6+ az t0

Wg5 9.e7 14

or

l
'ffi_

'M

Wf5+ mating.

15 6a4+ a6 16 gd3+ b5 17
ac5+ Eb6 18 ad6 6a6 19 dc4+t
The harmonious positions of
White's forces encourage a glorious

4a

17

adl

finish.

19 ... bxc4 20 6a4+


Wus+: cxb5 22 9e4+ l-0

*tl

zt

after t8 ...o,a6

12 Greedy Openings

Queen's Indian: 4 ... 9a6 5

abd2

Sicilian:

Dougherty-Ea

New York 1987

Toronto

af6 2 af3
Aao s Amz
1 d4

lll

e6 3 c4 b6 4 93

5 b3 is more natural but the text

pedigree having been


1920s by Marshall

gb3 is considered in the illustrative game Epishin-Komarov in the

(8

... 6c3 9
l0
Ua4+! o,al t1 6xe4 dxe4 12 Ah3
.AcS l3 Wc6 trb8 14 AxfT+-.
8 e5 694

gh3+,

This counteratAcki

%l, -1
LTffi

a) 8 ... 698 9 0-0 Wc7 l0 Axd4


Axg2 ll Sxg2 a6 12 VR 6c6 13

6xc6 dxc6 14 2,e4 trc8 15 9"nt


.Q"e7 16 Eadl+: Bellon Lopez-

Gamarra Caceres,

Axd2+ 14 Wxd2 dxc6 15 trdl


Hxd2+ 16 Exd2 '/r% J.Bellin-

9e4+-.

a)

5 axb4?? Ueft {

Peters, USA Ch 1984-

after 8 e5

b) 5 AR e5 6 axbt
Ae7 8 6a: hro q Ql
6xe5 Ac6: Luz-De Fi
1993.

9 0-0 9c7 10 trel 9c5?! ll

dfg't 6xe5 13 g"f4


This irritating pin is the price

Oe4! d3 12

5 ... e5 6 axM Ata'


0-0 q g'ez 6oo rt

afi

I
pieces and the king rm
the centre.
ll Afes 6xe5 12 fu
6c4 Ug5 14 fi

Hergott is clearly m
running out of decent sqt

Black must pay for taking the two


pawns.

13 ... d6 14 Ehs tg tS 6xcs


bxc5 16 Exe5 dxeS tZ Axe5 9d7
18 AxbT WxbT 19 hxe6+! g8

gd6+ EgS

If

14 0-0 then 14 ... -C.

Axd2 wins.

WeS mate.

216fs't 6xe1
gf6 1-0

20 6xg7 Ac6
Wg5+ 696 23

14

4 exd5 Uxd5 5 3-b2


Also possible:

Copeland, British League 1998.

19 ... fxe6 then 20

8 0-0 Ae7 9 tc2


a611c4b612e5&

6e8

Axe4

If

6xa3 d6 s d4 4ld7 6 O

hgf6

...

l0 9xd4 9b4+ ll gd2


AxB 12 AxR o,c6 13 Axc6

White's pawns to &


centre. The gamc ot

Lucerne

Olympiad 1982.
b) 8 . o,e4 9 6xe4 (9 0-01?) 9

pnru

claim in the centreBaccarin Viaro, Pr


Championship 1996, Bt
pawn with 3 ... bxa3

e5

pawn. Other replies are:

2l

fure another but

after 5 6bd2

9 cxd5 exd5

Kudrin seeks to undermine the

prives White of rrmrti


Having accepted rhe
pawn, Black does nd I

chapter 'Opening to the Ending'.


5... gb7 6 9g2 c5 7 e4 cxd4
7 ... oxe4? leads to calamity. For

8 6e5 d5

ad

2 ... cxb4 3 a3 d5

HtrSt g0 l0

IIR

I e4 c5 2b4
The Wing Gamti

contains a certain amount of venom.

instance:

W-gG

Adorjan-Kudrin

14 ...

22

after

l8 ...Vxb7

9e6

15 c3

Arc{

Greedy Openings I j

Sicilian: Wing Gambit

Dougherty-Hergott
Toronto 1998

I e4 c5 2b4
The Wing Gambit has a good
pedigree having been adopted in the
1920s by Marshall and Spielmann.
2 ... cxb4 3 a3 d5
This counterattacking move de-

prives White of much of his fun.


Having accepted the offer of a
pawn, Black does not greedilY caP-

4bd2

after 2 b4

ture another but proceeds to stake a


claim in the centre. In FantiniBaccarin Viaro, Pan-American
Championship 1996, Black took the
pawn with 3 ..: bxa3 which enabled

White's pawns to dominate the


centre. The' game continued: 4
Axa3 d6 s d4 ad7 o 6R eo 7 e.d3
Agf6 8 0-0 3.e7 9Ve2 0-0 l0 gb2
a6 ll c4 b6 12 e5 dxe5 13 dxe5
6e8 14 Ue4+-.
4 exd5 gxd5 5 gb2
Also possible:
a) 5 axb4?? Ue5+
Peters, USA Ch 1984.

fu6e5

0-l

Shiraziafter 4

.. Vxd5

b) 5 aR e5 6 axb4 9xb4 7 c3
Ae7 8 6a: 6ro 9 abs Uas to
6xe5 Ac6: Lutz-De Firmian, Biel
t993.
5 ... e5 6 axb4 Axb4 7 6aS Af6
0-0 9 9e2 Ac6 10 6c4 e4
Hergott is clearly on top. White is
running out of decent squares for his
pieces and the king remains stuck in
8

aR

the centre.

1l afes 6xe5
6c4 9g5

If

14

fi

12 Axes trdg

14 0-0 then 14 ... 9.h3 15

tl

'T

'T

{%

%a%
gru-L

6e3

Axd2 wins.

14...9e615 c3 9xc4 0-l

after 10... e4

I4

Greedy Openings

Nimzo-Indian: 4 e3,6 ...0le4


Keres-Spassky
Game Eight, Candidates Mstch,
Riga 1965

1 d4
e3 b6 5

,,mi

l
%"%

Af6 2 c4 e6 3 6c3 fuat t


90r guz 6 6R Ae4 7 0-0

14

ga3

A precautionary
Spassky castling

obvious 14 Hxc3

Ue,

Uar+ rs trgl

and the game agein


ual check.

7... Axc3

t4 ... Ae4 r5 Efi I


15 ... 6c6 is the h
16 d5 he5 17 Lc2

The challenge is accepted. Other

more promising

Keres offers a pawn in return for


attacking opportunities.

replies:

a) 7 ...f5 8 d5 Axc3 9 bxc3 6c5


l0 9'a3 Abao t I Ac2 (l t trel Uf6
12 Vc2 96 13 e4 fte4 14 9xe4
0-0-0 l5 0raZ+= Sadler-Ward,
Hastings 1997) | ... gf6 t2 ad4
0-0 13 R 96 t4 wd2 eS 15 trf2 d6
t6 Ae2 olal n ht 6ac5 18 trgl
9a6:+ Buckley.Ward, Britiih

after 7 0-0

t6

&n

fim

9m lz

e.e2

tH
rmt

An admission
gone wrong. Spas*
to sort out his
but 18 ... aa6 wae
Aac5 (19 ... dxe6 20

9xc5 bxc5
Edt+-.

2l a

209;b?Jl

Championship 1998.

19 e4 c5

b) 7 ...6xc3 8 bxc3 3.xc3 9 Ebl


6c6 l0 trb3 Aa5 I I e4! h6 t2 3;b2

White continues rc

6u+ t3 Abl Aa6 t4 a3 alc6 t5


Vc2 0,e7 16 d5 trg8 17 trdl c5 18
dxe6 fte6 19 6e5 d6 20 trR Wc7
21 Va4+ b5 22 cxb'+- Nikcevic-

8 bxc3 6xc3 9 9c2 3.xB

gxB Ug5+

tl

ll

which is well met

...Vhs

12

96 23

b5r

E$

ft
23... EdS 24 9B
A subtle shuffi
Axg6+ and corri
under the most ftw
and 25

superb move which sacrifices

...9xf3+

22gt

Introducing the

10

Eht UnS rZ Egr:

another pawn to maintain the initiative. The players could also make an
e.arly peace agreement after 12 bg2

Wg5+ 13 *hl

2r ... ahs
There is no relitf
after

Vuksanovic. Heraklio 1993.

the board and nos


ous way to trap thc

ghs A*g2ggs+.

Afl.

stances.

24 ...EgB 2s IlD l.
Since 25 ory:7Z-

13 trg2 f5

Black is struggling in other lines:


a) 13 ... Wxdl+ 14 Uxdl 6xdl

27 Vxg6+

Ac2 Ac3 16 AbZ+-.


b) 13 ... d5 14 9a3 6e4 t5 cxd5
exd5 16 Axe4 9xe4 17 VxcT 0rd7
l8 trcl f5 19 gd6+- (Nunn).

*e7 2tr

ExgT ExgT+ 30 UrS


9xe6 32 tha+ ecz
White completely ri

15

ing to an analysis by
after

l5 Efl

Greedy Openings 15

14 ga3

precautionary measure

to

stop

Spassky castling kingsidg. Ihe


obvious 14 Uxc3 fails after 14 ...
Wdt+ rs trgt Uf:+ 16 trg2 Udt+
and the game again ends in PerPetual check.

t4 ...6e415 trfi trg8?!


15 ... 6c6 is the best bet but after
16 d5 Oe5 17 9.e2 White has the

more promising future.

t6 9:e2 UnS rZ R Af6 18 d5


gfl

after 18 d5

An admission that something has


gone wrong. Spassky would Prefer
to sort out his retarded development
but 18 ... 6a6 walks into 19 dxe6!
Aac5 (19... dxe6 20Va4+ wins) 20

9xc5 bxc5
Edl+-.
19 e4 c5 20

2l

gb2

exdT+
14

2l

*d8

22

e5

White continues to gain sPace on


the board and now finds an ingenious way to trap the black queen.

2r ... ahs

There is no relief in 2l ... 6e8


which is well met by 22tVe4.
22

*gr

96?3trga

'-%-L%'T

%%%L%
A"'ffi'N'%,9%Eafter

2l

e5

Introducing the threat of 24 trf2


and 25

9fl.

23... Ed8 24 9;d3

A subtle shuffle threatening


Axg6+ and cornering the queen
under the most favourable circumstances.

24 ... Eg8 25 trf2 r-0


Since 25 ...de'l 26 Axg6+ hxg6
27 Vxg6+ +.e7 28 gto+ *es zg
axe0
ExgT ExgT+ 30 UxgT UfS
Uxe6 32 Utr8+ ez 33 Eg2 leaves
White completely winning according to an analysis by Nunn.

:t

after 25 EJ2

l6

Greedy Openings

d4 e6 2

aR af63

ig5

Dutch:Leningrad5

Torre Attack: 4 c3
Ilebden-Grabuzova
Cappelle la Grande I997

Smyslov-BeliavskrSochi 1986

rd4f52c4af63adgaa

9.g5 c5 4 c3

speciality of Hebden who


prefers to avoid the well known

Agz s Waz.

lines associated with 4 e3.


4 ... cxd4 5 cxd4 h6
Alternatives are:

one which has caught our a


of good players. The idea is o
the obvious 5 ... 0-0 br'6 3h6

a) 5 ... Ua5+ 6

An innocuous-looking mou

0f3

abd2 g.e7 7 e3 h6

8 gh4 a,c6 9 a3 a6 l0 g.d3 d5 1l


0-0 b5 12 Ae5 6xe5 13 dxe5 6d7
14 9xe7 xe7 15 f4 9,b7 16 AA
96 17 alA++: Horvath-Sziebert,

9xf6 Uxf6 7 e4
It makes sense to seize the centre
but the dull 7 e3 has been tried in
6

the past.

gb4+ 8 6c3 0-0 9 Ecl Ug6


gd3
The threat ofe5 encourages Black
after I0

ildj

13 Exc3
In retum for the pawn White has a
lead in development and a half-open
g-file, already occupied by a strong
rook. Moreover the black queen is
running out ofdecent squares.

... b6 14 6e5

18

17

19

ll

,l

12 ... trf8 13 AxhT ertl


HxhT b4 ls ad5 9xd5 15 E
d6 17 sbr b3! r8 axb3 Ebt
White's undeveloped krrS
cannot help the deferrce

kill

6xg5+-.

17 Exgl+ h8 f8 dxes 3.a6


Wtl Eac8 20 trrg4 1-0

h1
vra 95 is rather slou' SEr
should prefer 9 f3 9a5 l0 0+.{
I I cxb5 a6 12 e4l r+ rth dor

The ex-World Champion is c


ing the h-pawn but at the neglu
getting his kingside pieces inro p

16...6xe5

aR!gf4

Wxh6 Axc5 9 Am?!


This plan of pursuing rhe

9 ... Wa5 10 0-0-0 b5


fuat nWgt

6c6

Or 16 ... 95 is well met by

edged play according to BelierC

Wn+ rS Anr

16 trcg3
Hebden goes straight for the
with simple chess.

6nrcgilh5 1laad6 l:

6 dxc5 8\a6 7 5f66 $ ll

Axc3+

13

---

Sadler-Tseitlin, Hastings I99l

7 ...

10

rr Egl 9trl tZ aS

e3 2ic6 8 d5 {}c5

b) 5 ... Q\c6 6 0-GO h6 " J


Axf6 8 e4 6xd4 9 exf5 ed
6ge2 c5 11 6xd4 cxA+ i:
9u0 t: hxd4 0-0 14 h.{ d6 t5
gd7 16 Wxh6 Ag7 l7
White pushed his h-paun ro=st
rfo

Sangla-Karpov,
USSR Team Championship 1968.

Wxg2

9xf6 exf6 I

Wockenfuss, Bad Lauterberg lg

6xd2 Wa5 0-l

...

trh6 13 0-0-0 gd7 14 Ehe I o


threat of e4 leaves Black's
dangerously vulnerable. U

gur 10 9c2!?) 6 ...


2,e4 7 9.f4 6c6 8 e3 gb4+ 9
abd2? g5! l0 Axg5 Axd2+ tt

10

with a strong

Other moves are: a)

after 4 c3

Budapest 1995.
b) s ... 9u0 o

to be greedy.

cO 8 h4

5 ... c5

after

l6

Ecg3

Beliavsky is ready to pounce.


l9 E[xg6+ gd7 20 Exf5

*c2 6xb3

tctr

0-1

Greedy Openings

Dutch: Leningrad 5 Ag5


Smyslov-BeliavskY
Sochi 1986 1 d4 f5 2 c4

gg7 s gd2

af63 Ac3

96 a 3"g5

An innocuous-looking move but


one which has caught out a number
of good players. The idea is to meet

the obvious 5 ... 0-0 by 6 Ah6 d6 7


2R c6 8 h4 with a strong attack"

5... c5
Other moves are: a)

Ser

4 c3

'%L

i%

%
L'%

5 ... h6 6
9xf6 exf6 7 e3 orc6 8 d5 6e5 9 fll
afl to gd3 hs 1l afl d6 12ah4
Eh6 13 0-0-0 gd7 14 Ehel and the
threat of e4 leaves Black's king
dangerously vulnerable, MilesWockenfuss, Bad Lauterberg 1977.

b) s ... 2,c6 6 0-0-0 h6 7 Axf6


Axf6 8 e4 Q\xd4 9 exf5 gxf5 l0
6ge2 c5 I I 6xd4 cxd4 12 db5
guo r: a)xd4 0-0 t4 h4 d6 15 trh3
9..d7 16 Wxfr0 AgZ l7 trg3 and
White pushed his h-pawn to victory.
Sadler-Tseitlin, Hastings 1991.

6 dxc5 0, i6 7 gh6 gxh6

r0 9.d3

Wxh6 Axcs 9 ah3?!


This plan of pursuing the h-Pawn

vra 95 is rather slow" SmYslov


should prefer 9 B 9a5 10 0-0-0 b5
I I cxb5 a6 12 e4l with doubleedged play according to Beliavsky.

9 "." Was r0 0-0-0 b5


gb7 t2'Es7

ll

695

The ex-World Champion is chasing the h-pawn but at the neglect of


getting his kingside pieces into play.

12 ... trfB 13 6xh7 AxhT t4


HxhT b4 15 ad5 9xd5 16 Exd5
d6 17 Ebr b3! 18 axb3 Eb8
White's undeveloped kingside
cannot help the defence and
16&cgj

Beliavsky is ready to pounce.


19 Wxg6+ *d7 20 trxfS Wel+ 21

c2 6xb3 0-1

AA

after 5tUd2

E%{ru- I

%%
LT_ %

%"ffiE
after

l2Vg7

A
%

l7

l8

Greedy Openings

Spanish: Worrall Attack 6 Ue2

Queen's Gambit Accepted: 3

Posazennikov-Lane

--_

Illescas-Anand

Leuven 1995

2nd Match Game. Leon l99a

le4e5zAR0c63gb5a64
ilat btc 5 o-0 Ae7 6 Se2

f d4 d5 2 c4 dxc43 AR 16 ircJ
White chooses to transpose lo d

This way of playing the Spanish is


a favourite of mine which makes it
doubly diffrcult for my opponent to
play against!

6... bs

Classical variation. Other trres:

a) 4 a4l?

%
,rffira

held on to the extra par+l- C-aci

A small percentage of players fall


into the mire with 6 ... 0-0, allowing
7 Axc6 dxc6 8 6xe5 Ude 9 aR
Wxe4 l0 9xe4 6xe4 I I Eel+-.

Dlugy, New York 1991.

b)

after 6Ve2

7gb3o-08c3d59d3

9 exd5 is a critical alternative but


concedes the initiative. so it is not

surprising that Black came out


better in the game Calzetta-Mitkov.
Las Palmas 1995: 9 ... e4 10 695
(10 dxc6 3"ga!) 10 ... ha5 1l Ac2
Aga D R exf3 13 6xB Ee8 14 d4
Wxd5 15 gd3 9.h5 16 6e5 g;9617

6xg6 hxg6 18 9'fl1c5:+.


e... gb7 l0 trdr
Against Michael Adams, London
1993,I tried l0 6bd2 which apparently made him confuse his systems.
The game continued l0 ... EeS ll

dxe4 14
dxe4 3.d6 f5 Oga Axe4 t6 6xf6+
gxf6 t7 Ae3 f5 r8 R gb7 t9 gd3
Vtrl: zo Aaz
.20 93 is destroyed by 20
9xg3-*.
20 ... axh2+ 2r sfl trad8 0-l

bxc4 bxc4 8 6c3 gb4 9

i-df QI
ad5 ll 9cl 6xc3 ll -i,xc
c5 13 dxc5 9a5 14 Axbr Orb+
l0

e5

hxc4 0{ 17 fr
l8 6xe3 6d7 gar-e Bld

15 ad2 Wxc5 16

pleasant ending in Ivanov-SalovPetersburg 1997.

%s
\'.ru %h%
W','.ru-L

4 ... af6 5 9xc4 e6 6 0{ d


9"Ul 6cO 8 9e2 cxd4 9 Edr 3r
l0 exd4 6a5! lr Ac2 b5 12 Aa
gb7 13 Ae5 trcE 14 a3 0{ tS tra
6c4! 16 trg3?
White offers a pawn in sa6} g
for pressure on the g-file; An
suggests.that l6 g.g5 haS is eqret
16... Wxd4! 17 9"h6
Consistent, since if 1.1

afterll...o,a5

&o,

Exc4 Black is better.

t / ...

We4 and White eventually won.

f2 ... 6xb3 13 axb3

4 e4b5 5 a4 gb7 6 b3 c6

Eflxe3*

a3 Af8 12 trel Ab8? 13 exd5


hxd5 14 d4 oic615 dxe5 at4 t6
10... Ee8lr 9g5 Aa5 12 4xe5
This looks good but I soon regain
the pawn with the bonus of a powerful pair of bishops.

6c6 5 6c3 6s5 6 3.1

6feleqe689c2gM9Edtt
l0 Ae2 g.b7 n 0-0 0-0 and BL6

%sry,ru

L%

It seems risky to accept the m


terial in the face of an attack L
there are always exceptions

o tL

rule.

l8 trxg7+

%L%

%%%
L,
-W"ru L

Or l8 Edl and now ... 1}c5

l9...Vhq

t9

AxgT 6Jg6 blunrs the onslaught_


18... gh8 19 Edr

The pin on the knighr

trg5
20

after

?_lxes

tr

195

$ifr

19

d by 19 ... =g8:

fl 6ga-.

Great vision but it is flawed.

20... Axd5 21Wxe5

Ael: Ut

Greedy Openings 19

Queen's Gambit Accepted: 3 ... a6

Illescas-Anand

@,,ru478
'ffi-t'ffi-t

2nd Match Gctme, Lepn 1997

r d4 d5 2 c4 dxc4 3 6R a6l e3
White chooses to transpose to the
Classical variation. Other tries:

a'l4 a4l? 6c6 5 Ac3 Aa5 6 .Q.fll


6fe I eq e6 8 Uc2 gb4 9 trdl b5
l0 9e2 gb7 ll 0-0 0-0 and Black
held on to the extra Pawn, GarciaDlugy. New York 1991.

b)4e4b55a49b76b3e67

after 6Ve2

6c3 gb4 9 gd2 Af6


l0 e5 6d5 l1 l4cl 6xc3 12 9xc3
c5 13 dxc5 9a5 14 Axb4 Vxb4+
15 ad2 9xc5 16 6xc4 0-0 l7 Ue3
EIxe3* l8 Axe3 0,d7 gave Black a

bxc4 bxc4 8

%a'ffi-a
w'ffi9%
after

... a6

pleasant ending in lvanov-Salov, St


Petersburg 1997.

4 ... af6 5 Axc4 e6 6 0-0 c5

9nl 6co 8 9e2 cxd4 9 trdl Ae7

10 exd4 6a5! ll 9"c2 b5 12 2,c3


gb7 13 6e5 Ec8 14 a3 0-0 15 Ed3
6c4! 16 trg3?
White offers a pawn in exchange
for pressure on the g-file; Anand
suggests that l6 g.g5 6d5 is equal.
16... Wxd4! 17 gh6
Consistent, since if 17 Axc4

ufter

Edl

Exc4 Black is better.


17

It

...6xe5
seems risky

to accept the

terial in the face

ma-

of an attack but

there are always exceptions to the


rule.
18 trxg7+

Or 18 trd1 and now ... Wc5 19


3-xg7 696 blunts the onslaught.

18... h8 19 trdr

19

The pin on the knight with 19


Eg5 can be refuted by 19 ... trg8!
20 Exe5 Exg2+ 2l fl dg4-+.
19 ... Bc5 20 Ed5
Yh4

Great vision but it is flawed.


20...9xd5 21 9xe5 9e4! 0-l

after l6 Hg3

20 Greedv Openings

Conclusion

The

The pros and cons of accepting


material have to be carefully considered. Snatching even a single
pawn in the opening can be perilous

Art of Attack

I You can sacrifice material

to

if it leaves your development in a

gain a lead in development.


2 Remember that long-term pressure can be suflicient compensation
for material loss.

2Ch

backward state. Though pawngrabbers sometimes have the last


laugh, more common is the fate of
Smyslov against Beliavsky where

3 Promote your attack with an aggressive piece formation and do not


think that your opponent will automatically lose just because his

spectacular ways of garniq

is

the ex-world champion's excursion

queen

to win pawns ends in disaster after

every available pawn.

spending time capturing

hrs defenceless king falls victim to a

violent counter-attack.

Another warnlng

The

is

sounded by
the game Hebden-Grabuzova. Here
Black's win of a hot pawn merely
leads to the opening of a line of attack against his own king, thus en-

abling the opponent to

through in double-quick time.

break

Art of Defence

I Think before you capture material. There is usually some motive


behind a sacrifice.
2 Calculate accurately. There are
many cases where material is wildly

sacrificed only for the subsequent


attack to be abruptly rebuffed by

strong defensive move.

3 Do not lag behind in development.

great many defeats can be

attributed to neglect of this basic


general principle. Sometimes winning a pawn is simply not worth all
the trouble!

The king-hunt is one of

and is sure to proride

1'

lasting happy memories----u


course, you happen to be
losing side! It is surprisi
often the right conditions ft

hunt arise but also hr


chances are missed.

The king is usuallv rcll


behind a row of par*ns ard
be prised open by meaas d
fice. Once on an open bo

ever, the poor monarcb

itself subject to attack bp


pieces and running for its

fruitless attempt

ro
checkmate. Nevertheless
sacrifice entails a degree

since

it

often involr-es

'

calculation of many variatir


it is often necessan' ro m
intuition.
Our illustrative games sl

power

of

such factors a

development and

calculation and the role rbesr


the chase.

Art of Attack
sacrifice material to
development.

that long-term Pres-

affcient

compensation

lGs.
your attack with an agfomration and do not
opponent will auto-

just

because his

time capturing
pawn.

Art of Defence
bcfore you capture ma-

b usually

some motive

accurately. There are


where material is wildlY

for the subsequent


ailruptly rebuffed bY

bg behind in

develoPmany defeats can be


qlect of this basic

irle.

Sometimes winis simply not worth all

Chasing the King

The king-hunt is one of the most


spectacular ways of gaining victory

ind is

sure

to provide You with

lasting happy memories---unless, of


course, you haPPen to be on the
losing side! It is surPrising how
often the right conditions for a king
hunt arise but also how often
chances are missed.

The king is usually well fortified


behind a row of pawns and can onlY
be prised open by means of a sacrihce. Once on an oPen board, how-

ever, the poor monarch will find


itself subject to attack by hostile
pieces and running for its

fruitless attemPt to

life in

avoid

checkmate. Nevertheless such a


sacrifice entails a degree of risk
since it often involves the Precise
calculation of many variations. Here
it is often necessary to trust Your

intuition.

Our illustrative games show the


power of such factors as better

development and

accurate

Though it may sound as if we can

all win the brilliancY

Pize,

opportunities still have to be spotted

well as blind alleYs. In

-as
games

the

Movsziszian-Stoll, Short-

Piket and Shaked-Raptis the king is


dragged into the oPen Yet ends uP

perfectly safe! A studY of such


games will add a note of caution
before you next invest material on

king hunt.
One great advantage of chasing a

king in the opening is that the opponent's pieces will probably not have
had time to get coordinated and maY
even still be sitting on their original
squares-as is the case in Romero
Holmes-Soto Perez.

A final

reminder that amazing

games are not confined to the mod-

ern era is the classic attack


Lasker-Thomas, a personal favourite of mine.

In this chapter we have gone


further than give examples of Pure
tactical calculation and attempted to

calculation and the role these play in

explore the very foundations

the chase.

successful king hunt.

of

22 Chasing

the King

Austrian Attack: 7 e5

French Tarrasch:

Hansen-Hoi
Dantsh Champtonship 1998 -

Los Angeles

te4962daAg7 36c3 d64f4


o,tal I es

gb6

l0 dxc6 bxc6 ll hl which

White's aggressive intentions.

8... dxeS

after

xf7 l0 e6+

gaus-Hahnewald. Bundesliga

7 e5

ELffi
3. ,ffiT

',ru,@

'ffi,D.

,ru"%

c) 8 ... 6b6 lrecommended by


Nunn who assesses the position as
unclear) 9 Ae3 c6 l0 h4 f6? I I

g8

after I1...6c7

Ankerst-Ramseier, Silvapl ana I 993 .

9 fxes

6m ro Ae3 c6 rt

0-0

8\c7 12 axhT!Abds

follow 12 ... xh7. e.g.


xf7 t4 WhS+ g8 15
16 Eh7+ f8 17 gh6
e8 l8 WxgT Bxd4+ 19 hl Ef2
20 trdl 2,cd5 216e4 winning.
13 Axd5 6xd5 14 9"g5 *xh7 15
trxf7 trxf7 16 Ehs+ Sg8 17 9xg6
6r+ tt AxfT+ rs rs thzt
Intending Efl.
19 ... Wxd4+ 20 Ehr *xf7 2t
Efl Wxe5 22 Exf4+ 9e8 23 Wg6+
*0t zt trer gas 25 trxe7 1-0

6n

ro

,,M,Aru

cc

9 exf6 Axf6 l0 (H) 3.df


If Black tries to trdnsprc
main line with l0 .. n.

White can play the surpri


6exd4 with pressure agaim
11 ...

Ac5

12 b4l

Axd4

13

trbl U6
a5 16 Ba4+ fual n gxbe
6e7 15 a4 intending -8r3
(13 ... 6xba 14

gives White excellent


11 dxcS!

988.

OxhT! f5 (ll ... *xh7 12 thS+


13 9xg6+-1 12 h5 xh7 13
hxg6+ Sg8 14 Eh5 6f6 ts exf6
trxf6 16 Wtrz+ fS 17 ghS+ 1-0

common inaccuracy

as occurs in the normal


8 ... cxd4 9 cxd4 f6.

telegraphs

xe6? I I Wg4+ *fl 12 Ac4+ d5


l3 Axd5+ f0 ta 6e4 mate.
b) 8 ... e6?l t h4 h6 l0 h5 hxg5
ll hxg6 fxg6 12 9xg6 trxf4 13
axPt gxf:t 14 gh5 f8 15 0-0-0
We7 16 trhfl dxe5 17 dxe5 6xe5
18 Exfit+ 6f0 tS Wxe5 wins Flo-

l99l

rarely punished. Black's il


avoid releasing the cearrrl

gives White a slight advantage.

a) 8 ... h6? 9 AxfT!

le4e62d4d53od2,Q

The usual line with 7 0-0 can be


answered with 7 ... e5 8 fxe5 dxe5 9

7...6e8 S 6gs!
A critical move which

_--

hrazsAatcs6dAd

Aro s 6n o.o 6 3"d3


d5 c6

Shaked-Raprir

chrc
-e.I

Axc5 t2 M

The speculative sacrifu


Axf2+?!, seen in Van Ba
Rijn, Dieren 1997, failed b
cal sequence after 13 trxf,l {
2rcd4 8\xt215 xD e5 16
Axe5 17 WtrS+ 69O l8 trd
le gl trf7 20 Ags 3-a; r
&fB 22 9c4 l-0
13 a3 Ae5 14 6re5 -fu
ges Bas 16 gd4
Shaked enjoys a lead in d
ment which prompts his
take desperate measures.

16 ... Axh2+ 17

g3!

op

efi2 ei

18 gl is met by tS ..- t
now Black has problems o

White's wandering king.


18 ... h5 19 9.96+ *c7 a
21 9c5+ *e6 22 f5+ gff 2
b6 24 &h4
after

I9Vh7

t-0

Superb! The

king smor

threat of 25 EIg5 mate.

Chasing the

King

French Tarrasch: 8 ... f6

Shaked-Raptis

'

ll

Los Angeles-1991

,ru,

te4e62d4d53ad2hr6les

6raz s 3.d3 c5 6 c3 Ac6 7 o,e?


guo s An ro

,A

common inaccuracy which is


rarely punished. Black's idea is to
avoid releasing the central tension
as occurs in the normal continuation

8 ... cxd4 9 cxd4 f6.


9 exf6 Axf6 l0 0-0 9.d6
If Black tries to transpose into the
main line with l0 ... cxd4 then

6%

after 8

...

f6

White can play the surprising l l


6exd4 with pressure against e6, e.g.

I ... Ac5 12 b4! Axd4 13 cxd4 0-0


ts 3.a:
a5 16 Ua4+ gal n gxb4+) t4 b5
he7 15 a4 intending Aa3 which
I

(13 ... 6xb4 14 Ebl Ua0

w,ffi

ffis
afier I I...Dc7

'ffii');

gives White excellent chances.

ll

dxcS! Axc5 12 b4 9"d6

The speculative sacrifice 12 ...


Axf2+?!. seen in Van Baarle-Van

,,ffi,a

Rijn, Dieren 1997, failed to a tactical sequence after 13 trxf2 Ag4

&f8224c4 l-0
13 a3 6e5 14 6xe5 9xe5
Ae3 tsd8 16 gd4

',L,ffi

14

Ded4 6xf215 xf2 e5 16 6xe5!


6xe5 l7 UtrS+ 69O l8 Uxd5 trf8+
19 gl Ef7 20 Ag5 9d7 2l Eel+

after

t6

9,d4

15

Shaked enjoys a lead in development which prompts his opponent to


take desperate measures.

16... Axh2+ 17 xh2 694+ l8


*g3!
is egt is met by l8 ... gh4 but

now Black has problems comering


White's wandering king.
l8 ... h5 19 3-96+ *e7 20 f4 e5

2l Ac5+ *e6 22 f5+ f6 23 wd2

b6 24 Eh4 1-0

afier l9tVh7

Superb! The king supports the


threat of 25 Ug5 mate.

after 24

*h4

24

Chasing the. King

King's Gambit, Cunningham Defence


Short-Piket
Madrid 1997

e4 e5 2

f4

exf4 3

aA

French: Classical Vanarrm

Topalov-Bareev
Linares 1994

le4e62d4d53adm

9.e7 4

Ac3 Ah4+ 5 e2
This line was popular over

Ag5 dxe4

Avoiding the mass of theory- a


ciated with 4 ... gb4 and 4 .,. 3cl
5 6xe4 9e7 6 9xf6 Arft 7

100

years ago but has been unfashionable ever since and is very rarely
seen at international level.

ad7 8 gc2

5 ... d5

I f2 9rc n

exd5 0-0

t3

after 5

*e2

9g2

game Weenink-Maroczy. HoIh

7 9xf4 0le7
8 gfi dg6 9 Ae3 0-0 l0 gd2
AxR ll gxB Ae5 12 9xg5
Bxg5+ l3 We3 9xe3+ t/r/z

1930, White gained the bener cr


ing after 8 .." We7 9 0-G0 0{ lO

c5 ll 94 96 12 95 9.g: tr a
cxd4 14 6xd4 e5 15 fte5 Uxc5

Olesen-Lukacs, Budapest 1994.

&,lmg

6 6xd5 af6 7 axf6+ Wxf6 8 d4


gs4 9 Ed2!
A clever improvement on moves

such as 9 c3 and 9 e5. Short intends


to shelter the king Uy dt-cZ.

%a:%

^,M&'%L

l0

c3 0-0-0!? 1l Bxf4
We612 e3 95 13 Axg5 9xg5 14

after 9Vd2

Wxg5 f5 15 h3!
A crucial move as 15 gd3 is well
met by 15 ... 6xd4! 16 cxd4 9b6
17

White could even get away with


snatching the rook, e.g. 17 xd4
Efrxe4+ 18 c3 9e5+ 19 &c2

We4+ 20 9d3 Wxg2+


Vc6+ 22 Ac3 winning.

2l

ll

%%
A

3,d2

f2 fxg4 19 Eh6
trf8+ 20 gl Exfl+ 2l xfl trel+
22 &n We2+ 23 *gS gaS+ Za
xg4l-0

Wc5 19 gds.
9 dxeS hxeS l0 f4 ag5
0-0 12 gd3 gds!
White was intending 13 0{F{F=

rf

l3 a3?!
4\e2 should be considered
Oxf4! 14 6xf6+
14 gxf4 is bad. e.g. 14 .. 3.Jr
13

13 ...

gfl (15 gd2 trd8 or 15 &


ag4+ t6 hn rs-+1 ls...f516a
fxe4 17 Axe4 .4h3+ 18 gt IC
19 ad4 Exf4-+.
14 ... gxf6 15 AxhT+ geT I
We4 treE! 17 gxeS gf5!!
In l9th century romantic sfl
15

when the onslaught continues.

15 ... 6xd4 16 cxd4 Exd4

e5!

Bareev seizes the initiatir-e. In t

of Man 1997.
b) s ... d6 6 d4 9g4

hxg4

aR.

8...

cxd5 14 Ehel= David-Hebden, Isle

9 ... 6c6

An old idea recommended \r


theory books. If Black casrls E
move, White can build-up a rEGl
able attack by f4. 0-G0. idl e

The most direct, offering a pawn


for quicker development. Others:
a) 5 ... c6 6 d4 d5 7 9.xf4 Ag4 8
Hd: hez 9 93 0,s610 Axb8 trxbS

Black sheds another piece in m


of the attack. The white queen rl

be diverted from its defensir-e rolc-

18 Bxa8 We4+ 19 &nVgZ+2


$es Aas+ 2t *d4 gd2+

17 ... Exe4+ 18

after 16 ..trxd4

The brilliancy prize is assured!


22 &c5 We3+ 23 c4 ab6+ Dl

Chasing the

French: Classical Variation

Topalov-Bareev
Linares 1994

le4e62d4d5 36c3 af64


Ag5.dxe4
Avoiding the mass of theory associated with 4 ... gb4 and 4 ... Ae7.

5 6xe4 Ae7 6 Axf6 Axf6 7


haz s Ucz

c3

An old idea recommended bY the


theory books. If Black castles next
move, White can build-up a reasonable attack by f:1, 0-0-0, Ad3 and

{ter

5 @e2

aR.
8...

after 8Yc2

e5!

Bareev seizes the initiative. In the


game Weenink-Maroczy, Holland
1930, White gained the better ending after 8 .." We7 9 0-0-0 0-0 10 f4

c5

tt

94 96 12 95 9g7 13 hR

cxd414 6xd4 e5 15 fte5 Uxe5

Ag2 6c5 17 h4 6xe4 18

16

Wxe4

Wc5 19 Wd5.

9 dxe5 6xe5 l0 f4 696 1l

93

0-0 12 gd3 Eds!


White was intending 13 0-0-0+:.

6d evd2

after

14 gxf4 is bad. e.g. 14 ... gh4+


15 fl (15 d2 EdS or 15 e2
ag4+ 16 6r: rs-+) ls ... fs 16 aa
fxe4 17 Axe4 th3+ l8 gl Wc5+
t9 ad4 Exf4-+.
14 ... gxf6 15 AxhT+ @97 16
9e4 tre8! 1z 9xe8 Afs::
In l9th century romantic style,
Black sheds another piece in name
of the attack. The white queen will

17

gfs

be diverted from its defensive role.

9e4+ 19 f,Z gg2+ 20


*es Aas+ 2l d4 Ed2+
18 Wxa8

*
,6 .

13 a3?!
13 0,e2 should be considered.
13 ... hxf4! 14 hxf6+

Exd4

The brilliancy prize is assured!


22&cS 9e3+ 23 Sc+ 6t0+ O-t

after

2l ...VaZ+

King 25

26 Chasing

the King

English: 3 ... f5

Catalan: 7 Ua4

Seirawan-Browne

Korniushin-Kofenov
Novgorod 199'

Berkley 1979

lc4e526c3Ac63aRf54d4
695 h6 6Am 95

ld4d52af3e6393Q
Ag2 c5 5 0-0 Ac6 6 c4 drc{

e4 5

Browne boldly advances on the


kingside in an attempt to exploit the

time wasted by White's king's

repum
being solid but White can c
complications with this pin u

knight.

knight.

The Catalan has the

7R

a) 7 e3 6f0 8 Agt d6 t h4 trgS


l0 hxg5 hxg5 ll R exB 12 6xR
gd7 13 d5 6e5 t4 3.e2 Ue7 15

6xe5 Uxe5

16

gd4 Eg3+ with

the

7 ... 9.d7 8 9xc4 crd4


trc8 10 6c3 9e7

after 6 ...

g-5

initiative, Lindenmaier-Ikonnikov,
Germany 1995.

7 a,gt

af6

l0 6ge2 o,e7

8 h4! 94 9 e3

tt

6hsr

'AZ $.;sl 12 Eb3


d6 13 6aS A96: Polugaevsky
-Seirawan, Haninge 1990.
7... exf3 8 exf3 Ag7 9 d5?!
9 Ae3 is better.

9... we7+ r0 d2!?


This is quite ambitious but understandable in view l0 We2 Uxe2+ I I

LxeZ 2rd4 when Black's

strong

dark-squared bishop gives


comfortable ending.

him

10... ad4 rr gd3 d8!


A remarkable position has arisen
with both players having moved
therr kings to the d-file. In Black's
case it was to avoid the pin by Eel.

Axc4 WcS 15 d3?!

Or 15 b3 Aa6 16 $'xa6 6xe2 17


Sxe2 Eflxc3 l8 trbl Wa5 19 Ad3
Wxd5T

f5 ... Eb8 16 Ae3 9xc4+!

%A'ffi
%'ffiL
sru_ffi %a

17

after

ll

.. *aA

l0 ... Axd4 I I Uxdl &.'


trdl 9to r+ I
trxc6 (14 ... Wxc6 15 ih6:
gh6! Af8 (15 ... Axtr- 16
Wtr+ 9"co 13

0-0 17 AxeT exeT 18 Ee519 Wxf6+ ind 2OYxPt t; &


17 tradl Ec8 l8 e4 EcS 19 e5!
20 Ag5 2,e7 2l S[a{+ fl66 rr
h6 23 gf6 trg8 2a a3 Le7 5 .!
&xe7 26 Bc4 l-0 Hulak-Sah
Nis 1985.
ll trdl gb6?! t2 6xc6 Arr
Ae3 Uxb2?! 14 Eabl rgr3
14 ... Wc2l? gives rr\lrrrc f
attacking options but this dc
necessarily make Black's pc
any more palatable after 15 -&.1
bxc6 (15 ... Exc6? 16 9xc6* I
17 EbS- gaS tS Ebxd8- *r
9c5 mate) 16 9xa7*:.
15 Axc6+ Exc6

l5

3.
,,ru

l6 hUs: trr

l6 Wxc6+l
worthy finishing ror.rch

,N

splendid game.

e
,ffi
after

... bxc6

6a7+-.

xc4 9a6+ f8 ab5 6xb5 0-l


In view of 19 d3 ac3+ 20 *c2
Exb2* 2l &xb2 6xdl+ 22 *ct
6xe3-+ or 19 6d4 ad4i_ 20 *ca
6e2+ 2l dZ trxbZ+ 22 *et 9c3+
n *n AU+ Zq *gl Exg2 mate.

ti

l6

Ae3

16 ... bxc6 17 trb8+ .t-dl


trdxd8+ e7 19 trxhE Uxcl
trb7+ d6
The king is forced to*-ards
centre of the board. 20 ... C]d'l
be met by 2l tra8!+-.
21 trd8+ *e5 22 904+ txil
Exd4

*xd4 24 e3+ l-0

Chasing the

King 27

Catalan: 7 E[a4

Korniushin-Kofanov
Novgorod 1997

L'% %t.ffi-t

ld4d52af3e6393at64

.Q"g2 c5 5 0-0 6c6 6 c4 dxc4 7 Va4


The Catalan has the reputation of
being solid but White can create
complications with this pin on the

"%'A i'ffi-

knight.

7 ... S:dl 8 Wxc4 cxd4 9 6xd4


trc8 10 6c3 Ae7

{ter 5

l0 ... 6xd4 ll Wxd4 Ac5 12


9co 13 trdl 9uo t+ Aco+

Wn+
95

2l
trs8
&xe7 26 Vc4

20 9g5 orc7
h6 23 gf6

Nis

2J

x
a\

&.

fu t]

.*ds

ic,

1985.

11 Edr 9u0z: 12 4\xc6 Axc6


Ae3 Uxb2?! 14 Eabl Ua3

-Y-

e4
e7

13

14 ... Vc2t? gives White fewer


attacking options but this does not
necessarily make Black's position
any more palatable after 15 9xc6+
bxc6 (15 ... Exc6? 16 Uxc6+ bxc6
17

Eb8-

-9"d8

l8 Ebxd8+ *e7

after I5...Vxc6

19

Ac5 mate) l6 3"xa7+=.


15

glgf+ Exc6
... bxc6 l6 ab5! Ea7

l5

L%

'T

s%

x*,&

a%,L

17

0)a7+-.
16 Wxc6+!

worthy finishing touch to

splendid game.

16 ... bxc6 17 trb8+ gag rg


Edxd8+ e7 19 ExhS Wxc3 20
Eb7+

*d6

The king is forced towards the


centre of the board. 20 ... Ad7 can

2l Ea8!+-.
2l trd8+ *eS 22 Ad4+ gxd4
Exd4 xd4 24 e3+ l-0

%N-

AK,

be met by

fier

16

ilej

23

after 20 Eb7+

28

Chasing the King

Dutch: 2 94

Bishop's Opening: 2

Movsziszian-Stoll
Bad l{drishofen 1997

I d4 f5 2 g4l?
To divert the Fpawn and take

Le4e529.c4
As early as move two \lhite

over the centre.


2 ... fxg4

Herlemann-Sauer, Baden, 1992, 2 ...


e6 3 gxf5 exf5 4 e4! d5 (4 ... fxe4?
5 Wh5+ 96 6 Ue5+ wins) 5 e5 Ae6
6 am g.e7 7 Egl f8 8 6c3 c5 9
afl Ed7 l0 dxc5 d4 11 Wxd4! was
clearly good for White.

8,,ruA

lines, according to how Black re

after 2 94

.Af4!? ge7

9xg4

(5
maintains the

6 2rc3l
5 ... d6 6 Bg5 Wxg5 7
Axg5 Axe5: Kozlovskaya-Prudni-

tension)

kova,Rjazan 1992.
b) 3 ... d6 4 gd3 ac6 s m af6 6
hxg4 Axg4 7 R gd7 8 e5 dxe5 9
trxh7l l-0 Heldele-Fliter, Deizisau

A g .,ML
a%%
'%tT-g

hc6?!
Preferable is 6 ... e6.

after

7c396
7 ... 0-0-0 8 h3 h5 (8 ... gxh3? 9
hxt5 Wxf5 10 Axh3+-) 9 6xf5
Wxf5 l0 gil gA ll WxB gxlF- 12

7 c3

ll

1-0

&6
t hl

h6 10 Eel 6trs r I afl C6 l:


9e3 Ae6 13 9;xa7 ExaT 14 Oe3
6tq $ h2 traaS 16 69l 95 t7
trfl tradS 18 93 696 19 Uhs +h7
20 aR Axb3 2l axb3 Eh8 2t adj
Wg7 23 bxg5+ 9g8 2a he lo
Lane-Timmerrnans, Amsterda
998.
3 d4 exd4 4 c3 dxc3?!

6f6 is better.
6xc3 a,at e aR aM 7 ArO
Ae7 8
af6 9 as abdT la
5

9xf7+!

^4

Devastating Black's positionl0 ... *xf7 1r 695+ 96


I I ...
12 t4

16... c6

trfl

l{ Lc

Allowing White to develop qui&-

Ba4+ f7
19

15 6xf7 h6 16 3.f4

ly. 4 .."

Black's attack is too lightweight.


14 ... 6xe5+ 15 dxeS Uxe5 16

t7 gf4+.
17 Eafl+ Ar0 rs trxf6+! Wxf6

2.. af6 I can personaft

a) 3 ...c6 4 dR d5 5 3.b3! .$ff


(5 ... dxe4 6 Ag5!+:; 6 *3 A67
Ag5 Ha5 8 0-o abdT 9 Ee I (HXl
l0 d4 exd4 I I Axd4 9.g4 lt 0d3
dxe4 13 6xe4 Ac7 14 AM6*! 3bS

gf5-+

6xf5 gxfs r0 ad2!


3"h6 lr 9xh3! Axd2+ 12 *xd2
Wxf2+ 13 gd3 Hg3+ 14 9e3
Though White's king is exposed

After

b) 3 ... ac6 40f3 Ac5 5 c3


0-0 0-0 7 g,b3 a6 8 Abd2 aa7

4 e5 Af5 5 6e2! gaz 0 Ags

ending.
8 h3 gxh3 9

dB

Pergerrcht. Brussels 1990.

1998.

gb8 13 adz allows White to


regain his pawn with a superior

sponds. Another bonus is thar


like the move-order 2
Ac5 3
9c4, this system avoids the need to
learn how to combat the Petroff2 ... d6
recommend 3 d3.

3e4d5
a) 3 ... e5 4 dxe5 Ac6 5

ca

dictate the style of play. Whirc


has options of transposing to o&o

"ru..-

The only way to test this outland-

ish sacrifice is to accept it. In

.-.6

Krakops-Meijers
Riga 1998

after 14

ilej

Se8/g8 l2 9b3+ *'ins.

Simple but effective.


12 ... 2re513 f5+ Axf5 14
Sxf5 15 Wc2+ 1-0

eff+

Chasing the King 29

Bishop's Opening: 2 ... d6

Krakops-Meijers
Riga 1998

le4e52A.c4
As early as move two White can
dictate the style of play. White now
has options of transposing to other

lines, according to how Black re-

2 ga

dta

sponds. Another bonus is that, unlike the move-order 2 aR 6c6 3


9c4, this system avoids the need to
learn how to combat the Petroff.
2 ... d6
After 2 .. af6 I can personally

8'T

"ruw
after 2 9c4

recommend 3 d3.

a) 3 ... c6 4 AR d5 5 g"b3! g'd6


(5 ... dxe4 6 Ag5!+:) 6 o,c3 .e6 7
ag5 wa5 8 0-0 abdT 9 Eel 0-0-0
l0 d4 exd4 11 6xd4 gg4 12 Wd2
dxe4 13 6xe4 fuci 14 Ad6+! Sb8
l-0 Lane15
h6 16
Pergerrcht, Brussels 1990.
b) 3 ... 2,c6 46R Ac5 5 c3 d6 6
0-0 0-0 7 g,b3 a6 8 abd2 3"a7 t h3

6xf/

$er

7 c3

g?t

h6 l0 trel 6ns il afl wf6 12


Ae3 9e6 13 AxaT ExaT 14 0,e3
6tq ts h2 Eaa8 16 69l 95 17
trfl tradS 18 93 696 19 Eh5 h7
20 aR Axb3 2l axb3 EhS 22 ads
Wg7 23 6xg5+ &g8 24 6n t-o
Lane-Timmernans, Amsterdam

,ffia

after 9 6bd7

l 998.

3 d4 exd4 4 c3 dxc3?!

Allowing White to develop quickly. 4 ... 6f6 is better.

6xc3 a,at e aR ab6 7 gb3


Ae7 8 at olte 9 a5 abdT 10
5

*,& w9

AxfT+!
Devastating Black's position.
l0 ... xf7 1r Ag5+ 96
I I ... e8/g8 12 Wb3+ wins.

t2 f4
Simple but effective.

dter

14

ilej

12 ...

*xf5

6e5 13 f5+ 9xf5 14 exfS+

15 Wc2+ 1-0

after l2

f4

30 Chasing

the King

Sicilian Dragon: Yugoslav

Sicilian Four Knights: 4 3-b5

%gw@"ru

L'%, L'4ru,L"&

le4c52aflaf63Aca
Avoiding the complications of
eS hdS 4 6c3 e6 5 6e4 f5.

'tr

...6c6 4 Ab5
This is a good way to continue
3

e4 c5

Ac6 3 Af3 6c0 4 gbs.

9... Axd4 l0 9xd4 AeO

l1

... Axd5

12 exd5 a6?!
There is no time to waste in
a cut-throat line. Other possibilitk
a) 12 ... Wc7 13 9bl (the dirw
attack with 13 h4 has a big &arback after l3 ... Efc8 l4 h5 ah6:13 ... trfcS 14 c3 Ua5 15 c4 0xd
16 trxd2 dal
9e2+: Dl'oins
Stisis, Groningen 1994.
b) 12 ... ad7 13 AxgT xg' l.{
h4 at615 h5 Ec8 16 hxg6 fte6
94 trc5 18 Wh6+ g8 19 95

sd

h6?

A typical mistake inviting a king


hunt. Though older sources assume
the position is roughly equal, recent
developments put White on top, e.g.

L%L,,ruL,,ru

%%%

DryAru.'ffi-

at 7 ...a,c7 a Wns go 9 gR f5 l0
exf6 d6 11 6xc7+ WxcT 12 0-0
gh6 13 d4 Axg5 14 9xg5 h6 15
Ah4 Wc6 16 ft+ fS tZ AxeT+

ll
tci
(19 ..4h5 20 trxh5! gxh5 2l 9620 Ah3 Exc2+ 2l gbl Eel I

l-0 Yakovich-Reinderman, Leeuwarden 1994.


b) 7 ... e6 8 he+ Bh+ 9 ER fs lo
exf6 gxf6 l1 93 l-0 Kovalev-Klees-

cfier

Ae6- Exe6 23 gxf6 exf6 2-1 drc(


l-0 Luther-Danner. Budapesr l99l

7 ... h6

13 h4! Wc7 14 h5 Eac8 15

chaetzky, Berlin 1994.

6xd5
After

6xf7 *xf7 9 Bf3+ etr to cl


6uo
10 ... ab4 I a3 6c2+ 12 *dl
6xal 13 g4r. and 14 gf5 decides.
8

ll d4 d5
I I ... d6 is not much of an im-

15

.aS

t4 h4.

To avoid White's capture on c6,


doubling the pawns.
5 e5 6xb5 6 6xb5 6as z 6gs

c7

tr

White has all the fun after I I


4\xd512 exd5 3"d7 13 9xgr 5ag;

after 4 A.b5

4...4d4

e6+

I e4 c5 2 aR d6 3 d4 crdl I
6xa+ 6rO 5 6cs 96 6 3.e3 ig7 :
R 6c6 8 gd2 o-o 9 o-o-o
The Yugoslav Attack is \\hir'r
Avoiding the theoretical I I rbl.

2 o,c3

provement after 12 d5+ fl*65 1r, ...


d7 13 e6+ *e8 14 gf7 mate) 13
cxd5+ xe5 14 b4! and the queen's
bishop will stylishly deliver mate.
12 dxcs 6xc4 13 ad4+ &d7 t4

Dieren 1990

main weapon against the Dragon-

against a player waiting to transpose


to the Sveshnikov system after 4 d4
cxd4 5 6xd4 e5. The game position

can also arise after

Aract

Ziatdinov-Sehner

Romero Holmes-Soto Perez


Malaga 1998

15 ...

s4 at6

e.'l

6xh5 16 AxgT -xg:


gh6+ g8 t9 gJ

18

6hs zo Exh5 wins.


16 9xg7
3"e+

tr

gf4+ l-0

after I I d4

*xg7 17 hxg6 hrg6 rt


*f6 20 Eh_<!

19 Wh6+

Cutting off the king's escape,

6uo

20 ... e6
Or 20 ... e5 21 9g5+ te6 "
Axg6 fxg6 23Vxg6+ trf6 24 fgI.+*e7 25 ElhT+ wins.
219g5+ *g122 Eh7+! l4
Black is mated after 22 ..- rhl
23 Wf6 followed by trh I -h8

Chasing the

Sicilian Dragon: Yugoslav Attack

Ziatdinov-Sehner
Dieren 1990

lll

1e4c52aRd63d4cxd44

Axa+ Aro 5 6c3 96 6 Ae3 9g7 7


R 6c6 S gd2 0-0 9 0-0-0
The Yugoslav Attack is White's
main weapon against the Dragon.

9...6xd4

%a

10

9xd4 ge6

Avoiding the theoretical l

ll ads
l Ebl.

l1 ...9xd5

White has all the fun after ll ...


dxd5 12 exd5 3"d7 13 AxgT xg7
t4 h4.

afier 1 f.'b5

'ffi

after 9 0-0-0

12 exd5 a6?!
There is no time to waste in such
a cut-throat line. Other possibilities:
a) 12 ...9c7 13 bl (the direct
attack with 13 h4 has a big drawback after 13 ... Efc8 14 h5 th6!-+)
13 ... trfcS 14 c3 9a5 15 c4 9xd2
9e2+: Dvoirys16 trxd2 Aal

Stisis, Gronin gen 1994.

\ruA

b) t2 ...6a2

20

$er 7

,ru,

'i-\ru, %

ofier I I d4

t:

9xg7 &xg7 t4

15 h5

.Q.h3

Exc2+ 21

bl

tre2 22

Ae6+ Exe6 23 gxf6 exf6 24 dxe6


l-0 Luther-Danner. Budapest 1991
13 h4! Uc7 14 h5 Eac8 f5 gd3

h6

*%w

af6

Ec8 16 hxg6 fxg617


gh6+ g8 19 95 Uc7
94 trc5 18
(19 ..4h5 20 trxh5! gxh5 2l 96+-)
h4

6xd5
After 15 ... 6xh5 16 9-xg7 *xg7
t7 s4 aif6 l8 gh6+ g8 19 95
ah5 20 Exh5 wins.
16 9xg7 *xg7 17 hxg6 hxg6 18
9e+ Auo 19 Vh6+ ro zo trtrst
Cutting offthe king's escape.
20... e6
Or 20 ... e5 21 9g5+ *e6 22
9xg6 fxg6 23 Vxg6+ Ef6 24 WE4+
*e'7 25 Eh7+ wins.
219g5+ *g7 22 Eh7+! l-0
Black is mated after 22 ... *xh7
23 Wt6 followed by trhl-h8.

after I I 0,d5

,,m,

%
tr

after 20 Eh5

King j I

32 Chusing the King

Conclusion

Dutch:2 6c3
Ed.Lasker-Thomas
London

l9l

This feast of glorious kiry:{

should be an inspiratin

ld4f526c3Drclajneet
3"g5 9e7 5
6xe4 b6

9xf6 9xf6

everyone.

Some openings offer

6 e4 fxe4 7

Or 7 ... d5 8 6xf6+ 9xf6 9 c3


10 gd2 o-o I l We3 gtro tz

ad7

Wxh6 gxh6 13 9'.e2 a6 14 0-0 c5 15


Efel b6 16 gd3 Ef6 17 tre3 tra7

18 93 trc7 19 Eael

trn

20 ah4

down to the player landing tlc


punch that determined *ffi
was the white or black king tb
to walk the plank.
Nevertheless, opportunitics
attack arise in all openingr ou

AAAA

af8 2l f4, Korchnoi-Meulders,


Brussels 1987, with a better ending.

after 4 9g5

8 heS

solid French Defence whE

The preference nowadays is for


the less committal attacking build-

Topalov-Bareev. served as a

Black's better developmetrL


At the very start of the gu
weakest point in Black's

Be7?

gives Black a reason-

able game but he assumes that I I


6xf6+ gxf6 will allow the queen to
guard h7. Sir George Thomas' talents extended also to the tennis

after 10...Ve7

court where he reached the last eight

at Wimbledon. Then, in 1923, he


achieved the distinction of becoming British Champion at both badminton and chess. Remarkable. but
such is chess trivia that he is probably best remembered for allowing
the following combination!

ll

Bxh7+! &xh7 12 axf6+


12 ... *h8 l3 hg6 mate.
13 Aeg4+ g5 14 h4+ gf4
Black has no choice.

15 93+
EtrZ+

*R f6

g'e2+

Sgf 18 d2 mate.

h6

&g2

11

board for a vicious assauh r


clever mating net-all arisry

up by 8 Ad3. For instance: 8 ...


gb7 9 We2 We7 l0 0-0-0 Ac6 ll
c3 0-0-0 12 9a6 96 13 trhel EhfS
14 gb5 Axa6 15 Wxa6+ b8 16 d5
2ia5 17 d6 cxd6 l8 hxd6 a8 19
b4 trb8 20 bxa5 bxa5 219xa5 trb6
22 Ba3 trc8 23 WxaT+! l-0
Bisguier-Burtman, USA 1995.
8 ... 0-0 e ad3 9uz ro wns

l0 .. 9xe5

of creating a stroog r
than others. In the Dragon Si
game, Ziatdinov-Sehner. h w
chances

A:ruiW 'ry,
T%Lffi_

%%%

A Ag
after 18

*d2

mate

pmii

the f7 pawn. defended only b:


king. This was emphasird
Krakops-Meijers where \l'hL
spered by an initial sacrifice o
oust the king from its camp.

Chasing the

This feast of glorious king-hunts

should be an inspiration

to

You often need to sacrifice to

expose the enemy king to attack.

attack arise in all openings, even the

2Back up your attack with major


pieces. Short-Piket shows that even
if a king occupies a central square
the attacker cannot break through
without the strong initiative generated by heavy fire-power.
3 When chasing the king try to
short-cut the calculation of myriads
of variations by giving priority to
forcing moves such as checks and
captures. Also look for ways to cut

solid French Defence which, in

offthe king's

Topalov-Bareev. served as a springboard for a vicious assault with a


clever mating net-all arising from
Black's better development.
At the very start of the game the

checkmate.

weakest point in Black's position is


the f7 pawn. defended only by the

so your king is not easily attacked.

emphasised in
Krakops-Meijers where White pro-

material

everyone.

Some 'openings offer more


chances of creating a strong attack
than others. In the Dragon Sicilian

game, Ziatdinov-Sehner, it was all


down to the player landing the first
punch that determined whether it
was the white or black king that had
to walk the plank.

Nevertheless, opportunities for

king. This was

%,ru,

Art of Attack

The

Conclusion

King

spered by an initial sacrifice on f7 to

oust the king from its camp.

The

escape and then go

for

Art of Defence

I In the opening try to castle early


2 Do not be tempted by gain of
if this leaves your pieces
sitting on their original squares.
This happened in the game

Movsziszian-Stoll where, as a result,


the king came under a devastating
attack.

3 Stay alert at all times. In Korniushin-Kofanov White even gave


up his queen to chase the king and
mate it with minor pieces.

Dutch Defence: 3 -t-e5

Atalik-Thang Trang
Budapest I 998

3 Attacking the King in the Centre


The three golden rules

of

the
opening are to develop your pieces,
control the centre and safeguard

your king by castling. However,


rules are made to be broken and

sheltering the king at an early stage


is often forgotten in this modern era
of razor-sharp opening theory.
Such neglect of king safety can
occur for various reasons. For instance through fear of opposite-side

castling, as in the game Seirawan-

Ivanchuk where the threat

of

an

attack on the kingside deters Black


from castling. White's reaction is to
open the centre to get at the king,

even though he is not yet castled


hrmself'! Indeed. castling is not essential before launching an attack,
especially if the co-ordination of the
attacker's pieces is superior.

A player who sticks faithfully

to

pet lines can soon get into trouble if


these opening variations run counter

to basic chess principles, as in the


game WolfFWall where Black voluntarily weakens his own position
and the opponent's pieces come
flooding in after a single sacrifice.
The attacking player will do all he
can to stop the opposing king seeking shelter. This can be done by
sacrificing or even subtle manoeuvring, as in Liardet-Kogan. The art of
successfully attacking a king in the
centre lies in judging the right moment to launch the assault.

All the games in this chapter have


the common theme of creating and
maintaining the initiative. The odd
pawn is dropped here and there but
a pattern soon emerges of superior
development making its presence
felt. Indeed the defender may fall
further behind in development as
repeated threats must be fended off,
giving little or no time for mobilisation of barracked forces.
Therefore, it is worth remembering the importance of the co-ordination of your pieces. An advantage in
space may not be very significant if
your pieces lack harmony. On the
other hand, in Schmaltz-Karpatchev
Black has all the trumps-full and

harmonious co-operation of his


pieces, a space advantage and tactical threats directed against the white
king stuck in the centre.
Basically, a king left in the centre
is bad for three reasons:
I It undermines the activity of the

pieces because of the difficulty of


getting the rooks into play. This allows the opponent to take a lead in
development.

2 It is not safe. In particular the

{21f7 pawn is vulnerable because it


is only defended by the king.
3 It is easier for the opponent to
create direct attacks against the king
when the centre is open.

1 d4 f5 2 aR af6 3 Ags A.r


Af4 d6 5 abd2 6xd2 6 trd2 ci

e4l

With this enterprising sacrifr


the Turkish grandmaster folb
one of the key principles of u
ing an uncastled king----open lits
the centre!

7 ... fxe4 8 Ag5 d5 9 f3 e


Ad3 fxg2 ll Wxg2
This case is an extreme exq
of what can happen when you

dl

your pieces to hang about on t


original squares. After just dcn
moves it is clear that White tns s
ceeded in demonstrating two cr

b
a liability. He has E

three reasons why an uncasrled

is

such

pieces developed compared


Black's none and the centre I

been successfully opened allcri


for more channels of attack.
ll ... Ac6 12 0-0 6e7 13 B
1-0

Now it is three out of

reasons because the weakness

rfu

oft

king defending the f7 square I


been exposed. 13
ftf.?
AxcT+ wins.

Attacking the King in the Centre 35

EffigN-b

Dutch Defence: 3 Ag5

ll

Atalik-Thang Trang
Budapest 1998 -

the Centre
h fiis

sh3p1s1 haYs

.f-r. of creating and


ft hitiative. The odd

hcre and there but

@ges of superior
its

presence

t -&ing
ffender may fall
h development as
mst

be fended off,

r m time for mobilisafrces.


k worth remember-

i
rc of the co-ordinahE- An advantage in

bc rery significant if
H hannony. On the

Scfrnaltz-Karpatchev

tb tumps-full and
of his

@rperation

rdvantage and tactiaqainst the white

thc oentre.

e king left in the centre


nEasons:

in

the activity of the

rd4f52af3af639g5de44

gf4

d6 5 abd2 6xd2 6

9xd2

e6 7

e4l

With this enterprising sacrifice,


the Turkish grandmaster follows
one of the key principles of attacking an uncastled king----open lines in
the centre!

7 ... fxef S 695 d5 9 f3 exf3


AaS rxgZ

lI

10

%%%%
A
AA
after 7 e4

Uxg2

This case is an extreme example

,rru

of what can happen when you allow


your pieces to hang about on their

original squares. After just eleven


moves it is clear that White has succeeded in demonstrating two out of

three reasons why an uncastled king

,,ru

is such a liability. He has four


pieces developed compared to
Black's none and the centre has

been successfully opened allowing


for more channels of attack.
1l ... 6c6 12 0-0 ae7 13 aflt.

after I

I Vxg2

after

l3 dJ7

l-0
Now

it is

three out

of

reasons because the weakness

three

ofthe

king defending the f7 square has


xf7 14
been exposed. 13
AxcT+ wins.

of the diffrculty of

loots into play. This alto take a lead in


safe. In particular the
fo vulnerable because it
by the king.
ir for the opponent to

ecks

against the king

ls open.

j6

Attacking the King in the Centre

disagreed about the merits of the


plan: "this stuck in my cra*' ... so I
thought I would test my judgement

King's Indian Defence: 5 .od3


Seirawan-Ivanchuk
Groningen FIDE World Ch 1997

against his" commented

td4at62c496 36c3 9g74

8 ... ad7 9 ge3 9"h6 ro Edz

e4 d6 5 9"d3

Seirawan has long been a champion of this move which steers clear
of the main lines of the King's Indian and keeps options open on

lurther development, depending on


Black's response. There are similanties to the Samisch in that White

can support the e-pawn with

AA
.,ffi

%
AA

f3

After 5 ... 0-0 6 Age2 play can


continue:

% %.

E. gN,@
lll

-0

after 8 J3

gfi

trfE

17

Urf{

ut

against the hapless black king and


something has to give.

l7 ... t6 18 dxc6 Wxc6 19


we8 20 4los+ ag 21 uxd6+
22

abs

1-0

idl
id7

Black resigned in vieu' of the


various threats such as 23 1Tb6&c8 24 Ad6+ or simply 23 otx.'

199r.
6 d5 a5 7 Dge2 6a6 8 R!?
Apparently after their game in
Reykjavik (see the previous note)

Seirawan actually recommended


this move to his opponent! It turned

it on the

grounds that Black could exchange


the dark-squared bishops then exert
pressure on the queenside. They

centre, but he has few options. After


14 ^.. Bxb2 15 dxc6 bxc6 16 ax6
the alternatives 17 Wg7 or 17 ircf
leave Black in a mess. It is imPonant to note that, although White has

White's forces are piling

b) 6 ... 6aal I g.c2 a6 8 a4 e5 9


d5 a5 l0 h3 Ac5 1l Ae3 6nt n

out Ivanchuk dismissed

12 Eh6 Aacs tl trdr gb6 l{


Ant ez
An admission that his king rrll

15 f4 exf4 16

Bundesliga 1995.

'/z-'/z Seiraw an-Ivanchuk, Reykj avik

first indication that White's opemng

coaster attack.

Christiansen-Babula.

0-0 6a6 t3 2ia2 adc5 14 gd2


Ad7 15 Wxa5 6xe4 16 Eel af6
17 b4 ahs 18 B f5 19 Ebl b6 20
Aac3 9f6 2't Wd2 g,h4 22 t4 g:t6

around the king look r*'eak--dre

not castled, he can still activate his


rooks. Black. on the other hard k
in no position to form any signiF
cant counterplay against the roller

9tr+ gs 16 Ag3 tse8 17 trbl Eb8


l8 trb3 6a8 19 Exb8 Axb8 20
WUt aaz 2l e5t gxf4 22 9xh7+
trs z: Age tsds 24'tgfs gh6 25
I

l1 ... 0-0 looks logical but urthour


the bishop on 97 the dark squares

now be well and truly stuck in de

a) 6 ... a6 7 0-0 6Uaz S R c6 9


Ag5 b5 10 hl ab6 I I b3 bxc4 12
bxc4 afd7 13 fil c5 14 d5 f6 15

Axfll

Axe3 1l Wxe3 c6?!

strategy has been a triumPh.

after 5 3,d3

while Black, for his part, will try to


create active play by attacking the
weakened d4 pawn.
5 ... e5

the

American.

afterll...c6

Attacking the King in the Centre 37

disagreed about the merits of the


plan: "this stuck in my craw ... so I
thought I would test my juigement

against his" commented

the

American.

8 ... ad7 9 9e3 Ano ro

L,% I
%.;,01,

Waz

%
L%
,,%l

Axe3 11EIxe3 c6?!


I

I ... 0-0 looks logical

but without

the bishop on 97 the dark squares

around the king look weak-the


12

I
a

afier

tl

22

IA e
tr

ffi

%a

ffiKt
',9%
after

l4

... @e7

against the hapless black king and


something has to give.

17 ... f6 18 dxc6 Wxc6 19 hd4


Be8 2o 6as+ as 2l Exd6+ gd7

ru-

,,ffi,

M,T
,rffi,

Efi trf8 17 uxf4


White's forces are piling in

J3

Ir&, A

%A
L%

coaster attack.
t5 f4 exf4 16

t#

after I 1.. c6

trdl Eb6 14

now be well and truly stuck in the


centre, but he has few oPtions. After
14 ^.. Uxb2 15 dxc6 bxc6 16 Exd6
the alternatives 17 Wg7 or 17 Exc6
leave Black in a mess. It is imPortant to note that, although White has
not castled, he can still activate his
rooks. Black. on the other hand. is
in no position to form anY significant counterplay against the roller

A
-a
^

gh6 6acs

Aut ez
An admission that his king will

afier 5 9.d3

;(

tr

first indication that White's opening


strategy has been a triumPh. .

abs

1-0

A
,M,

Black resigned in view of the


various threats such as 23 '9t,6+
*c8 24 6d6+ or simply 23 o,bc7.

"ffi-

A
,\

:A
ufter 17 Wxf4

afierll...c6

-i8 .4ttacking the King in the Centre

French Winawer: 5

gd2

Nimzo-Indian: 4 B

Liardet-Kogan

Watson-Hurley
Kilkennv I997

I e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3
c5 5 gd2

Genevct 1998

%r
T.

6c3 AU n eS

A relatively

unusual continuation
enabling White to recapture on c3

with the bishop after ... 9xc3.

Over-analysed lines are avoided and

Black is set critical problems at


very early stage ofthe opening.

,,ru

Al
,,m

s ... gd7?!

1992. Black tried

ll Axc6 bxc6 12 6xe5 c5 13

Wtrs+t 96 14 Uf3 Ef6 ls axdT


*xd7 16 WU: trca 17 ga4+ gdS

r0 gd3

--bt+

Halldorsson-Brlc

2l trh3 9u: zz ga
Wd2 Vc4 24 b3 Uxb3 15
Wa: zo trh2 WxR o-l

Ag5! l-0

20 h4 We6

6 dxcS! Axc5 7 Wg4


Now 7 ... gf8 looks like a recordbreaking attempt to return all the
pieces to their original squares while
7 ... gf8 gives up the right to castle.

af3 Eb6

centre-incidentally threatening
pawn fork on e5-and then Le

Reykjavik 1988, continued t C


cxd4 9 Wxd4 6c6 l0 gb5 Ce7! ll
gflt 0-0 12 Axc6 9c5 13 fud
6xd5 14 9xd5 trdS 15 Ubl br.r
16 0rc2 9"a6 (echoing our mi
game as Black has devastating cm
trol of the g1-a7 diagonal) 17 Ed:
Exdl+ 18 Wxdl EdS 19 Ucl 3Ir

t'avour) I dR a,c6 g OUxa+ f6?! (8


... 6ge7!?) 9 gbs gaz to 0-0 fte5

7 ... g6 8

9 o-o-o

Wxus

after l0 fudj

9uo

White has won a pawn but

BH

controls the gl-a7 diagonal th,ertb


preventing kingside castling.
13 am trd8 14 a)s o+ ls
A?le5

Watson has shed a pawn to acti-

tu

vate his pieces aggressively.

r0 ... 9e3 1r trhfl 6n0 rz Wns


f813 ass!
Black's position is so full of holes

it resembles Swiss cheese.

t3 ... 9xd2+

14 Exd2 Sg7 15
Edf2 Ae8 t6 trf4 Waa rz Ef6 ad7
18 9xe6!

18... 6xf6
l8 ... fxe6 19 6xe6+ g8 20
trf8+ 6xf8 2l ExfS mate.
19 exf6+ g8 20 Wnt 6f5 2t
trxfS l-0

td
!c

8 ... gd7 9 9xd7+ auraz tt


dxcS 9xc5 ll 6xd5 ird-{ li

9xf2

Bravo!

to entice White to create a pest

The game

went astray in the complications


after 6 ab5 gfB (6 ... Axd2+ 7
Bxd2 intending 6d6+ is rn White's

18

provocative manoeuvre. The idce

smash it down!
6 e4 c5 7 cxdS exd5

after 5 9-d2

5 ... cxd4 and

gd6

Black rejects the standard mott


5 ... Ac3 or 5 ... 9e7 in fasour of i

%ffi
%
L"ruL"ru ''ffi,A

In the game Lutz-Costello, Ostend

rd4af62c4e63acaabafc
d5 5 a3

%t"ffit

W.ML#
,-'.ffi
%t

L%
after

%%
g

l8Vxe6

At one stroke Kogan opeos th


d-file for the queen's rook and rd
the knight to the attack. 16 U:rc
loses the queen after 16 ...

*el 9f2*.

16 Wa2 Uns+

fri-

tz Set Oa* tt

Axd3 Wxd3 0-l


Since 19

tl

A?l Ae3

is crushing.

Attacking the King in the Centre 39

Nimzo-Indian: 4 R

Liardet-Kogan
'Geneva i,998

rd4Af62c4e63Ac3Ab44R
d5 5 a3 3.d6
Black rejects the standard moves
5 ... Ac3 or 5 ... 9e7 in favour of a
provocative manoeuvre. The idea is

to entice White to create a

Pawn

centre-incidentally threatening a
pawn fork on e5-and then later
ofie. 5 3.d2

smash it down!
6 e4 c5 7 cxd5 exdS 8

The game

Ab5+

after 5 ... 9.a0

Halldorsson-Barle,

Reykjavik 1988, continued 8 e5


cxd4 9 9xd4 6c6 10 gb5 Ue7! 1l
gf4 0-0 12 9xc6 Ac5 13 hxd5
6xd5 14 Wxd5 EdS 15 gb3 bxc6
16 0rc2 Aa6 (echoing our main
game as Black has devastating con-

:-g

e%
WA

',

7b

Io I'd3

trol of the gl-a7 diagonal) 17 trd1


Exdl+ 18 Uxdl Ed8 19 Wcl Ab6
2o h4 tye6 21 Eh3 W zz g+ Ud:
23 Wdz Vc4 24 b3 9xb3 25 Ucl
gd3 26 trh2I*xR o-l
8 ... gd7 9 9xd7+ 6uxaz to
dxc5 9xc5 ll Axd5 Axd5 12
Bxo5 9uo

after 12

White has won a pawn but Black


controls the gl-a7 diagonal thereby

..Vm

preventing kingside castling.


13

am Ed8 14 af4 0-0 15 e2

4tef

jv

L'ru

At one stroke Kogan opens the


d-file for the queen's rook and adds
the knight to the attack. 16 Uxe5
loses the queen after 16 ...

el Af2*.

gb5+

16 9a2 Uus+ rz et 6as+


6xd3 9xd3 0-1
Since 19 APl9e3 is crushing.

fu

I8Yxe6

I
,,ru,

18

tt

after I5 ...o,e5

40 Attacking

the King in the Centre

Scotch:4 ... gh4


Schmaltz-Karpatchev
Cappelle la Grande l99i

Sicilian c3: 5 ... Ag4

llll

Nisipeanu-Moldoven
Bucharest 1997

le4e520,n0,c63d4exd4.4
6x0l Wtrl

1 e4 c5 2
h3

mendous surprise value.

6c3

knight to force through d4-d5.

It is easy for White to go wrong:

gfi?!

Ac5 6 cl 6ro j ad2


6ga 8 93 Wf6 9 t3 Axd4 l0 cxd4
ab4 tl Wc3 a,e3 t2 fz 6at+
0-l Nunez- Ferron, Abierto 1994;
b) 5 Ae2?l Ac5 6 c3 Vxe4 7
hxc6 E[xg2 0-1 Neubauer-Hresc,
a) 5

after 4 ...

8... gd8?:
8 ... Wd6 also allows

Vnl

\\hirc r
an attack. Keitlingtns
Fogarasi, Budapest 1996 contiq
9 d5!? AxR lo AxR ha+ tt ta
E$xe6+ 12 9e3 Uxc4 t3 Ard
create

cxd4 (13 ... Wxd4 14 9e2- Aer l:


bc3 gives White a srong idridiw
14 ad2 WUs ts a4 Va6 16 fU
0-0-0? (16 ... Be6+ l7 Uxe6- ftd
l8 AxbT Eb8:) l7 trcl* tb8 tl
trc6! b6 19 WxfT gd6 l0 :rd
trxd6 2l Wf8+ *cZ 22gxg-- t49 d5 Axf3 l0 AxR exdS

St.Veit 1995;

c) 5 Ae3 Wxe4 6 2,AZ Vel I


Aez 6rc 8 o-o ad5 9 6f5 Axe3
l0 fxe3 Wc5 I I 0,e4 We5 12 6c3
96 13 693 Ag7 left Black a pawn
up in Tyehimba-Post, Philadelphia
1992..

d) s ab5 9c5 6 Vez a,aq


6xd4

t
after 12

..

and 8 ... Wa6 is revealed. Noq-.

0-0

Schuermans-Lane, Le

Touquet 1991.
5 ... gb4 6 adbs

9a5

Aa3 ao

8 Oa3 bs 9 gd2 Aro ro gs Wtrs

lr ads Axd5 12 exd5 0-0

Inspired chess! By activating his


king's rook, Black aims to take advantage of the exposed white king

13 dxc6 Ee8+ 14

trfi

If

.Q"e2

dxc6

15 Axa5 then 15 ...

9g4

15
is

good for Black.

15 ... Aga 16 f3 Wxh2 17 9xa5


trad8 18 9d2 Wxg:+ 19 trn 3"h3

0-l

td
rflc
l0 ... Ad4 ll dxe6. the quetn o
not take back on e6.
ll Axd5 6ge7 12 hc3 .rd5 [
The difference between 8 -.-

9b6 9 93 We7 l0
gg2 d6 l1 Ae3 zXe n haz O-o r:
-Q"xd4 8 c3

0-0 Ee8:

c5'

ghs 8 c4
Much better than the normal I
Ae3 because White intends to cr.
ploit Black's undeveloped kiry'

The most aggressive Black defence against the Scotch. Having


played it myself I know it has tre5

aR 6c6 3 c3 d5,

exd5 Uxd5 5 d4 Ag4 6 Ae2

cxd5 6d4 14 Ae3 afs 15 C.+


Wd7 16 ge4+ ed8
The king has to move because ll
..

Ae7 is well met by l7 Axc5.


17 d6! 6xe3 18 fxe3 Ect l!

Wn++ ro 2o o-o-o Ec6

WM
L'&"
T

after 19.. gh3

20 ... Axd6? fails completet-v

21 ole4 Ec6 22 Axd6 Exd6 ''


Bg3+-.

2r trds Exd6? 22 trhdl tc7


Wg3 1-0 Black resigned due to

lI

... c6 24 Exd6 9xd6 25 f&


*c7 26 oe4 and the bishop is loo-

Attacking the King in the Centre

Sicilian c3: 5 ... Ag4

Nisipeanu-Moldovan

il

'

%
%
,,m,^

@,,ru4H

Bucharest 1997-

%tffit

1e4c52af-J6c63c3d54
exd5 Wxd5 5 d4
h3 gh5 E c4

9g4 6 Ee2

e6 7

Much better than the normal 8


9e3 because White intends to exploit Black's undeveloped king's
knight to force through d4-d5.

8... gd8?!

8 ... gd6 also allows White to


create an attack. Keitlinghaus-

after 8 c4

Fogarasi, Budapest 1996 continued


9 d5!? AxR l0 AxB a,aq tl dxe6

%I
w, %
A%

e %.ru

ru

Wxe6+ 12 9e3

9xc4 13 9xd4

cxd4 (13 ... Wxd4 14 Be2+ Ae7 15


6c3 gives White a strong initiative)

t4 ad2 gus ts

0-0-0? (16 ...

a4 Va6 16 gb3

9e6+ l7 Wxe6+ fxe6

l8 9xb7 EbS:) 17 Ecl+ gb8 18


Ec6! b6 19 9xf7 Aa6 ZO trxa6
trxd6 2l Wf8+ cz 22gxg7+ l'0.

9 d5 Axf3 10 AxR exd5


The difference between 8 ... gdS
and 8 ... Ua0 is revealed. Now, after
l0 ... ad4 l1 dxe6. the queen cannot take back on e6.
Axd5 6ge7 12

'T

ffi.ru
-

','.ru_

after

ll

Ac3 Axd5 13
cxds Ad4 14 g"e3 afs 15 Ea4+
Uaz ro We4+ d8

l6Ve4+

The king has to move because 16

w
w,

...

AE

Ae7

is well met

by l7 9xc5.

17 d6'! 6xe3 18 fxe3 Ec8

19

Una+ ro 2o o-o-o Ec6


20 ... Axd6? fails completely to

21 0,e4 trc6 22 6xd6 trxd6

23

Wg3+-.
21 Eds trxd6? 22

23

Ehdl &c7

Wg3 f-0 Black resigned due to 23

... c6 24 Exd6 9xd6 25 WR+

&c7 26 Ae4 and the bishop is lost.


after 20 0-0-0

A
%

tr

4l

4)

,4ttacking the King in the Centre

Reti: 3 b4

Grob Defence

... 95

Benjamin-Brookshear

Wolff-Wall

New York 1990

London ;,985

l aa d5 2 c4 d43b4
White states his aggressive intentions after only three moves. He intends to attack the d4 pawn and
wishes to deter ... c5.
3 ... f6
To support ... e5. Others:
a) 3 ... 96 4 e3 dxe3 5 fte3 9g7 6
d4 af6 7 Ac3 0-0 s Ae2 Ag4 9 0-0
c6 10 h3 gxR ll gxf3 abd7 12
b5 cxb5 13 6xb5 with good play
against b7, Fridman-Mattheus,

,rru,

I e4 g5?l
Michael Basman has thought

,rru,

AA

Ld

ac3 r
5 h4 gxh4 6 d5 6e5 7 f4 A96
hR 9gz 9 Ad3 Ag4 lo gel- t
1l 6xh4 olxh4 12 trxh4 h5 13 E
c5 with a small advantage. al6o{

% ,ru,

g
,rrru.

c) 3 ... a5 4b5 c5 5 e3 96 6 exd4


cxd4 7 d3 Ag7 8 93 when White
has the better chances due to the

a{ter 9 s*c4

Black still won after 68 moves-

3 ... Ag7 4 h4 gxh4 5 aI3 6xh4 6c6 7 d5 6e5 8 Ae2


Even in his youth the frl
American champion played in rc
mature style. While Black smlggl
to develop his pieces and ger d
queenside.
his pieces

Wolff is busy amhri

8 ... af6 e g"f4 6ega t0 O


Axf5 ll exfs h5 12 gbs+ d7

weakness of the d4 pawn.

4 e3 dxe3 5 fxe3 e5 6 c5 e4 7
hae Ac6 8 6xc6 bxc6 9 3"c4

Exh5!

Whites cuts out the possibility of

Black castling kingside.


9 ... ah6 l0 0-0 9e7

,,ru

A nice sacrifice which fcc

Black to endure a passive posrtir


13 ... Exh5 14 Uxg4 Eh7 15

exf6 16 d2!
The king steps out ofthe sry I
the rook to check on the rfilc- (
the other hand 16 0_0_0 Ure7! wor
have still allowed Black hqcr

T-

The sacrifice has paid off. The


twin threats of 16 9xc6+ and 16
Ee4 are winners.
l5 ... gf8 16 Ee4+

Ginsburg-Basman.

There followed 3 ... d6 4

NE

1992.

gA

In

1979. White tried 3 c4 preferriry


dominate the centre with his por.r

ola5 12 Ad3 9xc5 13 0-0 Val ru


Axa4 and White had a clear advantage in Nikcevic-Todorovic, Cetinje

15

2d4h636c3

after 3 b4

b) 3 ... Ag4 4 WU: fo 5 e3 dxe3 6


dxe3 e5 7 c5 0,c6 8 Ac3 a5 9 9c4
(the power of the a2-g8 diagonal is
a theme also explored in the main
game) 9 ... ah6 10 b5 a4 I I 9c2

trf4 We7

ry

mine the weakened kingside.

Hamburg 1997.

ll 6c3 96
12 gb2 Ag7 13 6xe4 Wxe4 14

of weird and

u'ondcrl
openings and this is one of rrEr
But, once he has recovered fro
shock, White can perhaps 'rrdr

number

as tz Eat+

survival. After the

l-0

text houtrr

even ar this early stage Black h


decent moves.
16 ... f5 17 Wxf5 trh4
e3 E

after l5 V!3

19 Eel+

&dl

r-o

f8

lt

20 AxdT Erf2+

Attacking the King in the Centre 43

Grob Defence

... 95

Wolff-Wall
'London 1985

I e4 g5?!
Michael Basman has thought uP a
number

of weird and wonderful

is one of them.
But, once he has recovered from
shock, White can perhaps underopenings and this

,,ru

mine the weakened kingside.

,ffi9

2 d4kr6 3 ac3
In Ginsburg-Basman. London
1979. White tried 3 c4 preferring to
dominate the centre with his pawns.
There followed 3 ... d6 4 Dc3 0rc6
5 h4 gxh4 6 d5 6e5 7 f4 2196 8
dR 9;g7 9 9.d3 9g4 l0 Ua4+ f8

.,ry,

ll 6xh4 Axh412

after

.. 95

trxh4 h5 13 trhl

c5 with a small advantage, although


Black still won after 68 moves.

3 ...9g7 4 h4 gxh4 5 aR d6 6
6xh4 6c6 7 d5 6e5 8 9e2
Even in his youth the future
American champion played in very
mature style. While Black struggles
to develop his pieces and get castled
queenside, Wolff is busy activating
his pieces

s ... af6 9 gf4 aeg4 lo a)f5


9xf5 ll exf5 h5 12 g"bs+ 6oz rf

after 9 9e2

Exh5!

%
A

nice sacrifice which

forces

Black to endure a passive position.


13 ... trxh5 14 Wxg4 trh7 ls f6
exf6 16 Sd2!
The king steps out of the way for
the rook to check on the e-fiIe. On
the other hand 16 0-0-0 9e7! would

still allowed Black hopes of


survival. After the text, however,

have

even at this early stage Black has no


decent moves.
16 ... fs 17 Wxf5 trh4 r8 93 trh2

19

Eel+ f8 20 9xd7 trxf2+ 2l

ar

r-o

after

l6 *d2

44 Attacking

the King in the Cen.tre

Vienna: 5 e2

Conclusion

Gavrilov-Potapov
Russia Cup 1997

L,'ry_
1 e4 e5 2 Ztc3 6ce 3 f4 exf4 4 d4
This astounding move was first
played by Steinitz in 1867. The
position can also arise from a
King's Gambit after 1 e4 e5 2 f4
6c6 3 6c3 exf4 4 d4r.?.
4... gh4+ 5 e2

Though Steinitz claimed that the


White king was in no real danger,
being free to move to either flank,
the modern view is that it gets in the
way of the other pieces. Nevertheiess Black has to be careful that his
queen is not chased around the

fered as a consequence.

Gavrilov-Potapov demoog

the perils of blindll

5 ... b6 6

abs

Aa6 7 a4 0-0-0 8

be traced back to the game MartinAdams, London 1992, which con-

tinued: 8 ... We7 9


Axf4 Wxe4 I I gd2

*f2

Af6

.Ab7 l0
12 gd3

Bas t: trhel d6 14 a5 and White


had the advantage. Even though

Adams is a world class player. improvements were bound to be found


as this game was played at a fast
time-1imit.

9 r2 gb7 to gd3 a6 ll hc3


Drc n tret 95 13 e5?
13 a5!? b5 14 Axb5 axb5 15 a6
AaS 16 9xb5 6a7 and Black fends
offthe attack.
l3 ... Axd4! l4 3"xa6

14 hxd4 Vxg2 mate

embarrassing.
14 ...9xa6 15

tln

was established over 100 veas


It is a risky business igronng s

A
r{ter 5 &e2

Ac5 18 hxg4 Axd4+ 19


Wxel+ 20 h2 h5

0-1

t7

h3

WolfFWall where Black's of


opening moves were cn-lel\'
ploited. No wonder I ... 95 i

&

longer in Tim Wall's repenorel

lesson on the perils

a%

master's pieces are directed rg


the opposing monarch t'rth prr

%t

A
aJier

is a
of .nr

Atalik-Thang Trang

%
,,ffiw

WSa

material.

All the Turkish

&

gr

able consequences.

Always remember. as an eE
your primary objective shouH

deprive the opposing king of se


The

Art of Attack

I Exploit weak squares arom


king, as in Benjamin-T.Brooksl
2 Sacrifice to keep the king i
centre as in Schmaltz-Karpatch
3 Remember that the threar q
stronger than the execution- [t
game. Seirawan-Ivanchuk

was so worried about casdine

is

Wxd4

basic principle as develop


pieces. And there are bener p
for a king to seek shelter than q
A choice of opening can bc

cial as illustrated b1' ttr

6xd4

l5 Wxd4 Ac5 wins.


rs ... Wh4+ 16 gr ar94

tbll,o

theory especially when mos

board.

hm Wg+:?
The inspiration behind White's
romantic choice of opening might

In most of the games eramm


is clear that the loser had plal'c
differently in the opening and

after

l3

...

Nal

Attacking the King in the Centre 45

Conclusion

In most of the games examjned it


is clear that the loser had played indifferently in the opening and suf-

I ll

fered as a consequence.

Gavrilov-Potapov

tt

the perils of blindly

following

theory especially when most

5 9e2

cial as illustrated by the

I I

A
,m,

of it

was established over 100 years ago.


It is a risky business ignoring such a
basic principle as develoPment of
pieces. And there are better places
for a king to seek shelter than on e2!
A choice of opening can be cru-

$er

demonstrates

game

WolfFWall where Black's offbeat


opening moves were cruelly exploited. No wonder I ... 95 is no

an attack that he left his king in the


middle of the board where it proved
to be even more vulnerable.
4 Take advantage of an opponent's lack of development, due to

weak opening play, as seen in


Wolff-Wall, Atalik-H.Thang Trang
and Gavrilov-Potapov.

5 Disrupt the coordination of the


opponent's pieces, as in the game
Nisipeanu-Moldovan where a Pawn

was used to split the Black army

into two. thereby creating a

In cases like these. where the defence tended to be rather poor, the
attacking player had all the fun with
bold attacks and scintillating sacrifices

longer in Tim Wall's repertoire!

is a short
of snatching

Atalik-Thang Trang
lesson on the perils

fua

material.

All the Turkish

grand-

master's pieces are directed against


the opposing monarch with predictable consequences.

Vca

Always remember, as an attacker,


your primary objective should be to
deprive the opposing king ofsafety.
The

I
,ffi
&

'ffi,

k l-?

axd4

The

Art of Defence

I Take

preventive

measures

against any possible escalation ofan


enemy attack. As a general rule, the
best antidote is to whisk the king to
safety by castling early.
2 Go on the offensive if the opposing king is in the centre. In his
game against lvanchuk, Seirawan,

after ruling out any possibility of

Art of Attack

I Exploit weak squares around

total

lack of harmony.

the

king, as in Benjamin-T.Brookshear.
2 Sacrifice to keep the king in the
centre as in Schmaltz-Karpatchev.
3 Remember that the threat can be
stronger than the execution. In the
game. Seirawan-Ivanchuk, Black
was so worried about castling into

enemy counterplay, went over to the


attack even though his own king remained uncastled.
3 Choose tried and tested openings. If an opening is rarely played

there

is usually a good reason-

reserve
weapon!

.. g5 strictly as a surprise

Sicilian Najdorf: 6 ... Acf


Timman-Van I+eh6th Match Game, Breda 19,

1e4c52ARd63d{s

4 Attacking the Castled King

5 6c3 a6 6 -e.d A
The usual move here is 6 .-- c
Van Wely prefers to tr,v to tra

axd4 af6

to a
Mastering the various techniques

of attacking the castled position is


of the greatest importance because
these are among the most typical
situations occurring in practical
play. How often do we hear a player

complain that he had obtained

good attacking position from the


opening but failed to capitalise on it.
Prior to embarking on an attack, it
is paramount to have some kind of

positional superiority whether this


be in the form

ofa

space advantage.

more effective development

or

better pawn structure. Any one of


these factors can help to tip the balance and provide the impefus for an
initiative. This applies both to same-

side and opposite-side castlingalthough in the latter case, where


both sides often indulge simultaneously in all-out attack, timing is
absolutely critical.
Some opening systems allow the
opponent to gain an early space advantage by setting up a big pawn
centre---only to smash this later

with blows from the flanks and


follow up with a counterattack.
However. the game MorozevichBratchenko. an Alekhine Defence,
is a perfect example of what can
happen if this plan goes wrong.
White uses the extra space to improve the position of his pieces and
quickly launch an attack.
The Open Sicilian invariably
leads to a sharp game and TimmanVan Wely is no exception. White

batters the defence with a weaknessprobing pawn advance and then


sacrifices material to expose the

opponent's king. Kasparov-Kengis,


another Sicilian, is more evidence of
the effectiveness of this technique.
The demolition of the enemy

pawn cover is a frequently recurring


theme. The game Bacrot-Magem is

another fine example and sees


White firstly taking time to isolate
the king from its defenders before
going for a final attack.

If you have ever dreamed of playing a Hollywood star then take a


look at the game Limbos versus
Humphrey Bogart-not just of
human interest but also a nice minature with an instructive finish.
Opposite-sides castling can lead
to double-edged positions where
everything depends on who holds

the initiative. In

Howell-Miles.

White starts off with every intention


of launching an all-out attack but

this soon backfires with


launching

Black

a powerful counter-

offensive which slices through the


opponent's vulnerable defences.
It is a different story in the game
Gofshtein-Beikert where, due to the
closed nature of the position, White
has plenty of time to build up his
forces in an orderly fashion before
making a final, well-prepared
assault.

The lesson is always to think positively. If you grab the initiative then
you are on course for victoryl

Scheveningen

or E

Attack.

7h3
An odd-looking move brn i
pares 94 with a position simile
Keres Attack. In the secord

this match Timman tried

"t

facilitate queenside castlir4followed 7 ... 6xd4 8 idl


Ae3 Ae6 10 f:l exf4 ll iil

and Black had equalised.


7 ... e6I 94 A.e7 9 9g2 5?l
This is a cautious approod

cause after

9 9g2 it is clcr

White intends to castle kirysi


Borge-Rytshagov. Groningen

Black whisked his king ro


with 9 ... 0-0. The game cm
l0 0-0 Axd4 ll Uxd4 e5 12

Ae6 13 trt trca A a4 Zo4


trc8 16 trfcl Wc7:.
10 f4 Wc7 ll 0-0 6xd4 12
e5 13 gd2 exf4 14 Efi &

trafl

0-0

In view of White's \r-ell I

pieces it is more prudent Io trlr

6dZ but Timman has comil


after 16 ad5 .trd

pressure

Bxd5.

16 trxf6! 9xf6 17 trrtr


Wf2 g7?
Or 18 ... Ba5 19 AxhO Uc

9e3 maintaining White's cL


according to Timman.

19 e5 fxe5 20 AxhGr:

Wu r-o

fi

Attacking the Castled King 47

Sicilian Najdorf: 6 ...

6c6

Timman-Van WeIy
6th Match Game, Breda 1998

le4c52af3d63d4cxd44

axd4 Af6 5 Ac3 a6 6 9.e3 Ac6

King
with a weaknessadvance and then
ial o expose the

. Kasparov-Kengis,
b more evidence of
of this technique.

of the enemy
e frequently recurring
Bacrot-Magem is

example and sees


- 5ng time to isolate
frs defenders before
auack.
dreamed of play-

ser

star then take

but also a nice minafinish.

castling can lead


positions where

In

on who holds
Howell-Miles.

with every intention


a all-out attack but

with

it

powerful

Black

counterslices through the


defences.

story in the game


where, due to the

of the position, White


time to build up his
odcrly fashion before

fual,

well-prepared

fo always to think posi-

gnb the initiative then


for victory!

The usual move here is 6 ... e5 but


Van Wely prefers to try to transpose
to a Scheveningen or English
Attack.

,rffia

A%

7h3

An odd-looking move but it prepares 94 with a position similar to a

,,ffi9

after 6 ...

dc6

Keres Attack. In the second game in


this match Timman tried 7 Ue2 to
facilitate queenside castling. Then

followed 7 ... 6xd4 8 Axd4 e5 9


9e3 Ae6 l0 f:t exfTt ll Axf:l trc8
and Black had equalised.
7 ... e6 8 94 9e7 9 Ag2 h6?!

This is a cautious approach because after 9 9g2 it is clear that


White intends to castle kingside. In
Borge-Rytshagov, Gronin gen 1997,
Black whisked his king to safety
with 9 ... 0-0. The game continued:

6xd4 ll Uxd4 e5 l2Ud2


Strt Ecs 14 a4 Ec4 15 b3
trc8 16 Efcl Wc7:.

l0

0-0

9e6

13

Uc7 11 0-0 Axd4 12 Wxd4


e5 13 Ed2 exf4 14 trxf4 Ae6 15

after 15 ...0-0

10 f4

trafl 0-0
In view of White's well

placed
pieces it is more prudent to try 15 ...
AdZ but Timman has considerable

pressure after 16
Uxd5.

6aS AxaS

16 Exf6! 9xf6 17 trxf6 gxf6 18


Wn g7?
Or lE ... Ua5 19 Axh6 Uc5! 20
9e3 maintaining White's chances.
according to Timman.

19 e5 fxe5 20 9xh6+!

*96 2l

Wnl r-o
r{ter 19 ..fr"5

48 Attacking the Castled King

Grunfeld: Polugaevsky Vanaril

Alekhine: Four Pawns


Morozevich-Bratchenko

Novgorod I 997

I e4 af6 2 e5 ads 3 d4 d6 4 c4
6UO S f4 dxe5 6 fxes Ac6
White has a space advantage but
in the long-term Black hopes to undermine the pawns.

9.e3

gf5 8 hc3 e6 9 aR

Ae7!?
A sharp continuation which in-

k},q

Neu, York 1989

d4

af6 2 c4 96 3 a.d d

cxdS hxd5 5 e4 Axc3 6 brc3 -t


7 3"c4 c5 8 6e2 6c6 9 Ae3 Oa

%%
L,,ru

trc1

Heralding the

penmented with other replies:

after 6 ...2,c6

a) l0 .. Wcr ll h4 EdS l:

n hM

6a5

13 g"d3 c4 14

Thrs rs unusual. Others:


a\ t2 ... Bazu t 13 a3 a4xd5 (13

,rruL

... Aga 14 e6!+-) 14 6xd5 Wxd5


(14 ... gh4+ 15 93 9xd5 16 trgl

hxf5+) 15 6xf5 Wxe5 i6


Djurhuus-Egeli, Norwegian

Wxe5 17

e5 15 h
17 fte5 ire5
fl:l treS 20 Atr

A96 13 AbS+ c0 14 dxc6


0-0 15 cxbT Eb8 16 0-0 Exbi 17

.ru' %

12 ...

tsf3+:
inn

Cheutshenko-Danilov. Tall-

%A

1998"

c) 12 ... Ad7 lthe

best

of

1l

Solozhenkin, Noumea I 995.

l8 Eael 9a0 rs 6rst


This aggressive reaction caps

fine display.

...9c8
If 19 ".. 9xh2+ then 20 *n ge Zt
Ehl HxgZ* 22 Vxg2 9xg2 23
2h6* wins.
20 ah6+ h8 2t Eh4! gc5 22
6xf7+! l-0

,,ru

19

cxd4 WaS+ 12

13 ... trfcS!? 14 h5

adE

18 Exc4 Wa6 19
gxd4 gbs 21Eh3t

9a:: erdt

This is calculated brilliance21

&n
c{ter

l9

o,f5

15

gives White good chances.


14 h5 e5
A slight inaccuracy which lead
ruin because the position is so sb
Polugaevsky suggested lrl . - cf
an improvement but 15 trt-e6 h
16 e5! he7 17 Ed3 looks good
White.
15 hxg6 hxg6 16 d5! d4 17 e-r
Exc4?
l7 ... exd4 is essential alfu
atier 18 Ad2l gb6 19 gl E'l
has a strong centre.

gfi if,

h4 Eac8

after 12 2,d4

13 gbs+ c6 14 dxc6 0-0 15 0-0


Wc7 16 cxbT AxbT 17 Ug4 Wxe5

Ward-Gillen, British Ch 1993b) 10 ... Aa5 I I 9a: es t: A

Championship 1994.

the

bunch) 13 e6 fxe6 14 dxe6 Ac6 15


Bg4 Ah4+ 16 93 Axhl 17 0-0-0
0-0 18 gxh4 gf6 19 9e2+: Texier-

9n+ rs :-: er

b6 t3 f4 Ae6 14 c4 9c8 15lcj


Krasenkov-Zezulkin, Polish Tc

rus

Championship 1998.

b)

gbl

Ac8?!

Bf:+-

Polugacu

vanatton.
10... cxd4

The main line but Black hes

vites Morozevich to enter wild


complications.
10 d5 exds ll cxd5

Polugaevsky-Kudrin

ll

... Axc4+ 22gl f6


24 Eh6! r-o

23tt

Attacking the Castled King 49

Grunfeld: Polugaevsky Variation

Polugaevsky-Kudrin
N.eu, York 1989

d4

af6 2 c4 96 3 Ac3 d5 4

cxd5 Axd5 5 e4 hxc3 6 bxc3 Ag7


7 Ac4 c5 8 6e2 6c6 9 3.e3 0-0 10

trcl

Heralding

the

Polugaevsky

varratron.

10... cxd4
The main line but Black has experrmented with other replies:
a) l0 ... Wc7 ll h4 Ed8 12 h5
Aa5 13 9a3 c+ 14 gbl e5 15 hxg6

after

l0 Ecl

fxe5 9xe5 18
s 20 Ef2 Ec6

f5 23 e6 l-0

Arui,,ruT
% %L%

Ward-Gillen, British Ch 1993.


b) l0 ... 6a5 ll Ad: es 12 dxe5

b6

13

fll 9e6

14 c4

9c8

15

%'%s

Uc2+=

Krasenkov-Zezulkin, Polish Team


Championship 1994.

1l ixd4 Ha5+ 12 fi gd7

13

h4 Eac8

13 ... trfcSl? 14 h5 adS 15 f3

gives White good chances.


14 h5 e5
A slight inaccuracy which leads to
ruin because the position is so sharp.

Polugaevsky suggested 14 ... e6 as


an improvement but 15 hxg6 hxg6
16 e5r.6e7 17 Wd3 looks good for
White.
15 hxg6 hxg6 16 d5! d4 17 oxd4
Exc4?
l'7 ... exd4 is essential although
atler l8 gd2l gb6 19 gl White
has a strong centre.

l8 Exc4 Wa6

19

gd3!

axd4 gb5 218h3!

exd4 20

This is calculated brilliance.


21

&fl

... Axc4+ 22*gl f6

24 trh6! r-0

23

gru.B.%

%%"ru%
'%aru-L

tr
after 14 h5

ru.,@

g
A

gh7+
after 20... gb5

50 Attacking the Castled King

Nimzo-Indian: 5 Ub3

Nimzowitsch Defence:

Alterman-Kurajica
Dresden Zonal 1998

d4 Af6 2 c4 e6 3 0c3
6ts uo 5 gb3 c5 6 Ag5

9.U

I 'm,L
%"%

This side-line is hardly known but


deserves greater prominence. 6 a3 is

more normal.
6... h6
Sokolov-Gra nda Zuniga, Wijk aan
Zee 1997. continued 6 ...2,c6 7 d5
6a5 8 9c2 h6 9 gh4 exd5 l0 cxd5
0-0 I I e3 d6 12 Ae2 Axc3+ 13

"e\ffi, %
"ry,w'ffi %D%
Lffi, %tffi,t

t4 ad2 gd7 15 0-0


c4l:

bxc3 We7
Eae8 16
7

after 6 9g5

gh4 gb7

Altematively:

a) 7 ... 6c6 8 d5 6a5 9 Vc2


6xc4 l0 0-0-0 9xc3 ll Wxc3 exd5
12 trxd5 6a5 13 Ed6 Bc7 t4
trxf6!l as played in Miles-Kalesis,

12

Baden 1987.
8 e3 He7 9 0-0-0
The scene is set for a kingside onslaught by White. Black must look
for chances in a queenside counter-

familiar territory at an early sage oi


the game.

4 o,c3
Others:

a) 4 f4 6c6 5 Ac4 9.b1- 6 E'r''


Btr++ z 93 We7 8 9e2 irdl- 9
6xd2 d6 l0 0-0-0 af6 l1 aeff (>(
12 h3 d5 13 exd5 9xe: tiitC
6xd5 15 2,c4 gave White a sl[dl
space advantage in Milor-Milcs

gf4 d6 6 Ud2 aff:


0-0-0 9e6 8 6a4 Au6 S R 0{ ll
a3 EfeT 1l 6xb6 axM 12 ici
hg6 13 br d5!
An excellent way to open rp tht

after 9 0-0-0

centre in order to activate the

H-l

pleces.
14 exd5

,ru

ads

16

,,ru
n

A.

lf 14 e5 Black can a win a parr


after 14 ... o,al 15 9g5 9eE.
14 ... 6xd5 15 Ucl b5 16 3.C
b417 axb4 6xb4 l8 b3 6xc2!
White's position now falls apert
19 Wxc2
Or 19 *xc2 Ha2+ 20 bl Bhl
threatening ... Eal-r and

Axe5+-.
19 Axd5 Axd5 20 Eh8+ 1-0

hc6 2 d4 e5 3 dxe5 2rd

4 ... Ac5 s

attack.

...
l8
9e3 bxc4
g7
2l WxgT+
17 gd2
Or 18 ... fte5 19 trxh6 trxc4 20

e4

Jadoul. Tarnby 1987.

Bravo! Alterman ignores the pin


on the c-file and goes all out for the
16...

Miles is a specialist in this opa


ing. The choice is perfect if Bld
wants to get his opponent inro m

*b2 6xcz 2l Eel Udz :2 er:


Q)e2+ 23 bt Uc3 o-l HebdEr

Pachman-Muse. Baden

attack. Timing is essential.


9 ... cxd4 10 exd4 Axc3 11 Wxc3
d5 12 gbl 0-0 13 6e5 95 14 9g3
dxc4 15 9xc4 trc8 16 h4!

Isle of Mun 1995

b) 4 afl 6xf3+ 5 UxA UE (


Wg3 9g6 ? WxcT 9aO s Ec{ ff
9 6c3 Ae5 l0 gd2 0-0 I t H}o dl
12 exd5 b5 13 6xb5 9.E l.l ec:
trfcS 15 Va4 a616 ad4 Exc-r! tfr
start of'a brilliancy) l7 bxci $t
l8 Ab3 orc4 t9 l9xa6 Eg5-- !I

b) 7 ...95 8 Ag3 Ae4 9 e3 Ab7

l0 gd3 9xc3+ I I bxc3 dxg3

If

... e5

Isle of Man 1995.

Chania 1997, was a great adveft for


the opening;

hxg3:

Howell-Miles

after

l5

.. .3'F

wlns.

..Hc8

19... Ua3 20 Wc3 Axb3 G'l

Attacking the Castled King

Nimzowitsch Defence: 2 ... e5

Ilowell-Miles
Isle of Man 1995

I e4 Ac6 2 d4 e5 3 dxe5 Axe5


Miles is a specialist in this oPening. The choice is perfect if Black
wants to get his oPPonent into un-

familiar territory at an early stage of

ryAa

the game.
4 6c3
Others:

a)4f4

AA

4+69d2

9xd2+ 9
Btr++ z
6gR 0-0
6xd2 d6
12 h3 d5 13 exd5 Bxe2 14 Axe2
0xd5 15 6c4 gave White a slight
space advantage in Milov-Miles,

after 3 ...

Ne5

Isle of Man 1995.

b) 4

aR 6xR+ 5 Uxf3 9ro o

Wg3 Wg6 7 WxcT gd6 8 Uc+ hr0


e 4\c3 Ae5 l0 3.d2 0-0 I I 0-0-0 d5
12 exd5 b5 13 6xb5 AfS t+ Ac:
Efc8 l5 Va4 a616 Ad4 Exc3! (the
start of'a brilliancy) 17 bxc3 trbS!

l8 Ab3 o,e4 19 Uxa6 Wg5+ 20


b2 6xc3 2l Eel Vd2 22 g,d3
$s2+ 23 bt 9c3 0-1 HebdenJadoul, Tarnby 1987.

4 ... Ac5 s gf4 d6 6vd2 af6 7


0-0-0 9e6 8 Aa4 gb6 9 R 0-0 r0
a3 EfeT 1l Axb6 axb6 12 0,e2
4)96 13 gbr d5!
An excellent way to open uP the
centre in order to activate the black

after 13

*bl

pleces.
14 exd5

If 14 e5 Black can a win a Pawn


after 14 ... ad7 15 Ag5 We8.
14 ... Axd5 15 Ucl b5 16 gd2
b417 axb4 6xb4 18 b3 6xc2!
White's position now falls apart.
19 9xc2
Or 19 xc2 Ea2+ 20 gbl Efa8
threatening ... Eal+ and ... 3.fS*

Jts

I5..Ec8

wtns.
19 ... Ua3 20 Wc3 Axb3

0-l

c{ter 18 b3

5l

52 Attacking the Castled King


Queens's Gambit:6

Sicilian Taimanov: 6 Ae2

Rigu

1995

llll

le4c52af3e63d4cxd44

4lxd4 Oc6 5 6c3 Wc7 6 9e2 a6

1 d4 d5 2

6c3

6...

7...4f6

6b3 3"e7 9 f4 b5
l0 Ae3 d6 ll gf3 6fA n e5 dxe5
13 fxe5 adl 14 Axc6! 9xc6 15

after 7 0-0

Asrian-

Fominyh. Minsk 1998.

.. b5 8 6xc6 dxc6!? (8 ...

Axf4 13 trxf4 Q\e1 14 trafl:

lll

A typical energetic move by Kasparov, in place ofthe usual I I f4.

1l

... b5

If l1 ... 694l?

then White has ex-

cellent chances after 12 f4

trxf2 Axf2

a2l

15

gR

would save

%,s%
s'fu, % Na
after I I A,g5

a tempo.

15 ... wc6 16 aA gxf3 17 trxR


bxa4 18 f5 trb8 19 trafl 0-0?
19 ... trxb2 is a marked improve-

2l

trg3+ h8

.c

l0 abs 0{ ll .t
*h8 13 Edrl
The simple plan of Ed3-h-1 i

9 bxc3 Wa5
gxf6 t2 wg4+

direct road to mate.


13 ... ad7 14 wh4 15 ad6 15
Bacrot takes time out to stq

lrir

the game with 17 e5l 4xc4

4\xc4 *g7 19 trd3+17 0-0 ab6 r8 trR 6xc4 19I


Eg7 20 elt
The final piece in the jigsau 20 ...

22

E{e2+-.

2l trg3 g6 22 Wdt exfS 23 Exf5


Hb624Wxh5l-0

Be2 0-0 13 Ad3 (r3 e5) 13


a3 Axc3 l5 9xc3+:.

White continues in a similar

tojoin in the attack.

gbs
20 ... gxf6

tension. The game continued 9 I


Wc5 l0 gb5+ gd7 I I ab3 fer

It is is difficult to organir
cenl defence. After 16

A fantastic way to allow the rooks


20...

Wa5 in order to presenr

16... trg8

gf6!

and queen

..

black knight emerging via e5-

ment according to Kasparov: 20


fxe6 Wxe6 2l ExfT Vxf/ 22 ExfT
&xf7 23 h4 a3 24 B/xd7+ g8!:.
20

b) 6...b5?e5h68ih.le
hxg5 hxg5 10 Axg5 aM7 I I I
trbS 12 exf6 trgS 13 h4-: I-cn
Thesing, Berlin 1992.
7 Axc4 cxd4 8 6xd4 ixc}.
In the game Sokolov-Dia
Dresden Zonal 1998. Black

13

14 e5 Ac5 15 6e4.
t2 f4 gb7 13 e5!? ad5 14 axds
Axd5 15 a4?!

Rishon leZion1996.

frained from exchanging pieces

Rogic-Milov, Dresden Zonal 1998.

8 hl Axd4 9 Bxd4 Ac5 t0


Wa: ns rr Ag5!?

for rdart

c5

Black can also try:


a) 6 ... abdT 7 Axc4 h6 t A
Wxf6 9 0-0 0-0 10 a3 Axc-r 1l b
Ed8 l2 Be2 b6 13 a4 a6 14 2
gb7 15 f4+: Manor-Kosashr

a) 7 ... Ac5 8

b) 7

aR af6 3 c4 &e
gb4 6 Ag5

The Vienna variation is renosr

kingside attack.

Wxc6 9 Afi Wc7 10 e5 Ab7 11


AxbT WxbT t2 f4+:) 9 ge3 gd6
l0 f4 e5 11 gd2 ex?l 12 Axf4

e6 5 e4

as an aggressive weapon

Black now has problems dealing


with White's plan of simple development followed by an early ?l and

Aa5 Wc7 16 Wn+-

Pamplona 1997 9.,

&,rru4

0-0

iCJ

Bacrot-Magem

Kasparov-Kengis

r{ter l9 ... 0-0

6xd6 21 exf6 l-0

Attacking the Castled King

Queens's Gambit: 6 Ag5

Bacrot-Magem
Pamplona 1997/98

lll

ld4d52aRaf63c4dxc44

6c3 e6.5 e4 gb4 6 9g5

The Vienna variation is renowned


for White.

as an aggressive weapon

6 ... c5

AgA

Black can also try:


a) 6 ...abd7 7 Axc4 h6 8 Axf6
Wxf6 9 0-0 0-0 l0 a3 Axc3 ll bxc3
trdS 12 We2 b6 13 a4 a6 14 adz
gb7 15 f4+: Manor-Kosashvili.
Rishon le Zion 1996.

b)6"..b57e5h68g"h4959
gA

Axg5 hxg5 l0 Axg5 abdT I I

trb8 12 exf6 EgS 13 h4+: LemerThesing. Berlin 1992.


7 Axc4 cxd4 8 6xd4

il

In the game

w. 8'%

g%

eru

W, ,,%tr

E
,rt

9xc3+

Sokolov-Dizdar.

Dresden Zonal 1998. Black re-

w,

after 6 9g5

frained from exchanging pieces with


8 ... Wa5 in order to preserve the
tension. The game continued 9 A.d2

Bc5 1o Ab5+ gd7 I I ab3 Ve7 12


Be2 0-0 13 gd3 (13 e5) 13 ... e5 14
a3 Axc3 15 Axc3+:.
9 bxc3 9a5 l0 dlus o-o ll 9xf6
gxf6 t2 gg4+ h8 13 trdl!
The simple plan of Ed3-h3 is a

fft
,-

A
after 12

. *nt

direct road to mate.

13 ... ad7 14 gh4 rs ad6 16 f4!


Bacrot takes time out to stop the
black knight emerging via e5.
16... Eg8
It is is difficult to organise a de2:U0
cent defence. After 16
White continues in a similar vein to
the game with 17 e5! 6xc4 18
6xc4 @s.7 19 trd3+-.
17 0-0-ab6 18 ER axc4 19 Eh3

AA

trg7 20 e5!
The final piece in the jigsaw.
20 ... Axd6 21 exf6 1-0

I
g

after I 6 f4

54 Attacking the Castled King

Czech Benoni: 6 ... Ag4

Caro-Kann: 5 ... exf6

Gofshtein-Beikert

Mnatsakanian-Simagin
Kiev 1965

French Team Championship 1998

le4c626c3d53d4dre44

ld4at62c4c53d5e5

hxen 0f6 5 hxf6+ exf6


This is no long6r the height of

The Czech Benoni is a solid response which avoids lots of theory.

Unfortunately, Black's congested

position is not to everybody's taste.


4 6c3 d6 5 e4 Ae7 6 6f3 Ag4
The white-squared bishop often
ends up restricted in movement so

AA

b) 7 ... heS 8 dR 0la6 9 94


6ac7 t0 a3 9'd7 l l b4 b6 t2 Ebt
trb8 13 Ae3 left Black in a passive

positon in

with opposite-sides castling.


6 Ac4

after

Black is eager to exchange it. After


6 ... 0-0 7 h3 play might continue:
a) 1 ... a6 8 a4 abdT 9 94 6e8 I0
gd3 h6 lr Ae3 dc7 t2 Baz gS t:
h4+- Shirov-Lillo Ferrer, Villarrobledo rapidplay 1997.

fashion, perhaps because the -earnc


inevitably leads to a confronarioo

Alternatives are:
a) 6 c3 ,e7 7 gd3 Ae6 8 ac]
0-0 9 Wc2 96 l0 h4 f5 I I h5 EeE ll

6 . Lsa

af4 Af6

ll

Byme-Bragg, Philadelphia 1991.

c) 6

6A

g.d6 7 ae2 0-0 8 G0

6az to Wd2 Hc: t t c+


af8 l2 Efel 9f5= Larsen-HanserEeS 9 9"e3

Naestved 1988.
6 ...A.e7
6 ... 3"d6 or 6 ... EIe7 can also bc
considered but the text has a good
record.
7

ghs

In

after l0 94

Gutierrez-Rahman. Dub.i

Olympiad 1986, White opted for

counter-attack.

UxR 0-0 t h4 h8 r0 94
Game on! Gofshtein can safely
advance his kingside pawns and

more restrained set-up with 7 Qel


The game continued: 7 ... 0-0 8 O{

continously improve his pieces.


l0 ... 6a6 ll Ad2 Q\c1 12 95
hg8 13 Wg3 a6 14 z4 a515 f4 exf4
16 Axf4 f6 17 Ae3 96 18 0-0-0

ad7 9 )9: huo 10 Ad3 96 r r


=er
9e612 c3 Ee8+:.
7 ... 0-0 8 Ae2 96 e Yh6 s.fs la
Aul cs 1l Ae3 a,c612 0-(Hl c4l
A crafty way of opening the c-fitrc
for Black's rook.

tre8 19 Ad3 6a6 20 eS!


Perfect timing. Now White can

a,al u gb3 Ect l5


6c3 Wa5 16 bl trxc3!
13 Axc4

crash through on the kingside.


20 ... dxe5 2l h5 fxgS 22 hxg6 h6

The key defender leaves the board


spelling doom and gloom for \tltit.
17 bxc3 Axc2+ 0-l

25

The lone rook mates after 25 ...


Bxg5+ 26 Wxg5 hxg5 27 Eh7+
gf8 18 trf7.

Kasparor--

b) 6 e3 -9"d6 7 9g2 0-0 8 aE


9 Ae3 Wa5+ l0 c3 Eb5:

Rishon LeZion 1997.


7 h3 Axf3?!

23 2,e4 *g7 24 Axg5 Axg5


Axg5 l-0

Sf1 2,dl+--

Ee8+

Novikov-Alienkin,

It is probably better to preserve


the bishop with 7 ... thS. f'or
example: 8 gd3 Q\a6 9 Ae3 6c7
I0 94 3"96 I I Bc2 a6 12 de2 b5
l3 b3 Wb8 grves Black chances of a

13

Miles. Israel 1998.

There is no defence against

after 19 . .0,a6

*cl

Axb3 l8 axb3 Wa2.

lt

Attacking the Castled King 55

Caro-Kann: 5 ... exf6

Trui
'ffi%

Mnatsakanian-Simagin
Kiev 1965

le4c626c3d53d4dxe44

6xe4 Af6 5 6xf6+ exf6


This is no longer the height of
fashion, perhaps because the game
inevitably leads to a confrontation
with opposite-sides castling.

%
A

6 9.c4
Altematives are:

9sa

a) 6 c3 S.e7 'l 9.d3 Ae6 8 0rc2


0-0 9 Uc2 96 l0 h4 f5 I I h5 treS 12

af4 Af6

13

*fl haz+:

after 6 A,c4

Kasparov-

Miles.Israel 1998.

b) 6 e3 gd6 7 9g2 0-0 8 aR


tre8+ 9 9e3 9a5+ l0 c3 9b5:

I I

Byrne-Bragg, Philadelphia 1991.

gI

g.d6 7 3.e2 0-0 8 0-0


Ee8 9 Ae3 baZ tO 9d2 Wc7 I I c4

c) 6

AR

Af8 12 Efet Ars:

Larsen-Hansen,

Naestved 1988.

6...9e7
6 ... gd6 or 6 ... 9e7

can also be
considered but the text has a good

record.
7

Ser

l0 94

ghs

In

Gutierrez-Rahman. Dubai

after 12 ... c4

Olympiad 1986, White opted for a


more restrained set-up with 7 0le2.
The game continued: 7 ... 0-0 8 0-0
a,at s 69r Auo Io gd3 96 I I Eel
Ae612 c3 Ee8+:.
7 ... 0-o 8 a,e2 96 e Vh6 g.fs ro

VH,

Aus cs ll Ae3 dc612 0-0-0 c4!


A crafty way of opening the c-file
for Black's rook.

3.

13 Axc4 aiat
Au: trcs rs
6c3 Ua5 16 Ebl Exc3!
,ru_

The key defender leaves the board


spelling doom and gloom for White.
17 bxc3 Axc2+ 0-l

There is no defence against l8

$frq

19...

da6

cl 9xb3

18 axb3 Ua2.

after l6

&bl

56 Attacking the Castled King

Closed Sicilian: 5 Ae3

French Tarrasch: 3 .,. a,rc6

Ledger-Duncan
British League (4NCL) 1997

1e4c526c36c6393964d3
Ag7

5 Ae3

Naleczou,1986

I I

A flexible move. White can aim


for 9d2 followed by Ah6. to ex-

I e4 e62 d4 dS 3 ad2 ac{ 4 c3


A relative side-line compared I
the common 4 o,g13_. For exaryl

Lane-Cobb, British Champiomhi


1998, continued 4 ... hf6 s eS ifa
6 ab3 a5 7 a4 g.e7 8 gb5-:

change bishops before advancing on

the kingside, or quietly continue fll


with a solid position.
5 ... d6 o waz es
A critical junction:
a) 6 ... trbS 7 Ag2 b5 8 6ge2 b4
9 adt ad4lo o-o e6 I I 6cI Wa5

Horvath-Kuligowski

&

4 .". e5 5

after 5 9e3

in

is a

Ledger-Gallagher,
1997

b) 6 ... e6 1 Ag2 9a5 8 Age2


q:aq g o-o he7 lo Shl fuat t rq
gbS 12 ga h5 13 f5 9"e5 14 fxg6
6xg6 15 95 dxe2 16 Wxe2 9xc3
17 bxc3 Bxc3 18 tsf2 Wg7 19 d4
White had tremendous attacking

in compensation for the


pawn in Smyslov-Kottnauer,
chances

Moscow-Prague 1946.
7 f4 AgeT 8 9g2 0-0 9 aR trb8
10 0-0 exf4 1l Axf4 f5 12 Ah6 b5

A
A
A,M:
after

&A

l4 Eael

xf6 20 gf4+ gfs 21


trfl

Efxft+ 24@xf1trb6 25 wra+ t-o

reasonable alternatire

White) 9 ... fxe6 l0 Ub3 reo I


o-0 Af6 12 Wxe6+ b8 t3 eE

6)xe4 14 Bxe4 Ee8 15 gd3 3.d


15 Ad2 95 17 93 left Black s-rr
compensation for the paun rn X

Cm

S 6xd4 hxd4 9 cxd4 ic6 I


ga4+ ad7 11 gb3 0-0{ 12 }
Ae6 13 Eel Axc4 14 6rc4 6 I
9d Was 16 Af4 gs 17 ig3 r
l8 Eacl hc6 19 tre8!!
A staggering move u'hich d
stroys Kuligowski's position.

19...9xd4
Or 19 ... Exe8 20 6b6- crbS l
Bxd5+; 19 ... Ae7 20 OM- atb
2l Bxd5a.
20 trxd8+ Wxd8

Nothing can save Black. l0


hxdS (20 ... 9xd8 2l Edl-) :
ab6, Wxb6 22 Uxb6 a-xb5 l
ExcT+ b8 24 Ec4+ a? 15 E:

A touch ofclass.
18... trxf6
If 18 ... EIcS then 19 9xd6 trd8
20 ah5+! gh6 2l afl+ *xh5 22
19 Exf6

ga: tt Qt

Shanshai 1995.

xg7 14 trael
Ihe big difference is that Ledger's king is surrounded by pieces
while Duncan's protective kingside
cover is full of holes.
14 ... b4 15 ad5 fxe4 16 dxe4
9g417 Ags Waz 18 af6!

exf5 Wxf5 22 Wxd6+ xg5 23

Ae2

Jun-Brunner. Second Match

13 AxgT

Wflt wins.

(9 0-01? 0-0-0 10 Aez

White's slight advantage eventually


British Championship

9xd5 6 i.gl

t
9e6 l0 0+Micic-Gunawan. Belgrade I 98t.
b) 7 ...WtrS t cxd4 Ae6 9 irc

Efe7,

12 c3 bxc3 13 bxc3 o,c6 14 9f4


Wc7 15 hb: es 16 9g5 dge7 17
gh6 0-0 18 AxgT xg7 19 fzl and

led to a win

exd5

exd4 7 .Ac4 Efs


a) 7 ... Wd8 8 cxd4 (8 G0l?r

mates.

214a5 Ab4

ufter 17

. Wd7

The knight is taboo: 2l ... &.l


22 We6+ b8 23 AxcT+ '5rc" l
WeS+ UcS 25 Exc8 mate.

226xc6'Ed223 We6+ l-0

Atlacking the Castled King 57

French Tarrasch: 3

L"/ffiL

%
%

...2,c6

ih

Horvath-Kuligowski

le4e62d4d53ad26c64c3
A relative side-line compared to
the common a 69A. For examPle

Naleczow 1986

Lane-Cobb, British ChamPionshiP


1998. continued 4 ... Dt' s es 6tal
6 ab3 a5 7 a4 Ae7 8 3"b5+:"

4 .". e5 5

exd5 Uxd5

6 6gR

exd47 Acl9rs
a) 7 ...gaS s cxd4 (8 0-0!?) 8

EfeT+

9.e2

Ae6 t0

A"ffia

...

0-0-r =

ufter 4

Micic-Gunawan. Belgrade I 988.

cj

b) 7 ...Wfrs s cxd4 Ae6 9 9xe6

(9 0-o!? 0-o-o 10 aez

is a

uds t1 ab3

reasonable alternative for


white) 9 ... fte6 l0 gb3 0-0-0 I I
0-0 af6 12 9xe6+ b8 13 ae4
2lxe4 14 Wxe4 Ee8 15 gd3 gd6
16 gd2 95 17 93 left Black with
compensation for the pawn in Xie
Jun-Brunner. Second Match Game,

Shanshai 1995.

^.N
fier

14

S 6xda 6xd4 9 cxd4 9e6 l0


ga4+ gd? lr gb3 0-0-0 12 0-0
Ae6 13 Eel Axc4 14 6xc4 f6 15
Aes Wos t6 3:f4 g5 17 9g3 6e7
18 Eacl Ac6 19 tre8!!
A staggering move which de-

Eael

L1

,rru_

after 7 9,c4

stroys Kuligowski's position.

sry

r9 ... Bxd4
Or 19 ... Exe8 20 Q\b6+ cxb6 2l
Wxd5t; 19 ... Ae7 20 6b6+ axb6
2l Wxd5+.
20 ExdS+ UxdS

Nothing can save Black. 20 ...


6xd8 (20 ... *xd8 2l trdl+-) 2l
6b6+ Wxb6 22 Vxb6 axb6 23
ExcT+ US z+ Ec4+ a7 25 tra4
mates.

s"

21

aas 3"b4

The knight is taboo: 2l ... Exal


22 Ve6+ Eb8 23 AxcT+ VxcT 24
BeS+ s{c8 25 Exc8 mate.
22 6xc6 Waz

z: We6+

1-0

AA
after t8 ...2,c6

.5ti ,4ttacking the Castled King

Spanish: Schliemann 4 ...

ad4

French: Exchange Variation 4 cxd5

Velicka-Souleidis

Limbos-Bogart

Gelsenkirchen 1998

Belgian Congo

le4e52ar:-Ac63AuStSl

e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3

195

ad 3-Ul I

6cs 6antt

exd5

An enterprising way to handle the


opening and avoiding the marn line
linked to 4 ... fxe4 5 6xe4 d5.

This is a version of the Exchangt


Variation, popular nowadal-s ui6
Nosueiras and Short.
4"... exds 5 gd3

5 Aa4

a) 5 6xd4 exd4 6 AdS cO 7 exf5


Wg5 8 6c7+ Sd8 9 6xa8 Uxg2 l0
Efl cxb5 He2 Olte n fl Uc6 13

White's opening promises a snnll


advantage with the possibiliS- of
building up a kingside attack. Prob

ll

dl d5 14 gd3 96 15 9xd4 9xf5


16 Bc3 9g4+ 17 el 9c5 0-l

after

Bauer-Held. Bundesliga 1990.

ably a good choice when ;*ou

4 .. dal

b) 5 exf5 af6 6 6xe5 c6 7 3c2


hc4 d5 9 0,e3 gf7 l0 Ad3
Aa0 t t 2,e2 6xe2 12 9xe2 d4 13

We7 8

T,@

o,c4 9c7 14 d3 9xf5 15 Ag5+--

Hracek-Sokolov. Nussloch 1996.


c) 5 6xe5 Wf6 6 f4 (6 AR!?) 6 ...
fxe4 7 d3 gb4 8 ga4 gh4+ 9
Axc3 l0 bxc3 6e6 I I dxe4 6fe
Af3 Wg+ 13 h3 tsg3:+ Schmittdiel-Breutigam, Bundesliga 1997.
5 ... af6 6 exfS 9"c5 7 0-0 0-0 8

L'./_ry-

gfl
n

hxe5
It looks risky

'ffi,-t

6 Dge2 0-0

I ab5 is essential.
... 694 12 93 Uxf5 t3 at4 gs
14 ad3
14 d4 gxf415 dxc5 6xh2! wins.

gl

Ag5 -bdT

initiative.

15 Ae7!

White manages to transport a root


to the seventh rank.

15 ... S"xe7 16 ExeT

trf7 l7

SxfT

9xg3+

The king goes for a walk.

0-1

White resigned due to 17 ehl


Btr++ tg gl trf6 l9 AeS Ag4-+.

7 0-0 c6 8

Bxh5 96 12 gh6 f5 13 trfel aba


t4Ee2 gd7?
This allows Limbos to speed try
his attack. 14 ...Vg7 15 trael !fl
t6 gh4 also maintains a suoog

fhe knockout blow.


15 &xh2 UtrS+ tO

b) 5 ... olc6 6 a3 9xc3+ ? bxd


8 Wts Aeo 9 trbl b6 lo AB
la Riva-Pecorelli Garcn
De
96:

9 6e3 Ec7 l0 ahs 6rh5 ll

lr

14 ...4)xh2t.

t997

Havana 1998.

after 9 2e2

rasi-Aagaard. Budapest, White tried

Bxe5ll6e2?

s... af6
a) 5 ... c5 6 dxc5 2rc6 7 a3 ixc5
8 6R hgeT t h3 0-0 l0 G0 h6 ll
Eel+: Docx-Luminet. Antserp
6ge7

another
pawn at the expense of getting the
rest of the pieces into play. In Foga-

the calm 8 d3. White only had a


slight edge after 8 ... d5 9 6xe5
Axf5 10 9fl1 c6 I I gb3 a5 t2 3;g3
gd6 r 3 trel Uc7 14 fit h8.
8 ... d5 9 0,e2 Ue7 l0 6xd4

ch$

international.

t'ffi_ A

to grab

Bogart was considered a decent

player but here he was waeln.g e


dollar a game against a Belgim

,ffi

are

tackling a famous f,rlm star! Dr. Pad


Limbos was playing friendl;- gans
against Humphrey Bogart during fu
filming of 'The African Queea'

9xh7+ ro rs gel gd6 2a


94 Ed8 2t f4 95 22h4 t-0
18

after

l4

ddj

=rf,

Attacking the Castled King 59

French: Exchange Variation 4 cxd5

Limbos-Bogart
Belgion Congo

ll

I95l

,,ry

le4e62d4d53hc39"Ul
exd5

This is a version of the Exchange


Variation, popular nowadaYs with
Nogueiras and Short.
4 ... exd5 5 9.d3

White's opening promises a small


advantage with the PossibilitY of
building up a kingside attack. Probably a good choice when You are
tackling a famous film star! Dr. Paul
Limbos was playing friendly games

ffis

IA

after 5 fudj

against Humphrey Bogart during the

hlming

of 'The African Queen'.

Bogart was considered a decent club

%l

wrffi
L.ffiL

player but here he was waging

dollar a game against a Belgian


international.

s ... af6
a) 5 ... c5 6 dxc5 Dc6 7 a3 Axc5
s 4R 6ge7 t h3 0-0 l0 0-0 h6 ll

Eel+:

Docx-Luminet. Antwerp

1997.

b) 5 ... 6c6 6 a3 Axc3+ 7 bxc3


6ge7 8 WtrS AeO 9 trbl b6 10 aR

g6: De la

Riva-Pecorelli Garcia.

Havana 1998.

after 9 6gj

6 olse} 0-0 7 0-0 co 8 Ag5 6nd7

9 6e3 9c7 l0 ahs axhs 11


Uxhi 96 12 gh6 f5 13 Efel ab6
14Ee2 3td7?
This allows Limbos to sPeed uP
his attack. 14 ...Vg7 15 trael trf7

16

gh4 also maintains a

strong

initiative.

L'w
rel
%

15 3"e7!

White manages to transport a rook


to the seventh rank.

15

*xf7

...9xe7

16 ExeT

trfl

17

trxfl

The king goes for a walk.

tret gatr
94 Ed8 2t f4 95 22h4 t-0
18

9xh7l f6

19

zo

after14..ilaZ

60 Attacking the Castled King

English: 3 e4

King"s lndian Defence: Averbath

Mascarinas-Juarez Flores
Manila Interzonal 1990

USSR'leam Championship I 934

t c4af626(3

Averbakh-Aronin

llll

e63 e4

White has no desire to conform


meekly with Black's plan of transposing to the Nimzo-Indian after 3
d4 gb4.

This model game by the origin


of the system demonsu-G

ator

3...d54e5d4

White' s attacking possibil ities.

Other moves:

8 ...
Or:

a) 4 ... 0,e4 5 6xe4 dxe4 6 Wga


0rc6 7 Wxe+ Wd4 8 Hxd4 6xd4 9

Ae3 Wa5 12 gd2


14 Wc2 axb5 15

after 3 e4

l3 trb1 Axe5 t/zr/z Bareev-Rozentalis,Kazat 1997.


b) 4 ...6m 5 d4 c5 6 cxd5 exd5
7 6R o,c6 8 dxc5 Axc5 9 Uxd5
BU6 tO 9c4 9xf2+ Il *e2 O-O 12

trll 6dxe5 13 6xe5 Axe5

irff

ll
,M%

14

5 exf6 dxc3 6 bxc3 Wxf6 7 d4 c5


s At3 Eds?

This rs not the best way to deal


9 9g5. lnstead KasparovWeemaes, Cannes simul 1988, continued with the usual 8 ... cxd4 but
Black soon suffered after 9 cxd4
hc6 (.9 ... AU++tzy l0 a3 h6 1l
gb2 gd6 12 g,d3 o-o 13 o-o e5 14

with

after 8

ofthe e5 square. On the other hd


one might rightly argue that the &
fensive pawn barrier is fau['

6/3

weakened.

l6

22ac4,Ed7

trel g,b7 24 Axf5 1-0


9 gd3! cxd4 l0 cxd4 gb4+ ll
gd2 gxd2+ 12 wxd2 ad7 13 0-0
o-o 14 Wra hro t5 Ae5 Aoz ro
23

Efel trc817 tre3!

17 ... Ac6 18 Eh3 h6 19 Eel


6e8 20 dga L0
20 ... Hg5 20 6xh6+ gxh6 22
Eg3 wins.

Ee8 ll Aa gb6 12 e5 Ofd- 13


aus trcs (13 ... 6a6) 14'gb3 ac5
15 Ac7 hcxe5 16 6xe5 4xe5 l'
Wxb6 axb6 l8 hxaSl AlbutWhitehead. New York 1987.
I hR 69l r0 Wd2 eh7 rl i3
4)ge5 12 6xe5 Axe5 13 f4 --da ra
Abs Af6 15 0-o 95
The logic behind the text rs frrc

because Black is battling for cootml

d5 abS 15 c5! Axc5 16 6xe5 W?l


17 trcl b6
5 19 h4 gd8

The rook can make a big impression by swinging across to 93 or h3


to aid a kingside attack.

l0 a.t
II
gb4 13 a95
Oh5
Adl lear-es 6c

black queen trapped, Alburt-\\-il&USA Ch 1986.


b) 8 ... e6 9 dxe6 Axe6 l0

Bxe5 9d4 15 We4 Aaz t0 6as


Wc5 17 Ed3+- AzrnaiparashviliMitkov, New York 1997.

18
Vaoz

abdT

a) 8 ... b5 9 cxb5 a6

gd3 gd7 10 a,e2 Ac5 ll b4 (ll


.Q"e4!?) ll ... 6xe2 12 &xe2 9.d4

20gf3

aca iC7 I
Ag5 c5 7 d5 5

d4 Af6 2 c4 96 3

e4 d6 5 Ae2 0-0 6
8 gf4

I I

'ffi,

16... dxe5
16

gxPt leads to a spee{

dr

ftg3 lS id3g8 19 Wxh6 6xf6 20 Exf6-.


17 fxg5 Axg5 18 $63+ tg7 rt
feat upon 17 exf6

M,
A

e5!

Averbakh grabs the chance lo


give away a pawn in order to exphn
the bl-h7 diagonal.

'T,-

We2

A deadly threat is 20 9e4.


19 ... trh8 20 d6 e6 21 6,c7
22Hxfl+ l-O

Black resigned in view of

after 16... Ec8

Ebl

ll

g7 2a Ug6- Sfr
25 Axe6 with mate to follou.

xf7

23 P65+

Attacking the Castled King 6l

King's lndian Defence: Averbakh

Averbakh-Aronin
USSR Team Championship I 954

td4af62c496 36c3 9g7a


e4 d6 5 Ae2 0-0 6 9"g5 c5 7 d5 h6
8 gf4

This model game by the originof the system demonstrates

,ru.

ator

%
,ffi-g

White's attacking possibilities.

s... abdT
Or:

a) 8... b5 9 cxb5 a6 l0 a4 95 ll
ae3 ua5 12 gd2 9u+ tr R ahs
14 Vc2 axb5 15 6dl leaves the

after 8

9f4

black queen trapped, Alburt-Wilder,


USA Ch 1986.
b) 8 ... e6 9 dxe6 Axe6 10 Axd6

I I aB lyb6 12 e5 6fd7 t3
6us trcs (13 ... Aa6) 14 9b3 6c6
15 6c7 6cxe5 16 6xe5 6xe5 17
Uxb6 axb6 l8 6xa8+ Alburt-

treS

Whitehead. New York 1987.

Ed2 gh7 rr Ag3


6ge5 12 hxe5 9xe5 f3 f4 9"d4 f4
abs Af6 15 o-o 95
The logic behind the text is fine
because Black is battling for control

l6R 691

10

of the e5 square. On the other hand


one might rightly argue that the defensive pawn barrier is fatally

after

l5

... g5

weakened.
16 e5!

Averbakh grabs the chance to


give away a pawn in order to exploit

bl-h7 diagonal.
16 ... dxe5

the

l6
feat

,ry,

e8
l7

We2

A deadly threat is 20Ve4.


19 ... trh8 20 d6 e6 21 ac7 Eb8
22Exf7+ l-0
Black resigned in view of 22 ...

@xf7 23 ths+ Sg7 24 1496+


25 4\xe6 with mate to follow.

f8

,,ru-

after

2l

... Eb8

62 ,4ttacking the Castled King

Conclusion

A successful attack on the castled


king requires good judgement, accurate calculation and perfect timing.
Of course, an aggressive opening
helps, such as that seen in VelickaSouleidis where Black managed to
introduce favourable complications
and force White to concede critical
weaknesses in his defensive pawn
bamer.
Creating an open line for a rook
along the h-file can be very effective against an opponent who has
castled on the kingside. In the game,

Polugaevsky-Kudrin, White manages to walk a tightrope by keeping


his king in the centre while at the
same time looking for a breakthrough on the kingside.
In situations of opposite-side castling, it is not an uncoflrmon sight to
see one careless move lead to ruin.
In Mnatsakanian-Simagin, Black seizes his chance to conjure up a decisive counterattack out of nowhere.

The

Art of Attack

) Cany out a pawn storm to induce weaknesses in the opponent's


defensive shield but bear in mind
that any reckless advance can leave
you vulnerable to a counterattack.
2 Speed up your attack by opening lines and diagonals.
3 Try to manoeuvre your pieces
into an attacking formation in the
minimum amount of moves. A
space advantage is a big help if attacking forces have to be transferred

from one side of the board to the


other, since then there will be little
or no distraction from counterplay.
The

Art of Defence

One of the most difficult posi-

tions to break down is the castled


king. Strengthen it still further with
reinforcements available as a result
of steady development.
2 Counter an attack on the flank
by opening up the centre.

Watch out

signed
cover.

for

sacrifices de-

to destroy the king's pawn

Checkmate

It requires a certain amount of,


skill to deliver mate straight out of
the opening! The defender EiIl

gladly give up material, anything o


delay the inevitable, and this males
a swift victory even more swocl
Despite their spectacular EaturE"
mating possibilities usually pryt
a player to follow set procedures of,

play. Of course, other attacking


methods are important too. bd.
when playing for mate, the asurc
player will take his cue from typr

il

I
t

I
I

cally recurring mating patterns-

Colle-Buerger

is an example

of,

m
dard sacrifice on h7-to crack th
defence and follow up with an ir
how a king can be caught by a

filtration by the queen. By comper


ing it with, say, the game Aleksie

Solaja, White's sacrifice

will

bc

easier to find.

The more pieces on the boad, thc


more the possibilities-and thesc
extra possibilities can bring drcir
ia thc
own reward. This is
"u16"1 wtcrc
game, Bronstein-Vedder.

White bamboozles his oppoocrr


with scintillating play, ending in e
trademark mate.

it is a big mistake to
go blindly on to the attack and sit
Then again.

Art of Attack

d e pawn storm to inrces in the opponent's


ield but bear in mind

rp

advance can leave


to a counterattack.
your attack by open-

diegonals.

lErocuvre your pleces

rtino

formation

anmt of

in

the

moves. A

is a big help

if

athave to be transferred
of the board to the

6tn

there will be little


from counterplay.

Art of Defence
rhc most diffrcult posidown is the castled
it still turther with
available as a result

attack on the flank

q the centre.
qt for sacrifices de-

the king's pawn

5 Checkmate in the Opening


It requires a certain amount of
skill to deliver mate straight out of
the opening! The defender will
gladly give up material, anything to
delay the inevitable, and this makes

a swift victory even more sweet.


Despite their spectacular nature,
mating possibilities usually prompt
a player to follow set procedures of

play. Of course, other attacking


methods are important too. but,
when playing for mate, the astute
player will take his cue from typically recurring mating patterns.

Colle-Buerger is an example of
how a king can be caught by a standard sacrifice on h7-to crack the
defence and follow up with an in-

filtration by the queen. By comparing it with, say, the game AleksicSolaja. White's sacrifice will be
easier to find.

The more pieces on the board, the

more the possibilities-and these


extra possibilities can bring their
own reward. This is evident in the
game, Bronstein-Vedder. where
White bamboozles his opponent
with scintillating play, ending in a
trademark mate.

Then again. it is a big mistake to


go blindly on to the attack and sit

back in expectation that the win will


come all by itself. In Botos-Videki,

White automatically pushes his


pawns up the board only for the
assault to falter. Black then takes
advantage of White's resulting
positional deficiencies to launch a
counter-offensive.

Rogulj-Atlas features a frequently


seen mating idea. The combination
of the rook and bishop homing in on
the king alerts Black to a decisive
sacrifice.

Beliavsky-Larsen is a lesson in
how to make the best use of pieces
that are poised to strike deep into

enemy territory. While Black is


wasting time on an inappropriate
flank pawn advance White's men
get into position for a smashing
breakthrough against the black king,
stuck on its original square.
In Kobernat-Stenzel, White employs a tricky opening, sacrificing a

pawn for rapid piece development


and an initiative, and his early pursuit of the opposing king is crowned
with success.

This chapter should encourage


and convince you that certain techniques for checkmating early in the
game can be learned.

64 Checkmate in the Opening

Philidor: 5 ...9e7

Bogo-Indian: 6... c5

Conquest-\ilall
British Championship I 998

ll

Bronstein-Vedder
I4rijk aan Zee 1997

1 d4 af6 2 c4 e6 3 af3 b6 4 g3
gb7 s 9"g2 9bl+.
A tried and trusted way of avoil
ing the Queen's Indian Deferrc

1e4e52aRd63d4exd4
It is worth taking time-out to refute pages of analysis associated
with 3 ... f5. After 4 dc3 the main
line continues 4 ... fte4 5 6xe4 d5

which is entered atler 5 ... Ae7.

6 gd2 c5
a) 6 ... 9xd2+ 7 dbxd2 GO 8

6 Aeg5! h6 (6 ... e4 7 0le5 is bleak


for Black) 7 atTll SxfT 8 6xe5+

with a devastating attack.


4 6xd4 610 s Acl ge7 6 gd3
White has investigated various

alter

... B-e/

d6 9 Bc2 c5 10 e4 cxd4

atal

0{t

ll Ardl

12 Hael a6 13 b3

',rnb

f4 oc6 l0 9e3 b5 ll Af3

Farago-Eperjesi. Budapest 1997.


b) 6 ... We7 7 6c3 c5 8 e3 G09
0-0 d6 l0 a3 Axc3 I I 9xc3 ae4*=
Vark-Rodrigues, Tallinn 1997.

12 e5 d5 13 gd3 6c5 gave Black a


slight initiative in Mutton-Wall,

offers more practical chances tha


10 ah4 6xc3 11 Axc3 fux1;2. 12

ways to conduct the attack:


a) 6 g.e2 0-0 7 0-0 c5 8 ab3 a6 9

Wc7=
Schmittdiel-Wall, Gent I 997.
b) 6 Ac4 0-0 7 0-0 a6 8 a4 0lc6 9
6xc6 bxc6 l0 gfil a5 I I We2 Ad7

British Championship 1998.


c) 6 9"fl1 0-0 7 gd2 6c6 8 0-0-0

dxd4 9 Wxd4 Ae6 l0 R a6 11

Wd2*: Lane-Wall. British

Cham-

pionship 1998.
6 ... 0-0 7 0-0 tre8 S ghl 6c6 9
6xc6 bxc6 f 0 f4 gf8 ll e5 dxeS?!
ll ... 694 is the only way to defend because now the open lines favour Conquest.

7 dxcS Axc5 8 0-0 0-0 9 Ac3


he4 l0 Bc2
A logical continuation whicL
6xg2

ru,tr
^,ru,
after I I

ll

tradl Axd2

a613 a3 Wc714

12 Exd2

trfdl9e7l5ft3

A brilliant concept, jettisoning


e5

c-pawn to increase the influence

fu

of

the queen on the a2-g8 diagonal-

16... Ac6
The tactics behind the sacrificc
are revealed after 16 ... Axc5 wher
17 ExdT! AxdT l8 Efxe6+ *hS 19

12 fxe5 694 13 Atn gaz r+


15 gh4 h6?
15 ... ah6 is hardly appealing but

16 h3 95 17 Axg5 hxgs 18
mate.

Q)c6 when the game is equal-

... f5

Ec8 16 c5

Wf? trgS 20 HxbT+- is devastatirry17 cxb6 WUZ rS aes! gxg2


ExdT Ad5

Wel Be6

was a sad necessity for Wall.

l0

rt

gh7

Or l9 ... 2lxd7 20 9xe6+ hE 2l

hf7* g8 22 ah6++ h8 3
Wg8+ trxg8 24 2lf7 mate.

trlxd5 trxc3 2l Ed8+


With typical grace. Bronstein
20

jures up a mating attack.


after t-5Vh4

cm

21 ... af8 22 trxf8+ srXt 23


eg 24 trd8+ xd8 25 UII

WU++

mate

Checkmate in the Opening 65

Bogo-Indian: 6 ... c5

Bronstein-Vedder
l4/ijk aan Zee

d4

af6

2 c4 e6 3

l9!7

aA

b6 4

93

Ab7 s Ag2 Ab++

A tried and trusted way of avoid-

ing the Queen's Indian

Defence

which is entered after 5 ... Ae7.


6 Ad2 c5
a) 6 ... 9xd2+ 7 abxd2 0-0 8 0-0
.)ner

Ye

l0 e4 cxd4 11 6xd4
Q*al 12 Eael a6 13 b3 t/rVz
d6 9 Vc2 c5

Farago-Eperjesi, Budapest I 997.


b) 6 ... Ve7 7 6c3 c5 8 e3 0-0 9
0-0 d6 I0 a3 Axc3 I I Axc3 4\e4+:

WE

after

%d&
g
A'X;

5 . gb4+

Vark-Rodrigues, Tallinn 1997.

7 dxc5 Axc5 8 0-0 0-0 9 6c3


6e4 l0 Wc2
A logical continuation which

&,

offers more practical chances than


10 ah4 hxc3 ll Axc3 Axg2 12
4\xg2 4\c6 when the game is equal.

l0 ... f5 11 tradl 6xd2 t2 trxd2


a6 13 a3 Bc7 14 trfdr 9e7 l5 gb3
Ec8 16 c5

A brilliant concept, jettisoning the


atier I I

%
A fu,

El

LT- ,ru_
.ry,

w,ffi- %aru
"H\"',&rg
'ffi

c-pawn to increase the influence of

e5

the queen on the a2-g8 diagonal.


16 ... Ac6

after I

c5

The tactics behind the sacrifice

@
,,ru"

IL
WT
t

I I
,ru,

17 cxb6 BUz
ExdT Ad5

rs 6e5! Axg2

19

&

1lll
,ru,-

Or 19 ... Q\xd7 20 Wxe6+ *h8 2l

Ia
r[4

are revealed after 16 ... Axc5 when


17 ExdT! 6xd7 18 Efxe6+ h8 19
Wf trga 20 ExbT+- is devastating.

6f7* g8 22 ah6++ h8
-E-

With typical grace. Bronstein conjures up a mating attack.

Ltier t 5 Vh4

Wtr++ e8 24 trd8+
mate

23

Bg8* Exg8 24 4\fl mate.


20 trlxd5 trxc3 21 Ed8+

2l ... gf8 22 ExfS+ xf8

,,,ru,,-

g
ru,

'T,

23

xd8 25 BfB

after 20

Hxc3

66 Checkmate in the Opening

Spanish: 5 ... d6

Kings Indian: 6 94

Tal-Teschner

Botos-Videki
Hungarian Team Champ. 1991

Vienna 1957

le4e52hRhc639-bsa64

Ary,

Aal6ro

5 o-o d6 6 c3
6 Axc6+ bxc6 7 d4 is the Steinitz

variation but the text offers more

options for White.


6...3"e7 7 d4 bs 8 3"b3
This position can also arise after I
e4 e5 2 6R 6c6 3 Ab5 a6 4 Aa4
af6 5 0-0 bs 6 g"b3 g.e7 7 d4 d6 8
c3-a move-order used to avoid the

L'm

A
tr"ffi.

8... Ag4
a) 8 ... 0-0 9 m ad7 10 Ae3 Aa5
9".c2 2,c4 12 Acl c5 13 b3
6cb6 14 a4 led to a slight edge for
White in Garcia-Van Riemsdijk,

b) 8 ... exd4 9 cxd4 0-0 l0 6c3


6a5 ll Ac2 c5 12 h3 gb7 13 d5

choice considering that Tal was the


greatest attacking player ofhis era!

In Korchnoi-Cooper, Thessalmai
Olympiad 1988. White tried a pci
tional approach with 9 AA. Th
game continued 9 ... exd5 l0 crdj
Ac7 l1 9c2 b5 l2h4 9;g413 aBl

gd7?! (13 ... 9xe2 la 6gxe2 bl


looks a better bet for Black) 14 il

after

j th6

12 gds waz rs gh6 trb8


Black cannot castle kingside and

bxa4 15 9121 with a slight initiatirc9 ... exd5 l0 cxdS 6c7 lf h4


A standard attacking pattern- If
Black responds passively he *ill bc
swamped, but his hopes lie in rle
opponent's uncastled king disnq
ing the harmony of the white pku.
11 ... tre8 12 g.d2 bs 13 13 tG7
14 a aba6 15 6xb5 6rb5 16

Wxus trn8

13 ... 0-0-0 14 a4! favours White.

ad8 r5 ad2 c6 16 9'b3

Axa6

dxc3 17 Wxc3 Wa7+ 18 hl gc5


19 gd3 a,tl zo e5 d5 21 f5 gxfs

Or

19

19

tr
after

22

af8

fi Va4 trxb2 rt -9lJ

Ecl

Wxa6 trb6-+.

gbs

20 ua5 f5!
White's position is fatally flaurud2l gxf6 9.xt6 22 h5 9.g5 23EIl
19 ...

22 Wxfs af8 23 a,e4l dxe4 24


Eacl Bb6 25 trcdl l-o
Black resigned in view of 25 ...
to mate.

9c2We7 13 R Ef7 14 6ge3 -ElB


Ed2 c6 16 0-0-0 gave \trrhirc e
strong attack in Quinteros-Ramir+
15

7d5e6895Ae89gill

11 ... 96
I I ... 0-0 12 gh6 with a
clear advantage after 12 ... Ah5 13
Wg4 dxc3 14 hxc3 6a+ tS Hxh5.

O,fee zs Axe6 fxe6 27 Wh5+ leads

fb l0 Ae3 Aa6 I I gd3 OcS t:

Siebrecht-Pehlgrim. Hamburg 1995-

After

14 f4

c5

Probably the best reply. Others


a) 6 ... e5 7 d5 a5 8 h4 A8 915

b)6...c67g56e88Mb59
l0 9xb5 9.b7 ll h}-

given his opponent a strong initia-

tive-not the best pyschological

6...

cxb5 cxb5

tre8 14 0rc2 gf8 15 bg3+:


Joentausta-Sietioe, Lahti, 1996
t h3 9xR 10 WxR exd4 1l Wg3
Teschner has captured a pawn but

prlse weapon.

Vicente Lopez 1993.

ll

Buenos Aires 1997.

3ad 3.;gta

This bayonet attack. to kicksr


the kingside offensive, is a big r

after 5 ... d6

Marshall Gambit.

1d4Af62c496

e4 d6 5 3"e2 0-0 6 g4!?

0-1

Checkmate in the Opening 67

Kings Indian: 6 94

Botos-Videki
Hung4rian Team ChamV I 994

ll

d4

af6 2 c4 96 3 hc3 9g1 a

e4 d6 5 9"e2 0-0

6 g4l?

This bayonet attack. to kick-start


the kingside offensive, is a big sur-

%
,a
,ffit

pflse weapon.
6 ... c5

Probably the best reply. Others:


a) 6 ... e5 7 d5 a5 8 h4 6e8 t h5

?ra6 ll gd3 2rc5 t2


9c2 Ve7 13 R Ef7 14 6ge2 Af8
15 Ed2 c6 16 0-0-0 gave White a
strong attack in Quinteros-Ramis,

f6 l0 Ae3

after 6 94

Vicente Lopez 1993.

b)

AI .&
'ffi

tional approach with 9 aR. The


game continued 9 ... exd5 l0 cxd5
olc7 tt Uc2 b5 12h4 9g413 Agl
Ad7?! (13 ... 9xe2 14 6gxe2 b4
looks a better bet for Black) 14 a4
bxa4 l5 9f+ witn a slight initiative.
9 ... exd5 l0 cxd5 Ac7 ll h4
A standard attacking pattem. If
Black responds passively he will be
swamped, but his hopes lie in the
opponent's uncastled king disrupt

%tr

afier 13

7d5e68g5he89gd3
In Korchnoi-Cooper, Thessaloniki
Olympiad 1988. White tried a posi-

&*
w

6... c67 95 AeS 8 h4 b5 9

cxb5 cxb5 10 9xb5 gb7 I I h5+:


Siebrecht-Pehlgrim. Hamburg I 995.

th6

after I I h4

ing the harmony of the white pieces.


ll ... tre8 12 g.d2 b5 13 a3 We7

14

R aba6 15 6xb5 6xb5 16

Wxb5 trb8 17 Va4 trxb2 18 Axa6

9xa6

A
A

19

Ecl

Bxa6 Eb0-+.
19 ... g"bs 20 ua5 f5!
White's position is fatally flawed.
2l gxf6 Axf6 22 h5 9.g5 23 Edl
Or

0-1

19

after 20...f5

68 Checkmate in the Opening


Colle:4 ...9e7

Fischer-Sozin Attack: 8 Ag5

Colle-Buerger

Yemelin-Nepomnishay
St. Petersburg

Championship I 99 6

Hastings 1928

td4af62af3e63e3d5

le4c52af3d63d4cxdl4
hxaa 6t0 5 Ac3 fi 6 9c4 e6 7
gb3 bs

gd3

This system, perfected bY the B*


gian master Edgar Colle. is ideal fq

Ag5

The latest fashion is 8 Pl but the


text is also tricky for Black.
8 ... Ae7
a) 8 ... Ae7 9 0-0 0-0 l0 trel Ab7

club players who want a reliable


Iine without having to memonse lots

1l Axe6! fxe6 12 Axee Wb6 13


hxf8 *xf8 14 9xf6 gxf6 15 ad5

LI

Axd5 16 Bxd5 Wc6 17 gf5 h6 18


e5 dxe5 19 tradl led to a winning
attack

in

Dieren

1997.

Timmerman-De Vilder,

ad5 orc5 12 e5 Axb3+


6xb3 9xd5 14 trxd5 Ae7 15
exf6 gxf6 16 gh4 exd5 17 9xf6
aZ tS Hg4+ c7 19 AxhS 9xh8
13

16 Ag5 0,ce7 17 tradl Ef5 lt


AxeT''- Gehring-David. Bader

weiler 1995.
b) 4 ... gd6 5 ruaz 6uaz o oo
c6?! (A natural but rather PassruF
move. 6 ... c5 should be considscd)
7 trel h6 8 We2 0-0 9 e4 dxe{ lO

20 Wxb4+- Tate-De Firmian, Chica-

go 1995

Ae3

W tz 94 Q\c6 13 95 Axd4 14

hxe4 6xe4 11 Bxe4 af6 l2 frl


hOS t: Ag5 Ae7 14 9xe7 0xc?
15 Wg3 b6 16 6e5 gb7 l7 Ec{
trt-dS 18 trh4 gf6 t9 a/ga Ee7 lx)
6xh6+ ls zt 6rs t-o Siktar

A
,r/ffi,tr

9xd4a,u ls ghs

Yemelin is happy to declare his


aggresslve rntentlons.

15...6c5
Any thoughts of winning the epawn with 15 ... b4? are spectacularly refuted by 16 ad5! exd5 (16
... gdS 17 trhgl+-) 17 9xd5 BbS
18 96! hxg6 19 9xg6 gf6 20 trhgl.
16 Ehgr tre8 17 trg3 Axb3+ 18
axb3 e5 19 ads 96 20 gh6 h8
21Axe5+!!

after l5 \Wh5

Korenek. Czech Team Ch. 1997.

rook which plays a key role in the


mating combination.
21 ... dxes 22 af6l-0

Black had no wish

to

see

22

9xf6 23 gxf6 trg8 24 Ed8! Ae6


Wg7 mate.

13 Be2

and a queenside pawn advantage13 ... Bc7


Not 13 ... b6? which drops a Picr-

after 14 Axf6

14

Axf6 l5 9e4.

tradl trd8 15 6e5 3.d7 l5

AxhT+!
Superb.

...

25

5 abd2 o-o 6 o-o 6uaz z or


dxe4 8 hxe4 hxe4 9 9xe4 Atr fa
Aal cs ll dxc5 Axc5 12 9-g5 3.G7
Colle has the better develoPmrr

An incredible finish. White gives


up a piece to open the d-file for the

e3 and only later advance to e'1-

WaZ t+ 0xe6 fte6 15 Hg4 E"at

0-0-0 b4 I I

gR gb6 ro o-o-o o-o ll

of variations. Usually, the idea is o


create a solid centre with c3. d4 d

4 ...A.e7
a) 4 ... c5 5 c3 6c6 6 gd3 id5 7
0-0 0-0 8 dxc5 Axc5 9 e4 e5? (9 -Wc7 10 We2+:) l0 exd5 6xaS tl
6e4 Ab6 12 $..c4 9e6 13 Ofg5

after 8 9g5

b) 8 ... a]aat s ge2 gb7 lo

u.fter 20 ... @h8

16 ... xh7 17 Axf6 3-16


BtrS+ g8 19 WxfT+ l-0

rt

Checkmate in the Opening 69

Colle: 4 ...9.e7

Colle-Buerger

, Hastings 192fi
rd4af62af3e63e3d54

ofier S 9g5

3.d3
This system, perfected bY the Belgian master Edgar Colle. is ideal for
club players who want a reliable
line without having to memorise lots
of variations. Usually, the idea is to
create a solid centre with c3, d4 and
e3 and only later advance to e4.
4 ...9.e7
a) 4 ... c5 5 c3 0c6 6 gd3 gd6 7
0-0 0-0 8 dxc5 Axc5 9 e4 e5? (9 ..'
Bc7 l0 We2+:) 10 exd5 Axd5

2l
after 4 9,d3

ll

he+ AUO 12 3.c4 Ae6 13 6fg5


gd7 14 0xe6 fxe6 15 9g4 tradS
16 Ag5 DceT 17 tradl trf5 18
AxeT+- Gehring-David, Baden-

.ru

'%t

weiler 1995.
b) 4 ... ad6 5 6UaZ 6uaz o o-o
c6?! (A natural but rather Passive
move. 6 ... c5 should be considered)
7 Eel h6 8 He2 0-0 9 e4 dxe4 l0
Q)xe4 6xe4 I I E{xe4 6f6 12 Wh4
has ts 9g5 9e7 14 AxeT WxeT

he5 g,b7 17 Be4


gf6
t9 dg4Ve7 2o
trtus is trh4
6xh6+ ffi zt af5 1-0 Siktanc15 Wg3 b6 16

ofrer l5Vh5

,ffia
after

t3Ve2

Korenek. Czech Team Ch. 1997.

s abd2 o-o 6 o-o 6h,at

et

dxe4 8 6xe4 hxe4 9 9xe4 6f0 fo


Aal cs 1l dxc5 9xc5 12 Ag5 9"e7
13 Be2

Colle has the better develoPment


and a queenside pawn advantage.
13 ... Wc7
Not 13 ... b6? which drops a Piece
after 14 Axf6 Axf6 l5 9e4.

gd7

16

16 ... xh7 17 Axf6 9xf6

18

14 Eadl Ed8 15 ae5


AxhT+!
Superb.

ofter

20

. &hS

Wns+ gs 19 WxfT+ 1-0

after 16 LxnZ+

70

C-heckmate in the Opening

King's Gambit: 4 ...9g4


Rechel-Walendowski

French Winawer: 5 ... Aa5

Metz I998.

Dresden Zonal 1998

e4 e5 2

Rogulj-Atlas

I 'T ll
%.

f4 exl4 3 aR d6 4 d4

aga

4 ... g5 is more

usual. Moroze-

vich-Kasparov, Paris 1995. then

continued 5 h4 94 6 695 (6 69l is


better) 6 ... h6 7 6xf7 xf7 8 AxPl

9g7 9 9c4+ SeS l0 0-0 6c6 ll


Ae3 Wxh4 12 gf7 trh7 13 e5 6a5
14 gd3 xf7 15 gfl+ e7 16
9xh7 Ae6 when White's attack had
hzzled out leaving him a prece
down. The text, pinning the knight

*K'mK

%,%
B'ffiiL
ufter

6%

%A

4 .. LSa

,%@

sffi

''ffi-a

Championship 1997.

6 ...

aJier I

u4

cxd4 7 Ug4 6e7

t brdt
cm

dxc3 9 WxgT trg8 l0 UxhT 6bct


Black's shattered kingside is
pensated by his better developmen-

11

aR wc7

12 g.bs -e-d7 l;}

Axc6?!

the

It is better not to give Blact

%@

queenside.

ll

,,ru,

dominating bishop on the a8-hl diagonal but play instead 13 G0 as t3


.. 6xe5 14 \xe5 Uxe5 15 -txdl*
xd7 16 Wd3 leaves White
cient compensation for the Perr
due to the awkward position of
black king.
13 ... Axc6 14 0-0 d4 l5 AGs
Uxes 16 WxfT+ @d7 17 gflErys
l8 Wxg5 trg8!!
A brilliant combination.

sffi
fu

has

worked wonders because his opponent's weakened defensive pawn


barrier now collapses.

18 ... ab8 19 dxc5 dxcs

9.d2

Ac7 t Ft
6c6 9 6n 6no lo gd3 Ad7 ll
afxd4 2rxd412 6xd4 G0 13 0t5
f5 14 h3 gb6 15 6e2 UeS d
Black has f'ended off the an=L
Docx-Tondivar, Belgian Tca

of his better development by quick-

Efcl c5 r8 gbs!
White's constant probing

nian, Bundesliga 1993.


c) 6 Ad2 cxd4 7 ab5

6 Ac4 Ve7 7 0-0 0-0-0 8 6c3


Au6 s Ab3 h6 l0 gd3 Ae6 ll a4
Rechel strives to take advantage

We6 17

696 l0 M b5 ll
HgS 6aZ 12 c4 Va4: I-au-\'egr

Bohn-Ternette, Landau, 1988

... Axb3 12 cxb3 g5 f3 9g3


Ag7 t4 as 6oz t5 a6 b6 t6 ads

6b4

a) 6 OR orc6 7 Ud3 cxd4 t


6xd4 2lse7 9 b4 gb6 l0 fuc6
bxc6 I I Aa4 9.c7 12 f4 a513 .&cz
Aa6 14 t9d2 axb| 15 9xa6 lxj
16 axb4 Ua8-+ Voigt-ZehrftHbxc3 Ua5

8 0-0 c6 9 gb3 abdT l0 wd:+:

ly creating an attack on

Rejecting the usual 5 -.- 9.xc3*


for something more adventurous-

Leipzig 1996.
b) 6 Bga 2,e7 7 dxc5 -0-xc3-

and preparing to castle queenside, is


a natural way to proceed.
5 gxf4 Ad7
Other ideas for Black include:
a) 5 ... at6 6 6c3 3"e7 7 Ac4 0-0
Aschauer-Sjoedahl, Vienn a 1996.
b) 5 ... Ae7 6 9d3 2,c6 7 c3 4f6
8 0-0 Ah5 9 Ae3 0-0 10 Abd2 gave
White the slightly better chances in

le4e624\c3d53d4gb44c5
c5 5 a3 Aa5

20

Exc5+ l-0
after 17

c5

19 Wxe5 trxg2+ 20 hr Ef,+


2r g1 Eg2+22 hltrg3+Gl

Checkmate in the Opening 7l

French Winawer: 5 ... 9a5

Rogulj-Atlas
Dresden Zonal 1998

le4e62a,c3d53d4Aulle5

ll

c5 5 a3 Aa5

Rejecting the usual 5 ... Axc3+


for something more adventurous.

6b4

a) 6

6A

olc6 7 Bd3 cxd4

2rxd4 dge7 9 b4 3"b6 10 6xc6


bxc6 I I oia4 9.c'7 12 f4 a5 13 A.e2
Aa6 14 Ud2 axb4 15 Axa6 Exa6

16 axb4 9a8-+

Voigt-Zehrfeld,

ctfter 5 a3

Leipzig 1996.

b) 6 Uga De7 't dxc5 Axc3+ 8


bxc3 Ba5 9 3.d2 696 l0 h4 h5 ll
Wg5 Od7 12 c4 Va4: Lau-Vaganian, Bundesliga 1993.

c) 6 gd2 cxd4 7 alus gcz a f4


Dc6 9 Af3 Atro lo gd3 gd7 ll
afxd4 0rxd412 6xd4 0-0 13 Uh5
f5 14 h3 gb6 15 6e2 We8 and
Black has fended off the attack,

Docx-Tondivar, Belgian

ll

Team

Championship 1997.

6 ...

Serlla4

cxd4 7 Vg4 Ae7 8 bxa5


dxc3 9 WxgT trg8 l0 WxhT abc6
Black's shattered kingside is compensated by his better development.

lr

aR wc7 12 9"b5 gd7

after t0 ... hbc6

13

Axc6?!

It is better not to give Black

dominating bishop on the a8-h1 diagonal but play instead 13 0-0 as 13


.. 6xe5 14 d)xe5 Uxe5 15 AxdT+
xd7 16 \Wd3 leaves White suffr

cient compensation for the Pawn


due to the awkward position of the

black king.

13

Wxe5 16
18

'rm_
T-

Axc6 14 0-0 d4 15 695


9xf7+ *al n Wt+ Exgs

Bxg5 trg8!!

A brilliant combination.
19 Uxes Exg2+ 20 hf Exf,l+
2r gl Hg2+22 nr Eg:+ O-t

ctfter t8Vxg5

72 Checkmate in the Opening

Old Indian: 5 Ag5

Caro-Kann: Main Line

Tsesarsky-Khasin
Kfar Saba 1997

Beliavsky-Larsen
Tilburg I98l

I AR d6 2 d4 ad7
6c3

e5 5

1e4 c6 2 d4 dS 3 ac3 dxel I


Axe4 9f5 s 693.A96 6 h4 fi 7
AR ad7 s hs gh7 9 9&l Ar&l
In the game Beliavsky-I-ar*nLondon 1984, Black tried 9 --6gf6?! which merely disrupted hfo
kingside developmeni. The gancontinued: trO AxhT axh? ll Uc2
e6 12 g.d2 g.e7 13 0-0-0 gb6 t4
he5 trd8 15 trhel 0-0 16 ry!
(this attacking theme is borros-ed

3 c4 Q)gf6 4

Ag5!?

The standard move is 5 e4 but the


text has the potential to create problems for Black at a very early stage.

5... Ae7
Others:

a) 5 ... h6 6 gh4 g.e7 7 e3 0-0 8


E$c2 exd4 9 dxd4 EeS l0 0-0-0
gf8 ll 94 c6 t2 6f5 Wc7 13 95

hxg5 14 Axg5

hh7 15 trgl+:

Ginsburg-Brooks,
I

qlter

8-g)

from the main illustrative gamef 16

Philadelphia

... Efe8 17 6xe7+ ExeT 18 hf5


ad6 Ef8 20 gf4 adl6:l

989.

b) 5 ... c6 6 e3 E[a5 (threatening 7


... e4) 1 9tr+ AeZ 8 Wc2 0-0 9 gd3
tre8 10 0-0 af8 11 dxe5 dxe5 12

Ag3 9d8 13 h3 Ac7 14 a3 9c5 15


b4 left White a space advantage in

Eee8 19

lal'T, ',ffi- I

ls A96! ads

If 15 ... fxg6 White

has a ssong
attack according to Beliavsky aftcr
after 9 9,d3

14

19 hxg6

Exe6+ is decisive.

aggressive

17 Exe6 EeE

gM

20

lt

af5-

19 ... fxg6 20 Exe6+ fl 2l


hxg6+ xe6 22 Eel+ Ae5 23
Axe5l-0

optron.

w%
.ffi,tr

f7 winning.

gh7+ AxhT l7 trxg7+ 1-0

f8

Afs grs tz Aao Eg8


17 ... fxg6 fails to l8 6xg7*!
xfl 19 EIxg6* g8 20 6e6*
9,g7 2l HxgT mate.
18 c4 ab4 19 Eh3!
Ihe threat of 20 6xh6! gxh6 ll

gxf6! Axf3 15 trdgr!

16

16 Bxg6+

trdel Bxg6
16

also possible.

15... Axhl
15 ... 96 does nothing to stop the
stampede towards the king after 16
Axg6! fxg6 (16 ... h8 17 Eh3+-)
11Hxg6+ hxg6 l8 Hxg6+ h8 19

a4?

combination.

bishop with I I ... hxg5 when White

The best and most

rl gf4 e6 rz
6e5 a5?! 14 Etcl

Wxd3 hgf6

futed

ll

12 Axf6 Axf6 13 g5 9;g4

lo

0-0-0 Ae7 13

A typical pawn lunge which ls re


by means of a sunnmg

Delemarre-Cifuentes.Wijk aan Zee


t995.
6 Wc2 c6 7 0-0-0 Wc7 8 e3 0-0 9
gd3 h6 lo h4 tre8
94 afs?
Now is the time to snatch the

wlll proceed t2 hxg5 e4 13 6xe4


dxg4 t4 693 6f8 ls gh7+ h8
16 gf5+ g8 17 trh4 ah6 18 gxh6
9xh4 19 Axh4 96 20 sc4 with a
slight advantage. ll ... exd4!? is

Ae5+.

after

14

gxJ3

Checkmate in the Opening

Caro-Kann: Main Line

Beliavsky-Larsen
Tilburg l98l

I%A

le4c62d4d53Ac3dxe44

$er 5 9;g5

hxe4 9f5 5 693 9.96 6 h4 h6 7


Aa ad7 8 hs gh7 9 gd3 gxd3
In the game Beliavsky-Larsen,
London 1984, Black tried 9
6gf6?l which merely disrupted his
kingside development. The game
continued: 10 AxhT 6xh7 11 We2
e6 12 g;d2 g"e7 13 0-0-0 gb6 14
4-ie5 Ed8 15 trhel o-o 16 A96!
(this attacking theme is borrowed
from the main illustrative game)

16

... trfeS 17 6xe7+ trxe7 18 6f5


Eee8 19 ad6 Ef8 20 gf4 adf6 21

',',m

ufter 9 Adj

&

Ae5+.

Wxd3 6gf6 rl gru ee tz


0-0-0 Ae7 13 he5 a5?! 14 trhel

lo

a4?

A typical pawn lunge which is reby means of a stunning

futed

combination.

nnn
8/llJ

ls ag6! ads

If 15 ... ftg6 White has a strong

to Beliavsky after

after 14.. u4

afs gra rz g"d6 trg8


17 ... fxg6 fails to l8 6xg7+!
xf.z 19 Bxg6r- g8 20 Ae6+

attack according

Ser

9 s..d3

16 Uxg6+ A

17 Exe6 9e8 18
trdel 9xg6 19 hxg6 Au+ zo 6fs.
16

2l E{xg7 mate.
18 c4 ab4 19 gh3!
The threat of 20 6xh6! gxh6 2l

Ag7

Exe6+ is decisive.

19 ... fxg6 20 Exe6+ &n Zt


hxg6+ @xe6 22 trel+ 6e5 23
Axe5 l-0

A
after 18

t4 ... gxJ3

. 6tl

74 Checkmate in the Opening

Dutch: Ilyin-Zhenevsky 7 Uc2


C herepkov-G rish anovich
St Petersburg ChampionshiP 199:

Owen's Defence: 4 f4

Aleksic-Solaja
Croatian Team Championship 1998

1e4 b6 2 it4 e6 3 gd3 AAI t

1 d4 e6 2 c4 f5 3 aR af6 4 93
Ae7 5 Ag2 d6 6 hc3 0-0 7 Bc2
A little move-order trick which
delays castling in order fustl-v ro

f4t?

Black no doubt expected 4 aR


but this old idea has tremendous

open up the centre.


7 ... We8?!

surprise value.

4...4f6
A look at history reveals

This is the normal plan intending


gd8 and ... e5, but the change in
circumstances requires a differEnr

that rn
the game Pillsbury-Hodges, Cambridge Springs 1904, Black tried 4
... 9;e7 before putting pressure on
the centre. The game continued:
6t: cS 6 Ae3 (6 c3!?) 6 ... .c4

...

after

approach. For instance, KindlGorgs, Stuttgart 1985, saw Blact


play 7 ...6c6 to exploit the positim

f4

5
7

if

9xc4 9xe4 8 Ac3 AU+ s o-o


Axc3 l0 bxc3 Uc7 ll ad2 af6 t2
6xe4 6xe4 13 gd3 d5 14 gbs+
ad7 15 c4 when White's intiative

Axc4 13 ha4 113 6^15:1 13 --Ad5 14 Axd5-+ Oxd5 15 Arc5


dxc5 16 6e6 6e3 17 9xe3 Ua: le

gave him a small advantage.


5 9e2 c5 6 c3 3.e7

0-0 Elxe6 19 9xc5 Ef7 t/r'h.


8 e4 Eh5 9 e5 6e8 l0 A2 A16

Wagner-Wenzel,

Bundesliga
7 cxd4
aU++ 10 ad2

1l af4 wn I2h4
With this advance of the h-paut
White declares his kingside attack-

1988, saw instead 6 ... cxd4

a)n
dxd2 ll Abxd2 Axd2+ t2 orxd2
0-0 13 0-0 6c6 14 aR 96 t5 a3
EcS 16 Vf2 when Black had weak
d5 8 e5 a,e4 9

ing intentions.

dark squares around his king which


led rapidly to his downfall.
7 aR d5 8 e5 6e4 9 0-0 0-0 t0

after

12 ... Eb8 13 a3 &h8


13 ... 6xd4, as a simpli$'ing
vice. is flawed upon 14 Axdl dre5
15 6dxe6 Axe6 16 6xe6 Uxe6

dr

l0 6bd2

abd2

White prepares to exchange


Black's central knight which will
strengthen the light-squared bishop

and enable him to use his space advantage to start an attack.

10 ... 6xd2 11 9xd2 Val n


Ag5 9xg5 13 fxg5 oic6 14 trf4
2,e715 AxhT+!
Exposing the king

in text

book

fashion.

15 ... xh7 16 Whs+ g8

Ad5 winning.
14 Ae3 96?! 15 0-0-0

lgd7 t6 E

sg8

Black has the miserable choice of


16 ... 95 17 dg6+l winning the qchange or 16 ... gxh5 17 Exh5 stca
White can double the rooks on
h-file with a winning garne.

fu

17 hxg6 hxg6 18 trh6 eg7 rt


trdhr bs 20 Eh7+ g8 2r Ebt+
*g7 22 ElhT mate.

17

Eh4 f6 l8 gxf6 trfcE 19 Unz+ t-o

ihe q,reen' 8 d5 ab4 9 IIb3 ae5


Ac5 I I Wc2 Axe6 12 Ad4

10 dxe6

after 14 .. de7

Checkmate in the Opening 75

Dutch: Ilyin-Zhenevsky 7 9c2

@
,,ru

Cherepkov-Grish anovich
St

Petersburg Champbnship 1997

ld4e62c4f53aRa,tetgl

.Ae7 5 Ag2 d6 6 Ac3 0-0 7 9c2

A little move-order trick which


delays castling in order firstly to

,rua

open up the centre.

7... Ue8?!
This is the normal plan intending
... AdS and ... e5, but the change in

{t*

afa

circumstances requires

different

after

Vc2

approach. For instance, KindlGorgs, Stuttgart 1985, saw Black


play 7 ...6c6 to exploit the position
of the q.re.n, S d5 ab4 9 9b3 Aa6
l0 dxe6 Ac5 I I Wc2 Axe6 12 ad4

9xc4 13 ora4 (13 6xf5:) 13 ...


Ad5 14 .0xd5-r- 6xd5 15 6xc5

dxc5 16 0e6 6e3 17 Axe3 WaS ts


0-0 Wxe6 19 Axc5 Ef7 %-Y,.
8 e4 9trs 9 e5 6e8 10 6e2

ttaf4vn nnt

6c6

With this advance of the h-pawn,


White declares his kingside attacking intentions.
12 ...

$ter l0abd2

%.^"ru'ffi
a.ru
%%
L"ruW'% K:9
after 12 h4

trb8 13 a3 h8

13 ... 0xd4, as a simplifuing device. is flawed upon 14 6xd4 dxe5


15 6dxe6 Axe6 16 6xe6 Wxe6 17

9d5 winning.
14 3.e3 96?! 15 0-0-0

gd7

16 h5

g8

Black has the miserable choice of


16 ... 95 11 0,96+l winning the exchange or 16 ... gxh5 l7 Exh5 when
White can double the rooks on the
h-file with

winning game.

17 hxg6 hxg6 18 trh6 g7 19


trdhr b5 20 trh7+ g8 2r trh8+
&g7 22 ElhT mate.
c{ter l6 h5
afier 14

6e7

76 Checkmate in the Opening


Advance French: 6 gd3

,,ru

Kobernat-Stenzel
Hawuii 1998

a
''ffi-t

e4 e6 2 d4 d53 e5 c5 4 c3 2.c6
s afi gb6 6 gd3
The idea of sacrificing at least the

1 93 e5

ensuing

independent

"ffi.:g

gd7
still fall for 7 ...
6xd4?r 8 bxd4 Wxd4 9 AbS+

A look through the archives indi-

10

In Ayas-Hernandez, Vendrell
1996, Black preferred the cautious
10 ... a6 when White was on top

23

trcl

ll

Ac6 24 UxhT+-.

Eel H00 rz 6ns Axu5


If 12 ... Sb6 then 13 9e3 Wa5 14
Ad2 gdS 15 Ecl Ec8 16 Exc8
Wxc8 17 9u: 6f0 18 trcl Ac6 19
hxaT WdA 20 dxc6 bxc6 2l Exc6
left White with a powerful pair of

passed pawns.

0S rn Bns: g0 rs
Br rs 16 Af4 We7 l7 tracl Ag7
18 Ac7+ WxcT 19 Wxd5+ c8 20
13 Axb5+

Uaz+ t-o

I l

cates that few players have enoush


courage to accept the gambit. Hosever, Slipak-Sorokin, San Fernando
1993, saw a Yery strong Russian

player surprisingly decline the of-

fered pawn with


,rffi-

s%

w% tr

ll

Not 4 ... dxc4?? when 5 Eal6c6 6 9xc6+ wins.


5 gb2 a,c6 6 f4 Q)ge7 7 On ar
Olafsson returns the pa\rrl in
8 6xe5 6xe5 9 fxe5 0-0

A96

EI

l_\

9e7

11

AxbT trb8

f0'Ec2

12 Ae4 f5!

An

$U/

17

14

order to go on the attack.

I I

after

hn

Aas tz a3 a5 13 bxa5 Exa5


equal chances.
4 c4 Ae6

g
I

3 .. af6. fhe

game continued: 4 Ab2 9d6 S cl


c6 6 Wb3 dxc4'7 Bxc4 Ae6 8't}cl
o-o 10 0-0 ue7 I I d-l
abd7 t

Abd2 a5b6 15 Ac3 Exa3 16 ara-l


Axa3 17 0xe5 6xe5 18 Axe5 srth

after l0 0-0

Antonsson-

Johansson. Yaxjo 1992"

lo

undermine the central Pawns.

,,%@

0-0 Wxe5

alier 11 We2 0,e7 12 hl 4\c6 13


f4 ab414 trdl 6xd3 15 trxd3 9c4
16 b3 Bc7 t7 Ab2 b5 l8 f5! (the
strength of this move was first revealed in a joint analysis with Jon
Ady rn my book Beating the
French) 18 ... Ae7 19 f6 -gd8 20
fxgT trg8 2l Es3,$ioz 22 ghs Ab6

an
he

3... Axb4

winning the queen.

Wxd4

spirit and here

his fianchettoed bishops

Some players

t hxd4

dS 3 b4?!

comes up with something different


as early as move 3 ! Instead of the
usual 3 c4 he tries to enter a son of
Sokolsky and rely on the pou'er of

after 6 fudj

complications.
6... cxd4 7 cxd4

8 6c3 hxd4

2 9g2

Bent Larsen has always had

d-pawn was popularised by Sir


Stuart Milner-Barry. It is appealing
to those who relish swashbuckling
attacks and feared by Black if he is

unfamiliar with the

King's Fianchetto: 3 M
Larsen-Olafsson
Bet,erwiik 1959

energetic continuation r*'hich


forces White on the defensir-e or
dares him to open up the f-file.

13 gd3 6xe5 14 0-0 gc5 l5


Aa: WaO 16 Axc5 Wxc5 17 Ecl
f4 18 gxf4 hxd3 19 exd3 3.ht 20
trR whs 2r trg3 trxf4
Olafsson intends to triple on the
f-file and White is a mere spectator22 6a3 trbf8 23 6cz Wts o-t

Checkmate in the Opening 77

taI

, ,':

).

I I

gt

I Ift

1 93 e5

ea

i<.
J

/3

'/..

tr

.t

tier

2 9g2 d5 3 b4?!

Bent I-arsen has always had

lJ

King's Fianchetto: 3 b4
Larsen-Olafsson
Bet,erwijk 1959

an

independent spirit and here he


comes up with something different
as early as move 3l Instead of the
usual 3 c4 he tries to enter a sort of
Sokolsky and rely on the power of

his fianchettoed

bishops
undermine the centrai pawns.

5 Ad3

Ifrt a,,i, 'trI

3 ... Axb4
A look through the archives indicates that few players have enough
courage to accept the gambit. However, Slipak-Sorokin, San Fernando

after

ll

6as tz a3 a5 13 bxa5 Exa5

fr
tu
hl

t:

I l
I I

A
-E-

$U/

it
i

l:

equal chances.
4 c4 Ae6

i..
!

.l{
LI

,{rer

t7

. 9g7

,&,
,)

,r&_

/.8i
,*'

Kt

14

Abd2 A5b6 15 Ac3 Exa3 16 Exa3


Axa3 17 Axe5 6xe5 l8 Axe5 with
0-t)

b4

1993, saw a very strong Russian


player surprisingly decline the offered pawn with 3 ... 6t0. the
game continued: 4 Ab2 Aa6 S c+
c6 6 Wb3 dxc4 i Wxc4 Ae6 8 Bc2
d3
huaz s aR 0-0 l0 0-0 He7

dier l0

after 12

Not 4 ... dxc4?? when 5 EUa4+


6c6 6 Axc6+ wins.
5 gb2 a.c6 6 f4 )ge7 7 af3 d4
Olafsson relurns the pawn in

f5

order to go on the attack.


8 6xe5 hxe5 9 fxeS 0-0 10 Hc2
{)96 l1 AxbT trb8 12 Ae4 f5!
An energetic continuation which
forces White on the defensive or
dates him to open up the f-fiIe.

13 Ad3 6xe5 14 0-0 Ac5

15

AaS WaO 16 9xc5 Wxc5 17 Bcl


f4 l8 gxf4 Axd3 19 exd3 gh3 20
trR gh5 21 trg3 trxf4
Olafsson intends to triple on the
f-file and White is a mere spectator.
22 6a3 trbf8 23 6cz Wts o-r

A
n
){
U

after

2l

Xrf4

78 Checkmate in the Opening

Conclusion

Semi-Slav: 9 Ae2

Sakaev-Kobalija
Russiun Championship I 998

*,H'

ld4d52a!i]--at63c4c64a,c3

e6 5 Ag5 h6 6 gh4 dxc4 7 e4 95 8

Ag3 b5

L,%

9 Ae2

A move that

left in the
shadows by the alternatives 9 a3,9
has been

can carry out a lightning attack.

to Hc2 9b7

11 0-0

6e5 h5 13 h3 h4 t4 g,h2
ah5 15 9xh5 trxh5 16 tradl We7
StAat

after 9 Ae2

17 Q)xd7 WxdT 18 d5 cxd5 19 exd5

Axc3 20 Wxc3 Axd5 2l Efel '/z-%


Lalic-Zhr Chen, Ubeda 1998.
b) 9 .. a6 10 Wc2 Ae7 ll trdl
g,bl 12 0-0 abdT 13 6e5 dxe5 t4
Axe5 trg8 15 Axf6 Axf6 16 e5
A.e7 17 Wh7+ Lobron-Slobodjan,

the successful execution of a logr.-a.


plan is seen in Rechel-Walendo*s-

ki, Here White consistentlv stri'.=


to undermine Black's dettnslr e
shell and is finally reu'arded *'rlh a

Nussloch 1996.

l0 6a4 Axe4 ll Aes af6

12

decisive weakening of the lleht


squares, allowing his queen ro ln-

tac5

White has had mixed results after


12 9xc4 but the text is likely to put
9 ... b4 out of business. The idea is
to prevent Black from getting rid of
the bishop on e5 with a later
6bd7 because now the knight on d7

vade and conquer.

ufter t2

Q\c-5

can simply be exchanged.

12...9g7
After 12 .. Axc5 13 dxc5 abdT
14 Ad6 White is better because the

%A %t
L%
%A

black king is stuck in the centre.

9xc4 0-0 14 Ec2 abdT 15 h4


gxh4 16 6xd7t. AxdT 17 trxh4
AaS tS AxgT *xg7 19 Eg4+ h8
20 wd2
13

The attack is devastatingly simple.

gf6 21 6e5 Ae8 22 0-0-0


23 trhl 698 2a Egh4 &g7 25

20 ...
2,e7

ru-

trf4 l-0
Black resigned due to 25 ... We7
26 trg4+ @h7 2t trxg8 xgS 28

Bxh6 with mate to follow.

after 19

@hS

f(

l;1

surprise openine ::.n


reap rich rewards, any neglect oi
basic chess principles. such ar development of pieces. can be si:,tcidal. Larsen-Olafsson is a gooJ
example of how badly things car'r Ec
wrong when imagination runs s tld
An illustration of how checkmate
can be the well-deserved pnze trbr

Though

h4 and 9 Wc2.
9 ... b4?!

a) 9 ... AU+

A successful offensive. culminating in checkmate right out of dre


opening, requires not onll' a knoqledge of standard mating paneln-.
but also the ability to co-ordinare
one's forces in such a wa)'rhal *Ie)

tfil/

_t

E
.i

li

Checkmate in the Opening 79

The

Conclusion

successful offensive. culminat-

ing in checkmate right out of

ra\ X,

'- l.t
1nn
:
4JU ,t ,a

*icr . iel

th-e

opening, requires not only a knowledge of standard mating Patterns,


but also the ability to co-ordinate
one's forces in such a way that they
can carry out a lightning attack.

Though a surprise opening can


reap rich rewards, any neglect of
basic chess principles, such as development of pieces, can be suicidal. Larsen-Olafsson is a good
example of how badly things can go
wrong when imagination runs wild.
An illustration of how checkmate
can be the well-deserved prize for
the successful execution of a logical
plan is seen in Rechel-Walendowski, Here White consistently strives

to

undermine Black's defensive

shell and is finally rewarded with

I-r.

'w

i)

I
1.,

r8

Art of Attack

Remember. an aggressive openif you want to go


for an early checkmate.
2 If possible, demolish the enemy
king's defensive wall by a piece sacrifice-this is often the best way to
corner the king.
3 Learn typical mating patterns.
This will help you spot the moment
to go on the offensive.

ing is a big help

The

Art of Defence

Be prepared to accept sacrifices

gratefully and win with the extra


material. Many players want to attack all the time and are too free
with their material.
2 Castle and get the king out of
the centre.

decisive weakening of the light


squares. allowing his queen to in-

3 Avoid passive positions. Always


look at ways of creating counterplay
to sidetrack attackers from their

vade and conquer.

main objective-your king!

Petroff: 3 d4

Van der Wiel-Saunders


Breda 1998

6 Winning Moves

Ie4e52af3af63d4Af,Gaa

An effective way to sharpen your


tactical skill is to study games with
different kinds of combinations,
which will alen you to all sorts of
opportunities for winning moves.
It is all very well solving a 'White
to play and mate in two' newspaper
puzzle in the comfort of your own
home but it is a quite different prop-

Hort and Emms-Sjodahl. Nevertheless, it is not mere chance that White

osition when you are thrown on


your own resources in overtheboard play. That is why examples

at a very early stage, showing how


pressure in the opening can pay
handsome dividends. The King's

such as Van der Wiel-Saunders and


Uhlmann-Dunnington are so useful,
since they illustrate how tactics can

Gambit has a deserved reputation

flow naturally from a positional advantage. Knowing how to formulate


a plan will enable an attacker to

steer

game towards

position
where, at a given moment, there is a

possibility

of playing a

winning

is still able to sacrifice

because,

if

we look closely, we see that he has


advantages such as a superiority in
space and better development.

In the games Kudrin-Fedorowicz,

Crickmore-P.Lane and CarlierKerhoff the critical moment arrives

as

an attacking weapon and this is


amply illustrated in GrabarczykShetty. White uses his lead in develto line up an impressive

opment

array

of pieces

against the black

king and a decisive breakthrough is


not long in coming. The merits of

employing

a tricky

opening

are

combination.
Some decisive moves dazzle with
their elegance as is the case with the
exceptional queen sacrifice seen in
Liu Wen Che-Donner. However.
one should not forget the importance of the preceding moves. which
entail active piece play and probing
of the defence. as without these the

borne out by Svensen-Reefschlaeger

where Black employs the rather


unusual Chigorin Defence and

the better game after just

has

five

moves!

Ifyou think that you have to enter


a complicated mel6e to create the
necessary conditions for a successful attack-then don't panic! The

final attack would not have been

games Kuprechik-Romanishin and

possible. Also the fact that winning


moves slem from recurring com-

Bolzoni-Lane demonstrate that even


in tranquil positions there are latent

binational themes

possibilities

will

encourage

you to learn and apply these attacking techniques in your own games.
Sometimes a decisive blow is delivered just at the moment when the
opponent appears to have set up a
rock-solid defence. as in Karpov-

just waiting to

be

unleashed.

Hopefully, by studying the various themes depicted here, you will


be able to reach winning positions

and play winning moves


own games.

in

your

Ad3 d5 5 6xe5 6az o Oxrr


AxdT 7 0-0 Ae7

An easy and popular altemativE o


the well-known lines starting siL 7
...

gh4.

8c4
The best way to proceed is to

dermine the d5 pawn

in ondq b

weaken the knight on e4.


8 ... c6
Logically supporting the pawn-

J.Polgar-Van der Sterren, Wi[


Zee 1998, saw Black retrear tb
knight after which he could do d
ing to stop White's pieces breeting
through on the queenside. Th
game continued 8 ... atr 9 Ac3
aan

9e6 10 c5 0-0 ll gf2t 6 t2 v

t: Vc2 9614 b5 trfe8 15 .l


ah5 16 Ae3 AdS 17 a5+:.
9 Ac3 6xc3 l0 bxc3 drc{ ll
9xc4 0-0 12 Eel 9.f5 13 gB -tS5
t4 gf4 aar rs axd6 9rd6 15 Lt
A sure sign of a class playcr- Yr

WaZ

b
ar
to push the h-pawn and drirr tb
enemy bishop away from lhc &
der Wiel makes maximum use of
space advantage by taking tirrE

fence off7.
16 ... h6 17 Ee5 YOZ

rr 5

-tl,

l9 Eael
White has a huge positiml ed
vantage. The rook threatens to ir
vade on the seventh rank md lLfo
cannot be prevented withom
material.
19... Efe8 20 WxfT+! l{

lm d

Winning Moves

Petroll 3 d4
Van der Wiel-Saunders
Breda I 998
;

'Sirdahl Neverthee chance that White

rril-rce because.

if

E-e s3e that he has

as a superiority in
der elopment.

Kudnn-Fedorowicz.
E and Carliercal rnoment arrives
oge. showing how
oPenrng can pay

lrrdr. The King's


rrred reputation
e4on and this

d in
es

as

is

Grabarczyk-

his lead in devel-

Ep an lmpresslve
agarnst the black
r'-e breakthrough is

rmg. The merits of

rrcs

opening

are

reen-Reefschlaeger

rylo;. s the rather


o Delence and has
E at'ter just five

et r ou have to enter

rxlee to create the


usrs tbr a successr don't panic! The
ik-Romanishin and
monslrate that even
irns there are latent
n s aiting to be

le4e52af3af63d46xe44
gd3 d5 5 0xe5 ad7 6 AxdT
AxdT

7 0-0 Ae7
An easy and popular alternative to
the well-known lines starting with 7
... Btr+.

8c4
The best way to proceed is to undermine the d5 pawn in order to
weaken the knight on e4.

8...

qller

Ye/

c6

Logically supporting the pawn.


J.Polgar-Van der Sterren, Wijk
aan Zee 1998, saw Black retreat the
knight after which he could do nothing to stop White's pieces breaking
through on the queenside. That
game continued 8 ... 6rc g 2,cl
Ae6 l0 c5 0-0 I I g?l c6 12 b4

t: Wc2 96 14 b5 Efe8 15 a4
ah5 16 Ae3 Ad8 17 a5+:.
9 6c3 6xc3 l0 bxc3 dxc4 11
Axc4 0-0 12 trel gfs 13 Wn 3.g0
14 g'f4 Aa6 rs Axd6 Wxd6 16 h4
A sure sign of a class player. Van
Waz

der Wiel makes maximum use of his


space advantage by taking time out
to push the h-pawn and drive the
enemy bishop away from the defence off7,
16 ... h6 17 treS BaZ rA h5 gh7

l9 Eael
White has a huge positional advantage- The rook threatens to invade on the seventh rank and this
cannot be prevented without loss of

'T iT

i%

%t%

% %a%

AA
after

VJ3

&
n

2t

g
A

material.
srudr ing the vari-

tted here. you will


r r rnning positions
ng moves ln your

19... trfe8 20 WxIT+! l-0


after 19

trfe8

8l

82 lVinning Moves
Caro-Kann: 4 ... ad7
Bugojno 1978

An interesting alternative to 7

9i:

...

6d7 then 9 6xf7

...

L,,ffi,:

eo 11 g4 Ef6 12 gxf5 9xf5 13


We3 left Black's king vulnerable in
Kavalek-Barcza, Caracas 197 l.

996
In the game Thipsay-Sandipan,
Calcutta 1998, Black encouraged
White to chase the bishop: 9 ... 9c4
I0 R A96 ll h4 h6 (the point is
that ll ... h5 is less effective now

after

,,ffi,

gf5

that the pawn on

suppons

gq

12

I I

13

r0 h4 h5
If l0 ... Ad6 then ll We2! Axe5?
( I r ... c5!?) 12 dxe5 gd5 13 trh3
dxg4 14 9xg4 Wxe5+ 15 Ee3+Mecking-Miles, Wijk

aan

Zee 19'78.

af6 2 c4 96 3 Ad 941

6f:

cs 7 d5 ca

Ir
9 cxd5 is the ml1'

Recent books on the Krng's

dian assume

move. But after the tricky' text Blect


must defend very accurate!-v.
9 ... 2,e4
It is easy to go wrong:

17

gd2 Hxd2+ l8 *xd: erff

19

*g7 20 trd6 6M 1l Egl*f8 22 Ee5 AaZ 23 Eb-

gxf5

0f

Aga b5 18 Axf5 6xf5 19 Uee


Marinin-Kazakov. St Perrstrg

l 998.

r4fter

l0 h4

10 cxd5

6xc3

11 bxc3

Od7

At this point Lane (no relernl

qc
I
computer because on t}r nch

ll 95 ad5 12 dxg6 fxg6 13 Wc2


*fl u trh3 6e7 15 Ac4 6rs to

had spent a lot of time on tte


ing. There was no need to coosl

trR Ed7 17 Exfs+!


A.brilliant sacrifice which annihi-

board there was last year's

lates Black's defence.


l7 ... gxf5 18 9xf5+

game. Crickmore-Cole. Four

e7 19 9e4

btr
Prrs

Attack,25 moves 1-0.


12 e6 Axc3+ f3 9.d2

.i.rd f{
White now domrnates thc mfar

tre8 20 3.r+ *ag 21 9e5 Eg8 22


0-0-0 96 23 Eel 9gz 24 Bue+

Wxal

*e7
A better try is 24 ... 9c8 but 25
9xa7 Ee7 26 Va5+ *d7 27 Vc5

ant al-h8 diagonal.

14 ... fxe6 15 dxe6 ab6 16 aGs


It
Wre tz Ac3 We7 rt 3.rt
h4!trxf4
After t9 ... hxg5 20 hxgs WE

also looks terrible for Black.


25 Exe6+! l-0

Black had no wish to see 25 ...


Wxe6 26 Wc7+ gd7 27 9'd6 mate.

Kouatly-Jadoul, Montpellier I 9t5b) 9 ... dxe5 l0 fte5 Oe8 I I qd5


3"fs 12 o-o a6 13 9g5 tr 14 .tL{
t?
95 15 Ag3 fxe5 16 OxeS

.ru,

gd3 Aae t+ Axg6+


gd7 15 Wt:+-.
Axg6 fxg6

d4

a) 9 ... Ag4 l0 cxd5 &.e5 ll h3


e4 l2hxg4 exf3 13 gxf3:e8 14 fi
ad7 15 Ah6 9xh6 16 Exh6 tgj

9 94

E
II

Paignton 1996

wgtr

xf/ l0

King's Indian: Four Pawns 9 e5


Crickmore-P.Lane

e4 d6 5 f4 0-0 6
Ae2 exdS 9 e5!?

,rru_

Ars::

9e6 or 7 ... ad7.


8c3e6

If 8

"ruL

,.ffi

le4c62d4d53ad2dxe44
hxel 6d7 5 aR dgf6 6 6xf6+
$)xf67 6es

,fl
,_

%
l%

Karpov-Hort

after

16. Vat

moves his bishop and plays

n an

Wcl l-0

2l

Eht--

h5 d5 22 hrgS
trxf7 24 gxfT+ htt

20 93 Ef8

I
Il

Winning Moves 83

King's Indian: Four Pawns 9


Crickmore-P.Lane

3
I

e5

Paignton 1996
1 d4 af6 2 c4 96 3 hc3 9g7 4
e4 d6 5 f4 0-0 6 6tl cs 7 d5 e6 8
Ae2 exd5 9 e5!?
Recenr books on the King's Indian assume 9 cxd5 is the only
move. But after the tricky text Black
must defend very accurately.

ru

ru
i8
ger 4

g,/5

9...6e4
It

is easy to go wrong:

a) 9

...694 l0

ll

cxd5 dxe5

h3

e4 l}hxg4 exB 13 gxB tre8 14 f5


adi t5 Ah6 9xh6 16 Exh6 Wg5
17 gd2 Wxd2+ 18 xd2 gxf5 19

gxf5 Sg7 20 Ed6 6U0

after 9 e5

zt trgt+

*f8 22 trg5 gaz n

trh6+-

Kouatly-Jadoul, Montpellier I 985.


b) 9 dxe5 l0 fxe5 6e8 ll cxd5
gfs t2 o-o a6 13 Ags f6 14 gh4
95 15 Ag3 fte5 16 Axes 6d6 tz
Ag4 b5 18 Axf5 6xf5 19 Wg4+

Marinin-Kazakov.
1e98.

,zncr l0 h4

l0 cxd5 Axc3

ll

St

bxc3

,ru-

D%
'%a

Petersburg

6d7

At this point Lane (no relation)


had spent a lot of time on the opening. There was no need to consult a

after

l4Vxal

computer because on the notice


board there was last year's best

e,,ru.

game. Crickmore-Cole, Four Pawns

Attack,25 moves l-0.


12 e6 Axc3+ 13 gd2

Axal

14

BIxal
White now dominates the import-

tr%

,ry,

ant al-h8 diagonal.


14 ... fxe6 15 dxe6

Wro

6Uo f0 AgS

rz Ac3 9e7 r8 3"h8 h6

19

h4!trxf4
After 19 ... hxg5 20 hxg5 White

dter

6 Val

moves his bishop and plays Eh8+.

20 93 Ef8 2l h5 ds 22 hxg6
23 af7 ExfT 24 gxfT+ xh8
Bcl l-0

d4
25

after 18 .. h6

84

Winning Moves

Pirc: Chinese Attack 5 g4

French Tarrasch: 3 ... c5

Liu Wen Che-Donner

Emms-Sjodahl

Harplinge

Buenos Aires Olympiad l97E

1998

le4d62d4at63adg0r

le4e62d4d53ad2c54Agf3
cxd4 5 exd5 9xd5 6 Ac4 9a0 z

9.e2 9g7 594

After this famous game th lbecame known as the Chire *


tack. Other options are:

0-0 a6?!

7 ... at6 is standard after which


Emms would presumably have

a)5...c66s5arnttf4ffit

transposed into the main line after 8

b5 9 3.e3 b4 l0 aa4 Om tt
gxh6 Axh6 12 6xM fxbS 13
Wd2: Vasiukov-Miller, Bad Lb

AR

6u: 6co 9 abxd4 Axd4 l0 6xd4

Another move-order, 7 ...


hc6. is a mistake because of 8 6e4
followed by recapturing on d4. e.g.
8 ... Ed8 9 Ve2 Ae7 10 trdl af6
I I c3 Axe4 12 Vxe4 0-0 13 cxd4
dw ru Eel 3.f6 15 gfl 6as to
9.e5 9xe5 17 dxe5 b6 18 Axd5
Wxd5 19 Wxd5 exd5 20 Eacl Ae6

af6.

2l

Aa++. Del

benzell 1996.

b)5...alc6695ad773.dc5t
hR exd4 9 6xd4 G0 l0 h4 fudr
ll 9xd4 9xd4 12 9xdn M 13
0-0-0 9e6 14 Pl ff 15 h5 gre

after 7 .. a6

White strong attacking charrces c


the h-frle in Schulz-WoelbeG Drfr

Campo-Escobedo

mund 1991.

Tinajero, Mexico C;ty 1991. 7 ...


he7 is also unconvincing. Pizzato
-Zakarias, Szeged 1994, continued
8 Ae4 Vc7 9 6xd4 6f5 10 Ag5
6xd4 (10 ... Wxc4 1l axfs+-) ll
Wxd4 Ac6 12 gb5 gd7 13 Eca
trc8 14 Eadl 6e5? 15 Wxe5! l-0
8 6e4 Bc7 9 Wxd4 6c6 10 Wc3
gd7 lr trdr
The opening has been a complete
success for White. He has greater
space and can develop fluently. A
bonus is that Black does not have
time to whisk his king to safety on
the kingside.
... bs 12 gb3 b4 13 Ec4 af6

ll

14 6xf6+ gxf6 15 gf4 gb6

16

c)5...c5695atd77d5M3

f4 trb8 9 afj bs l0 M ac? ll E


b4 t2h6 gf8 l3 abl ab6 14 b&+-

%a
L"ru, % "ru

Todor-Holzer, Austrian

Ttr

Black probably took 6 h3 es e


sign that White had no intmir d
going on the offensive.
8 h4 e6 9 95 hxgS l0 hrgsQ46
l0 ... ah7 shouldbe cmirH-

after I I Edl

lr wd3

% '%L%,L I
L,MA%.L,ru

trxd7!
The breakthrough.
l6 ... *xd7 17 trdt+ c8
17 ... *e7 18 trd6 trcS 19 Exe6+

fxe6 20 E{xe6+ aA

zt

9xf6+

wlns.

18 ad4 nz ts bxe6 Ee8 20


Ed7+ c8 21 Exfl Ee7 22 ExeT
AxeT 23 9"a4

nz

24

9e3 l-0

Tcr

Championship 1996.
5 ... h6?! 6 h3 c5 7 d5 GO?!

The queen prepares to ffithe h-file with deadly effcct

ll

ae6

... exdS 12 hxd5 ac5 13


14 9n+ f5 15 tUhT+

lt!

ef, r

Bxg6+

Brilliant. With this inecsOe

a%
%s%
Lru-A
"ffi"

-*

after 15 . .VU

sacrifice, the black king is led


slaughter.

o tb

16 ... xg6 17 ghs+ cL? E


."fl+gh6 t996+*fi
If 19 ... h8 then 20 ExE* Ot?
2l Ehi mate.
20 Axh6+ l-0

Winning Moves 85

Pirc: Chinese Attack 5 94

Liu Wen Che-Donner


.t

Buenos Aires Olympiad 1978-

e4 d6 2 d4 af6 3 6c3 96 4
9.e2 9g7 594
After this famous game the line
became known as the Chinese at-

tack. Other options are:

a)5...c6695axutlth68

aa

t0 a]a4 4lu0 t t
gxh6 Axh6 12 hxb6 Bxb6 13
E$d2= Vasiukov-Miller, Bad Lie-

fu--

I-i
)ru, I
I

LW,, -r_)

IE
tp'

after 5 94

0-0-0 Ae6 14 f4 f5 15 h5 gave


White strong attacking chances on
the h-file in Schulz-Woelbert, Dortmund 1991.
c) 5 ... c5 6 95

6fd7 7 d5 6a6

l,

&

,ru-

aR b5 10 h4 6c7 ll h5
gf8 13 abl ab6 rub3+-I'odor-Holzer, Austrian Team

f4 trbS 9

b4 L2h6

f9*

\ru

A
A

benzell 1996.
b) 5 ... 6c6 6 gs haz 7 Ae3 e5 8
aB exd4 9 0)xd4 o-o lo h4 hxd4
ll Axd4 Axd4 12 Exd4 ab6 13

t6

b5 9 Ae3 b4

) anl

Championship 1996.
5 ... h6?! 6 h3 c5 7 d5 0-0?!

Black probably took

,,ry,

,,ru

tr

6 h3 as a

sign that White had no intention of


going on the offensive.
8 h4 e6 9 95 hxg5 l0 hxgS he8?!
10... ah7 shouldbe considered.

ll

,.ffi-

after I I Wdj

wd3

The queen prepares to transfer to


the h-file with deadly effect.

1l ... exdS 12 hxd5 6c6 13 Wg3


ae6 14 un+ rs 15 Eh7+ f7 16

A
,ffi

Bxg6+

/,&

a
'|ru
t t: vt'

Brilliant. With this

impressive

sacrifice, the black king is led to the


slaughter.

16 ... xg6 17 ghs+ trz rt


An+ gno D 96+ &g7
If 19 ... h8 then 20 trxh6+ g7
2l Hh7 mate.
20 Axh6+

l-0

^,%g
after 15

. @fi

86

Winnmg Moves

King's Gambit:
Fischer Defence

Grabarczyk-Shetty
Koszalin 1998
1 e4 e5 2

Ontario 1998

h65h4
A slightly different approach to

T-

It is

s... af6

695

Instead:

Rechel-Michalczak, Bundesliga 1994.

%
I

b) 5 ... 9g4 6 d4 0,c6 7 9xf4


Af6 8 6c3 Ae7 9 Wd2 a6 l0 a3
AxR ll gxf3 4]d7 12 0-0-0 gf6 13
1992.

Was

"ru "ru-

%%%
gru-L%g

Langheinrich-Toivanen,

6 6c3 Ag4 7 d4 Ae7 8 Axf4


6trs s Ae3 Ag3 l0 trh2 c6 ll

,ffi-w".rua|dx

AA

development without being the

after I I Wdj

customary pawn down.


ll ... b5 12 gb3 a5

t3 a4 b4 14
hns ro 6e: Atn

6ar o-o ls gn
r7 gd2 6xg2+ 18 trxg2 AxR

19

ExgT+!

"ru..-@

A brilliant combination which exposes Black's disorganisation.

'T.-

19... eh8

If 19 .. SxgT White triumphs in


style after 20 Ef5+ g8 21 Wxh6
gf6 22 d2l and Black will be
mated.

20

Afs 9g5 2l hxgs 994 22 96

Wg5 23 Wxg5 hxg5 24 trh7+ g8


25

'T

,-

after

1994.
b) 5 ... ge6 6

\eu

\-u-sl'

9c4 Ae" : G4

5:-;fr

l0 irfJ i:-r,il
I I bxd5 Axd5 12 Axd5 it-6 l-1 c-:

8 d3 0-0 9

f4

exf4

Cuba 1997
6 a4 96 7 9.c4 Ag7 8 d-t i:-h6 I
h4 f6 10 hxf6+!
This surprising sacrifice is par .tf
a deep attacking plan rr'hich t: ea-s]
to play and difficult to resist.
10 ... Wxf6 rl Ag5 Eft l: .:-d5

18 A{fi

trc8 l5 0-0 intending t-[


t3 0-0 af6 A 6c1+ 5e7 15 fr!
Unfortunately for Fedorourcz hrs

14 gxf3

6h6 mate.

t/z-th Tischbierek-Oll.

o,ea
Upon 12 ... Lga White can rrurntain an advantage with l3 tl irr-:

,ffi-t

.i\
4

a) 5 ... 6ge7 6 Ac4 -..d-' 6xd5 Ae7 8 0-0 0-0 9 d3 ig5 10


WhS Axcl 1l Eaxcl Ae- t: r+
hxd5 13 Axd5 exf4 14 art{ itf

and White's pair of bishops proms


a small edge, Del Campo-Goruaiez-

White has managed to take a lead

in

6c3 hc6 3 6ge2

Fedorowicz puts a stoP to dre dr


bate but the text runs the nsk of ltrsing control ofthe d5 square
4 ads d6 5 hec3 a6

after 5 h4

a) 5 ... Ae6 6 9xe6 fxe6 7 d4


Wro g es Wf5 9 gd2 6c6 l0 Bxf4
Bxc2 11 0-0 0-0-0 12 gf/ urs t:

Vaxjo

e4 c5 2

An occasional favourite of Fr=cher


and Spassky who liked to keeP thar
opponents guessing uhether thre
follow-up would be the usual dl-d4
or else g2-g3 with a Closed Sicili,an
3 ... e5

Other approaches are:

Ae3+-

Kudrin-Fedorowicz

,,ru-

f4 exf43 aR d6 4 g.c4

the alternatives 5 d4 and 5 d3.


designed to prevent ...C7-C5

Sicilian. 3 4\ge2

M,
iEt

4 9c4

tr

position is rapidly deterioratrng


15 ... h6 16 Axf6+ irf6 ll ftc5
18 Aas+ gaz 19 Erf6 fggd2 b6 2l trafl Ebt ll 5--gl

6xe5
20

Hh7 23 d4 1-0

I
ll

Winning Moves 87

Srcilian: 3 8)ge2

A
T-

Kudrin-Fedorowicz
Ontario 1998

L.

;l
tx

;A

,U

e4 c5 2

6d

6c6 3 6ge2

An occasional favourite of Fischer


and Spassky who liked to keep their
opponents guessing whether the
follow-up would be the usual d2-d4
or else g2-g3 with a Closed Sicilian'
3 ... e5
Fedorowicz puts a stoP to the debate but the text runs the risk of losing control ofthe d5 square.
4 Ad5 d6 5 hec3 a6

ia ! iiJ

ig
a/ier 5 6ec3

Instead:

a) 5 ... 4\ge1 6 Ac4 6xd5 7


Axd5 Ae7 8 0-0 0-0 9 d3 3"g5 l0
Wh5 Axcl ll Eaxcl 0,e7 12 f4
hxd5 13 Axd5 exf4 14 trxf4 Ae6

%s

L%

t/t-th Tischbierek-Oll. New York


1994.
bt 5 ... Ae6

6 Ac4 9*e7 7 0-0 af6


f4 exf4 l0 Axf4 bxd5
11 hxd5 Axd5 12 Axd5 9f6 13 c3

8 d3 0-0 9

r 1i.Ed3

6a4967

-e,

-F6
'5-

,rru,

Er gg
tE

.ffi-l

and White's pair of bishops promise


a small edge, Del Campo-Gonzalez.
Cuba 1997

-e-!B

Ac4

Ag78ilah69

h4 f6 r0 6xf6+!
This surprising sacrifice is part of
a deep attacking plan which is easY
lo play and difficult to resist.
lo ... Wxf6 ll Ag5 gf8 12 ads
0\oa
Upon 12 ... 9e4 White can maintain an advantage with 13 R AxfS
14 gxR trc8 15 0-0 intending 1u1.
13 0-0 af6 M hc7+ &e7 15 f4!

after

..f6

Itl',ffi- 'fu- &t


l?zzz\z(fr N L7//.

Unfortunately for Fedorowicz his


ition is rapidly deteriorating.
15 ... h6 16 Axf6+ Axf6 17 fxeS

pos

6xe5 18 Aas+ az 19 trxf6 Wg7


20 gd2 b6 21 trafl trb8 22 6e3
trh7 23 d4 r-0

tr
,{ter

15

f4

liti

Winning Moves

Chigorin:4 cxd5
Svendsen-Reefschlaeger
Gausdal 1995

d4 d5 2 c4 2.c6 3

aR

English: 3 ... f5

Uhlmann-Dunnington

fuga a

Zillertal

.l

1c4e526c3d634f3f5

cxd5

An aggressive system which

4 o,c3 is a familiar sight but the


text offers White a chance to avoid a
main line.
4...9xR 5 exf3?
This leads to disaster due to the
weakness of the d4 pawn. Also

%s
a%
.ffig
s%

,,&

possible are:

a) 5 dxc6 Axc6 6 aca af6 7 R


e6 8 e4 A.e7 9 Ae3 0-0 l0 gd2 a6

after 4 cxd5

I I gd3 b5 12 0-0 Waz+: PetranJakubek, Slovak 1996.

b) 5 gxB Wxd5 6 e3 e6 7 Q\c3


gh5 8 Pl Bxdl+ 9 xdl 0-0-0 l0
ez hr0 t Ag2a,e'l t2 gd2 Af5
13 trhcl bS 14 a4 h6 15 abs
trd7= Verat-Atalik, Cappelle la

,rry,

5... Wxd5 6 Ae3

It is possible to gambit the pawn


with 6 6c3 but Black should be
able to cope with the temporary

Bcz Bdz 8 9"b5 a6 9 Aa4 e5 lo


Ae3 Ad6 11 Ae4 dgeT 12 2,c5
Bc8 13 h4 0-0 14 E4 ad5 15 Axc6
bxc6 16 4\e4 f5 17 gxf5 Hxf5 and
Black is clearly better, Moutousis-

af6 l0 Ac+ AUa

after 8 9.b5

ll

Af6 s 9gS c6 6 e3 alaS g,e2 a,c7 8 b4 Ae7 9 Ub3 h5 lo

9xf6 9xf6 ll trbl 0-0

12

0+ R

Boulier-Dunnington, Lyon. I 990b) 4 e4 af6 5 d3 6c6 6 Ae3 96 o-o Ag7 s ad5 h6 9 gd2 a-5 lo a-:
95 11 Ac3 a4 12 6xf6* Ex6 li

exf5 Axf5 14 ad2 0-0 15 A-er


EIeT: lglesias-Urday, Candas 1991.

4 ... e4 5 Ag5 9.e7 6 AreT 0xe7


7 ad2 6ro s e3 o-o 9 Ae2 c5 lo

6u:

uo
Dunnington has time to make hrs

pawn structure rock-solid

becar.r.s

the closed nature of the posirion rr


duces the significance of his relatn.e
lack of development.
11 wd2 g.b7 t2 0-0-0 ac6 13 [r

exf3 14

Axn *n8

15

Axe4 fxe4 17 ad5


Aa6

Ehel

Qre+

rr

Vfl lt fc2

and, into the bargain, threatening m

for Black.

whelming but this is a classy way to


finish.
14 bxa3 Eilxa3+ 15 bl dxc3 0-1

4d4

a) 4 d3

Pinpointing Black's weak c-paru

maintains an edge

8 ... 6xd4! 9 Axd4 e5 l0 9c2


exd4 ll Brs+ *ug 12 0-0-0 ah6
13 Wf4 ga3!
The position is already over-

6c6, ... 96, ...9g7 and ...6ff.

delPlata 1971.

pressure. For example: 6 ... Wxd4 7

can

transpose to various systelrls such as


the reversed Closed Sicilian after . -

c) 4 e3 drc s 9ezc6 6 b{ -te- gb2 0-0 8 0-0 gh8 9 b5 e4 l0 e5


we8 ll d3 h6 t2 ah3 6bd; t-r
dtq q)eS-- Panno-Rubineni. I[ar

Grande 1995.

Atalik. Peristeri 1994.


6... .0-0-0 7 6c3 Ba5 8 gbs
The pin on the d-file should dictate 8 wb3 when 8 ... e6 9 0-0-0

1993

AA
after I j tVf4

some lines ...


19 Wc2

on

19

Bxd5.

ad2 then 19 ... Axc-t! l0

Bxc4 6a5 2lWc2 Bxd5 wins.


19 ... cxd4 20 exd4 b5 2l crH

Bxd5 22 bxc6 Eac8 23 bl


=rc6
24Wd2 Ad3+ 25 al9xb3! 0.,r

Winning Moves 89

English: 3 ... f5

Uhlmann-Dunnington

'T.-

Zillertal I99i

"ry,

,ru,

lc4e526c3d63aaf5
An aggressive system which

can

transpose to various systems such as

the reversed Closed Sicilian after

...

6c6, ... 96, ...9g7 and ... Af6.


4d4

Af6 s 9gS c6 6 e3 2a6 7


9e7 9 gb3 h6 10
Axf6 Axf6 ll Ebl 0-0 12 0-0: R.
a) 4 d3

3"e2 a,c7 8 b4

1sd5

Boulier-Dunnington, Lyon, 1990.


b) 4 e4af6 5 d3 a,c6 6 Ae2 96 7
o-o Ag7 8 ad5 h6 9 gd2 a5 lo a3

after

j . f5

95 l1 Ac3 a4 12 6xf6+ Wxf6 13


ext5 Axf5 14 ad2 0-o 15 {)e4
We7: lglesias-Urday, Candas 1992.

c) 4 e3 6fe s g.e2 c6 6 b4 9-e7 7


gb2 o-o 8 o-o h8 9 b5 e4 lo E)g5
we8 11 d3 h6 12 ah3 abdT 13
Df4 2,e5= Panno-Rubinetti. Mar
del Plata 1971.
4...e4 5 9"g5 9.e7 6 AxeT

t -t

b-s

9xe7
7 ad2 Af6 8 e3 o-o 9 9e2 c5 lo
Ans uo
Dunnington has time to make his
pawn structure rock-solid because
the closed nature of the position re-

%affiL%
L_T

',ru %
%a:ffi-',%,A|ffi:B
after

10..

b6

duces the significance of his relative

lack of development.
rr wd2 g,b7 t2 0-0-0 ac6 13 f4
exf3 14 Axn n8 l5 Ehel D,e416

Axe4 fxe4 17 ads


Aa6

Wr

rS

Pinpointing Black's weak c-pawn


and, into the bargain, threatening in
some lines ... Wxd5.
19 Wc2

On 19 ad2 then 19 ... Axc4! 20


Bxc4 6a5 2l:9c2 Wxd5 wins.
19 ... cxd4 20 exd4 b5 21 cxb5

1v4

Wez

Wxd5 22 bxc6 Elac8 23 Ebl trxc6


24Wd2 Aa:+ zs al9xb3! 0-l

E,ry'
tli/

EI
,rru_

ag
L"ru- w

,,ffi, tr

after 25 @al

90 Winning Moves

Kupreichik-Romanishin

Pirc: 5 9e3
Carlier-Kerkhof

USSR Champibnship 1976

Brussels 1995

Scotch: 7 9-c4

I AR 96 2 e4 9g7 3 it1 {a

le4e522lf3o,c63d4exd44

hxd4 9c5 s 3.el9f0 6 c3 6ge7

gbs

bcr Aro 5 Ae3

This system has been largely for-

gotten since Kasparov set


trend with 7 9c4.

new

7 ... d6
a) 7 ... Ab6 8 o-o o-o 9 Udz

996
l0 trel 6e5 l l Ehl ds (l I ... d6!?)
t2 gf4 Aga B R af6 14 e5 %r/z
Fodre-Flear. Paris 1990.
b) 7 .. a6 8 9a4 b5 9 Ac2 0-0

ll

AA

de2

Af2 t{gs

after 7 9b5

gh3

is met by 14 ...

Ag3 ftg3

f4

Reilly. Melbourne 1998.


b) 6 ... *ga 7 695 a6 (7 .--c5!?)
after

lj

3.e3

18

gfi

c4!

il
ltr

%L%

%
j

%'T- ',',ffi
"m
AT,

diagonal which spells trouble for


White in defending 92.
19

Vn

gfi

gds 20 gxa,l a,ntzt gl

zz trxe8

6t:+ o-t

8RAc89h4e6l0h5Mllff3
l{
6
t7 Af6+ f/ 18 gxht l.O

95 12 6xg5 hxg5 13 h6 -e.ht


Axgs 9d7 15 Elt htrz to fca

Kogan-Reindernan, Antwerp l99t


7 0-0-0 6ga 8 9g5 c5 9 L3
10 e5 cxd4 11 9xd4 6az rZ
The opening has been a trfunpt
tbr White. The pressure on c7 fucts

15 9.f2

Romanishin has found a way for


his bishop to gain access to the long

.tol
Joh-*c

12 h5 trhS 13 0-0-0 exd4 14


and White stood better in

17 gxh3T.

14... gd7!
A slight change of plan is called
for, otherwise 14 ... 9-b7? 15 exf5!
is embarrassing for Black.
15 Efel Eae8 16 exf5 6xf5 17

Uas+ Ae6

gd2
White adopts a modern setq
which indicates a willingrc o
castle queenside, play th5 o crchange dark-squared bishoF d
6...o,a6?t

ER
16

l-0.

Practice has also seen:


a) 6 ... a6 7 Ah6 b5 8 3.xg7 fug?
9 gd3 ab7 10 e5 6fcl7 I I h.l &c5

for his bishop.


14

(c

then start a kingside attack.

gd4

Romanishin is quick to try and exchange the central pawn because he


wants to open up the aS-hl diagonal
14

12 e5

l0

tova-Ostojic, Mureck 1998


8 0-0 0-0 t hxc6?!
The resulting position is easy for
Black to play so I would suggest 9
?l!? as a possible improvement.

ll

AxgT xg7

grm) 12
go{ Bt
l5 693 hc7 l6 ah5+ *h8 lTtb

14

9 ... bxc6 l0 9xc5 cxbs


Ug6 12 6az cs 13 Ae3 f5!

c5ll

the similarity to the main


... 6e8 13 dxc5 dxcS 14

ad2 d5 12 R ad7 13
hl h5g6 15 exds
9xd4 16 9xd4 6xd5 17 Ae4 gh6
18 9xg7 UxgT 19 9xd5+- Chorva0-0 a]e5

0-o

Carlier-Bernard, Brussels 1995.


went instead 5 ... c6 6 Ud2 b5 7
gd3 abdT 8 0-0 0-0 9 9.h6 b{ lo

Black to make further conccssi-

which fatally undermir B


defence.

t2 ... f613 ac4+ m rr c


Axf6 15 Atro 6cs 16 NS 61,
trhel d5

after 22 ...o,JS*

18

Axd5!

An excellent riposte.
18... exd5 19 Axd5 14

Winning Moves

Pirc: 5 9e3
Carlier-Kerkhof

&

Brussels 1995

ll

lafl962e49g73d4d64

hn 5 Ae3 0-0
Carlier-Bernard, Brussels 1995,
went instead 5 ... c6 6 Wd2 b5 7
gd3 abdT 8 0-0 0-0 9 gh6 b4 l0
0r.2 c5 I I AxgT &xg7 12 e5 (note
the similarity to the main game) 12
... 6e8 13 dxc5 dxc5 14 Ae4 trbS
15 693 4\c7 t6 ahs+ eh8 17 gh6
l-0.
6cs

E%A

gd2
White adopts a modern set-up
which indicates a willingness to
castle queenside, play .Q.h6 to ex-

'T.-A%

%.
A

'T

a%
'w, 'ffiA
tr
after 6tVd2

change dark-squared bishops and

then start a kingside attack.

6...o,a6?l
Practice has also seen:
a) 6 ... a6 7 Ah6 b5 8 AxgT xg7
9 gd3 .Q.b7 l0 e5 6fd7 I I h4 dxe5

12 h5 Eh8 13 0-0-0 exd4 14 Ae4

and White stood better in JohansenReilly. Melbourne I 998.


b) 6 ... fuga 7 Ag5 a6 (7 ... c6l?)

ia-'

R Ac8 t h4 e6 l0 h5 h6 ll ah3
95 t2 dxg5 hxg5 13 h6 9"h8 14
gxgs Wd7 15 Ef4 6m rc Wg3 fs
t7 ar6+ f7 18 axh8 l-0
8

Kogan-Reindennan, Antwerp I 998.


7 0-0-0 694 S 9.g5 c5 9 m af6

e5 cxd4 ll Uxd4 a,al n,Ent


The opening has been a triumph
lbr White. The pressure on e7 forces
Black to make further concessions

after

l2Vh4

E3.

l0

which fatally undermine


defence.

his

12 ... t6 13 9c4+ *h8 14 exf6


6xf6 15 9trO 6cS 16 695 e6 17

trhel d5 l8 Axd5!

22

5)13+

An excellent riposte.
18... exdS 19 hxd5 l-0

%A
AN,

%tr%. "rur- %
after

l7

... d5

9l

92 Winning Moves
Dutch: 4 ... c5

Nimzowitsch:5 3"e3

Averbakh-Goldberg

Binham-Horn
Bonnevoie 1998

1 e4

hR

6c6 2 a,c3 6to: d4 d6 4

,ru,

"'ffi,

I I

9.g+

An unusual line to avoid thery-

5c4

"ffi-a

a) 5 0-0 orc6 6 c4 cxd4 7

,rru.

... e6

position similar to the Pirc.

5 Ae3 a6

A sneaky move which stops the


troublesome 9bS but is rather slow.
a) 5 ... e6 6 9e3 9e7 7 d5 exd5 8
exd5 9.xB 9 Axf3 6e5 l0 Ae2 0-0

a
w"ffig

tr

after 5 9.e3

,rrua

g
tr

l0 ... Ae5?! is no good as ll


hxe5 Axe2 12 6xf7! Axdl 13

after

leaves Black

l0

...

ab8

15 ... 0-0 16 aal tret 17 wel


6uaz ts Wg3 96 19 ah6+ gf8 20
f5 6e5 2l Eael Ahs 22 gxh5
gh4 23 fxg6!!
Amazingly, the queen is given up
for a stylish checkmate.
23 ... Axg3 24 trxf7+ l-0
...6xf7 25 g7 mate.

24

Wb3 Oc6

7 A'ra

o{ ae4 lo

--

This fails to a tactical trick so 9

fxe4 is a better try when lO IGA


preserves a small advantage.
l0 exf5 gxf5 11 6xf5!

The tell-tale signs of a lack of &


velopment and a strandd ki4 b
enough for Averbakh 1e mefc I
spectacular sacrifice.
11 ... exfS 12 Eel d6
After 12 ... h6 an analysis bY

facing the loss of a pawn.

Black' s light-squared bishop.

b) 5 c3 cxd4 6 cxd4 9.M+

guo s

5... cxd4 6 6xd4 9:e7 7 *3{


A prelude to attacking the cPsr
with ... Wc7 but 7 ... M ts bdlcr
transposing to note 'a' above.
8 0-0 Uc7 9 e4l 96?

kov-Mestrovic. Ljubljana I 994.


6 Ae2 e6 7 0-0 Ae7 8 h3 ghs 9
d5 exdS 10 exd5 6b8

ible by the relentless pursuit of

MaSt

t992.

gbs alat t d5 6cb8


8 .Q"e2 Ae7 9 Uaz no lo o-o-o
AxB I I gxf3 a6 12 f4+: Sveshni-

The perfect square for the knight

Berger-Keres.

1937

12
Axb4
Ac3+: Markowski-Oliwa RingSd

b) s ... e5 6

to dominate the game-made poss-

Ae3 e5:

Wxb4 1l UxM axb4

1998.

rr ad4 996 12 f4 Ae413 6xe4


$)xe4 t4 An An 15 Afs

&dr

9e7 8 6c3 0-0 9 b3 hg4 l0 &c6


dxc6 1l m af6 12 Uxd8 trxd l3

tt f4 6ed7 12 gR Ee8 13 gd2


4)c5 14 0-0-0 a5 15 94 a4 16 95
6tdt n h4 ab6 18 gd4 g"f8 19
Ehel t/zt/z Rohl-Rogers, New York

hxd8 Axc2 14 0,e6

ld4e62aafs393hf64hg,
c5

Horn adopts a flexible line where


Black can counter in the centre with

and ... d5 or even exchange on


f3 and follow with ... 96 entering a

USSR Championship l95O

L,ru,
L,,%L
T,
I%
%L',ffi

Ar
winning attack: 13 gf4 fa8 (tf
-

erbakh concludes that Whitc lies e

Hxc4 14 Ecl) 14 6as Oxas ts


tshs+
13

rs

16

9xd5.

ggs d8

There is little choice as 13 .-- Oft

or l3 ... 0-0 is crushed by la Od514 ExeT

9xe7

15

ad5

AxeT+ 8)xe7 17 Yxd6+


after 22 ... A.h4

ArG f6

Af,

Edr trg8
If l8 ... Ea7 then 19 %6*.
19 9xb7 Eg6 20 ual or
9uo+ Se8 22 9xc6 l-0

f8

il

Winning Moves 93

Dutch:4 ... c5
Averbakh-Goldberg
USSR Championship I 95!)

ld4e62aRf5393af649g2
c5

An unusual line to avoid theory.

5c4

a) 5 0-0 8)c6 6 c4 cxd4 1 Q)xd4


n

A
e'
/A

fr i

Le-t

Ae7 8 6c3 0-0 9 b3 694 l0 hxc6

1l m af6 12 Wxd8 Exd8 13


Ae3 e5: Berger-Keres, Margate

dxc6
1937

b) 5 c3 cxd4 6 cxd4 Ab4+ 7 Ad2


Wuo s Wb3 6c6 9 o-o fle4 lo
Axb4 Wxb4 1l Bxb4 6xb4 12

hc3+: Markowski-Oliwa,

after 4

..

c5

Ringsted

1992.
5 ... cxd4 6

Axd4 'e7 7 o,c3 a6


A prelude to attacking the c-pawn
with ... Wc7 but 7 ... Ec6 is better
transposing to note'a' above.
8 0-0 Hc7 9 e4t 96?
This fails to a tactical trick so 9 ...
fxe4 is a better try when l0 We2
preserves a small advantage.
10 exfS gxf5 l1 6xf5!
The tell-tale signs of a lack of de-

b ltt

9\t58

IA

b::

erbakh concludes that White has a


winning attack: 13 g?t WdS (13 ...

Hxc4 14 trcl) 14 Ad5 axd5


Wtrs+
13

15

EI

l0

Cxfs

-e.

ts 16 Axd5.

There is little choice as 13 ...

ah4

after

gss d8

f7

or l3 ... 0-0 is crushed by 14 ad5.


',/, /\
,/
A

'T-

velopment and a stranded king is


enough for Averbakh to make a
spectacular sacrifice.
ll ... exf5 12 trel d6
After 12 ... h6 an analysis by Av-

I I
I
I

%t
,ffi-

ad5 axds
14 Exel
AxeT+ a-xe7 t7 Bxd6+ 6aZ
Edl trg8
If l8 .. Ea7 then 19 9b0+.
19 AxbT trg6 20 Wd4 ac6
Wu6+ *e8 22 Axc6 l-0
UxeT 15

16

rt

21

Zffi
AKafter

''ffi

'&,A
1j

... &d8

94 Winning Moves

Caro-Kann: 4 ... ad7

Giuoco Piano: 5 d3

Watson-Meduna

Bolzoni-Lane

Prague 1992

Belgian Team ChamPionshiP l91N

I
,ffi

1e4c62d4d53ad2dxe44

6xel haZ 5 695 agf6 6 gd3


This formation is White's most

A minor line compared to the


main alternative 6 ... e6. A cel-

,,ru'

after 6 ... 96

fte6 l0
A96+ d8 I I gtil b5 t2 a4 3,b'7
13 Eel AaS t+ Ag3 Sc8 15 axb5
cxb5 16 Wa: gcO 17 gf5 exf5 l8
ExeT AxeT 19 c4 l-0 Deep BlueKasparov, New York 1997.

similar

.Ag7 8 We2!0-0

8 ... h6 is a calculated gamble by


Black to survive the attack and end
up with an extra piece. 9 o,e6 (9

of

after 9 ... h6

pulls out all the stops to open the h-

is l0 ... hxg5
ll h6! gh8 12
hxgs 6bo 13 h7+ *s7 t4 Vd2l
intending

"ffiwru

fls6+ gives White an im-

ll e4 ahf6 12 6e6,! fxe6 t3


trf7 t4 Axg6 gf8 r5 95

Wxe6+

gh7+! l-0
(17 ... h8 l8
hxgT+ WxgT 19 9e4+ g8 20
9xe5+-) 18 hxgT+ xg7 19 Wh6+
g8 20 th8 mate.

Consistent, especiallY as th d
12 WxdT* offers White nothig
due to the weak doubled c-P.rE
After 12 ... hxdT 13 dxc4 -tr4 ll

abd2 gd3 15 trel

gb6 intilhg

gxh6 6e5 17

tf r7 ... xh7

after 17

12 ... Aa6!
The move that blows a hle i
White's plans, because 13 lxJ
loses to 13 ... Axf2+.

gb4
There is no good square fq th
queen, e.g. 13 UUI 9.xa: 14 trdl
trb8 (14 ... 6xe4 also looks good l5
Exd3 6xf2 16 tre3 oiga fl ca o|
18 a]el Ef5-+) 15 trxdi trxb3 16
axb3 Ub5 l7 c4 gb7 wins.
13 ... Axd3 14 trel trbS 15 ft,
AcS 16 hxe5 9e6! 17 Urt5 &6
18 6xd3 c4 t9 ab2 A\ga 2a ff
13

mense attack.

has tr

tl

12 Wxc4

... Ea4 wins.

file and accelerate the onslaught.


snatching the piece

tional who expected 8 ... axb5 9


9xb5 with equal chances.

ing

brilliance. Watson

10...6xh5
The critical test

White has gained time by the forctd


retreat of the black bishoP.
8 b5 6a5!
A surprise to the Belgian inerE

9 bxa6 6xc4 l0 axbT -e.rb?

gives White good attacking

touch

.tcs a

to the game excPr .

ga4+ gd7

D,e4l?) fte6 l0 Wxe6+ gf8 I I gd2


Q)ae n o-o-o gd7 13 Ebl g.e8 14

opponunities.
t h4 h6 l0 h5!

0,c6 3 9.c4

The point of mY sixth move b rq


vealed. After a standard rePtY d
as 6 ... 0-0 then 7 b4 96 8 A 59
a5 Aa7 l0 b5 reaches a Pcilir

able) 8 hxe6! We7 9 0-0

6e5

6R

5...d66c3a67b4fufl

ebrated game indicates that Black


has to be wary: 7 allf: h6? (7 ...
Ae7 or 7 .." gd6 are more accept-

alB

e4 e5 z

af6 s d3

The closed version of the Girm


Piano gives priority to developmcr
and commencement of active qc
ations only in the middlegame.

'rru_

aggressive option.
6 ... 96'!,?

I
0-0

th7+

Ae5

21 Ee3 0-0 22
f4 trxb2 0-l

N2 EB

23

Winning Moves 95

Giuoco Piano: 5 d3

Bolzoni-Lane

r6

g6

Belgiun Team ChamPionshiP 199$

le4e526RAc633"c4Ac54

0-0 af6 s d3
The closed version of the Giuoco
Piano gives prioritv to development
and commencement of active oPerations only in the middlegame.
5... d6 6 c3 a6 7 b4 gil
The point of mY sixth move is revealed. After a standard reply such
as 6 ... 0-0 then 7 b4 9b6 8 a4 a6 9
a5 Aa7 l0 b5 reaches a Position

similar

to the game except

L,,ry,

'%"a'

L%

%s
,x,

%
,b%
,ru,L

after 8 b5

that

White has gained time bY the forced


retreat ofthe black bishoP.

ha5!
A surprise to the Belgian international who expected 8 ... axb5 9
8 tr5

Axb5 with equal chances.


9 bxa6 Axc4 10 axbT AxbT

ga4+ gd7

12

ll

Bxc4

Consistent, especiallY as the end12 BxdT+ offers White nothing


due to the weak doubled c-Pawns:

ing

r9.. h6

After 12 ... 6xd7 13 dxc4 9xe414


abd2 gd3 15 tre I Ab6 intending

after 12

... Ea4 wins.

..

9.a6

12... Aa6!
The move that blows a hole in
White's plans, because 13 Wxa6
loses to 13 ... Axf2+.

gb4
There is no good square for the
queen, e.g. 13 UU: Axa: 14 Edl
trb8 (14 ... 6xe4 also looks good l5
trxd3 hxf2 16 Ee3 694 17 c4 e4
18 4)el gf5-+) 15 trxd3 trxb3 16
axb3 Wb5 l7 c4 9b7 wins.
13 ... Axd3 14 Eel trb8 15 Wa3
Ac5 16 6xe5 We6! 17 E{xc5 dxcS
r8 6xd3 c4 19 0,b2 694 20 h3
fleS 2l tre3 o-0 22 ad2 trfd8 23

13

17 A,ht+

f4 trxb2 0-1

A
after

l6 Ne5

96 Winning Moves

Conclusion

2 Punish quickly any unusual


opening which neglects develop-

The thrill of playing a scintillating


move has to be tempered with the
knowledge that the right position
has to be achieved first! In most
cases a carefully considered plan

ment. In Averbakh-Goldberg, White

was a prerequisite to

the
a formidable attack.

and jumped at the chance to hold


the black king in the centre, thus allowing his attack to rage on.
3 Do not underestimate the im-

construction of
In Watson-Meduna, White followed

portance of psychology. When a


player comes under relentless pres-

a main line but was able to intro-

sure from an attack then something


is likely to give. This is usually the
moment when a star move makes its

duce an original and aggressive sequence as soon as Black deviated.

Though the game ends in some


spectacular fireworks, also present

appearance.

are familiar factors such as weakening of the defensive pawn shield and

rapid deployment of reinforcements


for the attack.

The

Art of Defence

I Gain a good knowledge

of typical traps so these can be spotted in


advance.

The

Art of Attack

Look for typical motifs. In

position arising from a Pirc such as


in Carlier-Kerhoff. Whrte is eager to
exchange dark-squared bishops to
weaken the defence and aim for the
advance e4-e5 ousting the defensive

knight on f6. This lays the foundations for a winning move.

7 Opening

gave Black no time to consolidate

2 Familiarise yourself with basic


opening ideas. Taking on, say, the
King's Gambit or a main line Open
Sicilian with only a little knowledge
is asking for trouble.

3 Develop your pieces. This


simple principle, repeated over and
again throughout this book. cannot
be disregarded and is a contributory
factor to so many defeats.

When we discuss the 'attack'

immediately think of a queen trin


involved in some mating codlfol
tion in the opening or middlego
However, any assumPtion drat x
ics are unlikely because queas

ler

been exchanged is wrong and ce

lead to complacency-wifr drrtrous consequences, Never fcgl


that the ending too can offer mr

oppornrnities for a PlaYer m il


look-out for a decisive blos'The Spanish Exchange is m r
the best known ways to securc I

r:rir
h i
game Fischer-SPasskY. The AtE
can was renowned for usiry t
opening and his games are a guil

early queen-swap and its

possibilities are examined

light to others who wish to crce


mating attacks.

If

there is one thing that

Ki

Indian players hate it is the th@


that their prepared ag-gressit'e tz

ation can be thwarted bv the

E;

Variation-with both pa
leaving the board after jus e'g
moves. ln the game, Ryba-Hi[r
Persson, Black reminds us thil tc
is no need to shake hands fa I
early draw and gradually imrer
the pressure by improving rhe Pu
tions of his pieces. No easl rio

change

but plenty to battle for.

In LutherMaiwald. Black follot

basic principles

by sastling Gr

and fending off the initial offcm


all seems fine. Hos'tru-and
close scrutiny of the game rtarEz

that Black has problems

sirt I

I
t gickly any unusual
Et neglects developtrth{oldberg, White
n time to consolidate
I r 6e chance to hold
E in Se centre, thus alH to rage on.

I nferestimate the imf'pychology. When a


ll uder relentless presf dack then something
girc- This is usually

E
:

the

a star move makes its

frlt

of Defence

ud knowledge of typi'lhe can be spotted in


fu 1-ourself with basic
E Taking on, say, the
E q a main line Open
Ic!1 a little knowledge
rmble? ],our pieces.

This

rft repeated over and


;}un this book. cannot
H ad is a contributory
st defeats.

7 Openirig to the Ending


When we discuss the 'attack' we
immediately think of a queen being

involved in some mating combination in the opening or middlegame.


However, any assumption that tactics are unlikely because queens have
been exchanged is wrong and can

lead to complacency-with disastrous consequences. Never forget


that the ending too can offer manY
oppornrnities for a PlaYer on the
look-out for a decisive blow.
The Spanish Exchange is one of
the best known ways to secure an
early queen-swap and its various

possibilities are examined

in

the

game Fischer-Spassky. The Ameri-

can was renowned

for using

this

opening and his games are a guiding


light to others who wish to create
mating attacks.

If

there is one thing that King's

Indian players hate it is the thought


that their prepared aggressive variation can be thwarted by the Exchange Variation-with both queens
leaving the board after just eight
moves. ln the game, Ryba-HillarP
Persson, Black reminds us that there
is no need to shake hands for an

early draw and gradually increases


the pressure by improving the positions of his pieces. No easy victory
but plenty to battle for.

In Luther-Maiwald. Black follows

basic principles

by castling

early
and fending off the initial offensive
all seems fine. However. a
-and
close scrutiny of the game reveals

that Black has problems with his

passively placed pieces which allow


his opponent to make rapid progress
with an attack. It's a similar story in
Miles-A.Rodriguez.
In Adams-Lautier, White starts off
with aggressive intent-which is by
no means reduced by the time the
ending is reached. This game is a
model example of how to place obstacles in your opponent's waY and
wait for him to trip up.

Seeking complications in an attempt to avoid drawing lines at all


cost is another way a player can get
into a mess. This is the case in
Lane-Nunn where Black embarks
on a king advance in the search for
attacking chances, only to end uP
being mated himself'!

It seems too good to be true to be


able to swap queens. sacrifice and
then checkmate-but that is exactly
what happened in Doubleday-South.
The roots of White's demise lay in
his kingside pieces being rooted to
their original squares while Black
focused on the attack.
A surprise opening move, such as

that seen in Epishin-Komarov.

can

lead a defender to unfamiliar terri-

tory which inevitably makes the


game more difficult for him. Here,
as the game rapidly approaches the
ending, White's pieces take control

of all the mosl

important squares

and dominate the board.

Remember, no matter how few


pieces remain, the endgame demands accurate play and the need to
be ever alert to tactical tricks.

98 Opening to the Ending

Adams-Lautier
Tilburg 1997

I e4 c5 2 Q)c3 e63 f4
The Grand Prix Attack.
3 ... d5 4 af3 die4

ld4Af62c4963Add54gf4
A positional continuation which
has been employed by Capablanca
and Karpov. The bishop exerts pressure on the h2-b8 diagonal.
a ... 9g7 5 e3 c5 6 dxc5 Ua5 7

Abs gd7 8 0-0 3.e7 9 d3 a6 lO


Axc6 Axc6 I I f5+: Noerdi-

White is happy to enter the ending

Szabo, Hungary 1994.

ous obstacles to regain his pawn.


7... Bxa4 8 6xa4 6e4

b) 4 ... af6 s gb5- id?

after 4 Af4

14 Axe6 fxe6 15 Ec4 dxa2 16


e2* Dreev-Leko, Dortmund 1994.
b) 8 ... gd7 9 0.c3 o,e410 6xd5
0n6 11 R 6exc5 12 trbl! e6 13
6c7+ 6xc7 14 9xc7 Aa4 15 9d6
.= Novikov-Kudrin. Toronto 1998.
9 cxdS AaZ fO R Axa4 ll fxe4
9.xb2 12 Ebl gca+ 13 gf2 ad7
14 Ecl 6xc5 15 f3
The bishop is taboo: 15 Exc3?
6xe4+ 16 f3 6xc3 17 9e5
Adl+! l8 Sg3 6e4+ t9 &f4 an
and now Black is winning.
15 ... gb4 16 Ec4 Aus

Axfl l8 2,e2

Ac6 1l 694+: Lane-[.acklfo;oBrussels 1998) l0 ab5 f" ll


dl! (this new move changes th
assessment of the line heavitl' h
White's favour) ll ... Aa6 l: ac6!

&

,,ry

L,ru

ffit

.ru,
,ru_

l-0 Bhend-Rolli. Baden 1998.


5 6xe4 Ae7 6 d4 cxd4 7 Orll

Wxd4 8

6xd4

The ending is roughly equal H


White has a slight initiative thrnts

%
'ffi-t

to the space advantage.

effi

after

AxdT+ HxdT 7 he5 Uc7 E erd5


exd5 9 gfl d4 (9 ... gd6 l0 0{

8..Ae6?! 9 Axb8 trxb8 l0

ll

to avoid \fhitc's

because Black has to overcome vari-

cxd5 6xd5?! (10 ... Axd5 1l gb5+


9.c6 12 Axc6 bxc6 13 trdl+:)
gb5+ *d8 t2Ect! a6 13 fucq a,ac

quiet line

usual attackine formation. lnstead:


a) 4 ... d4 SbeZ 6to 6 a$ a\c6

Ua4+

a)

...6

Grand Prix Attack: 2

Grunfeld:4 9"fl1

Chekhov-Krasilnikov
Moscow, l998

s ... ao 9 -4"e3 ad7 l0 $ aE.


6xe4 12 9xe4 Oc5 l3
llgf3 9g2
gd7
14 o-o-o trc8

14 ... 0-0-0 might be a bener ilce


because the king can then defd
the b-pawn.

Vla4+

15 Ed2 trc7 16

tz trxu+

Ehdl atr4 r7

fiiez Ans 18 Ad4 f6


The obvious 18 ... 0-0 is *'ell

9xe2+ tg Sxe2 d7
He should not centralise the king
with enemy men swarming around.

by

20 e5 h6?! 2l e4 EacE 22 A.e3 b6


22 ... a5 23 gb5 Exe4 24 d3 f5
25 ExbT+ wins.

The tactics favour Adams bec--*P


the rook on c7 is overloaded st

23

gfi

gh7 24 trc4 ab7?

Black is in trouble but this hastens


his demise. 24 ... h5 25 trfcl h4 26
Axc5 bxc5 27 Exc5+
25 e6+! l-0
Black resigned in view of 25 ...
fxe6 26 dxe6+ d8 27 Ef8 mate.

19 9e5 which wins a


19 b3!

A"&.
ru.
,r&%
%

L%

after

e%B

l9

...

*az

patr-

the defence of the b7 paun.


19 ... gb4

tr

Other moves do not help: 19 -9xe2 20 Exe2 6c5 2l M or 19 --

o,c5 20 Axc5 Axe2

2l Ird

9xc5 22 9"d5! both win for trlrir20 bxa4 Axd2+ 2l Erd2 ir{

22 2,c3 Ac6 23 1lhs+ l_0

Opening to the Ending 99

Grand Prix Attack: 2 ... e6

Adams-Lautier

lilburg 1997

,ffi

w
t'rru

il

Al

le4c520,c3e63f4
The Grand Prix Attack.
3 ... d5 4 AR axe4

to avoid

quiet line

White's

usual attacking formation. Instead:

W
s'T- A

693 6c6
abs gd7 8 0-0 ae7 9 d3 a6 l0

a\ 4 ... d4 5-de2 0if6 6

Axc6 9xc6

I f5+:

Nogradi-

Szabo, Hungary 1994.

b) 4 ... 4]re s Ab5- Ad7

AxdT+ VxdT 7 6e5 9c7 8 exd5


exd5 9 ga d4 (9 ... gd6 lo o-o

after 4 dJ3

6c6 ll 6e4+: Lane-Lacklison,


Brussels 1991) lo ab5 ge7 I I
*dl !

*L

(this new move changes the

assessment

rx I

W,

of the line

White's favour) l

...

heavilY in

6a6 12 0lc6l

l-0 Bhend-Rolli, Baden 1998.


5 6xe4 3.e7 6 d4 cxd4 7 9xd4

Bxd4 8 6xd4
The ending is roughly equal but
White has a slight initiative thanks

ruA

to the sDace advantage.

t ... io 9 9e3 6-az to 93 6gf6

1r Ag2 dxe4 12 9xe4 6c5


gR gd7 14 o-o-o Ec8

13

14 ... 0-0-0 might be a better idea


because the king can then defend
the b-pawn.

15

Ed2 Ec7 16 trhdl 6a4

AA
after 8

Nd4

17

he2 Ab5 18 Ad4 f6

The obvious l8 ... 0-0 is well met


19 Ae5 which wins a pawn.
19 b3!
The tactics favour Adams because
the rook on c7 is overloaded with
the defence of the b7 pawn.

by

%t

19... gb4
Other moves do not help: 19
9xe2 20 Exe2 6c5 2l b4 or 19

Dc5 20 9xc5 Axe2 2l

...

...

Exe2
9xc5 22 gd5! both win for White.

20 bxaf 9xd2+

2l Exd2 Axa4

22 o,c3 3c623 Atrs+ t-o

,,ry,

Lru
I%
s%
%
s%
'%s
A

after I9

,ru-

bj

100 Opening to the Ending

Spanish: Exchange Variation

Slav: 6 9b3

Fischer-Spassky
Game Nine, Stefi Stefan 1992

Hebden-Crouch
British League GNCD l99E

le4e520Rhc63gbsa64

,,ru,

Axc6

A forcing line which

This opening has been very popu-

lar ever since Bobby Fischer played


it at the Havana Olympiad 1966.

4 ... dxc6 5 0-0 f6 6 d4 exd4 7


Axd4 c5
a\ 7 ... 9c5?? (played numerous

after

I6b3

Christiansen, USA Champ. lY)l b) 6 ... Wc7 7 orc3 e6 8 9.d2 Ocf

9 trcl Ae7 l0 6e5 GO ll -9bj

(ll ... Axe5 12 6xd5 !xcl+


13 -Q"xcl 6xd5 14 e4! is better fq
White) 12 Aa4 2,e4 13 Axc6 ft@
14 xd2 bxc6 15 6xc6+- Ri:ardiEfc8

looks better, e.g. 14 a5

Cativelli. Clarin 1997.


7 Bxb6 axb6 8 aca e6 9

c415 2rd4 b5 16 6xe6 xe6:.

After

Eb7

15 e5 9"e7
15 ... fxe5? 16 axb6 cxb6 17

9e7 18 Exd8 9xd8

19

after

lj

a4

hbxc5+ White wins material.


16 trxd8 AxdS 17 6e4! Sc6?
Spassky walks into a clever trap.
17 ... Axb3 l8 cxb3 0,e7 19
axb6 cxb6 2O exf6 (20 Ad6+?! c6

Hxa6 6aS=t 20 ... gxf6 2l Edl


dts zz g"f2 white is slightly better.
18 axb6 cxb6 19

6bxc5!

A glorious move.

19....c8

K*
,ffi
a%
,ru0.

19 ... bxc5 20 Exa6+ gb6 2l

3.E+

lr ard7 Ard,

The pin on the knight is a***zd12 ... gd8?!


Better is 12 ... *e7 to co-ordinc
the rooks when. after 13 0{ ffi l,l

Hebden-Beikert, Cappelle la

Gra&

1992. Black prepared to dorDb


rooks on the a-file with 12 --- BaJ
13 e2 *e7 14 Ehcl h5 15 h]
6f6. when White again plaved 16
R to take control of the cenue13 o-o
R 9'c6 15 Eftr

ae8 16 6a4
^rcAc7 17 9.b4 f5?!

Axc5+-.
20 dxa6 fxe5 2l hn++ f-O
Because of 2l ... @US ZZ o,al+
*xb4 23 Ea3 intending c3 mate.

AfdT 10 Ae5 Ad6


12 gd2

f3. White can aim for e3e{- Ir

After

2l

9 0-0 gd6 l0 gb4 9c7 ll U.3


Axb4 12 Wxb4 9e7 13 Arc6t
bxc6 14 9xe7* *xe7 15 a5 trhct

16 trcl o,al n hxc6- d6 It


6a3! was played in Bnjmir

Kolcak-Sarkosy, Swedish
Team Championship 1994
S ab3 Wxdl 9 trxdr 9g4 l0 f3
Ae6ll6c3 AaO 12 $.;e3 b613 a4

14 a5

om

pensation in the half-open a-filea) 7 ...9c8 7 gd2 6c6 8 .ab5 c6

e6! l-0

ef7

tta

se-r'

doubled b-pawns as he has

times) 8 UhS* I -O Dantas-Petersen,


Zagan 1995.
b) 7 ...uaor: 8 ae3 ad7 9 ad2
c5 l0 a4b3 b6 1l a4 a5 12 Uf3
de7 13 trfdl A96? 14 e5 Uc6 15

0-0-0?!
13 ...

,n o165

complications of 5 Ad3.
5... cxd5 6 Wb3 gb6
Black enters an ending w.ith

Often an ending arises straight after


the opening where White tries to exploit his kingside pawn advantage.

0,e4

ld4d52c4c63af3atr4cl
-E-I5 5 cxOS

17 ... f6 is a better bet.

l8 f4 ghs

after I9 6bxc5

19 trc2 gs 20 ft35 5
21 96 Axg6 22 fuet f4 23 Aff

l-0

Opening rc the Ending

Slav: 6 Wb3

Hebden-Crouch
Briti,sh League UNCL)- I 998

Am af6 4 e3

L'"ffi
,ffi

Af5 5 cxd5
A forcing line which avoids the

s%

d4 d5 2 c4 c6 3

complications of 5 .Ad3.
5... cxd5 6 gb3 gb6
Black enters an ending with weak
doubled b-pawns as he has compensation in the half-open a-fiIe.
a) 7 ... Wc8 7 9'd2 6c6 8 AbS e0

$ta E ab3

9 0-0 gd6 l0 gb4 Uc7 I I Wa3


Axb4 12 Wxb4 We7 13 9xc6+
bxc6 14 9xe7- *xe7 15 6e5 trhc8
16 trcl ad7 17 6xc6+ gd6 l8
Aa3! was played in Benjamin-

after

6Vbj

Christiansen, USA Champ. 1997.


b) 6...Wc7 7 hc3 e6 8 Ad2 6c6

9 trcl Ae7 l0 6e5 0-0 1l gb5

Efc8 (l

... Axe5 12 6xd5 Wxcl+


14 e4! is better for
White) 12 0ra4 2le4 13 Axc6 bxd2
14 xd2 bxc6 15 6xc6+- RicardiCativelli. Clarin 1991 .
7 Bxb6 axb6 8 6c3 e6 9 gb5+
13

So lj

a4

Axcl Oxd5

afdT r0 hes gao l1 6xd7 6xd7


12 gdz

%.ffi
L, . ',ru,

%
',',ffi"t

after 12 9,d2

The pin on the knight is awkward.

12... gd8?!

Better is 12 ... @e7 to co-ordinate


the rooks when. after 13 0-0 af6 14
R, White can aim for e3-e4. In
Hebden-Beikert, Cappelle la Grande
1992. Black prepared to double
rooks on the a-file with 12 ... tra5

13 Se2 &e7 14 Ehcl h5 15 h3


when White again played 16
R to take control ofthe centre.
13 0-0 6rc u R A96 15 Efcl

6f6.

l7
19

6bxc5

ghs

19 trc2 95 20 fxg5 h6

2l 96 9xg6 22 fuel f4 23 6xb6!


l-0

%%"m%A

Atr

... f6 is a better bet.

18 f4

fier

after 22

...

f4

l0l

102 Opening to the Ending

English Openrng:

Closed Sicilian: 2 ... e6

Lane-Nunn
Stroud 1980

1 e4 c5 Z 0:ca e6 3 93 d5 4 exds
exd5 5 d4 cxd4 6 Exd4 af6
In Lane-Bologan, Cappelle la
Grande 1992, my opponent concentrated on defendrng the isolated dpawn which allowed me to create a

winning attack:

6 ... Ae6 7 9g2

'ffi9 & A
L%
I .ru

YoPal I 997

aSD

I I
,,,ru

--

':,i=
=:

.:-:
7.2rxd5? 8crdSd.- l=:
Aa+ l0 6xd4 exd-l l. Er:r:
Romanishin. USSR Champ

c)

6xf6+ Wxf6
Alter 8 gxf6 9 Ehr 3 ,:.
king is exposed to danse; :-. '- :
has the merit of creating l : -: :-

::
,: i
b5 4e5 14 f4 ag6 lj i:l-Logothetis-Skembris. .\the:.. . :' 9 BxI6 gxf6 l0 a3 -i-c5 I t br
Lne n Auz as 13 b5 ie- l1 ct '
edged game. For example '
a3 Ac5 11 b4 Ab6 ll ,ir-:

ag4'!

%L,

17

The grandmaster prefers to main-

b) 7 Ae7?' 8 }-re-' -- : l
Zlxb+ Axb4 10 a3l? d5'
d6!?) 1l Wc2 Exe5 1l ar'n- r:: :
d3 Be7 14 gd2 d4 l5 -i-el ;, ::
fxe3 Lea 17 ARlt t-:.:.:.,-

tr

ufter l0Wc5

.H,

tain the tension and wrongly avords

*b4 23 trc5 l-0

Axc6 bxc6?

22 S)xe6

=iB

Rayner-Clarke, Dublin I 9'rl

,A

Ae2 Ab4+ 8 Ac3 9xR 9 Axf3

mate.

-lch {

leaves Black busted.

Wc4. The only difference is that


White has added 93 and the result-

19

hxe6- fxe6 20 Exe6 Ehe8:.


1S af4 ag4 t9 tres+ b4 20
trd4 Ae6 2l a3+! *xa3
2l . c3 2.2 trd6 Ag4 23 tre3

.id5

695 and ::e .::..'


of Axf6* followed L,r gr--after 5 d4

reversed Goring Gambit Declined!

ll .. *xc6 18 Ad4- c7

e5 3 r--R

7 ... d6
a) 7 ... Af8? 8

lln

This position arises after the moveorder I e4 e5 2 6n AcO 3 d4 exd4


4 c3 d5 5 exd5 Wxd5 6 cxd4 9g4 7

bxc3 Be7+ 12
WxeT+ *xe7 13 0-0-0 Ae6 14 0,e2

6c3

An idea of Michael St<=:

one could transpose into the obscure

l0 ... Axc3+ ll

convenience Black at an er:..


ot'the game with the thrcrt i i

,m,

tling, puts pressure on the knight at


c6 and invites Black to enter an ending. It sounds great but before this
game lt was not widely known that

ing endgame should still be equal.

af6

Wfs

"ffi.-

ll aft 0-0 125)ce2 Ac5 13


c3 b5 t4 wdl ab6 15 a4 b4 t6
crb4 hxb4 17 b3 trcS 18 Ab2 Af5
l9 ad4 Ae4 20 Wg4! A96 21
Axe4 dxe4 22 df5 trc5 23 6hS*-.
7 Ag5 Ae7 8 AUS+ hc6 9 Axf6
9xf6 l0 Bc5
This crafty move prevents cas-

c4

es Aun 5 Wc2 0-o 6

AgeT

d6 f5 trhel *c5 t6 c4 dxc4

- t::

Miles-Rodriguez

''ffi-,r.ru-

rua/ier

20

Ae6

Ribli underestimates

ti-.e

::.-:.'

the bishop on c5 :

.-:

smother
.
looks best to give the bisi:c: :- =-cape square. White can ;r':.:.--: r

0-0-0 with a slight space rj :---:.


15 c5! Aa7 16 b6 ArR l - :rfl

sbS l8 Egl+ tfB l9

=dl:d-.
Miles is clearly on top

r- .-:
BI:;* : .:=,
19 ... c6 20 dxe5 fre5 ll rrdo

passive position of the

t:AS ZZ e4 Axb6 23
,haz zs Ac4 l-o

f{: f6 l{

fre5

Opening to the

Ending

English Openrng: 7 Wf5

Miles-Rodriguez

*,,ru^
A

L',.ry,

tl ,(

An idea of Michael Stean to in-

,,ru

f,'.

;-.

-f.'rr.
ia E{

tier

t
I

&.s|ffi

of Axf6* followed by

%
L"ru, "ffi, 'ffi\

"ru,a%

WxhT*

leaves Black busted.

after

7 \Wf5

d3 We7 14 g'd2 d415 g.e2 dxe3 16

fxe3 fuga 17 9nl+

KasparovRomanishin. USSR Champ 1978.


c) 7 ... hxd5? 8 cxd5 d6 9 We4
il)a+ 10 Axd4 exd4 l1 Wxd4+
Rayner-Clarke, Dublin I 993.

ll

ig I

6xf6+ Wxf6
After 8 ".. gxf6 9 Wh5 Black's
king rs exposed to danger but this
has the merit of creating a doubleedged game. For example 9 ... e4 l0
a3 Ac5 I I b4 gb6 12 ah4 a5 13
b5 6e5 14 f4 dg6 15 gb2+:

,,ffi

l,
,ru,

,ru

A
U

,,,ffi'

--___I

L::

rier l0Vc5

%e

L% I

,,,ry)

,,ru,

,\

convenience Black at an early stage


of the game with the threat 8 Ag5.
7 ... d6
a) 7 ... Af8? 8 695 and the threat

b) 7 .. Ae7?l 8 6xeS 6b4 9


Dxb4 Axb4 l0 a3l? d5?! (10 ...
d6!?) 1l Wc2 Exe5 12 axb4 gf5 13

5 d4

.:'jl
il

1 c4 af6 2 2,c3 e5 3 6R 2,c6 4


el Ane 5 Wc2 o-o 6 ads treS 7

E@

llll

Wrs

,r

.r'.

Yopal 1997 -

.ru,
,rru.

after I 4 d4

Logothetis-Skembris, Athens I 997.

9 WxI6 gxf6 10 a3 Ac5 ll b4


gb6 12 anZ aS 13 b5 6e7 14 d4l?
trga?

AT.

*r
E

I I

T_

5I
irer 20 Ae6

,rru,_

Ribli underestimates the threat to


smother the bishop on c5. 14 .". a4l?
looks best to give the bishop an escape square. White can continue 15
0-0-0 with a slight space advantage.
15 c5! Aa7 16 b6

gb8

18

trgl+ f8

19

Axf3

gdl!

17 gxf3

Miles is clearly on top due to

the

passive position of the Black pieces.

19 ... c6 20 dxe5 fxe5 2l cxd6


ads 22 e4 6xb6 23 f4l f6 24 fxe'
'\dt zs Ac4 1-o

after

l9 Edl

103

104 Opening to the Ending

Queen's Indian: 5

gb3

Queen's Gambit Declined: 4 --- c5

Epishin-Komarov
St.Petersburg

19,97

rd4Af62c4e63aRb6493

ga6 s Eb3
Rare. 5 abd2, Adorjan-Kudrin,

is

featured under'Greedy Openings'.


5 ... c5

a) 5 ... d5 6 cxd5 exd5 7 9g5


Ae7 8 6c: 9.Ul 9 9xf6 9.xf6 l0
Ag2 0-0 I I 0-0 tre8 12 trfel 6a6
13 tradl 9a0 t+ Wa4+: GrivasKalesis. Budapest I 994.

b) 5 ... orce e daaz Aas 7 Va4


gb7 8 9g2 c5 9 dxc5 bxc5 l0 0-0
.9"e7 ll 2,e5 9xg2129xg2 0-0 13
adB d6 14 g.d2 dxe5 15 Axa5

,,ry, ,
,2,

%%
A%t

5Vbj

game
went
d6 9 g;g2
alc3 h6 t2

gf4

6... Ed7

after

1l 9d4

the tactics are in his favour.


1l ... Axd5
After
... e7 12 0-0-0 Black is
also in trouble:

abd7 l4 ah4
afl +.
694
- t2 9xg7 trg8 13 0-0-0!l76e7
14
Aes 6uio riae4 0-0-0 16 ad6+
Axd6 17 Axd6 trg6 18 Ed2! afs
19 gf4
13 e4

Threatening

to put a

Lx!F_ 22 fxg6

9xhl

23 gxf7 1-0

Oll

a) 10 AxeT 6xc3! I I btrii

Engqvist-Pedersen, Oslo I 99?-

10... Acb4
Exploiting White's lack of

,m-a

derd

opment to grab the initiative-

%t

%%%
L"ru._

rL

strangle-

hold on the position with 9d6


19 ... gb7?! 20 e4 ab4 2l exfs

!)

b) 10 gd2 0-0 I I 6R a6! 12 c3


adb4 t3 6e4 b5 14 ga3 Ic7:*

13 d6-t!

96 15 f4 Ehe8 16 e5

6dI

E{xe7:+.

ll

b) 12 ... d6

Uxd4

7 ... 4\c6 8 Wa4 6xd5 9


9e7 r0 9f4?!

8 Ue3+ We7 9 6c3 Wxe3 l0

Ee6 17 6xh7+-.

6xa4 b5-+.

14 h3 Ee8 15 a4 with a draw.

Axd6 14
Axf6+ gxf6 t5 ad5+ d8 l6 6xf6

gtr lt tEi

Or 7 dxe6? Wxa4 8 exf7+

0 abdT

a\ 12 ... treS

16 0-0 tre8 17 f4

Claussen-Pyhala, Espoo 1987-

f8 ll

Axe3 Ab411.Q"d4!
Epishin has a lot of pressure and

a) 8 Ab5 0-0 9 Axc6 bxcf lO


9xf6 9xf6 ll e5 c5 12 ge3 GrdS
13 dge2 d4 14 He4 Aa6 15 Od5
Axe2 19 Efel d3 20 axtr+ !ff
0-l Roods-Gross. Hawaii 1998b) 8 gd2 6xd5 9 exd5 -txg5 lO
f4 gh4+ 1l 93 exd5 12 gril
Wxh4* 13 gf2 We7* 14 Ee2 -trf
ls aa d4 16 abs Glo! 17 Ecr
*ta with compensation in ffi

because

Ba4+!?

Axe5

the c-pawn is a long-term weakness.


Geneva
The

1997,

ad Of r

Bxd4. Then 6 ...9e7 7 e4orfl:.

Buenos Aires 1996


6 d5 exd5 7 cxd5 c4?!

poor practical choice

d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3

It is probably better to play 5

gb8 16 Ac3+= Sorin-Almasi,


A

"sg5 c5

Seeking less explored variatims5 cxd5 cxd4!?


An idea of the Dutchman Prins-

%.,,ru

after

Doubleday-South
Ottawa Championship I 977

after 19 9,f4

l1 UxdT+ 9xd7 12 Ordi rrl5


13 a3 Ec8+ 14 bl 9.f5+ f5 O.f
6c2+ 16 a2 0-0 17 e3
South finds a brilliant way b crpose White's king.
17 ... 6xa3! 18 bxa3 trcZ+ tl
gb3 gf6 20 Exd5 trb2+ 2r w
Ec&+ 22 Ec5 b5+ 23 gds Eal+

0-l

Open.ing to the

Ending

Queen's Gambit Declined: 4 ... c5

Doubleday-South
Ottawa Championship I 977

II I I

d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 hc3 af6

.i{95 c5
Seeking less explored variations.
5 cxd5 cxd4!?
An idea of the Dutchman Prins.

--

,r&

r|ier 5 vlb3

L,,ry

l
.t F\Lfu

a_\

Kt

Or 7

tr

9.d4

7 Wxd4
dxe6? Wxa4 8 exfT+

xf7

after

3.

. c5

I
,,,ffi-

6... gd7

:al

trier

a) 8 9b5 0-0 9 Axc6 bxc6 10


Axf6 Axf6 ll e5 c5 12 We3 exd5
13 4\ge2 d4 14 Be4 ga6 15 ad5
Axe5 16 0-0 tre8 17 f4 g-f618 gf5
Axe2 19 trfel d3 20 Axf6+ Wxf6
0-l Roods-Gross. Hawaii 1998.
b) 8 gd2 6xd5 9 exd5 9xg5 l0
?t gh4+ 11 93 exd5 12 gxh4
Uxh4* 13 gt2 We7* 14 We2 Ae6
15 aA d4 16 ab5 0-0-01 17 trcl
US wittr compensation in Brinck
Claussen-Pyhala, Espoo 1987.

IJ

,?:'

Ba4+!?

Wxd4. Then 6 ... Ae7 7 e4 2,c6

JL

&

It is probably better to play 6

.4.

n ,,ru-

6xa4 b5-+.

7 ... Q)c6 8 Ba4 6xd5 9 0-0-0


9e7 l0 Af4?!
a) l0 AxeT hxc3! I I bxc3

after l0 ...6cb4

HxeT:+.

t
re
l.
-;

b) l0 gd2 0-0 r I bB a6! 12 e3


Adb4 13 6e4 b5 14 Wa3 Wc7-+
Engqvist-Pedersen, Oslo 1 992.

l,ffiiL

10...6cb4
Exploiting White's lack of development to grab the initiative.
11 BxdT+ Axdl 12 6xd5 exd5

,A
rru.

13 a3 Ec8+ 14 bl Ats+ ts at
0,c2+ 16 a2 0-0 17 e3
South finds a brilliant way to expose White's king.

a
et L,,ffi,.:

after 19 Af4

tr

17 ... 4xa3! 18 bxa3 Ec2+ 19


gb3 af6 20 trxds trb2+ 21 c4
Ec8+ 22 Ec5 b5+ 23 gds trd2+

0-l

%%
E%

,,ru
,,ru,

A
after 17

e3

105

106 Operung ro the Ending

King's Indian: Samisch 6

Kings Indian: Classical 7 dxe5

Korinthos 1998

aa

I d4 af6 2 c4 96 3
9g7 4
?]c3 0-0 5 e4 d6 6 ,e2 e5 7 dxe5
dxe5 8 Wxd8 Exd8
This line is not as innocuous as it
looks although it is often played by
White in the mistaken belief that
Black must reconcile himself to an
instant draw.
9 g"gs

%a
"ffi

ll
'fi
,- %

%
%a%
A,ru, AruL
after

I d4 af6 2 c4 96 3 aid &


e4d65f30-069.e3c57r

tr

.. gxdS

the d-file with the bonus of threatening ll6xe5. Others:

"m
'ffi A%

%a%

sruA

... trfB ll 0-0 c6 12 b4 tre8 13


c5 a5 14 a3 axb4 15 axb4 Ea3
Tiger (yes, that really is his name)
improves the posiitons of his pieces

after 15

l0

White's

solid-l ooking structure.

6a2 trxd3 18
6f8 19 trbl trag zo Axes
If 20 Edl then 20 ... h6 21 9xf6
16 Ed3 trb3 17

20

...

orc6

2l Axf6 Axf6 22

A key move in reviving


line.

ll

13

En3

fu

irc7 I

Axal

14

Ir
r

15 93 (White takes too long

if4 ac
ed2 Ec8 18 am aa4 19
Ac3+ 20 e3 trd8 2l aE{ h
velop) 15 ... 9a6 16

I I

,ru

wrns a plece.

13 ... Ac3+ 14 &f2 ful/J


16 3"g5 6ro lz
Atrs+ tg h4 Sg7 19 ge
If 19 4fl1 then 19 ... Af,-:
6xf4 2l Axf4 f6 22 icl h5
the white king is caught in a m

g: Eet

net.

*il
Ll

19 ... h6 20 9xh6+

Whoopsl
23 ...

6xe7+ 6xe7 12

gbl

tinued 13 Axd8

9.xd3

Axf6 gives Black a pleasant ending


with the benefit of the two bishops.

compmri
e...6c6 r0 ads ad7:

more than sufficient

Laco-Mohr, Portoroz 1996,

Chicago 1992.

and chips away at

de Mallorca 1989.
8 ... trxd8 9 9xc5

It used to be thought rtrar E


must be seriously misguida
allow White to exchange qtE 'rt
wln a pawn. Nowadays, bu
Black's lead in developrnr
effective g7 bishop is cmsrt

Edr
White challenges for control of
10

Ae3 694 14 9xg4 9xg4 15 B


.Q"e6 16 *e2 f5: Gurevich-Sherzer,

9xd8
The alternative 8 Axc5 t
Black compensation in the fqt
active pieces: 8 ... 6c6 9 ic3
l0 Ecl Wa5 ll am EdE l2
6c5 13 9"d2 Axc3 14 bxc3 -tr
Bc2 6e5:+ Dlugy-Gelfand P
dxcS 8

A%

abdT

Zapata, Sao Paulo 1997.


b) l0 ad5 c6 11 hxf6+ 6xf612
daz oz 6xe5 Ee8!=+) 12 ... h6 13

Gausdal 1986

There are a variety of replies but


thrs is one of the best ways to head
for a middlegame battle.

a) l0 0-0-0 Ef8 ll adS ce n


he7+ h8 13 9"e3 EeS 14 Axc8
Eaxc8 l5 6g5 Ee7 Teixeira-

.--

Gil-Howell

Ryba-Hillarp Persson

af4 0-r
after

j 6cl

gxhS f5 22 &g3 fxe/ 23 232',


24 t4Bg8+ 25 695 h4+

Opening to the Ending 107

King's Indian: Samisch 6 ... c5


Gil-Howell
Gausdal 1986

d4

af6 2 c4 96 3 hc3 9g7 4


R 0-0 6 Ae3 c5 7 dxc5

,,ru-

e4 d6 5

dxcS 8 Wxd8

The alternative 8 Axc5 gives


Black compensation in the form of
active pieces: 8 ... 6c6 9 Ae3 hd7

,ru-

l0 trcl wa5 11 ah3 trds 12 af2


6c5 13 Ad2 Axc3 14 bxc3 Ae6 15
Bc2 6e5:+ Dlugy-Gelfand, Palma

:':.r a

&td8

de Mallorca 1989.

after

8... trxd8 9 Axc5


It used to be thought that Black
must be seriously misguided to
allow White to exchange queens and

win a pawn. Nowadays, however,


Black's lead in development and
effective 97 bishop is considered

L"%

%,

line.

f ir'r l \

Aa-1

Laco-Mohr, Portoroz 1996, continued 13 Axd8 9xal 14 9,c7 b6


too long to de6 gAl 2,c5 17

Lru I
ffiL,
%

e...a-)c6 l0 Ads adTl


A key move in reviving the whole
12 AxeT Axb2

. c5

'%r@'

more than sufficient compensation.

l1 6xe7+ dxe7
13 trbl

L%
'%a

,,ru

'g'm
after9..Ac6

0ra4 t9 6f2
gca+ 20 e3 EdS 21 694 h5 22
6tro* gZ n *n Ad2 and Black
wlns

plece.

13 ... Ac3+ 14 *f2 Aol+ ts


g3 tre8 16 g"g5 6to rz 6ns
6ns+ rs *h4 Sg7 19 94
If 19 afi+ then 19 ... af2+ 20 g3
olxf4 2l Axf4 f6 22 fucl h5 and
the white king is caught in a mating
net.

19 ... h6 20 Axh6+ xh6 2l

,tfter 23 4\cl

gxh5 f5 22 *g3 fxe4 23 Ag2 gxh5


24 f4 Eg8+ 25 dgs h4+ 0-l

ctfter

l8 &h4

108 Opening to the Ending

Pirc: 3 R

Philidor: 4 Bxd4
Luther-Maiwald

Reilly-Leskiewicz
Melbourne 1998

Gelsenkirchen 1996

1d4d62e4af63R
Now 3 ... g6 4 c4 transposes to

le4e52afjd63d4erd{r
Wxd4
In place ofthe usual 4 Alxdr.

Samisch King's lndian.


3 ... e5

4 ... a6

Probably best.

al 4 ... 9.d7 and now:

iro " ilil


1l 6xe5 6xe5 12 ite$'
al; 5 Af4 Aro o 6c:

4 dxeS

After 4 d5 Ae7 5 Ae3 0-0 6Wd2


6e8 7 9d3 h6 8 93 Ag5 t h4 Axe3
l0 Wxe3 c6 ll c4 cxd5 12 cxd5

ad7

13

trbl f5

6c3 Ac5 t4

g.c2 WU6

ts

Black had the initiative in

Ae7 8 h3 0-0 9 0-0-0 a6 l0 e5 &d

Johansen-Kagan, Melboume I 99t-

a2) 5 9g5 Wc8 6 Ac3 e.6 '


gd2 h6 8 9e3 Af6 9 Go{ Ae? l(
Ac4 Ae6 I I gb3 9xb3 ll arb3-.
Gurevich-Remlinger, Nes' \'ql

qfter j./3

Shetty-Komliakov. Calcutta I 998.


4 ... dxe5 5 Wxd8+ xd8 6 Ac4

Black has given up the right to


castle but in practice his king is very

1994.

'%r

B makes it
awkward for White to develop
safe and the pawn on

smoothly.

6... Se7

trxd3 Ad7 18 tradl Ehd8


19 93 AeS 20 f4 f6 2l Hld2 Vzr/z

6xd8ll

17

Luther has a definite edge trrenr

to his pressure

ll

after 6 9.c4

oD c7 and

ry

... Ae6 12 9.c4 0-0 13

=.hcl q
It is tempting to go a pas-n

b) 6 ... 9e6 7 Axe6 fxe6 8 ah3


Ad6 9 a,az @el l0 6c4 6c6 ll
gd2 b5 12 o,e3 a6 gave White a
minimal advantage in Bezgodov-

ixc: h
l-l
4\g415 Ag3 9xc3 16 brci i\d=
13 ... b5 14 ads bxc4 15 Q-*
with 13 Axe6 Axe6 14
this advantage disappears after

,ru,,-

S.Kasparov, Minsk 1998. Apparently Black is no relation to Garry!


7 6c3 Ae6 8 6OS+ Axd5 9 exdS

Axf6 16 Axf6 Atz 17 5es Arg

r8 Ad7 trfc8 19 g.c3 h5?


19 ... trdS is the onlv mot'e h
White is still slightly better after l
Af6 Ee8 21 9,e5.

*d6

Tempting White to chase the king


but 9 ... abdT is besr.

20 af6+ *tg zt trxeo:


Luther spots a mate.

l0 b3 6xd5 11 Aa3+ e6 12
Axd5+ *xd5 13 trdl+ *e6 14
14... gb4+ 0-1

gilB

Axe5

advantage.

Aagaard-Shaw, Rotherham 1997.

trd8??
A nightmare

Aft 6co 6 gd2 6ro z rs g

8 0-0-0 9g7 9 e5 dxe5 r0

Dla3

6xd3

St Petersburg 1998.

More usual and fine for Black are:


a) 6 ... e8 7 .Ae3 2,bdl 8 aq a5

c6 lO 2,e2 3"c5 l1 gf2


Axe3+ 12 xe3 hc5 13 b3 e7 14
trhdl ardT 15 6cl ab6 16 ad3

b) 4 ... 6e7 5 3.gs 6bc0 e Ui


(6 wd2!?) 6 ... f6 7 aM oeO
6bd2 6xh4 9 6xh4 9e? 10 (}(H
96 ll f4 AdZ+= Kashtanor'-Irur

tr
after

ll..

Abq+

2l

... fxe6 22trd7 eS


What else? 22 ... Ac6
mate.

23

gd2 r-0

l-r 3.b

Opening to the Ending 109

Philidor:4 Uxd4
Luther-Maiwald

&

Gelsenkirchen 1998

.ru,
.Efl,

le4e52ARd63d4exd44

Bxd4
In place of the usual 4 6xd4.
4 ... a6
a) 4 ... 9.d7 and now:

al)5Ail dte sarclarce tVaz

Ae7 8 h3 0-0 9 0-0-0 a6 l0 e5 dxe5


I

I 6xe5 hxe5 12

Axe5+=

Johansen-Kagan, Melbourne I 998.


a4 5 3.,g5 9c8 6 0,c3 o,c6 7
Waz no 8 Ae3 6f6 9 o-o-o Ae7 lo

b3R

after 4Vxd4

Ac4 Ae6 I I gb3 9xb3 12 axb3+:


Gurevich-Remlinger, New York
1994.

IA

,ffi

b) 4 ... De7 5 Ag5 hbc6 6 Wc3


(6 Wd2!?) 6 ... f6 7 Ah4 696 8
dbd2 6xh4 9 6xh4 We7 l0 0-0-0
96 ll f4 Adl+: Kashtanov-Ivanov,

ll

St Petersburg 1998.
5 .g"f4 6c6 6 gd2

%
A

ajf6 7 6ct 96
8 0-0-0 Ag7 9 e5 dxe5 10 Wxd8+

Axd8ll

Axe5
Luther has a definite edge thanks

to his pressure on c7 and space


advantage.

11

...6e6 12 .c4 0-0

13

Ehel

after I I 9xe5

It is tempting to go a pawn up
with 13 Axe6 Axe6 14

-Q-xc7 but
this advantage disappears after 14 ...
4\g415 Ag3 9xc3 l6 bxc3 Axa2:.
13 ... b5 f4 ad5 bxc4 15 6xf6+
Axf6 16 gxf6 gb7 17 0,e5 9xg2

rs ad7 Efc819 ac3 h5?


19 ... trdS is the only move but
White is still slightly better after 20
gf6 Ee8 21 9e5.
20 af6+ f8 21 trxe6!
Luther spots a mate.
2l ... fxe6 22E:d7 e5
What else? 22 ... 9c6
mate.

23 g"d2 1-0

23

9,b4

tr
after20..h5

l0

Operung to the Ending

Conclusion

The selection

of

games shows

how often the course ofa potentially


long-drawn-out ending is abruptly
changed by the introduction of a
surprising tactic or rapid attack.

Positively-minded protagonists
know that making things diflicult
for your opponent is the first step to
success. In the game, Gil-Howell,
Black relies on rapid piece development to commence a king hunt and
this in turn provokes weaknesses
which are then exploited.

In

the main
to be learned is that one

Reilly-Leskiewicz

lesson

The

Art of Attack

-l Be on the look-out for all sorts


of tactical tricks in the ending-this
is not just a slow strategic phase of

8 Opening

the game.

2Bear in mind that an active king,


as recommended by endgame principles, can also fall foul of a direct
attack.
3 Some simplifoing opening vari-

ations, such as the

Spanish

Exchange, are ideal for creating


tactical situations based on clearlydefined plans already adopted in
master games.

should remain ever vigilant.

The

Art of Defence

Remember that tactics do not

stop just because queens have been


exchanged. Obvious perhaps, but.
judging by the examples. something
which is easily forgotten.

2 Castle early and try to avoid


passive position.
3

If in doubt. counterattack.

man surprised is half

bc+r

The moment you surprise yG


ponent is often the moment yrn
begin to dictate the course d

ofi'

cr
fu

game.

Many players concenrate

mF

getting their pieces out vifr fl.


routine play. One can qrydb
with them because few people br

q
q
pecially when more often fra t
the game will have deviarcd rrl
the time to study the latest twie
say, move 19 of a certain lir"

before then. However, the extrerdy


early opening surprises prcsemd L

this chapter have a much


chance of appearing on ytxrr

Here your preparation

brr

bod-

will aor b

wasted, and your opponents, hrvto rely on their own resources, rl

have a hard time knowing sH


do next. Most popular opniqgr

5
represented here-with rnteresfi
possibilities for both WhiE d
Black.

In the game. Korchnoi$rmrtlr,


White amazes as early as movc firrc.

Looking just like a typical bi


ner's mistake, this crazy hiCE
move this should mislead 1c

fh .{rt of Attack
r

tbe look-out for all sorts

El Ekks in the ending-this


rl a slou strategic phase of

B
rh mind that an active king,
Edd b-v- endgame Printr elso fall foul of a direct
sirrpliS ing opening vari- sh
as the Spanish

Gc. arE ideal for

creating

rfuedons based on clearly-

I lms already adopted in


tEs
fh -{rt of Defence
that tactics do not

I-ber
Dccause queens have been
td Obr-ious perhaps, bul
I ts' de examples. something

bcesfi

forgotten.

carlr and try to avoid

llEIrOon.

i&ubt

counter-attack.

8 Opening
A man surprised is half beaten.
The moment you surprise your opponent is often the moment you can
begin to dictate the course of the

Surprises
opponent into thinking that your
opening repertoire is suspect. How-

ever, the analysis supporting the

game.

idea is sound and will prove to be


big asset to you.

Many players concentrate on just


getting their pieces out with dull,

The idea of moving your knight to


the edge ofthe board to provoke the

routine play. One can sympathise


with them because few people have

opponent is also explored in


Cladouras-Stein and Froehlich-

the time to study the latest twist on,


say, move 19 of a certain line. especially when more often than not

Miles, where each time the innova-

the game will have deviated well


before then. However, the extremely
early opening surprises presented in

this chapter have a much

better

of appearing on your board.


Here your preparation will not be
chance

wasted. and your opponents, having


to rely on their own resources, will

have a hard time knowing what to


do next. Most popular openings are
represented here-with interesting

tor triumphs.

It is always satisfying to revive


successfully old lines which have
been unfairly dismissed. LoginovSakaev shows Black cultivating an
old idea of Spassky's and creating a
strong attack.
The Budapest Gambit has the advantage of being played as early as
the second move so Demirel-Kogan
and Abatino-Chatalbashev should

Black.

provide you with enough live ammunition to come out with all guns
blazing.
And if you want something com-

In the game. Korchnoi-Sutovsky.


White amazes as early as move five.
Looking just like a typical begin-

pletely different why not try the


Elephant Gambit? The fine game,
Dodson-Rogers, shows

ner's mistake, this crazy knight


move this should mislead your

Black is capable of.

possibilities

for both White

and

just

what

Remember-who dares, wins !

l2

Opening Surprises

trd7 16 Ae7+ ExeT 17


=d8l8 Exc8 +.

Grunfeld 5 6a4

Korchnoi-Sutovsky
Dresden Zonal I 998

7 Ae3 0-0

@"ru

a't'/ ... e5 8 d5 0-0 9 aB d


6xb6 axb6 I I Ac4 b5 1l ib3
13 0-0 6c7 14 dxc6 Erdl
trfxdl bxc6 16 Eacl ge6 l7 !
Rowson-Knott, British \fi

d4 af6 2 c4 96 3 6c3 d5 4
cxdS 6xd5 5 0)a4

An absolutely sensational move!


The fact it has been endorsed at the
highest level by a player of Korch-

League (4NCL) 1998.

noi's stature means that it has to be


taken seriously. The reason for all
the fuss is because this move of the
knight to the edge of the board is
not considered worthy of mention
by any of the opening books. It was

b)7.6c683.b5.t.d,9{
trcl ab8 I I Ael 0{ l.
I -0 Paramos-Herrero. \{d

WcS l0

A
,ffi,9

t997.

8aR

after 5 o,a4

White is developing normallr

there are still obstacles for Blec

the Armenian player Nadanian who


tested and developed the ideas behind the system. The basic reason-

ing is that in the main line 5 e4


6xc3 6 bxc3 Black will continue
with ... Ag7 and ... c5, undermin-

overcome.

8... Axa4
The game Yegiazanan-)ier.c
Minsk 1998, continued 8 . &

lll

Dc6l0 d5! AxR I I ex-8'l


13 6c: cd t+ t
bxc6 and now instead of 15 fl1
played which can be uell nra trr
... e5 White should try 15 hf! C
ha4 trc8 17 hc5 Uel 18 a
according to Nadanian
Ae2

t2 Bcl 6ed7

ing the centre pawns, whereas after

the text White no longer has

to

worry about this potential weakless


on c3 and it is more difficult to play
.. c5. If Black now makes a rouline
response. White can continue with
e4 and simply develop his preces.

5... Ag7
If 5 ... e5 then 6 dxe5 9.b4+ 7
9.d2 2,e3 8 fxe3 Axd2+ 9 Wxd2
Wtr++ tO 93 Wxa4 ll gd4 is in
White's favour because the tripled

Yegiazarian.

9 Uxa4 c5 10 Edl gb6 lr


cxd4 13 -rdl

Aal n 9a3

after 8 4\J3

14 Ae2 e5 15 Ec2
Korchnoi later suggested t5

Ac4.

squares.

ls

ab6

ln the game, Toulzac-Varlet,

Montpellier 1998, Black tried 6 ...


AU+ tne game continued: 7 a3 (1
6f:Z Axa+l 8 hxd4 Wxd4 9 Wxd4
Ac2t wins) 7 ... a4a6?l (7 ... 2,c6
8 d5 looks a better bet for Black) 8
Ae3 0-0 9 9.e2 e5 l0 AR exd4 l1
Axd4 Axd4 12 Bxd4 Wxd4 13
6xd4 trdS 14 0-0-0 c6 15 af5!

when White is better afttr I i


Axb5 16 Axb5 a6 17 GO r{

pawns control several important


6 e4

Wug

% "ffi\%
're2
W
AA :H. ,B: L
after 13

.. Nd4

...

gd8

16

abs

ts Ac+ 6a+

Q.c-o

19

rz {

ixdf

c
20 0-0 Ae6?
Ihe last chance for Sutorskr r
... Ae5 but Korchnoi is stitrl fuc

vourite after

tr

2l

Axf,7

axf ''

23W3.
2l Axe6 fxe6 22 Efcl Ar5
trc7 9xd6 24 Bxd6 Ef7 L{ fl
A-g7

l-0

Opening Surprises I

trd7 16 de7+ HxeT 17 trdS+ g7


l8 Exc8 +.
7 Ae3 0-0

a) 7 ...e5 8 d5 0-0 9 aR c6 10
Axb6 axb6 I I Ac4 b5 12 gb3 aa6

13 0-0 6c7 14 dxc6 E{xdl 15


Efxdl bxc6 16 Eacl 9"e6 17 Exc6
Rowson-Knott, British National
League (4NCL) 1998.

b) 7 ... 6c6 8 gb5 gd7 9 6c5!


BcS l0 trcl 6b8 I I Ae2 0-0 12 h4
I

-0

I I
I
A

w
.H
A
U

AA

Paramos-Herrero. Mondariz

t99i

*er

8aR

Aa4

after

overcome.
8 ...6xa4

The game Yegiazarian-Neverov,


Minsk 1998, continued 8 ... Ag4 9
9.e2 Dc6l0 d5! AxB I I gxf3 6e5
12 trcl 6ed7 13 2c3 c6 14 dxc6
bxc6 and now instead of 15 f4?! as
played which can be well met by 15
... e5 White should try 15 h4! e5 16
ha4 EcS 17 {]c5 We7 l8 a4+:

according to

Yegiazarian.
9 E9xa4 c5 10

tner

l5 Ec2

White is developing normally but


there are still obstacles for Black to

af3

Nadanian

hxd4

I I
I

*o
A

and

trdl gb6 1r trd2

9"d7 12 Efa3 cxd4 13

&

after 20 0-0

Wc7

14 A.e2 e5 15 Ec2
Korchnoi later suggested 15 ab5!

when White is better after 15 ...


Axb5 16 Axb5 a6 17 0-0 Ac6 18
9c4.
15 ...

gd8

16

iT,

abs ac6 t7 ad6

6al

ts g.c+
19 Axd4 exd4
20 0-0 3"e6?
The last chance for Sutovsky is 20

Wug

... Ae5 but Korchnoi is still the favourite after 21 4\xf7 HxfT 22 f4
Ag7 23 Wb3.
2l Axe6 fxe6 22 trfcl 9"e5 23
Ec7 Axd6 24 Wxd6 trf7 25 Bxe6

.tiler

13 Nd4

l-0

,,ru-

A
after 25 Vxe6

l3

l4

Opening Surprises

Spanrsh: 5

...6a5

Sicilian: 3 ... aa5

Cladouras-Stein

Froehlich-Miles

Bundesligu 1990

Bad Wcirishofen 1997

e4 e5 z 6R 6c6 3 Abs a6 4
Aa4 b5 5 Ab3 Aa5
This looks like an obvious opening mistake but it has been played
by Fischer and Taimanov. The truth
is that attempts by White at outright
refutation are fiuitless and a longterm positional strategy is needed.

ll

1e4c526RAc63gbsar

,,x

A
A

a) 6 Axe5 dxb3'7 axb3 Wg5 (7


... Be7!?) 8 d4 Wxg2 9 UA 9xf3

a
A

af6

,ffi,

Be2 Q)xe1 12 dxe5 Axe4


14 0-0 (14 fte4 Eh4+
wins) 14 ..695 15 f4 De4 and the

,ffi

ll

R SeS

Chernyshov, Pardubice 1997c\ 4 c3 a6 5 9;a4 b5 6 -l-cl d


... d6!?) 7 0-0 gb7 8 exdi -3.rr

d4 ab7 l0 9'e3 e6 I I 0b@ I


12 o,e5 9e7: Kierzek-SimL I
1996

d
White wants to develop g

White attack has fizzled

Black achieves a straightforward


of the bishop which is so

often White's trump card in the


Spanish. The price is a lack of development but this is, however,
difficult to exploit.
8 axb3 exd4 9 Axd4 gb7 10 trel
96 116c3 997 t2 9,f4
Another idea is l1 gd3 followed
by 9g5.
t2 ... af6 13 Wd2 o-0 14 g.g5
Waz ts 9xf6 Axf6 16 ads gg7
17 c4 EadS l8 cxb5 axb5 19 Ea7
c5 20 afs?
An error but 20

aR

4 ... a6 5 Ae2 e6 6 d4
c3?!

20 ... gxfS

E@
9"ru,

'T

ra

l0 trcl trc8

11

gd2 a7

14 ... h5 15 Ae5

6xe5 16 A

0-0 17 Axh5 Axh4

.M,

lt !

Axf2+!

Miles wrecks tg/hi1s'5

and picks up a pawn in drc


a,fter 23

12

dg613 9g3 Ae7 14 h4?!


Froehlich is trying to pro\t r
compensation for the pau h
just weakens his own setqAdO is an option but Miles b
the favourite to win.

b4 is slightly

2l exf5 trfe8 22 f6
9xd5! 0-l

but it is not worth a par*n. ? O


is better 7 ... Vc7 8 b3 atr 9 .
d6 l0 c4+:,
7 ... dxc3 8 6xc3 b5 9 i.fl.l

afterll...9s7

better for Black.


Wc6 23 ExbT

1l Axe{ -8.x

fud

b) 6 9xf7+?! xf7 7 6xe5+


e7! 8 d4 at6 9 gR ab7 l0 b4

exchange

10 e5 Oe4

ib7 6
ig" 9

7 0-0 gb7 8 gd3+: Prokqd

Neumann-Stein, Bundeslig a 1984.

out,
Rabar-Taimanov, Belgrade I 956.
6... d6 7 d4 0xb3

3s2 b6 5 ac3

Jakupovic-Kozul, Sarajer-o I 99t


b) 4 d4 a6 5 9e2 cxd4 6

l0 axR gb7 ll 0-0 f5 12 Eel


t4 gf4 9d0:+

13

cxd4 7 dxd4 96 8 Ae3

after 5 ... Da5

fxe4 13 695 d5

2,c4

for \f,tir

a)

6 0-0
The other moves:

startling move

cope with when his main pla i


exchange on c6! It has bem
for some time but Miles ha< 6
pulted it into the limelight4 0-0
Also possible:

ZrbT

19

Sxf,l Wta+ zo egl

Ac7 0-l

kiit

proct

Ufl

Opening Surprises I

Sicilian: 3 ...6a5

Froehlich-Miles
Bad Wdrishofen 1997

6R 6c6: Ans 6aS


A startling move for White
I

I I I

e4 c5 z

to

cope with when his main plan is to


exchange on c6! It has been known
for some time but Miles has catapulted it into the limelight.
4 0-0
Also possible:
a) 4 3r,2 b6 5 6c3 9.Al e aq

cxd4 7 6xd4 96 8

.f:i'-'- . . da:

af6

10 e5 0,e4

9e3 Ag7 9 0-0

after

ll 6xe4 Axe4:

Jakupovic-Kozul, Sarajevo I 998.


b) 4 d4 a6 5 9.e2 cxd4 6 6xd4 b5
7 0-0 gb7 g Wd:+: ProkopchukChernyshov, Pardubice 1997.
c'S 4 c3 a6 5 ;a4 b5 6 9c2 d5 (6
... d6!?) 7 0-0 gb7 8 exd5 Axd5 9

Ae7: Kierzek-Simic,

White wants to develop quickly


but it is not worth a pawn. 7 dxd4
is better 7 ... Vc7 8 b3 af6 9 gA

957

j .. 0,a5

c3?!

$ze.r !

tr

''ffi-t

Bled

t996

4 ... a6 5 Ae2 e6 6 d4 cxd4

gN@,,ru4

d4 ab7 l0 ae3 e6 1l abd2 af6


12 Dle5

,,ru,

after

d6 l0 c4+=.
7 ... dxc3 8

6xc3 b5 9 9.f4 gb7


12 Efdl
696 13 9"g3 Ae7 t4h4?l

cj

l0 trcl Ec8 ll VAZ 2,el

--

Froehlich is trying to prove some


compensation for the pawn but this
just weakens his own set-up. 14
Ad6 is an option but Miles is still
the favourite to win.

14 ... h5 15

he5 6xe5 16 9xe5

0-0 17 Axh5 Axh4 18

ffi I

l&xd7

Axf2+!

Miles wrecks White's kingside

and picks up a pawn in the process.

oner 23 ExbT

19

Ac7

xf,t gtrl+ zo gl 9xh5 2l

0-1

after

l8Vxd7

l5

l6

Opening Surprises

French: 2

Reti: 2 ... b5

Loginov-Sakaev
St. Petersburg

Championship I 99 6

"ffi-t"ffit''ffi.t

r 6n 0ro 2 93bS
This variation is named after
Boris Spassky who employed it

% %'ffi, %

T%
A%

%% affi_

against Petrosian in the 1966 World


Championship match. In queenside

openings White usually includes a


pawn advance to c4 in his plans. But
now this pawn can simply be taken.

AAA

Moreover, the power of White's


bishop on 92 is ready to be challenged

after 2

by a counter-fianchetto on

b5

d3 d5 7 abd2 abdT 8 e4 dxe4

2 ... e5

Black attempts to show


is awkwardly placed. Or:

tb

qt

a) 2 ...4e7 3 93 d5 4 d3 dr
dxe4 b6 6 AR 9a6 7 c,t &
hc: .qb4 9 g'd2 e5 lo o-Go i

6xd4 exd4 l2

Ad

d4Q\e1 6h4b6 7ac3d5tl


Aa6 9 Axa6 hxa6 l0 Ae2 3

ql+: Ehlvest-VaganianI

after4..e5

gb3

ad4 3.c5 7 2,ac2


... gb7!?) 8 h3 0xf2 9
xf2 }9f6t l0 e3 Wg5+ I I *D:
b) 5 hxe5 gb7 6 aR gxa3 7
bxa3 Axfl 8 exB 0-0 gives Black
enough compensation for the
a) 5 cxb5 e4 6

5 ... e4 6 ah4 Ac5 7 Ac2 d5 8


d4? exd3 9 Wxd3 6c6 l0 cxd5
l0 cxb5 is well met by l0 ... 6e5
I I gdl 2,eg4 12 e3 0e4-+.

ll 9c3 Axf2+!

Wxd5+ 13 gd2 6e4 0-1

12

995.
3 6a

I
A

Incredibly, the Australian i


tional has decided to play e frr
with his queen fulfilling th rd

Rodrigueahu

Clarin 1997, White sensiHy 6


93 to develop the bislrq rl

Tb
6cl,
&e
ll
tLll
0-0 6a5 8 Bc3 Axc4 9 troll
having to move the queenlowed 4 93 96 5 gg2 9-gI
7 d4 d6 8 0-0 0-0 9 dxe5
6xe5 dxe5
ad2:.
4 ... d6 5 g"c4 Ad7 6

Nor6l

hc6 4 gbs

the bishop. In

material.

dl

on b3 became a liability in S-l


Goldgewicht, Montpellier l9lfc) 2 ... dte 3 e5 6d5 4 ffir

Summerscale-Arkell, I 994.
c) 3 9g2 gat + o-o e6 5 d3 d5 6
o,adz cs 7 e4 Aei 8 trel 6c6 9 c3
0-0 l0 e5 AeS I I d4 b4: PetrovicTimoshenko, Nova Gorica 1997.
3 ... a6 4 c4 e5!?
A surprise because only 4 ... b4 or
4 ... e6 are normally considered.

... 0e5

inal intention was to mect !


with 3 exd5 Bxd5 4 6ca+:-

ing Black equal chances) 6 .


a],f6 7 abd2 Wa5 8 c3 b5 9 I
l0 c4 b3 ll a3 and the we*trt

hg5 Ae7 10 6gxe4 gd5:

l0

ld

unusual positions. Chigorin's

l9l
b)2... c5 3 f4 olc64mi
d3 d6 (5 ... d5 is the best mr

6a3

dga

e4 e62Ve2

Vasiukov-Volkov, Moscos

a) 3 c3 c5 4 9,g2 gb7 5 0-0 e6 6


d3 Ae7 7 a4 b4 8 abd2 a5 9 e4 d5-Walker-Knox, British Champ. 1994.
b) 3 a4 b4 4 992 gb7 5 0-0 e6 6

The early queen move

bt.
3

'Pe2

Wohl-Garcia SrrE
Malaga 1998

after I I Vc3

10

6c3 We6 11 ads

13 gb3 f5??
13 ... af6 is better.
14 ab6+ l-0

Ad r2a

Opening Surprises I

French: 2We2

Wohl-Garcia Santos

,rua

Malaga 1998

e4 e6

I I

2Ve2

The early queen move leads to


unusual positions. Chigorin's original intention was to meet 2 ... d5
with 3 exd5 Wxd5 4

6c3+:.

I ... e5
Black attempts to show the queen
is awkwardly placed. Or:

...4e7 3 93 d5 4 d3 dxe4 5
6 Afl g'a6 7 c4 6c6 8
6c: Au+ 9 9.d2 es lo o-o-o ad4
l1 6xd4 exd4 12 6dS+:
a) 2

dxe4 b6

*r:

bs

after 2 Ve2

Vasiukov-Volkov, Moscow 1995.


b) 2 ...c5 3 f:t 0.c6 4 hB Ae7 5
d3 d6 (5 ... d5 is the best move giving Black equal chances) 6 "Ae3
af6 7 abd2 Wa5 8 c3 b5 t h3 b4

j\

l0 c4 b3 ll a3 and the weak pawn


on b3 became a liability in SarthouGoldgewicht, Montpellier 1998.
d6
c)2...dte 3 e5 ad5 4

aa

*z -t

.,,%

e5

AI

A
-H-

995"

aR ac6 4 gbs

ctfter

4Vb5

Incredibly, the Australian international has decided to play a Spanish


with his queen fulfilling the role of
the bishop. In Rodriguez-Bronstein,
Clarin 1997, White sensibly tried 4

93 to develop the bishop without

13 ... af6 is better.


14 ab6+ l-0

tr

,A

Ehlvest-Vaganian, Novgorod

having to move the queen. Then followed 4 93 96 5 9,g2 Ag7 6 c3 Af6


7 d4 d6 8 0-0 0-0 9 dxe5 6xe5 l0
6xe5 dxe5 ll ad2:.
4 ... d6 5 ac4 gd7 6 Eb3 Ef6 7
0-0 ha5 8 Wc3 6xc4 9 Wxc4 0-0-0
l0 6c3 We6 r1 AaS Ac0 12 d3 h6
13 gb3 fs??

{ter I lVc3

d4 4\e7 6 h4 b6 7 Ac3 d5 8 gdl


Aa6 9 Axa6 Axa6 lo hez Uaz t t

c3+:

ll

3.

Ut/

A
A

A
A

A
after

'ffi.
l3

...

f5

l7

l8

Operung Surprises

ad2

Demirel-Kogan

Budapest: 4 3.f4
Abatino-Chatelbafu

Vlissingen 1996

Cutro 1996

Budapest: Fajarowicz 4

Af6 2 c4 e5 3 dxes Ae4


This variation has been popular
ever since Fajarowicz played it
against Steiner at Wiesbaden in
d4

llll

1928

ad2

adz (5 gd5 6c5! 6


9xa8 .Ab7 7 VxaT 6c6 when the
queens leaves the board) 5 ... gb7 6
6xe4 Axe4 7 9f4We7 8 e3 Ab7 9
Bc2 96 l0 AR 9.g7 I I 9e2 a,c6
12 Ag5 Be6 13 0-0-0 0-0 and
Black will restore material equality,
a) 4 a3 b6 5

Miralles-Toulzac, Mulhouse 1998.


b) a Wc2 ds s aR (5 exd6l?
should be considered) 5 ... Af5 6
9b3 hcS 7 gdl 6c6 8 a3 dxc4 9
Uxd8+ trxd8 l0 3.g5 9.e7 I I AxeT

*xe7 t2 abd2 b5 13 ah4 g'e6 t4


93 trxd2 0-l Linn-Braemigk, Trier
1992.

4...6c5 5 6gR 6c6 6 b3 g5


A stunning way to create doubleedged play. A bishop on 97 and the
menace of g5-g4 combine to thwart

White's efforts to hold on to the

e5

after

j . .6e4

Andrade, Brasilia 199E.


a2) 5 ... s6 6 af4 9-s7 7
8 Ae2 d6 9 0-0 a5 l0 fc2

tut
ft
trdl 6c5 12 R b613 Q.n td
9el Ec8 15 gf2 fs 16 Adt 0

'ffi'T

%a%
s'% %a
aJier 6 ... 95

9g7 8 e3 d6 9 3.e2 dxe5


Kogan has a comfortable position
and White is unable to open up the
position in an effort to exploit the

The pin on the d-frle is ominous


for White and he also has to cope
with ... 6bd3 when Black domi-

nates the game.

gA Wd

17 Ae4 6xe4 18
9xa7 6xB+ 20 gxf3
2,c621trab10-l
16

Val AtZ

19

c)46RAc55e36c66t

0-0 7 3.e2 EeS 8 0{ O.r


6xe5 6xe5 l0 b3 a5 I I -t.hl
t2 da4 gf8 13 f4 M tl6
15 trfi d6 16 cxd6 Uxd6 l7l
Axd6 l8 Eg3 Af8 19 Ac3

l9{lld) 4 Wd4 d6 5 exd6 .tJ


ue4+?! (6 afl!?) 6 ... 9-6'r,
0-0 8 aa waz s a\d4 .tD{
6fs geo ll 6xd6 cxd6 t2 g
13 Ef4 d4 t4 ale4 Ad5 15 B I
9lc5 We7 t7 ad3 6o0 ls m E
19 6xe5 6xe5 20 *D. B 2l .
dxe2 22 .xe2 9xR 23 3'fll
24 Ehel 9xe2 25 te3 F
Shaked- Lalic. London

pawn on 95.

exf5 0-0-0

'/l/z Mah-P ert, Witley 1996b) 4 e4 6xe5 5 f4 AEf (


6ec6 is also good) 6 9.e3 .t.}
6d2We7 8 gd3 gd6 9 tc24
l0 Wg4 696 I I tHH) {H
69f3 We7 with an extra p.r
Black. Lorscheid-Dunningf,
tend 1992.

pawn.
7 ,b2

l0 0-0 gfs 1l b4 hxb4 t2 Axes


9xe5 13 hxeS Wd6 14 e4 Wxe5 15

r d4 af6 2 c4 e5 3 dr6 Ogl


The Budapest Gambit rrdh
rapid piece development r r
pensation for the pawn defici4 9f4
a) 4 e3 6xe5 5 htrl anA c
al) 5 ... 3"U++ 0 g&. .5 7
oa6 8 9.e2 Ac5 9 0{ Ea6 tO
Axc3 1l 6xc3 gh6 12 g 6l
s5 14 ah5 uaz rs f4 9fi116
a,c6 17 b4 6e6 ls ad5t L-r

after

l5 ...0-0-0

Beliavsky-Epishin. Reggio
1991.

Opening Surprises I

Budapest:4

A?l

Abatino-Chatalbashev
Cutro I998

tl

d4

af6

2 c4 e5 3 dxe5

L"1&L

694

The Budapest Gambit relies on


rapid piece development as compensation for the pawn deficit.
4 9"f4
a) 4 e3 6xe5 5 6h3 and now:

:ner 3 ..

Q)e4

al) 5 ... gb4+ 6 fudz as 7 af4


6a6 8 Ae2 6c5 9 0-0 tra6 l0 9c3
9xc3 I I 6xc3 trh6 12 93 d6 13 a3
gaz ts f4 gxf416 exPl
95 14 ah5
2,c6 1'7 b4 Ae618 ad5t Lima-De

g
after 3

.. 6Sa

Andrade, Brasilia 1998.


a2) 5 ... g6 6 at4 9,g7 7

r.
ffi

8 9e2 d6 9 0-0 a5

hc3 0-0
l0 Wc2 6a6 1l

trdl Ac5 12 R b613 gd2 g.d7 t4


Ael trc8 15 Af2 f5 16 ad3 6cxd3

/z-/z Mah-P ert, Witley I 998.

'

tr

b) 4 e4 Axe5 5 fa 696 (5 ...


6ec6 is also good) 6 Ae3 9,b4+ 7
8)d2We7 8 gd3 Wao s 9c2 6xf4
10 Wga dg6 11 0-0-0 dc6 12
hgB We7 with an extra pawn for
Black. Lorscheid-Dunnington, Ostend 1992.

4tter 6 ... 95

t&

c) 4 afl Ac5 5 e3 6c6 6 hc3


0-0 7 9,e2 tre8 8 0-0 6cxe5 9
6xe5 6xe5 l0 b3 a5 ll 9.b2 tra6
t2 2,a4 gf8 13 f4 orc6 14 c5 Ea8
15 gR d6 16 cxd6 Wxd6 17 Uxd6
Axd6 18 Eg3 Af8 79 2,c3 t/rt/z
Shaked- Lalic. London 1997.

d) 4 Wd4 d6 5 exd6 9xd6

after 5 ... d6

la

He4+?l (6 AR!?) 6 ... 9e6 7 alc3

after

l5

... 0-0-0

0-0 8 aR Baz s ad4 gxc4 l0


6tS Ae0 I I 6xd6 cxd6 12 93 d5
13 gf4 d4 14 De4 g"d5 ls R f5 16
6c5 Be7 t7 ad3 6c6 l8 h3 6ge5
19 bxe5 6xe5 2o *r2 $ 2r gd2
dxe2 22 9xe2 Axf3 23 9"b+ We6
24 Ehel 9xe2 25 Be3 fil 0-l
Beliavsky-Epishin. Reggio Emilia,
1991.

ru,

'"ffi- %A

ctfter 8

..

o,c6

l9

120 Opening Surprises

4... gb4+ 5 ad2 d6


A relatively new idea to maintain
the initiative. 5 afl 6c6 is more

Caro-Kann:3

Bri tish Championship I

common.

a) 6 AgR dxe5 7 6xe5 9xd2+

9xd2 Uxd2+ 9 xd2 6xf2 l0 trgl


aia6 ll ad3 ae4+ t2 *e3 6fO t:
h3 .e"d7 14 Ae5 0-0-0,/z:Vz Gomez
Esteban-Mohr, Maribor 1995.

b) 6 exd6 gf6 7 6h3 Axf2

xf2 9xh3 9 93 Axfl 10 trxfl


gb3

g
nfter l2 Vc2

&g2 9xd6 12
ad7
(12 ... 0-0!?) 13 Ae3 Be5 14 c5+
Summerscale-Szabolcsi, French
t1

Shovunov, Maikop 1998-

c) 3 ... dfa + es afd7 5 ild


a0 7 dg5 Ue7 8 -g.d3 d

{)tr:

opening minus a pawn and desper-

catch

up in

development.

12 ... h6 13 9;g2 0-0 14 0-0 Ee8


15 e3

gf6

16

trc:6as

T-

trfI 6c5 0-l


White can do little against

2rc2 cxd4l0 9g3 f6 ll m


12 Axe5 fxe5 13 gxhT Ac6

fal

Ad6

*d7

'ffi

15 .e"go 9ro 16 f4 or
18 Atrl Ae5 19 ft6+

20 9tZt+

tract 9f5

Black has a clear advantage.


17 gb3 trab8 18 9a3 a5 19 Wc5
trbd8 20 trfer b6 2r gbs ab4 22

attack) 5 e5 dxc3 6 exft qG


9xd2 exf6 8 0-0-0 9;e7 9 ll {=
b) 3 ... dxe4 4 axe4 Afl 5
adf6 6 c3 6xe4 ? tlxe.l fi
Bcz Wds e aa 9.fs

ll axb3 a6 12 h4: Td

6 ... dxeS 7 rxb4 exf4 8 6gR


6c6 9 93 fxg3 l0 hxg3 6xb4 11
Ba4+ 6c6 12 Wc2
White has emerged from the

to

lines while at the sanre '


!F
Black a few early problerrs.
3 ... e6
The solid reply. Other nxluGar
a) 3 ... d4 4 9.c4t aft (4 5 UxfT+ d7 6 dxc3 gives e *

lofue!

Team Championship I 996.

ately needing

9*

le4c626c3d53Uf3
good wal to avoid ttc r

6a3
Alternatively:

Hd+*

UB

Kennaugh-Eoute

after

16

ft

l?

Galego-Izere- St*i

t992.

Af5

4 d4 af6 5 g.g5 dre4


Arapovic-Campora,

Mdi

1988. continued instead 5 - - -iG:

23

6tdZ 7 9xe7 YxeT t USIC{


fll c5 l0 hB cxd4 I I 6trd4 M
0-0-0 f6 13 Axd5! 9f7 tl3
-a
14 Af5 Wn ts Ah6+wins) t4C
eS

the

threat of 24 ... $.;d'7 which traps the


queen. For instance: 24 ad4 9.d7
25 3"c6 Axc626 Axc6 Exd2-+.

with

big advantage-

t oaa t I
The position has similaib t
French Defence but wirh thc F
on c6 Black's pieces are tm ld
9 ... 6xe4 l0 ArcT IUI
Wxea 6f6 12 Eh4 bs 13 -tid
A blunder, but 13 .-. h6 l{ D
6 6xe4 6aal

Ac4 0-0 9 6e2

tr
after

2j . Q)c5

is still slightly better for


14 AxhT+ l-0

Whit

Opening Surprises

Caro-Kann: 3

L,rry_
t'1v'

A
6Kt

b t:$cz

Et;i

zati

&:'t;

I
,N

*vt' 3.

&

.rry,

a m-

+i1

tr

r23

1e4c626c3d53UR
good way to avoid the main

lines while at the same time giving


Black a few early problems.
3 ... e6
The solid reply. Other moves are:
a) 3 ... d4 4 9c4l hrc g... dxc3
5 EfxfT+ d7 6 dxc3 gives a strong

c) 3 ... 6rc + eshraz s d4 e6 6


4ltr: ao 7 695 We7 8 9d: cs s
2,e2 cxd410 Bg3 f6 1l 6R Axe5
l2 6xe5 fxe5 13 AxhT hc6 14 0-0
gd7 15 -Q"g0 Wr0 ft f4 e4 17 f5
gd6 l8 gfil Ae5 1Q ftss+ Wxe6

20 gf7!+
1992.
4 d4

Galego-Izeta, Seville

5 g"g5 dxe4

I
ry.

with

The position has similarities to a


French Defence but with the pawn
on c6 Black's pieces are too passive.

E,

Wxe4 Af6 12 Eh4 b5 13 gd3 c5??


A blunder. but 13 ... h6 14 Ehel
is still slightly better for White.

hc-5

2l
after

j Vf3

Totsky-

at6
Arapovic-Campora, Mendrisio
1988. continued instead 5 ... 9.e7 6
e5 afdT 7 9xe7 WxeT 8 Wg3 0-0 9
?1 c5 l0 6f3 cxd4 I I hxd4 4\c612
o-o-0 f6 13 6xd5l Wrz it: ... exd5
14 af5 Wfz ts 6h6+ wins) 14 a,c7

Artt

illr
,\

attack) 5 e5 dxc3 6 exf6 cxd2+ 7


9xd2 exf6 8 0-0-0 Ae7 9 Wg3+:.
b) 3 ... dxe4 4 dxeq 2,dl s dq
haro o c3 8\xe4 7 Wxe4 Are s
Wcz Wds 9 aR gf5 1o Hb3 9xb3

ll axb3 a6 12 b4:

Shovunov, Maikop 1998.

w,

it6

9R

Kennaugh-Houska
British Championship I 998

ll

L,%L,ffi

%L%

% "ru-L%
%,ffi %w%
LruL% '&s
after 5 9g5

big advantage.

a,xe4 zlh,al
9c4 0-0 t he2

o-o-o Ae7

9 ... Axe4 l0 9xe7 9xe7 1l

l4 AxhT+ l-0

A
after

l3

... c5

l2l

122 Opening Surprises

Sicilian: Kan 6 O@
Carlsson-Mortcr$r

f'rompowsky:2 ... orc4


Bellon Lopez-Del Campo
Cuba j,998

I d4 af6 2 9g5 Ael s gtrl


Though 3 9fit is now established
as the main move. the text also has a
lot of merit.
3 ... c5 4 A 95 5 fxe4 gxh4 6 e3
White has a wretched pawn structure but the open lines provide
plenty of attacking opportunities.
6... gb6
The critical move has to be 6

Copenhagen 1998

"/ffi.

le4c52af3e63daoa

dxd4 a6 5 gal

A
,,ru

Ah6 when White has tried the


amazing 7 *D. and lived to tell the
tale. A challenging idea is 7 9.c4 to
exert pressure on f7. Zlochevsky-

after 6

Horvath. Bozen 1998, continued 7


... Wuo (7 ... Axe3 8 gR) 8 6c3

il

ej

t hge2 Axe3 l0 ad5 Ea5+


b4 dxb4 12 dxe3 cxd4 13 0-0
dxe3 14 AxfT+ SdS 15 gd4 trf8
l6 Wg7+-.
7 0c3! Ag7
The tempting 7 ... Wxb2 leaves
Black's king stranded after 8 ad5
as s Ebl Wa3 lo Eh5 Wxa2 ll
trdl 6c6 L2 aR 9a5+ 13 f2
cxd4 14 exd4 e6 15 9g5+ orc7 16
6e5 exd5 17 dxfT+ e8 18 6xh8
Wuo ts Ae2 dxe4 20 gh5+ gd8 2l
Ehel l-0 Gorelov-Kuzmin, Mosll

The highly-rated Dani$

|
cE
the centre, but this adrflawed. In the gamc ffi
Hernandez, Chicago 1993. E
kept an eye on the e4-e5 a&r6 ... 89c7. The game cmb
He2 d6 8 0-0 9e7 9 Ehl fr5
c4 0-0 I I fil b6 12 a4b3 -tD1
0R es 14 f5 hc5 15 &.Es d

after

l0

16 trgl trad8
9rs te g++:"

o,J3

overwhelming position directly


from the opening.

10... e6 ll Wxh4 dc612 eS WUg


af6 d6 14 gbs dxe5 15 Axc6
bxc6 16 6xe5 9b4+ 17 c3 9xb2
13

18 0-0

White's assault nears a crescendo.


18 ... Wxc3 19 ads Af6 20 gxf6

l-0

17 3.c2

trfeS

lt-l

7 e5 AfdT
7 ... Eb6 is necessary.

8 Axe6!

i
8 ... fxe6 9 ghs+ g6 la ftf
hxg6 11 Uxg6+ 9e7 r2 Oc$
This brilliant idea. erpkii
vulnerability of Black's ki"e h
be seen in advance.
12 ... gh6 13 ag5+ oft
A grim retreat but 6e elEl
is 13 ... Axg5 14 9g7-+ t:l
A

Ads Bao s Uga Sf8 ro aR

White is up against strong opposition but he has managed to create an

Tb r

takes the oppornrnity to

cow Champioinship 1988.


8

ad2

The text is rarely seen.


moves are 6 c4 or 6 G0.
6... d5

bc6

&

O,aca I Ae3 Axd4 8 .9.xd4


fi dl
Ae3 Ae7 t0 adz trbs
exd5 exd5 13 f5 G0 14II5Ed
trR gfll 16 trh3 h6 17 -g.xb!.h.

''ffi

...

af6

The most popular square fu


knight. ln Lesiege-Hellstn, h
da 1997, Black experimemdri
... 2le7 and there follourd 6

gaping hole is creacd

heart of Black's camp.

%,-,m,
"ru,-

LM,

after 18 0-0

'*

A',

ad6 mate.
14 AxdS dxc4 15 f,c7
9xe6 l-0

$l

Opening Surprises 123

Sicilian: Kan 6

6d2

Carlsson-Mortensen
Copenhugen 1998 -

ll

le4c52aRe63d4cxd44

dxd4 a6 5 gd3

af6

The most popular square for the


knight. ln Lesiege-Hellsten, Bermuda 1997. Black experimented with 5
... De7 and there followed 6 0-0
olbce I Ae3 6xd4 8 9xd4 orc6 9

Ae3 Ae7 10 Ad2 trbS 11 f4 d5 t2

%%%%
A
AA

gh5 treS 15
Ef3 gf8 16 trh3 h6 17 axh6!+-.
6 ad2
The text is rarely seen. The main
exd5 exd5 13 f5 0-0 14

{ter

5 e3

after 6 0,d2

moves are 6 c4 or 6 0-0.

6... d5
The highly-rated Danish player

to challenge
the centre. but this advance is
flawed. In the game Shikhmantakes the opportunity

Hernandez, Chicago 1993, Black


kept an eye on the e4-e5 advance by
6 ... 9c7. The game continued 7

hl abdT 10
ll ?r b6 t2 a4b3 gb7 13
bR es 14 f5 hc5 15 Axc5 dxc5

We2 d6 8 o-o g"e7 9

c4 0-0

fu

roal3

16 trgl tradS 17 Ac2 Efe8


Am te g++:
7 e5 afdT

18

gd2

after

6fd7

7 ... Efb6 rs necessary.


8

6xe6!

gaping hole

is

created

in

the

heart of Black's camp.

8 ... fxe6 g WtrS+ 96 l0 Axg6+


hxg6 ll Wxg6+ &e7 12 0,c4l
This brilliant idea. exploiting the

vulnerability of Black's king, had to


be seen in advance.
12 ... gh6 13 g"gs+ gf8
A grim retreat but the alternative
is 13 ... Axg5 14 Wg7+ e8 15

$ter

18 0-0

hd6 mate.
14 AxdS dxc4 15 3.c7 3"g7
BIxe6 l-0

16

cfter 12 . . gh6

124 Opening Surprises

Spanish: Berlin 4 d4

I e4 e5 2 0R 6c6 3 gb5
The solid Berlin variation.

McDonald-lYctr
London 1998

i%i, i

Af6

4 d4t?
Steering the game towards a critical position at the earliest opportun-

ity; the usual line is 4 0-0 6xe4 5


d4 ad6 6 9xc6 dxc6 7 dxe5 Afs s
9xd8+ with the slightly better end-

%,ffi%
,,ry,
'ffi,a

ity traditionally

AA

...6xd4 5 6xd4 c6 6 Ac4


i Wxd4 9b6 8 gd3 Ab++ g

Kaminski-Keitlinghaus,

Lazne Bohdanec 1996.


b) 4 ... Axe4 5 We2

6d6 6 9xc6
8 3"g5 9c7 9

9xe7 9xe7 l0 6c3 9e6 ll


0-0-0+: Zapata-Mitkov. Erevan
Olympiad 1996

L,ry "ru.L,ffi

i^

5 ".. Ae7 is better when White


continues 6 Eel, intending e4-e5,

,ru,

13

Axd6 13 a4 a5 14 9.d3 ac6


9xh7+!

gf6

17

19 Wg3 f4

Axf4 l-0
Black resigned in view of 20 ...
Wxf4 21 Ae6+! Vxg3 22 AxfE+
&h6 23 ftg3+-.
20

12
o,e614 c3 c5 15

iD

ell

trg8!

A star move. At a *&


finds a way to refute \Uhil'r

lir I

and so relegate the


opening books to a
t2 d3

after l0 d5

minq frr

lf 12 gxf6 Black wire A


gxf6+ 13 dga f5 t4 B c.r
h5 or 12 Ag4 is rebuffcdb
A

L"ry_

Congratulations! The Greek Gift

15 ... SxhT 16 Ag5+ S96

ac4 ffi

9e3+:.
9 ... 996 r0 hre5 -Lla{

15

is always a dangerous weapon.

af5

tt

b4 0-0-0 l7

ro as

The central pawns have become a


dominant force, obliging the knight
to return to its original square.
l0 ... ab8 ll d6 cxd6 12 exd6

1995, and the battle gst


middlegame: 9 d3

in the

abd2 ad7

tr'ffi.

betbre taking on d4.


6 e5 ads 7 c3 0-0 8 cxd4 Ae7 9

Was+ rs l8 1t{xd6+

d3. was selected in t


Ristic-Michalczak, h

5 0-0 9"c5

Hn:6m

associarcd

Spanish Exchange Varirir


without the need to swapqE
6 ... dxc6 7 9e2 Aga tB

McDonald follows an oU I
recommendation to uin e
assessed as leading to a'r
position. A quieter cout-r

after 4 d4

exd4
c3 3"c5 l0 0-0 d5 1l exd5 0-0 12 b4
cxd5 13 9xd5 6xd5 14 9xd5 Ae7
15 Ae3 left White with an extra

7 dxe5 6f5

This delayed capturc c (


to exploit the kingside pm

94

a) 4

dxc6

Ie4e52aAac63-tf
erd

Aan Af6 5 0_0 9e7 6

ing for White.


4... exd4

pawn in

Exch

Spanish: Delayed

Zapata-Antoniou
Elista Olympiad 1998

tr,ffi.
ctfter14..dc6

id
12 ... gfS 13 trel eflt I
Ae6 15 gxf6 gxf6 16 A[l
16 6c4 merely delays t
table upon 16 ... gds l7 tt
Axc2! 13 gxf6 gxff
Ad3 and ... f5.

rs gf4 Wrs-+.
16... Eds r7 q!?hr

g.tr]

Opening Surprises 125

Spanish: Delayed Exchange

McDonald-Wells
London 1998 -

le4e5zAnhc63gbsa64
gal6to 5 0-0 Ae7 6 9xc6

This delayed capture on c6 aims


to exploit the kingside pawn major-

ity traditionally associated with the


Spanish Exchange Variation - but

without the need to swap queens.


6 ... dxc6 7 Be2 Ag4 8 h3 ghs 9

after 7 We2

94

McDonald follows an old Russian


recommendation to win a Pawn.
assessed as leading to an 'unclear'
position. A quieter continuation. 9

d3. was selected in the

-t g'

rra
I
I

a$D

,,,ru

game

Bundesliga
Ristic-Michalczak,
1995, and the battle got under waY

v&

in the middlegame:
abd2 ad7 t 4\c4 f6 t2 dd 6c5
13 aff 4\e614 c3 c5 l5 a3 gd7 16
b4 0-0-0 t7 Ae3+-.
9 ... 996 10 6xe5 Axe4 11 g5

I I
.,ry,

,rrffi.,

,,,'ffi

9 d3 gd6 l0

,,ru'

6
A

Eg8!

A star move. At a stroke Wells


tinds a wav to refute White"s sel-up

aCID

D ^,,ru-

tr

trg8

after I

and so relegate the line rn future


opening books to a minor footnote.
12 d3
If 12 gxf6 Black wins after 12 ...
gxf6+ 13 694 f5 14 f3 Ad5 l5 d3
h5 or 12 hg4 is rebuffed by 12 ...

'l i/-i

l_E

aOD

I
/lE

'ffi,

Axc2! 13 gxf6 gxf6 intending


Ad3 and
12 ...

Ae6

I
I I

... f5.

gfs

13

trel axm
al3

14 h2

15 gxf6 gxf6 16

16 hc4 merely delays the inevitable upon 16 ... gd5 17 trgl 0-0-0

t8 At4 Bts-+
16... gds 17

2l

ghr aa6 o-r


after 17

-;.-

4)cO

I I

gd6

126 Opening Surprises

Unorthodox Knrght Flcr

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit: 5 ... e6


Szenetra-Thiele

Mueller-Pieper

Deiilsuu 1998

d4

af6

Eppingen ) 9':

"ffi-E

A)$ d5 3 e4 dxe4 4

le4e52aflac63ic{id
: r.::::

Guaranteed to make

the White pieces smile T':.,:


long considered a begi:::-'. :

The Blackmar-Diemer Gambit is

a romantic opening, sacrificing

pawn for a direct attack which often

it

rewards White with a spectacular


vlctory. Since the publication of my
book on this opening I have found

weapon even by inlema:r:-=


4 6xe5?

that a great deal of interest has been


generated in the gambit. Inevitably,

after

some lines have wobbled under

/3

&
L"ry-

reputation. Instead Lane-Dutton,


Dartington 1995. continued 5 ... 96

gd3 (6 Ac4 is the standard move)


6 ... Ag7 7 0-0 0-0 8 Wel (the illustrative game is a reminder that this
is a standard theme) 8 ... abdT 9
wh+ cs l0 d5 b6 11 ah6 gb7 ).2
{)95 Wc7 13 6e4 Be5 14 AxgT
We5 15 2txf6 6xf6 16 trxf6l Bxd5
17 ExfT+! trxf7 18 BxhT+ to ts
Wxg6+ e5 20 hxfT+ &d4 2l
Wg4+ 9e3 22 We2+ &f4 23 g3

,,m

A
U

E,A

M,

tlre kingside to help in the attack.

8 ... c5 9 dxcS Axc5+ l0 ghl


4lc6ll Ag5 h6 12 gh4 Ae7
l2 .. hxg5 fails after l3 bxg5
treS 14 trxf6 Bxf6 15 Efl Wxfl+
l6 Axfl Ad4 l7 Wtrstt.

8Vel

13 Axh6! Ae8

If 13 ... gxh6 14 Hxh6 and hg5


wrns.
14 Ag5

Q:t6

f5 15 tradl gd7 16 gc4


Efet Bc8 18 trxd7 l-0

I
5

Rambeau-Sailen--..

:-'
b) 4 c3 6xR' 5 9r:J
-'- :- .d6 7 Ag5 Ae7 8 h-r
Werner-Vuckovic. Lenk I e!:
c) 4 6xd4 exd4 5 d3 dl t :l .
7 6xc3 6ro s Ag) i:- - .10 f4 c6 ll e5? l=- -: -:
i j :-: I;5
*ht 6e3T Renaud-Tt-:: :

%tr
after 12

9.e7

998.
5

6xf7

: : -i.
- :ii:, :
i
sidered response. 5
:,-,=--:r:,
White struggling For=i:
0-0 Wxe5 7 c3 Lco ! o: f
Axg8 trxgS lU : j
(Tartakower) or 6 isr i-:
4\c2+l8 Wxc2 ElxgJ a i;r t
l0 trfl hg4 intendinc l'-:i
i,-n
I I R? is crunched br I
5 2tg4 White lose.

d5l but 5 Axf-

%K n
,,,ru-

If

aCID

1993

a... Bgs

mate.

gd3 Ae7 7 o-o o-o 8 Wel


An easy transfer of the queen to

-:::-

WxeT 13 EIe2 dxe5


U

after

Ac5 7 6c3 c6 g Ae-: ir.:_:


4]tio to Efl Be7 I I E:l ;:

Ae6:

White.

An altempt at ourright

:Lr:

is a mistake. Also possib.: ::r


a) 4 d3 hxf3+ 5 9rl} i:r :

closer scrutiny but practitioners


have found plenty of new ideas for
4... exR 5 6xR e6
The Euwe Defence has a sound

has been adopted as

,(

(Bucker).
5 ... Wxg2 6 6xh8

White has been

se. ,-,:

trrcked since the plausib.=-. :':,r

Efl

allows

6 .. Eixej- - r:l

mate.

6 ... Wxhl+ 7 9fl


d5 9 d3 6tt+ to fl

Orst- E
ih-r mer

Opening Surprises 127

Unorthodox

Ikight Hop

Mueller-Pieper

Eppingen l9$8

{'m

1 e4 e5 z Q)R 0rc6 3 gc4 ad4


Guaranteed to make a player with

the White pieces smile.

L%
%a

Though

long considered a beginner's move


it has been adopted as a surprise
weapon even by internationals.
4 6xe5?

An attempt at outright refutation


is a mistake. Also possible are:
a) 4 d3 6xf3+ 5 WxB Ufo o Uez

;ie. I R

Ac5 7 orc3 c6 8 9e3 Axe3 9 fxe3


ah6 r0 trfl tse7 I I ga d6 12 h3
9e6: Rambeau-Sallerin, Paris

&

&t"ffi,t

Lffi%

1993.

6xB+ 5 WxR af6 6 d4


d6 7 9gs Ae7 8 h3 0-0 9 0-0+:

b)

4 c3

Werner-Vuckovic, Lenk I 994;


c) 4 6xd4 exd4 5 d3 d6 6 c3 dxc3
7 4fxc3 hf6 s Ags 9.e7 9 0-0 0-0
e5? Q\g4 12 9'xe7
10 f4 c6
WxeT 13 Ue2 dxe5 14 h3 Wc5+ 15
Oe3T Renaud-Toure, Elista

aJier 3 ...Q:al

E%s%@T
T

{',ruL%a

1998.
a ... Wgs 5

;.r;. i Uel

6xf7

5 hg4 White loses a piece to 5


d5! but 5 9"xf7+ needs a considered response. 5 ... *d8! leaves

Axg8 Exg8 l0 e5
(Tartakower) or 6

LIN.

T-'T

If

White struggling. For instance:


0-o Bxe5 7 c3 0,c6 8 d4 gf6

ctfter 5

NJ7

6
9

Wg6

694 6tr0t Z c:

2,c2+t8 Wxc2 Wxg4 9 Ac4 Uxg2


l0 trfl hg4 intending ... 6xh2 and
ll R? is crunched by ll ... he3-+

(Bucker).
5 ... Wxg2 6 Axh8

White has been well and truly


tncked since the plausible-looking 6

Efl

allows 6 ... Bxe4+

9"e2

olre.

,e7

6R

mate.

6 ... 9xh1+ 7 .9ft Wxe4+ 8 Ae2


d5 9 d3 6ts+ to fl Ah3 mate

%%%%:

ll

*hl

',B

after

l0

...

th3

mate

I28 Opening Surprises

ElePhant Gambrt. -: ''--'.=:

Alekhine: 4 e6
Kobas-Shabalov
Philadelphia 1996

Dodson-Rogers

Nottinghtm i - -

.ffit

le4at626c3d53e5

le4e52ARd5
Though played

3 d4 is a novel way of transposing


to the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit.

Ai

ctfter 4 e6

8 Ag5

M@"M:
AffiZ

%, ,Z

6e4

Z^

%T.

96!?) 8 dxe5 e6 S $:gS 2,a410 Bg4

We7

1l A)xhi dxc2+ t2 dl

qfter

Dxal 13 6xd5 exd5 14 Ag5 9xe5


15 BhS+ l-0 Hector-Konopka,
Bundesliga 1997.
6 ...6c6 7 0:n ao
Because 1 ... 6xc5 is met by
Ab5 with some play for the pawn.

A %t%
L%

fS t+

Shabalov, Philadelphia 1997.


b) 6 afl 6c6 7 aUS eSZr 1Z ...

n
A N

q\fi

6ro s Ad4 Wc7 ro gd3


0-0-0 9g7 12 h4? e5

The threat is ... e5-e4.


14 9g3
If' 14 We2 White has not much for
13 Axe5

hxeS

the piece after 14 ... af7 15 6xd5


6xd5 16 Lxgt Df+ 17 Be3 trg8.
14 ...6-:,e415 Axe4 dxe4 16 Eel

6as+ o-t

Ee

b) 3 exd5 Ad6 tthe c.c=- :


4lfo 5 6c3 is grrrr i . i ',
+ 6c: 4lf0 5 d3 h6 6 i:- r
6 .. 0-0 7 0-0 abd- ! o-r :-l
treS I0 6c+ 6bo I I -'l'.::
:--,
Ael 6Uxas 1.1

//, A-g 62;


8,L

Arrl

,L A

irJi

Il

c4 Q)f4 -+ Hyslop-Het\i=:.
Rapidplay 1995
3 ... ad6
Cochrane-StaunIon.
continued instead -1

'

::.::E:- : 5 6c3?! fxe5 6 i \c:- !:Ae6 8 0-0 c6 9 I-l .r:-'


Wazr t l exd5 ird-< .1 -r l
L

Wh5* winning
7

8 Ae3

96 ll

?-lxe5'.'

We2

Olympiad 1992.

Jacobs-

::
Choi-Shaughnessr. Eli.:: . r::
cLc6

0-0-0 with a great attack) I I We5


trg8 12 Axd5 Bd8 t3 af4 3,g7 t4
Wxe6+ l-0 Cheah-Dada. Manila

ll

cently led to a minr-re'. r ..:


J ?lxe5
a) 3 c3 dxe4 4 Ba-l- j-;-

'rrur- n

d7 t0 hf: Ues (10 ...


Ag7 11 gh6 Af6 12 6xd5l exd5
13 Wxd5+ e8 t4 BtrS+ az tS

s6 9 Am Ag7 l0 Df+ aq
e5 12 Axf6 exf6 13 AaO+
6e2 Ba5+ l5 Eild2 Wxc5-+

3,:'--.

neglected

Wxh5+

6c6

::
in most operr:-::
However, Jonathan R;:::.-,
covery of many ne\i ;:rr -

3 ... afdi 4 e6?l


A speculative pawn sacrifice to
stifl e Black's development.
4 ... fxe6 5 d4 c5
This is better than 5 ... 96 which
gives White a target. For instance: 6
h4 af6 7 h5 hxh5 8 trxh5 gxh5 9

6 dxcS
a1 6 Ad3 4)fo z dxcs

tbr

years. the Elephant Gar:':.:

4 d4 dxe4 5 ac3 lf6 h iE


Ac4 0-0 s 0-0 AbdRogers is keen tr' ir., - rr.:

central knight to rncril:;'--,.


of his dark-squared c:..-.:: b8-h2 diagonal.
9 AxdT WxdT l0 -i-rfo gr
R EaeS 12 6xe.l irel l-r
Exe4 14 gh5 A\hl-:

It tums out that. rl3ii-ir


.i' :. ..

doubled fi-pawns. the


more exposed than

Bla:i.

3r
trafl Eel le
tr8e6 20 *h3 tr6e5 ll grto
15 xh2 Wxd4 16 S-r

tr12 Efe8 18
a/ier

l)

. e5

22 &g2 BaS+

Z: Ein =tr:-

Opening Surprises 129

Elephant Gambit: 3

hxe5

Dodson-Rogers
Nottingham l9!0

le4e52aRd5
Though played

for

years

I
and

years. the Elephant Gambit remains


neglected in most opening books.

However, Jonathan Rogers's discovery of many new ideas has re-

cently led to a mini-revival.


3 6xe5
a) 3 c3 dxe4 4 Wa4+

gd7 5 Uxe4

orc6 6 hxe5? We7 1 d4 f6-+


;fter 4 e6

after 2 ... d5

Choi-Shaughnessy, Elista 1 998.


b) 3 exd5 Aa6 (ttre older 3 ... e4 4

Ve2 hf6 5 6c3 is good for White)


4 a,c3 af6 5 d3 h6 6 Ae2 (6 g3!?)
6 ... 0-0 7 0-0 abdT 8 d4 e4 9 N2
treS 1o 0c4 6be ll 6xd6 !&xd6
t2 Ae3 6bxas 13 6xd5 6xd5 14
c4 df4-+ Hyslop-Hebden, London

&

A% A

ru

Rapidplay 1995.

3... gd6

Cochrane-Staunton, London 1842

continued instead 3 ... We7 4 d4 f6

5 hc3?! fxe5 6 2txd5 Wf7 7 $".c4


Ae6 8 0-0 c6 9 ?l cxd5 l0 fxe5
Wazr tl exd5 Axd5 12 e6 Wc6 13
.

Jne

| -A/q"ll

tr
after

Wh5* winning.
-1

4 d4 dxe4 s A* 610 6 gg5 gfs


7 3-c4 0-0 8 0-0 abdT
Rogers is keen to exchange the
central knight to increase the scope
of his dark-squared bishop on the
b8-h2 diagonal.

I I

9 6xd7 WxdT r0 Axf6 gxf6 ll


EaeS 12 6xe4 9xe4 13 fxe4
Exe4 14 Htrs 9xtrz+:
It turns out that, despite the
doubled Fpawns, the white king is

8 ..6taz

more exposed than Black's.

15 xh2 Wxd4 16 93 Wxc4 17

afterl]..e5

Et2 trfe8 18 trafl tre2 19 gf5


tr8e6 20 h3 E6e5 21 Wxf6 trh5+
22*g2 Was+ zs Bn trnz+ o-r

w'T

2l
after2j...trhZ+

j()

Opening Surprises

Conclusion

The

The impact of a new idea in the


opening can be truly dramatic.
There is no shortage of games
where an unusual move backed up

by a logical plan leads to an immediate collapse of the opponent's


defence.
In Szenetra-Thiele White adopts

reaps the rewards-all because


Black is unfamiliar with his opponent's formation and struggles in
vain to find the right response.
But beware-there are exceptions
too! In Kobas-Shabalov. White tries
at-

tempt to complicate matters, but his


well-prepared opponent refutes the
line and hangs on to the sacrificed
pawn.

Choose an opening surprise that

you think will be unsettling for

typical opponent.

Play the new idea at an early

stage of the game so that your oppo-

nent

Back up each idea with a plan

and not just a one move trick.

The Art of Defence


1 Remain calm and don't

panic-

this is rule No. l! You need a little


time to adjust to the change in
clrcumstances.

9 Lack

will not have a chance to devi-

ate from the prepared line.

straightforward attacking plan and

out a forgotten varialion in an

Art of Attack

Pounce upon and refute any

It makes sense ILl d:'=.i:


pieces to their optimun: s--. :
that they are handill p.::+;
tack or defence. fhe c:::e
should be advanced :.. rr:
bishops and the queen ::i-the knrghts havc bes: :e.
and the squares benre:- ---,,
and rook are \ acan: a.'

r:J. ::
plar Hr,;:i
practice, such a :.,::
contempIate castlrns

dubious line.

the rooks into

3 Reject the offer to enter wild


complications. Your opponent will
probably be aware of the various

development rarelv

tricks and traps-so side-step any


preparation and find a solid reply.

rrc --:-:-.

most opentng \'zfliiit:,r.-: :i


require the advanc: :
pawns, repeated mL1\ e> ..
same prece. or a neeci :,: :<i

individual threats

Dr Siegbert Tarras::. i

chess player and tca;L.=::-:

good old days. procla::.:c


one piece stands b.r: :

pieces stand badly I.-.=:e


words are never trucr ::-:following games \\ her= ---.:
gets into difficulties 'r'e.apreces remain rooted :.- --.e-'
lnal squares. An obr rou-i 3\!:
Mah-Vukovrc where B.::r
under a direct attack :i.-1::--.the opening and rs ior;:c ::
befbre he has developec r--E:i
of his pieces. The gar.,; I:-:

Polugaevsky shous ho; 3i


top level, a tricky openrn: :.--'.
dazzling tactics can :..-- l3i
badly developed oppor: e::

rArt

of Attack

r qening surprise that


,i, be unsettling for a
E
E rl idea at an early
!G so that your oppoI hue a chance to devirpared line.
p ah idea with a plan
Art of Defence

It makes sense to develop your


pieces to their optimum squares so
that they are handily placed for attack or defence. The centre pawns

telm and don't panic-

bishops and the queen; then, when

ec

I
r

9 Lack of Development

move trick.

llo-ll You need a little


Ia to the change in
la
r Ton and refute any
t offer to enter wild
r Your opponent will
G trlxre of the various
EPr-so side-step any
d find a solid reply.

should

be

advanced

to free

the

the knights have been developed


and the squares between the king
and rook are vacant" you can
contemplate castling and bringing

the rooks into play. However, in

practice, such a

continuous

If you think that no one falls for


an opening trick once it has been
published, then take a look at the
number of people that have fallen

victim to traps given here. This


should convince you that it is
possible to gain victory in the
opening with relatively littte
knowledge.

Sacrificing at an early stage to


take advantage ofpoor development

is the theme of the game Adydiffr

development rarely occurs, since

Waitzkin which underlines the

most opening variations tend to


require the advance of several
pawns, repeated moves with the
same piece. or a need to deal with

culties of manoeuvring pieces when

individual threats"

Dr

Siegbert Tarrasch,

great

from the
good old days, proclaimed that if
one piece stands badly, all the
pieces stand badly. These wise
words are never truer than in the
following games where the loser
gets into difficulties because his
pieces remain rooted to their original squares. An obvious example is
Mah-Vukovic where Black comes
under a direct attack straight out of
the opening and is forced to resign
chess player and teacher

befbre he has developed hardly any


of his pieces. The game Taimanov-

Polugaevsky shows how, even at


top level, a tricky opening and some
dazzling tactics can soon destroy a
badly developed opponent.

under attack-a defensive task


which should never be underestimated. Pinter-Tkachiev shows a
more subtle approach with Black
gambiting a pawn simply for active
play. In the end, White's inability to

develop his kingside contributes

greatly to his downfall.


'The threat is stronger than the execution' is a suitable slogan for the
game Nunn-Kopec. Black feels so

by White's initiative
that he lacks the confidence to
endangered

castle. This upsets the coordination


of his pieces to such an extent that

he finds it impossible to defend


himself along the open lines leading
to his king. Meanwhile MiladinovicChristenson shows how a slightly
unusual opening can work wonders.
Black falters at a critical early stage
of the opening and falls for an unlikely mating attack.

l-12 Lack of Development

9 ... Ae6. The continuahon szc l(


ll 93 Ag7 t2V&. Ehs l:

Dutch: 3 d5

Wc3 95

Miles-Vaisser
Elista Olympiad 1998

6a 6u A
chances

lieve there is a big

ld4e62af3f53d5

White by playipg

You will have a hard time frnding


analysis on this move in books on

better chances.

... d5.

6 2,g5 S.b4+ 7 c3 Wxdl+ 8 xdl


Ae7 9 6xe4 6f6 l0 gd3 Ac6 l l
abd2 gd7 12 trel ae5 13 gfl
bn ru *c2 gave White the slightly

better chances thanks to Black's


weak e6 pawn in Hauchard-Roos,

after 3 d5

rr gd2 6u+ rz Uar

@T.

.."

gd6 5

g3

Ward-Holst, Copenhagen 1998.


4 9xd5 d6 5 Ag5 9e7 6 6xh7!
The point of the preceding moves
is revealed. White wins a pawn but

must now allow his queen

to

9xg8 trh4

Now the threat

is

rules of chess. Miles has grabbcd

rEil
of c3 E

Iowed by adz-R. Vaisser's titgEd


problem is to stop smiling!

Lru,rffirg
after 5 695

t2 ...trd413 ail2 t4 t1.,!


14 c3 forks two pieces ad

&

allows 14... Ad3 mate!


14... ads 15 c3 ad!
The only way to save the rod r
15 ... trd3 loses after 16 gc] 6fi
17

gdl.

16 fxe3 Wne+

tz

93

frgs

ft.etl

gxh2+!

be

The imaginative 18 -.- 3-h3

to impress after 19 exd4 3.xg2 2!

hRI 9xfi 2l exf3 g2- D. *2


gxhl:W 23 9xhl when Sihile r
mains a pawn up without
fear a vicious attack.
19

... Ae6 to trap

fi

Ef6+ 20 el

Not 20 gR?? gh3+

the queen.

mate.

9u3 Aa6
In the game Agrest-Karlsson,
9

Stockholm 1997. Black tried a direct attack on the white queen with

rEf
pciid

incredible position

Black's attack by means

chased around the board ifhe wants


to hang on to the extra material.
6 ... c6 7 gb3 trxh7
If 7 ... Ae6 then 8 Ug3, threatening 9 B96-. is good for White.
8

An

seems to defo most of the

pawn and is now hoping to

b) 3 ... gb4+ 4 c3 (4 9'd2 ue7 5


cq dfO 6 6c3 is an interesting alter-

6rO 6 dxe6 dxe6 7 Abd2 0-0 8 Ac4


Ve7 9 Afil gxtlt l0 gxf4 b6 I I
9s2 Ab7 t2 0-0 abdT 13 0fe5:

l0 Be3 Ee4!?
It might be better to adopt a u
restrained policy by playing lO
Ae6 to avoid the exctlagr d
queens.

French Championship 1994.

native for White)

l0 9.g5l sEl

Wa:ltt Wa3 and While br t

idea is to stop Black adopting his


favourite Stonewall pawn formation

Others:
a; 3 ... Ad6 4 dxe6 dxe6 5 e4 fxe4

improveqr h

example: 10 ... 9xb3 ll -t-8,


9xe7 12 axb3 leaves Whir e prr
up in the ending or l0 --. tf, ll

considered a minor side-line, it has


suddenly become popular. The main

3 ... exd5

atrectil

neutralises Black's initiatfuE- Fq

the Dutch Defence. Long

with

9g2 d5 with

for Black. Howevcr, I

20 ...

after 9 . .o,a6

hari4 n

2l CE }{

gh4+ 2l @f7'/*y2

Lack of Development l3

L%

{1i4l','%

9 ... Ae6. The continuation was l0


Hc3 95 ll 93 Ag7 t2gd2 Eh5 13
2rcZ 2ld1 14 9g2 d5 with attacking
chances for Black. However, I believe there is a big improvement for
White by playing 10 Ag5! which

l'm

neutralises Black's initiative. For

example:

l0 ... Axb3 ll

Lxe't

9,xe7 12 axb3 leaves White a pawn

up in the ending or 10 ... Wn tt


Ua:lt t Wa3 and White has the
better chances.

lb3ds

l0 Be3 Ee4!?
It might be better to adopt a more
restrained policy by playing l0 ...
Ae6 to avoid the exchange of
queens.

*"/&a

1l

1r gd2

An

6ul

rz

after

l2Vdl

gar

incredible position which

seems to defu most of the positional

rules of chess. Miles has grabbed a

pawn and is now hoping to rebuff


Black's attack by means of c3 followed by ad2-R. Vaisser's biggest
problem is to stop smiling!

AA

12 ... trd4

atlows
14 ...

<48,-t

t3 ad2 f4 14 t3

14 c3 forks two pieces and also

l4 ... 6d3 matel


ad5 15 c3 he3!

The only way to save the rook as


15 ... trd3 loses after 16 Bc2 Af5
17

after

l5

gdl.

16 fxe3

gtr++ tz 93 fxg3

fS

9g2

@"ru ,,ry,

gxh2+!

The imaginative 18 ... Ah3 fails


to impress after 19 exd4 9xg2 20
Af3! .9"xR 2l exB 92+ 22 *e2
gxhl:B 23 9xhl when White re-

AA
b9

aa6

... de3

,ry

ru
.E,,

mains a pawn up without having to


fear a vicious attack.
19 fi 9ro+ zo el
Not 20 Agzr 9n:+ 2t *nWh4
mate.
20 ... wh4+

2t &ft'/,-,/,

,,M,

.rrffi

after

19

,A

.E

Wf6+

134 Luck of Development

QGD:4 Ua4*

QGD Tarrasch: 5 e4

Taimanov-Polugeewty

Mah-Vuckovic

19fr

European U-16s. Zagan 1995

USSR Championship

1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Ac3 c5 4 cxd5
exd5 5 e4
An ambitious line which seeks to
put Black under pressure by bombarding him with tactics.

ga4+ abdT
It is possible to transp(Ee b r
lines after 4 ... olc6 or ,{ --- 6

5... dxe4
The choice in the stem game of
this variation was 5 ... Ac6 which
continued 6 exd5 dxd4 7 aA (7
dge2!?) 7 ... 6xR+ 8 UxB gd6 9

ld4d52c4dxc43AI3il

,-

,ffi

w.ffi.Lffitr
after 5 e4

Marshall-Schlechter, Monte

Carlo 1904.
6

9c4

After 6 d5 Black survives after

... fs 7 gf4 gd6 8 gus+ &n s


ah3 af6 l0 Ac4 a611 a4h6:+.
6... cxd4?
He should pay more attention to
his development and try 6 ... 6c6,
e.g. 7 d5 6e5 8 6xe4 6xc4 9
9a4+ Ad7 l0 Uxc4 Ue7 I I Ag5
f6 t2 s".e3 bs 13 Ed3 c4 t4 Vd4
Be5 with equal chances as in
Summerscale-Gershon, Tel Aviv
1997.
z guSr Wezt
a) 7 ... dxc3? 8 AxfT+

I
A

AA

ll

after

9f4

trftd8

b) 7 ...WaZ is still in White's fa-

fl.

ads gaz s Ate gao ro 9g3


Axf4 ll gxf4 d8 12 9e5 Ac6
8

12 ... f5 is necessary to defend 97


6f6 14 0-0-0 grves
White the better game.

when 13 Wxd4

after

l2Ve5

lI

l8 Eacl:

Pik

i-Ifr

Lrnares 1997.

56c3e66e4c57d5
It should be noted 6ar rr* pt
tion can arise from a rzh;r

I d4 * 2
e6 3 Af3 d5 4 ac3 dxc4 5 G
AbdT 6 e4 c5 7 d5 or I d4 d5 2{

move-orders such as

c+ dxc4 4 Ocf ec S tz
d5.

7 ... exd5 8 e5 d4
Keres suggested 8 .-. b5

sH
Hd
cd
lel Or
exf6 dxc3 12 9xc4 Eb{! (12
cxb2? allows a brilliant fioil I
13 AxfT+! xf7 14 aC5* iffi
Wc6+ f5 16 Ue6 'nae) 13l
6xf6 14 AxfT+ e7 t5 Id
xd8 16 bxc3 Ee4+ 17 ic} (
lS gb3 hg4 when Whia is slil
better according to an elyi
Ftacnik.
9 9xc4 dxc3 l0 erf6 Ufi
It a hopeless case for BLct b
and wriggle out of the dirE sid
probably the only way fa
avoid disaster. One u'ay o
is with 9 Uxb5 trb8 l0

*di

13 WxgT Vg4 t4 Wn+ aZ ts


Wxf/+ d8 f6 Uc7+ e8 17 Ed6
l-0

(t

b4 OGa

b) 4 ... gd7 5 9xc,1 e6 6 -t


.c6 7 Ac3 AxR 8 gxA cf 9
abdT lo 9-e2 fuei ll 3.b4 o{
Ag3 a6 13 0-0 Ec8 14
=fill G5
dxc5 b5 16 Ydi 6xcS tZ !:

abdi 6e4c5i

compensation for the pawn.

vour after 8 6xe4 We7 9

l0

6xe4 9xe4 12 9;b2 a6 13 &

6f0

9 9,t4
gd6+ gf6
12 &e5+! *e7 13 Axg8 Wxb3 14
9xb3 cxb2 15 9xb2 gives White
Wuo to Edt+ e7

... 0-0-0 9 e3 3.d5

Fedorowicz-Shirazi, USA Ch

gb5+ gd7 l0 0-0 de7 tl 9g5

0-0:

',ru

playing 5 Uxc4. Also psiblc


a\ 4 ... Waz s Yxc+ Ucr 6 eI
At'6
Ae6 7 9xc6+ 6xc6 8 a3

Lack of Development 135

QGD: 4 Ua4+
Taimanov-Polugaevsky
USSR Championship 1960

d4 d5 2 c4 dxc4 3

AR ajts q

Wa4+ abdT
It is possible to transpose to main
lines after 4 ... orc6 or 4 ... c6 by
playing 5 Wxc4. Also possible:
a) 4 ... gd7 5 Uxc4 Uc6 6 abd2
Ae6 7 9xc6+ Axc6 8 a3 (8 gb5) 8

I
I

... 0-0-0 9 e3 9"d5 lo M 6e4 11


6xe4 9xe4 12 S,bz a6 13 9e2:
Fedorowicz-Shirazi, USA Ch 1984.

I I

b) 4 ... Aaz s 9xc4 e6 6 Ag5


9-c6 7 6c3 Axf3 8 gxf3 c6 9 e3
abdT lo g'e2 3.e7 ll gh4 o-o 12
9,g3 a613 0-0 trc8 14 trfdl c5 15
dxc5 b5 16 Ed3 6xc5 17 Uxd8

Eftd8

l8 Eacl:

after 4Va4+

Piket-Nikolic.

Linares 1997.

56c3e66e4c57d5
It should be noted that this position can arise from a variety of
move-orders such as I d4 af6 2 c4
e6 3 6fl d5 4 hc3 dxc4 5 9a4+
abd7 6 e4 c5 7 d5 or I d4 d5 2 aR
ortt I cq dxc4 4 6c3 e6 5 Ha4+
o,au s e4 c5 7 d5.
7 ... exdS 8 e5 d4
Keres suggested 8 ... b5 which is

after 8 e5

probably the only way for Black to


avoid disaster. One way to continue
is with 9 Wxb5 Eb8 l0 Wa4 d4 I I

exf6 dxc3 12 9xc4 trb4! (12 ...


cxb2? allows a brilliant finish after
13 AxfT+! xf/ 14 695+ xf6 15
gc6+ f5 16 We6 mate) 13 Udl
6xf6 14 AxfT+ e7 15 9xd8+
xd8 16 bxc3 Ee4+ 17 Ae3 e7
l8 gb3 694 when White is slightly
better according to an analysis by

$er I2Ve5

Ftacnik"
9 9xc4 dxc3 10 exf6 Hxf6
It a hopeless case for Black to try
and wriggle out of the dire situation

after

ll

...Vc6

l -16

Lack of Development

with l0

... gxf6. I was lured into this


dreadful position against Kinsman

Sicilian: Kalashnikov

at Wrexham 1997 and soon succumbed upon 11 0-0 Ag7 12 Eel+


gf8 13 Ar+ 6eS 14 tradl 9e7 15
bxc3 Ag4 16 3"ds 9'.d7 L7 Ve4

New York 1998

Ady-Waitzkin

I quickly found out


from my opponent why the game
was watched with particular interest
tre8 18 Ah++-.

by Taimanov!
rr Ag5 Wc6 12 0-0-0!
A fantastic decision-abandoning
the queen to allow the rooks to enter
the attack. A clear case ofthe perils
of poor development.
12 ".. cxb2+
The queen is taboo as 12 ... 9xa4
loses after 13

Ehel+

after

l5

9'b5

A.e7 14Exe7+

12 ... 9e7. However, the game


Garcia Palermo-Gelfand, Oakham
1988. will hardly inspire confidence. The game continued: l3

take advantage of Black's

l0 ... axb5 11 6xb5 t{

gd2
White wants to take the ro*'
a6 without allowing 13 -.- U.5+-

4)ac7+

after 18

.. *e7

9xd7+ Sf818 trxe7!

tj

d7

13

13 gd2 is also plr5ral


Edelman-Khan, Philedelphh l!
ended in a brilliant victory efu
Uaz nxgs 14 6xa6 %o ls h
af6 16 0-0-o Ac6 17 ,xg, ft

pieces are poised

fxg5

fu

preces"

EIxc6 bxc6 14 AxeT cxb2+ 15


Sxb2 xe7 16 Ehel+ d8 17 ae5
Sc7 l8 6xd7 AxdT 19 Ee7 tradS
20 9xf7 EhfS 2t R l-0
13 xb2 9.e7 14 Ehel f6 15

cl

6tc:

'Ihis tactical approach rs


ryucd,
Ady's aggressive style. 6 c.l rs i
positional move. in order rc p
space on the queenside and s

6 ... a6 7 aa3 b5 S ad5 A.d,


A speciality of Wair'kin9 Ag5 h6 l0 Axb5+!?
A calculated gamble to Et a

,,ru

that represents a chance for Black is

15 ... Eb6 16

e5 5

the d5 square.

Vxc417 trd8+ ef7 18 0e4+ xe6


19 6xc4+-. The only other move

for the onslaught,

6R 6c6 3 d{ Graa
abs d6
An enterprising variatim rl
differs from the more ff
e4 c5 2

Sveshnikov in that the king"s tal


can be moved to e7 rather ff- Tl
move-order makes it avkrzd I
White to judge the correct plr-

ef8 15 ExfT+ g8 16 trftd7+

gbs
All of White's

hxd4

18 a4 6xe4 19 9g4* 6 20 Ut
at62t Ufl+ gez 2ztrxdp-giti

ll

We6+ *d8 24
13 ... Eb6

The most efficient way to end the

9xe5

l{.

It might be better to cosib


... Ec6 but White still bas.5
initiative.
14 c4 9.a6?
Black cracks under thc Ftu
The threat of c4-c5 suggs ll

game.

18 ... xe7 19 We4+ gdS 20


ArS+ cZ 21 9e5+ *c6 22 Ed6+
us z: Wuz+ r-o

after

Vb2+

trc6.
15
c5

9a5 Axb5 16 LxbS


af6 18 Aa6 1-0

6rf

Lack of Development

Sicilian: Kalashnikov

Ady-lYaitzkin
New York 1998 1 e4 c5 2

6xd4

e5 5

6R

0.c6 3 d4 cxd4 4

abs d6

An enterprising variation which


differs from the more familiar
Sveshnikov in that the king's knight
can be moved to e7 rather f6. This
move-order makes it awkward for
White to judge the correct plan.

''%a

rptsaus

rs typical of
Ady's aggressive sffle. 6 c4 is the
positional move" in order to gain
space on the queenside and secure

g.

6tc:

'Ihis tactical approach

the d5 square.
6 ... a6 7 6a3 b5 g

after 5 ... d6

gN@,,ru^
% 'ffiL'T-

6d5 hceT

A speciality of Waitzkin.
9 Ag5 h6

l0 Axb5+!?

calculated gamble

to try

and

take advantage of Black's dormant

pleces.

10 ... axbS 11 6xb5 tra6


hdcz+ gd7 13 gd2
White wants to take the rook
a6 without allowing l3 ... Ua5+.
$Ecr 1S *e7

12

on

AA

13 WaZ is also playable.

after 9 ... h6

Edelman-Khan, Philadelphia 1998,


ended

in a brilliant victory after 13

Wd2 hxg5 14 Dxa6 Wb6 15 6acz


af6 16 o-o-o 6c6 17 9xgs Ad4
18 a4 6xe4 19 9g4+ f5 20 Wg6
at6 2t uflz+ ae7 22 Exd4 Ef8 23
Weo+ Sd8 241i9xe5 l-0.
13 ... Eb6

'rru,
789

It might be better to consider 13


... Ec6 but White still has a strong
initiative.
14 c4 9.a6?
Black cracks under the pressure.

rlb

The threat of c4-c5 suggests 14


aco.

23Vb2+

15 9a5
cs Ar0 l8

9xb5 16 Axb6 9c6


ha6 l-0

,,ry,

...

17

after 14 c4

j7

38 Lack of Development

Sicilian: Richter-Rauzer

Pirc: 150 Attack

Nunn-Kopec
British National League 1998

Lane-Bernrrd
Huy 1992

le4c52af3d63d4cxd44

Axd4 af6 5 6c3 6c6 6 Ag5 e6 7


Uaz ao 8 o-o-o gd7 9 R
By adopting this rarely seen line
Nunn avoids the mass of theory associated with 9 f4. White's basic
idea is to keep his options open and
contemplate a kingside pawn storm

%{T l

L'ffi %

A%
% 'ffi_ '%t

L,-L'M,

with h4 and 94.

9...6xd4

The game Nunn-Ydeslaver, Leeuwarden 1995, saw 9 ... 9.e7 which is


a popular reply: l0 h4 trcS ll Ebl

after 9 J3

h6 12 6xc6 9xc6 13 Le3 d5 14 e5


flt 3.xh4 16 gd4 9.e7 t7
gf2 b5 18 f5 with a terrific attack.
l0 Uxd4 b5 ll f4
Black has developed his queenside swiftly but at the cost of leavthe

board. This inspires Nunn to open


up the centre.

l7 Vxd7.
t6 ae4 Olts

tl

after 15 9'd3

Uf2 9xe5?!

In a diffrcult position the lure of

640 9.c0 20 Ehfl is

oc7

better for

20 ... axb5 then

2l Ad6+ wins

the queen.

2r ad6+ l-0
Black resigned in view of 21 ...
&fB 22 Uc5! axb5 23 af5+ @g8 24
6e7+ f8 25 6d5+ wins.

White retains the option of B- r*


than 6R, to accelerate thc d
This line is very popular *ith Erg
lish amateurs who chose fu n
'150' trecause, according to th d

fashioned English gradmg syrE


this is the strength of a deccr cl
player. A translation to Elo rd
be the less colourful 'l8m Aft'.+"-

Black wants to disra WE


from launching an imminem li
side attack by instigating <lEdl
play. In the game I-aneMiks, L
Touquet 1990. I met 5 .-- Ac6 rf
6 R to help a kingside past tu
and soon had a powerful arract 6 0-0 7 0-0-0 e5 8 6ge2 9.d7 9 fr
gusz to 94 b5 gM -e.xx u
Wxh6 6xd4 13 95! 6et l.t fui
exd4 15 bas fs rc *7- i?f, t'
WxhT+ 697 18 exf5+-.
6 gh6 9xh6 7 9xto ElS t ar
huaz s 6rs Uns
Black would be happy to q

board anyway. Black's maiE prd


lem is that his developrrerr b p
and White is threatening to qtr q

20

Axb5! 9c7

If

li

is rh*t h

r0 Ud2 Wa5 lr UM lr5 [


Wru6u0 t3ilYg4l4tc3C!{t
A hot pawn but orhersire t
queen will be chased arcrd t

19

White.

18 94 ah6 19 trhel ac6

The slight difference betsctn

and other Ae3 lines

queens to avoid the attack

free pawn proves too much. The al-

ternative 17 ... 0-0 18 94

af6 3 Oc3 t5

11 ... 3"e7 12 e5 dxe5 13 fxe5


6aS U 9xe7 6xe7 15 gd3 gc7
It is already difficult for Kopec to
harmonise his pieces because l5 ...
0-0 is wellmet by 16 AxhT+! xh7

e4 d6 2 d4

5 ... c6

6al s

ing his king in the middle of

Ae3 9g7 s gd2

the centre.

after19..9.c6

n4
t

Egr Un: r0 as 6uaz


tt Egs Utro 19 e5 Aas
0xd5 cxd5 2l exd6 e6 22 0{}{
23 Exg6+! l-0
15

Wtrs

Lack of Development

Pirc: 150 Attack


Lane-Bernard
Huy 1992

1 e4 d6 2 d4 af6 3 6c3 96

Ae3 9g7 s gd2

ll

The slight difference between this

and other

tri
*
dter

9e3 lines is that

fashioned English grading system.


this is the strength of a decent club
player. A translation to Elo would
be the less colourful ' I 800 Attack'.

913

5 ... c6

Black wants

t XL
I

w
3. %
w
l-t

Adj

to

distract White

from launching an imminent kingside attack by instigating queenside


play. In the game Lane-Miles, Le
Touquet 1990, I met 5 ... 6c6 with
6 R to help a kingside pawn storm

w,,ru,

$*

here

White retains the option of R, rather


than 6R, to accelerate the attack.
This line is very popular with English amateurs who chose the name
'150'because, according to the old
nfter 5Vd2

and soon had a powerful attack: 6 ...

0-0 7 0-0-0 e5 8 6ge2 gd7 9 bl


gusz to 94 b5 ll gh6 9xh6 12
Hxh6 Axd4 13 95! 6e8 14 6xd4
exd4 15 6as rs ft a,e7+ *f7 17
WxhT+ 697 18 exf5+-.
6 gh6 Axh6 7 Uxh6 9a5 8 gd3

after 9... UlzS

Auaz s 6n Wns
Black would be happy to swap
queens to avoid the attack.

w
w
e
w
I

It

la

19 ..9.c6

ro gd2 Eas rr Eh6 Uns rz


Wru 6uo t3 a4Wg4l4 We3 9xg2
A hot pawn but otherwise the
queen will be chased around the

E.

board anyway. Black's main problem is that his development is poor


and White is threatening to open up
the centre.
15 trgr Wn: ro a5

abdT

17 Eg3
Whs 18 trgs Wtro 19 e5 ad5 20
6xd5 cxd5 2l exd6 e6 22 0-0-0 0-0
23 trxg6+! l-0

A
after

2l .

0-0

j9

140 Lack of Development

Pseudo-Trompowsky: 2 .-. fr

King's Indian: 5 h3
Pinter-Tkachiev
Porec 1998

E
!
E

Mil adin ovic-C hristensor


Kori.nthos I998

td4af62c496 3Ac3 9g74

ld4d529"g5

This move was routinely pkyd


by Hodgson at a time whcn E
people considered it a joke- His
cess was quickly copied by Ah
and it is now regarded as a fez-

e4 d6 5 h3 0-0 6 9.g5

It is always good to know when


an opening line has been busted!
Anyone who has memorised the
second edition of ECO E will be in
lbr a shock if they follow the recommendation there, 6 aR abd7 7
e5 6e8 8 Af:l c6 9 Wd2 dxe5 l0
dxe5 6c7 11 trdl ae6 12 3,h6
Wa5 13 AxgT xg7 14 We3+:,

weapon.

2...h6

A sly move-order. Black

r{ter 5 .. 0-0

since Nunn has pointed out the im-

of 12 ...6xe5! when 13
6xe5 Wxd2+ or 13 9xd8 6xR+

b cl3gh4c64e3
I prefer thrs practical apfuct r

provement

el-a5 diagonal or even retrEat

leaves Black is a pawn up.

6 ... abdT 7 gd3 c5 8 d5 he5 9

9.e2

In

such

a blocked position

the

4 flR after which can follw,[


tsuo s b3 gf5 6 e3 N7 ? -Cf,
9xd3 8 Wxd3 e6: as in Ad
Karpov, FIDE World Chaqir
ship, Lausanne 1998. The diftF
ence is that 5 9cl is no lql
possible because then 5 --- C5 6 AG!

value of the light-squared bishop is


diminished so White should prefer 9

hR

instead.

9... b5!
At the first sign of indecision Tkachiev grabs the chance to steal the
initiative.
l0 cxb5 a6 11 bxa6 Eas 12 gd2

94 would simply win the

9.

qfter

4... gb6

An

b5

enables

Tkachiev to carry out a triumphant

dpst

figtr fu

then 6 ...

9bil+

l}

ning the bishop on h4- The

,m

Siegel-Nor, Budapest 1997, sas 5

- -

AfS whictr allowed White to efd

L'.ru. %
%A lffi

Lru,

ru.w

%a
%a%

finale"

22bxc4Exb223 gxb2 Ab6 0-l

e5

energetic way ro

af3
If 6 dxe5??

9xc3!

The exposed white king

gcl

kingside development is woeful.


15 f4 o,c416 9xc4 Axc4 17 b3

to break through on the queenside.


18 9xc3 Vxa2 19 Eb2 Ual+ 20
rz tsn+ 21 e3 Ea3!

space advantage.

9xa6 13 Wc2 trIb8 14 trbl afdT


At the cost of a pawn, Black has
active piece play whereas Pinter's

Black spots a clever combination

udEE!

the bishop out of the way so L


after ... tsb6 is played the bishe i
unable to fend off checks m ft

after

2l @ej

tr

on the queenside with a ffi


6n 6aZ 7 c4 9xbt t trSI
e6 9 c5 Wc7 l0 9"g3 Uc8 I I bl*:6 ... e4 7 afd2 3-e6 t c{ eJI t
6c3 trc8? 10 cxdS cxdS ll M
White abandons his qr.eta L

plan: 6

search of mate.
1l ... Bc6

ll

... Excl+ 12

Excl ExdJ

Ec8+ mates.
12

9xc6 bxc6 13 9.a6

l{

13

Lack of Development I 4l

Pseudo-Trompowsky: 2 ... h6

"l*e-t
,ffi

L'%
A

ru9
:4q5

Miladinovic-Christenson
Korinthos 1998 -

ld4ds29g5
This move was routinely played
by Hodgson at a time when most
people considered it a joke. His success was quickly copied by Adams
and it is now regarded as a fearsome
weapon.

2...h6

A sly

move-order. Black nudges


the bishop out of the way so that
after ... Wbe is played the bishop is

0-0

ll

"ryr%%%
L,ruL Bru- L

w'/ffi.g

after 2 9g5

unable to fend off checks on the


el-a5 diagonal or even retreat to cl.

ffitA
ru'ffi%
L{x
WA
A

w"ru-%

,ffi..2L

ship, Lausanne 1998. The difference is that 5 Wcl is no longer

'v,

/\).t .m,L

possible because then 5 ... 95 6 Ag3


94 would simply win the d-pawn.

4... gb6

$er 9 .. b5

@A

3gh4c64e3
I prefer this practical approach to
4 AR after which can follow 4 ...
9uo s b3 gfs 6 e3 adi 7 gd3
Axd3 8 Uxd3 e6: as in AnandKarpov, FIDE World Champion-

An

Ucl

e5

energetic way

to fight for

after 5 Vc

space advantage.

6aR

If 6 dxe5?? then 6 ... 9b4+ winning the bishop on h4. The game

&

AryL%,L

w
%t%
A%
W.L,,ru

A
A
$er 2l @ej

tr

Siegel-Nor, Budapest 1997, saw 5

...

Af5 which allowed White to expand


on the queenside with a standard
plan: 6 aR Ad7 7 c4 9xbl 8 trxbl
e6 9 c5 Wc7 l0 Ag3 9c8 1l b4+:.
6 ... e41 afd2 Ae6 8 c4 ad7 9
6c3 trc8? 10 cxdS cxd5 11 6xd5!
White abandons his queen in

a
%
A

search of mate.
l1 ... Hc6

ll

... Excl+ 12

Ec8+ mates.
12 Wxc6 bxc6

Excl Axd5 13

l3 9a6 l-0

after I I dxd5

142 Lack of Development

Conclusion

The

Though failing to develop one's


pieces is responsible for many a defeat, there are exceptions. In MilesVaisser, White wins a pawn and
then finds his queen pushed around
the board until it has to return to its
original square. A comical position

in which it looks like Miles


has already started setting up the
pieces for the next game! However
Black cannot quite force a win and
arises

settles

for a draw by

perpetual

check.

Nevertheless there is no doubt


that having more pieces in play does
enable a player to take the initiative
and launch an early attack. This is
especially true in a sharp opening

Art of Attack

I Look for ways to attack if your


opponent's position shows signs of
poor development.
2 Before deciding on a sacrificial
breakthrough, assess the opponent's
ability to defend. If his forces are
still on their original squares then

the odds should be in your favour.

3 Lack of development may be a


sign that your opponent is foundering in an unfamiliar or very tactical

opening variation. The solution?


Attack!
The

it

Art of Defence

Be wary of accepting material if


means you lose several tempi.

variation such as that seen in


Lane-Bernard, where I not only
gained a space advantage, which is
usual against the Pirc, but also an

Backward development is often the

advantage in development by continually attacking a wandering black


queen with gain of time.

twice in the opening if this results in


slower development.
3 Choose an opening to suit your

key element in the success of

an

enemy attack.

2 Avoid moving the same

style. Some variations

piece

disregard

continuous development in search


of quick counterplay or gain in material. These risky lines may well be
safely adopted by top-class grandmastrs but most of us mere mortals
have to be a little more careful!

Inde
Abatino-Chatalbashev I t9
lD
Adams-Lautier
f2
Adorjan-Kudrin

Ady-waitzkin

137

Aleksandrov-Sulskrs

lO

Averbakh-Goldberg

93

A
Aleksic-Solaja
Alterman-Kurajica 50
Atalik-Thang Trang
:15
Averbakh-Aronin 6l
Bacrot-Magem
5l
Beliavsky-Larsen T,
Bellon-Del Campo
lX2
Benjamin-Brookshear O
ql
Binham-Horn
lr:t
Bolzoni-Lane
Botos-Videki
6I
Bronstein-Vedder 65
Browne-Quinteros I
9l
Carlier-Kerkhof
Carlsson-Mortensen 123
Chekhov-Krasilnikov S

Cherepkov-Grishanovich 75

Cladouras-Stein I la
Colle-Buerger
C
Conquest-Wall
ef
Crickmore-Lane t3
Demirel-Kogan I lt
Dodson-Rogers 129
Doubleday-South lGt
Dougherty-Hergott 13
Emms-Sjodahl
ta
Epishin-Komarov lOt
Fischer-Spassky lU)
Froehlich-Miles I 15
Gavrilov-Potapov 4
Gil-Howell
I(n

fh

Art of Attack

fu

ways to attack if your


position shows signs of

Index of games

&Giding on a sacrificial
ssess the opponent's

d,ftnd- If his forces are


aiginal squares then
be in your favour.

ddwelopment may be a
Wonent is founder
niliar or very tactical

The

solution?

Art of Defence
of acceptrng material if
yoo lose several tempt.
&velopment is often the

in the success of

an

wing

the same piece


qening if this results in

opening to suit your

variations disregard
fuelopment in search
or galn rn ma-

rbky lines may well

be

\r top-class grandmt of us mere mortals


e

lirle more careful!

Abatino-Chatalbashev
Adams-Lautier

Adorjan-Kudrin
Ady-Waitzkin

ll9
99

t2
t37

Aleksandrov-Sulskis
Aleksic-Solaja
Alterman-Kurajica
Atalik-Thang Trang

74
50

Averbakh-Aronin

6l

Averbakh-Goldberg
Bacrot-Magem
Beliavsky-Larsen

Bellon-Del Campo
Benjamin-Brookshear
Binham-Horn
Bolzoni-Lane
Botos-Videki
Bronstein-Vedder
Browne-Quinteros

10

35
93
53
73
122

42
92
95
67
65
9

Gofshtein-Beikert
Grabarczyk-Shetty
Hansen-Hoi

54
86
22

Howell-Miles
Illescas-Anand
Karpov-Hort
Kasparov-Kengis

5l

Hebden-Grabuzova 16
Hebden-Crouch l0l
Horvath-Kuligowski 57
19

82
52

Kennaugh-Houska l2l

Keres-Spassky
Kobas-Shabalov
Kobernat-Stenze

14

128
176

Korchnoi-Sutovsky llz
Korniushin-Kofanov 27

Krakops-Meijers
Kudrin-Fedorowicz

29
87

Kupreichik-Romanishin 90

Cladouras-Stein

ll4

Colle-Buerger
Conquest-Wall
Crickmore-Lane
Demirel-Kogan

69
64

ll8

Dodson-Rogers

129

Doubleday-South
Dougherty-Hergott
Emms-Sjodahl
Epishin-Komarov

105

lO2
Lane-Nunn
139
Lane-Bernard
Larsen-Olafsson 77
Lasker-Thomas 32
56
LedgerDuncan
39
Liardet-Kogan
Liu Wen Che-Donner 85
59
Limbos-Bogart
Loginov-Sakaev l16
109
LutherMaiwald
134
Mah-Vuckovic

13

Mascarinas-JuarezFlores 60

Fischer-Spassky

100

ll5

Miles-Rodriguez
Miles-Vaisser

44
t0'1

Mnatsakanian-Simagin 55
Morozevich-Bratchenko 48

CarlierKerkhof
Carlsson-Mortensen

Chekhov-Krasilnikov
Cherepkov-Grishanovich

Froehlich-Miles
Gavrilov-Potapov

Gil-Howell

9l
123
98
75

83

84
104

McDonald-Wells

125

Milandinovic-Christenson

14

103

132

144 Index of games

Movszeszian-Stoll
Mueller-Pieper
Nisipeanu-Moldovan
Nunn-Kopec
Onischuk-Hertneck
Pinter-Tkachiev
Polugaevsky-Kudrin
Posazennikov-Lane

Rechel-Walendowski

Reilly-Leskiewicz

28
127

Short-Piket
24
Smyslov-Beliavsky 17

4l

Svendsen-Reefschlaeger 88

r38
8

140

49
18

l0
108

Repp-Paschitta

11

Rogolj-Atlas

7t

126
135

Tal-Teschner
Tsesarsky-Khasin
Timman-Van Wely
Topalov-Bareev

40
26

Yemelin-Nepomnishay

30

Ryba-Hillarp Persson
Sakaev-Kobalija
Schmaltz-Karpatchev
Seirawan-Browne

106
78

36
23

66
72

47

Uhlmann-Dunnington
Van der Wiel-Saunders

Velicka-Souleidis
Watson-Hurley
Watson-Meduna
Wohl-Garcia Santos
Wolff-Wall

Romero Holmes-Perez

Serrawan-Ivanchuk
Shaked-Raptis

Szenetra-Thiele

Taimanov-Polugaevsky

Zapata-Antoniou
Ziatdinov-Sehner

25
89
81

58
38
94

1\7
43
68

124
31

The golden rules of successful opening play are all too easily forgotten,

even by Grandmasters. Using examples played by contemporary stars such


as Bobby Fischer, Garry Kasparov, Anatoly Karpov, Yasser Seirawan, Nigel

Short and Michael Adams, Gary Lane explains how to win your games in

short order.

Ihe key themes covered include:

o
o
o
o

Chasing

the uncastled king

Defeating greedy openings

Attacking the castled king


Springing opening suprises

lnternational Master Gary Lane is a former Commonwealth


Champion. An experienced and successful chess coach, he
has written a number of best selling books for Batsford

including The Grand Prix Attack, Beating the French and


Winning with the Closed Sicilian.