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What is the ISPS Code?

The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Diplomatic Conference of December 2002


adopted new Regulations to enhance maritime security through amendments to SOLAS Chapters
V and XI. Chapter XI, previously covering ship safety has been split into two new chapters, XI-1
and XI-2.

ChapChapter XI-1, Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Safety, has been enhanced to include additional
requirements covering ship identification numbers and carriage of a Continuous Synopsis Record.

Chapter XI-2, Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Security, has been created and includes a requirement for
ships and companies to comply with the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. The ISPS Code
contains two parts. Part A is mandatory, while Part B is recommendatory and contains guidance for implementation
of the Code. The USCG has decreed that sections of Part B of the Code will also be taken into consideration.
Chapter XI-2 also sets out requirements for ship security alert systems and control and compliance measures for
port states and contracting governments.

As well as the new Regulations in SOLAS Chapter XI-2, the Diplomatic Conference has adopted amendments to
extant SOLAS Regulations accelerating the implementation of the requirement to fit automatic identification
systems (AIS) (Chapter V). The Diplomatic Conference has also adopted a number of Conference Resolutions
including technical co-operation, and the co-operative work with the International Labour Organisation and World
Customs Organisation.

Review and amendment of certain of the new provisions regarding maritime security may be required on
completion of the work of these two organisations.

These requirements form a framework through which ships and port facilities can co-operate to detect and deter
acts which pose a threat to maritime security. The regulatory provisions do not extend to the actual response to
security incidents or to any necessary clear-up activities after such an incident.

In summary the ISPS Code:

 enables the detection and deterrence of security threats within an international framework
 establishes roles and responsibilities
 enables collection and exchange of security information
 provides a methodology for assessing security
 ensures that adequate security measures are in place.

It requires ship and port facility staff to:

 gather and assess information


 maintain communication protocols
 restrict access; prevent the introduction of unauthorised weapons, etc.
 provide the means to raise alarms

 put in place vessel and port security plans; and ensure training and drills are conducted.

TOPIC STATUS

1 Issuance of Merchant Marine Circulars


2 Function of the Directorate General of Consular
and Maritime Affairs

3 List of Merchant Marine Consular Offices

4 Panamanian Maritime Fees

5 Data and Documentation Required for Ship


Registration

6 Application for vessel Registration

7 Vessel Registration (Navigation "Patente")

8 Amendments to the Vessel Registration


(Navigation "Patente")

9 Registration and inspection of Yachts

10 Preliminary Registration of Title Deeds and


Mortgages of Vessels

11 Mortgage Contract

12 Execution of Bill of Sale; Language


Requirements

13 Cancellation of Vessels from the Panamanian


Registry

14 Ex Officio Cancellation of Vessels under


Panamanian Registry

15 Statutory Certificates

16 Registry of Vessels Under Construction which


require "Patente" (Registration Number and
Radio Call Letters before they are Completed
in their Construction Phase

17 Applications for Radiocommunication Station Replaced by MMC No. 111


License in the Maritime Mobile Service and List
of Approved Radio Service Companies

18 Required Documents for Ship Radio Stations

19 Navigational Charts, Publication, Records and Replaced by MMC No. 98


National Documents Required on Board
Panamanian Vessels of 500 GRT and above

20 Annual Safety Inspection Program

21 Minimum Safe Manning Requirements

22 - Certificate of Liability for Oil Pollution


Damage, 1968 Law 21 of July 9, 1980 -
Resolution No. 145 of March 22, 1976

23 Oil Record Book

24 Discharge of Contaminating Substances

25 Construction Subdivision and Stability,


Machinery and Electrical Installations

26 Regulations Concerning Construction - Fire


Protection, and Fire Extinction for New
Passenger Ships Carrying More than 36
Passengers; New Passenger Ships Carrying
Not More than 36 Passengers; and Existing
Passenger Ships Carrying More than 36
Passengers

27 Regulations Concerning Construction - Fire


Protection, Fire Detection, and Fire Extinction-
for New Tankers

28 Regulations Concerning Construction - Fire


Protection, Fire Detection, and Fire Extinction
for New Cargo Ships of more than 500 Tons
Gross Tonnage

29 Regulations Concerning Life – Saving


Appliances, etc. for New Ships engaged on
International Voyages

30 Observance of Traffic Separation Schemes

31 Investigation of Serious Casualties

32 Casualties Investigation of Panamanian Flag


Vessels

33 Death Inquiries

34 Performance Standards for Gyro Compasses

35 Bareboat Chartered Vessels (Fletadas)

36 Specifications for the Issuance of Technical


Certificates

37 Report to be submitted by the Classification


Societies and other Recognized Organizations
in case of a mayor Casualty

38 Safety Requirements for Cargo Vessels under


500 GRT

39 Exemption from the Requirements of


International Conventions and National
Regulations
40 Carriage of Timber deck Cargoes

41 Carriage of Solid Bulk Cargoes

42 Stowage and Securing of Containers, Unitized


Cargo and Vehicles

43 Minimum Safe Manning Certificate

44 Medical Certificate

45 International Convention on Tonnage


Measurement of Ships, 1969

46 Notice to mariners and Summary of


Corrections

47 Retention of the Official Log Book

48 "MODU Code" Replaced by MMC No. 87

49 List of Merchant Marine Consular Offices


Authorized to receive License/Seaman’s
Identity Card’s Applications

50 Issuance of Certificate of Competency

51 Application for Statutory Certificate of


Competency

52 Seaman’s Identity Card

53 Personnel exempted from the requirement of


having a Seaman’s Identity Card on
Panamanian Flag Passenger Vessels

54 Certificate of Competency

55 List of Countries whose licenses are validated Replaced by MMC No. 85


by Panama

56 Private Accounting Authorities Replaced by MMC No. 111

57 Regulations for Crew Accommodations

58 Regulations for Crew Accommodations

59 Cargo Ship Safety Certificate for Cargo Vessels


under 500 GRT and Cargo Ship
Radiotelephony Certificate for Cargo Vessels
under 300 GRT
60 Amendments to Panama Ship Mortgage Law

61 Regulations on Crew Accommodations for


Vessels under 500 GRT

62 Entry into force of ANNEX II to MARPOL 73/78

63 Surveys on Crew Accommodations

64 Exemption of the Requirements of Crew


Accommodations

65 Validity of the Minimum Safe Manning


Certificate

66 Certificate of Crew Accommodation -


Procedures

67 Issuance of Tonnage Certificates

68 Certificate of Proficiency in Survival Craft

69 Administrative Fee Imposed by the Republic of


Panama for each Statutory Certificate issued
by these Organizations

70 Panama Policy on Technical Matters

71 Official Documents on Board Panamanian Flag


Vessels and Standard Fees

72 Consular Fees and Legalization’s

73 Minimum Safe Manning Certificate

74 License Applications

75 Bulk Carriers entering Canadian Ports

76 "Declaration of Conformance" as per the Code


of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes (BC
Code)

77 Rules and Guidelines for MOUs

78 Minimum Safe Manning for Laid-up Vessels

79 Acceptance of home Country Lifeboatmen or


Survivalcraftsmen Certificates

80 Temporary reduction in Manning due to special


circumstances

81 MARPOL 73/78 – Retention on Board of Oily


Waste

82 "MODU Code – 1989"

83 Oil Record Book Changes

84 Consular Visits to Panamanian Flag Vessels

85 List of Countries whose licenses are validated


by Panama

86 Panama Policy ‘ GMDSS Licensing Replaced by MMC No. 94

87 MODU Code" – 1979 & 1989

88 Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan

89 ITC 69

90 New Rules of Measurements: PC/UMS

91 Panama policy Matters

92 GMDSS Radio Qualified Personnel on board Replaced by MMC No. 104


Panamanian flag Vessels

93 SOLAS 1988 Amendments, Chapter III


Regulations 6.2.1,

IMO Resolution 762(18)

94 Panama Policy – GMDSS Flag Vessels

95 Implementation of the ISM Code

96 Fire Protection Replaced by MMC No. 122

97 Implementation of the ISM Code – Required


Reporting Date

98 Navigational Charts, Publications, Records, Replaced by MMC No. 107


National Documents and International
Certificates Required onboard Panamanian
Vessels of 500 GRT and above

99 GMDSS Radio Qualified Personnel on board Replaced by MMC No. 104


Panamanian Flag Vessels

100 Implementation of the ISM Code Under Revision

101 New Requirements for the Registration of Amended by MMC No.102


Vessels
102 Amendments to MMC No. 101

103 GMDSS equipment requirements

104 GMDSS Radio Qualified Personnel on board Amended by MMC No.106


Panamanian Flag Vessels Policy

105 Global Maritime Distress and Safety System


(GMDSS) Fines

106 Amendments to MMC No. 104 GMDSS (Radio Replaced by MMC No.118
Qualified Personnel on board Panamanian Flag
Vessels Policy)

107 Publications and Records required on vessels


of 500 gross tonnage or above with
International Registration in the Panamanian
Registry

108 Publications and Records required on non-self Addition to MMC No. 107
propelled units certified under the Mobile
Offshore Drilling Units Code

109 Application of GMDSS in accordance with


International Tonnage Certificate ITC'69

110 Radio Direction Finder Apparatus Exemption


Certificate Ch. V, Reg. 12(p) of the 1997 Edition
of SOLAS 74/78

111 Radio Accounting Authorities

112 EPIRB PROGRAMMING AND REGISTRATION

113 Compliance with mandatory Ship reporting


systems

114 Policy matters

115 Implementation of the ISM Code for other


Cargo Ships and Mobile Drilling Units of 500
Gross Tonnage and upward - Required
reporting date.

116 Survey of Passenger Ships

117 Termination of Satellite Processing of Distress


Signals from 121.5 and 243 MHz emergency
beacons.

118 Amendments to MMC No. 106 GMDSS (Radio


Qualified Personnel on board Panamanian Flag
Vessels) update policy
119 Emergency Escape Breathing Devices (EEBD) REVISED

Interpretation of item d: see MMC


122

120 Issuance of Crew Accommodation Certificates

121 General Exemption to Ships without


Mechanical Means of Propulsion as per Reg.
V/3.1 of the 2000 Amendments to SOLAS 74.

122 Guidelines for the Maintenance and Inspection of


Fire-Protection Systems and Appliances.

Interpretation of MMC 119 (item d)

Minimal revision of 11.1 (April 2003)

123 Ship Security Guidelines NEW


ISPS CODE

124 Ship Security Assessment Guidelines NEW


ISPS CODE

125 Ship Security Plan Guidelines NEW


ISPS CODE

126 Ship Security Officers Guidelines NEW


ISPS CODE

127 Company Security Officers Guidelines NEW


ISPS CODE

128 Measures at Different Security Levels NEW


ISPS CODE

129 Pre-Arrival Notification NEW


ISPS CODE

130 Maritime Labor Inspections NEW


131 Implementation of the ISPS Code NEW & REVISED (June 1,
04)
ISPS CODE

132 ISPS Code Entry into Force. NEW & URGENT


Cut-off date for submission of SSPs.

133 Ship Security Alert System (SSAS) NEW

ISPS CODE

134 Validity of Course Certificates and Course NEW


Endorsements

135 Procedures for the issuance of the Continuous NEW


Synopsis Record (CSR) and the full term
International Ship Security Certificate (ISSC)

ISPS CODE

SECURITY CODE (ISPS)


The Department of Maritime Security of the Panama Maritime Authority has developed
the following Guidelines in compliance with the International Ship and Port Facility
Security Code (ISPS) concerning ship security:

MMC 123: Ship Security Guidelines

MMC: 124: Ship Security Assessment Guidelines

MMC 125: Ship Security Plan Guidelines

MMC 126: Ship Security Officers Guidelines

MMC 127: Company Security Officers Guidelines

MMC 128: Measures at Different Security Levels

MMC 129: Pre-Arrival Notification

MMC 131: Implementation of the ISPS Code (REVISED)

MMC 132: ISPS Code Entry into Force (Cut-off date for submission of SSPs)

MMC 133: Ship Security Alert System (SSAS)

MMC 135: Procedures for issuance of CSR and full term ISSC
To view all those circulars, please click HERE

The objective of these guidelines on Ship Security is to assist industry, employers,


workers and others involved to respond to the risk to vessels from the threat posed by
unlawful acts in the maritime environment. The guidelines provide guidance framework
to develop and implement a ship security strategy commensurate with identified threats
to security.

The Guidelines on ship security are part of an integrated approach to security and
safety without prejudice to what is contemplated in the ISPS Code.

The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) adoption in December 2002 of


amendments to its SOLAS Convention and the ISPS Code addressed both ship and
port facility (location where the ship/port interface takes place) security. These
guidelines are intended to be compatible with the provisions of the SOLAS ISPS Code.

Ship security guidelines, as far as possible and except for ease of reference, should not
replace, duplicate or create extraneous procedures or functions to those in the ISPS
Code. Where there is no ISPS terminology, definition or procedure that meets the
requirements of these guidelines alternative terminology, definitions and procedures
should be compatible with the ISPS Code.

Nothing in these guidelines is intended to prejudice the rights or obligations of the State
under international law. These guidelines should be interpreted in a manner that does
not undermine the ILO conventions on workers rights.

These security guidelines do not override or abrogate the Panama Maritime Authority, or
any authorized in their behalf, as well as any commercial and industrial corporation or
an individual’s responsibility to comply with the laws, regulations and rules applicable in
the respective port or the Country of Panama. The guidance is not a substitute for
applicable legal requirements nor is it regulation itself.

The scope of the guidelines is to promote recognized security roles, tasks and
measures to deter, detect and respond to unlawful acts against vessels serving on
international voyages and maritime operations.

These guidelines were developed to assist owners and operators to establish protective
measures that are appropriate to their specific vessel. Knowing that vessels are unique,
owners and/or operators may seek an alternative to the specific protective measures
recommended, demonstrating that such alternative to the protective measure provides
an acceptable level of protection.

Merchant Marine Circular No. 123


To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security
Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: SHIP SECURITY GUIDELINES

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS Code)

The Department of Maritime Security of the Panama Maritime Authority has developed the
following Guidelines in compliance with the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code
(ISPS) concerning ship security.

PREFACE:

1. 1. The objective of these guidelines on Ship Security is to assist industry, employers,


workers and others involved to respond to the risk to vessels from the threat posed by
unlawful acts in the maritime environment. The guidelines provide guidance framework to
develop and implement a ship security strategy commensurate with identified threats to
security.

2. 2. The Guidelines on ship security is part of an integrated approach to security and safety
without prejudice to what is contemplated in the ISPS Code.

3. 3. The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) adoption in December 2002 of


amendments to its SOLAS Convention and the ISPS Code addressed both ship and port
facility (location where the ship/port interface takes place) security. These guidelines are
intended to be compatible with the provisions of the SOLAS ISPS Code.

4. 4. Ship security guidelines, as far as possible and except for ease of reference, should not
replace, duplicate or create extraneous procedures or functions to those in the ISPS Code.
Where there is no ISPS terminology, definition or procedure that meets the requirements of
these guidelines alternative terminology, definitions and procedures should be compatible
with the ISPS Code.

5. 5. Nothing in these guidelines is intended to prejudice the rights or obligations of the State
under international law. These guidelines should be interpreted in a manner that does not
undermine the ILO conventions on workers rights.

6. 6. These security guidelines do not override or abrogate the Panama Maritime Authority, or
any authorized in their behalf, as well as any commercial and industrial corporation or an
individual’s responsibility to comply with the laws, regulations and rules applicable in the
respective port or the Country of Panama. The guidance is not a substitute for applicable
legal requirements nor is it regulation itself.
7. 7. The scope of the guidelines is to promote recognized security roles, tasks and
measures to deter, detect and respond to unlawful acts against vessels serving on
international voyages and maritime operations.

8. 8. These guidelines were developed to assist owners and operators to establish protective
measures that are appropriate to their specific vessel. Knowing that vessels are unique,
owners and/or operators may seek an alternative to the specific protective measures
recommended, demonstrating that such alternative to the protective measure provides an
acceptable level of protection.

September 2003

Merchant Marine Circular No. 124


To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security
Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: SHIP SECURITY ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS Code)

1. 1. Section 8 of Part A of the ISPS Code requires the Company Security Officer (CSO) to
ensure that, for each ship for which he has security responsibilities, a Security Assessment is
carried out by persons with appropriate skills to evaluate the security of a ship, in accordance
with ISPS Code.

2. 2. The Ship Security Assessment (SSA) is considered to be an essential and integral part of
the process of developing and updating the Ship Security Plan.

3. 3. A Shipping Company can carry out its own SSA.

4. 4. The SSA must include an On Scene Security Survey and, at least, the following
elements:

1. 1. Identification of existing security measures, procedures and operations;

2. 2. Identification and evaluation of key shipboard operations that it is important to


protect;

3. 3. 3. Identification of possible threats to the key shipboard operations and the


likelihood of their occurrence, in order to establish and prioritize security measures; and

4. 4. Identification of weaknesses, including human factors, in the infrastructure, policies


and procedures.

5. 5. The SSA must be documented, reviewed, accepted and retained by the Company.
6. 6. Prior to commencing the SSA, the CSO should ensure that advantage is taken of
information available on the assessment of threat for the ports at which the ship will call or at
which passengers embark or disembark, and about the port facilities and their protective
measures. The CSO should study previous reports on similar security needs. Where
feasible, the CSO should meet with appropriate persons on the ship and in the port facilities
to discuss the purpose and methodology of the assessment. The CSO should follow and
specific guidance offered by the Contracting Governments.

7. 7. A SSA should address the following elements on board the ship:

1. 1. physical security;

2. 2. structural integrity;

3. 3. personnel protection systems;

4. 4. procedural policies;

5. 5. radio and telecommunication systems, including computer systems and networks; &

6. 6. other areas that may, if damaged or used for illicit observation, pose a risk to people,
property, or operations on board the ship or within a port facility.

8. 8. Those involved in a SSA should be able to draw upon expert in assistance regarding to:

1. 1. knowledge of current security threats and patterns;

2. 2. recognition and detection of weapons, dangerous substances and devices;

3. 3. recognition, on a non-discriminatory basis of characteristic and behavioral patterns


persons who are likely to threaten security;

4. 4. techniques used to circumvent security incident;

5. 5. methods used to cause a security incident.

6. 6. effects of explosives on ship structures and equipment;

7. 7. ship security;

8. 8. ship/port interface business practices;

9. 9. contingency planning, emergency preparedness and response.

10. 10. physical security;

11. 11. radio and telecommunications systems, including computer systems and networks;

12. 12. marine engineering; and

13. 13. ship and port operations.


9. 9. The CSO should obtain and record the information required to conduct an Assessment,
including:

1. 1. the general layout of the ship;

2. 2. the location of areas which should have restricted access, such as the bridge, spaces
in which the main propulsion or generating machinery, navigation equipment, fire control
station, emergency power and communications are located.

3. 3. the location and function of each actual or potential access point to the ship;

4. 4. changes in the tide which may have an impact on the vulnerability or security of the
ship;

5. 5. cargo spaces and stowage arrangements;

6. 6. locations where the ship’s stores and essential maintenance equipment is stores;

7. 7. locations where unaccompanied baggage is stored;

8. 8. emergency and stand-by equipment available to maintain essential services;

9. 9. number of ship’s personnel, any existing security duties and any existing training
practices of the Company;

10. 10. existing security and safety equipment for the protection of passengers and ship’s
personnel.

11. 11. escape and evacuation routes and assembly stations which have to be maintained to
ensure the orderly and safe emergency evacuation of the ship;

12. 12. existing agreements with private security companies providing ship/waterside
security services; and.

13. 13. existing security measures and procedures in effect, including inspection and control
procedures, identification systems, surveillance and monitoring equipment, personnel
identification documents and communications, alarms, lighting, access control and other
appropriate systems.

10. 10. The SSA should consider the continuing relevance of the existing security measures and
guidance, procedures and operations, under both routine and emergency conditions and
should determine security guidance relevant to:

1. 1. restricted areas;

2. 2. response procedures to fire or other emergency conditions;


3. 3. the level of supervision of the ship’s personnel, passengers, visitors, vendors, repair
technicians, dock workers etc;

4. 4. the frequency and effectiveness of security patrols;

5. 5. access control systems, including identification systems;

6. 6. security communications systems and procedures;

7. 7. security doors, barriers and lighting; and

8. 8. security and surveillance equipment and systems, if any

11. 11. The SSA should consider the persons, activities, services and operations that it is
important to protect. This includes:

1. 1. the ship’s personnel;

2. 2. passengers, visitors, vendors, repair technicians, port facility personnel, etc…

3. 3. the capacity to maintain safe navigation and emergency response;

4. 4. the cargo, particularly dangerous goods or hazardous substances;

5. 5. ship’s stores;

6. 6. any ship security communications equipment and systems; and

7. 7. any ship’s security surveillance equipment and systems.

12. 12. The SSA should consider the persons, activities, services and operations that it is
important to protect. This includes:

1. 1. the ship’s personnel;

2. 2. passengers, visitors, vendors, repair technicians, port facility personnel etc;

3. 3. the capacity to maintain safe navigation and emergency response;

4. 4. the cargo, particularly dangerous goods or hazardous substances;

5. 5. ship’s stores;

6. 6. any ship security communication equipment and systems; and

7. 7. any ship’s security surveillance equipment and systems.

13. 13. The SSA should consider all possible threats, which may include the following types of
security incidents:
1. 1. damage to, or destruction of, the ship or port facility, e.g. by explosive devices, arson,
sabotage or vandalism;

2. 2. hijacking or seizure of the ship or of persons on board;

3. 3. tampering with cargo, essential ship equipment or systems or ship’s stores;

4. 4. unauthorized access or used, including presence of stowaways;

5. 5. smuggling weapons or equipment, including weapons of mass destruction;

6. 6. use of the ship to carry those intending to cause a security incident and/or their
equipment;

7. 7. use of the ship itself as a weapon or as a means to cause damage or destruction;

8. 8. attacks from seaward whilst at berth or at anchor; and

9. 9. attacks whilst at sea.

14. 14. The SSA should take into account all possible vulnerabilities, which may include:

1. 1. conflicts between safety and security measures;

2. 2. conflicts between shipboard duties and security assignments;

3. 3. watchkeeping duties, number of ship’s personnel, and any implications to crew


fatigue, alertness and performance;

4. 4. any identified security training deficiencies; and

5. 5. any security equipment and systems, including communication systems.

15. 15. The CSO and Ship Security Officer (SSO) should always have regard to the effect that
security measures may have on ship’s personnel who will remain on the ship for long
periods. When developing security measures, particular consideration should be given to the
convenience, comfort and personal privacy of the ship’s personnel and their ability to
maintain their effectiveness over long periods.

16. 16. Upon completion of the SSA, a report must be prepared, consisting of a summary of
how the assessment was conducted, a description of each vulnerability found during the
assessment, and a description of counter measures that could be used to address each
vulnerability. The report must be protected from unauthorized access or disclosure.

On Scene Security Survey


17. 17. The On Scene Security Survey is an integral part of any SSA. The On Scene Security
Survey should examine and evaluate existing shipboard protective measures, procedures and
operations for:

1. 1. ensuring the performance of all ship security duties;

2. 2. monitoring restricted areas to ensure that only authorized persons have access;

3. 3. controlling access to the ship, including any identification systems;

4. 4. monitoring of deck areas and areas surrounding the ship;

5. 5. controlling the embarkation of persons and their effects (accompanied and


unaccompanied baggage and ship’s personnel personal effects);

6. 6. supervising the handling of cargo and the delivery of ship’s stores; and

7. 7. ensuring that ship security communication, information, and equipment are readily
available.

Merchant Marine Circular No. 125

To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security


Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: SHIP SECURITY PLAN GUIDELINES

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS Code)

1. 1. According with the Part A 9, ISPS Code requires each ship to carry on board a Ship
Security Plan (SSP) approval by its flag state or by an organization recognized by it to carry
out such approvals, known as a Recognized Security Organization (RSO).

2. 2. The Company Security Officer (CSO) has the responsibility of ensuring that the plan is
prepared and submitted for approval. The content of each individual SSP will vary depending
on the particular ship it covers. The Ship Security Assessments (SSA) will have identified the
particular features of the ship and the potential threats and vulnerabilities. The preparation of
the SSP will require these features to be addressed in detail.

3. 3. All SSP have to make provision for the three, internationally adopted, Security Levels:

A- A- Security Level 1, normal; the level at which ships and port facilities will normally
operate;

B- B- Security Level 2, heightened; the level applying for as long as there is a heightened
risk of a security incident;
C- C- Security Level 3, exceptional; the level applying for the period of time when there is
a probable or imminent risk of a security incident.

4. 4. The Plan must be written in the working language or languages of the ship. If the
language or languages used are not English, French or Spanish, a translation into one of these
languages must be included, preferably English. The Plan must address, at least, the
following (Part A 9.4 ISPS Code):

1. 1. Measures designed to prevent weapons, dangerous substances and devices


intended for use against people, ships or ports, and the carriage of which is not
authorized on board the ship;

2. 2. Identification of the restricted areas and measures for the prevention of unauthorized
access;

3. 3. Measures for the prevention of unauthorized access to the ship;

4. 4. Procedures for responding to security threats or breaches of security, including


provisions for maintaining critical operations of the ship or ship/port interface;

5. 5. Procedures for responding to any security instructions Contracting Governments may


give at Security Level 3;

6. 6. Procedures for evacuation in case of security threats or breaches of security;

7. 7. Duties of shipboard personnel assigned security responsibilities and of other


shipboard personnel on security aspects;

8. 8. Procedures for auditing the security activities;

9. 9. Procedures for training, drills and exercises associated with the Plan;

10. 10. Procedures for interfacing with port facility security activities;

11. 11. Procedures for the periodic review and updating of the Plan ;

12. 12. Procedures for reporting security incidents;

13. 13. Identification of the Ship Security Officer (SSO);

14. 14. Identification of the CSO including 24-hour contact details;

15. 15. Procedures to ensure the inspection, testing, calibration, and maintenance of security
equipment provided on board, if any;

16. 16. Frequency of testing or calibration of security equipment provided on board, if any;
17. 17. Identification of the locations where the ship security alert system activation points
are provided (this information should be kept elsewhere on board in a document know to
the master, the SSO and other shipboard personnel as decided by the Company);

18. 18. Procedures, instructions and guidance on the use of the ship security alert system,
including testing, activation, deactivation, resetting, and procedures to limit false alerts.

5. 5. The SSP must (Part B 9.2 ISPS Code):

1. 1. Detail organizational structure of security for the ship;

2. 2. Detail the ship’s relationships with the Company, port facilities, other ships and
relevant authorities with security responsibility;

3. 3. Detail the communication systems to allow effective continuous communication


within the ship and between the ship and others, including port facilities;

4. 4. Detail basic security measures for Security Level 1, both operational and physical,
that will always be in place;

5. 5. Detail the additional security measures that will allow the ship to progress without
delay to Security Level 2 and, when necessary, to Security Level 3;

6. 6. Provide for regular review, or audit, of the SSP and for its amendment in response to
experience or changing circumstances;

7. 7. Detail reporting procedures to the Department of Maritime Security of the Panama


Maritime Authority contact points;

6. 6. In addition, the SSP should establish the following, which relate to all Security Levels
(Part B 9.7 ISPS Code);

1. 1. Duties and responsibilities of all shipboard personnel with a security role;

2. 2. Procedures of safeguards necessary to allow continuous communications to be


maintained at all times;

3. 3. Procedures needed to assess the continuing effectiveness of security procedures and


any security and surveillance equipment and systems, including procedures for
identifying and responding to equipment systems failure or malfunction;

4. 4. Procedures and practices to protect security sensitive information held in paper or


electronic format;

5. 5. The type and maintenance requirements of security and surveillance equipment and
systems, if any;

6. 6. Procedures to ensure the timely submission, and assessment, 0of reports relating to
possible breaches of security or security concerns;
7. 7. Procedures to establish, maintain and update an inventory of any dangerous goods or
hazardous substances carried on board, including their location.

7. 7. The Plan can be kept in an electronic format. In such case, it must be protected by
measures aimed at preventing unauthorized access, disclosure, deletion, destruction or
amendment (Part A 9.6 ISPS Code).

8. 8. The Plan should address the security measures to be taken at each Security Level
covering:

1. 1. Access to the ship by ship’s personnel, passengers, visitors, etc;

2. 2. Restricted areas of the ship;

3. 3. Handling of cargo;

4. 4. Delivery ship’s stores

5. 5. Handling unaccompanied baggage;

6. 6. Monitoring the security of the ship.

Merchant Marine Circular No. 126

To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security


Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: SHIP SECURITY OFFICERS GUIDELINES

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS Code)

1. 1. Section 12 of Part A of the ISPS Code requires that companies designate a Ship Security
Officer (SSO) on each ship.

2. 2. The duties and responsibilities of the SSO include, but are not limited to (Part A 12.2
ISPS Code):

1. Undertaking regular security inspections of the ship to ensure that appropriate security
measures are maintained;

2. Maintaining and supervising the implementation of the Ship Security Plan (SSP),
monitoring the continuing relevance and effectiveness of the Plan, including the
undertaking of internal audits and any amendments to the Plan;
3. Co-ordinating the security aspects of the handling of cargo and ship’s stores with other
shipboard personnel and with the relevant Port Facility Security Officers (PFSO);

4. Proposing modifications to the SSP;

5. Reporting to the Company Security Officer (CSO) any deficiencies and non-conformities
identified during internal audits, periodic reviews, security inspections and verifications
of compliance, and implementing any corrective actions;

6. Enhancing security awareness and vigilance on board;

7. Ensuring that adequate training has been provided to shipboard personnel, as appropriate;

8. Reporting all security incidents;

9. Co-ordinating implementation of the SSP with the CSO and the relevant PFSO;

10. Ensuring that any security equipment is properly operated, tested, calibrated and
maintained;

11. Reviewing and completing the Declaration of Security (DOS) on behalf of the ship.

3. 3. According with Part B 13.1 ISPS Code requires the SSO to have knowledge and receive
training in some or all of the following, as appropriate:

1. Security administration;

2. Relevant international conventions, codes and recommendations;

3. Relevant government legislation and regulations;

4. Responsibilities and functions of other security organizations;

5. Methodology of SSA;

6. Methods of Ship Security Surveys and inspections;

7. Ship and port operations conditions;

8. Ship and port facility security measures;

9. Emergency preparedness and response and contingency planning;

10. Instruction techniques for security training and education, including security measures
and procedures;

11. Handling sensitive security related information and security related communications;

12. Knowledge of current security threats and patterns;


13. Recognition and detection weapons, dangerous substances and devices;

14. Recognition, on a non-discriminatory basis, of characteristics and behavioral patterns of


persons who are like to threaten security;

15. Techniques used to circumvent security measures;

16. Security equipment and systems and their operational limitations;

17. Methods of conducting audits, inspection, control and monitoring;

18. Methods of physical searches and non-intrusive inspections;

19. Security drills and exercises, including drills and exercises with the port facilities;

20. Assessment of security drills and exercises.

4. 4. In addition the SSO should have adequate knowledge of, and receive training in, some or
all of the following ship specific areas, as appropriate (Part B 13.2 ISPS Code):

1. The layout of the ship;

2. The SSP and related procedures (including scenario-based training on how to respond);

3. Crowd management and control techniques;

4. Operation of security equipment and systems;

5. Testing, calibration and, whilst at sea, maintenance of security equipment and systems.

5. 5. Other shipboard personnel having specific security duties should have sufficient
knowledge and ability to perform their assigned duties, including, as appropriate (Part B 13.3
ISPS Code):

1. Knowledge of current security threats and patterns;

2. Recognition and detection of weapons, dangerous substances and devices;

3. Recognition on a non-discriminatory basis of characteristics and behavioral patterns of


persons who are like to threaten security;

4. Techniques used to circumvent security measures;

5. Crowd management and control techniques;

6. Security related communications;

7. Knowledge of the emergency procedures and contingency plans;


8. Operations of security equipment and systems;

9. Testing, calibration and, whilst at sea, maintenance of security equipment and systems;

10. Inspection, control and monitoring techniques;

11. Methods of physical searches of persons, personal effects, baggage, cargo and ship’s
stores.

6. 6. All other shipboard personnel should have sufficient knowledge of and be familiar with
relevant provisions of the SSP, including (Part B 13.4 ISPS Code)

1. The meaning and the consequential requirements of the different Security Levels;

2. Knowledge of the emergency procedures and contingency plans;

3. Recognition and detection of weapons, dangerous substances and devices;

4. Recognition, on a non-discriminatory basis, of characteristics and behavioral patterns of


persons who are considered apt to threaten security;

5. Techniques used to circumvent security measures.

Merchant Marine Circular No. 127

To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security


Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: COMPANY SECURITY OFFICERS GUIDELINES

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS Code)

1. 1. Section 11 of Part A of the ISPS Code requires each shipping Company to designate a
person to act as the Company Security Officer (CSO) for one or more ships, depending on
the number or types of ships the Company operates, provided it is clearly identified for
which ships the person is responsible.

2. 2. A Company may, depending on the number or types of ships it operates, designate


several persons as Company Security Officers, provided it is clearly identified for which
ships each persons is responsible.

3. 3. In respect of such ships, the duties and responsibilities of the Company Security Officer
(CSO) include, but are not limited to (Part A 11.2 ISPS Code):
1. Advising the level of threats likely to be encountered by the ship, using appropriate
Security Assessments and other relevant information;

2. Ensuring that Ship Security Assessment (SSA) is carried out;

3. Ensuring the development, the submission for approval, and thereafter the
implementation and maintenance of the Ship Security Plan (SSP) and its placement on
board the appropriate ship;

4. Monitoring the continuing relevance and effectiveness of the plan, ensuring that the Ship
Security Plan (SSP) is modified, as appropriate, to correct deficiencies and satisfies the
security requirements of the individual ship;

5. Arranging for internal audits and reviews of security activities;

6. Arranging for the initial and subsequent verifications of the ship by the Flag State or the
Recognized Security Organization (RSO);

7. Ensuring that deficiencies and non-conformities identified during internal audits, periodic
reviews, security inspections and verifications of compliance are promptly addressed and
dealt with;

8. Enhancing security awareness and vigilance;

9. Ensuring adequate training for personnel responsible for the security, of the ship;

10. Ensuring effective communication and co-operation between the Ship Security Officer
(SSO) and the relevant Port Facility Security Officers (PFSO);

11. Ensuring consistency between security requirements and safety requirements;

12. Ensuring that, if sister-ship or fleet security plans are used, the plan for each ship
reflects relevant ship-specific information accurately;

13. Ensuring that any alternative or equivalent arrangements approved for a particular ship
or group of ships are implemented and maintained.

4. 4. According with Part B 13.1 ISPS Code requires the Company Security Officer (CSO),
and appropriate shore based Company personnel, to have knowledge of, and training in,
some or all the following, as appropriate:

1. 1. Security administration;

2. 2. Relevant international conventions, codes and recommendations;

3. 3. Relevant government legislation and regulations;

4. 4. Responsibilities and functions of other security organizations;

5. 5. Methodology of Ship Security Assessment (SSA);

6. 6. Methods of Ship Security Surveys and inspection.


7. 7. Ship and port operations and conditions;

8. 8. Ship and port facility security measures;

9. 9. Emergency preparedness and response, and contingency planning.

10. 10. Instruction techniques for security training and education, including security
measures and procedures;

11. 11. Handling sensitive security related information and security related communications;

12. 12. Knowledge of current security threats and patterns;

13. 13. Recognition and detection of weapons, dangerous substances and devices;

14. 14. Recognition, on a non-discriminatory basis, of characteristics and behavioral


patterns of persons who are likely to threaten security;

15. 15. Techniques used to circumvent security measures;

16. 16. Security equipment and systems and their operational limitations;

17. 17. Methods of conducting audits, inspection, control and monitoring;

18. 18. Methods of physical searches and non-intrusive inspections;

19. 19. Security drills and exercises, including drills and exercise with port facilities; and

20. 20. Assessment of security drills and exercises.

Merchant Marine Circular No. 128

To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security


Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: MEASURES AT DIFFERENT SECURITY LEVELS

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS Code)

Measures which might be taken at each of the Security Levels outlined by the ISPS Code:
Security Level 1
For Access Control

1. 1. The Ship Security Plan should establish the security measures to control access to the
ship, where the following may be applied:

1. 1. checking the identify of all persons seeking to board the ship and confirming their
reasons for doing so by checking, for example, joining instructions, passenger tickets,
boarding passes, work orders etc:

2. 2. in liaison with the port facility, ensuring that designated secure areas are established
in which inspections and searching of people, baggage (including carry on items),
personal effects, vehicles and their contents can take place;

3. 3. in liaison with the port facility, ensuring that vehicles destined to be loaded on board
car carriers, ro-ro and other passenger ships are subjected to search prior to loading, in
accordance with the frequency required in the Ship Security Plan.

4. 4. segregating checked persons and their personal effects from unchecked persons
and their personal effects;

5. 5. segregating embarking from disembarking passengers;

6. 6. identifying access points that should be secured or attended to prevent unauthorized


access;

7. 7. securing, by locking or other means, access to unattended spaces adjoining areas


to which passengers and visitors have access; and

8. 8. providing security briefings to all ship personnel on possible threats, the procedures
for reporting suspicious persons, objects or activities and the need for vigilance.

Security Level 1
For Restricted Areas

2. 2. The Ship Security Plan should establish the security measures to be applied to restricted
areas, which may include:

1. 1. locking or securing access points;

2. 2. using surveillance equipment to monitor the areas;

3. 3. using guards or patrols; and

4. 4. using automatic intrusion detection devices to alert the ship’s personnel of


unauthorized access.
Security Level 1
For Handling of Cargo

3. 3. The Ship Security Plan should establish the security measures to be applied during cargo
handling, which may include.

1. 1. routine checking of cargo, cargo transport until and cargo spaces prior to, and during,
cargo handling operations;

2. 2. checks to ensure that cargo being loaded matches the cargo documentation;

3. 3. ensuring, in liaison with the port facility, that vehicles to be loaded on board car
carriers, ro-ro and passenger ships are subjected to search prior to loading, in accordance
with the frequency required in the Ship Security Plan, and

4. 4. checking of seals or others methods used to prevent tampering.

Security Level 1
For Delivery of Ship’s Stores

4. 4. The Ship Security Plan should establish the security measures to be applied during
delivery of ship’s stores, which may include.

1. 1. checking to ensure stores match the order prior to being loaded on board; and

2. 2. ensuring immediate secure stowage of ship’s stores.

Security Level 1
For Handling Unaccompanied Baggage

5. 5. The Ship Security Plan should establish the security measures to be applied when
handling unaccompanied baggage is screened or searched up to and including 100 percent,
which may include use of x-ray screening.

Security Level 1
For Monitoring the Security of the Ship

6. 6. The Ship Security Plan should establish the security measures to be applied which may
be a combination of lighting, watchkeepers, security guards or use of security and
surveillance equipment to allow ship’s security personnel to observe the ship in general, and
barriers and restricted areas in particular.

7. 7. The Ship’s deck and access points to the ship should be illuminated during hours of
darkness and periods of low visibility while conducting ship/port interface activities or at a
port facility or anchorage when necessary. While underway, when necessary, ships should
use the maximum lighting available consistent with safe navigation, having regard to the
provisions of the International Regulation for the Prevention of Collisions at Sea in force.

8. 8. The following should be considered when establishing the appropriate level and location
of lighting:

1. 1. whilst at anchor or alongside, the ship’s personnel should be able to detect activities
beyond the ship, on both the shoreside and the waterside;

2. 2. coverage should include the area on and around the ship;

3. 3. coverage should facilitate personnel identification at access points; and

4. 4. coverage may be provided through co-ordination with the port facility.

Security Level 2
For Access Control

9. 9. The Ship Security Plan should establish the security measures to be applied to protect
against a heightened risk of a security incident to ensure higher vigilance and tighter control,
which may include:

1. 1. assigning additional personnel to patrol deck areas during silent hours to deter
unauthorized access;

2. 2. limiting the number of access points to the ship, identifying those to be closed and
the means of adequately securing them;

3. 3. deterring waterside access to the ship, including, for example, the provision of boat
patrols in liaison with the port facility;

4. 4. establishing a restricted area on the shoreside of the ship, in close co-operation with
the port facility;

5. 5. increasing the frequency and detail of searches of people, personal effects, and
vehicles being embarked or loaded onto the ship;

6. 6. escorting visitors on the ship;

7. 7. providing additional specific security briefings to all ship personnel on any identified
threats, re-emphasizing the procedures for reporting suspicious persons,

8. 8. carrying out a full or partial search of the ship.

Security Level 2
Restricted Areas
10. 10. The frequency and intensity of the monitoring of, and control of access to, restricted
areas should be increased to ensure that only authorized persons have access. The Ship
Security Plan should establish the additional security measures to be applied, which may
include:

1. 1. establishing restricted areas adjacent to access points;

2. 2. continuously monitoring surveillance equipment; and

3. 3. dedicating additional personnel to guard and patrol restricted areas.

Security Level 2
For Handling of Cargo

11. 11. The Ship Security Plan should establish the additional security measures to be applied
during cargo handling, which may include:

1. 1. detailed checking of cargo, cargo transport units and cargo spaces;

2. 2. intensified checks to ensure that only the intended cargo is loaded;

3. 3. intensified searching of vehicles to be loaded on car carriers, ro-ro and passenger


ships; and

4. 4. increased frequency and detail in checking of seals or other methods used to prevent
tampering.

12. 12. Detailed checking of cargo may be accomplished by the following means;

1. 1. increasing the frequency and detail of visual and physical examination;

2. 2. increasing the frequency of the use of scanning/detection equipment, mechanical


devices, or dogs; and

3. 3. co-coordinating enhanced security measures with the shipper or other responsible


party in accordance with an established agreement and procedures.

Security Level 2
For Delivery of Ship’s Stores

13. 13. The Ship Security Plan should establish the additional security measures to be applied
during delivery of ship’s stores by exercising checks prior to receiving stores on board and
intensifying inspections.
Security Level 2
For Handling Unaccompanied Baggage

14. 14. The Ship Security Plan should establish the additional security measures to be applied
when handling unaccompanied baggage, which should include 100 percent x-ray screening
of all unaccompanied baggage.

Security Level 2
For Monitoring the Security of the Ship

15. 15. The Ship Security Plan should establish the additional security measures to be applied to
enhance the monitoring and surveillance capabilities, which may include:

1. 1. increasing the frequency and detail of security patrols;

2. 2. increasing the coverage and intensity of lighting or the use of security and
surveillance equipment;

3. 3. assigning additional personnel as security lookouts; and

4. 4. ensuring co-ordination with waterside boat patrols, and foot or vehicle patrols on the
shoreside, when provided.

Security Level 3
For Access Control

16. 16. The Ship should comply with the instructions issued by those responding to the security
incident or threat thereof. The Ship Security Plan should detail the security measures which
could be taken by the ship, in close co-operation with those responding and the port Facility,
which may include:

1. 1. limiting access to a single, controlled, access point;

2. 2. granting access only to those responding to the security incident or threat thereof;

3. 3. directing persons on board;

4. 4. suspending embarkation or disembarkation;

5. 5. suspending cargo handling operations, deliveries etc;

6. 6. evacuating the ship;

7. 7. moving the ship; and

8. 8. preparing for a full or partial search of the ship.


Security Level 3
For Restricted Areas

17. 17. The ship should comply with the instructions issued by those responding to the security
incident or threat thereof. The Ship Security Plan should detail the security measures which
could be taken by the ship, in close co-operation with those responding and the port facility,
which may include:

1. 1. establishing additional restricted areas on the ship in proximity to the security incident
or the believed location of the security threat, to which access is denied; and

2. 2. searching restricted areas as part of a search of the ship.

Security Level 3
For Handling of Cargo

18. 18. The Ship should comply with the instructions issued by those responding to the security
Incident or threat thereof. The Ship Security Plan should detail the security measures which
could be taken by the ship, in close co-operation with those responding and the port facility,
which may include:

1. 1. suspending loading or unloading of cargo; and

2. 2. verifying the inventory of dangerous goods and hazardous substances carried on


board, if any, and their location.

Security Level 3
For Delivery of Ship’s Stores

19. 19. The ship should comply with the instructions issued by those responding to the security
Incident or threat thereof. The Ship Security Plan should detail the security measures which
could be taken by the ship, in close co-operation with those responding and the port Facility,
which may include:

1. subjecting ship’s stores to more extensive checking

2. preparation for restriction or suspension of handling of ship’s stores; and

3. refusal to accept ship’ stores on board the ship.

Security Level 3
For Handling Unaccompanied Baggage

20. 20. The ship should comply with the instructions issued by those responding to the security
incident or threat thereof. The Ship Security Plan should detail the security measures which
could be taken by the ship, in close co-operation with those responding and the port facility,
which may include:

1. 1. subjecting such baggage to more extensive screening, for example x-raying it from at
least two different angles;

2. 2. preparing to restrict or suspend the handling of unaccompanied baggage; and

3. 3. refusing to accept unaccompanied baggage on board the ship.

Security Level 3
For Monitoring the Security of the Ship

21. 21. The Ship should comply with the instructions issued by those responding to the security
incident or threat thereof. The Ship Security Plan should detail the security measures which
could be taken by the ship, in close co-operation with those responding and the port facility,
which may include:

1. 1. switching on all lighting on the ship or illuminating its vicinity;

2. 2. switching on all on board surveillance equipment capable of recording activities on,


or in the vicinity of, the ship;

3. 3. maximizing the length of time such surveillance equipment can continue to record;

4. 4. preparing for underwater inspection of the hull of the ship; and

5. 5. initiating measures, including the slow revolution of the ship’s propellers, if


practicable, to deter underwater access to the hull of the ship.

September 2003

Merchant Marine Circular No. 129

To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security


Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: PRE-ARRIVAL NOTIFICATION

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS Code)

1. Effective from September 15th 2003, pre-arrival notification for vessels approaching
Panamanian waters will be 96 (ninety six) hours and must include copy of crew list, and detail of
cargo if any. This requirement also applies to vessels bound for the Panama Canal with
scheduled transit and also to those with a voyage time less than 96 hours from their previous
port of call.

2. If the vessel is due for transit it should follow MR´s Advisory to Shipping No. A-17-2003
(Panama Canal Authority Advisory). If the vessel is going to enter a Panamanian port, please
submit information to:

Panama Maritime Authority (PMA)


Maritime Security Department
E-mail: MSD@amp.gob.pa
Fax: (507) 232-8268

September 2003
Merchant Marine Circular No. 130

To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security


Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: MARITIME LABOR INSPECTIONS

References: Law No. 2, Decree Law No. 7, Decree Law No. 8


Resolution J.D. 022, Resolution J.D. 007, Resolution J.D. 009

1. 1. The purpose of this Merchant Marine Circular is to announce new regulations applicable
to Maritime Labor Inspections on board Panamanian flagged ships.

2. 2. According to Chapter Ten “Inspections” of Law Decree No. 8 of 1998 “whereby work at
sea and in navigable waterways is regulated” on board Panamanian-registered vessels, the
Panama Maritime Authority (PMA) through the Directorate General of Seafarers has
approved the regulations related to Maritime Labor Inspections by Resolution J. D 022 of
August 14, 2003.

3. 3. Effective on 5 September 2003, most of the Panamanian-registered vessels engaged in


domestic and international trade will be subject to maritime labor inspections, to ensure
compliance with the national and international standards which were ratified by Panama,
regarding the implementation of regulations about living and working conditions, crew
accommodations, certifications and manning.

4. 4. The owner(s)/operator(s), charterers and others responsible for the operation of one or
more vessels sailing under the Panamanian flag, as well as their agents or representatives,
and the Master of such vessels shall be under obligation to admit the Inspection personnel
on board, cooperate with them and allow them to carry out the inspection.

October 2003
Merchant Marine Circular No. 131 REVISED
To: Shipowners/Operators, Masters, Recognized Security
Organizations and Marine Inspectors of
Panamanian Registered Vessels

Subject: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ISPS CODE

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 Amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships
and
Port Facilities (ISPS Code)

1. The purpose of this Merchant Marine Circular is to serve as guidance regarding the
amendments to the SOLAS Convention and to the new Chapters regarding Maritime
Security and the new ISPS Code.

2. The diplomatic Conference on Maritime Security held in London in December 2002 adopted
new provisions in the International Convention for the safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974
and the International Code for the Security of Ships and of Port Facilities (ISPS Code) to
enhance maritime security. The ISPS Code is entering into effect internationally on the 1st of
July 2004.

3. Having regard to the importance of the ISPS Code, the Panama Maritime Authority through
its Board of Directors created the Maritime Security Department. This department has the
responsibility to oversee the implementation of the ISPS Code and responds solely to the
Administrator.

4. The Panama Maritime Authority has outlined the implementation of the Code in a four-step
process:

1. The elaboration of the Ship Security Plans (SSP);


2. The evaluation of the Ship Security Plans (SSP);
3. The verification of the Ship Security Plans (SSP);and
4. The issuance of the Full Term ISSC (five years validity).

5. Panama will incorporate the figure of Recognized Security Organizations (RSO) in the
implementation of the ISPS Code; and multiple Interim Guidelines have been issued on the
different aspects of the Code: Ships, Port Facilities, Companies and Recognized Security
Organizations. For further information regarding this subject, please write to
MSD@amp.gob.pa

6. The Panama Maritime Authority has recognized as the RSOs responsible for the evaluation
of Ship Security Plans (SSP):

1. Phoenix Vessel Services (P.V.S.) (http://www.pvspan.com)


2. Universal Security Group (U.S.G.) (www.universesecurity.co.uk)
3. ST Education and Training, Pte, Ltd. (S.T.E.T.) (Singapore Technologies
Engineering subsidiary) (www.stet.com.sg)

Shipowners must submit their SSP for plan approval following instructions by the
different authorized RSOs.
7. Upon evaluation of the plan by P.V.S, U.S.G, or S.T.E.T., shipowners shall be notified of
the approval so they can contact an RSO (Verifier) to carry out the verification on board.
The following list of RSOs has been authorized for the verification process:

1. American Bureau of Shipping (ABS)


2. Det Norske Veritas (DNV)
3. Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (NKK)
4. Registro Italiano Navale (RINA)
5. Ferriby Marine
6. Panama Bureau of Shipping S.A. (PBS)
7. Panama Maritime Quality Services, Inc.
8. Panama Register Corporation (PRC)
9. Bureau Veritas (BV)
10. China Classification Society (CCS)
11. Korean Register of Shipping (KRS)
12. Lloyd’s Register (LR)
13. 13. Germanischer Lloyd (GL)
14. 14. China Corporation of Shipping
15. 15. Maritime Security Bureau
16. 16. Martinez & Co., Inc.
17. 17. Aspiotis Maritime Ltd.
18. 18. Marine Bureau, Inc.
19. 19. Hellenic Register of Shipping
20. 20. International Register of Shipping (Panama) Inc.

8. The RSO carrying out the verification will then submit a report to the Panama Maritime
Authority detailing the inspection carried out and determining that the vessel is found in
compliance with the approved ship security plan. The Panama Maritime Authority will then
issue an International Ship Security Certificate (ISSC) to the vessel.

9. The validity of the ISSC will be of five (5) years with interim inspections between the second
and third year and a second one six months prior to expiration. Interim ISSC could be issued
by the RSO carrying out the verification or by the Panama Maritime Authority and the validity
of the same should not exceed six (6) months.

10. Ships under bareboat charter - For the effects of this Maritime Administration, the
responsibility of the elaboration, evaluation and implementation of the Ship Security Plan on
board of bareboat charter vessels will be subject to requirements of the Flag the vessel is
flying.

11. ITC 69: This Administration will consider the application of the ISPS Code to those
passenger vessels, cargo vessels and high-speed crafts based only on their ITC-69
tonnage, this provision does not include MODU units. National tonnage provisions (interim
scheme) will not be taken into consideration.

December 2003
Revised April 2004 (inclusion of 5 additional RSOs)
Revised June 2004 (inclusion of 2 additional RSOs)
Merchant Marine Circular No. 132
To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security
Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: ISPS CODE ENTRY INTO FORCE

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 Amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS)

The amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974
and the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) adopted by the
Conference of SOLAS Contracting Governments on December 12, 2002, are due to enter into
force on July 1st, 2004.

In this regard, shipowners and all those involved in the ISPS implementation process are
strongly urged to redouble their efforts to ensure compliance with the new maritime security
measures, whose dispositions become mandatory on July 1st of this year.

In order to avoid any repercussions to Ships, shipping companies, port facilities and
international shipborne trade, all parties involved must play an active role in the ISPS Code
implementation.

The Panama Maritime Authority reiterates all information contained in Merchant Marine Circular
No.131 (revised), which details the procedures to follow by all parties concerned in the
implementation process and strongly urges all those involved to comply at the earliest possible
date.

The Maritime Security Department, has established a cut-off date as of May 1st, 2004 for the
submission of ship security plans (SSP) in order to guarantee a proper implementation of the
ISPS. This measure is being taken to avoid last minute bottlenecks and to assure proper
compliance with the ISPS Code, by allowing enough time for verification of the SSPs.

We would also like to encourage all companies to provide to the Maritime Security Department
(csr@amp.gob.pa) the information of all designated Company Security Officers (CSO) and
their contact details by May 1st 2004.

Attention is also drawn to the compliance of Merchant Marine Circular No.129, with regards to
“Pre-arrival Notification”.

February 2004

Merchant Marine Circular No. 132

To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters, Recognized Security


Organizations and Marine Inspectors of Panamanian flagged Vessels

Subject: ISPS CODE ENTRY INTO FORCE

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 Amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS)
The amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974
and the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) adopted by the
Conference of SOLAS Contracting Governments on December 12, 2002, are due to enter into
force on July 1st, 2004.

In this regard, shipowners and all those involved in the ISPS implementation process are
strongly urged to redouble their efforts to ensure compliance with the new maritime security
measures, whose dispositions become mandatory on July 1st of this year.

In order to avoid any repercussions to Ships, shipping companies, port facilities and
international shipborne trade, all parties involved must play an active role in the ISPS Code
implementation.

The Panama Maritime Authority reiterates all information contained in Merchant Marine Circular
No.131 (revised), which details the procedures to follow by all parties concerned in the
implementation process and strongly urges all those involved to comply at the earliest possible
date.

The Maritime Security Department, has established a cut-off date as of May 1st, 2004 for the
submission of ship security plans (SSP) in order to guarantee a proper implementation of the
ISPS. This measure is being taken to avoid last minute bottlenecks and to assure proper
compliance with the ISPS Code, by allowing enough time for verification of the SSPs.

We would also like to encourage all companies to provide to the Maritime Security Department
(csr@amp.gob.pa) the information of all designated Company Security Officers (CSO) and
their contact details by May 1st 2004.

Attention is also drawn to the compliance of Merchant Marine Circular No.129, with regards to
“Pre-arrival Notification”.

February 2004

Merchant Marine Circular No. 133

To: Shipowners/Operators, Charterers, Masters of Panamanian flagged


vessels, Legal Representatives and Recognized Security Organizations

Subject: Ship Security Alert System (SSAS)

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 Amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS)

The amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974
and the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) adopted by the
Conference of SOLAS Contracting Governments on 12 December 2002, are due to enter into
force on 1 July 2004.
In accordance with Regulation XI/6, all Panamanian registered vessels, to which this regulation
applies, shall be fitted with a Ship Security Alert System (SSAS) that complies with the
performance standards specified in the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Resolution
MSC.136 (76), as revised by MSC.147 (77).

The Panama Maritime Authority has designated the Company (according to the ISM Code
definition) as the competent authority to receive alerts.

Upon receipt of an alert, the Company Security Officer (CSO) shall notify the Panama Maritime
Authority, on behalf of the Company. The notification shall include the name and the location of
the vessel whose SSAS has been activated, in order to inform the relevant Coastal State(s).
The communication between the Company and the Panama Maritime Authority will be
maintained until verification that the situation has returned to normal.

The Company shall notify the Maritime Security Department of the tracking system that will be
used to comply with Regulation 6.

As a reminder, see table for reference:

Type of Vessel Constructed Compliance Date


All ships constructed On or after 1 July 2004 Upon delivery
Passenger ships Before 1 July 2004 No later than first survey of the
radio installation after 1 July
Oil tankers 2004

Chemical tankers

Gas carriers

Bulk carriers Cargo and

High-Speed Craft of 500gt and


upward.
Other cargo ships of 500gt and Before 1 July 2004 No later than first survey of the
upwards including self- radio installation after 1 July
propelled Mobile offshore 2006
drilling units
February 2004

Merchant Marine Circular No. 134

To: Shipowners/Operators & Merchant Marine Officers and Ratings of Panamanian


Flagged Vessels.

Subject: Validity of Course Certificates and Course Endorsements

References: International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification


and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended in 1995
(STCW Convention)

In order to comply with Regulation I/6 and Section A-I/6 of the STCW78 convention, in its
amended form, with regards to the training and assessment of all seafarers working aboard
Panamanian flagged vessels and related, the Panama Maritime Authority hereby notifies:

DEFINITIONS
1. Course Certificate: document issued by the training center under which the seafarer has
received specialized maritime training, which is submitted with the application for licensing
and/or course endorsement.
2. Course Endorsement: document issued by a recognized maritime administration certifying
the validity of the course certificate being presented, and confirming that the bearer has
shown the proficiency necessary to carry out specific duties, in accordance with STCW95
regulations.

APPLICATION:
1. For purposes of license applications and course endorsements, all course certificates issued
by Training Centers recognized by this Administration are valid until their expiration date. In
the absence of an expiration date, their validity is limited to five years from the date of issue.
2. Expired course certificates and course endorsements submitted for the purposes of
licensing or course endorsement must be validated with an STCW95 revalidation stamp or
accompanied by an STCW95 revalidation certificate. Alternatively, a statement from the
regulating Maritime Administration may be submitted to claim an extended validity in
accordance with STCW95 regulations.
3. 3. All course endorsements issued by the Panama Maritime Authority have a validity of 5
years. The administrative format for course endorsements has varied throughout the years.
The following information is provided to help determine the validity of the endorsements,
according to their date of issuance:
Format # 1: Course Endorsements issued up to the year 2002: These documents only mention
the course being endorsed and the date of issue (stated in the lower left corner) of the course
endorsement. As such, they will remain valid up to 5 years from the date of the endorsement.
Format # 2: Course Endorsements issued between 2002 and 2004: These documents are
similar to Format # 1, but have a new line located beneath the name of the course being
endorsed, stating the date of issue of the course certificate (e.g. **ISSUED ON 17/06/2003).
These endorsements will remain valid for a period of 5 years from the date of issue of the
course certificate. This date is not to be confused with the date of issue of the course
endorsement, located in the lower left corner of the course endorsement, and which has no
relevance to its time validity.
Format # 3: Course Endorsements issued starting 2004: These course endorsements are
similar to Format # 2, but the line stating the date of issue of the course certificate has been
changed to state the date of expiration of the course endorsement (e.g. **ISSUED ON
17/06/2003 changes to **EXPIRES ON 17/06/2008).

CLARIFICATION:
Course endorsements are not subject to the expiration date of the license under which they
were issued (license number is stated in the upper right hand corner of the course
endorsement), and will continue to be valid up to their allotted time, as explained in Application
Point 3.

April 2004

Merchant Marine Circular No. 135

To: Shipowners/Operators, Company Security Officers and Legal Representatives


of Panamanian Flagged Vessels, Panamanian Merchant Marine Consulates.

Subject: Procedures for the issuance of the Continuous Synopsis Record (CSR)
and the Full Term International Ship Security Certificate (ISSC).

References: SOLAS 74 (2002 Amendments)


The International Code for the Security of Ships and Port Facilities (ISPS Code)

For the issuance of the Continuous Synopsis Record Certificate (CSR) and the International
Ship Security Certificate (ISSC), the Maritime Security Department of the Panama Maritime
Authority (MSD) has developed the following guidelines and procedures:

For the Continuous Synopsis Record (CSR)

1- Completed CSR applications in the attached format (click here), must be mailed or
faxed to:
Maritime Security Department
Panama Maritime Authority
Diablo Heights, Bldg. 534
P.O. Box 592, Balboa, Ancon – Panama, Republic of Panama

Fax: (+507) 232-8268


E-mail: csr@amp.gob.pa and msd@amp.gob.pa

2- Applications may be submitted by the Ship’s legal representatives, or the shipowners, or


the Company Security Officers (CSOs).
3- Panama Maritime Authority will process the data and issue the CSR Document, within
one week, at no charge.

4- The CSR Document may be withdrawn directly in the MSD central office by the
applicant, or by the Ship’s legal representative, or by a designated person carrying a
formal letter of authorization on company’s letterhead. Alternatively, the CSR Document
may be sent by courier at the applicant’s expense. Such preference must be clearly
stated and the courier account number to be charged (recipient) must be indicated.

For the International Ship Security Certificate (ISSC)

1- Submit a request by letter addressed to:


Maritime Security Department
Panama Maritime Authority
Diablo Heights, Bldg 534
P.O. Box 592, Balboa, Ancon – Panama, Republic of Panama

Fax: (+507) 232-8268


E-mail: csr@amp.gob.pa and msd@amp.gob.pa

2- Requests may be submitted by the Ship’s legal representatives, or the shipowners, or


the Company Security Officers (CSOs).

3- Panama Maritime Authority will issue the full term certificates within one week, previous
payment of US $ 250.00 Dollars.

The fee may be paid as follows:

(a) - Main Office in the Directorate General of Merchant Marine General


Headquarters in Panama, 50th Street.

(b) - At Panamanian Merchant Marine Consulates abroad. (Consulates will indicate


modalities of payment upon request, and provide an official receipt).

Copy of the payment receipt must be sent to MSD in order to process the ISSC.

4- The following documents are to be included with the request:

a) Copy of Plan approval certificate issued by one of the RSOs authorized by the
Panama Maritime Authority to perform SSP evaluation (PVS, STET or USG).
(REVISED)

b) Copy of the audit report issued by one of the RSOs authorized by the Panama
Maritime Authority to carry out plan verification on board (Merchant Marine
Circular No. 131 Revised).

c) Document issued by the RSO certifying that the ship security plan has been
implemented correctly on board (interim certificate or statement of compliance).

d) Copy of the payment receipt for the amount US$ 250.00.

5- 5- The full term ISSC may be withdrawn directly in the MSD central office by the
applicant, or by the Ship’s legal representative, or by a designated person carrying a
formal letter of authorization on company’s letterhead. Alternatively, the full term ISSC
may be sent by courier at the applicant’s expense. Such preference must be clearly
stated and the courier account number to be charged (recipient) must be indicated.
May 2004