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Fall/Winter 2012/2013 Anniversary Edition

CSIA BC Region magazine

Publication Number 41907024

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ProView
magazine

CANADIAN SKI INSTRUCTORS' ALLIANCE

British Columbia Region


2012-2013 Season

contents
CSIA BC COURSES & EVENTS Winter 2012-2013 Season
Ken's Kickass Level 1 Ski Camp
CSIA BC Region AGM Notice Of Meeting & Proxy Vote Form
WHISTLER OPENING DAY & CSIA 75th Anniversary Invite
Northern Festival
City Lights Special
WOMEN ONLY WORKSHOP
Professional Development Days PDP Schedule
Level 1 Course Conductors' Training CCT Schedule

2
16
17
18
19

29
20
22

REPORT from The CHAIR


by Josh Foster

17
its here

INDUSTRY News
CSIA Alumni
Never Ever Days
Back Country Adventures

26

4
6
8

FEATURED RESORTS
MOUNT SEYMOUR by Jonathan Mosley
KICKING HORSE by Esta Evans

23
24

CELEBRATE

75 YEARS of CSIA

TRAINING Physical Fitness


STRETCHING OUT - by Majorie Lauzon
RECOVERY by Carl Petersen

TRAINING Technical
BOOT FITTING by Erin Keam
INSPIRATION by Kim Fournel

this

10
12

SEASON
23

26
28

www.snowprobc.com
for updates to our EVENTS
listings in this publication

30

12

DEEP THOUGHTS by Dr KEN


RUN THROUGH, NOT TO...

32

TRAINING Teaching
THE ART OF WAR Ralph Forsyth
CHAIRMAN of the BARRED by Ken Chaddock

33
34

EVENTS in Review
AGM and Ignition Days Whistler 2011
Northern Festival January 2012
Women Only Workshop January 2012

Look under

EVENTS online

TRAINING Psychological Fitness


SETTING GOALS by Heidi Malo

at a resort
near you!

35
36
38
4

WHY
INDUSTRY
N E W S

CSIA WHY

Alumni NOW
The Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance will be celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2013. Over the past 74 years we
have certified thousands of aspiring ski instructors, currently have a good working relationship with the Canadian
Ski Coaches Federation and were directly involved in the formative years of both the Canadian Association of
Snowboard Instructors and the Canadian Association of Nordic Ski Instructors. By some estimates, we have had
a hand, either directly or indirectly, in certifying 300,000 to 400,000 instructors.
Where are they now?
Some, of course, have passed
away. Some were in the ski industry and went on to other
professions. Some have stayed in the industry to become
managers, owners, instructors or part time instructors in
their retirement.
We want to reach out to all instructors that have gone
through our certification system, whether they are active
members or not and keep them in touch and engaged. There
will be many celebrations throughout next year, some small
and some large, celebrating 75 years of success both on our
national level and on the world stage.

Lets all seek out our old friends and comrades and find out
where they are, arrange to meet, ski, talk, have a few laughs
and keep the spirit going! Our aim for the near future is to
amass a contact list of anyone and everyone we can reach
out to. We have had some success at Silver Star Mountain with
weekly meetings and ski sessions and a lot of fun.
See the CSIA Alumni Facebook page:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/CSIAAlumni/212958878777469
and look out for the Web Page in the future.

Norm Crerar

Alumni at Silver Star - FRIDAY MARCH 9, 2012


Back row, left to right:
Bob Moore, John Gillies, Eastern program Director
Emmet Weatherhead, Dennis Hunkin
Otto Kamstra,
Chair CSIA National Committee
Charles Icline, Martin Olson Elaine Arnot, Pat Mandle, Sandy Cook, Tony Mandle

Front row, left to right:


Norman Kreutz,
Director of Snow Sports Silver Star Mountain
Warren Jobbitt, Western program Director
George Young, Jas Cline, Glenn Wurtele
Norm Crerar, Strider Dog

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

e
g
a
s
es
from THE

CHAIR

Josh | FOSTER

Im excited! Its getting to be about that time again when I scrape off
the storage wax and buff the skis up for another season. Its always
with enormous anticipation that I think of opening day, its my favourite
day of the year to me its even bigger than Christmas Day seemed
when I was much younger.
To add to the anticipation this is a very,
very special year its our 75th birthday!
As I write, Im sitting on a plane from
Montreal to Vancouver, heading home
from a couple of days of very productive
meetings with all of the countrys Regional
Chairs, National Board Representatives
and National Office Staff. A talented group
of people and it's a real privilege to be a
part of it. Every last person is passionate,
enthusiastic and dedicated in their
commitment to our organization. I found
myself thinking and reflecting and to be
honest, feeling a little nostalgic.
I thought about my first year teaching
skiing when the CSIA was 50 that year, and
I remembered so many really great times
along the way. Perhaps Im just sappy and
sentimental, or it could be the smoke meat
sandwiches (an absolute requirement
when in Montreal) either way, I get a little
choked up when I think about this stuff.

The Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance


has been a huge part of my life. Being a
member has allowed me to create a career
that I absolutely love. Its contributed to a
lifestyle that most of my childhood friends
are jealous of who wouldnt be jealous of
someone whos work boots are ski boots?
I believe, most importantly, that being a
part of the CSIA has put me in touch with
some of the most wonderful and inspiring
people in the world!
To me thats it. Thats the best part about
our organization the people involved in
it and the people that you meet through
it. That Montreal meeting room full of
the people who you voted in to represent
your region are just the start, and theyre
great examples of what a CSIA member is:
Dedicated to the sport and the organization
that they love. When I think back to
some of the most important and impactful
moments of my skiing career I recall the

mentors who encouraged me and offered


guidance to challenge and motivate me.
You probably have a couple of those in
your experience too. I smile and chuckle
when I think of the partners in crime
with whom Ive worked, trained, and spent
countless chairlift rides, laughing.
So
many great moments that stick with me,
were made possible by my being involved
in this organization. I know you definitely
have some of those moments too.
So join us on November 30th and
December 1st as we celebrate the CSIAs
75th Birthday at Whistler Blackcomb with
our AGM and Ignition Day and relive those
experiences as well as start some new
ones. Details are in the following pages.
Its going to be a great event where you
can reconnect with the people who have
been a part of your CSIA experience and
more than likely meet some new people
that share your passion for skiing.
To paraphrase one of the great people that
Ive met through this organization, lets
make this the best season ever!
See you on the snow,
Josh

CSIA Official SPONSORS


www.snowpro.com

CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

INDUSTRY
N E W S

Never Ever Days (NED) is a program designed to promote the sport of skiing and
snowboarding. The primary purpose is to increase the participation numbers in the
Ski & Snowboard industry. Through this promotion, Whistler Blackcombs goal for the
2011/12 season was to expose 600 individuals to skiing or snowboarding for the very
first time. The Never Ever Days program is an all-inclusive, FREE day on the mountain.
Lift ticket, Max4 Lesson & Rental gear as well as morning greeting (muffins & coffee)
and aprs with the instructor were all included for every guest.
Why should we care?
Just read the article titled Running to Stand Still:

Total Results: The total number of participants

Why Growing the Sport Matters Now More

that purchased at least one of these products

than Ever released by the Canadian Ski Council,

was 83 (21% retention rate slightly above the

November 2011. Not exactly a feel-good-happy-

18.4% current national beginner conversion

read if you are a ski or snowboard instructor.

rate) Note: both of these products resulted in

OK. Here are the results from the inaugural NED

snowboarding @ WB

(Whistler Blackcomb, January 2012):

Total sales (rev.) = $12,972

an additional 2-day commitment to skiing or

600 guests were booked into the Max4 program

Note: Revenue generated by retail and food and

within 5 days of the promotion launch.

beverage sales are not included in the totals nor are

398 showed up a 34% attrition rate (This was

any additional purchases (lift tickets or EDGE card

expected given there was no cost associated with

days) outside of the comeback offer.

the program and no consequence for no-shows).


2633 individual users watched the promotional
video put together by the WB Marketing & Snow
School team for the program.
2,865 visits to the page, 90% of those between
Jan 10 Feb 2, 2012. PR exposure of WB to the
regional market.

Future/Conclusion: the dream


There are approximately 650 ski areas in North
America (Canada/US). If each ski area runs a NEDtype program and gets 50 new people hooked on
our sport, that equals 32,500 potential new skiers
or riders per year. a converted beginner who
tried skiing or snowboarding at the age of 20 and

PR exposure of skiing and snowboarding to the

participates actively for 40 years can conservatively

regional market.

be estimated to individually spend over $30,000 on-

There were 2 comeback offers presented to the

mountain during the course of their life. Canadian Ski

participants to promote retention:

Council - Ski & Snowboard Industry Update - Nov 2011.

Offer #1: 2-day lift, lesson & rental package for


$149 (representing a 68% discount)
56 people took advantage of this offer (14%
retention rate in Snow School)
Offer #2: 2-day EDGE Card (2 days of lift
tickets) for $99 (representing a 43% discount)
27 people took advantage of this offer (7%
retention rate)
21 people took advantage of both offers (4

You do the math


PS. If you have any questions regarding this article
or are interested in adopting NED in your area, give
me a shout, I would love to help.
Bartosz Barczynski
GM Adult Snow School, Whistler Blackcomb
bbarczynski@whistlerblackcomb.com
(604) 905-2278

days skiing or riding)

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

The Editor

British Columbia

Esta|EVANS
TRUST ME . . .
How often do we hear people say this?

ProView
magazine

How often do we say

it? Many times, would be my guess. Yet, how often do we hear

British Columbia

someone specifically say or tell us, 'I trust you'?


The most important thing in a person's

high degree of esteem and respect the

life is their children. They invest untold

clients have for us. As they might with a

amounts of time, energy and money, to

bartender (or hairdresser) people often

say nothing of the love and adoration that

open up to their ski instructor. Improving

one assumes they have for their progeny.

ski technique is only one small aspect of

Recently I got to thinking about how much

Uphold all that you promise to be. Respect

stranger their child...in possibly the most

your clients (and their secrets) and be

potentially dangerous of situations, a ski

extremely proud to be a member of the

lesson, on a massive mountain populated

CSIA. You are the future of our great

by all kinds of people, some of whom

sport. Feel honoured to share this huge

could care less about the fear or safety

responsibility with members throughout

of others.

BC and indeed coast to coast in Canada.

And yet... they do it without ever actually

YOUVE EARNED THIS AMAZING STATUS

saying, I trust you.

and HONOUR!
I wouldn't ever

Speaking of trust, thank you to the

consider giving my diamond engagement

CSIA BC Board for entrusting me with

and wedding ring to ANYONE for ANY

this amazing job of creating and putting

amount of time! Yet, I have given my own

together this publication. Trust me with

children to instructors who certainly had

your photos and articles and I will do my

no vested interest in my children other

best to see that they do you justice!

than to teach them how to ski and have


fun doing it.

Thank you to all the contributors for


helping make this the biggest issue yet!

This says a lot about the Canadian Ski

Our sponsors have taken good care of us

Instructors' Alliance which has thrived and

so please support them and remember to

become the honoured organization that it

mention you saw them in the magazine.

is today, 75 years old! Take the time to


read and understand those pages in the
Manual which relate to ethics and guest
service and understand how pivotal this
matter of trust is.

only children but adults who have fears,


anxieties

and

difficulties.

They

put

themselves into our hands, wholeheartedly


believing that we will take care of them
and help them become skiers, or better
skiers, SAFELY and with INTEGRITY.
Clients sometimes tell us their problems
and their deepest secrets. Much like a
highly skilled psychiatrist, we are trusted
with intimate information that reflects the
CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

One last thank you goes to my helping


hands

and

eyes:

Gerda

Koch,

Ken

Chaddock, Kim Fournel, Ken Paynter and


Chuck Prenevost.

Sometimes I can't

see the wood for the trees so I apologize

We are entrusted with teaching not

its here

the service we provide!

it must take for someone to give a perfect

This is amazing to me!

2012
SEASON
2013

CELEBRATE

75 YEARS of CSIA
this

SEASON
at a resort
near you!
Look under

EVENTS online
www.snowprobc.com
for updates to our EVENTS
listings in this publication

always for any errors and omissions!


Have

wonderful

ski

season

and

remember, If You're not Living on the


Edge, You're Taking up Too Much Space!

ADVERTISING | EDITORIAL
For all inquiries please contact:
proview@shaw.ca

DISCLAIMER: Opinions expressed in certain


articles do not necessarily reflect those of CSIA

PUBLISHED by CSIA BC
Publications Mail Agreement
Number 41907024
Return UNDELIVERABLE COPIES TO:
Canadian Ski Instructors' Alliance, BC
1003 Condor Place, Squamish, BC V8B 0P4

INDUSTRY News

BackCountry
ADVENTURES
Whistler brings ski
coaching into
the backcountry

The first program of its kind in


Whistler,

Extremely

Canadians

new Backcountry Adventures bring


ski coaching into the backcountry.
Take the secret recipe from their
famous

Steep

Skiing

Clinics

on

Whistler Blackcomb, add a dose of


backcountry techniques, awareness
and safety, hit blend, and prepare
to have your mind blown. Well, we
can at least promise tired legs and
a whole new way of looking at the
mountains.

OPENING UP BOUNDARIES
Launching

in

December

2012,

Extremely Canadian's new 1-Day


Backcountry

Adventures

will

genuinely open up boundaries for


adventurous intermediate to expert
skiers and snowboarders like never
before. Its all about the riding, and
always will be. Instead of herding
skiers and boarders through terrain
like

sheep,

Extremely

Canadians

professionally qualified Association


8

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

by Jill | DUNNIGAN
Extremely Canadian
Backcountry Adventures in Whistler

PREPARE TO HAVE YOUR MIND BLOWN WITH


A SECRET RECIPE OF STEEP SKIING CLINICS,
A DOSE OF BACK COUNTRY TECHNIQUES,
AWARENESS AND SAFETY

Extremely

Canadian

Adventures

will

be

Backcountry
based

out

of

Whistler Blackcomb, running daily from


December 8th 2012 to April 28, 2013,
subject to conditions, weather, and
enrollment numbers. For $199 CAD

of Canadian Mountain Guides (ACMG)

and recognized internationally as a

will

making

senior guide/examiner with ACMG

without

and IFMGA (International Federation

share

process

their

along

decision

the

way,

limiting what you really came for

Of

shred time. Gain techniques and

Keith Reid couldn't be more excited

tactics to hone your skiing, boost

about his role in the new program.

your avalanche safety knowledge,

The backcountry terrain and snow

and heighten your awareness in big

conditions within spitting distance of

mountain terrain. Whether its your

Whistler Blackcomb is world class I

first day in the backcountry or youre

can't wait to share it with more skiers

a seasoned shredder looking to step it

and riders said Keith, explaining I'm

up, you'll end the day with memorable

all about the skiing, and it's pretty

descents,

clear

better

decision-making

Mountain

that's

Guides

Extremely

Association),

mantra too. The great aspect of

thirst for more.

this new program will be sharing

True to Extremely Canadian's coaching


reputation, they set their sights as
high as they could for the programs
lead guide. President of the ACMG
CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

of what Whistler's slackcountry has


on tap. Privates are also available for
individuals or groups of friends/family,
offering one on one coaching, travelling
at their own pace, and a daily objective
geared entirely to your goals. Privates
pricing from $549 to $659 CAD + tax
depending on season.

Canadian's

skills for future adventures, and a

SHARING VALUABLE SKILLS

+ tax, you'll will get a full-day taste

my experience and decision making


process with the clients as we go.
They'll get the shredding the came
for, plus valuable skills to continue
improving on future adventures.
9

for

Ski Season

Photo: Don Weixl

As a ski professional it is imperative to be physically prepared for the upcoming


ski season in order to avoid injuries, and to perform better technically.
Working in the field of sport conditioning,
I hear client complaints about tightness
and aches due to a lack of joint and soft
tissue mobility. Many who come to me
for assisted fascial stretching admit to
not paying much attention to stretching
on their own. For optimal safety,
performance, enjoyment of the sport,
and profession longevity, committing to
a regular and comprehensive stretching
program can be very beneficial.

CONTRACT and RELEASE


Using a dynamic approach, rather than
the standard stretch and hold method, I
have put together a stretching program
consisting of 16 exercises, to help you
mobilise areas that tend to get tight due
to the biomechanics of skiing.
Without too much detail, contract and
release stretching techniques, such as
Active Isolated Stretching (AIS)
and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular
Facilitation (PNF), are based on
exploiting some physiological responses
of muscle relaxation to enhance the
benefits of the stretch.

AIS vs PNF
AIS technique requires the opposing
muscles to contract prior to the stretch, as
opposed to PNF technique which requires
the targeted muscles to contract prior
to the stretch. Both techniques are used
in physical rehabilitation but are also
excellent in preventing injury, as they
make you stronger within your full ranges
of motion. In other words, your body will be
more equipped to react safely in surprising
situations and save you from injury.

MAXIMISE your SESSION


Keeping in mind the goals of this program,
which is to maintain or increase mobility
and function, the stretching phases must
be synchronised with your breathing
rhythm exhale during the stretching
10

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

phase which should be about 2-4 seconds


long to stimulate the parasympathetic
nervous system responsible for the body to
relax and rest. To avoid the neuromuscular
system going on guard and tightening up
after stretching, movement in and out of
each position must be smooth and pain
free only a comfortable sensation of
stretching should be felt.

TIMING of your SESSIONS


In general, there is no limit to how
often you can stretch, as long as proper
exercise form is prioritised and that you
have no anatomical or medical condition
that would go against stretching if in
doubt consult your doctor before starting
any exercise program. Be smart with the
timing of your stretching sessions. This
program is ideal for the evening after
skiing, on a day off, or at least a couple of
hours before a workout or heading out. If
your muscles are still sore from a previous
day on the hill or another physical activity,
make sure you perform this program at a
lighter intensity.

MAXIMISING the BENEFITS


Regular stretching between on-hill time,
using contract and release techniques will
also speed up your recovery, so you will
be stronger for your next powder day or
expert bumps lesson. Do yourself a favour
and take at least 20 minutes 4-5 times per
week to stretch properly. I suggest you do
either this entire program or a portion of
it making a point of rotating through
all areas. Pay attention to potential
asymmetries. When you feel tighter on
one side executing a particular exercise,
favour that side by doing a few more
repetitions or do an additional set.
... and THAT'S NOT ALL
Remember that to optimise your ability to
ski fast and precisely, while staying safe,
also greatly depends on other aspects

of your ski season physical conditioning


preparation, such as training your overall
strength, power, speed, agility, balance,
core stability and cardiovascular system.
Calculate 4-8 weeks to begin seeing
improvement in each of these fitness
components. Finally, your busy lifestyle
will sometimes trick you and force you to
skip stretching and that is fine. Just dont
give up on it.

Here is your program: Enjoy!


For the printed ProView we have included
3 of a total 16 exercises.
Please enjoy the electronic full version of
STRETCH OUT for SKI SEASON at:

http://www.kinesiomajo.
com/blog/stretch-out-for-skiseason/
Majorie Lauzon
Practicing Kinesiologist (BCAK/CKA)
Certified Exercise Physiologist (CSEP)
Certified Fascial Stretch Therapist (CFST)
Ski Professional (CSIA 4, CSCF 2)
She offers her kinesiology services to the Sea
To Sky Corridor, in Squamish, Whistler and
Pemberton
For more information about Majos services,
including Fascial Release Therapy (a combination
of assisted stretching and soft tissue mobilization
techniques),
visit www.kinesiomajo.com
References:
1. Aaron L. Mattes, Active Isolated Stretching: The
Mattes Method, Published by Aaron L. Mattes, 20002.
Ann Frederick & Chris Frederick, Stretch to Win:
Flexibility for improved speed, power and agility, Human
Kinetics, 2006
3. Ann Frederick & Chris Frederick, Stretch to Win
Institute: Certified Fascial Stretch Therapist manual
(Level 1), Published by Stretch to Win Inc., 2010
4. Gilles Cometti, Les limites du stretching pour la
performance sportive.
1re partie: Intrt des
tirements avant et aprs la performance, Facult des
Sciences du Sport UFR STAPS Dijon, BP27877, 21078
Dijon Cedex, France
5. Andrew Biel, Trail Guide to the Body: Muscles of the
Body, Book of Discovery, 2010

What?
Mainly Psoas, Iliacus, Tensor Fasciae Latae, Rectus Abdominis,
Obliques, Intercostals & Serratus Anterior
How?
Squeezing your bum, lean your hip forward and reach your
arm up as far as possible. Keep your arm straight and arch
comfortably. To stretch further, rotate your trunk slightly
outward while side-bending it toward the opposite side. Return
to initial position. Repeat 8-15x until it feels looser.
Change sides

What?
Mainly Gluteals, Piriformis, Pectineus, Psoas Major, Iliacus,
Adductors & Gracilis
How?
Bring your knee toward your opposite shoulder then assist
the stretching by pulling with your hands. Wiggle gently
at different angles. Bring your knee away from your trunk
then assist the stretching by pushing away with your hands.
Repeat 8-15x until it feels looser. Change sides

What?
Mainly Rectus Femoris, Vastus Lateralis, Vastus Intermedius
& Vastus Medialis
How?
Stiffen your trunk muscles and flex your leg (avoid arching).
Then assist the stretching by pulling up on the rope.
Return to initial position. Repeat 8-15x until it feels looser.
Change sides

Photos:

esta evans

FITNESS

physical

Part 2 RULES of

RECOVERY
by CARL

| PETERSEN BPE, BSc (PT)

A skiers we all understand the importance of fall fitness to improve


winter ski performance. We must always strive to find a balance

ED FROM
T ADAPT
P
R
E
C
X
E
BOOK
RSE N S
E
T
E
P
L
CAR

between the stresses of training and proper recovery.


The response to training and the stress it creates
appears to be highly individual with the signs and
symptoms varying greatly from person to person.
Skiing athletes often neglect using recovery
techniques unless they are injured therefore
effective recovery strategies should be built into
the training and on-hill skiing schedule
THIS IS PART 2 OF A 2 PART SERIES
Rules 1 to 6 were covered in the part 1 Fall
2011 issue and included:
Rules 1, 2 & 3. Re-Hydrate, Re-fuel &
Recovery Work
Rule 4. Re-Align Your Body
Rule 5. Reconnect Your Core
Rule 6. Regain and Maintain Muscle Length
Rule 7. Re-set the balance clock
Balance training is a fundamental component
for skiers and should be part of everyones
daily fitness routine whether destined for the

BALANCE TRAINING
with the dynamic edge

World Cup tour or not. As a physical therapists


and fitness coach I see the benefits of balance
and body awareness exercises first hand.
Fatigue associated with hard training impairs
balance mechanisms and may cause pain. This
combination of fatigue and potential inhibition
due to pain make it imperative to try and reset
the balance clock of the joints before being put in
a potential injury situation.
Many gyms will have some balance equipment
available. By training on an unstable surface,
balance reactions and coordination are trained at
a subconscious level, facilitating these reactions
to become automatic. This helps prevent injury
and improve skiing performance. Re-set your
balance clock with some drills using wobble
boards, foam rolls, rolled towels or the dynamic
edge.
Practical Application BALANCE TRAINING

BALANCE TRAINING Challenge single leg balance


with an unstable base like a foam mat or rolled towel.

BALANCE TRAINING Ski specific


training on an extreme balance board

Rule 8. Release the soft tissue


There are many well known soft tissue techniques used in treating
sports injuries. Utilizing a variety of techniques based on your
preference and experience can help promote recovery.
Depending on facilities and expertise available the post training soft
tissue work can be done either by a professional or by yourself.
For example soft tissue techniques can be done on the upper and
lower extremities when in the whirlpool. Recent research shows
that soft tissue techniques to muscles that have been damaged
through exercise appears to be clinically beneficial by reducing
inflammation and promoting circulation.
Active trigger points that result from heavy eccentric exercise
common to skiing may reduce muscle strength. For years
physiotherapists and other health professionals have suggested to
patients to use a tennis ball to release sore, tight muscles. Recently,
in addition to using a tennis ball, small myofascial release balls are
being used to stretch and soften tight muscles. The concept is very
simple: Use the ball to iron out tight areas. By rolling on the ball
along the muscle and at different angles to the muscle, you are
trying to untwist the myofascial system.
Practical Application MUSCLE RELEASE
Left: QUADS BALL RELEASE
The fascia system responds best when gentle pressure is
applied and
sustained for two or more minutes. Also a good prone bridge
exercise for re-connecting the core
Above: HAMSTRING BALL RELEASE
A small ball is good for applying pressure to different muscles.

Rule 9. Reinvigorate with recovery menu


Researchers have demonstrated that underwater massaging (using
the jets in a spa) following eccentric training (like skiing) helped
athletes to maintain explosive leg power while doing nothing after
such training resulted in a reduction in leg power. It therefore makes
sense that skiers use a combination techniques to recover faster. By
including various water based procedures such as showers (circular,
pulse, needle), baths of various types including whirlpools, baths,
fresh and salt waters and temperature variations like steam, sauna,
and hot-cold you can promote faster removal of waste products
and may also assist in a general circulatory effect and desensitize
or toughen the athlete. Try one or more of the following recovery
techniques.
Showers:
Use them to cleanse pores. Shower promptly after training to clean
the skin and help flush out waste products. Remember the skin is
the largest organ in the body. Repeat often - especially on hotter
days

Sauna/Cold Plunge
Start with a warm to cool shower for
3 to 5 minutes and then towel dry.
Use the sauna for approximately
7 to 10 minutes. Follow this with
a cold plunge or cold shower for
15 to 30 seconds then rest with
feet up for 5 minutes. This routine
can be repeated on to three times
Finish with warm shower for 3 to 5
minutes.
Practical Applications
INVIGORATE & RECOVER

Above Left: SAUNA


Use a sauna to improve recovery
time.

Hot & Cold (A)



Hot (comfortable) for 2 minutes followed by cold (as possible) for
10 seconds and repeat 6 to 10 times.

Left: HOT & COLD

Hot & Cold (B)


Cold (as able to stand) for 1 minute followed by hot (as comfortable)
for 30 seconds repeat 8 to 10 times.

combination

CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

Using ice while in the whirlpool


makes it easy to get a good hot/cold

13

FITNESS | physical

WHIRLPOOL STRETCHES
Use the heat of the whirlpool to warm-up your muscles and massage
them before stretching them out

Rules 10. Relaxation

controlled breathing, yoga, stretching or imagery. Emotional

Relaxation exercises to assist in relaxing the mind as well as the

recovery techniques can include listening to music, videos and

body and decrease stress related fight or flight chemicals. They will

thought control.

also assist in acute and chronic stress management. It allows you


to recharge the batteries or refill the tank and helps you regain your
physical and mental strength to train or work at a high level.

14

Rule 11. Rest (passive)


Rest is one of the most important principles of training. The body
requires a certain period of time in order to recover from fatigue

To get the best results in relaxation try a different combinations of

or stress, especially fatigue that is built up slowly over a period of

techniques, and see what works for you.

time.

There are many different ways to relax and everybody has individual

Sleep is probably the best form of rest to aid recovery. Lack of sleep

preferences. It is best to combine a couple of the favorite relaxation

may interfere with glucose metabolism, which muscles depend

techniques and get into a personal routine. Relaxation techniques

upon for recovery and the brain needs to function. Lack of sleep can

include

also contribute to injuries. Your muscles need the rest and recovery

progressive

muscle

relaxation,

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

autogenic

training,

time during sleep to rebuild the tissue stressed during a


workout.
Lack of sleep can overwhelm your bodys ability to adapt,
increasing the potential for injury. Lack of sleep can also
make you prone to illness because the added stress
depletes the immune system. It is estimated that those
who get less than six hours sleep have 50 percent less
immunity protection than those who get eight hours sleep.
Practical Application
To ensure a good nights sleep minimize caffeine in the late
afternoon and avoid excessive alcohol. Keep the sleeping
room cool and avoid hot showers and heavy exercise
just before bedtime since a higher than normal, body
temperature makes it harder to sleep.
Avoid long afternoon naps and try sticking to a schedule
and getting up at the same time each day to avoid
becoming sleep lagged.
Conclusion
The challenge for most of us will be to identify which specific
areas are fatigued and then select appropriate recovery
strategies to restore them to a normal functioning state.
Skiers all need to be more aware of the importance of
restoration and regeneration following heavy workloads
during dryland training and on hill and how best to use
the facilities and modalities available to them to facilitate
recovery.

About the author


Carl Petersen is a partner and Director of High
Performance at City Sports & Physiotherapy
Clinics in Vancouver, Canada.
Information on his new book Fit 2 Ski at and
his DVD series Fit to Play & Perform can be
found at the following web sites:
www.fit2ski.com
www.citysportsphysio.com

CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

15

AGM
20
ANNOUNCEMENT

BC Region

2012 PROXY
FORM

PROPER PROXY USE


This is a sample of the proxy used to have your vote counted
if you are unable to attend the AGM and still wish to vote.

Dear Member,
Currently we have 3 director's seats up for election.
Nominations are being accepted for all Seats up for election.
Election at this year's AGM are for:
2 Directors from the Southwestern Zone
1 Director from the Northern Zone
1 Director from the Okanagan Zone.
In total, the CSIA BC committee has four zones with seven
directors:

It is very important that it be properly filled out.


Follow the simple directions in red as seen below.
PROXY ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE MEMBERS
I, the undersigned (Your name goes here)

Of (The city in which you live goes here)

A member in good standing of the Canadian Ski Instructors


Alliance hereby appoints: (The name of the person who will
be voting in your place goes here) or failing him/her, (The

3 Directors from the South Western zone

name of another person who may vote in your place goes

1 Director from the Northern zone

here)...to vote on my behalf at the Annual General Meeting of

1 Director from the Okanagan zone


1 Director from the Kootenay Zone
1 Director at large.

the members to be held on (date to be inserted) at (place to


be inserted).
DATED this day of , 2012
SIGNED:

To qualify for a Director's position in a specific zone you must

Every member is entitled to only five (5) proxy votes.

be a member in good standing, a resident of British Columbia,

The Board of Directors shall allocate any excess of proxy votes

and reside in the zone you would like to run for.

over that which may be voted by a member to other members

The Director seat is held for a two-year term. The person


elected to a Director seat can be reelected for a maximum of
three consecutive terms.

as it sees fit.
Proxy Voting - Please print that page and fill it out if you wish
to vote by Proxy.
PROXY VOTING

If you are interested in becoming a Director in one of these

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE MEMBERS

zones please contact Josh Foster by email or regular mail as

OF CANADIAN SKI INSTRUCTORS' ALLIANCE of BC

follows:

I, the undersigned (Your name goes here)

jfoster@bigwhite.com

5315 Big White Rd. Kelowna BC, V1P 1P3

Of (The city in which you live goes here)

If you are unable to attend the AGM and wish to vote, the
proxy form and instructions adjacent to this article will also
be available electronically on snowprobc.com in early October.

A member in good standing of the Canadian Ski


Instructors Alliance hereby appoints
or failing
him/her, to
vote on my behalf at the Annual General Meeting of the
members to be held on Friday November 30th, 2012 at

DATE
Friday, November 30, 2012

Aava Hotel Whistler, British Columbia.

PLACE
The AAVA HOTEL, Whistler Village, BC

SIGNED:

From 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm


Followed by SOCIAL and refreshments
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
16

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

DATED this day of , 2012

Every member is entitled to only five (5) proxy votes.


The Board of Directors shall allocate any excess of proxy
votes over that which may be voted by a member to other
members as they see fit.

Whistler

GRAND
2012 - 2013 Season Opening
Weekend
CSIA BC

20

CSIA

BC

Consecutive

6 th I gnition Day

Unique to BRITISH COLUMBIA!

by Gerda Koch

Proudly Sponsored by CSIA British Columbia, CSIA National,


Whistler Blackcomb, Big White and Fernie Mountain Resorts.
Ignite your season with our carefully selected Level 4 trainers extraordinaire at our
most popular program, with over 160 participants last season.
Ignition days are extended PDP sessions, with special themes built in, depending on
location and demand. Attendance is recorded in your personal profile in the National
Database. Results and Fun oriented. All this for FREE
50% lift tickets are offered if signed up before the deadline.

up
n
g
i
S

Sign up www.snowpro.com, in the PDP section.

E
N
I
L
ON

IGNITION DAYS & 75th Anniversary Events CALENDAR

om
pro.c
w
o
n
s
.
ion
www
Sect
PDP er 1, 2012
from

For further details and announcements on IGNITION DAY 75th


Anniversary Celebration events at Whistler and other resorts,
please go to: www.snowprobc.com in the EVENTS Section.

Octo

WHISTLER

Saturday, December 1, 2012

9 am to 3 pm (followed by 75th Anniversary social at GLC)

BIG WHITE, Kelowna

Saturday, December 8, 2012

9 am to 3 pm (followed by indoor social)

Saturday, December 15, 2012

9 am to 3 pm (followed by indoor social)

Saturday, January 19, 2012

9 am to 3 pm (part of 2-day Northern Festival)

FERNIE
HUDSON BAY MOUNTAIN

Special Anniversary Invitation


To ALL CSIA Members
Join Us For A Gala Celebration
Social Activities, Guest Speakers, Refreshments,
Music, & More Fun Than You Could Imagine.
Venue: Garibaldi Lift Co, Whistler
Time: 7:00 pm December 1st, 2012

75th ANNIVERSARY
WELCOME PACKAGES
Will be Available for You to Pick-up at
AGM, November 30th at The Aava Hotel

Space Limited!

RSVP

To Avoid Disappointment
Please REGISTER ONLINE

www.snowprobc.com/EVENTS Section

HUDSON BAY
MOUNTAIN
Smithers, BC
Northern
Festival 2013
January 19 and 20, 2013

Not just for Northerners! The best of Northern hospitality,


fun, food, entertainment packed into this two day event,
to celebrate the CSIA 75th Anniversary in conjunction
with CSIA BC Ignition Days.
This fun weekend includes ski improvement with top Level 4's, and a chance to
catch up with fellow ski professionals in the region.
If you've never been to Smithers, now's the time!

Registration will be accepted up to January 5, 2013 with a maximum of 27


participants.
The cost is $75.00 for the festival and includes a banquet dinner.
Hudson Bay Mountain is offering special rates for lift tickets during this event.
Contact: Brent Braaten
CSIA BC Committee Northern Representative

n
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Jan adline P
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sign

250

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ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

4-3

$75

18

NO

ten

@sh

Value!

email: brentbraaten@shaw.ca

Am

250-964-3640 or

640

aw.

ca

SPECIAL
MOUNT SEYMOUR
CYPRESS MOUNTAIN

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

1 pm to 7:30 pm, followed by indoor social

Monday, January 14, 2013

1 pm to 7:30 pm, followed by indoor social

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

1 pm to 7:30 pm, followed by indoor social

Cityof VANCOUVER
GROUSE MOUNTAIN

It is your turn!

We are taking Ignition Days under the stars


Sponsored by CSIA BC, CSIA National, Grouse
Mountain, Mount Seymour, Cypress Mountain
A full day program of ski improvement, personal motivation, and various
themes, guided by Level 4 guest trainers, to guarantee results and fun.
All levels welcome.
Your attendance is recorded in your
personal profile in the CSIA National
database.
Grouse/Seymour/Cypress reciprocal lift
tickets are available if you are signed up

! l
W
E
N Specia
ts

igh
City L

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pro.c
w
o
n
n
w.s
Sec tio

before the posted deadline dates.

ww

50% lift tickets for all other areas.

OW

ter N

Regis

in the

PDP

Evening social sponsored by CSIA BC.

service
that fits
YOU.

www.topshelfwhistler.com

604 962 7737


brian@topshelfwhistler.com

Located beside THE KEG, St Andrews Building,


Unit 1, 4433 Sundial Place, Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4

BC Professional
LOWER
MAINLAND
& COAST

Cypress Mountain

Monday, January 14

1 pm 7:30 pm
FULL EVENING

Hemlock Resort

Sunday, January 20

12 noon

Grouse Mountain

Sunday, January 13

9 am

Tuesday, March 12

1 pm 7:30 pm
FULL EVENING

Wednesday, December 19

1 pm 7:30 pm
FULL EVENING

Saturday, January 19
(part of Northern Festival)

9 am 3 pm
FULL DAY

CITY LIGHTS SPECIAL

Grouse Mountain

CITY LIGHTS SPECIAL


Mount Seymour

CITY LIGHTS SPECIAL

NORTHERN BC

I G N I T I O N D AY NOR TH
Hudson Bay Mountain, Smithers
Bear Mtn, Dawson Creek

On Demand

Mt Timothy, Lac La Hache

Sunday, February 17

Mount Sima, Whitehorse

On Demand

Murray Ridge, Fort St James

On Demand

Powder King, MacKenzie

On Demand

Purden, Prince George

On Demand

Shames Mountain, Terrace

On Demand

Tabor Mtn, Prince George

Saturday, February 16

9 am

Troll Mountain, Quesnel

Friday, February 15

1 pm

Saturday, December 15

9 am 3 pm FULL DAY

Fairmont

Tuesday, January 15

9 am

Kicking Horse, Golden

On Demand

9 am

Kimberley

Sunday, January 20

9 am & 1 pm

Revelstoke Mountain Resort

Thursday, December 20

1 pm

Panorama, Invermere

Friday, January 18

9 am

Red Mountain, Rossland

Monday, January 28

9 am & 1 pm

Summit, Nakusp

Sunday, January 27

1 pm

Whitewater, Nelson

Tuesday, January 29

9 am

KOOTENAYS

20

F E R N I E I G N I TION DAY

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

9 am

Development Program
VANCOUVER
ISLAND
OKANAGAN

Mt Washington, Courtenay

B I G W HITE IGNITION DAY

Saturday, January 5

9 am & 1 pm

Saturday, February 9

9 am & 1 pm

Saturday, December 8

9 am 3 pm

FULL DAY

Apex, Penticton

Sunday, January 6

12:30 pm

Crystal Mountain, Kelowna

Thursday, January 10

12:30 pm

Harper Mountain, Kamloops

Friday, February 22

9 am

Manning Park, Princeton

Saturday, February 2

9 am & 1 pm

Mount Baldy, Osoyoos

Sunday, February 3

9 am & 1 pm

Friday, January 11

9 am & 1 pm

Saturday, March 2

9 am & 1 pm

Wednesday, December 5

9 am

Sunday, March 3

9 am

Saturday, December 1

9 am 3 pm
FULL DAY

Friday, January 11

9 am

Sunday, January 20

9 am

Wednesday, January 30

9 am

Sunday, February 17

9 am

Sunday, March 16

9 am

Silver Star, Vernon

Sun Peaks, Kamloops

WHISTLER

20

2012-2013

W H I S T LER IGNITION DAY

Whistler
Whistler PDPs meet at
Whistler LIGHT BOARD
at the top of Whistler

The Canadian Ski Inst ructors' Alliance


Professional Development Program
is open to CSIA members in good standing. The free 3-hour session or
full day session gets recorded on your profile in the National data base
and keeps you updated on the newest skiing and teaching techniques.
The best CSIA ambassadors in your region conduct the sessions.
Most session focus on your personal ski improvement, leading
you to the next level of certification. Ski School Directors can request
special PDPs, covering topics like teaching children, assessment and
development, train the trainer. The registration page will tell you
whether such a session has been requested.

CANCELLATIONS
If any Professional Development Programs are cancelled due to weather
conditions or lack of snow, new dates will be announced.
Check with your Ski School Director or email: Gerda Koch - koch@shaw.ca

LOOK FOR REGISTRATION & UPDATES on our website:


www.snowpro.com PDP Section

Meeting Places
Ski School meeting areas, unless otherwise
specified.
A call back will not be given unless there is a
change to the dates and times of the programs.
CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

21

B r it is

lu
h Co

s
Briti

m b ia

lu
h Co

mbia

2012

COURSE CONDUCTOR Training


DATES

LOCATION

REGISTRATION

DEADLINE

November 21, 22, 23

WHISTLER 1

8:30 am Bottom of Village Gondola

November 11

November 25, 26, 27

SUN PEAKS

11 am Ski School

November 15

November 28, 29, 30

GROUSE MOUNTAIN

NIGHT COURSE 4 pm Starbucks Parking Lot

November 18

December 4,5, 6

REVELSTOKE

Meeting time TBA check online for update

November 24

December 7, 8, 9

FERNIE

9:30 am Ski School

November 27

December 11, 12, 13

MT WASHINGTON

9:30 am Ski School

December 1

December 14, 15, 16

WHISTLER 2

9.30 am at Aava Hotel

December 4

Another season is fast approaching which means kilometers over a mountain while encountering This is where Level 1 Course Conductor training
Course Conductor Training (CCT) is just around an elevation change of 1300 meters, your can help out big time. Staffed by top Level 4s
the corner. As I head into this most awesome of compass reading will be 5 degrees off. Not and exclusive to level 3 instructors, you will
opportunities, I'm reminded of a course that I understanding this fact and not knowing how find out what your elevation change has been,
took a few years ago entitled basic survival in to calculate the distance/declination ratio and how many degrees off of magnetic north
the wilderness. (not given by the CSIA but who could cost you your life!

you may be. Even though the only way that

knows what the future holds!)

you can examine Level 1 courses this season

Skiing is not a life and death situation, (though

During this survival program, I was taught how it may feel that way sometimes when we're on
to read a compass correctly so I could establish a CSIA course!) :) but every season we need
bearings and travel in the right direction. It to reset our skiing compasses to account for

is by doing the CCT, that's not the ultimate


purpose. In the end it's about direction and
focus for the year.

sounds pretty easy...use the compass to find elevation change. How much have we improved So sign up soon. Find out where you are and where
magnetic north, establish land marks, and since the start of last year? What should we you've got to go. Reset your skiing compass by
continue upon your known direction of travel. focus on for the coming season to maintain our attending course conductor training.
See you there,
Then repeat again and again until you find steady march towards the safety of our ultimate
Ken Paynter
your way home and into the safety of your goal? (Whatever that goal may be.)
BC Level 1 Technical Coordinator.
own living room. Simple as... OMG now I'm
really lost!.
The

problem

starts

when

you

encounter

elevation changes. For example, if you walk 16

If you are a certified CSIA Level 3 ski instructor and you are or would like

$ 160 plus HST, TOTAL $ 179.20

to be a CSIA Level 1 Course Conductor, you need to take the Level One

Before deadline $ 145 plus HST,

Course Conductor Course every fall for the current season.

TOTAL $ 162.40

Note: The first day of the 3-day course is indoors, the second and third
day is on snow (exception: Whistler 1)

*** NO TELEPHONE REGISTRATIONS ***


22

Lift tickets not included.


Contact the venue ski school desk for special rates.

ONLINE REGISTRATION www.snowprobc.com


ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

F E AT U R E D

RESORT

Professional

SKIERS&RIDERS

Inspire
Progressive Future

Jonathan | MOSLEY

Young or old, skiing is


ultimately about having fun in
the snow. To experience the
thrill and joy of gliding down
a snow covered mountain
is a feeling shared by snow
enthusiasts the world over.
For many, however, the
appeal goes beyond fun. They
want the personal growth
that comes with developing
skills and pushing their limits,
and they look to the pros for
inspiration.

North Vancouver, BC:


When I was 12 my heroes were two
pioneers of free skiing, Scot Schmidt and
Glen Plake. Now, 20 years later skiing has
progressed beyond anything I could have
ever imagined, and a new generation is
inspiring the next with exciting results.
Last February the kids in Mt Seymours
Progression Team had the opportunity
to ride with two of their heroes: K2 skier
Sean Pettit and K2 snowboarder Jordan
Mendenhall. Each dedicated an afternoon
as a guest coach to provide inspiration for
the team.
On 19 February, Sean Pettit took time
away from catching massive backcountry
airs to hang with the Mt. Seymour
Progression Team. Its great to see these
kids are getting into freeriding and are
super stoked, said Pettit when asked by
his sponsor about the experience.
The next weekend the team welcomed K2
rider Jordan Mendenhall, who spent the

day riding with our young riders, offering


insight, coaching and motivation. While the
team explored the mountain, the coaches
were able to capture the day on film and
produce a short edit of Mendenhall and the
team shredding together.
Mt Seymour is all about providing young,
up-and-coming skiers and snowboarders
with a way to naturally progress their skills
on freestyle and mountain terrain. With the
incredible support of K2, our Progression
Team comprised of freestylers between
the ages of 9-14 has been working hard
learning fundamental techniques to build
a strong foundation and excel in future
skiing and riding.
Three coaches from Mt Seymours Ski and
Snowboard School spend every Sunday
with the team exploring the mountain,
learning new tricks and having fun on the
snow. There is a strong focus on personal
growth and the kids start each Sunday
by setting goals with their coaches, and

then working to achieve and surpass their


expectations.
Meeting incredible athletes like Pettit and
Mendenhall offers the Progression Team
the motivation to excel. Perhaps one
day these kids will be coming back to Mt
Seymour as pros to provide inspiration to a
new generation of freestylers.
For more about the Mt Seymour Progression
Team and see the pros, coaches and team
members in action visit these links:
www.mountseymour.com/lessons
http://blog.k2snowboarding.
com/2012/03/06/jordan-mendenhallat-mt-seymour-with-the-progressionteam/ -Jordan Mendenhall video
http://news.k2skis.com/tag/seanpettit/ - Sean Pettit interview
http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=UuqhxmadEcY 2010-2011
Prog Team video
CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

23

CSIA BC Resort Feature

Kicking
Horse

Its worth the drive to this raw


rugged Golden Nugget of
the West with the 4th highest
vertical in North America

Golden is a mountain town of over


4,000 residents, located in the
East Kootenay region of British
Columbia along the Trans-Canada
highway and close to the BC-Alberta
border. Golden is a vibrant, rapidly
diversifying town with a profound
sense of community spirit, in a
natural, unspoiled mountain setting.
Spending a day at Kicking Horse in
Golden, BC and being treated like a
VIP this past December was like a
dream come true for me.
PROUDLY SMILING FACES GLOW
WITH GENUINE DESIRE TO
SHARE
THE KICKING HORSE
EXPERIENCE
As a Ski Pro from World Famous
Whistler I was a little nervous about
how I would be expected to act at this
smaller, yet very breathtaking resort
with a ski school one thousandth the
size of ours!

24

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

With ridiculously long


downhill runs, and the
option to heli-ski, Kicking
Horse is a place where the
stories are almost too
tall to believe.
Within minutes of arriving I was
introduced to all the front line staff
and then the ski school members. I
felt so welcomed, I forgot my initial
trepidation and began to enjoy the
people and the magnificent vistas
and incredibly squeaky snow. I was
shown around in grand style for the
morning by one of the senior staff
members and then in the afternoon
by Ski School Director, Will Comrie.
This resort has so much to offer and
is well designed to maximize ones
ski experience with a spectacular and
unique terrain mix. Wide tree glades,
incredible verticals and tighter tree

by Esta | EVANS
CSIA BC Magazine
Editor

runs accommodate the most discerning skiers and boarders of all


levels. You can ski long runs, in a group of mixed abilities and still ski
together and enjoy the easy to find lifts at the bottom of each area.
Divided in to easily accessible bowls by one of two lifts, Kicking Horse
has a wide variety of runs for every level - the Gondola has luxury
cabins that equal any in the world.
PEEK AT BOO THE GRIZZLY BEAR
A most interesting and unusual attraction that this resort can boast
about is BOO the Grizzly Bear. Kicking Horse Mountain Resort is home
to the worlds largest enclosed and protected grizzly bear habitat. This
is where resident orphan grizzly bear Boo lives and plays.
Visitors are given the opportunity, as part of a one-of-a-kind
interpretive tour, to view a grizzly bear interacting much as they
do in the wild; foraging, hunting, playing, swimming, snoozing
and exploring. Educational and interactive tours are held hourly
throughout the summer season, to view this incredible mammal and
learn about the plight of this blue listed species. The Grizzly Bear
Refuge is an education, conservation and research facility that offers a
second chance at life for orphan grizzly bear cubs within a protected,
spacious and natural mountainside habitat.

Esta Evans

A LAST NOTE to the WISE PURCHASERS OF SKI SCHOOL UNIFORMS:


The female members of the ski school wore WOMENs
Jackets how absolutely professional and amazingly
flattering they are!

... I'm just sayin'!

Photography: esta evans

Thanking you again for the Royal Treatment from everyone: Sandra,
Will and the Ski School and Office Staff, the cafeteria folks, lifties and
all the retail employees!

Boo Bear
Photographer Adam Sherriff

CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

25

YOUR
FEET

DESERVE

by Erin | KEAM CSIA 4, CSCF 2

GOOD

BETTER

BEST

If the ski boot is considered the steering wheel or the transmission from the skier
to ski, this makes it the most important piece of equipment youll want to own.
An excellent fitting ski boot is achieved
by forming a relationship with a trusted
boot fitter who then tries to make the boot
comfortable and perform well on the ski
hill. They look closely at your foot shape,
its ability to function properly and try to
determine the skiers needs in relation to
their abilities and goals. Working with
you, the skier, good boot fitters create an
excellent fitting and performing boot that
is a joy to put on each snowy morning!
A skilled boot fitter will focus initially on
the foots forefoot and heel width, instep
height and foot length. The foots mobility
and stability are then examined to decide
whether an insole or foot bed is necessary.
There are many insoles available called
trim to fits that work well or get a custom
built foot bed that mimics the foot exactly
and is the ultimate foundation for improved
skiing performance,(see sidebar).
An expert fitter will go one step further
26

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

gathering any information regarding prior


injuries or anomalies the foot may display
by questioning the skier. The boot fitter
now has a three dimensional view of the
foot that steers them towards a certain
shape or last of ski boot. Taking into
account the length and shape of the lower
leg, the thickness and the position of the
calf, (womens calves tend to sit lower and
more to the inside of the leg) they finally
decide on the best brand and model of
shell for your foot.
If you are a performance skier or racer
the fit you want requires closer tolerances
and custom modifications, not unlike a
high performance car. The better skier
will need more in depth investigation of
foot function, shell stiffness, alignment
issues and performance characteristics to
determine the right ski boot.(see sidebar)
Whether you are a beginner or racer the
properly fitted boot should fit snugly yet

is comfortable.
Creating the ultimate
connection from skier to ski relates to
precise steering and energy transfer from
ski to snow.
Remember a well-fitting ski boot allows
good circulation keeping your feet warm
yet reacts to the subtlest input from you.
If the ski boot fits well then it becomes an
extension of the foot, rewarding you with
a solid connection to your equipment and
comfortable feet on the slopes.
With some research to find a recommended
local shop that involves you in the boot
fitting process through these steps, you
can find a boot that is not only comfortable
but guaranteed to work well.
Regardless of your skiing expertise whether
beginner or World Cup hopeful, the boot
fitting professionals at a reputable shop
near you can insure all your days on the
slopes remain trouble free when it comes
to your ski boots.

Sidebar # 1
A good boot fitter should discuss
stock insoles that come with the
boot, trim to fit insoles or custom
foot beds.
The stock insole often is just
padding that gives no real
support to the foot and most
times replaced by custom liners
offering more performance and,
or comfort.

support. Remember
good, better, best
is a simple formula
for deciding on what
your feet deserve
when
fitting
your
boots this season!

Sidebar # 2
The more performance a skier
seeks form their ski boots
the
more
adjustments
or
modifications will be needed.
Starting usually with a narrower,
stiffer race shell the boot fitter
has to alter it more drastically for
the skier.

Trim to fit insoles are more


supportive coming in various
profiles to match a wide range of
foot shapes, usually oversized in
length and width the boot fitter
must trim them to fit in the
boot.

The boot fitter may Punch the


boot, heating and stretching the
shell to match the foots shape
more precisely or grind the
interior of the shell to achieve the
same result in smaller, hard to
stretch areas.

The Custom foot bed is created


by the boot fitter from some type
of material that is mouldable
and forms to the sole of your foot
precisely.
Custom foot beds are the most
comfortable and give the best

Though most boots come with


cuff
alignment
adjustments,
more exacting skiers achieve
closer tolerances by placing
canting shims inside the boot or
planing the boots sole for even
better alignment.
Lastly stock liners can be removed
and replaced with custom foam
injected or thermo-mouldable
liners for the ultimate in foot hold
and comfort.
High performance ski boots take
some time to create so dont rush
through the process, but know
you will enjoy the rush from the
end result for sure!

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with a Web Version (PDF) for those not on the BC Mailing
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CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

27

TRAINING
technical

With the 2012 Summer Olympics still fresh in our minds,


lets celebrate Rosie MacLennan for landing Canadas first
gold medal of the game in womens trampoline.
For her to accomplish this Rosies
Nagy both demonstrated efficiency,
feet had to be under the mass at
precision, power & fluidity in every
impact; her control would have turn during the exhibitions. These two
been compromised with the slightest inspirational skiers showed the ability
misalignment resulting in a very to move at will in a turn.
TURN PHASES
different
Forofher
manage
Turn phases link movement patterns
withoutcome.
specific parts
the to
turn,
providing a Intrigued,
template for skill
assessmentwhat
and development.
I wondered
set them
the cause
rebounds,
her as
feet
needed
They also help in understanding
and effect,
problems
in to
onebe
part ofapart?
a turn will
have consequences in other parts.
I started to dig deep: What
underturn
her
mass.
The
feet
Although sequenced from 1 toperfectly
3 for reference,
phases
can be
approached
in any
that is effective
are
weway
actually
trying for
to results.
do as we
redirected
The ultimate goal is linked, fluid
skiing. the mass back up for her ski down the mountain? Redirect the
to perform and link her maneuvers.
Center of Mass (COM) from one side
It was the placement of the feet at
of the hill to the other.
impact that allowed her to direct

the energy from the trampoline to


maintain height, be in control in the
air as she executed her spins, stick
the landings by absorbing and coming
to a stop at the end of her routine.
Lets look at two phenomenal skiers
who represented Canada at the
2011 Interski; Eric Rousseau & Ollie

28

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

In other words move from


over here to over there
Therefore, if we are redirecting,
something needs to influence the
COM. Since moving the COM is not
the ideal option to move from here
to there, how can we achieve this?
We must place the Base of Support
(BOS) so as to deflect the COM. This

by: Kim | FOURNEL

will control the COM (fluidity & power)


and guide the COM through the arc
(efficiency & precision)
When I started playing with this
viewpoint, I would focus on feeling
my BOS influencing the direction of
the COM at every point in the arc
feet making the moves the COM is
there simply for the ride. And what a
ride when I skied from this 'stance'!

PHASE 1
I
concluded
that
patience is key in
order to position the
feet under the COM in
Phase 1 of the turn. The
ability to be mindful in
the placement of my
feet gave me control
over the COM reducing
the need to react
with a quick recovery
move. If you have ever watched Eric
or Ollie ski, they appear to move
slowly belying their incredible rate of
descent.

PHASE 2
In Phase 2, when I redirected the
COM with the BOS the sensation was
subtle because the COM moves to

WOW

the inside of the arc and the external


forces increasingly begin to pull the
COM down the mountain which in
effect made me feel light. It is at this
point that I set myself up to natural
inclination.

WHISTLER BC Friday, February 8th

PHASE 3

Open to certified members of CSIA

It was imperative that the BOS


maintained control of the COM
because as I entered the fall line
moving into Phase 3, the forces
increased and I was capturing the
energy in the skis. Being in a position
of control; made it possible and
easier to manage the forces through
angulation.

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To bring into play this relationship


between the BOS and the COM; you
are able to move at any point in the
arc. You can incline, angulate, tighten
the radius, and deal with pressure, as
you open the door to these and other
creative variations.

Kim Fournel
Genevive Bourgeois

to name just some of our CSIA Trainers

What I noticed in my skiing; I was


no longer getting caught forward!
And I could move more readily.
Simply because I created an effective
relationship between my BOS and
COM; I was in command. I was free
to move at any point in the arc. The
BOS needs to control the COM as
you move from fall line to fall line
especially when you are seeking
performance.

Remember: to be safe and Jump for


Joy as the Ski Season is soon upon
us.
Kim Fournel
B. Sc. Physical Education
Level 4 CSIA, Level 2 CSCF

ter Onli
s
i
n
eg

NOW!
www. snowprobc .com
e

$65

on or before January 27th, 2013


OR $80 on, or after January 28th

photo: tony moser

Inspirational
performances
by
incredible athletes motivates me to
keep learning and playing on my skis;
I encourage everyone to go out and
bounce on a trampoline and explore
the relationship between the COM
and BOS. It is a fun way to get fit and
work on ski technique.

Donnie Blunden
Leslie Glaysher

Women 2013
Only CSIA BC
Workshop
9 am Meet downstairs in Pikas for Sign In
9:30 am 3:00 pm Workshop

4:00 pm Indoor Presentation and Aprs

TRAINING

psychology

SETTINGand
ATTAINING

Goals

Goal Setting a simple yet very complex skill to master


You have most likely heard of goal

Next, I would like you to write down what it takes

setting or have even set your own

to achieve your goals. What are some mental,

personal goals, but why do so many


of us fail in attaining our goals?
What were your goals this past winter? Have you
set goals for next winter already? Did you achieve
your goals this year? If so, do you know WHY you
succeeded? Think about it. If you did not achieve

physical, technical, tactical skills that you will


need in order to achieve this goal. Do you need
determination? Perseverance? Have stronger legs?
Better cardio? Be more aggressive? This is the
beginning of your action plan. We will be going into
details of the action plan later on.

your goal(s), reflect on why you didnt get what

OUTCOME VS PROCESS GOALS

you wanted.

Focusing on the end result is the main reason why


many athletes dont manage to succeed in attaining

DREAMING IS GOOD
Whenever I talk about goals to my younger athletes
(i.e. 11-12 year olds) I always ask them what their
dream goal is. Dreaming is good. Dreams are
where we would like to end up (i.e. a world cup
skier, a Level 4 ski examiner) and goals are HOW
we get there.
Goals are what motivate the human being to get to
where they want. Sometimes our dreams become
our reality, and the reason being so is that you set
your goals to follow your dreams.
So the first question I will ask you is write down
what is your dream? Write down your answer. What
would be your dream goal to attain in skiing? The
goals you set yourself should make you happy,
make you feel excited. If you are not excited about
your goals, then why set them? You can have one
goal or several goal, so long as the goal(s) can be
reached in a realistic time-frame. What is it that
you want to achieve? Is it realistic? Do you think
you have the ability to achieve what you want to
attain?
30

their goals. When I ask an athlete their goals for


their next race, when they answer to be in top 3
or score good points it is not ideal. These types of
goals are based around results- which sometimes
have far too many factors that are out of the
athletes control. Uncontrollable factors (weather,
snow, visibility, other competitors) add more stress
which will only affect performance negatively. The
optimal focus you would like to have (whether you
are a ski racer, or simply want to improve in your
skiing) is to focus on the process of the action.
What do you need to do in order to ski fast?!
Scholars have different ways of explaining goal
setting. Personally, I like to keep it simple - there
are outcome goals and process goals. Outcome
goals are focused around the result. Therefore,
winning races, skiing down black diamond runs or
getting that famous blue pin! These are outcomes
that you would like, however these goals dont
mention HOW you will achieve them. This is where
process goals fall into place. Process goals are the
direction, the steps, one must take in order to get
to the big end goal (outcome).
ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

Outcome goals are good to have because

determine a time-frame. How much time

they tend to motivate us in wanting to

do you give yourself to lose the weight?

pursue our dreams. However, it is very

(i.e. 2 years? 15 months?)

important to have process goals because


this will give us the direction that we
need. It will give us meaning, and when
we reach the stepping stones we feel
that much rewarded to continue. Also, by
focusing on the process, we are focusing
on what we NEED to do to be successful.
Its nice to say Im going to pass my Level
4, but really the question is HOW are you
going to pass it? When racers tell me their
goal is win the race, I get a little nervous
for them. Why? Because ski racers who
are purely thinking about winning are

ADAPT YOUR GOALS AS YOU


NEEDED
Sometimes, the goals we set ourselves

Create action plan. Ask yourself how much

maybe too high. That is OK, if you realize

weight you need to lose this month in

this dont be shy to re-adjust. Goals are

order to achieve your time-limit. Then ask

not black and white, especially in skiing.

yourself what you need to do THIS WEEK


in order to achieve my monthly goal, what
do you need to DO TODAY to succeed. By
breaking down our goals, creating smaller
goals will only help in setting yourself for
success.

I just came back from a week of extreme


heat at the Canadian Championships,
where the speed events and GS races
were cancelled. Several athletes were
disappointed, because they were relying
on these races to qualify for the national

Generally, the more successful you are in

team, provincial team or simply to lower

attaining your goals, the more goals you

their points. Therefore, some athletes did

will set for yourself; the happier life you

not attain their year-end goals.

no longer thinking about HOW to win.

will lead.

What do I NEED TO DO to win? Mentally,

Now that you have a goal setting example

factors out of our control our goals,

physically, technically, tactically what do I

around weight-loss, how can we translate

we need to be aware of them. Another

need to do?

that into skiing. That is how can we set a

lesson we can pull from this is; dont wait

When I meet athletes for the first time, I

goal that is easily measurable. How can we

until the end of the season to try to stand

measure our skiing abilities? The easiest

out.

often ask them what their goals are. They


normally reply to me with no hesitation.
They

know

exactly

what

they

want.

However, the answer is quite different


when I ask them to explain to me how
they will get there. More often then none,
I get a blank stare. The minute one is

The lesson learned: there are several

way I find is ask yourself after every other


run On a scale of 1-10, where do I score
on todays goal? This way you will give
yourself an idea whether you are on the
track of improvement or not.

Start training today so that next year you


stand out earlier in the season! If goals
are reached earlier then planned, then
AWESOME! set some new higher goals!
If you have any questions, feel free to

asked to verbalize or even just write down

SUMMING IT UP

an action plan to their goals, they often

When setting goals you should set an

draw blanks. Why? Simply because we

outcome goal but also focus on the

arent sure how to achieve the goals we

process. If you stay focused on what

Mental performance consultant for Ski Qubec Alpin

have set out for yourselves.

you need to do, i.e. physical, technical,

Member of Canadian Sport Psychology Association

AN EXAMPLE OF GOAL
SETTING

contact me.

tactical, mental skill chances of attaining


the end goal will be higher.

Heidi Malo

CSIA 3, CSCF 2
heidimalo@gmail.com

Be as specific as possible. Create a time-

An overweight person is recommended by

frame (give yourself a time-limit, this will

their doctor to lose 60lbs. That person may

help eliminate procrastination!) Break your

look at his doctor with big eyes and say

goals down into smaller more achievable

OK??! and have NO IDEA where to begin.

ones. Make a realistic action plan with

This is an overwhelming number to most.

monthly/weekly/daily

So, first thing this person would have to

your goals regularly to see if there is any

do is break down the goal. Break the goal

improvement. And dont forget to finish

down to specific little goals. Afterwards,

every day some self-reflection questions.

goals.

Measure

Three questions that I always ask my athletes to answer (either in a journal, or


just verbally to me) at the end of every training/race day are :
1) What are three things you did well today?
2) Based on todays performance, what do you want to improve?
3) What is one thing that you learned today that you will take into
tomorrows practice (mental, physical, tactical, technical skill)?
By asking yourself these three questions, you are self-reflecting on your skiing,
which will only help you in your quest of attaining your goals

CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

31

DEEP
THOUGHTS

THROUGH

Run

(not TO)

the finish line!


When I was in high school,

I was running through the finish line,

I ran on the track and field

NOT to the finish line.

team. My specialty was the 100


meter sprint. I'd like to tell you
all about my many victories. How I
defeated some of the country's most
talented

young

sprinters,

and

how

my dreams of competing in the summer


Olympics were dashed because of an
unfortunate knee injury. I'd like to tell
you all of that, but I can't... because it
would be a flat out lie! Truth be known,
I was the slowest sprinter on my team
and only made the team when our

by Dr

longer the slowest runner on the team....I


was the second slowest. (Apparently natural
running speed is a key skill area in which I
was lacking!)
All that aside, the valuable lesson here
concerning my lack lustre track and field
career is the idea of running through the finish
line. It's a lesson that can be applied to many
areas of life not the least of which is physical
preparation for the coming ski season.

for stealing...(I guess he wasn't quite fast

I'm in decent shape right now, (as I hope

enough!)

you are) with the season fast approaching.

My coach at the time was very good. He

I have a fairly detailed

and how to use my arms to increase foot


speed. Both areas of skill development

Ken

improved and by my senior year I was no

fastest runner was suspended from school

taught me how to improve my starts


esta

My race results over time most certainly

proved hugely beneficial to my race results.


Nothing however helped me more than his
valuable lessons concerning how to finish.

work out routine

that I believe produces solid skiing specific


results. MidNovember will be when I first get
on the snow and I plan on being in very good
shape for when that day arrives. To achieve
my goal of a strong start, I will continue with
my off season training till December 1st, two
weeks beyond opening day.

There's nothing worse than getting your fitness level up

There's nothing worse than getting your

to a high standard, only to lose much of it just before

fitness level up to a high standard, only

you hit the slopes. So plan on sticking with your dryland

slopes. So plan on sticking with your dryland

routine beyond the start of the season.

to lose much of it just before you hit the


routine beyond the start of the season.
By moving the target date back a couple

You see, initially, I would run super hard for


100 meters, slowing down upon hitting the

end up running through the finish line.

but in fact, when you try and run a fast 100,

Good luck starting the season in full stride

you actually lose form and start slowing

and in peak physical condition. See you

down at the 90 meter mark.

when the snow flies.

in training so I could hold my form (and


speed) for the full 100 meters. In so doing,
ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

tendency to slow down and ultimately you

finish line. It sounds like logical thinking,

So coach had me running 110 meter sprints

32

of weeks, you will anticipate the natural

by Ken Paynter
Level 1 Technical Coordinator
British Columbia

TRAINING

Ski Teaching

What the ART of WAR


can teach us about

A SKI LESSON
by RALPH | FORSYTH

explains The essential point here is to

The Art of War is a modern best-seller


based on an ancient Chinese military
treatise attributed to Sun Tzu a high ranking
military general. It is believed that Sun Tzu
lived and compiled his theories-during
what is know as Warring States period,
roughly between 476 and 221 BC. It is
generally regarded as one of the definitive
works on military strategy and tactics. The

avoid disruption of the productive activities


of the people In order for us to help our
students be successful we always adapt
our lesson to the forces of nature, if its
freezing cold less talk and more action
is the order of the day, and on a sunny
powder day students are usually able to
challenge more difficult terrain than they
might be comfortable on.

Traditional virtues make up the criteria


for the assessment of The Leadership,
they include: Intelligence trustworthiness
humanness courage and sternness. These
are all common attributes of successful ski
instructors as well, anyone that has taught

Art of War has had an influence on Eastern

Amazingly for a military guide written

kids will attest to the need for sternness,

and Western military thinking, and more

over 2,000 years ago the advice offered

which must be matched with a sensitive

recently on business tactics, legal strategy,

is totally relevant for a modern ski lesson;

human touch, you have to have the courage

and now ski instruction.

when considering The Terrain Tzu suggests

to stand up in front of a group and share

that The terrain is to be sized up in terms

your expertise, if you are not trustworthy

of distance degree of difficulty of travel

who will -literally- follow as you lead

dimensions and safety. As any seasoned

them down the mountain. Intelligence of

ski pro will tell you most mistakes in a

course is implied when you are the kind of

lesson lead back to terrain selection, and

person that makes money doing what they

the adage of minimum terrain maximum

love. Sun Tzus criteria also embody the

speed should be followed in (almost) every

leadership skills required to be a ski pro.

I really would prefer to go skiing.

Sun Tzu

suggests

five

critical

factors that are to be assessed


before undertaking any military
action and the relevance to a ski
lesson is striking

instance. There is no better way to earn


the trust- and praise- of students than
to take them to terrain that strikes the

They are: 1. The Way 2. The Weather 3.


The Terrain 4. Leadership 5. Discipline.
Each of the five factors is also critical in
the development of a great ski lesson.
When considering The Way Tzu is referring
to civilian leadership and inducing people
to have the same aim as the leadership.
Much the same way that an instructor
must asses and adjust a lesson based on
the students goals, with both playing an
active role to ensure that expectations are
understood and achievable, they then form
the basis of the lesson plan.
The Weather is an obvious one for ski
instructors as so much of what we do is
influenced by weather, as The Art of War
CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

right balance between challenge, safety,


achievement and fun.

The Art of War by definition applies to


competition and conflict, but when viewed
through a slightly wider lens it offers
as many insights into achievement and
the interpersonal skills required to be

Discipline in the context of the Art of

successful in the modern world. Todays

War refers to organization, efficiency and

ski instructor has little in common with

coherence.

There is a lot to organize in

Chinese warriors 2,500 years ago but

a ski lesson; yourself (your attitude,

these simple principles laid out for success

understanding,

on the battle field are just as relevant for

interests,

and

expectations

equipment)
and

safety

the
of

students, and managing them all in a defined


time line. A well organized lesson requires
plenty of skill but is largely unnoticed by

an instructors success on the mountain.


This entry was posted in Ralph Forsyth's
BLOG, SkiTipDuJour.com

students, but a poorly organized lesson

Ralph is Ski Instructor and Entrepreneur

will be unmistakable. Equally important is

and on occasion a writer too! You can reach

coherent communication and recognizing

him via www.skitipdujour.com

that whatever your communications style


you should be direct, succinct and specific
when speaking with your students.
33

Have you ever taught a novice who has never ridden a


chair lift before (the answer is yes) or wonder what
other instructors do to help clients through their first
ever chair ride?
When students realize they are en route to

when we lower the bar carefully and

a chair lift for the first time (whatway up

gently I call it bar tender (pronounced:

there?) they may experience trepidation,

'barrr-tender'). This usually triggers a

and worse, a mind numbing meltdown.

laugh, especially after 2 pm (warning:

Heres what I use to help deliver an uplifting,

early morning I may get the dreaded

rather than a chair raising, experience (OK,

tough crowd deadpan).

enough punishment already!).

might invoke the fear dragon).


Keep your skis parallelnever snow
plow or pizza beside another person
when sliding away from the chair. This
minimizes the chance of overlapping
your ski tails with other peoples
equipment and blowing out an ACL as
your ski slips forward causing a slow
knee twisting backwards fallneed I
say more?
As our skis reach the exit ramp, I
count out loud 321go forward,

I have my learners watch other

build rapport with your clients and

people getting on the chair. Seeing

distract them by pointing out views

others loading the chair with little

from

issue or duress bolsters confidence.

before casually mentioning that the

Especially when it is kids hopping on

top of the chair is approaching and

without hesitation or difficulty.

thus scaring the cr#p out of them.

Before we get in line (and in other

Caution: choice of words is critical to

up with the chair dragging them

peoples way) I coach several points:

avoid waking the dragon, a.k.a. mind

around the bull wheel until the liftie

numbing white knuckled fear. Will

hits the mercy button.

1. For safety, pole straps off wrists and


palms gripping tops of pole grips so
we can push and steady ourselves
until we are about to sit on the chair.
Some demo and practice develops

their

now

lofty

perspective,

they get launched into the unknown,


dropped into a white abyss from which
no bodies have ever been recovered?
Actually no. I simply tell them keep

competenceno clumsy waddling


and slipping, or poking out of chair
mates eyes with flailing pole tips.

their skis parallel (french fries only, no

2. When to slide forward and where to


stop, I instruct that we push forward
just as the previous chair sweeps

chair. Depending on how much I think

pastno hesitating to watch the


people in front sit downusing our
poles to push then stop when our
boots reach the designated line.
3. Poles and sitting. Shift both poles
to one hand, baskets down and well
above the snow, turn just enough
to watch the chair, then sit when
it arrives, grabbing the seat beside
the knee with the free hand.

34

The ride itself is an opportunity to

the snow falls away below us which

pizza), to stand up when I say, and to


bend forward as we ski away from the
they will hear (fear can mute any well
intended guidance) I might add some
of these points:
Prepare to dismount before we raise
the safety bar. Skis (or snowboards)
off the foot rests and poles hanging
with tips down so we can raise the bar
at the blue work safety sign lift bar
here, with plenty of time left before

to the snow makes it is easy to slide


off the chair into a standing position.
I give a little physical assistance
to make sure they get off the chair,
minimizing the chance that they end

Once the dismount is successful we


celebrate with a cheer, then get back
to the pursuit of ski improvement and
great memories. After a couple of
rounds the success rate is assured.
Chair rides become a relaxing rest with
a view rather than a nervous prelude
to an abyss. And, I've got another
convert espousing barrr-tender.
Whether teaching or simply joining others
on chair lifts I always encourage safe
handling of the safety bar after all it is a
safety bar.
The goal: eliminate the crushing of skulls or
pinching of limbs due to a hastily slammeddown bar, or loss of teeth from a hastily

we need to stand up.

raised bar.

Shuffle to the front edge of the seat

How can you help raise the bar on safety

Once seated, its time to lower the

to make it easier to stand up. I explain

bar. Safely. I introduce my favorite

that the time to stand up is where the

silly linesecretly wishing to hear it

exit ramp slopes a little, and when I

echoed one day in a British accent

say to (I avoid phrases such as when

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

saying forward when the distance

bar safety? Just say let's barrr-tender and


let the conversation do the rest.
by Ken | CHADDOCK
CSIA 3, CSCF 2 and Author: How I Ski

BC Region

&
Ignition Day
AGM

in REVIEW

December 2011 Whistler BC

IGNITION DAYS

SPARK PASSION FOR SKIING


Last Winter, Ignition Days in Whistler, Big White and Fernie added spark and
sizzle to kick start the season for 160 CSIA BC members.
Come out and kick start the upcoming season... join in at Ignition Days and
stoke your passion for skiing and instructing for the 2012-2013 season.
CSIA BC looks forward to another great season
and will continue to provide the membership
with events such as Ignition Days. Your CSIA
BC Committee wishes to thank all the trainers
and host mountains for making these events
engaging and energizing. Ignition Day Whistler
flowed into the 2011 CSIA BC Annual General
Meeting held 3 December 2011, a welcome
opportunity to get involved and socialize with
colleagues over appies and refreshments.
YOUR CONTRIBUTION COUNTS
The AGM is the time and place to choose or
be chosen by your peers to represent the
membership as a Director on the BC CSIA Board.
Passion for the sport and being a member in

good standing are positive qualities that make


for a great Director, and while hard work it
may be, leading positive change for BC CSIA
members is a source of unexpected rewards.
BE THERE OR BE SQUARE
Dont miss this coming seasons Ignition Day
and AGM if you missed the last one! We would
love to have you participate and promise you an
amazing day of fun and catching up with fellow
members from all over BC.
CSIA CELEBRATES 75 YEARS
Dont miss the incredible Gala Event this year to
celebrate 75 amazing years of the CSIA.
Register early to avoid disappointment see the
INVITATION and more details on PAGE 17.
CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

35

BC Region

NORTHERN
Festival
by

Brent | BRAATEN

CSIA BC Committee Northern Representative

One of the most successful Northern


Festival ever wrapped up this past season
at Troll Ski Resort in Quesnel, BC.
Thirty CSIA members enjoyed
a two day ski improvement
weekend with Mike Manara,
Ryan MacInnis and Tracey
Fraser.
Troll
provided
a
great
background
with
awesome
conditions and weather, over
20 cm of snow on the first day.
The staff went out of their way
to make it a great weekend for
everyone attending.
Thanks to owner Hildur and the
entire staff at Troll and snow
school owner Scott Zacharias.

36

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

Everyone enjoyed working on


their skiing and they were also
treated to a fabulous meal
Saturday night in the lodge.
Also a big thank you to Mike
Manara for not only for his
excellent work on snow but also
with the indoor presentation.
To event sponsors, CSIA BC
Committee, Troll Ski Resort,
Evolve, NR. Ski,
Winterland
Ski, Ruckus a big THANK YOU.
We look forward to another
successful festival in 2013.

2012

in REVIEW

Troll Ski Resort

CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

37

CSIA BC

Women Only
2012 WORKSHOP

in REVIEW

by Kim | FOURNEL

January 27th was the perfect ski day. Snow


conditions were incredible; the groomers
were

velvet

carpets

with

dusting

of

snow and the off piste lines beckoned,


daring

experimentation

beyond

personal

boundaries. The type of ski day we dream


about, one that stirs all the senses.
As the coordinator of CSIA BCs 2nd Annual WOW

Working on technical understanding with practical

you are experiencing!

program I was thrilled to have 25 female CSIA

applications in their skiing, the women challenged

The WOW team is already planning for next

Members from across Canada join the teams of

themselves. Most of them wanted to explore off

years event with the collaboration of the CSIA BC

Hisae Fukui and Leslie Glaysher, Akiko Takemoto

piste. The ideal snow conditions enticed the women

Committee who supports this unique program that

and Donie Blunden, Rhonda Wittman and myself

to play inside and outside the box. The relaxed

recognizes the strength of the female membership

Kim Fournel for a day of training, professional

learning environment motivated the participants

and helps foster the potential in each of us.

development and Lots of Fun.

to test themselves, especially when cheered on by

See you then.

Our morning started with a group photo. A special

their peers.

Kim Fournel

location was chosen for the 2010 Olympic Women

That magical day wrapped up with Aprs and a

CSIA Level 4 CSCF Level 2

Downhill Start. No sooner were the smiles captured

presentation by our guest speaker Jan Matthews

for eternity than the groups were off. Where to Ski?

who shared with us the physical benefits of practicing

Where to Ski? So many choices on the mountain,

yoga before and after skiing. Her inspirational

yet so little time!

message to wrap up the day: Acknowledge your


beautiful surroundings and be grateful for all that

38

ProView | Fall/Winter 2012-2013

CSIA BC | www.snowprobc.com

39

YOU THINK THE SKIINGS

P: Paul Morrison

GREAT?

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB IS NOW HIRING


PART TIME SKI INSTRUCTORS FOR WINTER 2012.13
A number of part time combinations are available that vary from a few days a
week to working a variety of programs, which may add up to full time hours.
New this year, staff housing will be available for part time staff that are

APPLY TODAY
Visit whistlerblackcomb.com/jobs
and click on the Jobs Fair Tab

working for the whole season. Part time has never looked so good!