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MSTE 27200 Introduction to Motorsports Fall 2014

Description:

An overview of the motorsports industry, organization, technology, and


careers. (3 cr)

Class Times: Tuesdays & Thursdays 4:30-5:45


Instructors:

Pete Hylton
Andy Borme
Chris Finch
office:
ET201T
ET201V
ET201H
email:
phylton@iupui.edu aborme@iupui.edu chfinch@iupui.edu

Text:

none

Grading:

Assignments: 1. Intro (PeteHylton)


2. History (Pete Hylton)
3. Physics (Pete Hylton)
4. Vehicle Dyn. (Chris Finch)
5. Aero (Andy Borme)
6. Essay (Pete Hylton)
Event Attendance
Class Attendance
Final Project (Pete Hylton)
Final Exam

Minimum Scale:
Goals:

90-100 = A, 80-90 = B, 70-80 = C, 60-70= D, 0-60 = F

25 points
25 points
25 points
25 points
25 points
25 points
20 points
30 points
100 points
100 points
400 points total

+/- will be given

This course is designed to give students an overview of the motorsports


industry, including types of vehicles, types of competition, careers
available, historical perspective, development of pertinent technologies,
and brief discussions of engineering related topics which will be covered
in more detail in future classes. All program faculty participate in the
class as well as guest speakers from industry. A student research project
is required along with pertinent homework assignments.

ABET General Criteria Outcomes:


After completion of this course, the students should exhibit ability to:
D Function on a multi-disciplinary team
F Understand professional and ethical responsibility
G Communicate Effectively

H Understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic,


environmental and societal context
I Recognize the need for, and an ability to engage in, life long learning
J Demonstrate a knowledge of contemporary issues
Course Level Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should exhibit ability to:
Demonstrate knowledge of the motorsports industry and techniques,
skills and modern tools of the industry
Apply current knowledge and adapt to and solve problems relevant to
the industry.
Possess a general knowledge of the history and evolution of motor
racing in both the US and abroad
Communicate effectively
Perform as part of a diverse team
Recognize professional, ethical and societal responsibilities
Recognize contemporary issues and be aware of and respect diversity
Course Topics:

Achieving Success in College and this Program


The Physics of Motorsports
Motorsports Industry Overview
History of Motorsports
Sanctioning Bodies, Rules Making, Event Organization

Internships / Industry Perceptions & Diversity in Motorsports

Creative Design Approaches


Designing for safety in motorsports

Basic Aerodynamics
Basic Vehicle Dynamics
Basic Data Acquisition
Basics of Data acquisition and Analysis
Guest Speakers from the motorsports industry

Student Project Presentations

Final Projects:
Each student will complete either a Research Project (done individually or in pairs if permitted
by instructor) or a Design Project (may be done as a group) as described below.
Research Project
Thoroughly research and investigate some motorsports aspect, OR perform further investigation
on some topic which was only covered briefly in class OR compare and contrast two or more
different aspects or viewpoints of some topic(s) covered in class. The professor must approve
the project topic. Write and submit a report, of approximately 10 pages, typed, double spaced,
12 point font. Use APA writing format. Minimum 5 references (book, magazine, video, internet,
interview), must be credible (no bloggers), of which at least 2 must be off-line check accuracy
and authenticity of sources. Feel free to use the university writing center for help.
Make a presentation in class of no more than 12 minutes. A rubric for both written and oral
presentations will be provided and should be used as you prepare. Submit proposed topics and
requested dates to the instructor. Presentation dates will be assigned on a first requested
basis when proposal is submitted.
Design Project
Design projects must involve all aspects of an actual design and fabrication project, including
concept evaluation, design considerations, necessary analysis, and project completion.
A variety of projects will be considered acceptable. The professor must approve the project
concept.
Write and submit a report, including description of all design aspects, and analysis, with
appropriate figures and graphics. Use APA writing format. Minimum 5 references (book,
magazine, video, internet, interview), must be credible (no bloggers), of which at least 2 must be
off-line check accuracy and authenticity of sources. Feel free to use the university writing
center for help. Make a presentation in class of no more than 12 minutes is required. A rubric
for both written and oral presentations will be provided and should be used as you prepare.
Submit proposed topics and requested dates to the instructor. Presentation dates will be
assigned on a first requested basis when proposal is submitted.

Classroom Policy
1. Keep cell phones/pagers on silent mode.
2. If you need to leave the classroom to return a call, or page, or to use the restroom do
so quietly so as not to disturb your classmates.
3. No cell phones, pagers, or PDAs will be allowed during tests.
4. Anyone caught cheating on a test will receive a zero.
5. Copying from each other on independent projects or lab reports will resulting a severe
penalty to both parties
6. Late assignments will only be accepted with a significant penalty for lateness.
7. Absences it is your responsibility to be in class and that is where you are expected
to be. Acceptable absences for which the instructor will work with you include your
illness (with immediate phone or email notification to the instructor and verification
afterwards) severe illness of immediate family member (ditto) or mandatory work
assignments (with maximum advance notice and verification).
8. Homework homework is for your benefit. Nothing teaches like example and
nothing brings improvement like practice. Only you can decide how much practice
you need in order to achieve the level of knowledge and the grade that you are willing
to settle for. Working the homework problems suggested by the instructor should be
considered the minimum necessary to survive the class. A reasonable expectation for
a good working knowledge and a good grade is significantly more you get to decide
how much it is worth to you.
9. Oncourse will be used to inform students of intermediate grades, team grades,
schedule changes, etc when necessary
Administrative Withdrawal:
A basic requirement of this course is that you will participate in all class meetings and
conscientiously complete all required course activities and/or assignments. Keep in touch
with me if you are unable to attend, participate, or complete an assignment on time. If
you miss more than half of the required activities within the first 25% of the course
without contacting me, you may be administratively withdrawn from this course.

Example: Our course meets twice per week; thus if you miss more than four classes in the
first four weeks, you may be withdrawn. Administrative withdrawal may have academic,
financial, and financial aid implications. Administrative withdrawal will take place after
the full refund period, and if you are administratively withdrawn from the course you will
not be eligible for a tuition refund. If you have questions about the administrative
withdrawal policy at any point during the semester, please contact me. (Source:
http://registrar.iupui.edu/withdrawal-policy.html)
Cheating:
Cheating is considered to be an attempt to use or provide unauthorized assistance, materials,
information, or study aids in any form and in any academic exercise or environment.
a. A student must not use external assistance on any in-class or take-home
examination, unless the instructor specifically has authorized external assistance.
This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, the use of tutors, books, notes,
calculators, computers, and wireless communication devices.
b. A student must not use another person as a substitute in the taking of an examination
or quiz, nor allow other persons to conduct research or to prepare work, without
advance authorization from the instructor to whom the work is being submitted.
c. A student must not use materials from a commercial term paper company; files of
papers prepared by other persons, or submit documents found on the Internet. A
student must not collaborate with other persons on a particular project and submit a
copy of a written report that is represented explicitly or implicitly as the students
individual work.
d. A student must not use any unauthorized assistance in a laboratory, at a computer
terminal, or on fieldwork.
e. A student must not steal examinations or other course materials, including but not
limited to, physical copies and photographic or electronic images.
f. A student must not submit substantial portions of the same academic work for credit
or honors more than once without permission of the instructor or program to whom
he work is being submitted.
g. A student must not, without authorization, alter a grade or score in any way, nor alter
answers on a returned exam or assignment for credit.
Fabrication:
A student must not falsify or invent any information or data in an academic exercise
including, but not limited to, records or reports, laboratory results, and citation to the sources of
information.
Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is defined as presenting someone elses work, including the work of other
students, as ones own. Any ideas or materials taken from another source for either written or
oral use must be fully acknowledged, unless the information is common knowledge. What is
considered common knowledge may differ from course to course.

a. A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or
pictures of another person without acknowledgment.
b. A student must give credit to the originality of others and acknowledge indebtedness
whenever:
1. Directly quoting another persons actual words, whether oral or written;
2. Using another persons ideas, opinions, or theories;
3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or
written;
4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or
collections without acknowledgment.
Facilitating Academic Dishonesty:
Facilitating academic dishonesty is when a student aids or attempts to aid another student in
committing academic misconduct. Examples of such activities might be:
Allowing another student to copy answers on examinations.
Writing a paper for another student.
Interference:
Interference is when a student prevents another student's work from being completed or
evaluated properly. Examples might include:
Stealing or changing another student's work before it is evaluated.
Destroying another student's work.
Stealing or defacing shared necessary resources to deprive others of their use.
Offering bribes or favors to affect a grade or an evaluation of academic work.

Making threats to affect a grade or an evaluation of academic work.


Violation of Course Rules:
Violation of course rules is when a student fails to abide by the rules stated in the course
syllabus when those rules are related to course content or to enhancement of the learning process
in the course. Examples of common violations include:
Working with a group when a project is intended to be for each individual.
Using unauthorized materials for examinations or projects.
Faculty Action on Misconduct:
All faculty are required to report academic misconduct to the university and to examine
any accusations of academic misconduct from students.
IUPUI Nondiscrimination Policy for People with Disabilities:
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is committed to the spirit and letter of
the Americans with Disabilities Act. Heretofore, the University has been subject to the
nondiscrimination provisions of Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Under
Sections 503 and 504, the University has instituted various administrative policies, practices and
procedures to ensure nondiscrimination against individuals with disabilities. These policies,

practices and procedures have been amended to comply with the requirements of the Americans
with Disabilities Act.
Accordingly, "no qualified individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability,
be either excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs, or
activities" of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. Moreover, no qualified
individual with a disability shall be discriminated against because of the disability of that
individual with regard to job application procedures, the hiring or discharge of employees,
compensation, advancement, job training, and other terms, conditions and privileges of
employment.
When the stress is too much
During the semester, if you find that life stressors are interfering with your academic or
personal success, consider contacting IUPUI's Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS).
All IUPUI students are eligible for individual counseling services at minimal fees. Group
counseling services are free of charge. CAPS also performs evaluations for learning disorders
and ADHD; fees are charged for testing. CAPS is located in Walker Plaza, Room 220 (719
Indiana Avenue) and can be contacted by phone (317-274-2548). For more information, see the
CAPS web-site at: http://life.iupui.edu/caps/.