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HCAA OPERATIONS PROCEDURES

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MANUAL

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GUIDANCE

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CHAPTER 3.1

GENERAL

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GENERAL

This Chapter contains guidance information and references for certain items that require further clarification during review/completion. The information contained in this chapter will be continually reviewed to assure that the most current policies are applied. Additional guidance will be added to this chapter as the need arises.

The primary sources for guidance material are EASA/JAA and ICAO publications. When sufficient guidance is not available form these sources information published by other Aviation Authorities will be evaluated and adapted as applicable for use as HCAA guidance material.

NOTE Law 3270/2004 (Article 9) states that all ICAO Annexes are translated into Greek and transposed by issuing an HCAA Governor’s Decision. Concerning Annex 6 and Annex 18, Flight Ops Section prepares any new amendments (after being informed by HCAA/D1/C that a new amendment has been circulated/adopted) and forwards it to the HCAA/Governor for signature. After being signed the new translated amendment is sent for publishing to the National Gazette.

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CHAPTER 3.2

GUIDANCE MATERIAL

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3.2 GUIDANCE MATERIAL

HCAA policy is to apply Chapter 2 of the EASA Requirements, EU OPS and JAR-OPS (3), which contains the Advisory Circulars Joint (ACJ), Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC), and Interpretive and Explanatory Material (IEM). EU AWO is also to be utilised for All Weather Operations.

Additional JAA Guidance Material, which should be used by HCAA Inspectors, is published in the form of Temporary Guidance Leaflets (TGLs). The TGL system was implemented in order to circulate information to the EASA member states in a timely manner. As the information has not gone through the EASA rulemaking process, therefore timely, it is designated as guidance material and it is up to each Authority to determine its applicability. TGL information is ultimately intended to be subjected to the rule making process and eventually become a requirement.

HCAA policy is to review each TGL and subsequently inform the Operators of its applicability. In general, all current TGLs and are intended to be applied by HCAA as policy guidance material. TGLs are published as part of the Administrative Guidance Material (AGM) chapters of the EUs. The AGM chapters that contain TGL information that is applicable to Flight Operations topics are Chapter Four “Operations Part 3”.

Also, Chapter One “General Part 3”, although an aircraft certification Chapter, contains several TGLs that have information applicable to Flight Operations. Only the TGLs that are related to Flight Operations have been listed.

All the TGLs are available for downloading and review at the HCAA subscribed document website www.ihs.com Following is a list of the current TGLs as of March 2004. The most current list is available on the JAA website www.jaa.nl under the “Operations” chapter. This website should be consulted for the latest TGL information. The material for TGL numbers not indicated below has previously been incorporated into the EU OPS.

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TGL #

AGM Chapter Four Operations Part 3

   

3

Guidance for Operators in Compiling Procedures and Training programmes for Cabin Crew

4

Ice and other Contaminants-Procedures

 

7

Aerodrome Low Visibility Procedures (LVP) for Take-Off

 

8

Mass Values

9

Planning Minima For Alternate Aerodromes

 

11

Training Programmes for the Use of Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems

12

All Weather Operations- General Aviation

 

20

All Weather Operations With Head Up Display (HUD) Guidance Systems

21

Quality Inspection Audit Pools

23

Use of Auto land Systems on ILS Category I Facilities

 

24

Crew Resource Management Cabin Crew

 

25

One-Engine-Inoperative Ferry Flights

 

26

EU OPS/JAR-ÓPS 3 MEL Policy Document

 

27

Guidance for Operators on Training Programmes for the Use of Terrain Awareness and Warning Systems

28

Drum-Pointer and Counter/Drum-Pointer Display Altimeters

 

29

EASA Policy Concerning the Use of Portable Electronic Devices on Board Aircraft

31

Crew Training for Exit Operation

32

Quality Assurance Programme for Small and Very Small Operators

33

Counter Drum Pointer Altimeter Temporary Exemption Policy

34

Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS) Operations

 

Only the TGLs that contain information applicable to Flight Operations from AGM Chapter One are included below.

TGL #

AGM Chapter One General Part 3

2

Airworthiness Approval of Navigation Systems for use in European Airspace Designated for Basic RNAV (Superseded by GAI 20)

6

Guidance Material On The Approval of Aircraft and Operators for Flight in Airspace Above Flight Level 290 Where a 300M (1,000ft) Vertical Separation Minimum is Applied

10

Airworthiness and Operational Approval for Precision RNAV Operations in Designated European Airspace

14

Policy Paper on Pooling of Quality Audits

15

Temporary Guidance Material on Approval of Departure Clearance Via Data Communications over ACARS

Note: For ETOPS guidance refer to AMC 20-6. This is the basis on which the Requirements are set on Chapter 3-19 of HCAA Ops Manual.

 

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CHAPTER 3.3

FINDINGS

 

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Finding Form

General

A Finding Form is required to be issued every time non-compliance is discovered during an Inspection/Audit, or during a review of an operator’s documentation. The basis of non-compliance could be against an EU OPS/JAR OPS 3 requirement or

Guidance Material, HCAA requirement or Policy, or the AOC holder’s Operations

Manual procedures (Levels 0,1,2). A Finding Form is also issued when an official recommendation is made (Level 3 Finding).

It is important that the Finding Form be completed properly for insertion and retrieval from the Computerised Tracking System.

The Inspector should always have blank Finding Forms available with him/her during each Audit/Inspection. When non-compliance is discovered during an Inspection the Finding Form should be completed by hand on site at the time the Finding item is discovered. This applies to Flight Inspections and Inspections at ground facilities.

Name, Location, Audit Area, Date

The Organisation’s Name, Location of Audit, Area of Audit and Date of Audit should

be filled in the spaces provided at the top of the Finding Form. The Address may be

left blank, as this will be automatically filled with the official business address when entering the Finding into the Computerised Tracking System. The Area of Audit is filled with the name of the Inspection Checklist being used. When entering the information into the Finding Form in the Computer System the names of the Checklists will appear as a drop down menu for selection.

Finding Numbers

The Audit Finding Number must be indicated in the space provided. The number assigned should be sequential for each Audit Area. For example, if there are 3 non- compliances discovered during a Flight Inspection (Flight Deck) three separate Finding Forms will be completed, for this Audit Area of Flight Inspection, numbered 1, 2, & 3. If during the same Audit,a non-compliance was discovered in Dispatch, one Finding Form with number “1” assigned, will be completed for the Audit Area Dispatch. Typically, the Finding numbers are those assigned from the unsatisfactory items found using the Checklists. But, when officially numbering the Findings it is advised to wait until the end of the audit/inspection in each Audit Area to assign finding numbers. If more that one Inspector is conducting an audit in the same Area the findings from each Inspector should be reviewed jointly and the finding numbers

 

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assigned so there is no duplication of finding numbers. Also, some of the non- compliances written by each inspector could be consolidated into one Finding Form.

Non-Conformance Reference

In the space indicating “Non Conformance with” reference from which the non- compliance was found must be entered. If from EU OPS, the requirement number should be indicated. If from a deviation from an Operations Procedure the Manual name and paragraph number should be indicated.

Specific Finding

In the “Specific finding” space the details of

the finding should be

written. It

is

important that the description be clearly written and directly related to the requirement reference. More than one item could be stated as long as it involves the same requirement and is likely to be resolved by the same department within the organisation. If this is not the case then a separate finding should be written.

Signing and Witnessing

The inspector should print and sign his/her name and insert the date on site at the time of discovering the non-compliance. It is also important at this time that the inspector(s) have some one from the

organisation sign as witness in the “Witnessed for Organisation” space provided. This

assures that a person representing the Organisation is witnessing the finding. It should be explained to this person that their signature does not constitute any obligation or responsibility for the corrective action. During a Flight Inspection a Flight Crew Member (preferably the Commander) or a Cabin Crew Member (preferably the

Senior CCM) should be the person signing as witness. During an inspection at a

ground facility the Organisation’s representative present at the time of the Finding

discovery would be the most likely person to sign as Organisation witness. A copy of the Finding Form should not be given to the Organisation at this time. The Organisation is welcome to take notes regarding the finding but it is not official until the Finding Level is agreed and the finding has been send formally.

Finding Level, Proposed Resolution date & Entry into Computer System

Upon returning to the office the inspector should enter the Finding information from

the handwritten form into the Finding Form in the Computerised Tracking System. At this point the Inspector assigns a Finding Level in the space provided and enters a

“Proposed Resolution Date” corresponding to the Finding Level, in the space provided. In the space “Witnessed for Organisation” type in the witnessing person’s name“. The original copy with the original witnessing signature should be kept on file

 

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for future reference if needed. This is case of the unlikely event that the Organisation, at a later date, would dispute the accuracy of the Finding. A copy of the completed finding is then printed for agreement on the Finding Level.

Finding Level Agreement

The space “Agreed by Audit Manager” is to confirm agreement regarding the Level of

the finding assigned by the inspector. This agreement is accomplished by the Flight Operations Section Head or his representative. This agreement of the Finding Level serves to support the Inspectors decision if the Organisation chooses to dispute the Level. Once the Level is agreed, the findings may be formally sent to the

Organisation.

Formally Sending Findings & Completion of Inspection/Audit

The Inspection/Audit is not considered completed until the results are sent to the Organisation/Operator. If non-compliances were found and, findings written, they should be sent officially to the Organisation/Operator as soon as possible after returning from the Inspection/Audit. This is accomplished via a formal letter/fax signed by the FSDirector accompanied by the completed Finding Forms. If the particular Areas of the Inspections/Audits, planned according to the Annual Schedule, are held over a multiple day period (1-5) then the formal letter/fax, to the Organisation/Operator, should contain all the completed Findings from this group of inspections. If more than one Inspector was involved in the Inspections/Audits the formal letter/fax should reference all the Findings written by all the Inspectors involved. The CPC is responsible for assuring that this occurs. If the planned Areas of Inspections/audits are more than 5 days apart the formal letter to the Organisation/Operator should not be delayed due to waiting for completion of the next group of inspection/ Audits. If any findings are written that specify a compliance date within 5 days they should be sent together formally immediately.

Formal Letter

The formal letter is prepared by the CPC and coordinated with all the inspection team involved in the Operations Sections then signed by the Flight Standards Division Director. The letter should be addressed to the Quality Manager of the Organisation/Operator. He should be the person responsible within the Organisation/Operator to distribute the findings to the responsible managers for resolution. As efficiency is essential in formally sending the findings to the Organisation/Operator a Formal Letter template has been constructed for use. There is no need to repeat any of the finding information in the body of the Formal Letter. The Finding Forms

 

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accomplish this task. The purpose of the Formal Letter is to formally send the findings by listing the Finding numbers and Areas and specifying that proposed resolutions are expected by the compliance dates on the Finding Forms.

The Formal Letter template is contained as part of the Computerised Tracking System. The system will automatically enter the name of the Organisation/Operator and the Finding Numbers and Areas. The name of the Quality Manager will need to be entered by the CPC. Also the CPC should verify that the letter lists all the applicable findings and that all the Finding Forms are attached when the transmittal letter is presented to the FSDD for signature.

The Letter and Findings should be either transmitted via facsimile, or given directly to the Organisation, the same day of letter signature.

Organisation Corrective Action Plan and Signature

The space provided is for the Organisation to propose their corrective action plans after they have formally received the finding(s). The proposed Short Term response is expected to immediately correct the non-compliance. The Long Term response is expected to either prevent re occurrence or to outline further steps

involving a non-compliance that is not solvable in the short term. If a Long Term response is not applicable it should be marked as such.

The signature should be of the person directly responsible for implementing

the corrective action. Typically this should be the responsible Post Holder. The signature should not be that of the Quality Manager as he/she is the one responsible for verifying the effectiveness of the corrective action, not the implementation.

Closure of the Finding

After the finding has been returned by the Organisation, signed with the proposed corrective action, it will need to be evaluated for acceptability by the issuing Inspector. If the proposed resolution involves changes to a manual or other documentation, the proposed changed pages should accompany the finding. If the proposed corrective action involves a Re-inspection the Organisation should anticipate this and propose a date for the Re-inspection prior to the proposed resolution date. It could be acceptable to close the finding based on an accepted proposal and perform the inspection at a later date. The proposed corrective action(s) are accepted the Inspector should mark the appropriate boxes and enter the date the finding was closed in the Computerised Tracking System. A copy of the closed finding should then be forwarded to the Organisation.

 

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CHAPTER 3.4

INSPECTION CHECKLIST

 

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3.4 INSPECTION CHECKLISTS

General

The checklists are aids to conduct audits/Inspections and to standardise inspections between inspectors. The checklist is the means to indicate if an item was found satisfactory, unsatisfactory, not applicable or not checked. The checklists are not intended to prevent an inspector from issuing a finding for an unsatisfactory item not indicated on a checklist.

If an inspected item is not applicable or found satisfactory or unsatisfactory an “X” (or

checkmark) should be marked in the appropriate column indicated. If an item was not inspected a “0” should be marked in the NA column. For those items marked unsatisfactory the number of the finding should be indicated in the “No.” column.

Normally a separate Finding form (and therefore number) should be issued for each unsatisfactory item indicated on a particular checklist. This is to be able to track and follow up each finding separately as findings may have different corrective action dates and be the responsibility of different individuals within the company. If multiple unsatisfactory items on a particular checklist have the same Finding Level, the same corrective action dates, and are the responsibility of the same individual/post holder then they may be described on one Finding form and given the same finding number for each unsatisfactory item on the checklist.

Note: On the Training and Checking checklists the “V” column represents another variable time frame, other than 6 or 12 months such as the 90 day recency requirement. A “U” for unsatisfactory and an “S” for satisfactory should be indicated in the column applicable to the training and checking item being evaluated. The NA column should be marked as appropriate e.g. Not Applicable, or not inspected.

 

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CHAPTER 3.5

MANUALS REVIEW

 

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3.5 MANUALS REVIEW

Operations Manual

After a satisfactory the preliminary application review where the basic elements of the Operations Manual (OM) were found satisfactory a detailed review needs to be accomplished. Assessment of the acceptability of the applicant’s Operations Manual is normally the most time consuming task in the certification process.

After the format and structure of the OM has been reviewed and found satisfactory in accordance with Chapter P of EU OPS or JAR-OPS 3, as applicable, a detailed review of the content is commenced. This task requires the application of considerable skill, knowledge and experience by the inspector.

An inspector reviewing an OM for the first time should do so under the guidance an inspector with the appropriate experience. The Section Head will

assign such an inspector. The structure of the OM, and the manuals composing the OM, must be clearly outlined. For example, if a separate Cabin Crew Manual is proposed then it should be clearly indicated how this fits into the structure of Part A of the OM.

The Compliance List is the primary document by which the content of the OM will be reviewed for acceptability. The content of the OM should state how the operator complies with the applicable requirement and should not be a repeat of the

requirements itself. In no case will wording such as “The operator should

” or “The

... operator shall ensure…” be accepted in the OM. The OM should accurately reflect

the aircraft type and type of operations of the AOC Holder. Types of operations not intended at the time of operation are considered extraneous information should not be included in the OM. For example CAT II/III information should not be presented in the OM until the operator is ready for evaluation/approval for this type of operation. Also, additional types of aircraft should not be presented in the OM unless they are to be ready to be evaluated for inclusion in the Operations Specifications.

AOC Applicants who have contracted the preparation of their Operations Manuals to another party, such as Jeppessen, should customise these manuals to reflect their own operation prior to submittal to HCAA. If the submitted manuals do not specifically reflect their intended type of operation the manual must be rejected and returned to the applicant. The time period required for the applicant to correct and resubmit the manual(s) will then be added to the target certification date.

 

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OM PART A- General Basic

Part A of the OM should contain appropriate details on the topics as specified in EU OPS. The review of this part of the manual should also ensure that the information agrees between different volumes of the manual and that there is no conflicting information. For example Part A of the OM could be separated into different volumes/manuals for Flight Crew and Cabin Crew or Crewmembers other than flight crew, as applicable. These need to be reviewed against each other to assure that there is not conflicting information and that each contains the required information. For example, if a Part A is issued for Flight Crew and Cabin Crew Manual is issued for Cabin Crew or Crewmembers other than flight crew, as applicable, then the organisational structure of the company should be contained in both and be identical. As another example the same description of the Quality System should also be contained in both manuals. If two Inspectors are assigned to review different parts of the manual a coordinated review between the Inspectors should also be accomplished to assure consistency.

OM Part B - Type Related

The preferred structure of Part B of the OM would include most of the type specific information directly in the Part B itself with minimal referencing to other sources for

the required information. The Operator’s primary sources of information for

composing Part B are the Manufacturers Flight Crew Operating Manual FCOM (which includes the condensed and expanded checklists) and the Airplane or Helicopter Flight Manual as applicable. For limitations and procedures that are copied from the FCOM and AFM into Part B it is important that this information is verified for accuracy. A Part B must be submitted for each type of aircraft intended to be operated by the AOC Holder.

As EU OPS allows referencing to other sources the reference should be specific. For example, when stating AFM at least the Chapter and Paragraph should be included.

OM Part C - Route and Aerodrome Information

Part C should list, as a minimum, where the applicable information can be obtained; in most cases it is referencing Jeppessen/AIP manuals. This is not to be confused with the methods of how this similar information is determined as is required in O.M. Part A chapter 8. For example, how the minimum flight altitudes are determined in respect of obstacles should be explained in O.M. Part A. Where the actual altitudes for a particular route may be found should be referenced in Part C. Any referenced

 

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information should be specific as to document.

the Chapter and chapter of the referenced

All the airports that the applicant is expecting to operate into should be listed and categorised in Part C. If an operator is suddenly required operate into an airport not contained in their PART C it is allowed as long as the procedure for evaluating the acceptability of the airport is followed. The revision to Part C to include the airport may follow at a later date.

OM Part D -Training

The training syllabi and checking programmes for all operations personnel to include Crew Members, Dispatchers, Line Training and Check Commanders and Cabin Crew trainers and checkers. For flight crewmembers the initial aircraft type training is the TRTO/Operator type rating program. The initial type rating training program listed in part D should not conflict with the recurrent or conversion program.

As HCAA is mutually recognised in the area of licensing, the HCAA Licensing Section

controls the training and qualifications of Instructor and Examiner personnel. It is the policy of HCAA to require a separate TRTO Manual to include Instructor and Examiner training and checking programs. However those programs need to be contained in Part D, if the type rating course is to be conducted by the Operator.

Airplane Flight Manual (AFM)

A copy AFM (RFM, or Pilots Hand Book for small aircraft) is required to be submitted during initial certification or prior to variation of the AOC when adding a new type. Unless a comparative analysis, between the AFM and OM, has been done by the operator and accepted by the HCAA inspector the AFM must be carried on board the Aircraft.

 

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LETTER OF APPROVAL

Subject: Approval of Issue X, Part XX, revision XXX

This issue X has been approved and authorized by:

Title

Name

Signature

Director of Flight Operations

   

HCAA Acceptance Statement:

Hellenic Civil Aviation Administration (HCAA) has reviewed “XXXX AIRWAYS” FOM up to and including the subject revision to the original issue. The HCAA is satisfied, upon completion of this review and with reference to JAA Administrative & Guidance Material Section Four: Operations, Part Two: Procedures Appendix 6A and 7A, the HCAA approves as applicable the content of this FOM. The official approval document of the above referenced FOM must be incorporated into and become part of this manual.

 

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CHAPTER 3.6

LEASING

 

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3.6 LEASING

3.6.1 Introduction

Regulations

The regulations applicable to leasing are: Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008, OPS 1.165 of Annex III to Regulation (EEC) No. 3922/91 (hereinafter referred to as EU-OPS) or PD 64/2012 (JAR-OPS 3), and Annex I to Regulation (EC) No. 2042/2003 (hereinafter referred to as Part M). The European regulations can be consulted on the website http://eur-lex.europa.eu/.

Definitions

The term "Community air carrier" shall be deemed to mean any undertaking within the European Union or States associated therewith (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland) whose business includes or consists solely of carriage by air, with an operating licence in accordance with Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 and an Air Operator Certificate (AOC) issued in accordance with the requirements of EU- OPS (aeroplanes), or an AOC issued in accordance with the requirements of the latest amendment to JAR-OPS 3 (helicopters).

Where in this chapter reference is made to EU-OPS for aeroplanes the reference also applies to the same article in JAR-OPS 3 for helicopters unless stated otherwise (e.g. EU-OPS 1.165 = JAR-OPS 3.165).

The term "undertaking" shall be deemed to mean any natural person or legal entity, whether profit-making or not, or any official body whether having its own legal personality or not.

The term "dry lease agreement" shall be deemed to mean any agreement between undertakings under which only the aircraft concerned is operated (without provision of crew) under the AOC and associated conditions of the lessee.

The term "wet lease agreement" shall be deemed to mean any agreement between commercial air carriers both of whom are in possession of a valid AOC which is in accordance with ICAO Annex 6, under which an aircraft is operated under the AOC of the lessor.

The term "audit" shall be deemed to mean an audit in accordance with the approved lease audit programme.

 

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Types of lease

Pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 and OPS 1.165 eight different types of lease can be distinguished, i.e.:

  • A. Dry lease-in

o

Between Community air carriers (Article 13, paragraphs 1 and 2 of

paragraphs 1 and 2 of Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 and

o

Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 and OPS 1.165/3.165, under a, paragraph 1, under b, paragraph 2). Between a Community air carrier and an air carrier from a third country

or an undertaking which is not an air carrier (Articles 12 and 13,

OPS 1.165/3.165, under c, paragraph 1).

  • B. Dry lease-out

o

Between Community air carriers (Article 13, paragraphs 1 and 2 of

o

Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 and OPS 1.165/3.165, under a, paragraph 1, under b, paragraph 2). Between a Community air carrier and an air carrier from a third country

(Article 13, paragraphs 1 and 2 of Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 and OPS 1.165/3.165, under c, paragraph 3).

  • C. Wet lease-in

o

Between Community air carriers (Article 13, paragraphs 1 and 2 of

Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 and OPS 1.165/3.165, under a,

o

paragraph 2, under b, paragraph 2). Between a Community air carrier and an air carrier from a third country whereby an aircraft registered in that third country is the subject of the lease-in (Article 13, paragraphs 3 and 4 of Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 and OPS 1.165/3.165, under a, paragraph 2, under b, paragraph 2, under c, paragraph 2).

  • D. Wet lease-out

o

Between Community air carriers (OPS 1.165/3.165, under b,

o

paragraph 1). Between a Community air carrier and an air carrier from a third country (OPS 1.165/3.165, under c, paragraph 4).

In the following sections the lease types referred to above will be discussed.

3.6.2 DRY LEASE

Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 states that an undertaking must have one or more aircraft at its disposal through ownership or a dry lease agreement in order to qualify for an operating licence.

 

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In addition the undertaking may have one or more aircraft at its disposal through dry or wet lease agreement. Recital 8 of Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 states however that the leasing of aircraft registered in third countries, in particular wet leasing, should only be allowed in exceptional circumstances. For example when there is a lack of adequate aircraft available on the Community market; this possibility should also be strictly limited in time and requires that safety standards be complied with which are equivalent to those of Community and national legislations.

Greece follows the European policy for so-called “dry Lease agreements”, regarding the mutual operation of aircraft without crew within the European Union, and the transfer of supervision between Member States in accordance with ICAO Article 83bis. This guide therefore only contains references to the statutory requirements. Applications will be assessed on a case by case basis.

  • 3.6.2.1 Dry lease-in

Dry lease-in from an undertaking other than an air carrier

With the entry into force of Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 the finance lease has been cancelled as a type of lease. This type of lease is now regarded as a dry lease- in. With finance leasing an air carrier has beneficial ownership of the aircraft, whilst the legal ownership rests with an external financier. HCAA regards this type of dry lease-in as an ownership agreement, as opposed to a temporary dry lease-in from another air carrier.

Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 Article 12 stipulates that aircraft operated by a Community air carrier must be registered in the national register or within the Community.

HCAA follows the basic principle that aircraft owned by the undertaking, or available on the basis of a comparable dry lease agreement, must be registered in the national register. This in order to ensure the effective performance of supervisory obligations.

Prior approval required

A dry lease-in requires the prior approval of the HCAA. For this purpose an air carrier must submit an application for approval of the dry lease-in agreement to the HCAA. With the addition of the aircraft to the AOC the HCAA grants its approval.

In the case of sale and lease-back, whereby an air carrier sells an aircraft and immediately leases it back, no removal from and addition to the AOC needs to take

 

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place if the lease agreement has been assessed and approved by the HCAA pursuant to the above assessment framework.

In the case of a temporary dry lease-in of an aircraft registered in another Member State the two authorities must make agreements with regard to the supervision as stipulated in EU-OPS Article 1.175(d).

HCAA assessment framework

Approval will be granted if the provisions of Article 13, paragraph 2 of Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008, EU-OPS/JAR-OPS 3 and Part M of Annex I to Regulation (EC) No. 2042/2003 have been fulfilled.

Temporary lease-in of aircraft registered in a third country

Pursuant to EU-OPS Article 1.180(a)(1) the aircraft to be operated must have a standard certificate of airworthiness issued by a Member State in accordance with Regulation (EC) No. 1702/2003. It follows from this that the airworthiness requirements and safety system must meet the safety level required in Europe (EASA Regulation (EC) No. 216/2008 and Regulation (EC) No. 1702/2003, Part 21).

Pursuant to Article 13, paragraph 3 of Regulation (EC) 1008/2008 a Community air carrier may under certain conditions temporarily lease-in aircraft registered in a third country if use is made of foreign crew and foreign procedures are followed.

Pursuant to Article 13, paragraph 2 of Regulation (EC) 1008/2008 a dry lease agreement requires prior approval in accordance with the applicable legislation regarding aviation safety.

Article 13, paragraph 2, and recital 8 of the aforementioned regulation do not preclude that in special circumstances the temporary lease-in of aircraft which are registered in a third country would also be possible if they are operated with the crew and procedures of the Greek air carrier. This may be necessary if, for example, structural modification of the aircraft would be required for Greek or European registration.

Certificates must be mutually recognised via safety agreements which the EU or Greece has concluded with third countries. The EU mandate must also allow acceptance by the HCAA of the foreign certificate of airworthiness.

An aircraft registered in a third country can in this way be added temporarily to the AOC of the Greek air carrier if all deviations from the requirements set forth in Subparts K and L and OPS 1.005 have been made known and are acceptable to the

 

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HCAA, and after the State of registration has transferred its supervisory powers regarding operation and maintenance to the HCAA (OPS 1.165/3.165, under c, paragraph 1).

A temporary addition applies for a period of 6 months, to be renewed once by a maximum of 6 months.

  • 3.6.2.2 Dry lease-out

Prior approval required

A dry lease-out requires the prior approval of the HCAA. For this purpose an air carrier must submit an application for approval of the dry lease-out agreement to the HCAA. With the removal of the aircraft from the AOC the HCAA grants its approval.

HCAA assessment framework

Approval will be granted after:

  • A. the aviation authority of the country of the leasing-in air carrier has accepted in writing the responsibility for supervision of the maintenance and operation of the aircraft; and

  • B. the aircraft is maintained on the basis of an approved maintenance programme.

Licences

An aircraft registered in Greece may only be flown if the pilots have a valid pilot licence in accordance with JAR-FCL mutual recognition which has been issued by a country which is included in the JAA Member States Arrangement. These are countries which have correctly implemented the JAR-FCL requirements.

An air carrier from a country without JAR-FCL mutual recognition may apply to the HCAA for a validation for its flight crew personnel. This application must be accompanied by a valid pilot licence which has been issued in accordance with the requirements of Annex I to the Chicago Convention.

 

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3.6.3 WET LEASE

Air carriers with safety deficiencies according to the criteria of Regulation (EC) No. 2111/2005 do not qualify for wet lease-in agreements. This “List of airlines banned within the EU” is published by the European Commission on the website http://ec.europa.eu/transport/air-ban/list_en.htm.

As a measure for the protection of air passengers in the case of wet lease-in it has been made compulsory for air carriage contractors to inform passengers of the identity of the operating air carrier pursuant to Article 11 of Regulation (EC) No. 2111/2005.

  • 3.6.3.1 Wet lease-in (within the EU)

A wet lease-in agreement under which a Greek air carrier wet leases an aircraft from a Community air carrier.

Free operation of aircraft registered within the European Community

Pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No. 1008/2008 Community air carriers may freely operate wet leased aircraft registered within the Community. Free operation is not permitted if it would compromise safety.

Assessment framework for approval of operation

Pursuant to OPS 1.165/3.165 every type of lease, except for full wet lease-out, requires prior approval for the operation. The HCAA provides the possibility to obtain this approval by means of a wet lease-in procedure whereby the Greek air carrier as lessee assesses the standard of safety of the Community air carrier to be leased (lessor).

Explicit prior approval must be obtained if:

  • A. no approved wet lease-in procedure is followed; or

  • B. the aircraft is leased without complete crew.

Selection of Community air carrier

The basis for approval is the responsibility of the Greek air carrier to determine in advance that the wet lease-in does not involve a change in safety risk for its passengers.

 

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The Greek air carrier must demonstrate to the HCAA the manner in which it accepts a Community air carrier as a subcontractor for wet lease-in (OPS 1.035). An audit is optional in this respect. The procedure must be described in the operations manual of the air carrier. The Greek air carrier may keep a list of acceptable Community air carriers.

In view of its supervisory role it is necessary that the HCAA is informed in advance by the Greek air carrier of the actual date of commencement and end of the wet lease-in.

The HCAA can be notified using the e-mail address d2c@hcaa.gr.

Approval of

the operation will then apply for the duration of the lease agreement.

  • 3.6.3.2 Wet lease-in (outside the EU)

A wet lease-in agreement whereby a Greek air carrier wet leases an aircraft from a non-Community air carrier.

Prior approval required

A wet lease-in agreement between a Greek air carrier and a non-Community air carrier requires the prior approval of the HCAA.

For this purpose the Greek air carrier must submit an application for approval of the wet lease-in agreement to the HCAA. The application must be accompanied by a written statement from the accountable manager that an audit has been performed in accordance with the approved lease audit programme, the final assessment and an overview of any findings and corrective measures.

If the HCAA sets conditions to the approval, these conditions must be incorporated in the wet lease-in agreement.

HCAA assessment framework

The HCAA may grant its approval if:

  • A. the leasing-out air carrier holds an AOC in accordance with ICAO Annex 6 with a validity of at least one year which has been issued by a State which is a signatory to the Convention on International Civil Aviation (ICAO) whereby the aircraft to be used are provided with a standard certificate of airworthiness in accordance with ICAO Annex 8 which has been issued by the State responsible for the issuing of the AOC; and

  • B. the Greek air carrier demonstrates to the HCAA that all safety requirements have been complied with. For this purpose the Greek air carrier performs an

 

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audit on the other air carrier in accordance with the approved lease audit programme in order to ensure that the non-Community air carrier observes an equivalent safety standard (EU-OPS, Part M and Part 145). The audit must in any case include: operation, maintenance, licensing and airworthiness; and C. one of the following conditions has been complied with:

o

the Greek air carrier demonstrates to the HCAA the exceptional need

o

for the wet lease-in. In that case the wet lease-in may be approved for a period of 7 months, to be renewed once by a maximum of 7 months; or the Greek air carrier demonstrates to the HCAA that the wet lease-in is

o

necessary to meet seasonal capacity requirements. The air carrier also demonstrates that these capacity requirements cannot be met by leasing aircraft registered within the European Community; or the Greek air carrier demonstrates to the HCAA that the wet lease-in is

o

necessary to overcome operational difficulties. the air carrier demonstrates that it is not possible or reasonable to lease an aircraft registered within the European Community. Any approval by the HCAA will then be limited to the duration strictly necessary to overcome the operational difficulties.

Approval also for short-notice short-term wet lease-in

Following approval of the wet lease-in the Greek air carrier may place the leasing-out air carrier on a white list, each time for a maximum of 12 months, in order to be able to overcome operational difficulties in situations which are immediate, unforeseen and urgent .

Refusal of approval by the HCAA

The HCAA may refuse to grant its approval if there are/is no equivalent safety standards or reciprocity as regards wet leasing between the relevant Member State or the Community and the third country (country not belonging to the European Community) where the aircraft concerned is registered.

Short-notice short-term wet lease-in

In order to overcome operational difficulties in situations which are immediate, unforeseen and urgent it is possible to conclude a wet lease-in agreement with a Community air carrier which has been preselected (see prg. 3.6.3.1).

If a Greek air carrier wet leases an aircraft from a non-Community air carrier the following apply:

 

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Prior approval required

The Greek air carrier must submit an application to the HCAA in order to place preselected air carriers on a white list which is kept by the Greek air carrier. The application must be accompanied by a written statement from the accountable manager, that an audit has been performed in accordance with the approved lease audit programme, the final assessment and an overview of any findings and corrective measures.

HCAA assessment framework

The HCAA may grant approval for a wet lease-in (inclusion on the white list) if:

  • A. the leasing-out air carrier holds an AOC which has been issued by a State which is a signatory to the Convention on International Civil Aviation (ICAO) whereby the aircraft to be used are provided with a standard certificate of airworthiness in accordance with ICAO Annex 8; and

  • B. the Greek air carrier demonstrates to the HCAA that all safety requirements have been complied with.

For this purpose the Greek air carrier performs an audit on the other air carrier in accordance with the approved lease audit programme in order to ensure that the non- Community air carrier observes an equivalent safety standard (EU-OPS, Part M and Part 145). The audit must in any case include: operation, maintenance, licensing and airworthiness.

Period of validity white lists

The period of validity of inclusion on the white list is determined by the results of the audit report and is always valid for a maximum period of 12 months. Renewed approval of validity of inclusion on the white list can be applied for as long as the audit report is still valid.

A Greek air carrier may use air carriers which are included on the white lists of other Greek air carriers insofar as their approved lease audit programme corresponds with its own lease audit programme and the audit reports are available to all parties.

White list lease-in; notification of the HCAA is sufficient

Following inclusion on the white list a wet lease-in agreement does not require prior approval if it complies with JAA Administrative & Guidance Material Section Four,

 

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Operations, Part Three, Temporary Guidance Leaflet No. 44 ACJ OPS 1.165. This concerns the following requirements:

  • A. the lessor supplies the aircraft only with complete crew;

  • B. the routes which are flown fall within the areas of operations specified on the AOC of the lessor;

  • C. the lease-in period does not exceed five consecutive days (aeroplanes) or fourteen consecutive days (helicopters);

  • D. the lessor observes duty and rest periods during the lease operation which comply with the applicable European and Greek regulations.

The Greek air carrier reports the use of leases within 72 hours to the HCAA stating the date of commencement and end of the lease (using the e-mail address of the Head of Flight Ops Section: d2c@hcaa.gr as well as to the email address of the assigned Flight Ops Inspector). The notification must include a statement as to why the use of a replacement aircraft is necessary, and that it is not possible or reasonable to lease an aircraft registered within the Community.

All requirements set by the HCAA on the Greek air carrier are observed.

  • 3.6.3.4 Wet lease-out

No prior approval required

A wet lease-out agreement whereby a Greek air carrier wet leases an aircraft registered within the European Community does not require the prior approval of the HCAA if the following conditions have been complied with:

  • A. the wet lease-out agreement is entered into with an air carrier with a valid operating permit or equivalent document which has been issued by a State which is a signatory to the Convention on international civil aviation (ICAO); and

  • B. the Greek air carrier provides the aircraft with complete crew; and

  • C. the Greek air carrier remains the operator of the aircraft and retains all functions and responsibilities prescribed in EU-OPS Subpart C and Part M Subpart B; and

  • D. the Greek air carrier carries out a risk analysis in accordance with OPS 1.175 which demonstrates that the intended flights fall within the operations specifications of the AOC.

 

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Differences for which prior approval is required

If the aircraft is not leased out with complete crew, or if it is not immediately clear from the risk analysis that all functions and responsibilities of OPS Subpart C and Part M Subpart B are retained during the lease (e.g. transfer of functions with ACMI operations), prior approval must be obtained of the HCAA for these differences.

Approval of the HCAA is also necessary for the wet lease-out of an aircraft registered abroad. With regard to such a sub-lease agreements will have to be made between the authorities.

Notification of the HCAA is sufficient

In view of the supervisory role of the HCAA it is necessary that the HCAA is informed by the Greek air carriers.

A Greek air carrier must report every wet lease-out within 72 hours including the operational details and the date of commencement and end of the lease to the HCAA (using the e-mail address of the Head of Flight Ops Section: d2c@hcaa.gr as well as to the email address of the assigned Flight Ops Inspector).

If the leasing-in air carrier is included on the list of air carriers with safety deficiencies according to Regulation (EC) No. 2111/2005, this must be stated explicitly. This in connection with the notification of EUROCONTROL with regard to the EC blacklist alerts.

3.6.4 LEASE AUDIT

A lease audit according an audit programme

The audit programme must be in accordance with OPS 1.035(b) and describes as a minimum:

  • A. method of auditing and inspections;

  • B. auditor qualification, authorisation and independence,

  • C. audit scope;

  • D. audit schedule;

  • E. monitoring and corrective measures;

  • F. determination safety standard.

 

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Lease audit programme approved by the HCAA

In order to guarantee the quality level of the audit referred to above a Greek air carrier must draw up a lease audit programme. The Greek air carrier must submit the lease audit programme to the HCAA once for approval.

The audit programme complies with the following components:

  • A. Method of auditing and inspections This must set out as a minimum: the composition of the audit team, the audit and inspection procedures, the standard to be followed, minimum number of days for visit to the auditee and the number of inspections, a distinction may be made between initial and follow-up audits.

  • B. Auditor qualification, authorisation and independence The requirements which are set for the auditors must be established, which must include as a minimum: the necessary basic competences, operational experience and/or knowledge, auditor training/experience and (per auditor) the minimum number of audits to be performed per year. The duties, authorisation and responsibilities of every functionary involved in the audit and the monitoring process must be described; independence of the auditor vis-à-vis the auditee must be safeguarded.

  • C. Audit scope The scope of the audit must be established and must as a minimum comprise the areas in accordance with TGL 44 AMC OPS 1.035-4.6. The audit scope must be detailed to auditor work instruction level. The basic principle to be applied in the establishment of a detailed audit scope and in the making of choices in this respect, is the risk that every part carries with regard to safe operation. Choices and exceptions must be justified. The level of the authority may also be included in the scope of the audit. ICAO provides results of regular audits on its Member States (the universal safety oversight audit programme, USOAP). The results can be found via the flight safety information exchange (see the website http://www.icao.int/fsix/). The FAA international aviation safety assessments program can also be used as a basis. If the category is equal to 1 no extra attention needs to be paid to the supervisory authority.

  • D. Audit schedule The following must be established in this: procedures for the planning of initial and follow-up audits and the planning of the audits themselves taking into account the period of validity of the audit results and any follow-up audits for the verification of corrective measures.

  • E. Monitoring and corrective measures The procedures with regard to monitoring, corrective measures and evaluation

 

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must be laid down in this. The following must also be included: the monitoring

of the other air carrier regarding changes to this air carrier which affect its safety level and the follow-up provided by the organisation itself. For example:

deteriorating financial situation, change of management, introduction of other type of aircraft, etc.

  • F. Procedures and criteria for the determination of a comparable safety standard on the basis of an audit It must be determined which effect every item from the detailed audit scope has on the safety level of the other air carrier. Procedures and criteria must be drawn up for the assessment of the audit results in order to be able to determine if there is a comparable safety standard. Also the responsible functionaries carrying out this assessment and the decision procedure must be established.

Third-party audits

If within the lease audit programme third-party audits are used such as the results of the IATA operational safety audit (IOSA) programme, all differences with regard to the audit scope must be clear.

Documentation

The following must be available for a minimum period of 5 years:

  • A. Audit plan;

  • B. Audit report;

  • C. List of findings and corrective actions;

  • D. Copy of the certificate with scope of registration (with IOSA);

  • E. Assessment of audit results and decision by the air carrier with regard to an equivalent safety standard.

APPENDIX

List of information to be provided on application for approval of a lease.

For the processing of applications for any type of lease which requires prior approval, a period of 30 days has been set calculated from the date of receipt of the complete application with corresponding documentation and grounds for the lease.

 

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For the processing of a lease application the following documents must be submitted to the HCAA (applies to every type of lease):

The number and type of aircraft with registrations, serial numbers and country

of registration and noise certificates if required; The date of commencement and end of the lease;

A copy of the lease agreement with the terms and conditions;

Copies of the insurance policies which show that the aircraft are insured with regard to passenger, cargo and third-party liability.

A.1 Wet lease

For the processing of a wet lease application the following additional information must be submitted:

Grounds for the lease with planned flight operation (schedule);

Name of the air carrier having commercial control over the aircraft;

A copy of the AOC of the other air carrier and any restrictions and/or

exemptions imposed on this air carrier; Statement from the accountable manager stating that the standard of safety is

of an equivalent level. In the case of a wet lease-in with a non-EU or non-JAA air carrier the audit report including the final assessment and list of any findings and corrective measures; Risk analysis as referred to in OPS 1.175 with planned measures by the lessor

if in the case of a wet lease-in cabin personnel and/or procedures of the Greek air carrier is/are used/followed; Risk analysis as referred to in OPS 1.175 with planned measures if in the case of a wet lease-out cabin personnel and/or procedures of the lessee is/are used/followed.

A.2 Dry lease

For the processing of a dry lease application the following additional information must be submitted:

The name and address details of the registered owner;

The State of registration with Certificate of Registration;

The Certificate of Airworthiness accompanied by a statement from the owner that the aircraft complies with the applicable requirements and noise certificates where necessary;

 

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The name and address details of the air carrier under whose AOC the

operational control and maintenance management of the aircraft takes place during the lease; Agreements regarding maintenance such as (but not limited to) aircraft maintenance program, minimum equipment list, maintenance control manual and continuing airworthiness management system.

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CHAPTER 3.7

MEL EVALUATION

 

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3.7 MEL Evaluation

General

The MEL is approved by FSDirector after the evaluation is done by both Flight Ops and Airworthiness Sections (it is reviewed by all technical inspector specialties, including an aircraft-specific qualified FOI), using the GL-MEL-003 checklist (Appendix 17).

Requirements

Annex 6, Part I, Chapter 11 requires that the Operations Manual provide information which will enable the pilot-in-command to determine whether the flight may be continued should any instrument, equipment or system become inoperative. This requirement is generally best met by the establishment of an approved Minimum Equipment List (MEL) which specifies for a given model of aircraft the minimum operable equipment required, taking into account operating rules for the existing environmental conditions, for the continuance of flight.

Minimum Equipment List Development

The MEL is developed from the Master Minimum Equipment List (MMEL) that is developed by the manufacturer in co-operation with the Operators of the aircraft and the certificating authorities at the time the aircraft first enters service. Each Operator is required to produce his own MEL appropriate to his own routes and procedures within the limitations defined by the MMEL.

Master Minimum Equipment List (MMEL)

MMEL Board

In conjunction with the certification of each new transport type aircraft a board is established to develop and maintain the MMEL for the aircraft and additional models of that aircraft developed in the future. The board is an advisory body to the CAA Director of the certificating organization and should have representation from the flight operations and airworthiness

 

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organizations within the CAA as well as the manufacturer and the initial operators of the aircraft.

MMEL Development

The development of the MMEL requires detailed analysis and careful safety assessment. The interaction between systems must be fully analyzed to ensure that multiple failures will not result in an unsatisfactory level of safety. When an aircraft is designed it is designed to achieve a certain level of safety. When any one system, instrument or equipment becomes inoperative, the design level of safety is reduced. With modern aircraft it is usual to provide extra redundancy in some systems to enable the aircraft to take-off and complete a flight with acceptable margins of safety even if, for example, one channel of a system has failed during a previous flight. Minor deficiencies, even without the provision of extra redundancy, which do not too seriously affect safety, may be acceptable for an occasional flight. In any case, the MMEL Board will need to carry out a thorough safety assessment as a guide to developing an acceptable list.

Exclusions

The MMEL does not include obviously required items such as wings, empennage, flaps, power plants, etc. Nor does the list include items which do not affect the airworthiness of the aircraft such as galley equipment, entertainment systems; etc.It must be stressed and understood by all persons developing and using the MMEL that all items that are related to the airworthiness of the aircraft and are not included on the list are automatically required to be operative.

Operator Minimum Equipment List

MEL Production

Operators are required to produce their own MEL to be approved by HCAA for incorporation in their manuals for the use and guidance of flight and ground operations personnel. The MEL will be tailored to the individual operator's routes and procedures within the constraints imposed by the MMEL. The current MMEL for a given aircraft may normally be obtained from the manufacturer of the aircraft or the Civil Aviation Organization of the certificating State.

Philosophy

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the aircraft un airworthy for the particular flight. Limitations, procedures and substitutions may be used to provide conditions under which the inoperative equipment will not make the operation unsafe or the aircraft un airworthy. This is not a philosophy which permits reduced safety in order to fly to a base where repairs can be made, but rather a philosophy which permits safe operations for a take-off from a maintenance base or an en-route stop. It should be emphasized that the operator will need to exercise close operational control over the use of the MEL by all concerned.

MEL as Part of Operations Manual

HCAA regulations require that the MEL be carried on board as part of the Operations Manual. It may be a separate volume. The Manual must contain en-route flight, navigation and communications procedures for the continuance of flight if any item of equipment required for the operation becomes unserviceable en route. The Manual must also cover requirements and procedures for dispatch with unserviceable equipment.

Operator responsibilities

Operational Control

HCAA regulations specify that the operator is responsible for exercising the necessary operational control to ensure that his aircraft are not dispatched with multiple MEL items inoperative without first determining that any interface or inter-relationship between the inoperative systems or components will not result in degradation in the level of safety and/or an undue increase in crew workload. The MEL is not intended to provide for continued operation of the aircraft for extended periods with MEL items unserviceable. In the case of unserviceable MEL items the operator should generally make repairs at the first station where repairs or replacement may be made, but in any case repair should be accomplished at the flight termination station, since additional un serviceability may require the aircraft to be removed from service. There are many reasons why an operator should want a MEL. The primary reason is that without an MEL there is no legal basis for an aircraft to begin a flight with an installed item of equipment inoperative. In addition, it is an ICAO Standard that international commercial air transport flights have a MEL approved by the State of the Operator. The applicant for an AOC should submit an MEL and an MMEL for each aircraft type

to be operated. The applicant’s MEL is expected to be tailored to the specific aircraft

 

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in that fleet. It is important that this process of “tailoring” does not make the new

wording less restrictive than the policies and provisos of the MMEL.

  • Where the MMEL indicates that an operations (O) or maintenance (M) procedure is required for dispatch with equipment inoperative, an appropriate procedure will be included.

  • Where a dispatch proviso is incomplete, such as “as required by regulation,” the requirements or policies must be researched and included in the MEL.

  • It is important to ensure that the maintenance irregularity reporting, deferring and correction procedures provided in the Flight Operations Manual, Maintenance Control Manual and MEL are in concert.

  • The inclusion of more restrictive requirements, such as those associated with the approval of all-weather operations, special RNP routes, and ETOPS.

 

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CHAPTER 3.8

CABIN ENROUTE INSPECTION

 

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  • 3.8 Cabin En-Route Inspections

Ref.: EU OPS, HCAA OPS Procedures Manual, Operator's OM.

3.8.1 Objective

This Chapter provides guidance for conducting a cabin en route inspection to ensure that an Operator's cabin safety procedures adhere to the EU OPS and HCAA Regulations, as well as to the operator's OM. Cabin En-Route inspections are carried out by HCAA Aviation Safety Inspectors (ASIs) with the specialty of Cabin Safety, as well as, Flight Operations Inspector in the absence of an ASI. HCAA Checklist 08-Fliqht Inspection (Cabin) shown in Chapter 4 of this Manual, should be used.

3.8.2 General

Cabin en route inspections provide HCAA with information concerning flight attendant training programs, Operator procedures, and the condition and maintenance of aircraft emergency equipment and furnishings.

Inspector Qualifications.

Since ASI's do not receive system training on all aircraft, it is important that Inspectors become familiar with the Operator's procedures and equipment before performing the inspection.

Each Inspector must be familiar with the cabin en route inspection procedures before performing this task.

Inspectors possess various degrees and types of expertise and experience. When additional information or guidance is needed, the inspector should coordinate with personnel experienced in that particular specialty.

Inspectors' Conduct.

In performing this job task, the actions of the Inspectors are subject to the close scrutiny of airline employees and the general flying public. The Inspector must be alert for leading questions from crewmembers and passengers regarding destinations,

 

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technical information, and other Operators .Inspectors involved in cabin en route inspections will not enter the cockpit during the flight, unless requested by the captain or another crewmember, or unless emergency circumstances indicate that it would be the proper course of action.

NOTE: Inspectors must comply with all regulatory requirements and approved Operator procedures.

  • 3.8.3 Inspection Areas

Three general areas have been identified for Inspectors to observe and evaluate during cabin en route inspections. Each area should be considered to be of equal importance. The three inspection areas are as follows:

  • A. Cabin (Interior).

The interior inspection area applies to the airworthiness of the aircraft cabin and the condition and availability of aircraft cabin emergency equipment and furnishings. Equipment Cabin chapter of HCAA 08-Checklist contains a list of the items to be inspected. Although these items are not all inclusive, they represent the types of aircraft items that should be evaluated during the inspection.

  • B. Crew member. The crewmember inspection area applies to Flight Attendants (F/A)

who perform assigned safety duties during the flight. Inspectors should evaluate such

items as crewmember knowledge, ability, and proficiency by directly observing F/A's performing their assigned safety duties and functions.

NOTE: F/A trainees who are receiving operating experience should not be evaluated on the same basis as the fully qualified crewmembers.

C. Flight Conduct.

The flight conduct inspection area relates to the specific phases of the flight that can be observed during the cabin en route inspection. This includes a wide range of items, including F/A and flight crewmember coordination of the performance of duties. These types of areas can often be observed before beginning a flight, at en route stops, or at the termination of a flight.

  • 3.8.4 Initiation and Planning

    • A. Initiation.

This inspection is normally scheduled as part of HCAA's Annual Inspection Plan. Additional inspections (unscheduled) can be carried out at the discretion of HCAA FSDirector and/or Head of Flight Operations Section, based on previous findings, related Operator incidents, etc

 

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Β. Planning.

Inspectors conducting cabin en route inspections should make arrangements for the inspection as far in advance of the flight as possible.

NOTE: Inspectors will not occupy the F/A jump seats. Only qualified crewmembers, as determined by the Operator, are authorized to occupy these seats.

The Inspector must conform to the Operator's approved carry-on baggage program. If there is any concern that the Inspector's carry-on baggage will exceed Operator limitations, the baggage should be checked.

The inspector's HCAA Form 626 "Aviation Safety Inspector ID," should be readily available for identification purposes.

3.8.5 Performing the Cabin En Route Inspection

The attention of the F/A's must not be diverted from assigned duties including passenger boarding, deplaning, and in-flight service. Surveillance of F/A awareness and the following of safety-related procedures should continue during the flight.

Interior Inspection

This inspection should be performed without disturbing the boarding or deplaning of the passengers. Any discrepancies noted should be brought immediately to the attention of the lead F/A pilot in command.

Crewmembers should initially be briefed to continue their assigned duties as if the Inspector were not present. The Inspector should then request that a crew- member provide an F/A manual and be available for a discussion relating to the crewmember's duties, at the crewmember's earliest convenience.

Some Operators require F/A's to accomplish a pre-flight inspection of at least some of the emergency and safety equipment in the cabin. In such a case, the Inspector should observe the F/A inspects the equipment and then perform an additional inspection of selected equipment.

NOTE: An Inspector can determine whether the Operator requires an F/A to conduct pre-flight by examining the F/A manual.

When an F/A pre-flight equipment inspection is not required by the Operator or has already been per-formed, the Inspector should inspect the equipment. If there is not enough time to inspect the emergency equipment before the flight, the Inspector may choose to inspect it after the flight.

 

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Inspectors should avoid impeding the flow of passenger traffic or in any way interfering with crewmembers conducting their respective duties. Since passengers are naturally curious about an inspector's activities, it is recommended that reasonable passenger inquiries be answered in a brief, factual, and courteous manner.

  • B. In-Flight Monitoring.

This phase of the inspection includes the activities associated with boarding, pre- departure, in-flight, and landing. During this part of the inspection, the Inspector will have the opportunity to do the following:

  • Evaluate operator procedures.

  • Determine adherence to company policy, regulation requirements, and safe operating practices.

  • Monitor passenger safety.

  • C. Required Flight Attendants.

When regulations require F/A's for the operation of a flight, the number of F/A's required is based on the number of passenger seats and/or the emergency evacuation demonstration. The number of required F/A's for each make, model and series aircraft used by the operator is listed in the operations specifications (Ops Specs).

3.8.6 Procedure

  • A. Initiate the Cabin En Route Inspection.

The Inspector should initiate the cabin en route inspection according to HCAA Annual Inspection Plan.

  • B. Prepare for the Inspection.

The Inspector should contact the Operator ahead of time to make flight arrangements. Related administrative paper work must be completed and forwarded to the appropriate HCAA department for approval.

  • C. Coordinate with the Operator.

The Inspector should coordinate with the Operator at least 1 hour prior to the flight. While coordinating, the Inspector should do the following:

 

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  • Identify himself or herself to the Operator representative, and state that he or she. is performing a cabin en route inspection on a specific flight

  • Present HCAA credentials (ASI ID Card), to the Operator’s representative.

  • Obtain applicable Operator boarding authorization per the airline procedures.

Request access to the aircraft as soon as practical (for example, after passengers

have interior pre-departure inspection, as time permits (deplaned) to meet the flight and cabin crews and perform the interior pre-departure inspection, as time permits

If aircraft access is denied, the following steps should be taken by the Inspector:

  • Apprise the Operator’s representative of the regulation authorizing Inspector access to aircraft (Law 2912/02).

  • see the appropriate supervisor if

Request to

the

representative still refuses

access.

  • Make it very clear to the Operator that the denial of access is contrary to regulations and that enforcement action may be initiated report the occurrence to the Head of Flight Operations upon return to HCAA FSD office if access was not granted.

    • D. Coordinate With the Crew.

Before boarding the aircraft or performing any inspection, the Inspector should coordinate with the crew as follows:

  • Identify himself or herself to the captain and to the lead F/A as an HCAA Inspector.

    • State the purpose of the inspection

    • Checks cabin crew qualification card, medical certificates, and other items that relate to cabin crewmember responsibilities.

  • E. Perform the Interior Inspection.

The inspector should inspect the following, as applicable:

(1)

Cabin placarding, markings, and signs (for example, exits, no-smoking signs, and emergency equipment), to ensure marking legibility and the correct location.

(2)

Fire extinguishers for the following:

 

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  • To verify the quantity and location

  • To ensure that they are properly serviced, tagged, and stowed

(3) Portable oxygen bottles for the following:

  • To verify the quantity and location

  • To ensure that they are properly serviced, tagged, and stowed

  • To determine the condition of the mask, tubing, and connectors

(4) Protective breathing equipment (PBE) for correct location, proper number of units,

and proper stowage .of units, and proper stowage. (5) First aid kits and emergency medical kits for correct number, location, and stowage.

(6)

(7) Megaphones for correct number, location, general condition, and proper stowage. (8) Overwater equipment as applicable. (9) Passenger briefing cards, to ensure the following:

That they are available for each passenger That they are appropriate to the aircraft That they contain the required information, to include the following:

Emergency exit location and operation Slide use and location Oxygen use Seat-belt use Flotation device use and location Appropriate pictorials for extended over-water operations, including ditching exits, life preservers, and life raft or slide raft in-flight location

Exit seating information

(9) Passenger seats, to ensure the following:

That a reclined seat does not block emergency exits That the seat cushions are intact That the tray table latching mechanisms are operable That the self-contained and removable ashtrays are in serviceable condition and are available when smoking is authorized That each seat has a complete restraint system That seat-belts are operational and not frayed or twisted

(10)

Passenger oxygen service units to ensure that they are closed and latched,

(11)

without any extended red service indicators or pins. F/A station, to ensure the following:

 

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That the seat retraction/restraint system is operational and is properly secured That the seat-belts are operational and not frayed or twisted That the seat cushions are intact That the seat headrest is in the correct position That the public address (PA) system and interphone are operable That aircraft-installed flash light holders are indeed installed

(12)

Galleys, to ensure that the following items are operable:

  • The latching mechanisms (primary and secondary)

  • The tie-downs

  • Other galley restraints

(13)

Galleys, to ensure the following:

That the hot liquid restraint systems is operable That the circuit breakers and water shut-off valves are accessible and properly identified That the cover and lining of trash receptacles fit properly That the non-skid floor is serviceable That the girt bar is clean and serviceable That the stationary cart tie-downs (mush-rooms) are clean That the galley carts are in serviceable condition and properly stowed That, if applicable, the lower lobe galley emergency cabin floor exits are passable and not covered by carpeting

(14)

(15)

Galley personnel lift (if applicable) to ensure that it does not move up or down

with the doors open and that the activation switches operate properly. Lavatories, to ensure the following:

 

That the placards are present and that the smoke alarm and ashtrays are present and operational That the trash receptacle cover and lining fit properly That the automatic fire extinguisher system is serviceable Stowage compartments, to ensure the following:

That the weight restriction placards are displayed That the restraints and secondary latching mechanisms are operable. That the compartments comply with stowage requirements for accessibility to emergency equipment.

(16)

Crew baggage, to ensure that it is properly stowed.

 

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(17)

Emergency lighting system, to ensure that all emergency lighting, including

(18)

the floor proximity escape path system, is in serviceable condition (for example, no light covers should be cracked or missing). Availability of cockpit key (if applicable) to each crewmember.

F. Pre-Departure.

The Inspector should perform the following during pre-departure:

  • Ensure that each F/A has an operable flash light readily available and has the appropriate up-to-date parts of a manual accessible when performing assigned duties.

  • Ensure that any discrepancies noted during pre-departure are addressed per the operator's manual

  • Ensure that the required number of F/A's are on board.

  • Observe the F/A's and ground personnel coordinating and supervising the boarding of passengers and properly stowing carry-on baggage NOTE: Ensure that the passenger-loading door is not closed until a required crewmember verifies that each piece of carry-on baggage is properly stowed. Proper stowage includes ensuring that the overhead bins are closed. Items that cannot be stowed must be processed as checked baggage.

  • Ensure that items such as carry-on baggage and galley supplies do not cover or

in

any

way

interfere

overhead compartments.

with aircraft emergency equipment in the

  • Emergency exit seats meet the regulatory requirements.

  • Ensure that all passengers are seated prior to any ground movements.

  • Ensure that the F/A's have sufficient time to take their assigned positions and to secure their restraint systems after giving the passenger briefing.

  • Ensure that the F/A pre-departure briefing is audible to all passengers and covers the following subjects:

  • Smoking: When, where, and under what conditions smoking is prohibited

  • Exit Locations: The preferred method is to physically point out exits.

  • Seat-belt Use: Instructions on how to fasten, unfasten, and adjust seat-belts.

  • Flotation Devices: Instructions on the location and use of required individual flotation devices.

  • Oxygen Use: Instructions on the location of and a demonstration on the use of the oxygen mask.

 

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  • Extended Over-Water Operations: Instructions on the location, donning, and use of life preservers, life-rafts (or slide rafts) and other means of flotation including a demonstration of the methods of donning and inflating a life preserver.

  • NOTE:

The method of donning and inflating infant life preservers is usually

substantially different from the method used for an adult life preserver.

>

Special

Passenger

Briefings

(when

applicable):

For

persons

who

are

handicapped or warrant some other special kind of attention, and for the

individuals assisting them.

G.

Movement on the Surface.

During movement on the surface, the Inspector should do the following:

(1) Ensure that all F/A's remain seated during the taxi unless performing safety- related functions. Safety-related activities can include the following:

>

Passenger preparedness

>

Baggage/cargo/galley stowage

>

Exit readiness

(2) Ensure that each exit is closed and locked with the girt bars properly attached (if applicable). (3) Ensure that the following items or activities are accomplished prior to takeoff:

>

All stowage compartments are properly secured and latched.

>

The galley is prepared as follows:

>

Loose items are secured *All serving carts are properly restrained

>

The cockpit door is closed in accordance with the operator's manual.

>

Passenger seat-belts are secured.

>

Any unoccupied F/A seat restraint is properly secured for takeoff.

>

Any other equipment is properly stowed and secured.

(4) Ensure that crewmembers observe the sterile cockpit rules.

H.

In-Flight Operations.

During in-flight operations, the Inspector should do the following:

(1) Monitor the crewmembers' performance during in-flight operations, to ensure the following:

That during takeoff each F/A remains seated with restraint systems properly fastened.

 

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  • That after takeoff, before or immediately after the seat-belt illumination is shut off, an announcement is made that passengers should keep their seat-belts fastened, even when the seat-belt sign is turned off.

  • That, if the flight is to be a smoking flight, an announcement is made that smoking is only permitted in specific rows and prohibited in the aisles and lavatories when the no-smoking sign is turned off.

(2) Ensure that the following are accomplished, as applicable:

>

Passenger compliance with seat-belt and no-smoking signs.

> Effective crew co-ordination for flight-crew and cabin crewmember communications-routine and/or emergency. > Turbulent air procedures are followed, including the proper restraint of serving carts, galley equipment, and compliance with instructions from the cockpit and co- ordination with flight crewmembers. > Crewmember handling of the passengers, to include the following:

>

Intoxicated passengers (not serving alcoholic beverages to them)

>

Abusive or disruptive passengers

>

Handicapped or ill passengers

>

Passengers requiring special attention

>

(3) Ensure that crewmembers, during the approach and landing phases of flight, prepare the cabin for arrival by performing at least the following actions:

  • Ensuring that carry-on baggage is stowed and that all seat backs and tray tables are upright and stowed, respectively.

  • Removing all food, beverages, and galley service items from each passenger seat location.

  • Ensuring that all stowage compartments are latched and secured.

  • Ensuring that the galley is prepared as follows:

    • Loose items are secured

    • All serving carts are properly restrained

      • Ensuring that the cockpit door is closed and locked in accordance with the operator's manual.

      • Verifying that passenger seat-belts and shoulder harnesses, if installed, are secured.

      • Properly stowing and securing any other equipment.

(4)

Ensure that crewmembers observe sterile cockpit rules.

(5) Ensure that crewmembers are seated in assigned seats before landing, with appropriate restraint systems fastened.

 

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  • I. Flight Arrival.

During flight arrival the Inspector should do the following:

(1) Ensure that after landing, the F/A's prepare the aircraft for arrival by performing the following duties:

> Before the captain has turned off the seat-belt sign, ensuring that passengers remain in their seats with seat-belts fastened > Upon arrival at the gate and after the seat-belt sign has been turned off, preparing the exits for deplaning

NOTE: The girt bar must stay engaged during movement on the surface.

(2) Ensure that the appropriate complement of flight attendants remain on board the aircraft at en route stops (when passengers remain on board the aircraft to proceed to another destination).

(3) Debrief

the

captain

and

lead

F/A

of

any

procedural

problems

or

 

discrepancies/malfunctions noted during the flight.

 

(4)

For

each

finding a

separate

Audit Finding form

should

be

filled out and

witnessed by the appropriate Operator personnel. In this case, the lead F/A or

the pilot in command.

J. Report Inspection Results.

Ensure that all Audit Findings are entered into the ADMS system and a copy has been forwarded to the Operator for corrective action. > Analyze each finding to determine if the discrepancies are the result of improper maintenance and/or missing or inadequate maintenance/inspection procedures. > Submit the completed HCAA Checklist 08-Cabin En Route Inspection with any Audit Finding forms attached to the FSD Secretariat office (incoming document) according to "Incoming Documents" procedure of the HCAA’ Administration Procedures Manual, Chapter 5.

>

 

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CHAPTER 3.9

STATION FACILITIES INSPECTION

 

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3.9 Station Facilities Inspection

Ref.: EU OPS, HCAA OPS Procedures Manual, Operator's OM.

  • 3.9.1 Objective

This Chapter provides direction and guidance for conducting a station facilities inspection to ensure that an operator's related procedures adhere to the EU OPS and HCAA Regulations, as well as to the operator's OM. Station facilities inspections are carried out by HCAA Flight Operations Inspectors (FOIs). HCAA Checklist 03-Station Inspection shown in Chapter 4 of this Manual should be used.

  • 3.9.2 General

Inspectors who conduct station facilities inspections encounter a wide range of situations and operational conditions. Station facilities range from large physical plants (that have a permanently assigned station manager, numerous employees, and various departments) to a single counter manned by a single employee. A station facilities inspection may be conducted to provide an overall view of operations, or it may be focused on a specific area of interest. Inspectors should use the direction, guidance, and procedures that follow when conducting a station facilities inspection.

NOTE: The direction and guidance of this and the following paragraphs is general in nature. Not all of it may be appropriate in any given situation.

  • 3.9.3 Inspection Areas

Nine inspection areas have been identified as areas for Inspectors to observe and evaluate during a station facilities inspection. These inspection areas are defined as follows:

 

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(1) Personnel.

This area refers to the personnel employed at the facility. Inspectors must evaluate the adequacy of staffing levels and the competency of assigned personnel in the performance of their duties.

(2) Manuals.

This area refers to the availability, currency, and content of the written guidance required by employees in the performance of their assigned duties.

(3) Records.

This area refers to those records that the Operator is required to maintain relative to station activities. For example, Operators are required to record hazardous material training for operations personnel. This area does not include those records

inspected during a “records inspection.”

(4) Training.

This area refers to the adequacy of the training given to assigned personnel as demonstrated by their knowledge of their duties. This area does not include crew and dispatcher training.

(5) Facility/Equipment/Surface.

This area refers to the various physical elements required to support flight operations, such as ramp areas, blast fences, signs, signalling devices, lighting, passenger and cargo loading equipment, aircraft servicing, and towing equipment.

(6) Conformance.

This area refers to the Operator’s employees’ compliance with the Operator’s own procedures, the EU OPS and any applicable HCAA Regulation.

(7) Flight Control.

This area refers to the control and support of aircraft flight operations.

(8) Servicing.

This area refers to the Operator’s procedures and standards required for the safe servicing and handling of its aircraft.

 

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(9) Management

.This area refers to the effectiveness of theOperator’s management and supervisory personnel.

3.9.4 Initiation and Planning

  • A. Initiation

This inspection is normally scheduled as part of HCAA's Annual Inspection Plan. Additional inspections (unscheduled) can be carried out at the discretion of HCAA FSDirector and/or Head of Flight Operations Section, based on previous findings, related Operator incidents, etc.

  • B. Planning for the Inspection.

The Inspector should carefully plan a station facilities inspection before conducting it. The Inspector should review previous inspection reports, identify any areas of weakness previously reported, and review the corrective actions that were taken. The Inspector should coordinate with the station manager ahead of time to establish a date and time for conducting the inspection.

  • C. Briefing for the Inspection.

Before beginning the inspection, the Inspector should request that the station manager provide a briefing on the facility operation, including its assigned

personnel and operational procedures. In turn, the Inspector should brief the station manager and the staff on the purpose and scope of the inspection. This discussion should include the following points:

  • Purpose of the facility inspection

  • Introduction of Inspectors

  • The specific areas to be inspected

  • Inspection authority (Regulation)

  • The proposed time and place of the debriefing

  • D. Preliminary Tour.

The actual inspection should begin

with

a

tour of the facility. The tour should

provide the Inspector with an overview of the operation and the location of individual sections. Inspectors should introduce themselves to supervisors and

 

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other employees during the facility tour to become familiar with each section. The tour should include those areas of the facility that are utilized by the flight and cabin crews for dispatch, briefing, and flight planning, and those areas that are utilized for passenger loading, cargo loading, weight and balance preparation, and ramp areas.

  • 3.9.5 Performing the Station Facilities Inspection

Inspectors should use the HCAA03 : Station Inspection Checklist listed in Chapter 4 of this Manual This checklist provides HCAA inspectors with “reminder” items to check when they evaluate specific areas. There may be areas inspected which are not included in the checklist. An area such as these should be recorded as an “other” item in the respective subject area. There also may be items on the checklist which are not observed and should, therefore, be left blank. Checklists are designed solely as a reminder and as a means of standardization to ensure that station facilities inspections are conducted in the same general manner. Inspectors should conduct station facilities inspections by using the procedures that follow.

  • A. Personnel. The Inspector should review the staffing of the facility. During this review, the Inspector should attempt to determine whether or not the station is adequately staffed and whether or not assigned personnel are competent in their duties. The Inspector may accomplish this by observing individuals as they perform their assigned job tasks. For example, the Inspector may review recently completed forms for accuracy and may interview personnel, while being careful to avoid interfering with their duties.

  • B. Manuals.

The Inspector should review the Operator’s manual(s) for the operation of the

facility to determine whether or not the manuals are on hand, current, readily available to personnel, and adequate in content. Direction and guidance for conducting a manuals inspection is included in a later chapter of this Chapter.

(1) On-Hand Requirements.

Inspectors should determine what manuals the Operator requires its station personnel to maintain and then determine whether or not these manuals are on hand. As a result of the inspection, the Inspector should be able to conclude that either these manuals are sufficient for the purposes of the station or that station personnel require additional information which was not available.

 

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(2) Currency Requirements.

The Inspector should also ensure that the Operator’s manuals are current and that

any required revisions are accurately posted.

(3) Content Requirements.

Each manual or publication should be checked by the Inspector to ensure that it includes that information and guidance necessary to allow personnel to perform their duties and responsibilities effectively and safely. Depending on the scope of operations conducted at the station, direction and guidance may be required in the following operational areas:

  • Refueling procedures

  • Aircraft towing or movement requirements/procedures

  • Weight and balance manual/procedures

  • Operation of ground service equipment/procedures

  • Aircraft flight manual (AFM) for types of regularly scheduled aircraft

  • Personnel training manual

  • Current emergency telephone listing

  • Accident/incident telephone listing

  • Security training and procedures

  • Severe weather notification procedures

  • Carry-on baggage procedures

  • Identification or handling of hazardous materials/procedures

  • Instructions and procedures for notification of the pilot-in-command (PIC) when there are hazardous materials aboard

  • Procedures for passenger operation of electronic devices

  • Contract service (if applicable)

  • Flight record disposition

  • C. Records.

Available records relative to station operations should be inspected, such as communications records and station personnel training records. In a small facility, a records inspection and a facility inspection could be conducted on the same day. In most facilities, however, records inspections and facilities inspections should be planned and conducted separately .

  • D. Training. The Inspector should review the training conducted for the various classifications of station personnel. The regulations do not specify training requirements either by

 

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subject or frequency for station personnel, yet these personnel should receive both initial and recurrent training in assigned job functions. This training may be either formal classroom training or on-the-job training. Specific areas of training include the following:

  • Duties and responsibilities

  • Hazardous materials

  • Passenger handling and protection

  • Load planning and weight and balance procedures

  • Communications procedures

  • Manual backup procedures in case of computer or communications equipment failures

  • Aircraft servicing and ramp operations

  • First aid and emergency actions

E. Facility/Equipment/Surface.

The Operator’s facilities must be adequate to provide safe operating conditions

for both aircraft and personnel. The Inspector should conduct an evaluation to

ensure that the following conditions are met:

(1) Ramp Maintenance.

Ramp areas should be clean and clear of foreign objects. The Operator should have a regular program for inspecting, cleaning, and repainting ramp surfaces. Adequate equipment must be available for snow removal.

(2) Passenger Safety.

Employees and passengers must be protected from jet or prop blast. If a jet way is unavailable or not used, Inspectors should evaluate passenger-handling procedures and facilities and give particular attention to the movement of passengers across ramps. The Operator must have established procedures for assisting handicapped passengers, especially when boarding ramps are not used.

(3) Night Operations.

To ensure that adequate lighting is available and is being used for safe ground operations, Inspectors should conduct observations during night operations, if feasible.

(4) Station Manager Responsibilities.

 

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Inspectors should determine what responsibilities have been assigned to the station manager and how those responsibilities are being discharged.

(5) Airport Deficiencies.

Inspectors are not tasked with conducting a physical inspection of the airport during a station facilities inspection; however, any airport deficiencies observed during a station facility inspection must be noted by Inspectors and must be recorded for transmittal to the regional airports division.

  • F. Conformance.

In each area to be inspected, Inspectors should evaluate the Operator’s

procedures for compliance with provisions of the applicable EU OPS and any

applicable HCAA regulation. In addition, the Operator’s employees must comply with the Operator’s directives as provided for in the Operator’s manuals.

  • G. Flight Control.

(1) The inspection of a station’s flight control function should be conducted while actual arrival or departure operations are in progress. This allows the Inspector to get an overall view of the effectiveness of the operation and its assigned personnel.

(2 ) Line Station Functions.

Operators often exercise operational control from a central location and assign the line stations with related support functions, such as delivering dispatch releases and flight plans to the flight crew. In this situation, Inspectors should determine which functions are the responsibilities of the station. Inspectors should evaluate station personnel in the performance of these functions. Inspectors should also evaluate the effectiveness of the division of responsibility between the central operational control centre and the line station.

(3) Load Planning.

Inspectors should determine who is assigned responsibility for load planning and weight and balance control. Passenger and cargo weights must be accurate and reliably obtained, collected, and transmitted. Personnel must be adequately trained. Procedures should be simple and effective. When computerized systems are used, there must be adequate backup provisions for computer failure. When station personnel are required to perform manual calculations in case of computer failure, the Operator must ensure continued proficiency of personnel in making

 

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these calculations. Inspectors should ask these individuals to perform a manual

calculation and compare the individual’s solution to the computer solution.

(4) Weather Information.

Inspectors should determine the approved source of weather information for the station.

  • H. Servicing.

The servicing area of a station facilities inspection covers routine loading and servicing as opposed to aircraft maintenance activities. While operations Inspectors should record and report observations they believe to be maintenance discrepancies, they are not assigned to inspect the maintenance activities. The preferred procedure is for station facilities inspections to be conducted by a joint operations/airworthiness team. Inspectors should evaluate areas of concern to operations personnel, such as the manner in which logbooks are handled and how MEL/CDL provisions are complied with. The inspector should observe and verify safe practices in the Operator’s service operations and that adequate personnel are available for the required aircraft servicing. Operations to be observed should include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Fuelling (ensuring that proper procedures are being followed)

  • De-icing (ensuring that the correct ratio and temperature of the glycol/water mix is being used and that all snow and ice is removed)-If Applicable

  • Marshalling (ensuring safe operation and correct procedures)

  • Chocks/Mooring (ensuring chocks are in place, the parking ramp is relatively level, and brakes are set or released)

  • I. Management.

Throughout the inspection, Inspectors should observe managers and supervisors and evaluate the organizational structure, particularly the effectiveness of vertical and horizontal communications. Managers and supervisors should be thoroughly aware of their duties and responsibilities and those of the personnel they supervise. Areas that Inspectors must observe and evaluate include the following:

(1) Outside Contractors.

 

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If the Operator contracts with other companies for station services, the station manager should have established adequate controls over their performance. The manager must assure that adequate training is provided to contractor personnel.

(2) Contingency Plans.

The station management should be prepared for contingencies. Action plans should be available for use in case of such events as accidents, injury, illness, fuel spills, bomb threats, hijacking, severe weather, and hazardous material spills. Station personnel should know the location of these plans. Plans should contain emergency notification checklists and procedures for suspending or cancelling operations. Emergency telephone listings should be posted in obvious locations and be clearly legible. Report Inspection Results.Ensure that all Audit Findings are entered into the ADMS system and a copy has been forwarded to the Operator for corrective action.

 

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CHAPTER 3.10

COCKPIT ENROUTE INSPECTION

 

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  • 3.10 Cockpit En Route Inspection

Ref: EU OPS,HCAA OPS Procedures Manual,Operator’s OM.

3.10.1 Objectives

The primary objective of cockpit en route inspections is for an Inspector to observe and evaluate the adherence of a certificate holder to the EU OPS and HCAA

regulations, as well as the operator’s OM En route inspections are one of HCAA’s

most effective methods of accomplishing its air transportation surveillance objectives

and responsibilities. These inspections provide HCAA with an opportunity to assess elements of the aviation system that are both internal and external to an Operator.

  • A. Elements of the aviation system which are internal to the Operator and that can be observed during en route inspections, are items such as the following:

• Crewmembers • Operator manuals and checklists • Use of MEL’s and CDL’s • Operational control functions (dispatch, flight following, flight-locating) • Use of checklists, approved procedures, and safe operating practices • Crew coordination/cockpit resource management • Cabin safety • Aircraft condition and servicing • Training program effectiveness

  • B. Elements of the aviation system which are external to the Operator and that can be observed during en route inspections are items such as the following:

• Airport/heliport surface areas • Ramp/gate activities • Airport construction and condition • Aircraft movements • ATC and airway facilities • ATC and airspace procedures • IAP’s, SID’s, and STAR’s

 

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• Navigational aids • Communications

3.10.2 Inspection Areas

Inspectors should consider all inspection areas, both internal and external, to be of equal importance. Four general inspection areas have been identified for observation and evaluation by Inspectors during en route inspections (see checklist No 07 chapter 5 Operation Procedure Manual). These inspection areas are as follows:

• Crewmember • Flight conduct • Airport/heliport • ATC/airspace

(A). The “crewmember” inspection area applies to both flight crewmembers and cabin crewmembers. Inspectors should evaluate such items as crewmember knowledge, ability, and proficiency by directly observing crewmembers performing their respective duties and functions. The applicable job aid contains a list of reminder items which should be observed in the crewmember inspection area. These items are not all-inclusive but represent the types of items inspectors should evaluate during a cockpit en route inspection.

(B). The “flight conduct” inspection area relates to 10 specific phases of flight which can be observed during an en route inspection. The job aid contains a list of the items that should be evaluated by inspectors during these phases of flight. These items are not all-inclusive and in some cases may not be applicable to the flight conducted. Inspectors are, however, encouraged to observe, evaluate, and report on as many of these items as possible.

NOTE: Inspectors that are unfamiliar with the Operator’s specific procedures for operating the aircraft should comment in their inspection reports on any item they

believe should be brought to the POI’s attention. Inspectors must use good judgment

concerning whether to comment on these items when debriefing crewmembers.

(C). The “airport/heliport” inspection area pertains to the various elements of airports or heliports that are passed through during the flight such as runways, taxiways, ramps, and aircraft ground movements. Inspectors should observe and evaluate as many of these elements as possible during an en route inspection.

(D). The “ATC/airspace” inspection area pertains to the various elements of Air Traffic Control and national or international airspace systems. These elements should be observed and evaluated by Inspectors during en route inspections. From an

 

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operational standpoint, these evaluations are a valuable information source, which can be used not only to enhance safety with respect to air traffic control and the airspace system, but also to enhance the effectiveness of en route and terminal facilities and procedures.

(E). Although these four general inspection areas cover a wide range of items, they are not the only areas that can be observed and evaluated during cockpit en route inspections. Inspectors may have the opportunity to evaluate many other areas, such as line station operations, flight control procedures, and flight attendants in the performance of their duties. These types of inspection areas can often be observed before a flight begins, at en route stops, or at the termination of a flight.

3.10.3 General Practices and Procedures

(A). Before conducting en route inspections, it is important that Inspectors become familiar with the operating procedures and facilities used by the Operator. Inspectors

can obtain such familiarization by reviewing pertinent chapters of the Operator’s manuals and by asking questions of, and obtaining briefings from, the POI or other

Inspectors who are acquainted with the Operator’s procedures and facilities. The

Inspector is encouraged to comment on any procedure believed to be deficient or

unsafe in the inspection report. The Inspector must use good judgment, however, when debriefing crewmembers about procedures that may be specifically approved for that Operator.

(B). POI’s are responsible for coordinating with their assigned Operators to ensure that each Operator has established procedures to be used by Inspectors for

scheduling the observer’s seat (jump seat). POI’s must ensure that an Operator’s

procedures allow Inspectors to have free, uninterrupted access to the jump seat. Inspectors should, however, make jump seat arrangements as far in advance as possible. Since Inspectors may have sudden changes in schedule, and may not

always be able to provide the appropriate advance notice, POI’s must ensure that the

Operator’s procedures are flexible and permit use of an available jump seat on short notice.

(C). whenever possible, Inspectors should plan cockpit en route inspections in a manner that will avoid disruption of Operator-scheduled line checks or training flights. Should an Inspector arrive for a flight and find a line check or a training flight in progress, the Inspector must determine whether or not it is essential that the cockpit en route inspection be conducted on that flight. If it is essential, the Operator must be so advised by the Inspector and must make the jump seat available to the Inspector. If the cockpit en route inspection can be rescheduled and the objectives of the inspection can still be met, the Inspector should make arrangements to conduct the inspection on another flight. When a required check ride is being conducted by a

 

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check airman from the forward jump seat and the en route inspection is essential, the Inspector should occupy the second jump seat, if one exists. On training flights, the check airman should normally occupy one of the pilot seats and the Inspector should occupy the forward jump seat. When it is essential that the en route inspection be conducted on an aircraft that does not have two jump seats, the check airman must occupy a pilot seat and the Inspector should occupy the jump seat. In such a case, the flight crewmember not being checked must either be seated in the cabin or not accompany the flight.

(D). An Inspector should begin a cockpit en route inspection a reasonable amount of

time before the flight (approximately 1 hour) by reporting at the operations area or at the gate, as specified by the POI. There the Inspector must first complete the

necessary jump seat paperwork for inclusion in the Operator’s passenger manifest

and weight and balance documents. The flight crew should then be located by the Inspector. After the Inspector gives a

personal introduction to the flight crew which includes presentation of the HCAA Form No 625, the Inspector must inform the PIC of the intention to conduct an en route inspection. The Inspector should then request that, at a time convenient for the flight crew, the flight crew present both their licenses and medical certificates to the Inspector for examination. Also, the Inspector should request that, at a convenient

time, the flight crew present flight information such as weather documents, NOTAM’s,

planned route of flight, dispatch or flight release documents, and other documents

with information about the airworthiness of the aircraft to the Inspector for examination.

(E). Sometimes an Inspector cannot meet and inform the PIC of the intention to conduct an en route inspection before boarding the aircraft. In such a case, when boarding the aircraft, the Inspector should make appropriate introductions, present

the HCAA Form No 625 , for the PIC’s inspection at the earliest convenient

opportunity, and inform the flight crew of an intention to conduct a cockpit inspection.

In this situation a flight attendant will usually be at the main cabin entrance door. One

of the flight attendant’s primary duties is to ensure that only authorized persons enter

the aircraft such as ticketed passengers, caterers, and authorized company personnel. Therefore, an Inspector should be prepared to present the HCAA Form No 625 and any applicable paperwork to the flight attendant as identification before entering the cockpit. When boarding the aircraft, an Inspector should also avoid unnecessarily impeding passenger flow or interrupting flight attendants during the performance of their duties. Also, during this time an Inspector usually has ample opportunity to observe and evaluate the Operator’s carry-on baggage procedures and the gate agent’s or flight attendant’s actions concerning oversized items. Once inside the cockpit, the Inspector should request an inspection of each flight crewmember’s license and medical certificates, if not previously accomplished. When the flight crew

 

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has completed reviewing the aircraft logbooks (or equivalent documents), the Inspector should inspect the logbooks to determine the airworthiness status of the aircraft.

(F). The Inspector should wear a headset during the flight. During cockpit en route inspections, Inspectors must try to avoid diverting the attention of flight crewmembers

performing their duties during “critical phases of flight.” Inspectors must be alert and

point out to the flight crew any apparent hazards such as conflicting traffic. If during an en route inspection, an Inspector becomes aware of a potential violation or that the flight crew is violating a regulation or an ATC clearance, the Inspector must immediately inform the PIC of the situation.

(G). Inspectors should use the Cockpit En Route Inspection Guidance list (see checklist No 07 chapter 5 Operation Procedure Manual) while conducting these inspections. This guidance list contains a list of reminder items for the specific inspection areas that should be observed and evaluated.

Items may be evaluated during an en route inspection, which are not listed on the guidance list. If the Inspector observed a violation during the flight and intends to recommend enforcement action or intends to make critical comments concerning the

crew’s performance, the Inspector must inform the flight crew during the debriefing.

3.10.4 Specific Cockpit En Route Inspection Practices and Procedure

(A). Once situated in the cockpit, the Inspector should check the jump seat oxygen and emergency equipment (if applicable) and connect the headset to the appropriate interphone system. The PIC or a designated crewmember should offer to give the Inspector a safety briefing. If the PIC does not make such an offer, the Inspector should request a briefing. It is important that the Inspector monitors all radio frequencies being used by the flight crew to properly evaluate ATC procedures, flight crew compliance, transmission clarity, and radio phraseology. The monitoring of these frequencies also ensures that the Inspector does not inadvertently interfere with any flight crew communications. Inspectors should continuously monitor these frequencies to remain aware of the progress of the flight.

(B). Inspectors should observe and evaluate the crew during each phase of flight. This should include an evaluation of crewmember adherence to approved procedures

and a proper use of all checklists. The Inspector should also observe the PIC’s crew

management techniques, delegation of duties, and overall conduct. All crewmembers must follow sterile cockpit procedures. Some of the areas that should be observed and evaluated during each flight phase are as follows:

(1) Pre-flight: Inspectors should determine that the flight crew has all the necessary flight information including the appropriate weather, dispatch, or flight-release

 

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information; flight plan; NOTAM’s; and weight and balance information. MEL items

should be resolved in accordance with the Operator’s MEL and appropriate

maintenance procedures. Inspectors should observe the flight crew performing appropriate exterior and interior pre-flight duties in accordance with the Operator’s procedures.

(2) Pre-departure: Inspectors should observe the flight crew accomplishing all pre- departure checklists, takeoff performance calculations, and required ATC communications. The flight crew should use co-ordinated communications (via hand signals or the aircraft interphone) with ground personnel. Often pushback clearance must be obtained from the appropriate ATC or ramp control facility. When weight and balance information is transferred to the aircraft, the flight crew should follow the

Operator’s procedures and completes the final takeoff performance calculations and which crewmember monitors the ATC frequency. The Inspector should observe the following:

• Accomplishment of checklists during taxi • Adherence to taxi clearances • Control of taxi speed • Compliance with hold lines • Flight crew conduct of a pre-takeoff briefing in accordance with the operator’s procedures (3) Takeoff: The takeoff procedure should be accomplished as outlined in the Operator’s SOP’s. Inspectors should observe and evaluate the following items or activities during the takeoff phase:

• Aircraft centreline alignment • Use of crosswind control techniques • Application of power to all engines • Takeoff power settings • Flight crew call-outs and coordination • Adherence to appropriate takeoff or V speeds • Rate and degree of initial rotation • Use of flight director, autopilot, and auto throttles • Gear and flap retraction schedules and limiting airspeeds • Compliance with the ATC departure clearance or with the appropriate published departure (4) Climb: Climb procedure should be conducted according to the outline in the Operator’s SOP’s. Inspectors should observe and evaluate the following items and

activities during the climb phase of flight:

• Climb profile/area departure • Airspeed control • Navigational tracking/heading control • Power plant control • Use of radar, if applicable

 

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• Use of auto flight systems • Pressurization procedures, if applicable • Sterile cockpit procedures • Vigilance • Compliance with ATC clearances and instructions • After-takeoff checklist (5) Cruise: Procedures used during cruise flight should conform to the Operator’s

SOP’s. Inspectors should observe and evaluate the following areas during the cruise

phase of flight:

• Cruise mach/airspeed control • Navigational tracking/heading control • Use of radar • Use of turbulence procedures • Monitoring fuel used compared to fuel planning • Awareness of mach buffet and maximum performance ceilings • Coordination with cabin crew • Compliance with oxygen requirements • Vigilance

• Compliance with ATC clearances and instructions (6) Descent: Procedures used during descents should conform to the Operator’s SOP’s. Inspectors should observe and evaluate the following areas during the descent phase of flight:

• Descent planning • Crossing restriction requirements • Navigational tracking/heading control • Use of radar, if applicable • Awareness of Vmo/Mmo speeds and other speed restrictions • Compliance with ATC clearance and instructions • Use of auto flight systems • Pressurization control • Area/situational awareness • Altimeter settings • Briefings, as appropriate • Coordination with cabin crew • Sterile cockpit procedures • Completion of appropriate checklist • Vigilance (7) Approach: Procedures used during the selected approach (instrument or visual) should be accomplished as outlined in the Operator’s SOP’s. Inspectors should

observe and evaluate the following areas during the approach phase of flight:

• Approach checklists

• Approach briefings, as appropriate (briefing in case for diversion to the

alternate must be included)

 

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Compliance with ATC clearances and instructions Navigational tracking/heading and pitch control Airspeed control, Vref speeds Restrictions for wet / contaminated runways Flap and gear configuration schedule Use of flight director, autopilot, auto throttles Compliance with approach procedure Sink rates Stabilized approach in the full landing configuration Flight crew call-outs and coordination Transition to visual segment, if applicable (8) Landing: Procedures used during the landing manoeuvre should conform to

those outlined in the Operator’s SOP’s. Inspectors should observe and evaluate the

following areas during the landing phase of flight:

• Before-landing checklist • Threshold crossing height (TCH) • Aircraft centreline alignment • Use of crosswind control techniques • Sink rates to touchdown • Engine spool-up considerations • Touchdown and rollout • Thrust reversing and speed brake procedures • Use of auto brakes, if applicable • Braking techniques • Diverting attention inside the cockpit while still on the runway

• After-landing checklist (9) Pre-arrival: Pre-arrival and parking procedures should conform to the Operator’s SOP’s. Inspectors should evaluate crew accomplishment of after-landing checklists, ground crew parking, and passenger-deplaning procedures. (10) Arrival: Inspectors should observe and evaluate the flight crew complete post flight duties such as post flight checks, aircraft logbook entries, and flight trip paperwork completion and disposition.

(C). During the en route inspection, Inspectors should observe and evaluate other inspection areas, such as ATC and airspace procedures and airports or heliports the flight transits during the cockpit en route inspection. (1) When evaluating airports or heliports, Inspectors should observe the condition of surface areas, such as ramp and gate areas, runways, and taxiways. The following list contains other areas which may be observed and evaluated by Inspectors during cockpit en route inspections:

Taxiway signs, markers, sterile areas, and hold lines

• Ramp vehicles, equipment, movement control

 

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• Aircraft servicing, parking, and taxi operations

• Obstructions, construction, and surface contaminants (such as ice, slush, snow, fuel spills, rubber deposits)

• Snow control, if applicable • Security and public safety

(2) During cockpit en route inspections, Inspectors have the opportunity to observe and evaluate ATC operations and airspace procedures from the vantage point of the aircraft cockpit. Inspectors may observe and evaluate the following areas from the cockpit:

• Radio frequency congestion, overlap, or blackout areas • Controller phraseology, clarity, and transmission rate • ATIS • Use of full call signs • Simultaneous runway use operations • Clearance deliveries • Acceptable and safe clearances

• Aircraft separation standards • Acceptability of instrument approach procedures, departure procedures, and

Feeder routings

(D). After the flight has been terminated, the Inspector shall debrief the crew on any discrepancies observed and on any corrective actions that should be taken. (1) If the Inspector observed a violation during the flight and intends to recommend enforcement action or intends to make critical comments

concerning the crew’s performance, the Inspector must inform the flight crew

during the debriefing.

3.10.5 Report Inspection Results

  • Ensure that all Audit Findings are entered into the ADMS system and a copy has been forwarded to the Operator for corrective action.

  • Analyze each finding to determine if the discrepancies are the result of improper maintenance and/or missing or inadequate maintenance/inspection procedures Submit the completed HCAA Checklist 07-Flight Deck En Route Inspection with any Audit Finding forms attached to the FSD Secretariat office (incoming document) according to "Incoming Documents" procedure of the HCAA’ Administration Procedures Manual, Chapter 5.

 

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CHAPTER 3.11

RAMP INSPECTION

 

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3.11. Objective

The primary objective of a ramp inspection is to provide Inspectors with the opportunity to evaluate an air carrier operation while the crewmembers and aircraft are on the ground. A ramp inspection is an effective method for evaluating an

operator’s ability to prepare both the aircraft and crew for a flight to be conducted.

Also, when a ramp inspection is conducted after the completion of a flight, it is an effective method for determining whether the aircraft and crew were adequately prepared for the flight, as well as for evaluating the Operator’s post-flight and/or turnaround procedures and crewmember and ground personnel compliance with these procedures. Ramp inspections allow Inspectors to observe and evaluate the routine methods and

procedures used by an Operator’s personnel during the period immediately before or

after a flight, to determine compliance with regulations and safe operating practices.

3.11.1 Ramp Inspection Areas

There are five general inspection areas that can be observed and evaluated during

ramp inspections. These inspection areas are as follows:

• Crewmember • Line station operations • Aircraft • Servicing and maintenance • Ramp and gate condition and activity

(A). The “crewmember” inspection area refers to the evaluation of crewmember preparation for flight and compliance with post-flight procedures. This area includes evaluations of crewmember manuals and any required flight equipment, flight crew flight planning, flight crew airman, flight crew qualification card and medical certificates, crewmember disposition of trip paperwork, and other items that relate to crewmember responsibilities. (B). The “line station operations” inspection area refers to the various methods and procedures used by the Operator to support the flight, such as distribution of dispatch, flight release, and flight-locating paperwork; distribution of weather reports and other flight planning material; passenger handling; boarding procedures; an carry-on baggage screening.

 

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(C). The “aircraft” inspection area refers to the aircraft’s general airworthiness, logbook entries, MEL compliance, carryovers, and required items of emergency and cabin safety equipment. (D). The “servicing and maintenance” inspection area applies to any ongoing maintenance and servicing, such as fuelling, de-icing, or catering. This area is usually evaluated in detail by airworthiness Inspectors when performing their ramp inspections. Operations Inspectors should, however, observe this area and comment on obvious deficiencies for airworthiness Inspector follow-up.

(E). The “ramp and gate condition and activity” inspection area refers to taxi and marshalling operations, ramp or parking area surfaces, any apparent contamination or debris, vehicle operations, and the condition and use of support equipment.

  • 3.11.2 General Ramp Inspection Practices and Procedures

(A). Ramp inspections may be conducted before a particular flight, at en route stops, or at the termination of a flight. A ramp inspection may be conducted any time an aircraft is at a gate or a fixed ramp location, provided the inspection is conducted when the crew and ground personnel are performing the necessary preparations for a flight or when they are performing post flight tasks and procedures.

( B). The Operator does not have to be given advance notice that a ramp inspection is going to be conducted. Inspectors must, however, conduct inspections in a manner that does not unnecessarily delay crewmembers and/or ground personnel in the performance of their duties. The following areas of conduct should be observed by inspectors during ramp inspection activities:

(1) Inspectors should not interrupt crew or ground personnel when they are performing a particular phase of their duties.

(2) When inspection activities require Inspectors to interact directly with the crew or ground personnel, the activities should be timed to be accomplished when the crew or ground personnel are waiting to begin another phase of their duties or after they have completed one phase of their duties and before they begin another phase.

(3) Inspection activities must be timed so that they do not delay or interfere with passenger enplaning or deplaning.

(4) Inspection activities should not adversely impede aircraft servicing or catering.

Because of the wide range of inspection areas involved, ramp inspections are usually limited in scope. There are many preparatory or post-flight actions that occur simultaneously and one inspector cannot physically observe all of these actions for a

 

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particular flight. As a result, the Inspector should vary the areas of emphasis for an inspection. For example, on one ramp inspection the Inspector may decide to observe and evaluate the PIC accomplishing flight planning and the Operator’s methods for providing the flight crew with appropriate flight planning support. On another ramp inspection, the Inspector may decide to observe the SIC accomplish the aircraft

exterior pre-flight and then evaluate the aircraft’s interior equipment and furnishings. As an example of a ramp inspection conducted at the termination of a flight, the

Inspector may decide to inspect the aircraft’s interior equipment, furnishings, and

aircraft logbooks, and then evaluate the trip paperwork turned in by the crew. In this

example, the Inspector may not have an opportunity to interact directly with the crew,

therefore the crewmember” inspection area would not be accomplished. Inspectors

should vary both the sequence and the emphasis of the inspection areas during a ramp inspection. Inspectors should describe in their reports how the inspection was limited in scope.

(D). Inspectors should use the ramp inspection checklist No 09 at Chapter 5 of the Operation Manual, when conducting ramp inspections. This Checklist contains a

listing of items (“reminders”) that should be observed and evaluated by the Inspector

during the inspection.

3.11.3 Specific Ramp Inspection Practices and Procedure

(A). Crewmember Inspection Area.

When an Inspector makes direct contact with a crewmember, the Inspector should provide an official but courteous introduction, offer appropriate identification for the crewmember to inspect, and inform the crewmember that a ramp inspection is being conducted. If the direct contact is with a flight crewmember, the Inspector should request to see the crewmember’s license, medical certificates and flight crew qualification card. The Inspector should review the certificates to see that they meet the appropriate requirements for both the duty position and for the aircraft for the flight to be conducted or that was just terminated. When the direct contact is with flight crewmembers or flight attendants, the Inspector should also request to examine the crewmember’s professional equipment. Crewmember professional equipment includes any equipment that crewmembers are required to have according to regulation or operator policies, either on their person or that which will be available during the flight. Examples of professional equipment include aeronautical charts, appropriate Operator manuals, and operable flash lights. Inspectors should determine whether the charts and manuals carried by crewmembers are current. The following is a list of other items and activities that, depending on the scope of the ramp inspection, should be observed and evaluated:

 

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• Flight crew flight-planning activities, such as review of weather, flight plans, anticipated takeoff weight and performance data, flight control requirements (dispatch, flight release, flight-locating, ATC flight plans) • Flight crew aircraft pre-flight activities, such as exterior walk around, logbook reviews, and cockpit setup procedures, including stowage of flight crew baggage and professional equipment • Flight attendant inspection of cabin emergency equipment and cabin setup procedures, including stowage of flight attendant baggage and professional equipment

• Flight crew and flight attendant post flight logbook entries and proper use of MEL’s and placards

• Completed trip paperwork and the appropriate disposition of such paperwork

(B). Line Station Operations Area.

This area of a ramp inspection usually involves a facility (or designated area of a

facility) including related ground personnel, and is commonly referred to as “line station operations.” Line station operations include a designated location where

crewmembers go to review and pick up required flight paperwork or to deposit flight

reports, to send or receive communications with the Operator’s flight control system,

and to join up with other crewmembers assigned to the flight. Line station operations also include gates and ramp areas where passengers and cargo are enplaned and deplaned. The following is a list of items and activities that, depending on the scope of the inspection, should be observed and evaluated in this inspection area:

• Pre-flight and post flight trip paperwork, such as load manifests, flight plans, weather reports and forecasts, NOTAM’s, dispatch or flight release messages

and Operator bulletins • Methods used by the operator to comply with MEL and CDL requirements, particularly the pre-flight information provided to the crew

• Adequacy of facility with respect to crewmember and ground personnel use for

completing pre-flight and post flight responsibilities, including work areas and administrative support (such as forms, charts, and copy machines when required by company procedures)

• Usability and currency of Operator manuals and aircraft performance

information maintained at the line station operations area for crew and ground

personnel use • Company communication capabilities and procedures • Passenger enplaning and deplaning including public protection procedures and carry-on baggage screening• Cargo and baggage loading and stowage procedures and unloading procedures

(C). Aircraft Inspection Area.

 

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Ramp inspections must include at least an examination of the aircraft’s registration,

airworthiness certificate, and maintenance logbook. Inspectors should plan their ramp inspection activities so that any inspection of the aircraft’s interior equipment and furnishings would be conducted either before passengers are enplaned or after they

are deplaned. The following is a list of items that should be observed in this inspection area:

• Aircraft registration and airworthiness certificates • Aircraft and cabin logbooks (or equivalent) (open discrepancies, carryover

items, and cabin equipment items needing repair or replacement) • Appropriate placarding • Fire extinguishers (correct types, numbers and locations; properly serviced, safe tied, tagged, and stowed)

• Portable oxygen bottles (correct numbers and locations; properly serviced,

tagged, and stowed; Condition of mask, tubing, and connectors) • Protective breathing equipment (properly located, stowed, and sealed)

• First aid kits and emergency medical kits (correct numbers and locations;

properly sealed, tagged, and stowed)

• Megaphones (correct numbers and locations; in operable condition, and

properly stowed)

• Crash axe (properly located and stowed)

• Passenger briefing cards (one at each seat position; appropriate to aircraft; required information including emergency exit operation, slides, oxygen use, seatbelt use, brace positions, flotation devices; appropriate pictorials for

extended overwater operations, including ditching exits, life preserver, and life or slide raft in-flight location)

• Passenger seats (not blocking emergency exits; TSO label on flotation

cushions; cushion intact; latching mechanism on tray tables; armrests have self-

contained and removable ashtrays; seatbelts properly installed, operational, and not frayed or twisted)

• Passenger oxygen service units (closed and latched with no extended red

service indicators or pins) • Flight attendant stations (operable seat retraction and restraint systems; properly secured; harnesses not frayed or twisted; seat cushions intact; headrests in correct position; PA system and interphone) • Galleys (latching mechanisms - primary and secondary; tie downs; condition of restraints; padding; proper fit of cover and lining of trash receptacles; hot liquid restraint systems; accessibility and identification of circuit breakers and water shut-off valves; non-skid floor; girt bar corroded or blocked by debris; clean stationary cart tie downs (mushrooms); galley carts in good condition and properly stowed; lower lobe galley emergency cabin floor exits passable and not blocked by carpeting, if applicable)

 

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• Galley personnel lift, if applicable (no movement up or down with doors open;

safety interlock system; proper operation of activation switches) • Lavatories (smoke alarms; no-smoking placards; ashtrays; proper fit of cover and lining of trash receptacles; automatic fire extinguisher systems) • Stowage compartments (weight restriction placards; restraints and latching mechanisms; compliance with stowage requirements; accessibility to emergency equipment; carry-on baggage provisions)

• Required placards and signs (seatbelt, flotation equipment placards at seats;

emergency / safety equipment placards; weight restriction placards; no- smoking/seatbelt signs; no-smoking placards; exit signs and placards, including door opening instructions)

• Emergency lighting system (operation independent of main system; floor

proximity escape path system; controllability from cockpit)

• Exits (general condition; door seals; girt bars and brackets; handle

mechanisms; signs; placards; slide or slide raft connections and pressure indications; lights and switches) • Main landing gear viewing ports, if applicable (cleanliness and usability)

(D). Servicing and Maintenance Inspection Area.

The servicing and maintenance of the aircraft may be observed at any time during the

ramp inspection. The following is a list of some areas that may be observed and evaluated in this inspection area:

• Fuelling procedures (ground wires in place; fuel slip properly completed; fuel provider trained in the Operator’s specific procedures) • Routine maintenance (qualifications of mechanics, repairmen or service

agents; appropriate logbook entries) • De-icing procedures (compliance with company procedures; proper

glycol/water ratios and temperatures; avoidance of engine/APU inlets; removal of all snow and ice; trailing and leading edges free of snow and ice and covered completely with de-icing fluid) Correct procedures used by service contractors (caterers; cleaners; lavatory and water servicing personnel; correct use of switches and controls)

• Vehicle operation near aircraft (general condition and proper servicing of

vehicles and equipment)

(E). Ramp and Gate Condition and Activity Inspection Area.

During ramp inspections, Inspectors should observe and evaluate the ramp and gate surface condition as well as any support activities being conducted during an inspection. Inspectors should observe vehicular operations on the ramp and around gate areas and other aircraft operations during marshalling, taxiing, or towing operations. Inspectors should report any condition that appears to be unsafe or could

 

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potentially be unsafe. The following is a list of some items that should be observed and evaluated in this inspection area:

• Ramp, apron, and taxiway surfaces (general condition; cracks; holes; uneven

surfaces)

• Contamination debris (FOD; fuel, oil, or hydraulic spills; snow and ice

accumulations; taxi lines; gate markings; signs; signals)

• Construction (appropriate barriers; signs; markings; flags)

• Vehicular operations (conducted safely around aircraft and gate areas by

qualified personnel)

3.11.4 Report Inspection Results

  • Ensure that all Audit Findings are entered into the ADMS system and a copy has been forwarded to the Operator for corrective action.

  • Analyze each finding to determine if the discrepancies are the result of improper maintenance and/or missing or inadequate maintenance/inspection procedures.

  • Submit the completed HCAA Checklist 09-Ramp Inspection with any Audit Finding forms attached to the FSD Secretariat office (incoming document) according to "Incoming Documents" procedure of the HCAA’ Administration Procedures Manual, Chapter 5.

 

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CHAPTER 3.12

GRANTING AN EXEMPTION